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How Some Foods Make Breath Foul

Though regular bad breath is most likely caused by certain kinds of bacteria in the mouth or other internal issues, some types of food can contribute to the proliferation of bad breath, and consuming them may lead to unpleasant experiences in social situations or other settings. Some types of food that lead to bad breath are fairly well known, while others may be less apparent. Being aware of the bad breath dangers of the items in a refrigerator or on a menu can help those concerned about their breath quality avoid the range of dining pitfalls that made unpleasant memories for some people. Onions and garlic are known by most people to have a lingering odor on the breath, and while the smell may be more objectionable to some than to others, avoiding these foods when fresh breath is critical is likely a good idea. The chemical constituents in onions and garlic create sharp, acidic, and pungent notes noticeable in the products themselves, and these properties remain on the breath so long as food particles are in the mouth or on the back of the tongue. In some cases, using a mouthwash may help soften the effect of these foods.

The Unusual Suspects Dairy products can lead to bad breath due to their high protein content, an issue that is present for most foods that contain large amounts of protein such as meats and some nuts, beans, and vegetables. While these items may seem harmless in terms of odor, their protein content gives anaerobic bacteria many opportunities to break these proteins down into amino acids and eventually release Volatile Sulfur Compounds (VSCs), the primary components of bad breath. Acidic foods, including citrus, tomato products, and even coffee, can contribute to bad breath as they alter the pH level of the mouth, encouraging odor-causing bacteria to produce more quickly.

More Culprits on Your Plate and in Your Glass Sugary foods, which extend from indulgent deserts to mints and beyond, provide food for bacteria in the mouth, encouraging growth while the sugars also coat teeth and promote the build-up of plaque and inter-tooth food particles. This build-up further promotes bacterial growth between brushing and flossing. Having a dry mouth can significantly contribute to bad breath,

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as well. Drying agents, the most common of which is alcohol (though daily cups of coffee can also be to blame), can wreak havoc on the breath by forcing bacteria to release VSCs in larger amounts and more rapidly. Through avoiding these types of food, or by incorporating them wisely into one's diet, people concerned about halitosis or the occasional bout of bad breath can help attain freedom from mysterious post-dinner breath concerns.

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How Some Foods Make Breath Foul