Page 1

THE

SPRING ISSUE

GAZE INTO INFINITY

Why we love infinity pools

SPRING CLEANING Declutter and organize your home

JUICE USE

BEACH BEAUTIES

Waterfront home design

GLASS HOUSE

The stunning glass art of Maryse Chartrand $6.99

www.movatohome.com

The health benefits of juicing

REPORT FROM MAISON & OBJET PARIS

HOROSCOPE HELP FOR HOME ORGANIZING


p. Paola Navone

#110 - 1706 West 1 st Ave. Vancouver, BC V6J 0E4 www.room8.ca

EMOTIONS SHOULDN’T BE DESCRIBED, THEY SHOULD BE EXPERIENCED. | www.baxter.it


#110 - 1706 West 1 st Ave. Vancouver, BC V6J 0E4 www.room8.ca

“BLADE” BY MODULNOVA IS THE STRONGEST MAN-MADE PRODUCT ON THE MARKET TODAY. 1CM THICK SOLID PORCELAIN DOORS THAT ARE SCRATCH, HEAT, STAIN AND ACID RESISTANT.

Advanced technology with full customization


Our steam ovens make every meal a masterpiece

AEG S T E A M O V E N S :

The secret weapon in top kitchens for decades AEG Steam Ovens do everything your current oven does and more, by adding steam. The extra moisture improves flavours, texture and colours while preserving crispness. With AEG “Best in Class” Steam Ovens you’ll experience a whole new world of cooking.

• Perfect results: Food sensors measure core temperatures from the centre during cooking. • Cooking efficiency: Food is cooked evenly, everywhere with “Hot Air” convection. • Saves time and energy: Oven heats up faster and cooking temperature can be reduced 20%.


GOURMET GREATNESS

EFFICIENT, SLEEK AND BEST IN CLASS

K I T C H E N APPLIANCES Discover incredible baking, grilling and roasting with a multi-function oven from AEG. Master new flavours with an AEG Steam Oven or spend less time cleaning with an AEG Oven that cleans itself. Visit a premium appliance retailer to see for yourself!

871 Cranberry Court, Oakville, ON L6L 6J7 | 905.829.3980 2912 West 4th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V6K 1R2 | 604.235.3980

euro-line-appliances.com

B1124

Also the proud distributor of:


movatohome.com

EDITOR’S LETTER

ECONOMIC INDICATORS TELL US that, overall, people are wealthier now than at any other time in history. Wages are higher. Goods are cheaper. Cheaper goods and the ability to buy them has resulted in increased consumption. Everyone, it seems, has a lot more stuff now than they had several decades ago. Yes, we are more materially comfortable. But is more really better? It’s ironic that as we have come to produce and acquire more stuff, an industry has sprung up to help us dispose of said stuff once it turns into clutter. Personal organizers and clutter clearers are in big demand these days. For this issue, Susan Kelly interviewed personal organizers about how we can tackle clutter in our homes to simplify our lives. One of the organizers Susan interviewed told me that she has a long waiting list of people who require her services. It’s not surprising. And the work of professional organizers is not limited to advising people about what to keep and what to cast off. There is always a psychological component in the act of editing one’s belongings. Organizers have told me that choosing to dispose of clutter invariably taps into the emotions that we attach to our possessions, even when they clutter our lives and metaphorically weigh us down. It’s not always a simple process. But it is a rewarding one.

The spring is traditionally a time of rejuvenation. There is something refreshing about throwing open windows after they’ve been tightly shut all winter. That primal urge, triggered by the vernal equinox, extends to taking a fresh look at everything we have. Do we need it? Use it? Does it serve a purpose? Does it give us joy? If you are struggling to decide what to do about clutter in your own home, the organizers Susan interviewed may have the perfect solution for you. Houses aren’t the only things that get cleaned in the spring. The spring cleanse of the human body is another trend that doesn’t seem to be slowing down. There’s an industry around that, too. Juice bars are fast gaining in popularity, and with good reason. Coldpressed juices are delicious, and the health benefits of consuming them are many. In this issue, writer Julie Gedeon explores why we’re flocking to juice bars to knock back a kale and algae smoothie almost as eagerly as we swig our five-dollar cappuccinos. It’s all part of the spring urge to clean up, spruce up, cast off, and rejuvenate. Our homes are sanctuaries, our bodies temples.

STEPHANIE WHITTAKER Editor-in-Chief stephanie@movatohome.com

There are several ways you can stay in touch with us: @movatohome @movatohome @movatohome

8

THE SPRING ISSUE


d e t o V

#1 Flooring Store in Burnaby 6 Years in a Row! 2014 winner

B es

t of Burnaby

604.294.9663 (WOOD) 3744 Hastings Street, Burnaby casamadera@telus.net

www.casamaderafloors.com

1

E PLA1C7 20

BURN

ABY


CONTRIBUTORS

SUSAN KELLY With the dual sign Gemini rising, frequent contributor Susan Kelly is accustomed to doing things in twos. For this issue, she profiles two beachfront Vancouver-area homes with distinct personalities. She also melds the two sides of her persona – writer and astrologer – in separate features that examine the issue of spring cleaning and decluttering. In one, she approaches it as a journalist; the other takes the form of our first-ever horoscope column. “Astrology is such a powerful tool for understanding our inner and outer worlds, which includes our homes,” Susan says. “I’m thrilled to have this chance to share my insights.” Susan provides weekly forecasts via Facebook at Susan Kelly Astrology.

KAREN SEIDMAN Veteran news reporter Karen Seidman considers artist Maryse Chartrand, whom she profiled in this month’s issue, among those few people she has had the good fortune to interview who made a lasting impression. “When life dealt her tremendous hardship and heartbreak, Chartrand found the inner strength not just to survive, but to find a way to flourish,” Karen says. “Maryse not only had the necessary courage, but also the talent and perseverance” required to make it in the demanding field of glass art, according to Elena Lee, the gallery owner who launched Chartrand’s career and who considers the artist “a shining example” to women.

Volume 6, number 2, Spring Issue 2018 Date of Issue: March 2018

6100 TransCanada Highway Suite 100, Pointe-Claire Quebec H9R 1B9

PUBLISHER Dr. Sharon Azrieli CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Stanley Kirsh

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Whittaker ART DIRECTOR Randy Laybourne EDITORIAL MANAGER

BRENDA O’FARRELL Journalist Brenda O’Farrell would always opt for the word “and” over the word “or.” It’s a philosophical preference; nothing to do with grammar. If faced with a choice of having this “or” that, she refuses to answer the question. There is no need to limit oneself to one option. Why not aim for this “and” that? This philosophy was also behind the look of a home in West Vancouver that she profiles for this issue. The owners, parents of young children, wanted an elegant look for their new home “and” they needed it to be practical for life with children. “They refused to choose one or the other,” Brenda says. “The results are stunning. They did get it all.”

Call 1-866-846-1640 movatohome.com sales@movatohome.com

Tracey MacKenzie ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Carmen Lefebvre

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Matthew Azrieli PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Wendy Loper CONTROLLER Jenny Marques DIRECTOR OF SALES - NATIONAL Kelly Chicoine

CONTRIBUTORS

ACCOUNTS EXECUTIVE

Julie Gedeon

Laura Cunningham

Wendy Helfenbaum Susan Kelly Brenda O’Farrell

FOUNDER Leah Lipkowitz

Karen Seidman LEGAL DEPOSIT

WENDY HELFENBAUM Wendy Helfenbaum is a print journalist and TV producer who covers real estate, architecture, design, DIY, travel and gardening. For this issue, Wendy researches and reports on the growing popularity of infinity pools. Her work has appeared in such publications as Style at Home, Country Gardens, Realtor.com, Garden Collage, Canadian Gardening, Canadian Living, and Renovation Contractor.

JULIE GEDEON A pescatarian since the days when people still thought it was a type of religion, writer Julie Gedeon has long supplemented her diet with berry-and-banana shakes, but she has a new appreciation for the possible health benefits of cold-pressed juices and supplemental smoothies as a result of the story she wrote about juicing for this issue.

10

THE SPRING ISSUE

2292-0870 Vancouver

PHOTOGRAPHY

issn

Tracey Ayton

Home Magazine Inc. 2018.

Paul Grdina Janis Nicolay

All rights reserved. Any copying or reproduction of content without the written permission of

STYLING Amanda Evans Sarah Gallop Nicole Markota

Vancouver Home magazine is strictly prohibited. Publication # 41959020


Intelligent shades that simplify your life

DUETTE

PIROUETTE

SILHOUETTE

from Hunter Douglas and Windowworks Purchase Hunter Douglas #1 selling Duette, Silhouette or Pirouette shades and upgrade to PowerView automation for only $99* per shade * TO QUALIFY, MINIMUM SIZE REQUIRED 60” X 60”. PROMOTION VALID UNTIL MARCH 31, 2018.

Customize your collection of rooms and scenes with the app, then use the scheduling feature to operate them whether you’re home or away. It’s designed for compatibility with Apple iOS and Android tablets and mobile devices. VISIT OUR SHOWROOM

10–13331 Vulcan Way, Richmond, 604 231 1433 | windoworks.ca


movatohome.com

CONTENTS

18 ON THE COVER COZY CONTEMPORARY

A home is re-imagined for a family moving to Port Moody after 16 years abroad

TO INFINITY AND BEYOND

Vanishing-edge swimming pools are the current must-haves for beautiful landscapes

30 THE HEALING ARTS

Artist Maryse Chartrand expresses her life journey through her exquisite glass artworks

50

12

THE SPRING ISSUE

FAMILY-FRIENDLY REFINEMENT

Elegance and practicality combine in this West Vancouver home

92


Perfect Finish, Now Perfectly Named The same SIKKENS® premium wood care formulas you trust now carry the SICO® name. Count on SICO ProLuxe® Wood Finishes to achieve the same flawless finish you’ve come to expect. Find your selected SICO dealer at

PerfectWoodStains.ca/dealers

Cetol is a registered trademark of AkzoNobel. Sico and ProLuxe are registered trademarks of PPG Architectural Finishes, Inc. © 2018 PPG Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


movatohome.com

CONTENTS

DOWNSIZE TO THE RIGHT SIZE A Delta family moves to a smaller home but gets so much more

58

8 EDITOR’S LETTER 40 GET SORTED Spring cleaning should always include reorganizing and decluttering

46 OF COLOURS AND CONCERTOS Publisher Sharon Azrieli reports from Maison & Objet Paris

70 A MOTHERHOOD ISSUE Our guide on how to find the perfect Mother’s Day gift

88 GUIDED BY THE STARS Our astrology column will help you organize your home this spring

102 FORECAST: SHOWERS Today’s large walk-in showers call for attractive, linear drains

104 JUICE USE Juicing provides an excellent tune-up and health boost for the body in spring

78 MOUNTAIN MODERN

A four-season vacation home in Whistler reflects the beauty of its surroundings

110 LOVE THE LAMINATE A century-old company produces new laminates for the new millennium

BEYOND BOUNDARIES A Vancouver design firm pushes creatively beyond what is expected

90

14

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER KITCHENS 2017

movatohome.com

GIVE THE GIFT OF GOOD DESIGN

1-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION FOR ONLY $19.99 www.movatohome.com

Twitter: @movatohome

1-866-846-1640

Facebook: facebook.com/movatohome

Instagram: @movatohome THE KITCHEN ISSUE

1


SASHA ROGERS Drawing in Light, New Paintings artist reception & artist talk Saturday, May 19, 2-5pm exhibition continues until June 17, 2018

image: Sasha Rogers, Stirrings, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 x 1.5 inches

KOSTUIK GALLERY CELEBRATING 20 YEARS

www.kostuikgallery.com | info@kostuikgallery.com | 604.737.3969 | 1070 Homer Street, Vancouver, BC Canada, V6B 2W9


movatohome.com

DESIGN

COZY

CONTEMPORARY A home is re-imagined for a family moving to Port Moody after 16 years abroad BY SUSAN KELLY PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL GRDINA STYLING: SARAH GALLOP

18

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

THE SPRING ISSUE

19


movatohome.com

DESIGN

STUNNING BAY VIEWS are easy to come by in the area of Port Moody known as the Golden Mile. But few homes along it can rival the charm and originality of this one. “I knew as soon as I walked in that it was the house for us,” says the homeowner, who lives there with her entrepreneur husband, twin 17-year-old daughters, and a rescued dog of mixed pedigree.

20

THE SPRING ISSUE

Originally built in the 1950s, the now3,500-square-foot home – enlarged from its original 2,900 square feet – had been modified throughout the intervening decades. But unlike many such patchwork properties, what was added had a definite and slightly quirky appeal. Natural-pine vaulted ceilings with wood beams, for instance, give a sense of timeless grandeur and more space.


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

The homeowner also loved two features handcrafted by the previous owner: inside, two porthole-shaped stained-glass windows on the main floor, and on the exterior, the ludic dolphins, lighthouses, and other images carved into the wooden posts supporting the elevated patio. “We were moving here from Hong Kong, where we had lived for 16 years,” she says. “One of our homes there was a houseboat, and we love such original and nautical touches.” In the revamp, the amateur photographer’s style preferences, which are “clean, white, and contemporary,” would have to be considered as well. And though she is no stranger to renovation projects, the logistics of organizing one while still living overseas proved daunting. She placed this one in the hands of interior designer Sarah Gallop, principal designer and owner of Sarah Gallop Design in Vancouver. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

21


DESIGN

Gallop and her team devised an innovative change to the main floor’s layout. It called for removing some walls and relocating the raised master bedroom. In its place now stands the kitchen. Elevated, it flows directly into the dining area on the same level behind the fireplace. The kitchen overlooks the great room’s living area and enjoys an unobstructed view through a wall of windows and out to sea. “The move gave the kitchen a definite sense of presence,” says Gallop. “And the whole main floor now has more of a great room feel.” A major design decision had to do with whether to paint the natural wood. In addition to the ceilings and beams, the original trim on all main floor windows and doors had a dark stain. Should it all be painted white as a more contemporary approach? Or would it be sacrilege to put a brush to any of it? After much debate, a compromise was reached. The ceiling and many beams were kept with their natural finish; the dark wood trim and columns around the sea-facing windows were painted white. Included was a bay window, which now has a bright, sunroom-like charm and is an area in which the homeowner finds inspiration to play the piano. “I think we made the right call,” says Gallop.

22

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

“This home is the perfect blend of old and new that somehow works together.”

Contrarily, darker-toned wood accents were added to the kitchen. A bank of bookmatched cabinetry on one wall provides ample pantry space and a wine rack, while a solid slab of black walnut was used for the raised breakfast counter. The warm woods contrast sharply with the white quartz countertops and high-gloss f lat-front custom-made cabinets. The great room is unified by engineered oak flooring running throughout and a soft white colour on the walls. The original fireplace commands pride of place in the centre, receiving new ledgestone cladding in a soft grey colour that is shot with ochre. The homeowner selected contemporary living room furniture upholstered in shades of grey. She then added accents in her signature colour, a bright turquoise that she considers positive and uplifting, in the rug and ottoman. It is echoed in the dining room, where a custom-made Chinese lacquer-finish hutch in the same hue, commissioned in Hong Kong, stands. •

The home’s original wood ceilings were preserved, echoed in distinctive black walnut accents in the kitchen and in the oak flooring that runs throughout. Flooring: Compass Collection engineered oak; appliances: Fisher & Paykel.

THE SPRING ISSUE

23


DESIGN

24

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

There is ample room to relax in the family room on the lower level. A games room, bathroom, home office, and laundry area are also located on that floor.

THE SPRING ISSUE

25


DESIGN

The main floor includes a bedroom for each of the twins. Being “not identical in any way,� as their mother says, they each have a bedroom that is different from the other. On the top floor, a 660-square-foot addition on the street side expanded the original square footage. The space contains the master bedroom with its walk-in closet and ensuite bathroom, and a guest bedroom that doubles as a den and tv room.

26

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

Stairs off the dining room lead to the basement level. Originally, the ceilings in parts of it were a scant six feet in height. An additional three feet of head space was excavated, and extensive structural work undertaken. Now a study with two workstations overlooks the back garden. Underneath the living room, there is a cozy family room with widescreen television and French doors leading to the backyard. A cut-out in an adjacent wall makes it possible for anyone using the games room beyond to see the television and check a hockey score. A specially commissioned table that converts from pool to table tennis stands in the room, which doubles as a laundry area.

movatohome.com

The homeowner continues to be thrilled with the home, finding it perfect for indulging her love of cooking and entertaining. The makeover impressed her family as well, and both her niece and sister are also building homes with Sarah Gallop’s help. But the homeowner remains unconcerned that their projects will rival her own. “This home is the perfect blend of old and new that somehow works together,” she says. “It’s just an amazing house and one in a million to me.” •

(Above) The family dog seems unimpressed by the enviable view from the elevated patio off the main-floor dining room. (Left) Arresting views also can be enjoyed from the basement-level home office.

THE SPRING ISSUE

27


INTEGRATING ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN The best designs in the world are based on purpose and function. When a design solves a functional problem as simply and elegantly as possible, the resulting form will be honest and timeless.

ALEXANDRA HRISTOVA

Principal ID. ALA.

RESIDENTIAL, RETAIL, KITCHEN AND BATHROOM DESIGN CONCEPT, CREATE, DESIGN • 2121 Franklin St., Vancouver, BC. V5L 1R7 • T. 604.910.6546 • www.a2hinteriordesign.com • Info@a2hInteriordesign.com


LANDSCAPE

TO INFINIT Y AND BEYOND Vanishing-edge pools provide a luxurious outdoor experience BY WENDY HELFENBAUM

THE MOST SUCCESSFUL OPTICAL ILLUSIONS trick the eye into seeing something magical. Infinity pools – where water flows over one or more edges, making the pool appear to blend with a larger body of water beyond – became popular in Europe in the 1990s, especially at hotels. Over the past 10 years, this type of pool has become a must-have outdoor element among North American homeowners with large swaths of land, Instagram-worthy views, and large landscaping budgets. Infinity pools are believed to have originated in France at the Palace of Versailles in the 17th century, says Reinier van de Poll, owner of Van de Poll Garden Design in Vancouver. “Many would point to the Stag Fountain as one of the first examples of a vanishing pool edge – the use of the horizon and the infinity,” he says. Today’s vanishing-edge pools are usually installed on properties that look out over a body of water, says Lee Gregory, project coordinator with Groupe Paramount in Montreal. “When someone has a special lakefront or cliffside property, they’ll often go the extra mile to draw attention to that,” says Gregory. “For instance, for a house on Lac Saint-Louis we did recently, we matched the colour of the pool as closely as possible to the lake, so that when it was filled with water, it would give the impression that the pool is endless. And the sounds of the waterfalls add to the experience.” •

30

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


LANDSCAPE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Photo courtesy of Groupe Paramount

THE SPRING ISSUE

31


LANDSCAPE

32

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


LANDSCAPE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Flat landscape is the easiest canvas upon which to install an infinity pool, but homeowners with sloped properties can have equally spectacular results, says Kennedy McRae, co-owner and landscape designer at Earth Inc. in Toronto. Opting for a vanishing-edge pool on a slope solves two problems: transforming formerly unusable space while creating an especially dramatic vista. “To create a negative edge, you have to have a little bit of a grade change, so if the body of water that we’re creating is higher than the actual lake, you can build right into the middle of the slope, and when you’re in the pool, it really becomes an infinity pool,” says McRae, whose team designed a show-stopping outdoor space for a two-acre property north of Barrie, Ontario. Even with no natural water in sight, infinity pools can add interest, he adds. “Some people want an infinity pool when they have a forest setting. A vanishing edge on one side is a cool design element that’s fun to play with.” •

Kennedy McRae: “Here, we hid the pool equipment under the cabana at the top. A lot of people forget you need a mechanical room to house all the pool equipment in.”

Photos courtesy of Earth Inc.

THE SPRING ISSUE

33


movatohome.com

LANDSCAPE

This was the case when van de Poll designed a sprawling backyard for homeowner Brian Craig, a father of eight in Pitt Meadows, B.C., who wanted to create a multigenerational retreat. Craig, a developer, had built in 1991 but waited until 2012 to finish the landscaping around his home, which is atop a 70-foot cliff. “Brian doesn’t have a body of water in the distance; his pool blends in with the horizon,” says van de Poll. “I had to pay a lot of attention to the natural terrain of the site – which was very sloped with a lot of rock outcroppings – to figure out where the pool was going to fit. I orientated the vanishing pool edge slightly

34

THE SPRING ISSUE

over to the east so you were looking towards mountains, trees, and an open view.” The effect is spectacular, but the pool has value beyond that for Craig and his family. “I’d grown up with a regular rectangular pool, and I wanted something completely different. As my kids got older and began working with me, they actually helped build the pool,” says Craig, whose son Jonathan runs True Light Building and Development Ltd. “Everybody’s got their memory of how they put the rocks a certain way. It’s beautiful and natural, and feels like you’re in a lake or

a pond. My 14th grandchild is on the way and everyone enjoys the pools. It’s a hub for the family, a real treasure.” What if you have a less than spectacular view? Infinity pools can help disguise that, says van de Poll. “If you see your neighbor, a trampoline, and a swing set, a vanishing pool edge could be facing your house and patio,” he suggests. “The concept and mechanics are the same, but instead of it disappearing off the horizon, you actually have the effect of a waterfall from the pools pouring down, and you could be sitting near it on the patio.” •


LANDSCAPE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Photos courtesy of Van de Poll Garden Design

To decrease the towering appearance of Craig’s home, van de Poll designed a cedar post-and-beam arbour so people sitting on the lower patio overlook the main pool, hot tub, and shallow children’s pool.

THE SPRING ISSUE

35


LANDSCAPE

36

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com

Photo courtesy of Van de Poll Garden Design


LANDSCAPE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Photo courtesy of Groupe Paramount

Whatever vista a property overlooks, adding an infinity pool requires plenty of additional work, such as building another basin to capture and recirculate the water flowing over the edge. Expect to tack on $40,000 or more above the cost of a standard rectangular pool, says McRae. “When you do an infinity pool, the other side doesn’t have the ground to push back on the body of water, so you have to make the walls of the pool thicker to create the strength to hold the water inside of the pool,” he says.

Gregory suggests defining various areas in an outdoor space to decide how they will be used. Then, the project should be viewed in a holistic way by factoring in all the elements surrounding an infinity pool. “One big mistake people make is going to a pool company first, one that’s not worried about the landscaping around the pool,” he says. Once the pool is installed, there may not be enough space for lounging or dining. “You can’t just plop a negative-edge pool in and walk away,” adds van de Poll. “People

show us a Pinterest page and don’t realize it also includes $150,000 to $250,000 worth of landscaping: patios, walkways, staircases, lighting, planting, and pool equipment.” Thoughtful planning and attention to detail can ensure a successful infinity pool project, one that’s good for body and soul. “My goal is always to create a backyard retreat,” says van de Poll. “At the end of a crazy week, I want people to open their back doors and say, ‘Oh my goodness, there’s my holiday spot.’ ” •

THE SPRING ISSUE

37


DESIGN VANCOUVER KITCHENS 2017

movatohome.com

FOLLOW • SHARE • LIKE

Facebook: facebook.com/movatohome

Instagram: @movatohome

Twitter: @movatohome

www.movatohome.com THE KITCHEN ISSUE

1


®

WE MAKE IT WRITABLE. YOU MAKE IT MEMORABLE. NEW Formica® Writable Surfaces

Our durable chalkboard and markerboard surfaces are perfect for any room in your home. Find out how to make Writable Surfaces part of your story at

formica.com/ca/writable

MADE IN CANADA ︱ 1-800-FORMICA™

9541-90 HAPPYWORDS ︱ 9524-NG UMBRA OAK

Formica®, the Formica® Anvil logo and Formica® Surfaces. FOR REAL.® are registered trademarks of The Diller Corporation. 1-800-FORMICA™ is a trademark of The Diller Corporation.


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

SPRING INTO A TIDY HOME Decluttering and organizing rooms is a joyful rite of the spring season BY SUSAN KELLY

40

THE SPRING ISSUE


movatohome.com

Photo courtesy of The Tidy Moose

LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

SPRINGTIME: the return of an instinctual, almost visceral, need to clear out and clean up. Beyond a quick refresh, a seasonal decluttering can have far-reaching benefits, say professional organizers. Business booms in the spring months for Anne Deliyannides and Debbie Bailey, coowners of Free From Clutter in Vancouver, hinting that the urge to get organized may be a universal one. “By April, sunny weather has returned, and people begin to think about new life. There’s a sense of rebirth and renewal,” says Deliyannides. This prompts us to want out with the old, as in detritus from living indoors during the winter months, and in with the new. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

41


movatohome.com

Photos courtesy of The Tidy Moose

LIFESTYLE

Clients report feeling lighter and freer after a good clearout, she says. This is especially true if they have been living with chaos. And there can be financial benefits to reorganizing a garage or closet. One client found a Coach purse that had been lost for a year. Almost all clients turn up unused gift cards or duplicate items that later might be sold. The easy part is putting away winter clothing, tires, and sports gear. When it comes to resistant clutter, the problem is usually all in the family, the pair finds. “An aging population means more people who are downsizing,” Deliyannides says. “They’re giving away their stuff to their kids – who don’t want it.” It’s not that they want to disrespect the older generation; it’s just that they live a different lifestyle. Hardest to place are such heirlooms as an ornately carved silver epergne

42

THE SPRING ISSUE

or a collection of Hummel figurines. With Vancouverites today tending to embrace a more contemporary aesthetic, such antiques look jarringly out of place. For many people, it’s a case of having no room in the condo or small home to accommodate such items. Bailey, whose background includes a degree in psychology, often finds herself helping people overcome guilt. She suggests they keep memory boxes, small containers with a few select mementos of the family member, rather than, say, the full set of antique china they’ll never use. “Grandma really wants you to be happy,” she says. “So sell it and use the money to take the kids to Disney World or top up their education funds.” Learning to value our stuff can pay off in more meaningful ways, according to Ivanka

Siolkowsky, owner of The Tidy Moose in Toronto. “Clutter holds us back from being our best selves,” she says. “Getting organized requires a shift of focus: placing less value on things and more on a higher quality of life.” This is the philosophy behind the growing trend toward minimalistic, less consumption-driven living. Siolkowsky learned at the feet of a master, Marie Kondo, author of the bestselling The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. The book teaches that the key to a sustainable clutter-free existence is to focus less on what to get rid of and more on surrounding yourself only with things that bring joy. Easy in theory, but more difficult in practice, which is where the select few consultants who, like Siolkowsky, are certified in the method, come in.


movatohome.com

Photos courtesy of The Tidy Moose

LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

Siolkowsky – organizer and former emotional shopper – sympathizes with clients who have things that hang in the closet for years. Well aware that difficult feelings can emerge during decluttering, she helps them focus positively on that which they really use and love. Traditional organizing methods tackle clutter by problem area, such as a closet. The Kondo method teaches to approach by categories instead. “Clothes are the big one,”

Siolkowsky says, “and we begin by gathering every item from every room.” The second biggest problem category she identifies is books and papers. But can clearing some clutter really be life-changing? Siolkowsky has seen some dramatic transformations. One client had a house that was “full of stuff and a very tense place to be.” After some instruction in the method, the client reported that things were

better in her marriage and her children were taking accountability for their belongings. Gone was the need to shout or nag, and the constant tripping over or misplacing of things. “We have a system now and it’s made a drastic difference in the mood of the home,” the client reported. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

43


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

Not everyone is ready or willing to pare their belongings down to the minimum. No matter how little or much stuff you choose to have, you need some place to put it, says Daniel Wilkinson, co-owner of Simply Closets of Toronto, which provides custom storage solutions. “There’s an emotional benefit to having a closet that is as beautiful as the rest of your home,” he says. “And well-designed storage also allows you to use space more efficiently.” Greater attention is being paid to what goes on behind closed doors, he finds. There is a big move towards custom closet interiors that have a style on par with that in the rest of the home. If the star of the master bath is a contemporary high-gloss charcoal vanity, say, then the same look is carried over into the adjacent walk-in closet. It also helps to think outside the closet to maximize space, Wilkinson says. Reserve the space inside it for things that need vertical

44

THE SPRING ISSUE

room, such as dresses and coats. For anything that fits in a drawer, consider built-in cabinets on each side of the bed that can double as stylish night tables. Space under windows or odd nooks can also be utilized. Within the closet, use gadgets judiciously to help reduce clutter that is both visual and actual. That tangle of belts and ties in one corner? Incorporate special racks for each category that slide out and then tuck discreetly away. If laundry winds up underfoot, built-in bins that tip out and then fold away solve the problem. And then there is the personal valet, an apparatus that swings out to accommodate scarf, keys, umbrella, dry cleaning, or anything else you aren’t quite ready to put away. “It’s not so much out of sight, out of mind as out of sight bringing peace of mind,” Wilkinson says. •


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

DECLUTTERING TIP SHEET Throw away the rule book if you want to get organized, says professional organizer Gayle Fransham, owner of Orderesque in Montreal. Over two decades of plying her trade, she has learned that what works for one person won’t for the other. “Take the one about ‘if you haven’t used it for a year, get rid of it,’ ” she says. “Just because I didn’t use my camping gear last year, doesn’t mean I won’t ever again.” It’s important to understand your lifestyle and needs. But one thing is for certain: You must have a plan. Here are Fransham’s best tips, adapted from her client handout, for a successful clutter-clearing operation.

Photos courtesy of Simply Closets

Prepare to act: Write down the scope of the project along with the tasks and steps required to get it done. Some people like to tackle the tough jobs first, others the small ones. Stock the refrigerator or have take-out menus on hand. Once you’re on a roll you won’t want to stop to prepare a meal.

Set up a sorting area: This is where you’ll put clearly marked boxes for the things you’ve separated. Divide the items into categories: donate, give to family and friends, sell online or at a garage sale, return, throw out, or recycle. Target storage solutions: Clean the area and assess available shelf, hanging, and bin space. Determine whether you need such new solutions as built-in cabinetry. Hold off buying storage containers and gadgets until you’re sure how much stuff is going back and how you want it stored. Take time with this final step and enjoy it because, once rid of items that are cluttering your life, you’ll probably find the actual organizing to be easy and fun. “You can learn so much about yourself during the purging process,” says Fransham. “When you finally let go, there is a lightness, a sense of emotional freedom.”

Choose your charities: To make the process more meaningful, go with one that is close to your heart, and set a time for it to pick up your donation. That way, you’ll be strongly motivated to meet your personal deadline. If none of your choices provides pickup service, commit to drop the items off on the planned date and ask someone for help if need be (there are options, such as hiring a student, to help with tasks such as this).

THE SPRING ISSUE

45


DESIGN

THE MOZART OF MISSONI, THE COLOUR OF CONGREVE IT WAS MY SECOND VISIT to Paris’s vast Maison & Objet design show at the Paris Nord Villepinte Exhibition Centre. This time, it was the winter 2018 show. And it was no less intimidating than my first visit in September 2017. You may recall from my report of that visit that the event is staged in the centre’s eight halls, which cover a mind-boggling 246,000 square metres. Seeing all of the exhibits is impossible. Following Maison & Objet’s winter show, I bring you the latest design trends that I saw there. I was, alas, disappointed to observe that the same colours that dominated design in 2017 were on show again. And I infer that they won’t be going away any time soon. I am referring to grey – in both colour and thought – as a general trend. Yes, there are valiant bursts of colourful endeavours by the tchotchke companies of the world but pitifully few efforts at true individualism and novel design. Granted, I am new to the design world in this decade. Although I have the right pedigree – a BA in art history from Vassar College and a degree in interior design from Parsons School of Design – I left this business for 20 years to pursue my passion: a career in classical music. I won’t bore you, dear readers, with too many details because I intend to keep you amused in future columns with narratives about my life as an opera singer. But one thing I can tell you is this: In the theatre, we keep our drama on the stage. It is difficult enough to learn our music, show up on time, and earn our paltry living without having to backstab other artists. That sort of nonsense doesn’t happen; it’s written for daytime television.

46

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Obviously, a soprano cannot sing the same notes as a baritone. So we really are not in competition with each other once we have the job. We are actually very collegial. I cannot say the same of designers. The ones I have met so far are pretty … well, not very nice to each other. Why is that? What is that about? Isn’t there enough creative juice to go around? Don’t they believe that the best designers will rise to the top? And the consumer will judge? Am I just a foolish utopian living in a dream world? Write to us! Scream at me, oh designers! Tell me how it really is out there.

Seletti Design

Seletti Design

Seletti Design

Seletti Design

Should designers not support each other as singers do in performance? Should that reasoning not reign in the world of design? For instance, there I was once again in the vast, lonely, impossible-to-properly-navigate Maison & Objet Paris ... And yes, as your publisher, I will probably attend the show twice a year to give you articles about world design trends. Aren’t you excited? And lo and behold: Everyone is still producing design that is mainly in GREY. And yet … And yet … And yet …

THE SPRING ISSUE

47


movatohome.com

DESIGN

All images: Missoni

The beauty of the human spirit rises. I hear it like a Mozart overture. I hear the oboes as the purple chairs that were pushing forth. I see the green settees, and the Portuguese designers with their metal Louis XIV table legs as flutes popping out. And lo! We have a rococo concerto. There is hope like spring in the midst of the winter rain in Paris.

48

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

All images: Missoni

Some red sofas, like red roses, sounded like the trumpets of a fanfare to announce: “Don’t despair, Sharon! The triumph of the human spirit is that it cannot survive without warmth, communication, community.” And so, the winner of the Maison & Objet show, for me, was the huge display by Missoni. The high-end Italian fashion house, founded in 1953, is known for its colourful knitwear designs. The warm zigzag patterns and lush fabrics are iconic and globally recognizable. Missoni’s presence was a soft haven in a harsh environment. Just beautiful! Can you hear the harmonies yet? If not, lean back. Relax. To quote the Restoration playwright and poet William Congreve: “Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast.” This is what the world needs now. See you at the next M & O in September. Stay cozy. And listen to Vivaldi if you get depressed in the cold. Dr. Sharon Azrieli Publisher

THE SPRING ISSUE

49


ART

50

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


ART VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

FINDING NEW LIFE AND SOLACE IN ART

Artist Maryse Chartrand’s life journey is expressed in glass BY KAREN SEIDMAN

IN WHAT APPEARS TO BE a barn nestled into the woods in Quebec’s Eastern Townships, glass artist Maryse Chartrand hunkers down to begin the painstaking task of polishing and repolishing her latest piece, a gorgeous glass sculpture featuring the rich colours and serpentine lines that characterize her Newly Freed collection. Looking at the bare trees and the snow sparkling outside the window of her Sutton

workshop, Chartrand feels the serenity she is trying to convey through her latest work. At first glance, it seems like an easy sentiment for an artist working in the country, in a rustic studio alongside her long-time boyfriend. Easy, however, is not the name of the road that brought Chartrand to her life as a successful artist. At age 55, she is actually on her third career, her second partner and love, and her first time living outside an urban area. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

51


ART

“At first, I thought that being a glass artist was about aesthetics,” Chartrand says. “But then I realized that my work really expresses my innermost quest, that it’s about being serene and at peace.” For more than 20 years, Chartrand worked in advertising and communications, slogging it out as a French copywriter while she and her husband, Samuel Beaudry, raised their three children. Feeling burned out, they decided in 2003 to take a year-long trip around the world with their children, aged nine, 11, and 13. Chartrand describes the trip – which included stops in Guatemala, New Zealand, Vietnam, India, France, and Italy – as nothing less than spectacular. However, efforts to sell a documentary about it failed, and the couple returned to their demanding jobs. •

52

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


ART VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

“Glass helps me express the mysterious beauty of life.”

THE SPRING ISSUE

53


ART

54

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


ART VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

Everything seemed back to normal until there was a knock at the door in the middle of the night in 2005. A police officer told Chartrand that her husband had killed himself. No, she insisted; he loved life and his children too much to ever harm them this way. But it was true. The news was both devastating and shocking. “It was incomprehensible,” says Chartrand. “I had to understand what happened to him.” So began her second career as a documentary filmmaker. She began to explore depression, which led to the successful documentary

movatohome.com

With and Without You, a second journey for the family that combined footage from their trip with Beaudry with the aftermath of his suicide. This greatly helped Chartrand’s emotional healing. The next surprise in her life was far more pleasant: she fell in love. Her new love, François Charbonneau, was a structural engineer and craftsman. Talking with him of dreams unfulfilled, Chartrand mentioned a weekend workshop of glassblowing she had done a few years back. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

55


ART

“Molten glass really captivated me,” she says. “I thought that if I was crazy, I’d do the threeyear full-time program to learn this craft.” With Charbonneau’s encouragement, she signed up for the program at Espace Verre in Montreal, the only school in Quebec dedicated to the fired arts. She had no objective of selling her work or being an artist; she just wanted to learn the craft. The more she immersed herself in glass, the more she became fascinated with it. “Glass is full of complexity and contradictions,” she says. “It is both transparent and opaque, solid but fragile, dense but fluid.” She considers glass her creative partner. “My artistic statement is really linked to the material I use,” Chartrand explains. “Glass helps me express the mysterious beauty of life.”

56

THE SPRING ISSUE


ART VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

“Life will bring you things you never expected.”

Her pieces embrace this wondrous feeling with their fluidity and stunning colours, in the way she achieves the appearance of flowers flowing through her thick glass vases or the way colours are suspended in a heavy clear glass cocoon. Her work doesn’t have straight lines, a reflection of the twists and turns of real life. She was “discovered” when gallery owner Elena Lee – the first to represent the Studio Glass Movement in Canada – chose her work for an exhibit of emerging glass artists. Chartrand’s work is now sold across the country, some pieces for as much as $1,500. One of her

early works, Quiet Strength, resides in the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. For Chartrand, the road she has journeyed, the new life she has created for herself, have been both painful and joyous. She believes her late husband would be thrilled about the direction of her life, as he had a real reverence for art and artists. “I didn’t expect this,” she says. “Life will bring you things you never expected. Falling in love again, being an artist, moving to the country – this is the beauty of life I’m trying to express through my art.” •

Maryse Chartrand www.marysec.com

THE SPRING ISSUE

57


DESIGN

58

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

THE RIGHT MOVE

A house in Delta proves to be the perfect new location for this family’s lifestyle shift BY SUSAN KELLY PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL GRDINA STYLING: SARAH GALLOP

THE SPRING ISSUE

59


DESIGN

60

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

THE MOVE WAS A SMALL ONE geographically for the owners of this recently renovated house in Delta. It did, however, mark a major shift in lifestyle. “We moved a five-minute drive away from our previous home,” says homeowner Louise Jackson, “but we gained the beautiful sea view we had always wanted. We did lose almost half our previous square footage, though.” The time was optimal to downsize, says Louise, a dietician. The 2,500-square-foot home overlooking Boundary Bay was perfect for her and her husband, lawyer Andrew Jackson, 18-year-old son Nolan, and a photogenic poodle named Raven. Their daughter, Kate,

also occasionally stays when on a break from her university studies. Built in the 1980s, the house had just the kind of squared-off contemporary architecture the couple liked. Because southeast storms spray a salty mist, an exterior rain screen and composite concrete siding were added along with energy-efficient windows and doors. Taking a cue from a neighbour, the couple installed weather-resistant artificial grass on the bayside lawn. It leads down to a seawall, off which the family takes turns lowering a kayak on calm days, and following it down via a set of stairs to the water. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

61


movatohome.com

DESIGN

One of two original carports was converted into a mudroom, which is accessed on the street side. An extra stand-alone garage was added to accommodate two cars and such items as tools, camping gear, and bicycles that the family makes frequent use of. “Even though I enjoyed purging our belongings before we moved, there were still a lot of things that needed to be stored,” says Louise. Inside the home, she wanted a whole new look on the main floor, one that would be contemporary but not minimalist. Previously, she had lived with several design trends that called for saturated colours on the walls, including a Tuscan-inspired phase.

62

THE SPRING ISSUE

Because the owners were ready for a change to something timeless, interior designer Sarah Gallop, owner of Sarah Gallop Design in Vancouver, proposed a modern scheme of palest grey with a subtle touch of warm undertones. Gallop suggested drastic changes to the layout. “They originally wanted to keep the status quo,” the designer says. “But when I showed them how removing some walls would open the space to the incredible view, they were on board.”

A new linear living-area fireplace was clad with rugged ledgestone. Extending to the ceiling, it creates a striking design feature and cozy place to sit and take the chill off. Fireplace surround: Pangaea quartzite ledgestone.


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

An existing monolithic double-sided fireplace blocked the kitchen from the rest of the great room, so it was demolished by contractor New Vision Projects. A new fireplace was installed on an outer wall, serving as a focal point for the great room. The owners’ passion for gourmet meals and healthful eating inspired the kitchen design. Gallop strategically placed a large island with an induction range so Louise can enjoy the view while cooking and also interact with people seated at the breakfast counter opposite or in the living area. Shelves

movatohome.com

on one end hold Louise’s cherished cookbook collection; dog bowls and treats are stored on the other. Gallop added an imposing, almost sculptural range hood overhead to balance the gleaming stainless-steel appliances. All are played against a backdrop of custom-made lacquered high-gloss cabinetry by Bojan High End Kitchens, featuring pale-grey uppers and charcoal-grey lowers. It was important to add texture, says Gallop. The contrast with the sleek polished surfaces adds design interest and keeps the space from becoming too impersonal or formal.

The fireplace is clad in a rugged grey ledgestone. Weathered grey eight-inch-wide plank flooring runs throughout the great room. It’s a perfect beach-house look that also fools the eye: the wood look is faux, on highly durable Italian porcelain tiles. Against them stands a striking dining table with chevron-patterned wood top. “The couple were wonderful to work with,” says Gallop. “They were willing to make choices that were a bit daring, which helped us create something unique for them.” •

The kitchen proved to be the homeowner’s favourite room. She especially enjoys the sea view from the island while preparing meals for the family. Range hood: Faber; appliances: Samsung.

THE SPRING ISSUE

63


DESIGN

The designer created a bright oasis in the main bath on the second floor. Textured white tiles reflect the sunlight entering through the skylight. Floor tiles: Cova Valmalenco Grigio from C&S Tile; shower surround: Oxo Line Blanco by Porcelanosa.

64

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Due to zoning restrictions, the original staircase leading to the second floor had to be retained. In the end, a few coats of paint were all that was required. Now pure white, its clean, simple lines are brought into a new century, accented with a simple white glass pendant light. The beach-house look is further emphasized by a wide neutral-tone runner rug to soften footsteps. The home’s existing four upstairs bedrooms and large family room were given a similar refresh. One bedroom was converted into a dressing room and walk-in closet. Gallop made big changes to the two upstairs bathrooms, one off the master bedroom and the other shared, originally very dark and cramped. Making the most of vaulted ceilings and skylights, she gave the bathrooms earth-toned walnut vanities and new tiles in a mix of subtle textures and light neutral tones. In the master bathroom, the tub-shower was removed and replaced with a spacious walk-in shower. •

(Bottom left) A butler’s pantry behind the kitchen serves as an extra food preparation and storage area for the homeowner. The side door there provides access to her herb garden.

THE SPRING ISSUE

65


DESIGN

66

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Louise chose not to bring along any artwork from her former house. With a new-found interest in collecting, she’s enjoying the prowl through galleries in Vancouver and Whistler. One recent purchase, a landscape painting by Delta artist Jodie Blaney, hangs in the dining area. Small works by other artists hang upstairs. A wall in the living room is crying out for a large-scale work, but she wants to take her time finding just the right one. “This house is so right for us now,” she says. “I’m in no hurry.” •

Wood-effect porcelain floor tiles run throughout the first-floor great room, providing a weathered look ideal for a beach house. Flooring: Mywood in Grey by Cisa Ceramiche.

THE SPRING ISSUE

67


ThinkGlass artistic countertops created by our glass artist Michel Mailhot are not just stunning but also very easy to clean, resistant and durable.

The world leader in innovative glass applications


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

Thank You, Mom It’s easy to find the right gift for Mother’s Day BY TRACEY MACKENZIE

We don’t need a special occasion to tell our mothers how much we love them; we can do that every day. However, Mother’s Day gives us an opportunity to shower them with carefully chosen gifts. Here is a guide to help you find the perfect present for your mom.

70

THE SPRING ISSUE


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

The 2018 Mother ’s Day Gift Guide The Blue Yonder

Transport yourself to the ocean using the Aquatic Wood home fragrance, combined with this pastel-blue Berlingot diffuser, designed by Maxidmum. Sold as a boxed set, it includes the Aquatic Wood fragrance, wick-burner, straight mounting, snuffer, and funnel. Available at Linen Chest. www.linenchest.com

The Beat Goes On

These Beats by Dr. Dre Solo3 On-Ear sound-isolating Bluetooth headphones in gold have an adjustable fit with cushioned ear cups. They have up to 40 hours of battery life, allowing you to take calls, control your music, and activate Siri with on-ear controls. Available at Best Buy. $250.24. www.bestbuy.ca

Eternally Yours

Show your love to the mother of your children with the Cartier Love Bracelet in pink gold. Perfect for day or evening wear, this bracelet will make her shine. Available at Cartier. $7,950. www.ca.cartier.com

Top Mop

The iRobot Braava 380T floor-mopping robot has smart sensors and a rechargeable battery that cleans for up to three hours of dry sweeping or two hours of wet mopping on a single charge. Ideal for picking up pet hair, the Braava is both quiet and efficient. Available at Amazon.ca. $349.93. www.amazon.ca

THE SPRING ISSUE

71


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

The 2018 Mother ’s Day Gift Guide

Dog Days

Toss a treat to your dog while using the full HD Wifi Furbo Dog Camera with two-way audio. Livestream video to monitor your pet with a 160-degree wide-angle view. Perfect for pet lovers, the Furbo works with Amazon Alexa. $179USD. Ships to Canada. www.amazon.com

Made In The Shade

A versatile, retro silhouette combines with a street-chic gradient to make these Johanna sunglasses from Kate Spade the perfect accessory for outdoor fun. Available at Nordstrom. $210. www.nordstrom.com

Cold Brew

The KitchenAid Cold Brew coffee maker enables you to make up to 14 cups of cold brew. Simply fill with coffee and cold water, steep and enjoy. A built-in stainless steel tap dispenses your cold brew directly from your refrigerator, and a reusable stainless steel steeper allows you to brew the beverage of your choice. Available at Amazon.ca. $120. www.amazon.ca

72

THE SPRING ISSUE


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

The 2018 Mother ’s Day Gift Guide Saved For Tomorrow

Keep your leftover wine safe and fresh in the Savino wine-saving carafe. Made in the U.S. of high-quality glass, food-grade and BPA-free plastic and silicone, it will keep wine fresh for up to a week. Dishwasher safe. Available at Amazon.ca. $70. www.amazon.ca

Fragrant Florals

The bestselling Amazing Grace eau de toilette from Philosophy is a feminine fragrance, with notes of bergamot, lily of the valley, and musk, which is sure to leave a lasting impression. Available at Sephora. $60. www.sephora.com

Tasty Teas

The Dolce Vita collection from Tea Forte consists of five naturally sweet organic teas that entice with their scent and will satisfy your cravings for dessert. Perfect for anyone who loves to entertain. Available at Tea Forte. www.teaforte.com

THE SPRING ISSUE

73


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

The 2018 Mother ’s Day Gift Guide Fashionably Fit

Fashion designer Tory Burch has teamed up with Fitbit to create a special edition wristband for the Fitbit ALTA. Available in various styles. We show one that is 22kt-gold-plated and has a flexible black band. Available at Tory Burch. $149.95USD. www.toryburch.com

Natural Wonder

This creation by Gloria Bass Design will make any mother swoon. A watermelon tourmaline pendant encased in 18kt yellow gold and studded with green diamonds gently hangs from an Akoya pearl necklace. Available at Gloria Bass Design. www.gloriabassdesign.com

Romance Of The Rose

This beautifully packaged OSKIA massage candle is scented with pure Rose de Mai oil. Made with coconut oil, its low melting point turns it into a warm massage oil that is packed with vitamins and minerals to leave skin feeling soft and smooth. Available at Goop. $51USD. Ships to Canada www.goop.com

74

THE SPRING ISSUE


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

The 2018 Mother ’s Day Gift Guide Slip Into Comfort

The Scuffette II Slipper by UGG is trimmed with shearling and lined with UGGpure, a textile made of wool but shaped to feel like shearling. It offers a comfortable way to shuffle around the house. Available at Nordstrom. $110. www.nordstrom.com

Clean Calls

Say goodbye to nasty germs with the PhoneSoap smartphone sanitizer by Uncommon Goods. UV lights sanitize your phone as often as you want. Perfect for parents with small children. Available at Uncommon Goods. $76. www.uncommongoods.com

Whole Lotta Love

All In Good Time

Encased in brushed rosegold-coloured stainless steel, the Rodeo watch from MVMT has high-end styling at an affordable price. The dial features rose gold hands and markers and a rose gold second hand. The strap is 100 per cent leather and interchangeable. Available at MVMT Watches. $115USD. Free worldwide shipping.

These beautiful blue and white Love plates from the Ellen Degeneres collection by Royal Doulton showcase Ellen’s LOVE of life. Each plate has its own distinctive design and is perfect as an accent plate or used on its own. Available at Linen Chest. www.linenchest.com

www.mvmtwatches.com

THE SPRING ISSUE

75


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

The 2018 Mother ’s Day Gift Guide

Framed

The NIX Advance Hi-Res Digital photo frame with motion sensor will turn on when you walk into the room and off when you leave. It has an easy plug-and-play setup to instantly display all of your digital photos. Comes with an intuitive remote control. Screen available in sizes of eight to 15 inches. Prices start at $79.99USD. Ships to Canada. www.amazon.com

Meals On Wheels

Mealtime needn’t be a chore. Goodfood makes it easy with prepackaged meals made of fresh ingredients. Choose from a variety of meals, including vegetarian options, that are delivered to your door. Available at Good Food. www.makegoodfood.ca

Cool Copper

This hand-hammered copper water bottle from Halfmoon is the perfect gift for the yoga enthusiast in your life. According to Ayurvedic practice, drinking from a copper vessel helps support the immune system and kills bacteria in water. Not suitable for hot drinks. Available at Halfmoon. $48. www.shophalfmoon.com

76

THE SPRING ISSUE


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

The 2018 Mother ’s Day Gift Guide Decorative Diffuser

The Vic Tsing wood grain essential oil diffuser and cool mist humidifier makes an aromatic impact on a room. This quiet humidifier can hold up to 300 millilitres of water and can run for as long as 10 hours. An adjustable LED light and time setting function are additional perks. Available at Amazon.ca. $39.99. www.amazon.ca

In A Snap

The Polaroid Snap combines a minimalist design with a retro vibe. Reminiscent of the original Polaroid instant camera, it is so compact, it can be easily slipped into a pocket, and the integrated printer produces full-colour two-by-three-inch prints in less than a minute. Perfect for the photophile. Available at Amazon.ca. $160. www.amazon.ca

La Vie En Rose

The Miranda Kerr collection by Royal Albert is perfect for a summer tea party. Delicate and colourful, it features a design of peonies and butterflies to evoke a sense of romance and whimsy that will add joy to your table setting. Available at Linen Chest. www.linenchest.com

THE SPRING ISSUE

77


movatohome.com

DESIGN

NO CLICHÉS, JUST COMFORT Whistler getaway home is built with family in mind

PHOTOGRAPHY: JANIS NICOLAY STYLING: NICOLE MARKOTA

78

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

THE SPRING ISSUE

79


DESIGN

WOOD AND STONE ARE major elements of the Coast Range, and thus fitting materials for this all-season vacation home in Whistler. The homeowners had asked interior designer Jennifer Heffel, owner and founder of HB Design in Vancouver, for something that would make them feel that they were in the mountains, but “they weren’t into that clichéd ski-resort stuff,” Heffel says. “They liked alpine contemporary, and the general BC West Coast style that incorporates wood, glass, and open spaces. They wanted clean lines, an uncluttered look, and a bright and airy feeling.” Accordingly, stone and concrete elements are mostly light-coloured, and wood is pale. The most prominent examples of this are the regularly spaced oak slats used in several places as vertical accents. Around the stairway, they rise from the ground floor and up through the stairwell and then continue across the ceiling of the second-storey hallway.

(Above and opposite) A metal channel runs up the side of the fireplace and along the length of the ceiling into the kitchen, making a strong architectural feature. Inset track lights allow for lighting variations and keep the expanse of ceiling clear.

80

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

This effect is echoed at one side of the great room fireplace, where the slats rise from the extended hearth and then angle for a short distance along the ceiling, running along the same axis as the stairway slats. Tongue-andgroove wood is also used on the ceiling of the entry foyer to delineate the space from the great room but maintain a connection with the exterior entry ceiling.

movatohome.com

“The wood-slat wall was a bit challenging for our contractor, Dave Johnston at Blue Ice Construction,” says Heffel. “We had envisioned tall beautiful oak detailing literally spanning two floors. We didn’t want to see any join lines or wobbles. Dave did some creative wood sourcing and found beautiful long lengths of oak. He was able to fabricate our vision quite successfully.” •

In the great room, straight edges meet curves and smooth surfaces meet texture. Tikar floor lamp: Mobilia; Sphere coffee table: Restoration Hardware; custommade dining table: Lock & Mortice; Fleur leather side chairs: Mobital; Big Mobile Light above dining table: Andrew Neyer.

THE SPRING ISSUE

81


movatohome.com

DESIGN

Stone is most prominent in the fireplace at one end of the great room. The bulk of it is pale grey and rough-hewn in contrast to the smooth wood slats. Darker-coloured basalt forms the hearth and firebox surround. There are other hard-surfaced elements in the home, such as the great room’s wooden hemispherical coffee table. Aesthetic echoes of the mountains, yes – but also eminently practical. The owners asked for a home that

82

THE SPRING ISSUE

would be low maintenance and durable, as they have two very active young children, and many young relatives also visit. Heffel and project designer Nicole Markota responded with some materials that Heffel characterizes tongue-in-cheek as “slightly indestructible.” For example, she says, “We picked flooring with a roughened texture that wouldn’t show marks and dings.”


movatohome.com

The home’s solid practicality is tempered with soft furnishings, rugs, and upholstered furniture, chosen by Markota in mostly muted tones that fit well into the light and airy decor. Texture in the form of nubbly rugs, woven cushions, chunky knitted throws, and furry bedspreads adds to the sophisticated yet homey ambience. The owners’ main reason for building was to be able to retreat from their principal home in Los Angeles to a BC scene that they know and love, and they wanted to share it with their extended family. Heffel, Markota, and Whistler-based architect Brent Murdoch responded with a home that’s 3,488 square feet and incorporates plenty of details to suit family gatherings. •

The breakfast nook’s custom-made banquette upholstered in Brentano’s Dapple Earthenware fabric angles around a Tulip table from Rove Concepts. Rugged Oak Stockholm flooring from Burritt Bros. has a brushed texture with a matte lacquer finish that will stand up well to little feet.

THE SPRING ISSUE

83


DESIGN

On the main f loor, a great room incorporating living, dining, and kitchen areas facilitates flow and provides unobstructed sightlines. A breakfast nook tucked into a corner of the kitchen makes for a cozy rendezvous and is conveniently located next to the family room with its sliding door that can be closed if the children get boisterous. Visitors are accommodated in the guest bedroom, which has an ensuite bathroom. A mud/ski room, small office, and powder room round out the main-floor features.

84

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Upstairs are a lounge, a laundry room, and three bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms. Rooms are smallish (who needs a big bedroom when you’re going to spend much of your time outdoors or hanging out with family by the fireplace?) but cleverly furnished to prevent a cluttered feeling. The children’s rooms have bunk beds designed by Heffel and team to provide plenty of built-in storage. All of this was discussed, designed, furnished, and finished on a very considered budget with clients at a remove – on another continent, in fact. Thanks to the Internet, the process went fairly smoothly. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

85


DESIGN

A deep tub in the master bathroom affords a good long soak after an active day outdoors. Aquabrass Fiji B0003 tub: Cantu Bathrooms & Hardware Ltd.; wall planks in Woodland Elm: Stone Tile.

86

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

“There was a bit of back-and-forth at the beginning in terms of keeping the job within the initial budget,” Heffel says. “We had Facetime and Skype meetings where we’d hold up samples, show drawings and 3D designs. We only met with the clients one time face to face; then it was all handled over the Internet.” It was a high-tech process doing what high tech is supposed to do: make life easier. The result is a contemporary and cozy home that allows its owners and their family and friends to leave high tech behind and revel in the great outdoors. •

(Right) The master bedroom has a quiet corner with a view. Torino side table: Four Hands; Nordic lounge chair: Mobilia.

THE SPRING ISSUE

87


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

STAR

STRUCK Let the planets be your guide as you declutter, reorganize, and spruce up your home for spring BY SUSAN KELLY

AH SPRING! As the sun barges into the supercharged sign of Aries, it delivers an annual energetic kick-start. It’s the vernal equinox and the astrological new year, celebrated for millennia by many cultures around the world. Early spring 2018 brings turbulent patterns and extreme impulses. We will have plenty of drive to (finally!) tackle the clutter. But before you book the dumpster, consider that with the planet Mercury in retrograde motion, our mental responses are less than clear. Best astrological advice: Rather than making new plans now, it’s best to review, refine, and build on what was started before. Include extra contingency time in any cleanup plan to allow for minor delays and mix-ups.

88

THE SPRING ISSUE

By late April, sensible Taurus takes over. This Venus-motivated sign evokes our need to be surrounded by beauty along with a dose of common sense. Patience and perseverance are easier to come by then, too. So, mark May onwards as the best time for a big decluttering project, especially if it must be executed in stages over time. The seasonal cleanup/clear-out urge is universal. But each zodiac sign will respond differently when it comes to goals and methods. Here is a guide to making a plan that works for you.


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

ARIES MARCH 21 – APRIL 19 ENDPOINT: A streamlined space that supports your active, goal-oriented life. THE STRATEGY: Clutter be gone! You insist on being first out of the starting gate. But since you’re better in the sprint than the marathon, you too often falter in the stretch. To stay in the race, make the clearout a competition against the clock or someone else. And tackle only projects that can be completed in a day or less. TAURUS APRIL 20 – MAY 20 ENDPOINT: A beautiful home that delights all the senses. THE STRATEGY: House proud, you run a tight, spotless ship. But you abhor change and waste, and so tend to cling to stuff forever. This is your year for a major life upgrade. Eye your possessions and pinpoint those with true intrinsic value: emotional or monetary. Toss overboard any that fall short. GEMINI MAY 21 – JUNE 20 ENDPOINT: Surroundings that tell your story. THE STRATEGY: You’re all about communication and feeding your insatiable curiosity. And so, books and papers, even in a digital age, tend to pile up alarmingly. Remind yourself that taming all clutter will free your mind. Edit ruthlessly, a little each day. Keep only that which increases efficiency or speaks volumes about you. CANCER JUNE 21 – JULY 22 ENDPOINT: A cozy retreat that makes your heart sing. THE STRATEGY: It’s family first for sentimental you. Small wonder letting go of heirlooms and keepsakes is so difficult. Memory boxes provide a creative way to preserve the most precious items. For the hard decisions, enlist someone objective to assist. And think of giving stuff a good home, chez a friend or the thrift shop.

movatohome.com

LEO JULY 23 – AUGUST 22 ENDPOINT: A jewel-like setting in which to shine. THE STRATEGY: Yes, clutter really is beneath your royal notice, which may be why it tends to pile up! Once it’s caught your attention, you excel at project management and putting together an ace team. Prioritize creating more space to entertain. You’ll love showing off the new and improved space and basking in the applause. VIRGO AUGUST 23 – SEPTEMBER 22 ENDPOINT: A home in which to heal mind and spirit. THE STRATEGY: You have an organization system others envy. But it’s a struggle, as a mania for detail prompts you to hang onto life’s minutiae. Result: more clutter and stress on your multitasking mind. To create serene surroundings, stash all your “busyness” behind closed cupboard doors or in bins. LIBRA SEPTEMBER 23 – OCTOBER 22 ENDPOINT: A camera-ready home at all times. THE STRATEGY: Decisions, decisions — if only you could make them! Hint: All that procrastination is really a form of perfectionism. Try damning the torpedoes and let go of stuff. For motivation, deploy your keen eye for aesthetics and make room for a new work of art, a designer sofa, or other decor refresh. SCORPIO OCTOBER 23 – NOVEMBER 21 ENDPOINT: To create a space of magic and meaning. THE STRATEGY: You have a flair for drama and a gift for transforming the space around you. To avoid: a binge-purge approach to clutter, letting it pile up before going on an all-day cleanup rampage. Aim for a more sustainable system. And much as you hate to let go, do eliminate anything that has negative memories.

SAGITTARIUS NOVEMBER 22 – DECEMBER 21 ENDPOINT: Surroundings that set your spirit free. THE STRATEGY: Your easygoing approach applies to possessions, too, which can mean they accumulate and take over. What to keep: things found on your travels or that have great personal or cultural significance. Next, curate them into collections for display. Then throw a party and let the revellers fill the void once filled with your clutter. CAPRICORN DECEMBER 22 – JANUARY 19 E NDPOIN T: To be master/mistress of a ll you survey. THE STRATEGY: Tradition is important to you, as is a clutter-free, organized environment. Surround yourself only with things that scream quality (hide the labels, though), or that remind you of your many achievements. You ace the scheduling and arranging. As for execution … well, that’s what minions are for, isn’t it? AQUARIUS JANUARY 20 – FEBRUARY 18 ENDPOINT: To be totally social and connected. THE STRATEGY: A genius for invention is your biggest ally in conquering clutter. Deploy it to find unconventional storage, recycling, and repurposing options. For motivation, focus on clearing space for the droves of people you can’t seem to function without. You will, however, work at your own erratic pace. PISCES FEBRUARY 19 – MARCH 20 ENDPOIN T: A serene retreat in which to re-energize. THE STRATEGY: You have a higher chaos threshold than most. Fortunately, your “It’s Just Stuff” motto also applies when it comes time to let go. Since too-big goals overwhelm you, focus on small ones. Then work at them as the spirit moves you, giving your creative side free rein as you go. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

89


DESIGN

PUSHING  BOUNDARIES This Vancouver design firm sources globally for unique interiors BY BRENDA O’FARRELL

IN THE WORLD OF home interiors there is custom design, and then there is custom design. The difference is more than mere emphasis. It is an exercise that reaches past the ordinary or the expected and pushes the boundaries to recast ideas about the fundamentals. This is what Dario Drinovac wants you to discover. But be forewarned. You may have a few questions. “I like customers who ask questions,” says Drinovac, a designer and the co-owner of Vancouver-based design house ROOM8. He says that when customers start asking questions, they discover new possibilities. Horizons expand as they realize that there are many degrees to customization.

90

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


movatohome.com

Photo: Ema Peter

DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

Photo: Darko Sikman

Drinovac says his ideal customers are “people who are looking for extraordinary things.” That is where ROOM8, which has been building its reputation since 1992, distinguishes itself from other design houses, he says. Customers are often surprised when they are introduced to what he calls “new-generation” products, items, and materials that the company sources from Europe and around the globe. “Our understanding of what is available on the market makes a huge difference,” Drinovac says. “We actually look for the most advanced finishes in the world.” Everything is custom-made. “We find something suitable for our clients’ homes, not the entire neighbourhood.” As an example, Drinovac points to ROOM8’s use of porcelain in kitchens.

“Porcelain is the strongest man-made material,” he says. “It is resistant to scratches, heat, stains, acid.” ROOM8 designs all the major components within the space – countertops, islands, cabinet doors and drawers – of porcelain. “The whole door is made of solid porcelain,” Drinovac says. It is specially engineered, using three sheets of porcelain that are laminated together. The process increases the material’s strength and allows the manufacturer to securely fasten the hardware to it. “It’s a very beautiful piece of engineering,” he says. ROOM8 creates entire islands in porcelain, including the countertops. Other materials such as wood, lacquer, glass, and metal are added to accentuate the look. The result is a customized space that is unique, contemporary, functional, and refined. Porcelain can be used for flat surfaces in any room. “It has too many advantages to be ignored,” Drinovac says. “The colours and textures available will surprise you. Fireplace surrounds, wall units – the limits are gauged by the imagination. “There are options, and you should explore them. Get engaged. Ask us questions. You might be surprised.” Drinovac knows “what can be done, what should be done, and what should not be done.” That leaves homeowners with the task of merely having to consider a few new possibilities. • Room8 110-1706 W 1st Ave., Vancouver 604-734-1323

Photo: Darko Sikman

www.room8.ca

THE SPRING ISSUE

91


movatohome.com

DESIGN

FAMILY-FRIENDLY REFINEMENT Elegance and practicality combine in this West Vancouver home BY BRENDA O’FARRELL PHOTOGRAPHY: TRACEY AYTON STYLING: AMANDA EVANS

92

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

THE SPRING ISSUE

93


movatohome.com

DESIGN

STYLE AND FUNCTION. When they come together, it is nothing short of a feat. Their coexistence is the hallmark of skilled engineering as much as it is great design. An example of how these two elements can seamlessly connect to create an impressive work can be found in this home in West Vancouver. A new three-storey house on a rare flat street in this neighbourhood known for its hillside inclines, it embraces both components to produce a unique brand of elegance. “It’s comfortable luxury,” says Amanda Evans, the designer who worked with the owners and Linda Burger & Associates, the home’s builder, to produce a cohesive

look. “Even though they wanted something luxurious, we wanted to get something that was durable and would survive family life,” Evans says. A couple with two young children, “they had a pretty good idea of what they were looking for,” says Evans, who owns Amanda Evans Interiors. “They wanted someone to bring it all together.” The mother, a doctor by profession, wanted a refined look. But she clearly understood the challenge of factoring in the rough and tumble that comes with two toddlers. She set the bar high. The home had to be stylish, but not too precious. •

Custom-built shelving units flank the fireplace in the living room. The backs of the shelves feature grey-tinted mirrors; the muted effect provides reflection without being busy. 94

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

A living-room accent table has a brushed brass frame and an antiqued-mirror top. THE SPRING ISSUE

95


DESIGN

movatohome.com

Brushed brass pendants above the island add a touch of warmth and sophistication to the all-white kitchen. The contemporary-style lanterns provide a mix of the modern and the traditional. 96

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

The island’s bar stools with backrests have brushed brass frames, coordinating the look with the pendants and the metal accents in the living room.

“It’s very comfortable and it’s really built for our family. And it’s very elegant,” she says of the final result. Creating that look included many ingredients. It started with a few pieces of furniture the couple had in a previous home, including a classic grey upholstered chair in the living room and a hutch in the dining room. They added to that with a few key purchases, including an oversized chandelier over the dining table. •

The kitchen island has a white quartz waterfall and countertop by Caesarstone, along with a built-in wine fridge. THE SPRING ISSUE

97


movatohome.com

DESIGN

The chandelier is a statement piece. “That was such a strong starting point for us,” Evans says. She also points to the custom millwork that showcases the fireplace in the living room. Flanking the quartzite surround, maple shelves are backed by grey-tinted mirrors. The subdued mirroring creates “the reflective value without being too busy,” she says. Grey is a theme that carries through much of the house. A personal favourite of one of the owners, it serves as the anchor that dictated the selections of many of the accent pieces. “We wanted to warm it up because grey can sometimes feel cool, especially with our weather in Vancouver,” Evans says. To do this, she added brass accents. The metals also confer glamour and a touch of sparkle. Adding to the look of refinement are the custom-made area rugs – one in the living room, another in the dining room. The dining table is a custom-made piece that combines two triangular gold metal base pieces with a four-inch-thick maple tabletop that was stained to coordinate with the millwork in the living room. The smaller chairs are covered with grey vinyl, a selection that, as Evans describes it, “looks beautiful but can withstand everyday life.” The two wing chairs, one at each end of the table, are finished with the same vinyl on the seats, but are covered with a textured material on the side and backs to add a touch of sophistication. Evans says the end chairs are a small nod to traditionalism. “For us, this is a pretty unique project. We got to do a very luxurious design and captured very comfortable aspects for family life,” Evans says. “We didn’t have to sacrifice style and the look to achieve that.” •

The dining room features a four-inch-thick maple tabletop that has been affixed to two gold-coloured metal bases. The table stands on a hand-made rug from Nepal.

98

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

“We wanted to warm it up because grey can sometimes feel cool, especially with our weather in Vancouver.”

THE SPRING ISSUE

99


movatohome.com

DESIGN

Soft pink grasscloth wallpaper gives texture to the walls in the baby’s room. The walls in this toddler’s room are covered with custom decals from Urban Walls. The images include all his favourite things, such as diggers and trucks. The yellow, blue, and green accents were added.

The master bathroom continues the home’s predominantly pale colour scheme with grey accents. 100

THE SPRING ISSUE


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

The wallpaper featured in the basement office is carried into the adjacent playroom. It’s a pattern that works for both spaces. The glass walls allow the parents to keep an eye on their children.

This mix of style and function was carried to the finished basement, where a glass-walled office serves as a workspace that enables the adults to work while keeping an eye on the children in an adjacent playroom. “I’m thrilled with the home,” the owner says. “It’s beautiful and also suits the needs of us. We’re going to live in the space.” •

THE SPRING ISSUE

101


movatohome.com

DESIGN

FORECAST: SHOWERS AND MORE SHOWERS

Showers are getting bigger. Here’s expert advice on managing the runoff.

When it comes to bathrooms, bigger seems to be better. No longer simply a utilitarian room, the bathroom is often expected to offer a spa-like experience. Few things epitomize this more than a capacious walk-in shower. All very nice – but big water can mean big headaches if the shower isn’t constructed well. Geoff Emerson, bathroom product sales manager of ACO Systems, tells us how you can prevent shower drainage from being…well, a draining experience. QUESTION: Geoff, what are current trends in shower sizes? ANSWER: The shower has become a place to relax, with benches and steamers and body sprayers. To accommodate this, showers are increasingly larger. Wet rooms are also becoming popular: keeping the bathroom unobstructed, without doors, walls, or glass dividing the interior.

102

THE SPRING ISSUE

Q: Some shower styles are not suited to some functions or locations. How does one choose the right style of shower? A: It depends on your space and needs. Neoangle showers tuck into corners – good for small rooms. Some people want the versatility of a bathtub plus a separate shower; others get rid of the bathtub and install a big shower in the space. A popular design is the barrier-free (i.e., curbless) shower, not only for those who need easy accessibility but also for those who desire a clean look.

Q: Is size of floor tiles important when choosing shower design? A: The new look favours large tiles (rectangles with at least one pair of sides of 12 inches or longer), which require few grout lines. The more grout lines you have, the more that can get dirty and the more you have to clean. Fewer grout lines make for seamless design and an unfussy, modern style. Larger tiles work for both wall and floor, creating a consistent look. Bonus: installing large tiles takes less time than installing smaller ones in the same area, and all cuts are linear.


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Q: No one wants a flood in the bathroom, but how do you marry style and efficiency? A: A small round or square drain doesn’t look great with larger tiles, but a linear drain is both efficient and stylish. As long as the shower is waterproofed properly and the floor slopes towards the drain, a linear drain works just like normal, and its shape suits locations central or peripheral. Putting a linear drain at one end of the shower is ideal, because you’re not standing on the drain, and waste water flows away from you. Q: What factors should be considered when choosing a drain style and size? A: There are many finishes to complement bathroom design. Match dark drains with dark tile, or go for a contrast of dark and light. Glass grates make for a contemporary look, while the standard stainless-steel drain gives a classic effect. Choice of grate pattern is entirely yours. When it comes to sizing, you can choose any size; however, linear drains look best when longer, adding their own stylish touch to shower decor. All drains should be easy to access for cleaning and maintenance, and you can add hair strainers to prevent clogging your shower. Q: Is installing a linear drain something that the average homeowner can do easily? A: People think that linear drains are expensive or difficult to install. But linear drains are just like regular drains – in fact, they’re even easier to install than round drains. •

ACO Systems www.quartzbyaco.com

THE SPRING ISSUE

103


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

TO YOUR HEALTH! Smoothie and juice bars are changing the way we enjoy plant-based nutrition BY JULIE GEDEON

104

THE SPRING ISSUE


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

CLEAN UP, TUNE UP, SPRUCE UP. Spring is the season for sweeping away winter’s cobwebs and grime from the house, the yard, the garage, the car. That big clean-up extends to our bodies, too, as we move toward the vernal equinox. For years, juices and smoothies have been the drinks of choice at this time of year for those who want to give themselves a post-winter health boost. And while it can be worth the trouble and money to invest in a juicing machine for the home, Canada seems to have almost as many juice bars these days as coffee shops, suggesting that some of us like to grab our wholesome liquids on the run. The folks who run juice bars know a thing or two about mixing plant-based liquid foods for their salubrious qualities.

movatohome.com

A case in point is Eddie Chan, who opened Bolt Fresh Bar on Queen Street West four years ago to give Torontonians healthful smoothies. He says, “We encourage people to begin with sweeter blends, like Blueberry Thrill with its coconut milk, blueberries, bananas, lemon, chia seeds, cinnamon, cardamom, and maple syrup, before transitioning to greener choices. “Yet many like our greenest smoothie, The Power Plant, straight away.” The lemon, ginger, coconut water, and green apple counterbalance the drink’s kale, spinach, cucumber, spirulina, avocado, chia seeds, and hemp hearts. Bolt Fresh keeps smoothies accessible by allowing customers to add ingredients. “Algae tastes like swamp,” Chan admits, “but it’s negligible in the mix.” •

THE SPRING ISSUE

105


LIFESTYLE

movatohome.com

Also, in Toronto, Greenhouse Juice offers cold-pressed juices for energy boosts or healthy reboots. Gold Rush, containing pineapple, cucumber, lemon, and ginger, is a vitamin-C-loaded hydrating antioxidation powerhouse to get things moving. The Good has cucumber, spinach, romaine lettuce, celery, lemon, and Himalayan salt, providing vitamins A and K, along with iron and electrolytes. “Our customers report better sleep, shinier hair, and younger-looking skin,” says Hana James. She co-founded Greenhouse Juice four years ago with childhood friends Anthony Green and Emma Knight. “We all felt there is great juicing in Los Angeles, New York, and other cities, and thought, ‘Why doesn’t Toronto have this?’ ”

The company now has 16 locations and has a subscription delivery service. The juices are made using hydraulic pressure to minimize heat and oxidation that can degrade nutrients and enzymes. “You’re left with a more vibrant, nutrient juice than you would have by using a home blender or juicer,” James says. Greenhouse recently introduced a range of juices with extended shelf life. Using light filtration technology, the company has been able to improve the products’ accessibility while allowing for glass bottling and without diminishing flavour, nutrients, or enzyme activity.

106

THE SPRING ISSUE

Photography by Elena Mari and Nathan Legiehn. Provided courtesy of Greenhouse.


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

movatohome.com

Why not just eat vegetables? We’d have to chew for days to obtain this level of nutrients, explains Zack Berman, co-founder with Ryan Slater of The Juice Truck in Vancouver. “The lack of fibre additionally permits our bodies to assimilate the vitamins and nutrients quickly, providing an energy boost without the later crash that comes from regular digestion,” he says. Friends since age 12, Berman and Slater backpacked for a year after university and noticed that people in the Himalayas consumed a vibrant-orange drink containing sea buckthorn. “The super-berry is high in iron, omegas, calcium, and vitamin C and, once we tried it, we sought out how other people obtained nutrients,” Berman says. The duo explored India’s 5,000-year-old Ayurveda diet but also the country’s juice carts. “Locals gather around these carts the way North Americans frequent coffee shops,” Berman says. He and Slater launched Vancouver’s first cold-pressed juice company seven years ago, initially operating from their now-famous Gastown food truck. They’ve since added a truck and three brick-and-mortar locations. They also sell their juices through more than 30 retailers, as well as offering online ordering and delivery.

Berman and Slater consulted with nutritionists and herbalists to develop blends. The Base is a popular start with cucumber, celery, pear, kale, lemon, and ginger, while The Kickstarter is anti-inflammatory and digestively helpful; it contains apple, cucumber, lemon, ginger, and cayenne. Smoothies are more filling with their retained fibre. “We start with familiar ingredients such as bananas, strawberries, spinach, kale, and avocados, and offer supplements that are leading the food movement,” Berman says.

Ashwagandha, a.k.a. India’s ginseng, is masked within a smoothie. “The word means ‘smell of a horse,’ ” Berman says, “but it helps to fill immunity gaps, counteract stress, regulate hormones and sleep, and provide energy.” Other boosters include maca (a root vegetable high in antioxidants that also includes vitamin C and iron), moringa (a leaf that’s like a multivitamin), and pine pollen that’s a natural testosterone supplement, which is ideal before workouts. •

THE SPRING ISSUE

107


LIFESTYLE

Patrick Andraous, who opened Just Pressed in downtown Montreal less than a year ago, also learned about cold-pressed juices during his travels. “And I thought, ‘Why don’t we have this in Montreal?’ ” he says. Juice companies abounded, but most use high-pressure processing (HPP) or pasteurization for longer shelf life, which isn’t the same as fresh juice bottled in glass for consumption within days. Montrealers can order online to have juice delivered twice weekly. Andraous champions the benefits. “I had such bad acne that I couldn’t sit back on a chair without pain,” he says. “Dermatologists tried everything, but it was only after drinking these juices along with eating regular meals for eight months that the acne disappeared.” Consumers appreciate the price when they learn that nearly two kilograms of produce go into every 500-millilitre bottle. “We’re certified by Ecocert Canada,” Andraous adds. “Every drop is 100 per cent organic.” The Liquid Gold with apple, ginger, and lemon is recommended for new juicers, but many immediately like The Mean Greens with its kale, spinach, cucumber, celery, parsley, apple, lemon, and lime. “Our green juices are 80 per cent greens, so it’s like drinking a salad, but our flavours are so well balanced that even my five-yearold nephew, the world’s pickiest eater, loves them,” says Andraous.

108

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


LIFESTYLE VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

Getting children to enjoy vegetables was among the reasons George Kyres started InBalance in Montreal last summer. His company offers Smoothie Cubes, produce that has been imported flash-frozen to retain nutrients and is packaged conveniently in small cubes. Add 10 cubes to a favourite liquid and voilà: a nutritious juice or smoothie. “It tastes amazing and is really healthy with the sugar and calories slashed in half by using fruit as natural sweeteners, and by adding superfoods like rosehip,” Kyres says.

movatohome.com

The combinations are delicious, with the orange base, for example, including carrot, apple, peach, pineapple, butternut squash, and rosehip. The cubes are available at stores in Ontario and Quebec and allow for less nagging by parents, which prompts the question: Will “eat your vegetables” eventually be replaced by “drink your veggies”? •

THE SPRING ISSUE

109


DESIGN

THE NEW LOOK OF LAMINATE A product that was pioneered a century ago gets new designs, compositions, and uses BY BRENDA O’FARRELL

IN THE WORLD OF INTERIOR DESIGN, there are few things – let alone styles – from the 1970s that we revisit these days. Shag carpets, harvest gold appliances, avocado-coloured powder room sinks, burnt-orange anything. The list goes on; just Google it. Retro from that decade can be overrated. But there is perhaps one thing from this best-to-forget era that has come a long way, baby: the product known as Formica. Yes, that beigy-brown countertop laminate made popular in the 1970s is not so much back, but rather it has re-emerged, with many new looks, and in new places. Think fireplace surrounds, walls, panelling, desk surfaces, entrances, kitchen cabinetry. If you have a vertical or horizontal surface, you may want to consider Formica. Just ask Christelle Locat-Rainville. She is the national marketing manager for Formica Group, the company producing the laminate that was created more than a century ago. Company headquarters in St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec manufactures a vast array of laminate products, including the new spring line: 11 new designs in the Living Impressions collection.

110

THE SPRING ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN VANCOUVER SPRING 2018

Among the new line are four 180-FX products. These new products don’t belong in your grandmother’s kitchen. They include Quartzite Bianco, an elegant stone-like surface that features a white background with dark veined detailing that can cover a wall in a bathroom to give the space a rich, stately finish. “We’re talking about new, impressive designs,” Locat-Rainville explains. Also in the new 180-FX line this spring is Formica Group’s first man-made quartz composite, which is engineered from a mix of concrete and recycled glass. With its true-toscale pattern, it makes any surface look like stone for a fraction of the cost. Stormy Night Granite is also in the 2018 product lineup. This dark grey stone-finished look can be used to create a feature wall in a living room or den that is simply stunning. Using Formica in innovative applications and settings – such as in entrances, on feature walls, and in kitchen cabinetry – is gaining traction with homeowners. “Every time we do research, all the people say they are impressed with laminate,” Locat-Rainville says. After seeing what the new designs look like and

movatohome.com

how they are being used, “everyone leaves the room with a new opinion of laminate,” she adds. Locat-Rainville says the true magic is found when homeowners take the time to discover the new ways Formica is being used in all rooms of the house, including, for example, both on the exterior and interior of kitchen cabinets. She says installing one of their Writable Surfaces inside a cabinet offers family members the ability to keep and update grocery lists, leave notes to one

another, and post general reminders in a fun, functional, and easily-wiped-clean fashion. Putting this type of surface within a frame at an entrance is another idea that busy families have come to appreciate. Whatever the location, function and style combine in one convenient product. •

Formica www.formica.com/en/ca 1-800-FORMICA (367-6422)

THE SPRING ISSUE

111


BUYERS’ GUIDE

FORECAST: SHOWERS AND MORE SHOWERS ACO Systems www.quartzbyaco.com THE RIGHT MOVE Sarah Gallop Design Inc. www.sarahgallop.com 604-952-4448 New Vision Projects www.newvisionprojects.com 604-690-1694 604-725-3191 Bojan High End Kitchens www.bojanhighendkitchens.com 604-866-8789 COZY CONTEMPORARY Sarah Gallop Design Inc. www.sarahgallop.com 604-952-4448

112

FINDING NEW LIFE AND SOLACE IN ART Maryse Chartrand, Artist www.marysec.com 514-775-2727

TO INFINITY AND BEYOND Paramount Group www.groupeparamount.ca 514-683-6644

FAMILY-FRIENDLY REFINEMENT Amanda Evans Interiors www.aeinteriors.ca 778-847-5554

Earth Inc. www.earthinc.com 416-216-0378

Linda Burger & Associates www.lindaburger.ca 604-925-5121 THE NEW LOOK OF LAMINATE Formica www.formica.com/en/ca 1-800-FORMICA (367-6422) SPRING INTO A TIDY HOME Orderesque g.fransham@sympatico.ca 514-592-5939

NO CLICHÉS, JUST COMFORT HB Design www.hbvancouver.com 604-251-9585

The Tidy Moose www.tidymoose.com 647-982-8439

Blue Ice Construction www.blueiceconstruction.com 604-905-4236

Simply Closets www.simplyclosets.ca 416-385-8855

Murdoch & Company www.murdochandco.ca 604-905-6992

Free From Clutter www.freefromclutter.ca 604-725-9353

THE SPRING ISSUE

Van de Poll Garden Design www.vandepollgardens.com 604-476-1907 TO YOUR HEALTH! Bolt Fresh Bar www.boltfreshbar.com 416-588-8103 Greenhouse Juice Co. www.greenhousejuice.com The Juice Truck www.thejuicetruck.ca 604-619-4176 Just Pressed www.jpressed.com 514-815-2244 InBalance www.infoodsinc.com/in-balance PUSHING BOUNDARIES Room8 www.room8.ca 604-734-1323


AD LIST

28 69 9 6 39 29 2 116 17 114 4 15 13 68 11

A2H InteriorDesign ACO Systems Casa Madara Euro-Line Appliances Formica Genesis Kitchens Granite Transformations JWT Architecture Kostuik Gallery My House Design Build ROOM8 Scavolini SICO Pro Luxe ThinkGlass Window Works

IN OUR NEXT ISSUE

Haul the garden chairs out of the garage and fire up the barbecue. It’s time to move life outdoors for the summer. In our upcoming Summer issue, we lead you down the garden path, so to speak, to show you the latest in furnishings for your outdoor oasis. What’s more, we’ll show you some of the best-designed landscapes in the city. On sale in May.

THE SPRING ISSUE

113


Creating great living spaces.

B.C. Georgie Awards Winner - RESIDENTIAL RENOVATOR OF THE YEAR FROM 2014 TO 2017 2018 BC Georgie Awards Finalist - CUSTOM HOME BUILDER OF THE YEAR & RESIDENTIAL RENOVATOR OF THE YEAR

myhousedesignbuild.com CUSTOM HOMES

RENOVATIONS

KITCHEN & BATH

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

MECHANICAL PLUS


Custom Built

Award Winning Custom Homes & Renovations

Kitchen & Bat

Mechanical &

Home Improv

To see the complete story of this fabulous custom home visit our website/custom homes gallery

Visit the MyHouse Design/Build/Team offices in Surrey or North Vancouver, or call 604 My-House (604 694-6873) today to schedule a complimentary consultation.


Vancouver Home - Spring 2018