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IIHEd

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH & CAPACITY BUILDING Institution Building for Nation Building

O.P. JINDAL GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

NAACAccreditation-'A'Grade

INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM 2017

“Other Ways of Knowing and Doing”: Globalizing Social Science Knowledge in Higher Education 11 – 12 December 2017

Organized by the Centre for Comparative and Global Education (CCGE) International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building (IIHEd), O.P. Jindal Global University

In collaboration with Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (OCIES) Indian Ocean Comparative Education Society (IOCES) World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES) UNESCO-chair in Community-based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education

Oceania Comparative and International Education Society

World Council of Comparative Education Societies

Faculty Coordinators: Dr. Mousumi Mukherjee, Assistant Director, IIHEd and Founding Executive Director, CCGE, mmukherjee@jgu.edu.in Ms. Nandita Koshal, Senior Research Fellow, IIHEd, nkoshal@jgu.edu.in


Concept Note This International Research Symposium aims to share knowledge on some of the recent theoretical and methodological trends in the field of comparative and international education. Drawing on the issues raised in the recent Special Issue of the journal, Comparative Education Review “Contesting Coloniality: Rethinking Knowledge Production and Circulation in Comparative and International Education” (Takayama, Sriprakash & Connell, 2017); this International Research Symposium seeks to provide a forum for sharing theoretical and methodological knowledge about “Other ways of Knowing and Doing” (Raina, 2016). It seeks to establish an academic alliance of OCIES scholars with educators, institutional leaders, and researchers investigating educational issues incorporating local wisdom and theories within the South Asian context and other marginalized/postcolonial contexts around the world. It aims to de-centre/ de-colonize our minds from an obsession with the West and Western knowledge, culture, theories and epistemologies in conducting social science research and knowledge production. This symposium also aims to establish South-South and North-South collaboration in social science knowledge creation by bringing scholars together to reflect on the pedagogic theories and ideas of intellectuals and educational reformers from the Global South. It aims to open up our minds to the global dynamics of knowledge in social sciences without rejecting the merits of Western knowledge, cultures, theories and epistemologies. The International Research Symposium includes Plenary sessions interspersed with workshops/papers and creative work by individual researchers (who are working on philosophies of indigenous intellectuals and indigenous methodologies around the world). References: Takayama, K., Sriprakash, A. and Connell, R. (May 2017). "Toward a Postcolonial Comparative and International Education," Comparative Education Review 61, no. S1 https://doi.org/10.1086/690455 Raina, D. (2016). “Mainstreaming Indigenous Knowledge: Genealogy of a Meta-concept” in Sarah Hodges and Mohan Rao [Eds.]. Public Health and Private Wealth: Stem Cells, Surrogates, and Other Strategic Bodies. New Delhi: Oxford University Press

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Message from Prof. (Dr.) C. Raj Kumar Founding Vice-Chancellor, O.P. Jindal Global University & Director, IIHEd

Dear Distinguished Guests and Research Scholars, I am delighted to welcome all of you to our campus for this two-day “International Research Symposium” organized by the International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building (IIHEd) and the Centre for Comparative and Global Education (CCGE) of O.P. Jindal Global University in collaboration with a number of external professional societies- OCIES, IOCES, WCCES and the UNESCO-Chairs in Community-based Research and social responsibility in Higher Education. The vision and mission of IIHEd is to promote research in higher education and capacity building for research. Our University is young, but it has already created a record in terms of its commitment towards research and teaching excellence. Recently we were featured in BRICS QS rankings, as the youngest university in India in an international ranking and one of the top 10 private Universities in India promoting public service through our teaching and research excellence. This is evidence of our growing reputation for high quality teaching and research. I hope that this International Research Symposium will become a platform to further research collaborations across campuses and national boundaries for many of you.

Message from Dr. Mousumi Mukherjee, International Research Symposium Convenor Assistant Director, IIHEd & Founding Executive Director, Centre for Comparative and Global Education

Dear Colleagues & Delegates, On behalf of the Symposium Convening Committee, I would like to welcome all of you to our first International Research Symposium 2017- “Other Ways of Knowing and Doing” Globalizing Social Science knowledge in Higher Education. We are very grateful particularly to Oceania Comparative and International Society and O. P. Jindal Global University for providing generous grants to support this initiative. We are also grateful to IOCES, WCCES and the UNESCO-Chairs in Community-based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education for their support to organize this International Research Symposium. Finally, we are grateful to all faculty and staff of O.P. Jindal Global University for their enthusiasm and support to help organize this important event designed to promote knowledge exchange across campuses, countries and communities oceans apart! May this International Research Symposium generate more collaborations for intellectual enquiry, new knowledge generation and sharing.

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INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH & CAPACITY BUILDING

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Institution Building for Nation Building

O.P. JINDAL GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

NAACAccreditation-'A'Grade

EDUCATION

INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM 2017

“Other Ways of Knowing and Doing”: Globalizing Social Science Knowledge in Higher Education International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building &

Centre for Comparative and Global Education

Invite you to register for the

Pre-Research Symposium Workshop on Journal Publication by

Dr. Zane Ma Rhea Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Monash University Editor, International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives & Co-President, Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (OCIES) Short Bio of Speaker Dr. Zane Ma Rhea is an Associate Professor in the faculty of education in the Monash University, Australia. She is the recently elected President of Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (OCIES) and the editor of the OCIES flagship journal International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives published from the University of Sydney, Australia. Her research theorizes cross-cultural understandings of the cultivation of wisdom and examines how higher education and schooling are harming or supporting the sustainable education of wise, global citizens. Her teaching, supervision, and research spans organisational development, leadership development, professional skills development in mainstream service provision to Indigenous peoples, and theorising knowledge exchanges within complex, postcolonial democratic states. Her most recent publication is Leading and Managing Indigenous Education in the Postcolonial World (Routledge 2014).

Kindly register for the workshop at https://goo.gl/forms/SZJFoL05mloVQPXP2 Date: Saturday, 9 December 2017 | Time: 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Venue: Big Bang conference Room, T1, 1st Floor O. P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat-131001, Haryana

Oceania Comparative and International Education Society

World Council of Comparative Education Societies

Faculty Coordinators: Professor Anamika Srivastava, Assistant Professor, JGLS & Fellow IIHEd Ms. Nandita Koshal, Senior Research Fellow, IIHEd & Research Associate, Centre for Comparative & Global Education


PROGRAMME Day 1: 11th December 2017 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Registration & Morning Tea

9:00 am– 9:30 am: Inaugural Session Venue: T1, Classroom 18, 1st Floor 9:00 am – 9:05 am

Welcome Address Professor (Dr.) Y.S.R Murthy, Registrar, O.P. Jindal Global University and Senior Fellow, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building, O.P. Jindal Global University

9:05 am – 9:15 am

Special Inaugural Address Professor (Dr.) C. Raj Kumar, Founding Vice-Chancellor, O.P. Jindal Global University and Director, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building

9:15 am – 9:30 am

Introducing the Theme: Why Globalize Social Science Knowledge in Higher Education? Dr. Mousumi Mukherjee, Assistant Director, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building & Founding Executive Director, Centre for Comparative and Global Education

INTRODUCTORY PLENARY SESSION - 1: 9:30 am- 12:00 pm “Theorizing from the Global South and Indigenous Knowledge Production” Venue: T1, Classroom 18, 1st Floor Chair: Dr. Sreeram Sundar Chaulia, Professor & Dean, Jindal School of International Affairs, O.P. Jindal Global University Speakers: Ÿ Dr. Dhruv Raina, Professor, History of Science Education, Zakir Husain Centre for Educational Studies (ZHCES), Jawaharlal Nehru University & Honorary Director, Northern Regional Centre (ICSSR) “Other Ways of Knowing & Doing” and the Changing Disciplinary Cartography of Higher Education Ÿ

Dr. Zane Ma Rhea, Co-President, Oceania Comparative and International Education Society Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Monash University & Editor, International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives Bringing Wisdom back into Higher Education: Rebalancing the local, national and global

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Dr. Jae Park, Assistant Professor, The Education University of Hong Kong. Former President, Comparative Education Society of Hong Kong & the Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Comparative Education Development Possibility of an Asian Research Paradigm and its Problems

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Dr. Rajesh Tandon, Co-chair, The UNESCO Chair in Community Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education and Founder, Participatory Action Research in Asia (PRIA)

Discussant: Prof. R. Sudarshan, Dean, Jindal School of Government and Public Policy, O.P. Jindal Global University 12:00 pm

Tea & Workshop 1 Workshop 1: 12:00 pm -1:30 pm “Decolonizing Epistemologies and Methodologies” led by Dr. Rajesh Tandon (UNESCO-Chair in CBR) Venue: T3, Mezzanine Floor

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

LUNCH (Venue: T3, Mezzanine Floor)

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PLENARY SESSION- 2: 2:30 pm- 4:30 pm “Indigenous Epistemologies and Global Thinkers” Venue - T1, Classroom 18, 1st Floor Chair: Dr. Rohee Dasgupta, Associate Professor, Jindal School of International Affairs, O.P. Jindal Global University Speakers: Ÿ Dr. Meenakshi Thapan, Professor of Sociology, Delhi School of Economics, and Co-ordinator of the D.S. Kothari Centre for Science, Ethics and Education, University of Delhi J. Krishnamurti's Pedagogic work and Global Vision for Teacher Enrichment Ÿ

Dr. Sanjukta Dasgupta, Professor and Former Head, Department of English & Dean, Faculty of Arts, University of Calcutta. Texts of Tagore and Tagore as Text: A Framework for Diversity and Inclusion in the 21st Century

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Dr. Tamara Savelyeva, Assistant Professor, The Department of International Education and Lifelong Learning, The Education University of Hong Kong & Editorial Board Member, International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education. East meets East: An Unexpected Encounter in Sustainability Education

Discussant: Dr. Namita Ranganathan, Dean, Department of Education, Central Institute of Education, University of Delhi 4:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Evening Tea & Refreshments

PAPER SESSIONS Paper Session 1: 5:00 pm- 6:30 pm Indigenous Inequalities, Alternative Pedagogies and Indian Higher Education Venue - T1, Classroom No. 7, Ground Floor Chair & Discussant: Dr. Yugank Goyal, Associate Professor, Jindal School of Liberal Arts and Humanities and Deputy Director, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building Ÿ

Dr. Albeena Shakil, Assistant Professor, Jindal Global Law School When the Indigenous is a Stratified Terrain: Challenges of Higher Education in India

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Dr. Amithy Jasrotia, Department of Sociology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur Challenging the unequal Educational Structure and Creating the New Ways: Cases of Mahashas (SCs) of Jammu and Kashmir

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Dr. Harpreet Kaur Jass & Mr. Rameez Raja, Department of Educational Studies, Jamia Milia Islamia University Alternative Learning Pedagogy for Science Education at Higher Education

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Dr. Sayantan Mandal (Assistant Professor, Centre for Policy Research in Higher Education (CPRHE), NUEPA Improving Students by Improving Teachers: The Changing Perspectives Teaching Learning in Indian Higher education

Paper Session 2: 5:00 pm- 6:30 pm Context Matters? Debates on Philosophy, Social Psychology & Politics of Desire Venue - T1, Classroom No. 8, Ground Floor Chair & Discussant: Professor Aditya Swarup, Assistant Professor, Jindal Global Law School, O.P. Jindal Global University and Assistant Director, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building. Ÿ

Dr. Meera Subramanian, Centre for Advanced Study and Education, M.S. University, Baroda Vivekananda's Philosophy on Education: A Reflection for the Education System of Today

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Dr. Chetan Sinha, Assistant Professor, Jindal Global Law School What if Discipline is not Interdisciplinary? Case of Social Psychology in India 5


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Dr. Umesh L. Bharte, Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Psychology, University of Mumbai. Doing it an Indigenous Way: A Case of Psychology in India

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Ms. Akansha Misra, Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies; University of Washington Sex Education in Schools and the Politics of Desire: The Case of Turkey

Paper Session 3: 5:00 pm- 6:30 pm Global Governance & Local Indigenous Knowledge Production Venue - T1, Classroom No. 9, Ground Floor Chair & Discussant: Ms. Wafa Singh, India Research Coordinator, UNESCO-Chairs in CBR and social responsibility in higher education & Participatory Research in Asia Ÿ

Dr. Kokila Konasinghe, Senior Lecturer in Law, Director of International Office of University of Colombo Green Imperialism: Third World Approaches (TWAIL) to International Environmental Governance

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Ms. Bishakha Mishra & Ms. Shashi Shikha, Ambedkar University Immersive Research: Building a Perspective Towards the Process of Knowing-Doing

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Mr. Sukrit Nagpal, Senior Programme Officer, PRIA and Ms. Nilanjana Bhattacharjee, Programme Officer, PRIA Utilizing Indigenous Knowledge for Sustainable Change

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Dr. Kaustuv Kanti Bandopadhyay, Director, PRIA and Dr. Anshuman Karol, Senior Program Manager, PRIA Co-Creating Knowledge with Citizens: For Making City Development Inclusive

6:30 pm: Performance Session- Cultural Mélange Venue: T1, 220 Seater Auditorium, 1st Floor Chair: Prof. Nisha Nair, Assistant Professor, Jindal Global Law School and Fellow, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building. 6:30 pm- 6:40 pm

RUMInations- Readings from Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī Ms. Arzu Mir Ali, 2nd year Masters student in Public Policy, O.P. Jindal Global University

6:40 pm – 7:00 pm

Performance Ethnography & Cultural Heritage Dr. Navina Jafa, Fulbright scholar and Vice President- Centre for New Perspectives Traditional Knowledge Skills & Sustainable Development, New Delhi

7:00 pm- 8:00 pm

“Shakespearean Navarasa - A Journey Through Dualism” directed by Prof. Rashmi Raman and performed by JGU faculty & staff

8:00 pm

Dinner (T3 MEZZANINE FLOOR)

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Day 2: 12th December 2017 PLENARY SESSION 3: 9:00 am – 11:30 am Decolonizing Pedagogies for Equity, Inclusion and Excellence Venue: T1, Classroom 18, 1st Floor Chair: Dr. Mousumi Mukherjee, Assistant Director, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building & founding Executive Director, Centre for Comparative and Global Education Speakers: Ÿ Dr. Antonia Darder, Leavey, Presidential Endowed Chair of Ethics and Moral Leadership, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles & Professor Emerita of Education Policy Organization and Leadership at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign The Social Justice Question: A Freirean Approach to Decolonizing Pedagogy, Methodology, & Leadership in Education Today Ÿ

Dr. Nidhi S. Sabharwal, Associate Professor, Centre for Policy Research in Higher Education, National University of Educational Planning and Administration (NUEPA), New Delhi Student Diversity and Civic Learning in Higher Education in India: Thinking through Ambedkar's Perspective

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Dr. Swaleha Sindhi, Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Administration, M.S.University of Baroda, Gujarat, India & the Vice President of Indian Ocean Comparative Education Society (IOCES) Retelling the Past: Locating Rukhmabai's Resilience amid Colonial Hypocrisy and Customary Adversity

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Dr. Gauri P. Hardikar, Associate Professor, Smt. Kapila Khandvala College of Education, Mumbai, Secretary, Indian Ocean Comparative Education Society (IOCES) Savitribai Phule Progressive Pedagogic Paradigm for Women's Empowerment in India.

Discussant: Dr. Mujibur Rehman, Dr. K.R. Narayanan Centre for Dalit and Minorities Studies, Jamia Milia Islamia University, India 11:30 am: Tea Break & Workshop 2 Workshop 2: 11:30 am– 1:00 pm “Decolonizing Pedagogies” led by Dr. Antonia Darder Venue: T3, MEZZANINE FLOOR 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

LUNCH (Venue: T3 MEZZANINE FLOOR)

SPECIAL PANEL DISCUSSION: 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm “New Technology and Indigenous Knowledge for Social Change” Venue: T1, Classroom 18, 1st Floor Chair: Prof. Nisha Nair, Assistant Professor, Jindal Global Law School and Fellow, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building Discussants: Ÿ Dr. T.M.Sakunthala Yatigammana Ekanayake, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka & Vice President, Indian Ocean Comparative Education Society (IOCES). Ÿ

Dr. Niladri R. Chatterjee, Fulbright Scholar, Charles Wallace Fellow & Professor, Kalyani University, India.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Evening Tea & Refreshments

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Valedictory Session: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm “Learning from Indigenous Intellectuals of the Global South” Venue: T1, Classroom 18, 1st Floor Chair: Prof. Rajeev Malhotra, Professor, Jindal School of Government and Public Policy, O.P. Jindal Global University Speakers: Ÿ Dr. Ratna Ghosh, James McGill, Professor and William C. Macdonald Professor of Education, McGill University Montreal, Canada & Special Projects Standing Committee Member, World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES). Juxtaposing the Educational Ideas of Gandhi and Freire Ÿ

Dr. S. Irfan Habib, Professor, National University for Educational Planning and Administration (NUEPA), New Delhi. Remembering the Pioneers: Educational Ideas of Maulana Abul Kalam Azad and Dr. Zakir Husain

Discussant: Dr. Rekha Datta, Professor, Political Science at Monmouth University, USA and 2017 FulbrightNehru Senior Research Scholar, India 5:30 pm – 5: 40 pm

Vote of Thanks Dr. Mousumi Mukherjee, Assistant Director, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building & founding Executive Director, Centre for Comparative and Global Education

5:40 pm – 6:00 pm

Closing Remarks & Certificate distribution to participants Professor (Dr.) Y.S.R. Murthy, Registrar, JGU and Senior Fellow, International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building

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Plenary Abstracts INTRODUCTORY PLENARY SESSION - 1: 9:30 am- 12:00 pm “Theorizing from the Global South and Indigenous Knowledge Production” Other Ways of Knowing and Doing' and the Changing Disciplinary Cartography of Higher Education Prof. Dhruv Raina (Jawaharlal Nehru University, India) For the last two decades institutions of higher education and research have been subject to a gradual structural transformation, a transformation that is not merely an organizational one, but is inseparable from a deeper transformation in scientific practices and the associated epistemology. This rearrangement has generated challenges as the sciences and social sciences separately and conjointly engage with `other ways of knowing'. The engagement with the other ways of knowing requires not merely a contextualization of its different meanings –as what constitutes them varies with cultural and national contexts. In the light of the above, in this presentation the author reflects on the relationship between the globalization of the social sciences after the Gulbenkian Commission Report on the one hand, and UNESCO 2035 vision document, and what this would mean for the future. Bringing Wisdom back into Higher Education: Rebalancing the Local, National and Global Prof. Zane Ma Rhea (Monash University, Australia) This paper first provides a background and context to the study of the cultivation of wisdom as a pedagogical pathway. Professor Ma Rhea will argue that the powerful influence of the current Western educational model across the planet has meant not only that the wisdom tradition has been forgotten and written out of the core business of education in Westernized nations; her research has found that wisdom traditions are also under threat in other cultural and religious systems. Accordingly, this paper will then examine wisdom in the context of the 'local', and discuss its various manifestations and tensions; then consider the 'national' and its wisdom ancestry; and then move to consideration of the 'global' within the modern university. In her conclusion, she will argue for an approach to the task of finding balance between the local, national, and global within the modern university to build its capacity to cultivate wisdom as a manifestation of 'higher' education. Possibility of an Asian Research Paradigm and its Problems Dr. Jae Park (The Education University of Hong Kong) In this presentation, Dr. Park shall first invite the conferees to self-reflection. To be open and candid, most of us academics, scientists and researchers in education in Asia have received a great part of our scientific knowledge and research training in and under Western institutions, models and paradigms. Thus, even the most nationalistic, anti-colonial and self-declared 'truly Asian' researchers are usually unable to get rid of the West-born research methods and interpretive frameworks. Is there any totally Asian research method that is most fitting and plausible to our Asian context? The author thinks there are ways in which Asian researchers can make claims without making use of Western scientific paradigms and techniques. This presentation will discusses rather loosely and informally some of these non-empirical methods in order to explore Asian realties with an Asian outlook. Humanities, with its branches such as poetry, essays, logics, axiology, hermeneutics and philosophy, seem to be a possible alternative. Dr. Park will showcase the works by the Taiwanese scholar Chen Kuan-Hsing and his main suggestion that Asia itself can be a method and, through this lens, Asians should be able to understand themselves and the reality 'out there', including the West, without recourse to Western paradigms.

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Participatory Action Research in Asia Dr. Rajesh Tandon (Co-chair, The UNESCO Chair in Community Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education) Western cannons of science and its methodological tools were created only 550 years ago on the premise of instrumental rationality, with a view to control nature and humans. Theory and empirical reality thus remained a cognitive exercise, largely based on conceptual frameworks of the then 'modernising' Europe. Over the next two centuries, other forms of knowledge systems were decimated by the conquest of the East & West. Two modes of knowledge production---from daily lived experiences and from the affective imagination of arts, music dance forms--- were delegitimised in this conquest. Indigenous systems of knowledge production continued 'under the radar' as a means of everyday survival and resistance. Subaltern traditions of knowledge—Nanak, Kabir, to name a few—have long been a part of anti-Brahmanical control over knowledge production and dissemination. In the contemporary context of growth of higher education and push towards knowledge economy, questions about cognitive justice and knowledge democracy need to be raised—in classrooms, research funding councils & academic fraternity.

PLENARY SESSION- 2: 2:30 pm- 4:30 pm “Indigenous Epistemologies and Global Thinkers” J. Krishnamurti's Pedagogic Work and Global Vision for Teacher Enrichment Prof. Meenakshi Thapan (Delhi University, India) The school teacher is a marginalized subject who has no agency in either framing the curriculum, in the transaction or pacing of knowledge, or indeed over the content or pace of teaching. Teacher enrichment, or training, must therefore encompass much more than the development of mere efficiency of skills. There is a need to cultivate deeper aspects of self-inquiry, empathy, and insights into transformative capacities of thinking in new ways. These will give agency to the teacher to enact her role with confidence and intelligence. The presentation provides a brief critique of existing ways in which the school teacher has been imagined in the policy discourse in India and the consequent diminished role of the teacher. The presentation will focus on J. Krishnamurti's contribution to teacher education and on the online audio-visual learning programme for elementary school teachers being developed by the Rishi Valley Institute for Educational Resources (RIVER), run by the Krishnamurti Foundation (India). This programme seeks to incorporate universal ethics, values and a deep affection for children with diverse capabilities through the education of the primary resource: the school teacher. The idea is to empower the teacher with faith in her abilities to work with young children and nurture her development with the necessary tools and skills for a creative and sympathetic role in the educational space. Texts of Tagore and Tagore as Text: A Framework for Diversity and Inclusion in the 21st Century Prof. Sanjukta Dasgupta (Calcutta University, India) Rabindranath Tagore's ideas and activities still offer a crucial standpoint for thinking beyond the constraints of nationalisms. In the study of Tagore's literary and educational work it is possible to track how artistic practice, analytical thought and educational institutions can be linked to move us beyond nationalisms, creating space to rethink and even to disrupt the increasingly powerful homology in which home, family, language and nation have come to stand for each other. The central argument of this paper is that in Tagore's work we find a radical effort to think beyond nationalist and gendered ideologies, to create a truly international but at the same time local field of practice through holistic education and democratic approaches. Tagore clearly outlined that local Bengali cultures, agricultural practices, and international artistic and ecumenical educational practices should be understood as fundamentally interconnected, offering an alternative to real-politick, rote learning, and utilitarian moral reasoning. 10


Such an alternative, gestures towards a rethinking of gender, family and nation. In the early twentieth century, Tagore had provided a blueprint for holistic education while he interrogated fragmented knowledge. Tagore's overt agenda regarding an alternative education system can thus be used to formulate interdisciplinary studies, cross-cultural studies, transdisciplinary studies, intersectionality studies, and critical diversity studies, leading to an inclusive approach enabling fortification of knowledge systems often disturbed by systemic fissures and ruptures. East meets East: An Unexpected Encounter in Sustainability Education Dr. Tamara Savelyeva (Education University of Hong Kong) Despite its firm roots in different philosophical traditions, an internationally accepted educational policy of sustainability education has made very little progress in bridging the classic ontological divides between North-South or West-East. And yet, examples of philosophical inquiry into the crucial question of the relationship between humans and Nature can already be found in Asian and Eurasian thought, centuries before the birth of the sustainability concept. Vladimir Vernadsky of Russia and Yulgok of Korea are two influential figures who articulated principles of sustainability within their respective Eurasian and NeoConfucian philosophical traditions. Vernadskian ideas of “noosphere” and Yulgok's “cosmo-anthropic philosophy” have been guiding ecological discourses and educational policies in their respective geographical regions until now. This presentation aims to discuss ways in which these philosophies behind the East-East engagement can be developed in order to enrich international policies and nurture sustainably-minded persons.

PLENARY SESSION 3: 9:00 am – 11:30 am Decolonizing Pedagogies for Equity, Inclusion and Excellence The Social Justice Question: A Freirean Approach to Decolonizing Pedagogy, Methodology, & Leadership in Education Today Prof. Antonia Darder (Loyola Marymount University, USA) There is much talk internationally about providing socially just education within subaltern communities. Yet, often the practices within educational institutions perpetuate the coloniality of power and structures of inequality that fail to support decolonizing pedagogical practices. This presentation draws on the work of Brazilian philosopher and author of Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Paulo Freire, to consider a set of personal and political principles that can assist us to enact educational leadership approaches founded on an ethics of liberation that can promote cognitive justice and community empowerment. Student Diversity and Civic Learning in Higher Education in India: Thinking through Ambedkar's Perspective Dr. Nidhi S. Sabharwal (Centre for Policy Research in Higher Education, NUEPA, India) Dr Ambedkar emphasized that education cultivates democracy in society, strengthens the roots of democracy and brings about social transformation. Social transformation includes a way of life that will promote liberty, equality, and fraternity, Dr. Ambedkar's 'key elements of an ideal society'. This presentation will discuss the implications of emerging evidence on peer-group formation around identities, and issues of discrimination associated with caste, gender, and race on higher education campuses for achieving an ideal society, in the context of increasing student diversity. It will emphasize the important role of a 'civic-learning approach' to education, which means an active engagement with values of liberty, equality and fraternity.

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Retelling the Past: Locating Rukhmabai's Resilience amid Colonial Hypocrisy and Customary Adversity Dr. Swaleha Sindhi (M.S. University, Baroda) Women's status in India has traditionally been low, and Indian women are inheritors of a very complex pattern of social models and cultural ideals. Backed up by religious texts, which insist upon their inferiority and subjugation, women have been depicted as socially and legally subordinate to men. As such, women have been subjected to many forms of oppression. In order to evaluate the position of women in India today, it is therefore necessary to look at some of the fundamental historical changes that shaped the way women were seen in India. In this paper, Dr. Swaleha Sindhi will examine the issue of child marriage and women's access to education in India. By drawing on existing literature on women reformists, the paper also outlines the struggle of one such reformist: Dr. Rukmabai Raut. Savitribai Phule Progressive Pedagogic Paradigm for Women's Empowerment in India Dr. Gauri P. Hardikar (Smt. Kapila Khandvala College of Education, Mumbai) In contrast to India's glorious heritage of according equal status to men and women as well as equal educational opportunity, nineteenth century India was reeling under the impact of colonization on two fronts. The British imperialism firstly led to economic exploitation and repression, while at the same time the patriarchal nature of the Indian society in the nineteenth century, coupled with a harsh and discriminating caste system, led to the deprivation and exploitation of women and people belonging to lower castes. Against this socio-cultural backdrop, Savitribai Phule revolutionized the traditional gender roles by becoming the first woman teacher of modern India, and starting a school for girls in a time when women and the lower castes were barred from seeking education. In the face of rigorous opposition, Savitribai Phule pioneered a movement of social transformation through education. However, in popular literature, she is portrayed mainly as Jyotirao Phule's wife. Thereby her individual contribution to equity and access to education is side-lined. This talk highlights Savitribai Phule's drive to challenge the social and economic power dynamics by empowering the oppressed through education. It explores her progressive pedagogical paradigm for education responsive to the felt needs, aimed to uplift through broadening of outlook and envisioned for practical application.

SPECIAL PANEL DISCUSSION: 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm “New Technology and Indigenous Knowledge for Social Change” Chair: Prof. Nisha Nair ( O.P. Jindal Global University) Discussants: Dr. T.M.Sakunthala Yatigammana Ekanayake (University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka) Dr. Niladri R. Chatterjee (Fulbright Scholar & Professor, Kalyani University, India) Technological innovation has altered education profoundly over the last decades. Now that distant learning, digital learning environments, and the advent of virtual reality promise even greater change for the future, it behooves us to reflect on the possibilities this offers for educational reformers and activists for social change at large. How might we concretely make use of these opportunities to provide education that is most suited for local learning, and how can the synthesis of this techno-pedagogical innovation be used to promote social change by improving student equality and overall access to education? In this panel discussion Dr. T.M. Sakunthala will share findings from a number of empirical case studies carried out in Sri Lanka about the ways in which new technology facilitates more collaborative way for students to learn as active participants in their own learning and foster transferable skills. Further, students obtain self-confidence to do things and they are empowered to plan their own activities. This creates a real shift in their status within the classroom and they leave the school with more confidence to face the challengers in the society. 12


Dr. Niladri Chatterjee will discuss how social media and handheld devices such as smartphones can be deployed to encourage discussion of gender/sexuality issues outside of the physical constraints of the classroom. Through his pedagogic practice as a University Professor in India, he seeks to understand how students normally reticent in the class find the virtual space enabling enough to post questions and queries that would otherwise remain unasked.

Workshop Sessions Day 1- 12:00 pm -1:30 pm Workshop 1: “Decolonizing Epistemologies and Methodologies” led by Dr. Rajesh Tandon (UNESCO-Chairs in CBR) & Ms. Wafa Singh (PRIA) The first workshop will focus on the way classical Western epistemological structures and methodologies still dominate and shape ideas and determine the questions that are asked around the world, and, subsequently, how this mental yoke can be discarded and replaced by more relevant (local) alternatives. This being easier said than done, main questions to be discussed concern the way such a paradigm change can take shape, and what could be the benefits of attempts to de-colonize our thinking.

Day 2- 11:30 am-1:00 pm Workshop 2: “Decolonizing Pedagogies” led by Dr. Antonia Darder & Dr. Mousumi Mukherjee (T3, MEZZANINE FLOOR) Building on the theoretical foundations that were provided in the previous plenary sessions, this workshop will provide the opportunity to discuss and debate the ways in which this can and should be done. Apart from asking the straightforward question how decolonization can be achieved, it is important to discuss to what extent decolonizing pedagogies can help to build more participatory methodology and foster equity, inclusion and excellence.

Paper Sessions Day 1 - 5:00 pm- 6:30 pm Paper Session 1 – Indigenous Inequalities, Alternative Pedagogies and Indian Higher Education Focussing on specific cases, these papers will try to shed light on the question- how the practise of teaching can be improved by using alternative pedagogies in a context of indigenous inequalities, as it exists in India ? Chair & Discussant: Prof. Yugank Goyal (O.P. Jindal Global University) Ÿ

When the Indigenous is a Stratified Terrain: Challenges of Higher Education in India Dr. Albeena Shakil, Assistant Professor of English, Jindal Global Law School, JGU This paper will discuss some challenges that higher education in India faces by covering a few notable recent developments. Ultimately, it will argue for a more participative rebuilding of the archive of knowledge and epistemology at all levels in higher education.

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Challenging the unequal Educational Structure and Creating the new Ways: Cases of Mahashas (SCs) of Jammu and Kashmir Amithy Jasrotia, Assistant Professor Department of Sociology, University of Rajasthan This paper explores how education changes, and in turn changes its respective society, by looking into the way Mahashas in Jammu and Kashmir have gained access to education, and how this has impacted their community.

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Alternative Learning Pedagogy for Science Education at Higher Education Dr. Harpreet Kaur Jass and Mr. Rameez Raja, Department of Educational Studies, Faculty of Education, Jamia Millia Islamia This paper explores the prospect of alternative pedagogical strategies for scientific education. It shares the features of classroom interactions and how the view of science education has been changing for prospective teachers.

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Improving Students by Improving Teachers: the changing perspectives teaching learning in Indian Higher Education Dr. Sayantan Mandal, Assistant Professor Centre for Policy Research in Higher Education, National University of Educational Planning and Administration Delhi In this paper the process of teaching learning and the on-going changes of learners, teachers, and institutions, is discussed. On the basis of empirical evidence, it argues that teaching learning in a large section of Indian higher educational institutions is largely traditional and not effective since it fails to evolve with changing demand, and cannot respond to changing learners. To improve the situation, this paper argues for the importance of investments in effective training of teachers.

Paper session 2 – Context Matters? Debates on Philosophy, Social Psychology & Politics of Desire Does context matter in debates on philosophy, social psychology and the politics of desire? The papers in this panel will throw open this important question for debate. Chair & Discussant: Prof. Aditya Swarup (O.P. Jindal Global University) Ÿ

Vivekananda's Philosophy on Education: A Reflection for the Education System of Today Dr. Meera Subramanian, Centre of Advanced Study in Education (CASE), M.S. University, Baroda In this paper the educational philosophy of Swami Vivekananda's will be introduced. For him education means the process by which character is formed, strength of mind is increased and intellect is sharpened, as a result of which one can stand on one's own feet. Swami Vivekananda stressed education for democracy and national development. The author goes on to show the relevance of these views for India's contemporary education system.

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What if Discipline is not Interdisciplinary? Case of Social Psychology in India Dr. Chetan Sinha, Jindal Global Law School, JGU This paper will highlight the missing picture of interdisciplinarity in the historical journey of social psychology in India from a critical cultural perspective. It will make its arguments through the integrating perspectives of Joe Kincheloe, John Ogbu and Henry Tajfel, comprising the role of group behaviour in a cultural context. In India, social psychologists' tried to inculcate the missing picture of 'indigenous perspective' from the cultural vantage point. The idea of this article is to explain the problem with claimed indigenous status without critically handling the history of religion, gender and caste. 14


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Doing it an Indigenous Way: A Case of Psychology in India Dr. Umesh L. Bharte, Department of Applied Psychology, University of Mumbai The postcolonial critique of psychology has resulted in serious rethinking of Western or Eurocentric systems of knowledge, and paved the way for “other ways” of appreciating the human psyche. Building on the available literature, in this paper the author deliberates upon different aspects of indigenisation of psychological knowledge in India. After discussing some specific pitfalls of doing psychology in an indigenous way, this paper ends with some reflection on the way we might advance into the future.

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Sex Education in Schools and the Politics of Desire: The Case of Turkey Ms. Akansha Misra, Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies; University of Washington This paper is based on ethnography of sex education classes in a leading private school in Istanbul, Turkey. These programs run by civil society organizations, international development initiatives and national governments, teach certain understandings of gender and sexuality that are direct consequences of modernization frameworks, Northern aid, and feminist politics in (inter)national development. Whilst these understandings have undoubtedly been useful in changing limited perceptions of human bodies and sexual relationships, they have focused overwhelmingly on the body as a site of biological and sexual needs and realities detached from larger histories, nationalisms and regional dynamics like ethnicity, religion, and class that fundamentally constitute them. This paper is a part of a larger South-South project comparing sex education and bodily regulation in schools in India and Turkey.

Paper session 3 Global Governance & Indigenous Knowledge Production This session will focus on issues related to global governance by organizations, such as UN agencies and the EU and their growing interest in indigenous modes of enquiry and co-creation of knowledge with members of indigenous societies for sustainable change and more inclusive development. Chair & Discussant: Ms. Wafa Singh (Participatory Research in Asia & India Research Coordinator, UNESO-Chairs in CBR and Social Responsibility in Higher Education) Ÿ

Green Imperialism: Third World Approaches (TWAIL) to International Environmental Governance Dr. Kokila Konasinghe, Centre of Advanced Study in Education, Faculty of Education and Psychology, Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda This paper presents a critical reflection on the North-South polarization of environmental law making. It contains an analysis of the operations of two of the most important environmental institutions responsible for managing global environmental issue – the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) and Global Environment Facility (GEF), which, operating under the United Nations and the World Bank respectively, play essential roles in the interaction between North and South.

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Immersive Research: Building a Perspective Towards the Process of Knowing-Doing Ms. Bishakha Mishra & Ms. Shashi Shikha, Ambedkar University To truly understand community, especially adivasi communities one needs to indulge deeper and interact with how a community knows and does itself into being. A community becomes a verb which is changing dimensions. What is interesting is that the adivasi communities have an epistemic order that is different from the western modern models, in that they carve a different relationship between knowing and doing? 15


This paper on immersion tries to understand the tension between knowing and doing in emergent social science research. The experiences of action research in Gumla, Jharkhand, set in the context of the 'third world' adivasi lifeworld from which it is inspired, explain how this method of learning from the adivasi life-world could enable deeper explorations of the reality within which developmental work takes place. Ÿ

Utilising Indigenous Knowledge for Sustainable Change Mr. Sukrit Nagpal and Ms. Nilanjana Bhattacharjee, Senior Programme Officer and Programme Officer at Participatory Research in Asia This paper reflects on questions that follow in the wake of recent developments in the discourse on urban development. It does so through engagement with a European Union (EU) sponsored project implemented by Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA), which focuses on strengthening the civil society of the urban poor, and tries to empower them through the mobilisation of resources. The project is ongoing in the informal settlements of three Indian cities: Ajmer, Muzaffarpur, and Jhansi, and focusses on the role of local community knowledge.

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Co-creating Knowledge with Citizens for Making City Development Inclusive Dr. Kaustuv Kanti Bandyopadhyay and Dr. Anshuman Karol, Director and Senior Programme Manager in Participatory Research in Asia This paper presents an empirical model of citizen-centric and citizen-led methods to harvest data, produce collective analysis and actionable knowledge, and gather evidence to support bottom up city planning. It argues that if technology can be demystified and used in bottom-up data gathering, and if citizens can be capacitated to engage in collective analysis, reliable and inclusive knowledge can be produced.

Performance Sessions- Cultural Mélange Day 1, 6:30 pm- 8pm Chair: Prof. Nisha Nair (O.P. Jindal Global University)

“RUMInations”- Readings from Rumi by Ms. Arzu Mir Ali, 2nd year Masters in Public Policy Student, O.P. Jindal Global University

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“Performance Ethnography & Cultural Heritage” by Dr. Navina Jafa, Fulbright scholar and Vice President, Centre for New Perspectives Traditional Knowledge Skills & Sustainable Development, New Delhi

Performance ethnography takes as its working premise that a theatrical representation of what one discovers through participant-observation fieldwork provides a vibrant and textured rendering of cultural others. Performance for the performance ethnographer is typically understood as an aesthetic act within a theatrical tradition. In western cultures this artistic endeavour calls upon actors through their use of presentational skills to evoke others for the consideration of audiences. Not to be confused with the ethnography of performance, which examines cultural performances as objects of investigation, performance ethnography relies upon the embodiment of cultural others. As such, it is a method of inquiry that privileges the body as a site of knowing. This method of inquiry is a close cousin to standard ethnographic practices. In fact, performance ethnographers deploy the same methodological strategies available to all ethnographers in their fieldwork. What marks the performance ethnographer as distinct, however, is their mode of representation. In-print representations of others based upon observation or even full participation in cultural practices is insufficient for the performance ethnographer. Instead, they strive to represent their cultural findings through the enactment of cultural “others”. By doing so, they believe they add flesh to the dry bones of the traditional ethnographic. Through this performance ethnography, Dr. Navina Jafa will actually depict diverse Indian cultural heritage, rather than cultural “others”.

“Shakespearean Navarasa A journey through dualism” directed and performed by JGU Faculty and students

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The central idea behind this production is to embrace diversity to create harmony. Art and expression know no boundaries - they are creatures of one's mind, which is infinite, boundless. Art explores the relationship between the finite and the infinite. The quest spans literature, music, dance and poetry - a quest to plumb the texture of this relationship. Using poetry from the classical 500 BCE text Natya Shastra, we present, Navarasa or the nine dominant houses of emotion observed to inhabit in life forms. To illustrate each of these rasas, we choose nine characters from a relatively more contemporary source, the works of 16th century playwright Shakespeare. We set this to different kinds of music and hope to create a syncretic narrative that becomes a simulacrum of the central theses of dualism. The Rasa theory of Natya Shastra places the Self at the core of realising a path within in order to understand the Universe. The dualism of the conscious self and the unconscious awakening of that self into its own centre, where it begins a journey both profoundly inward as well as outward is the realisation of Advaita or indivisibility of the self and its supreme force. In many ways, this effort is also an exploration of our own capacity for finding the harmony within disjointed art forms which, if synthesized, flow as one stream of consciousness. Our effort is not therefore to showcase one or another form of artistic expression, but to bring a chaotic explosion of talent and invite you to seek its core. And in doing so, to awaken to your own.

Day 2: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm Valedictory Session: “Learning from Indigenous Intellectuals of the Global South” Ÿ

Juxtaposing the Educational Ideas of Gandhi and Freire Prof. Ratna Ghosh (McGill University, Canada) Gandhi and Freire were two of the greatest thinkers of the 20th century: Gandhi known for his nonviolent resistance to colonial rule and Freire for education and the politics of liberation. Less known is Gandhi's interest and work in education. Both Freire and Gandhi brought a message of hope for oppressed people. Both developed educational models which would liberate the minds of people. But scholars have noted the great contradictions that existed simultaneously in their ideologies. Yet, these contradictions and “blind spots” should not eclipse their transformational visions because they were both undoubtedly paradigm shifters. This talk will begin by looking at commonalities in their lives and thinking, the intellectual roots of the main ideas developed by Gandhi and Freire, then go on to compare their educational philosophies, and discuss their main contributions to education that aimed to end injustice and oppression.

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Remembering the Pioneers: Educational Ideas of Maulana Abul Kalam Azad and Dr. Zakir Husain Prof. S. Irfan Habib (National University of Educational Planning and Administration) Our education system, from primary to higher education, is confronted with serious questions. Some of them are a legacy of the colonial past, which we failed to shake off while many cropped up due to policy failures over the past seven decades. There were several key players who got involved in devising a national education system for the newly independent India. The traditional education network was replaced by the colonial one, which attempted to open up the closed system to some extent. However, the colonial engagements added new complexities, making education even more enclaved, undemocratic and inaccessible for all. The primary task for the nationalist Indian thinkers on education as well as political leaders was to cope with these fundamental lapses. We also need to keep in mind that most of these key players began thinking about education even before independence. Dr Zakir Husain and Maulana Azad are among the few early thinkers who grappled with educational matters from the 1920s onwards. While the former was a university trained academic from Berlin, Azad, on the other hand taught himself everything from religion, philosophy and music to art and aesthetics. This paper will attempt to briefly discuss the contribution of Zakir Husain since his involvement by Gandhi in formulating the Basic Education and also of Maulana Azad as the first minister of education for independent India.

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Plenary Speakers Bios Dr. Dhruv Raina is a Professor of History of Science Education at the Zakir Husain Centre for Educational Studies (ZHCES), Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. He is a leading Philosopher and Historian of Science from India. He is best known for his work on domestication of science in colonial India, transnational intellectual networks of science and historiographies of science. He had been a scientist at the National Institute of Science, Technology and Development Studies (NISTADS), New Delhi. He was the first Heinrich Zimmer Chair for Indian Philosophy and Intellectual History at Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany. His recent publications include Needham's Indian Network: The Search for a Home for the History of a Science in India (Yoda Press, 2015), Domesticating Modern Science: A Social History of Science and Culture in Colonial India (Co-edited with Irfan Habib, Tulika Books, 2004), Images and Contexts: Studies in the Historiography of Science in India (Oxford University Press, 2003; 2nd Edition, 2010). He completed his doctoral studies in Philosophy of Science from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Dr. Zane Ma Rhea is an Associate Professor in the faculty of education in the Monash University. Her research theorizes cross-cultural understandings of the cultivation of wisdom and examines how higher education a nd schooling are harming or supporting the sustainable education of wise, global citizens. Her teaching, supervision, and research spans organisational development, leadership development, professional skills development in mainstream service provision to Indigenous peoples, and theorising knowledge exchanges within complex, postcolonial democratic states. Her most recent publication is Leading and Managing Indigenous Education in the Postcolonial World (Routledge 2014). She is also Editor of the OCIES flagship journal International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives published from the University of Sydney, Australia. Dr. Rajesh Tandon is the Founder of Society for Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA), a voluntary organization that provides support to grassroots initiatives in South Asia. He remains the organisation's chief official. He is the UNESCO Co-Chair on Community Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education, 20122016, renewed for second term 2016-2020. He also serves as chairperson of the Global Alliance on Community-Engaged Research (GACER) network, which facilitates the sharing of knowledge and information worldwide to further community-based research. He has authored/co-authored several books, including Community University Research Partnerships: A Global Perspective (2015), Global Governance, Civil Society and Participatory Democracy: A View from Below (2014); Civil Society and Governance (2003), Reviving Democracy (2003), and Voluntary Action, Civil Society and the State (2002); and co-edited Higher Education and CommunityBased Research: Creating a Global Vision (2014), Globalising Citizens: New Dynamics of Inclusion and Exclusion (2010), Participatory Citizenship: Identity, Exclusion, Inclusion (2006) and Participatory Research: Revisiting the Roots(2002). Dr. Namita Ranganathan is the Dean and Professor at the Department of Education, Central Institute of Education, University of Delhi. She has over thirty years of teaching experience in teacher education programmes. Her specialisations are in the area of developmental psychology, personality psychology and education for mental health. She has been extensively engaged with schools across India through various projects with The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), CARE India, Aga Khan Foundation and Save the Children, among others. She has also been on several management bodies of Kendriya Vidyalayas and several private schools. She is the co-editor (with Toolika Wadhwa) of Guidance and Counselling for Children and Adolescents in Schools (July 2017). 19


Dr. Meenakshi Thapan is Professor of Sociology at the Delhi School of Economics and coordinator of the D.S. Kothari Centre for Science, Ethics and Education at the University of Delhi. She has been coordinator of the European Studies Programme (funded by the European Union, 2010-2011), University of Delhi. Since 2012, she is also a Trustee of the Krishnamurti Foundation (India). Meenakshi's work in the field of education has focused on schools and schooling processes in India and in Vancouver and Paris. Her first book was Life at School: An Ethnographic Study (Oxford University Press, 1991, secon d edition, 2006) and the most recent are Education and Society: Themes, Perspectives, Practices (ed.) (Oxford University Press, 2015), Ethnographies of Schooling in Contemporary India (ed.) (SAGE, 2014), Living the Body: Embodiment, Womanhood and Identity in Contemporary India. (SAGE, 2009) and Contested Spaces: Citizenship and Belonging in Contemporary Times (ed.) (Orient Blackswan, 2010). She is also editor of a Series on the Sociology and Social Anthropology of Education in South Asia (SAGE 2015-2017) and of a five volume series on Women and Migration in Asia (SAGE, 20052008). A new Series on Education and Society is underway with Oxford University Press (2018-2022). Dr. Sanjukta Dasgupta is a Professor and Former Head, Department of English and currently Dean, Faculty of Arts, University of Calcutta. She is a critic, translator, and a poet. Her awards and grants include the British Council Charles Wallace Scholar grant, Fulbright Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Associate Fellow at Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla, etc. She participated in the first Writers' and Literary Translators' International Congress (WALTIC) at Stockholm and also served as Chairperson for the Commonwealth Writers Prize (Eurasia region), organized by the Commonwealth Foundation, UK. Professor Dasgupta is the Managing Editor of FAMILIES: A Journal of Representations and Assistant Editor of Journal of Women's Studies, Calcutta University. Her published books are The Novels of Huxley and Hemingway: A Study in Two Planes of Reality; Responses: Selected Essays; Snapshots (poetry), Dilemma (poetry), First Language (poetry), More Light (poetry), Her Stories (translations), Manimahesh (translation), The Indian Family in Transition (co-edited SAGE), Media, Gender and Popular Culture in India: Tracking Change and Continuity ( lead author, SAGE, 2011). Dr. Rekha Datta is Professor of Political Science at Monmouth University in New Jersey. Dr. Datta is a 2017-18 Fulbright Scholar, and will be serving as a visiting professor and researcher based at O.P. Jindal Global University in India under the Fulbright-Nehru Award for Academic and Professional Excellence in Teaching and Research. She is the author of Why Alliances Endure: The United States-Pakistan Military Alliance, 1954-1971 (1994), Beyond Realism: Human Security in India and Pakistan in the 21st Century, (2008, 2010), and co-editor, with Judith Kornberg, of Women in Developing Countries: Assessing Strategies for Empowerment (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2002). Her scholarly interests cover foreign policy analysis, domestic politics and foreign relations in South Asia, gender and development, gender-based violence, child labor, and human security. Her work has appeared in 10 books and in numerous journal articles, conference proceedings, and print media. Currently she is working on a book on Contemporary India (under contract). Her work received national recognition in 2011 with the Outstanding Leader in Experiential Learning Award from the National Society for Experiential Learning (NSSE). She received the Global Visionary Award (2012) and Distinguished Teacher Award (2003) from Monmouth University, and the Humanitarian of the Year Award from the Jersey Shore chapter of the National Conference for Community and Justice (2004). In 2005-06, she served as a Member of the Higher Education Transition Team for the Governor of New Jersey. Currently, she serves on the Committee on the Status of Representation and Diversity of the International Studies Association and is an affiliated faculty of the South Asia Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Datta founded the Institute for Global Understanding at Monmouth University and facilitated partnerships with the United NationsDPI (NGO), the United Nations Academic Impact, and a mentorship program with Asbury Park High School in New Jersey. She serves on the Board of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth and Middlesex Counties, New Jersey, and was formerly on the county Board of the American Association for University Women (AAUW). In 2013, she founded Women and Girls' Education (WAGE) International, a New Jersey based not for profit organization providing educational support for marginalized women and girls. 20


Dr. Antonia Darder is a distinguished international Freirian scholar. She is a public intellectual, educator, writer, activist, and artist. She holds the Leavey Presidential Endowed Chair of Ethics and Moral Leadership at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, holds a Distinguished Visiting Faculty post at the University of Johannesburg, and is Professor Emerita of Education Policy, Organization, and Leadership at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. Antonia is an American Educational Research Association Fellow and is the recipient of the 2016 Paulo Freire Social Justice Award and received the 2017 Scholar of Color Lifetime Contribution Award from the American Educational Research Association. She has worked tirelessly for more than three decades to fiercely counter social and material inequalities at work in schools and communities. Antonia is the author of numerous books and articles in the field, including Culture and Power in the Classroom (20th Anniversary edition), Reinventing Paulo Freire: A Pedagogy of Love, A Dissident Voice: Essays on Culture, Pedagogy, and Power, Freire and Education, and the forthcoming, The Student Guide to Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed. She is also co-author of After Race: Racism After Multiculturalism and co-editor of The Critical Pedagogy Reader, Latinos and Education: A Critical Reader, and the International Critical Pedagogy Reader, which was awarded the 2015 Alpha Sigma Nu Book Award. Through the passion of her written and spoken word and the simple beauty of her art, her work has travelled around the world, consistently calling for economic justice, human rights, and cultural democracy for all people. In 2015, Antonia was nominated for the prestigious Brock International Prize in Education. Dr. Nidhi S. Sabharwal is an Associate Professor, Centre for Policy Research in Higher Education, National University of Educational Planning and Administration (NUEPA), New Delhi. She has previously served as the Director, Indian Institute of Dalit Studies (IIDS), New Delhi. She has a PhD in geography from Jawaharlal Nehru University, and has worked on inter-group inequalities across human development indicators, focusing on the role of caste- and gender-based discrimination in market and non-market institutions; diversity and discrimination within higher educational institutions, Mid-Day Meal and Anganwadi programs and social protection policies. She has published books and articles related to equity and discrimination and presented papers at international conferences. Her current research focuses on access and equity in Higher Education. Dr. Swaleha Sindhi currently teaches at the Department of Educational Administration, in The M.S. University of Baroda, Gujarat, India, she has a long Teaching and Administration experience in School Education and has received the Best Teacher Award in the year 2007 for Excellence in Teaching. Her doctorate is in the area of Quality Assurance Systems in Secondary Schools. Her current research follows two core themes: Quality Assurance in Education and Policies in Secondary Schools besides other areas like Comparative and International Education, Girls Education, Educational Management and Economics of Education. Dr. Sindhi has also been writing columns on education theme in newspapers and journals and has more than thirty two research articles to her credit. She is the Vice President of Indian Ocean Comparative Education Society (IOCES) and a Life Member of Comparative Education Society of India (CESI).

Dr. Gauri Hardikar presently works as a teacher educator in Mumbai, India. She has been working as a teacher educator for the past 16 years. She teaches Psychology, Mathematics method and Inclusive Education. Her doctoral thesis is in the area of development of life skills training modules for teachers. Dr. Hardikar is a certified life skills trainer, and is passionate about propagation of life skills education. Facilitation of workshops on topics like well-being, self-management, conflict resolution, development education and progressive pedagogy are her forte. She has been invited to facilitate workshops on these topics in India and abroad. As a clinical psychologist, Dr. Hardikar is trained in therapies like Mindfulness Based Therapy, Reality Therapy and REBT. She is a certified NLP Master Practitioner. Her research interests include life skills education, well-being, positive psychology, mindfulness, self-compassion and andragogy. She is the Secretary of Indian Ocean Comparative Education Society (IOCES). 21


Dr. Mujibur Rehman is an Assistant Professor at the Centre for the Study of Social Exclusion and Inclusive Policies (CSSEI) at the Jamia Millia Islamia, (Central University). He is primarily a political scientist engaged in inter-disciplinary research. His major areas of interest include: identity politics, development politics, and politics of Islamic world. He has recently published an edited volume titled, Communalism In Post- Colonial India: Changing Contours (Routledge 2016). The book is reviewed in the Hindustan Times, The Tribune, The Friday Times (Pakistan) and several other places. The manuscript of his forthcoming book on, Election 2014, is under review by a major University Press. He is currently working on two major book length monographs: one is on Indian Muslim question; and the other is on anti- Christian violence in India. Dr. Sakunthala Yatigammana Ekanayake received her PhD from the Graduate School of Education, The University of Bristol, UK in 2011. She was conferred upon with a scholarship for the STELLAR Doctoral Consortium Workshop, GarmischPartenkirchen, Germany during 2-3 December, 2009. She was also a recipient of a scholarship for the Joint European Summer School on Technology Enhanced Learning, 2010, Gothenburg University, Sweden. She has published more than 30 papers in journals and conferences, and has also co-authored two books. Dr. Ekanayake currently teaches at the Department of Education, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Her current research interest focuses on the use of mobile phones for science teaching and learning, Pedagogy and Educational Technology. She is the Vice-President of Indian Ocean Comparative Education Society (ICES).

Dr. Niladri R. Chatterjee, Professor, Department of English, Kalyani University, India was a recipient of Fulbright doctoral research fellowship at the University of Texas, Austin and a British Council Charles Wallace Fellowship. He completed his PhD from Jadavpur Univeristy, Kolkata. He has co-edited two volumes (The Muffled Heart: Stories of the Disempowered Male and Androgyny and Female Impersonation in India: Naribhav) and published an e-novel - The Scholar - in 2016. Since 2009 he has been teaching a postgraduate elective course called New Gender Studies. He uses innovative pedagogy to extend his classroom outside the walls of the University to social media platforms to give voice to reticent students in the classroom. He has integrated new technology and modern arts-based methods into his teaching, sometimes even re-inventing old mythologies to teach about social issue. Dr. Ratna Ghosh, James McGill Professor and William C. Macdonald Professor of Education at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She was Dean of Education from July 1998 to December 2003. She was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada (C.M.) in 2000 and Officer of the Order of Quebec (O.Q.) in 2005. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (F.R.S.C.) in 1999, a Full Member of the European Academy of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, and in 2011 she was elected Fellow of The World Academy of Sciences- for the advancement of Science in the Developing Countries (TWAS), Social Sciences Division. Specializing in Comparative and International Education, her research, publications, grants and teaching have focused on multicultural theory and practice, equity and education and more recently on education's role in combatting radicalization. She has done research in Canada, Asia, Africa and Latin America. Professor Ghosh was featured in the Canadian Edition of Time Magazine, October 13, 2003 issue as one of "Canada's Best in Education". In 2009 she was selected for the Power List published by India Abroad. She is the recipient of the YWCA Woman of Distinction Award in 1996, and has received several awards from national and international organizations. She has held important administrative positions at McGill, as Director of Graduate Studies and Research for the Faculty of Education, and Acting Director of McGill International. She has had an important leadership role in the development and governance of the Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute, which is a consortium of Canadian and Indian 22


universities involved in academic exchanges and programs between India and Canada. She served as its Resident Director in New Delhi, India, in 1982-83, and as President of the Institute from 1988-90. She has been on the Board of Directors (as well as the Education and International Committees) of the Canadian Human Rights Foundation. She is on the editorial board of several international journals. In 2009 she was elected President (2011-2012) of the Comparative and International Education Society of the U.S.

Dr. S. Irfan Habib is an Indian Historian of Science and a Public Intellectual. He was the Abul Kalam Azad Chair at the National University for Educational Planning and Administration (NUEPA), New Delhi. Before joining NUEPA, he was a scientist at the National Institute of Science, Technology and Development Studies (NISTADS), New Delhi. He has been a Fulbright Fellow at the State University of New York and also a Research Associate at REHSEIS, CNRS, Paris. He has authored/edited several books including Situating the History of science: Dialogues with Joseph Needham, (Oxford, 1999); Domesticating Modern Science, (Tulika, 2004); Social History of Science in Colonial India, (Oxford, 2007); and UNESCO's History of Humanity, Vol.VII, (Paris, 2008). His most recent book is To Make the Deaf Hear (2007).

Dr. Jae Park is an Assistant Professor at the Education University of Hong Kong. His research interests are in sociology and philosophy of education. He recently published in Comparative Education Review, Educational Philosophy and Theory, International Studies in Sociology of Education, Comparative Education, and Ethics & Behavior. Among works on higher education are the chapters Internationalization of Chinese higher education in Latin American Campuses; Higher education knowledge production in postcolonial-neoliberal Asia; Asian Education and Asia as method; and, an edited volume Sociological and Philosophical Perspectives on Education in the Asia-Pacific Region. He serves as the Past-President of the Comparative Education Society of Hong Kong and as the Head of the International Education Research Group in the Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development of the Education University of Hong Kong. He is the editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Comparative Education and Development. Dr. Tamara Savelyeva is an Assistant Professor at Department of International Education and Lifelong Learning in the Education University of Hong Kong. She received her MPS from Cornell University in 2003, and her PhD in Education from Virginia Tech University in 2008. Dr. Tamara Savelyeva conducts educational projects and research in the area of sustainable education and international higher education in Eurasia, the Americas, and the Asia-Pacific region. Together with the participants of the Rio+20 higher education meeting in Brazil, she contributed the educational framework for the 2012 Earth Summit. Dr. Savelyeva serves on the editorial board of the International Journal for Sustainability in Higher Education and has over 30 publications on the topic of sustainable and international education in different countries.

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Names & Bios of Convening Committee Dr. Mousumi Mukherjee is Assistant Director at the International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building. She is the founding Executive Director of the Center for Comparative and Global Education. She is Fulbright alumna and one of the Emerging Scholar Fellow of the Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (Australasia & the Pacific). She is a Congress Standing Committee Member of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies, SIG Committee Member of the Comparative and International Education Society and a life member of the Comparative Education Society of India. Her expertise and interest is in the area of Education Policy and Leadership (school and higher education), Inclusive Education, Comparative and International Education, Comparative Case Studies, Institutional Ethnography, Global Ethnography, Southern Theory & Global Dynamics of Knowledge. She is also the Associate Editor of Routledge journal- "Diaspora, Indigenous and Minority Education". Ms. Nandita Koshal is Senior Research Fellow at International Institute for Higher Education Research and Capacity Building (IIHEd). She has a deep interest in macroeconomic research and analysis, policy formulation and, advisory and consultation for capacity building in the social development sector. She was a key contributor in the drafting of the State Higher Education Plan under RUSA for the state of Haryana. She has completed her Masters in Economics from Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, Pune and pursued her Bachelors in Economics from University of Delhi

Oceania Comparative and International Education Society Dr. Zane Ma Rhea is an Associate Professor in the faculty of education in the Monash University. Her research theorizes cross-cultural understandings of the cultivation of wisdom and examines how higher education and schooling are harming or supporting the sustainable education of wise, global citizens. Her teaching, supervision, and research spans organisational development, leadership development, professional skills development in mainstream service provision to Indigenous peoples, and theorising knowledge exchanges within complex, postcolonial democratic states. Her most recent publication is Leading and Managing Indigenous Education in the Postcolonial World (Routledge 2014). She is also Editor of the OCIES flagship journal International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives. Ms. Rebecca Spratt, University of Auckland is the Treasurer of Oceania Comparative and International Education Society. She is a development and aid consultant. She specialise in policy and advocacy, research, strategy development and generalist program management, particularly in the areas of education, civil society strengthening, and capacity development. She has 12 years' experience in these areas, predominantly in the Pacific region.

Indian Ocean Comparative and International Education Society Dr. T. M. Sakunthala Yatigammana Ekanayake received her PhD from the Graduate School of Education, The University of Bristol, UK in 2011. She was conferred upon with a scholarship for the STELLAR Doctoral Consortium Workshop, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany during 2-3 December, 2009. She was also a recipient of a scholarship for the Joint European Summer School on Technology Enhanced Learning, 2010, Gothenburg University, Sweden. She has published more than 30 papers in journals and conferences, and has also co-authored two books. Dr. Ekanayake currently teaches at the Department of Education, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Her current research interest focuses on the use of mobile phones for science teaching and learning, Pedagogy and Educational Technology. She is the Vice-President of Indian Ocean Comparative Education Society (IOCES). 24


UNESCO-Chair for Community-based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education Ms. Wafa Singh, is the India Research Coordinator of the UNESCO Chair in Community Based Research & Social Responsibility in Higher Education, Ms. Wafa Singh has been engaged in numerous national/international research projects under the higher education theme. The main fields of her work include community-university engagement, community based research, social responsibility of higher education, knowledge democracy, among others. She has represented the Chair at various international forums such as the 2nd Asia Engage Conference in Bali; and was invited to Community University Exposition Conference (CUExpo), 2015 in Ottawa, Canada, for representing India in policy dialogues and participating in a panel discussion on 'Community University Research Partnerships in India'. Ms. Singh also has numerous national & international publications to her name, which includes co-authoring a book titled 'Knowledge & Engagement: Building Capacities of the Next Generation of Community Based Researchers', published by the UNESCO Chair in 2016, and contributing to the 6th Higher Education in the World (HEIW6) report, titled 'Towards a Socially Responsible University: Balancing the Global with the Local', published by the Global University Network for Innovation (GUNi), in 2017. Her research interests include Higher Education, knowledge democracy, community based/participatory research, community based water management & sustainable development.

Symposium Organizing Team Names and Short bio of all student RAs Ms. Manashri Vellaiappan is a Research Assistant at the Centre for Comparative and Global Education. (CCGE). She is currently pursuing her Masters in Public Policy from Jindal School of Government and Public Policy, O.P. Jindal Global University. She holds a Bachelor degree in Economics from Ethiraj College for Women, Chennai. She has a deep interest in policy research and analysis in the education sector. Ms. Samridhi Puri is a Research Assistant at the Centre for Comparative and Global Education. (CCGE). She is currently pursuing her Masters in Public Policy from Jindal School of Government and Public Policy. She holds Shalu Jindal Outstanding Women Scholarship at O.P. Jindal Global University. She is interested in Primary Education, using education as a tool for rationality and thinking, Gender Studies, Rural Development and inclusive economic growth, Minority Rights Mr. Viveka Nand Jha is currently pursuing his Masters in Public Policy from Jindal School of Government and Public Policy, and is a Research Assistant at the Centre for Comparative and Global Education. He holds a Bachelor degree in Economics from Loyola College, Chennai, and is mainly interested in rural education and health, development and public finance issues, women empowerment, sustainability, urbanization and foreign policy. Ms. Anmol Jain is completing a Master of Arts in Public Policy from Jindal School of Government and Public Policy with a specialisation in education. Her interests lie in the fields of health and development, and in related areas such as climate change and gender questions. She is currently writing her dissertation titled: "How ICT Education can act as bridge for inclusive education in school". Ms. Arzu Mir Ali comes from Afghanistan and is currently in her second year of her Master of Public Policy at the Jindal School of Government and Public Policy. She has strong interests in questions related to gender related issues, and the way education and foreign policy interact with each other. Mr. Dilson Arlindo Mutote is completing a Master of Arts in Public Policy at the Jindal School of Government and Public Policy. He gained his Bachelor of Philosophy of Institutional Development in Mozambique and worked for seven years as a Client Manager in the News Mozambique Society. He has a strong interest in questions of involuntary resettlement, education, gender, human rights and energy policy. Mr. Tashi Dhondup hails from Tibet and is currently completing a Master of Arts in Public Policy. He has a strong interest in education and is attending the Research Symposium to further explore how education can influence the way we see nature, and how we might use education to cope with negative emotional sentiments.

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Ms. Charvee Puri is pursuing her Master of Arts in Diplomacy, Law and Business at the Jindal School of International Affairs. She is specializing in India's Foreign Policy, India-China Relations and China-Japan Relations. She is currently writing her dissertation titled: "How History Education is seen as a barrier in improving relations between China and Japan." Ms. Krystal Fane Kite is in the second year of her aster of Arts in Diplomacy, Law and Business at the Jindal School of International Affairs. In her research, she is particularly focussing on the South Pacific Region. Mr. Tenzin Choepel is a first year's M.A. student of Public Policy at the Jindal School of Government and Public Policy. Tenzin is participating in the research symposium to learn more about international education and meet education experts from India and abroad. Mr. Sonam Tsering is a first year's M.A. student of Public Policy at the Jindal School of Government and Public Policy. Sonam is participating in the research symposium to learn more about international education and meet education experts from India and abroad. Mr. Albert van Wijngaarden is a visiting fellow from Oxford University at the Institute for Higher Education and Capacity Building. He holds degrees in philosophy and history from several European universities and is currently in India for a research project on Indian parliamentary democracy.

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The President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee receiving the rst copy of the book ‘The Future of Indian Universities: Comparative and International Perspectives’ from Nobel Laureate Professor Amartya Sen at the Rashtrapati Bhavan on 17 July 2017.

Speech by the President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee 1.

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I am indeed very happy to welcome all of you to the Rashtrapati Bhawan. It is indeed my pleasure to receive the first copy of the book-The Future of Indian Universities: Comparative and International Perspectives edited by Professor Raj Kumar, founding Vice Chancellor of O. P. Jindal Global University and published by Oxford University Press, India. I would like to congratulate Professor Raj Kumar and all other contributors for their efforts in coming up with a book on a very important and pertinent topic that addresses the future of universities in India. I am happy that Professor Amartya Sen is present with us on this occasion. It is with pleasure, I acknowledge the august gathering of academicians, policy makers and other dignitaries who have come together to attend this function. I have had the occasion to interact with O.P. Jindal Global University a number of times, including release of two books, inauguration of international conferences on higher education and futuristic universities, and a summit on world-class universities. JGU is an example of how with determined efforts, focus on research, significant number of publications and international collaborations, a university can cover a long distance in a short span of just eight years. Ladies and Gentlemen, India has a long history of higher education. Some of the oldest institutions of higher learning such as Nalanda, Vikramshila (in India), and Taxila (now in Pakistan), etc. dating back to the 5th century BC, were located within the Indian subcontinent. These seats of higher learning attracted teachers, researchers and students from across the world. They produced mighty minds that shaped the politics, arts, culture, science and economics for over a millennium. The higher education system we inherited was designed and established by the British colonial masters. Though designed for providing lower level civil servants, this system ironically opened the way for producing many highly educated professionals and even noted scholars, who made ground-breaking scientific discoveries and went on to become even Nobel laureates. However, the needs of our contemporary times are very different from the aims and objectives of the colonial rulers that established the modern Indian higher education system. Our needs today are much more complex. Along with the post-independence emphasis on Nation-building through institution-building, we are now increasingly called upon to think about the role of Universities in the larger global context of an increasingly interconnected and interdependent world. The Universities of today are being called upon to compete globally for research-ranking to help build “World-Class Universities”. 27


8. Higher education systems around the world are going through a massive overhaul. What should the Universities of the Future look like? What should be the curriculum of the Universities of the future? What should be the pedagogy of the Universities of the future? What kind of graduates these Universities should produce? These are questions troubling many academics and world leaders. 9. Today we have assembled here for the release of the book- “The Future of Indian Universities: Comparative and International Perspectives” by a Nobel Laureate economist and philosopher, who was born in the land of the first futuristic global-minded University of modern India, i.e., Shantiniketan, the campus of Rabindranath Tagore's Viswa-Bharati University. Most of his early education also took place in Patha Bhavan School set up by Tagore in Shantinikentan, where many progressive pedagogic ideas were put into practice. The curriculum and pedagogy in the school was not exam-oriented. Students enjoyed freedom to explore their inner creativity. Their natural curiosity to learn and explore their environment was encouraged. The school also stressed cultural diversity and embraced influences from the rest of the world. These ideals of education were also embedded in conceptualizing Viswa-Bharati University, as is evident from the following quote of Gurudev Rabindra Nath Tagore, elucidated in his 'Ideal of Education:“University is there to offer us opportunity for working together in a common pursuit of truth, sharing together our common intellectual heritage, to enable us to realize that artists in all parts of the world have created forms of beauty, scientists discovered secrets of the material universe, philosophers solved the problems of existence, saints made spiritual truths organic in their lives, not merely for some particular race to which they belonged, but for all mankind. When we understand this truth in a disinterested spirit, it teaches us to respect all the differences in man that are real, yet remain conscious of our oneness, and to know that perfection of unity is not in uniformity, but in harmony.” - Tagore, (“The Ideal of Education", Visva-Bharati News, January 1934, p.5) 10. I would, therefore, urge all distinguished guests assembled here to think about the future of Indian Universities as a continuation of India's rich history and heritage of education. We would do well to take from reforms by great philosophers and visionaries, such as Tagore, who sought to revive the ancient Buddhist tradition of higher learning and research in a “common pursuit of truth” for all mankind. As our “Universities of the Future” gear up for global competition to find their place on the tables of institutional rankings, let us not forget the difference between “world-class” and “world-minded”. 11. Let our “Universities of the Future” re-invent our rich past heritage of “Kautuhalshala” (An assembly of inquisitive minds raising questions), hitherto silenced by the pedagogy of rote-memorising for test. Let our students raise important research questions and break new grounds in scientific discoveries, artistic creativity and philosophical ruminations. Let our “Universities of the Future” help reproduce the next generation of great scientists, philosophers, artists, teachers, doctors, engineers and innovators. 12. In the pursuit of these Kautuhalshalas, let us reinforce the glorific spirit of India where 'shashtarth”, 'tark' and 'vad vivaad', – continuous dialectics, led to constant synthesis. Let us, as I have said on many earler occasions, produce Argumentative and Pragmatic Indians rather than intolerant and dogmatic citizens. 13. Friends, I take this opportunity to congratulate the Founding Chancellor of O.P. Jindal Global University, Shri Naveen Jindal for his generous philanthropy for establishing the O.P. Jindal Global University in memory of his late father, Shri O.P. Jindal and the Founding Vice Chancellor Professor Raj Kumar for his visionary leadership and appreciate both of them for their outstanding contributions to institution building for nation building. JGU is an example of what corporate philanthropy can do for transforming the field of Higher Education.

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International Research Symposium Full Programme; 11-12 Dec 2017  

"Other Ways of Knowing and Doing: Globalizing Social Science Knowledge in Higher Education"- this two-day long international research sympos...

International Research Symposium Full Programme; 11-12 Dec 2017  

"Other Ways of Knowing and Doing: Globalizing Social Science Knowledge in Higher Education"- this two-day long international research sympos...

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