Identity - July 2022

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ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN, INTERIORS + PROPERTY

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A MOTIVATE PUBLICATION

ISSUE 222 / JULY/AUGUST 2022

The Design Issue

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contents

Features 16

Breath of life Loewe’s project uses craft interventions to breathe new life into damaged objects

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Blurring boundaries ‘WHY NOW?’ is a new concept where the collectible and the industrial intersect

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Broadening horizons Qatar’s latest design platform hopes to put its young talent on the global map

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Cultural rebellion Annabel Karim Kassar’s exhibition calls to preserve Beirut’s architectural heritage

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Raw sophistication Designed by Corpus Studio, this triplex near Paris combines austerity and glam

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Outside the box A contemporary Almaty apartment with a masculine twist and an industrial feel

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Blurred lines Yasmina Makram creates interior spaces for a contemporary Egyptian home

Regulars 12

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Design Focus

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Products

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Library

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#idmostwanted


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Editor-in-Chief Obaid Humaid Al Tayer Managing Partner and Group Editor Ian Fairservice Group Director Andrew Wingrove Editor Aidan Imanova Designer Hannah Perez Sub-editor Max Tuttle Chief Commercial Officer Anthony Milne Group Sales Manager Manish Chopra Sales Manager Jules Acciarresi Sales Representative - Italy Daniela Prestinoni General Manager - Production Sunil Kumar Production Manager Binu Purandaran Production Supervisor Venita Pinto Contributors Karine Monié

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Head Office: Media One Tower, PO Box 2331, Dubai, UAE; Tel: +971 4 427 3000, Fax: +971 4 428 2260; E-mail: motivate@ motivate.ae Dubai Media City: SD 2-94, 2nd Floor, Building 2, Dubai, UAE Tel: +971 4 390 3550 Fax: +971 4 390 4845 Abu Dhabi: PO Box 43072, UAE, Tel: +971 2 677 2005; Fax: +971 2 677 0124; E-mail: motivate-adh@motivate.ae London: Acre House, 11/15 William Road, London NW1 3ER, UK; E-mail: motivateuk@motivate.ae

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Wash Basin: RAK-VALET Bath Tub: RAK-VALET Wall and Floor: METAMORFOSI


Photo by Young Habibti

Last month was an exciting one for the design industry as many returned to Milan for the 60th edition of Salone del Mobile – a great time to reconnect with colleagues in person, and, of course, discover all the novelties from great minds the world over. And while being surrounded by so many new ideas and objects is on one hand extremely inspiring, it also makes one conscious of the enormous quantity of items being produced every day – many of which, after only a short lifespan, become discarded, contributing to the increasingly dangerous waste problem facing the world today. Sustainability and environmental consciousness have been topics prevalent to the design industry – and many take this responsibility seriously. Yet it often feels like a lot of the effort is being made through acts such as recycling, upcycling or using waste materials (all of which are important), whereas perhaps going back to basics is sometimes the longer-term answer. One such answer is longevity, which is a topic that came up in a lot of conversations with designers and brands alike. That is, ensuring that a product is made to last: in the way that it’s built, in its materiality, adaptability and design concept. There is a reason why some designs made over 100 years ago are still functional and relevant even today. ‘Timeless’ may be a cliché when describing a design object, but it is also its most sustainable trait, safeguarding it from being discarded, and ensuring it is valued enough to be mended and repaired when (or if) damaged, and passed on to a newer generation to care for. Loewe’s ‘Weave, Restore, Renew’ project touched upon just that, focusing on amplifying the beauty of restoring and mending, instead of discarding, as a means to restore the value of objects. In this project, artisans from Galicia in Spain were tasked to repair 240 different baskets using an ancient technique native to their region. “Acts of manual labour give new meaning to each object, honouring [its] history and value and preserving it for the future. Such a way of approaching the artisanal process sits right at the crossroad of respect for the environment and respect for the product,” said Jonathan Anderson, the creative director behind the Spanish luxury house. “It is the opposite of senseless consumption, and an acknowledgement that things done with love and attention retain a human quality that lasts over time.” And while it is understandable that we don’t all have the skills to mend objects in this way, the exhibition prompts a rethinking not only in the way we approach our objects but also in the way we make them.

Aidan Imanova Editor

Photography by Sean Davidson

Editor’s Note

On the cover: ‘Why Now?’ by Spotti, curated by Mr.Lawrence



design

A design encounter

GUBI is relaunching a collection that reflects the innovative spirit of one of the most renowned Italian designers WORDS BY KARINE MONIÉ IMAGES COURTESY OF GUBI

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lurring the lines between the past and the future, GUBI combines simple shapes with high-quality materials and innovative techniques. The Danish furniture, lighting and accessory brand is also very successful at relaunching designs from the 1930s up to the ’70s. A case in point: the Basket collection by Joe Colombo (1930-1971). While this series dates back to the late 1960s, when manufacturer Pierantonio Bonacina first produced it, the look of the pieces is still relevant today. The reason for this lies in Colombo’s futuristic approach. “The possibilities presented by the extraordinary development of audio-visual processes are enormous,” the designer once said. “Distances will no longer have much importance; no longer will there be any justification for the ‘megalopolis’… Furnishings will disappear… The habitat will be everywhere… Now, if the elements necessary to human existence could be planned with the sole requirements of manoeuvrability and flexibility, then we would create an inhabitable system that could be adapted to any situation in space and time.” This passion for innovation is the common thread between all Colombo’s creations, from the fibreglass Elda armchair (1963) to the first injection-moulded Universale chair (1965), made entirely from plastic, to the Optic alarm clock (1970). The Basket collection is no exception. “It gives a new form to traditional materials, exploiting an innovative structure that had never before been used for such large and light products,” says Ignazia Favata, Colombo’s former assistant who is now director of Joe

Colombo Studio. “It is really exciting to see it in production once again and to [have] Joe’s work reaching new audiences through the collaboration with GUBI.” Using the original drawings from 1967 as the collection’s starting point and with the name ‘Basket’ paying tribute to the classic hand-weaving technique used in rattan basketry, the newly relaunched collection features optimised proportions for today’s contemporary era. For the three-seater sofa, two-seater sofa and lounge chair, the inner fibreglass shell has been replaced by a more environmentally responsible steel skeleton, which is covered with a hand-woven rattan skin made from interlaced strips and oval stakes. Exemplifying the perfect blend between artisanal and industrial techniques, the series honours Colombo’s interest in material experimentation and functionality. Thanks to the frame fitted with rounded cushions on the seat and back – available both in indoor and outdoor fabrics – the two sofas and the lounge chair provide high comfort while reflecting organic lines, for an inviting feel. “It’s a privilege and a thrill to be able to bring the Basket collection back into production after so long and to revive Joe Colombo’s extraordinary vision,” says Marie Kristine Schmidt, chief marketing officer at GUBI. “Rattan is not a material commonly associated with his work and it’s wonderful to be able to showcase the diversity of the output he achieved.” In continuity with the past, this is, however, the start of a new chapter. THE DESIGN ISSUE

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Divine inspiration Launched in June during Salone del Mobile in Milan, Lee Broom’s new ethereal lighting series is inspired by places of worship and Brutalist architecture WORDS BY KARINE MONIÉ

Requiem

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Photography by Luke Hayes


Altar

Photography by Luke Hayes

Pantheum

Photography by Luke Hayes

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fter two years marked by a global pandemic and many event cancellations and postponements, the long-awaited 2022 edition of Salone del Mobile offered the opportunity to discover the best of design for the coming months. Among some of the most fascinating launches were the six new Divine Inspiration lighting series created by British lighting, furniture and interior designer Lee Broom. Coinciding with the brand’s 15-year anniversary, it is the first lighting release for Broom in four years. “When initially designing this collection, I decided to look back at some of the things that inspired me to be a designer in the first place,” says Broom. “I began

looking at the Brutalist architecture I grew up with as a child, a period of architecture that I love. Delving deeper, my attention became engaged with Brutalist places of worship. This led me on a fascinating journey researching cathedrals, temples and churches, from antiquity to mid-century to the present day.” These pieces – which were showcased in Milan in a theatrical show based on an experiential journey through dramatic rooms – explore how light is often linked to hallowed places. “I wanted to create a lighting collection that invoked that same sense of awe and mysticism as those buildings and their interiors,” says Broom. THE DESIGN ISSUE

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Requiem Hoop

Photography by Arthur Woodcroft

In total, 30 new products are available, featuring multiple configurations, finishes and materials such as carved oak, extruded aluminium, plaster and Jesmonite. Positioned at the intersection of architecture, art and design, every piece has its own unique allure, yet all of them express a sense of magic and poetry that invites observers to contemplate. Made by hand-draping fabrics dipped in plaster through and around illuminated rings, tubes or spheres, the limited-edition Requiem series – sculpted by Broom in his London factory – evokes marble drapery on ancient statues and sepulchral sculptures. Suspended by cables and available in 14

duo or quattro versions, Vesper focuses on the geometric lines of Brutalist sculpture and modernist cathedral lighting. Inspired by the coffered concrete ceiling of the Pantheon in Rome, as well as Brutalist architecture, Pantheum takes the form of a ceiling or wall constellation. With its fluted form, the almost one-metre-long Altar lighting fixture references the angular shapes of mid-century churches and altars. Available in three sizes in a gold or silver finish, Hail is an ode to the shards of light and shadow that emerge from lancet windows in church arches. Finally, characterised by its square configurations, Chant references pressed glass bricks, which were often used as an alternative to stained glass in places of worship during the 1970s. Highly sculptural, Divine Inspiration once again reveals Broom’s talent for creating drama and balance with an unexpected twist. “This is not a religious collection, but a reflection on the impact that religious architecture, interiors and artefacts have had on the psyche as well as the history of art and architecture,” he concludes. id


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Vesper Silver THE DESIGN ISSUE

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Photography by Arthur Woodcroft


craft

Corozo — Galician rainwear

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craft

Breath of life

Loewe’s latest project uses craft interventions to breathe new life into damaged objects

WORDS BY AIDAN IMANOVA

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craft

Jars by Young Soon Lee

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ew luxury houses have made such a passionate commitment to contemporary crafts as Loewe. Honouring its roots as a collective of artisans dedicated to leather making, the Spanish fashion house has since set craft centre stage. “It is where our modernity lies, and it will always be relevant,” explains creative director Jonathan Anderson. The brand supports contemporary art, craft and design from around the world through various initiatives such as the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize, as well as its annual presence at Milan Design Week – where its most recent exhibition, ‘Weave, Restore, Renew’, has delivered an important message. The project features 240 existing antique woven baskets from all over the world – each with its own distinct form and level of distress – that have been mended and repaired with leather in an approach inspired by kintsugi, the Japanese art of repairing cracked ceramics with lacquer, often mixed with powdered gold, amplifying the beauty of the objects. The art form revolves around the idea of giving new life to objects that may be forgotten or discarded. “Acts of manual labour give new meaning to each object, honouring the object’s history and value and preserving it for the future. Such a way of approaching the artisanal process sits right at the crossroad of respect for the environment and respect for the product,” Anderson says. “It is the opposite of senseless consumption, and an acknowledgement that things done with love and attention retain a human quality that lasts over time.” Exploring traditional crafts from Spain and

Santiago Besteiro for the Repaired in Spain collection

abroad, one of the main sections of the exhibition is ‘Repaired in Spain’ which sees these straw, raffia or wicker baskets repaired, woven and embellished with leather by Galician artisans and visually surprising, almost like sculptures,” Idoia Cuesta, Belén Martínez, Santiago Besteiro Anderson explains. Another part of the exhibition features the and Juan Manuel Marcilla, using an ancient Galician technique called coroza which uses traditional Korean jiseung technique that finely straw, reeds, briar and other natural fibres to weaves strings of paper to create household objects, as employed by Young Soon Lee, who is weave objects. “The striking fringed capes were used in the a finalist from the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize. region up until a few years ago and the coroza Using this technique with recycled newspaper, a tradition dates back thousands of years. For series of tote bags was created. “Authentic craft, for me, is sustainable; [there[this] section we created a series of bags and basket bags that retain the distinctive tiers of fore] the concept of repair is fundamental in this fringes of the corozo, which look both practical sense,” Anderson concludes. id

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Blurring boundaries

Julep sofa designed by Jonas Wagell for Tacchini. Costela armchair designed by Martin Eisler for Tacchini. Magico rug designed by Marcante Testa for SEM. Shini Chair. designed by Supaform. Flower Flower mirror designed by Anna Aagaard Jensen. Animal in a State of Utopia rug designed by Nawaaz Saldulker. Metal coffee table designed by NM3

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Gathering a selection of contemporary design pieces, ‘WHY NOW?’ is a new concept at the crossroads of the collectible and the industrial WORDS BY KARINE MONIÉ PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN DAVIDSON

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Victoria modular sofa designed by David/Nicolas for Tacchini. Side table designed by NM3. Tonnara Car Park 2 designed by Odd Matter for cc-tapis

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Titanium Pipe Stool H designed by Yeon Jinyeong for 13 dessert Alltubes Collection Bench S designed by Muller Van Severn

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ur goal is to build bridges between different points of view,” say design writer and curator Annalisa Rosso and brand strategist and creative director Francesco Mainardi. They are the co-founders of creative consultancy on contemporary design Mr.Lawrence, which works with companies, galleries, collectors and institutions. “We strongly believe that nowadays there is no point in keeping distances between collectible and industrial [design]. What we are interested in is the research, the possibility of pushing the borders of an out-of-date paradigm.” Claudio Spotti, owner of Milan-based established design store Spotti, asked the duo to collaborate with his team to select some objects as part of this perspective. The result was unveiled during this year’s Milan Design Week: a show styled by Greta Cevenini that displayed the newly launched WHY NOW? products in dialogue with pieces from Italian furniture company Tacchini, such as the Orsola, Elephant,

Orsola armchair designed by Gastone Rinaldi for Tacchini. Baloo Buffet designed by Mary-Lynn and Carlo Massoud. A.D.A. lamp designed by Umberto Riva for Tacchini

Lina, Costela and Reversível armchairs, the A.D.A. and E63 lamps, as well as a Noé DuchaufourLawrance-designed coffee table, among others. Throughout the project, the curatorial process was “all about love – for people and for objects,” say Rosso and Mainardi. “We think it is important, now more than ever, to consider the quality of a design work and its contribution to developing a new language. For that same reason, Spotti chose Tacchini as an exhibition partner.” The first WHY NOW? collection comprises over 30 pieces from 14 different countries, including the floral mirror by Anna Aagaard Jensen, a glass tableware set by Helle Mardahl, a series of vases by Bethan Gray, carpets made from old T-shirts by Nawaaz Saldulker, geometric steel elements by NM3, chairs and containers by Supaform, a buffet designed and produced by Carlo & Mary-Lynn Massoud, a totem/pouf by Objects of Common Interest and a carpet for cc-tapis by Odd Matter, to name only a few. All these creative minds were driven by the question

“WHY NOW?” and replied by showing the best of their latest research. “We are not interested in labelling objects as industrial or collectible, unique or unlimited,” Rosso and Mainardi say. “As for people, we believe each piece deserves its uniqueness and has its own story to tell, and we try to demonstrate that – both from an economic and aesthetic point of view. This approach is simpler than expected – and very freeing!” The pieces are sold in Spotti’s brick-and-mortar store and online on spotti.com. “Product design [and] furniture have become a multi-channel field and the challenge is to redesign the market, trying to investigate together – with those who buy and create design – the new rules of the game,” the team says. Spotti and Mr.Lawrence won’t stop here. They plan to continue their investigation into the contemporary design market. “We love collectible design as much as good industrial design and cutting-edge small editors,” confess Rosso and Mainardi. “Shuffling is always a good idea.” id

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Broadening horizons

A new design platform in Qatar hopes to put the country’s young talent on the global map WORDS BY AIDAN IMANOVA

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iddle Eastern designers are underrepresented by a large margin on global design platforms,” begins Alia Rachid, founder of a new design platform, FROMM, which is working to develop the Qatari design landscape and create space for young designers from the region. She adds that the barriers to entry into the design field are challenging to overcome for emerging talent – something her platform wishes to uncomplicate. Pivoting between Milan and Doha, Rachid explains that the platform can connect young designers from the region with Italian expertise to not only help develop their skills, but to additionally offer a wider perspective on the industry from a key design capital. “It is these designers who will serve to inspire the next generation of designers and further develop the design culture in our region,” she asserts. Its first collection, Shurooq, debuted during Milan Design Week and was designed in

collaboration with two Qatari designers, Shua’a Ali and Maryam Al Suwaidi, whose complementary styles brought forth a series of objects that are inspired by their Qatari heritage – an important brief for the project. “The integration of Qatari heritage into our first collection enables FROMM to put its best foot forward by showcasing the pride of our identity and origin to the international design community,” says Rachid. The collection features eight objects that are rich in both form and material, fusing the design languages of the two designers in a seamless manner, with each bringing their own sensibility, yet in a way that is harmonious and open. These pieces include the Baida’ sofa, the Haima’ sofa and the multifunctional Majra table by Al Suwaidi; and the Derj desk/console, Laite floor lamp, Maiz coffee table, Maktaba wall unit and Tawla side table by Ali. “FROMM’s mission is to create collections

that are an ideal fusion of design and manufacturing, while supporting local design communities,” Rachid affirms. “We hope to strengthen design across Qatar by firstly providing the tools and resources to young aspiring designers to develop their skills and gain exposure to the design and production process behind [creating] furniture.” Community building and education is an equally important pillar, which the platform hopes to contribute to through its FROMM Lab space, located in Doha’s vibrantly developing Msheireb area. The lab offers workshops, mentoring and educational services, helping connect designers with international universities, professionals and design companies. And while Rachid describes Qatar’s design landscape “as still in its infancy”, the growth of private and governmental initiatives is likely to prompt a soon-to-be-flourishing design scene in this Gulf capital. THE DESIGN ISSUE

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architecture

Cultural rebellion Annabel Karim Kassar’s exhibition at the V&A is a call to preserve Beirut’s architectural heritage WORDS BY AIDAN IMANOVA

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reserving memory of [our] social fabric…is an important countercultural move in an era which has seen a self-effacing wave of modernisation sweep Beirut. I believe that to save a house is [to] save a city,” says Lebanese architect Annabel Karim Kassar, founder of architecture practice AKK, whose exhibition ‘The Lebanese House: Saving a Home, Saving a City’ is currently on show at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. “Beirut’s historic buildings…are unique cultural resources. Should they not be preserved, it will be a loss to our collective heritage,” she adds. Four years ago, Kassar had begun the process to restore and preserve Bayt K – one of the few remaining classic Ottoman-Venetian houses still standing in the historic quarter of Gemmayze in Beirut. The devastating explosion on 4 August 2020 took over 200 lives, left 300,000 homeless and caused imminent damage to the city’s architecture – both old and new. Any progress made to the restoration of Bayt K had been reversed, leaving the

building in an even more delicate condition. Going back and starting again is “part of the process”, the architect says, who like many others living in Beirut began repairing the city almost straight away. “Immediately after the blast, we took urgent measures to tackle the reconstruction process. Sadly, three arcades on the second level collapsed and the roof frame sagged and endured cracking. The northern wall buckled towards the street by 15cm, in addition to many wide cracks rising from the floor,” Kassar describes. “There was considerable ballooning on the façade, which we preserved temporarily with planks of wood and metal cables before tackling the remedial action in terms of reconstruction and consolidating the masonry wall.” Kassar adds that the entire façade of Bayt K disconnected from the structure of the house, with parts of the ceiling becoming detached, which made it incredibly unstable. It has taken almost ten months to consolidate the building alone to ensure its integrity, she says.

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“The house was structurally weak and almost the entire roof was redone, to both reinforce and strengthen. We retained all the tiles to repurpose elsewhere. For the internal structure, we’ve added propping trusses with wooden sections, creating a lattice – the work was very delicate and complex, not to mention the economic crisis which affects the material outsourcing and availability of skilled labours for this kind of restoration,” Kassar explains. For the exhibition, Kassar and her team have erected a life-sized reconstruction of the façade of Bayt K, using it as a catalyst to examine the effects of the port explosion on Beirut’s architecture, as well as to look at how the city’s past can inspire acts of repair and rebuilding. The centrepiece of the installation is the triple arcade which is a symbol and trademark of traditional Lebanese architecture of the 19th century. An accompanying digital platform for visitors serves as a guide and archival database to the many architectural elements that constitute the Lebanese house, from plaster painted ceilings to timber truss roofing, balconies, cornices and more, all of which typify the city’s celebrated design vernacular.

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“[The exhibition] seeks to express important lessons in urban restoration and renovation that can be applied elsewhere; that local and international communities need to be mobilised and involved directly, to protect their common urban heritage,” says Kassar. “And that restoration is not about recreating a synthetic history but about finding a new, living purpose for traditional buildings – an approach that lies at the heart of my work.” Other parts of the installation include a reinterpretation of the traditional ‘Liwan’ – a small salon situated in the entrance hall of a Lebanese house. Kassar recreates imagined seating from within these reception spaces, with colourful mattresses laid on top of each other, inviting the museum’s visitors to dwell and contemplate. AKK has also commissioned three movies to accompany the installation; directed by Wissam Charaf and Florence Strauss, they seek to explore the emotional impact of the explosion by interviewing people across the city and analysing the effect of the explosion across various demographics and public and private spaces. “I want people to remember their city and its history through these houses,” says Kassar. id


architecture

Photo by Sophie Garcia

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design focus

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the Salone del Mobile, which once again became the home for the latest in design. Following a year-long hiatus, brands have had time to reflect on their concepts for new living spaces. This edition saw a plethora of ideas: the importance of modularity and adaptability; a return to brighter, more colourful spaces; a renewed sense of theatricality; a commitment to the environment; and the honouring of heritage. Here are identity’s picks of the latest pieces defining the home WORDS BY AIDAN IMANOVA

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living spaces

Optical illusion Alain Gilles has created a number of successful pieces for Bonaldo, and the Dogma bookshelf is his latest addition. Playful and modular – an approach that is becoming increasingly prominent in the design arena – the bookshelf plays with different shapes and juxtapositions of modules that give it a variety of visual effects, depending on its position in a space. It is designed around the basic element of the teardrop-shaped uprights, which enables a change in visual perception, allowing the design to become rounded and soft, or sharp and narrow, depending on the angle from which it is viewed. Comprising three modules, Dogma can be configured to taste and placed along a wall or left free-standing to double as a partition. THE DESIGN ISSUE

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design focus

Miniature architecture Pedrali’s vibrant collections of this year are a culmination of relaxed forms and harmonious volumes that are not afraid to incorporate a funky colour palette. One of such pieces is the contemporary modular sofa system, Jeff, designed as a set of ‘miniature architectures’ that combine to create reconfigurable scenarios. The square backrest pairs with a delicate seat that softens its overall volume and adds balance to the structure. The lining is removable for easy maintenance, while connecting hooks make it possible to dismantle and customise the sofa to adapt to the evolution of a space. 32

Photography by Andrea Garuti


living spaces

Metal head Run by Oskar Zięta, Zieta Studio specialises in technology-backed collectible objects and is known mostly for its collection of metal seating, manufactured using the FiDU technology through which it experiments with forms and qualities of various metals. Balancing function and aesthetics, its pieces are both functional and decorative. The design studio premiered its entire roster of products this year, with a mono-material approach. Some of the key pieces include the Morph table, which is based on parametric design exploration and draws inspiration from tree branches to shape the interwoven legs, and the steel Rotation vase.

Photography by Marta Więcek

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Tropical inspiration One of the leading designers defining the Poliform point of view on contemporary living is Jean-Marie Massaud, whose Ube stool is described by the brand as an “element of rupture”. Its sculptural and contemporary form is a nod to the art world, and the piece itself is not unlike a functional piece of art serving the living area. Inspired by the seed of the coco de mer, a tropical fruit famous in the Seychelles for its evocative and sensual shape, the stool has a distinctive concave figured that forms a comfortable cradle to sit on – and is made from a block of solid wood in a classic black elm finish. 34


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Natural future The conversation between Raphael Navot and Loro Piana Interiors began three years ago and has since given rise to a collection with a shared design language of comfort, timelessness and contemporaneity – the first being the Palm Duet chaise lounge which is now accompanied by an ottoman. Other pieces in the collection include a sofa, méridienne, armchair, stools, and a side table and coffee table, all under the same Palm family – referencing the palm of the hand as a symbol of welcome, protection and repair. Navot emphasises the human components of these pieces that are influenced by the sense of touch (featuring the brand’s Cashfur fabric). The collection is designed with a futuristic approach in mind, which to Navot is less about a “cold, hyper-technological vision of the future” and more about looking at the past as a place of possibility for what’s to come. THE DESIGN ISSUE

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Material revolution Kohler’s collaboration with artist Daniel Arsham is part of the brand’s Artist Editions collection which fuses creativity, craftsmanship, technology and innovation. Rock.01 is a 3D-printed sink that references the natural world through its organic form, featuring an asymmetric vitreous china basin made using the latest innovation in 3D-printed ceramics that Kohler has been developing over the past three years. The basin is perched on a hand-cast brass ‘rock’ with a patina finish. “Rock.01 melds the future of 3D-printing technology with the most basic methods of hand-cast brass. It is literally the new resting on top of the old, and I find that incredibly poetic,” Arsham says.

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living spaces

Icons reinterpreted An icon of MDF Italia’s product portfolio, the Neil chair by Jean-Marie Massaud has now been reinterpreted in denim by luxury brand Jacob Cohën. Celebrating material research, the seat’s clean lines, versatility and structural simplicity have allowed the brand to constantly renew the collection, offering new finishes. The collaboration with Jacob Cohën is a product of shared passions for design, research and detailing, as well as attention to sustainability. Focusing on the ecological impact of production has guided the brands in the creation of an easily disassembled chair that is also a model for experimentation and innovation.

Photography by Riccardo Raspa

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Sartorial roots Gianfranco Ferré’s latest home environments are an ode to the maison’s sartorial roots, such as the cut of its furnishings, its Milanese spirit and the vintage undertones that converge to display a chromatic palette that is rich in both warm and dark colours. Also drawing on the temples of New York jazz, the collection is as sophisticated as it is eclectic. The Seattle modular sofa crowns the collection with its bold character and a clear affirmation of the brand’s contemporary metropolitan style. Expressing a juxtaposition of materials, it is a meeting of the soft and sensual shapes, fabrics and leathers with the geometric precision of the shelves, which together create a balance of lines, aesthetics and function.

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living spaces

Photography by Valentina Sommariva

Block party Some may be unaware that the late Virgil Abloh had a master’s in architecture. Having become a visionary of contemporary culture, it was only natural that the creative polymath tried his hand at envisioning a new kind of living space that is centred on the creative processes of play and personal configuration. Modular Imagination, designed for Cassina, comprises matte-black ‘building blocks’ in two

different sizes that are designed to create, adapt and rebuild space as one sees fit – whether in a public or domestic space. The secret to modularity is also in its texture and material: while appearing rigid and almost industrial, the blocks are actually soft, allowing them to be used as a seat and a supporting surface or even as a pouf, bench or table. All in all, Modular Imagination represents how we can best live in a modern home in a versatile world. THE DESIGN ISSUE

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design focus

Clear cut Continuing its exploration and experimentation of the bold use of glass, Glas Italia’s showcase features an orchestra of poetic pieces that mould glass in unexpected ways. Take, for example, Pierro Lissoni’s Tête-a-Tête collection of sofas that are characterised by formal and clean lines and a light design – with a structure made up of 19mm-thick transparent extra-light glass that is shaped, tempered and UV-bonded. Adding softness are the removable cushions, available in various fabrics or faux eco-leather. The padding, which is said to be ‘as soft as goose down’, is made of hypoallergenic, cruelty-free and eco-compatible material, obtained by recycling plastics collected from the ocean.

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living spaces

Transparent design When the goal is to create design that lasts for generations, it is only natural that sustainability is top of mind. And this is so for Artifort, which offers an eco-material passport that displays the material composition of all its products. “Today, the burden of responsibility in creating any new item is significant,” the brand asserts, which is why the quality of material and build is of utmost importance. The organic Glider seat designed by Luca Nichetto checks these boxes. Keeping comfort in mind, it combines a generous seat with shapely arm fins – as well as elegant stitching that shows off its expert construction and the attention to detail on its upholstery. Nichetto shares that making this chair was not unlike “having a bespoke suit fitted”. id

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interiors

Raw sophistication Situated in an up-and-coming area on Paris’s doorstep, this triplex combining austerity and glam was designed by Corpus Studio for a young art collector WORDS BY KARINE MONIÉ PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPHE COËNON

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ifteen minutes from the centre of the French capital, Hauts-de-Seine is increasingly attracting people in search of calm, even while the area maintains its liveliness. This young art collector is one of these newcomers, having fallen in love with a three-level brick house that has been split into apartments. The structure, built around 1920, sits on a long and narrow site with a rear garden. “The façade has interestingly subtle brick detailing and a slight industrial character, owing to a steel lintel that we had to remove and replace with a bigger one for the large new window,”

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says Konrad Steffensen, who co-founded Corpus Studio alongside Ronan Le Grand. Despite the challenging shape of the plot, the vertical volume and sun exposure allow the interior spaces to be bathed in natural light. “When the client approached us, he was keen to maximise the potential of the house and upgrade its architectural fabric,” remembers Steffensen. “This was his simple and to-the-point brief.” Throughout the process, the homeowner and his mother – an artist who helped him along the way – were open to the recommendations of the Corpus Studio team.

“While we love working on Haussmann apartments – which we get a lot of in Paris – it was interesting to have a project where we could have fun playing with the architectural structure,” confesses Steffensen. Spread over 75 square metres, the triplex is organised with one function per level – sleeping, living and eating – while a vertical shaft connects the three floors. Corpus Studio made several structural modifications – some of which were more challenging than others – to bring to life this project, which took a year and half, including planning approvals.


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Ennio Chiggio sofa from Maisonjaune Studio, staircase custom made by Corpus Studio, Christopher Boots lighting fixture from Armel Soyer THE DESIGN ISSUE

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This page: Jumbo table by Kalou Dubus from Desprez Bréhéret, Marcel Delmotte vase from Aurélien Gendras. Dominique Zimbacca chair from Galerie Yves Gastou. Next page: In the kitchen, Matti Suuronen table, Artisans de Marolles chairs from Desprez Bréhéret, Suzie Lapierre d’Argy vase and Joan Gaspar lighting fixture (Marset edition)

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Curtains from the Dandy collection by Lelièvre, Pierre Chareau floor lamp from Galerie MCDE, Minitore armchair by Pierre Augustin Rose with a Pierre Frey fabric

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“In a very Gordon Matta-Clark way, we opened holes in the floors, walls and ceilings, making way for new windows and the central staircase,” says Steffensen. “We dedicated a lot of time to thinking about everything as a whole – from the major architecture works down to the decorative details.” Drawing their inspiration from several sources, such as the narrow townhouses of London and early century Parisian artist studios, as well as the work of Italian architect Carlo Scarpa and Austrian architect Adolf Loos, the Corpus Studio team took care of the spatial arrangements as much as they did the effects of light and shadow, and crafted the overall palette with a focus on neutral tones for the architectural finishes. “The materials stand out on their own with their beautiful natural hues, creating a timeless atmosphere,” says Steffensen. Touches of bold colour were added through decoration, such as the yellow accent in the kitchen that provides energy to the homeowner every morning; the mustard velvet sofa that brings a glamorous feel to the living room; or the terracotta Lelièvre curtains in the bedroom that combine with the ebony Pierre Chareau floor lamp and the beige wool bouclé Pierre Frey armchair from Pierre Augustin Rose. Zellige tiles, steel, aluminium, Douglas and oak wood, marmorino, tadelakt plaster and lime wash paint are some of the materials that bring together feelings of both rawness and warmth. Iconic pieces of furniture and lighting by Ennio Chiggio, Kalou Dubus, Dominique Zimbacca, Christopher Boots, Thomas Duriez, Martin Goerg and Matti Suuronen – among others – adorn these spaces where nothing feels excessive. “We wanted to shape an environment that conveys subtlety and complexity – not too clean but raw with sophistication,” expresses Steffensen. “We enjoy creating poetic spaces.”

Thomas Duriez floor lamp from Galerie Armel Soyer, Martin Georg stool from Aurélien Gendras), bed lining from the Canisses collection by Brun de Vian-Tiran

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Dominique Zimbaca chair, circa 1980 from Galerie Yves Gastou THE DESIGN ISSUE

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Outside the box In Almaty, Kazakhstan, this apartment designed for a couple with two children features a contemporary look with a masculine twist and an industrial feel WORDS BY KARINE MONIÉ PHOTOGRAPHY BY SERGEY KRASYUK

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Bespoke buffet, Miniforms dining table, Fritz Hansen chairs, Muuto ceiling lamp, Aromas floor lamp, poster by Aya Shirgaliyeva THE DESIGN ISSUE

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or their first owned apartment, Victoria and Victor – who have two sons – wanted everything to be perfect, so they called upon Elina Mussakulova from Sdelaemremont. kz Interior Bureau. It took the couple some time, however, to really trust the whole process and give Mussakulova the freedom she really needed to envision and design the perfect space for them. Located in the foothills of the Trans-Ili Alatau mountains, which divide Almaty (Kazakhstan’s largest metropolis) into lower and upper sides, this 200 square-metre apartment is only a 15-minute drive from the city centre yet provides views

of the surrounding nature through its large, black framed windows. “Getting all the perks of urban life combined with the benefits of a secluded home is what enticed our client to buy an apartment in this compound,” says Mussakulova. Getting started, which consisted in defining the layout plan, was not an easy task at first. At the same time, it helped both the homeowners and the interior designer to better understand each other and how to work together on this project. After some discussions, they all agreed on splitting the private areas on one side of the apartment – with an open living room, dining

area and kitchen – and the entertaining spaces on the other side with the bedrooms for the couple and the two sons. The space also incorporates a small laundry room and a large home office with chessboard-like wallpaper. Mussakulova, who is used to designing bright and bold interiors, clearly made an exception for this home. “Victoria and Victor initially told us that they were attracted to our studio because of our turnkey option, but they were wanting to create a dark, modern apartment with an industrial feel and asked us if we could do that,” she confesses. “We liked the challenge and accepted it.”

Left: Bespoke kitchen set with stairs, Blanco sink and tap, Smeg cooker and cooker hood, SP01 Design bar stools and Muuto ceiling fixtures. Next page: &Tradition sofa, Muuto coffee table and Linie Design carpet

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Previous page: Bespoke bed and nightstands, Linie Design carpet, pendant lights by Normann Copenhagen and Ideal Lux ceiling lights. This page, from left: Bespoke armchair and built-in closet set, IKEA side table and Aromas wall lighting. Tikkurila paint and Bath&Tile wall tiles

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Thinking outside the box was precisely Mussakulova’s main source of inspiration: “In our case we had to move [away] from colourful interiors to a monochromatic one,” she says. To create the industrial aesthetic requested by the homeowners, Mussakulova and her team decided to introduce numerous black elements, as well as concrete walls and ceilings. “However, we still wanted the apartment to be warm and cosy, so we opted for chevron parquet flooring that gives a very classical touch.” Completely different from her typical projects, this provided Mussakulova with several opportunities to experiment for a truly harmonious result. “We like open shelving options for the kitchen, but this time we designed the upper cabinets with closet doors, leaving just two small open shelves,” she describes. “When we accidentally found two identical vases in different colours to decorate them, we could not believe

we hadn’t planned this in advance. The sizes were ideal!” Furnished with pieces by Fritz Hansen, &Tradition and Muuto – among others – the atmosphere is characterised by Scandinavian influences in terms of lines and shapes, complemented by masculine touches through the colour palette. “The brief that called for a contemporary aesthetic made us opt for smart home technologies,” adds Mussakulova. “We turned to minimalist furniture and lighting, and we also sourced

several abstract artworks from young Kazakh artists to reflect a very up-to-date edge through every decision.” Elegant yet inviting, the different spaces of this peaceful apartment are visually cohesive yet practically functional. For Mussakulova, a simple idea captures the spirit of this home. id

Previous page:divide Ingo Maurer ceiling Two arches the lamp, IKEA table lamp, living space from the Muuto wall lamp, bespoke commode, dining and kitchen area, Kilim rug and Laare Redoute whale-shaped mirrors. and outlined by Right: Scion wallpaper, neo-traditional detailsbespoke couch and poster by Aya Shirgaliyeva THE DESIGN ISSUE

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interiors The outdoor dining and comfortable seating area, with an overhead pergola sitting next to the pool and fire pit

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Blurred lines The interior spaces of this contemporary Egyptian home with scenic views were designed by Yasmina Makram, who provided the resident family with a sense of escape from the city WORDS BY KARINE MONIÉ PHOTOGRAPHY BY NOUR EL REFAI

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The natural wood panelling across the bar wall contrasts with the light grey marble flooring

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The concave recess along the stairway brings in natural light and brightness to the space and floating stairs

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t took an entire year to see this project come to life – from the design phase to the last decorative details. Yasmina Makram, who leads her eponymous studio, immediately knew she could reflect her philosophy through this home: authenticity and harmony were achieved by gathering inspiration from history, heritage and the natural context, complemented by an approach based on the homeowners’ lifestyle. Combining all these elements resulted in this “scenic suburban haven,” as Makram describes it. Located in West Cairo, in a residential compound that offers peaceful golf views, the 646 square-metre, four ensuite bedroom house (with study/guest bedroom) has

a ground floor and an upper level comprising private and public spaces. With a sauna room and a changing area servicing the pool, the basement leads to the outdoor part of the home where a large pergola protects a seating area with a dining space, bar, pool, fire pit and sunken nook. “This house was conceptualised to give an out-of-thecity escape feeling with the integration of an indoor-outdoor experience through having an open-space layout, big windows for unobstructed views and natural light,” explains Makram. Designing a home for entertainment that could fit anywhere in the world yet remain relevant to the project’s setting was also part of the brief. THE DESIGN ISSUE

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A fireplace adds cosiness to the main living space, which reflects the deep green and blue theme that is recurrent throughout the home’s furniture, accessories and art pieces THE DESIGN ISSUE

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The upstairs family room is adorned with green accents and wall lighting fixtures

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The interior design team wanted the dining room to be a statement feature in the house and so they chose jungle green walls, complemented by an oriental rug and a Bocci chandelier

“We as a studio love contemporary modern design and we wanted to bring more of our heritage into it by making it more relevant to our culture, which we did by using curated Egyptian and Middle Eastern art pieces,” says Makram. Some of the biggest challenges consisted of creating the floating staircase, as well as blurring the lines between inside and outside. “We were very much inspired by the property’s great location, overlooking the golf course,” notes the interior designer. “We wanted the home to reflect an appreciation for the surrounding panorama.” A palette of mostly white, black, deep green and

night blue shades is used throughout, while pops of colour bring in further tones from nature. The materials, too, were selected in the same spirit. “We liked the idea of … a masculine space that is not particularly soft, yet still has direct references to greenery and the delicateness it provides to the space,” says Makram. The bar and the panelling across the bar wall feature walnut wood; Paris Grey marble prevails for the main interior flooring and staircase, visually translating balance, contrast and brightness; while grey travertine adds some rawness to the outdoor flooring and al fresco bar. Envisioned

as a key element in the villa and placed between the two reception areas, the fireplace in sleek black metal and Nero Marquina marble blends the concepts of comfort and luxury. For a sense of movement, openness and fluidity, Makram installed glass sliding doors in the dining area. “The objective was to make sure the villa’s interior would exude the cosiness of an urban apartment,” the interior designer says. “We wanted an interpretation of luxurious practicality. It was important for the home to look and feel distinguished, yet remain homely and very practical, as a city home should be.” id

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partner content

A place called home

As part of its ‘Your Home Finder’ campaign, proptech company Property Finder explores the meaning of ‘home’ with the UAE’s dynamic residents PHOTOGRAPHY BY AHMED ABDELWAHAB

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partner content

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he ideal home is designed to bring us peace, joy and comfort – among other qualities that UAE residents have defined as part of Property Finder’s ‘Your Home Finder’ campaigns, which asks the question: “What is the true meaning of home?” Having collaborated with a number of residents of various backgrounds, the campaign reveals the diversity of homeowners living in the country. Of them is Kat Lebrasse, who owns a social media marketing agency in Dubai called Co Lab. Lebrasse is a working mother, and most of her days are a balance of meetings and attending to the daily activities of her children. She invites identity into her home and reveals more about what home means to her. Can you describe your home? What are some of the elements that you love? I like to think of my home as a warm, cosy space. Each room has something special about it, whether it be the paint we chose, a piece of furniture or its layout. Our living room is my favourite room in our home. We gave it a lime wash feature wall which immediately transformed the space. Our sofa – the most comfortable white linen sofa ever, from Marina Home – is the hero of the room and everything else complements it. Can you tell us more about the style of your

home? Our style is quite wabi-sabi. It is somewhat minimalistic with some bohemian elements to give it the warmth we sought. Texture plays a large part in my selections, even with the walls. In some rooms, I opted for tapestry and macrame art as opposed to traditional canvas or print art, to add that extra element of texture. What feelings or emotions do you associate with your home? My home is a safe, open and warm space. It’s important to me that my children see it as a safe environment as well – as somewhere they can be their utmost selves. This applies to friends, too. We have an opendoor policy for our friends and neighbours and expect them to feel comfortable and at home in our home. What are the most important aspects you would look for when renting/buying a home? The flow of a house is very important to me when looking at a home. I need to be able to envision my family in the space together. Eating dinner together, snuggling on the sofa together, playing together. If the kitchen or dining is closed off from the rest of the house, for example, that would be a deal-breaker for me as it would restrict our togetherness. What sparked your interest in collaborating on the “Property Finder. Your Home

Kat Lebrasse

Finder” campaign? I really love my home and I’m proud of it. I really resonate with the idea that “it’s not a house, it’s a home,” as I genuinely believe that regardless of the area or other factors of the house, as long as you’re prepared to put your own touches on it, you can make it a home. What is something that every home should have? Every home should have good natural light. I am a big believer that exposure to natural light helps our bodies produce Vitamin D, helps us focus and ultimately makes us happier. THE DESIGN ISSUE

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lifestyle

A sense of place The restoration of Brown’s drawing room is the last piece of the puzzle for the London hotel’s new design vision

The Donovan Bar

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’m sort of in my wallpaper period,” Olga Pilozzi told Galerie magazine, following the renovation of the reception area of Brown’s – cited as London’s first hotel – which is now adorned with an exclusive hand-painted wallpaper by British artist Adam Ellis of over-sized wisteria plants in shades of blue and mint green. These features are coupled with an ornate Venetian-style chandelier in clear and green glass of varying cuts and sizes as well as the installation of a new Belvedere glass roof which floods the space with natural light and offers the feeling of being outdoors. Pilozzi is the director of design for Rocco Forte

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Photography by Janos Grapow

Hotels, of which Brown’s is a prized property. And she didn’t stop there. Pilozzi led the renovation of the entire ground floor, including the famed Donovan bar which now features a green glass countertop; as well as restaurant Charlie’s, which still maintains its original wooden panelling but is now dressed in wallpaper of a tropical motif of palm fronds and colourful birds. Now, for its famed Drawing Room, Pilozzi has once again commissioned Ellis for the wallpaper design, which portrays a Hogarthian scene of illustrations representing 19th-century London with images of the River Thames alongside mythological creatures and birds, with subtle

nods to the popular hand-tinted prints of red colouring of the time – an homage to the capital’s heritage and the hotel’s illustrious legacy. Other features include a series of square tables created by Pilozzi’s local blacksmith in Sussex that are topped with glass and illustrated with an old map of London. Six bespoke winged chairs have been created by William Yeoward and sit at different tables, while other chairs are by Pierre Frey and marked by a deep red velvet. The wall lights by Porta Romana and a bespoke runner by Christopher Farr with olive green and red accents complete the space, bringing added abstract geometry to the overall intimate space.


lifestyle

Best kept secret

A new trattoria in Dubai sets artisanal quality at the centre of its menu and its design PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MARSLAND

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e love a homegrown concept and Monno Ristorante is the latest venue on our radar: an artisanal Italian eatery in the heart of Dubai’s Jumeirah neighbourhood. The villa is charming and rustic, and the restaurant prides itself on its honesty, be it in the ingredients of its curated menu compiled by the owners – who are both pilots – and head chef Federico Bartoli, or in the design, which is not unlike a classic trattoria found on the back streets of quaint Italian towns. The love for Italian design and cuisine clearly informs the overall experience,

which oozes a rustic simplicity that suspends one reality’s of being in the hustle and bustle of urban Dubai. The bar area features a live pizza oven, while the main dining room and covered terrace are bathed in natural light and adorned with tables and chairs made from natural wood, as well as nostalgic chequered flooring, olive trees, jade green furnishings and cream linens. “To capture the nostalgic Italian style, the materials form a key part of the design,” shares Andrew Theunissen, head of design and founder of Aces of Space. The honed stone floor is sourced from

Italy and has been hand cut and laid in a contemporary version of a traditional Italian marble floor. European oak wood was used throughout the space, and sandblasted to achieve an aged look, while the walls have been manually patinated to allow for the rustic style to set. “The plaster, wood and stone finishes form the backbone of the classic look of the restaurant. From classic Italian moulding details on the tabletops to the classic slatted bar counter finish – they all come together to speak the same aesthetic and design language,” Theunissen concludes.

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design

A poetic touch

Charles Zana’s Hamptons collection for THG Paris summons the modernity of Manhattan

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here are many parallels that could be drawn between the sensibilities of Tunisian-born, Paris-based interior designer Charles Zana and the collections of luxury fittings brand THG Paris. Both embody a specific type of elegance that is traditional in its values yet seamlessly modern in its language, while displaying an approach that marries rigour and fluidity. But perhaps what most aligns the two is their poetic approach. Zana sees himself as something of a ‘musical director’, conducting an orchestra of highly skilled craftsmen, lighting designers and landscape architects, who together build a symphony of spaces. THG Paris, similarly, balances artisanship and modern technologies to craft its collections, passionately driven by the influences of art, design and architecture. So, it came as no surprise when THG Paris tapped Zana to create its latest collection, Hamptons, which marries both the designer’s and the brand’s love for luxury, softness and sensuality. Thus, the

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collection embodies just that. Hamptons recalls Zana’s memories of his first encounter with New York City, following his design studies. The shapes and forms of the collection are inspired by Manhattan’s urban grid that is surrounded by water – creating a balance of order and disorder – in addition to the geometry of the city’s vertical towers that can be observed in the engravings on the basin mixers – with particular influences drawn from the Art Deco architecture of the Chrysler Building. The collection fuses cylindrical shapes, notched wheels, ergonomic spouts and sturdy structures, all of which are defined by their function. The fine finishes are diverse in range, some celebrating the magical fluidity of water, others focusing on the beauty of light as reflected in the delicate textures of the crenelated surfaces. The Hamptons collection is a perfect model for the poetic strength that is created when two harmonious forces come together.


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products

Walk the line Irregular forms, engraved lines and geometric shapes dominate this moodboard, from Tom Dixon's Hydro chair to the latest textiles introduced by Hermès in Milan

Vipp655 pouf in Soprano upholestery Vipp Available at vipp.com

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1. Magot coupe by Fferrone Design. Available at mytheresa.com 2. Hydro chair by Tom Dixon. Available at mytheresa.com 3. Serenity stainless steel platter by Zaha Hadid Design. Available at farfetch.com 4. Pythagore plaid by Studio des Fleurs for Hermès. Available at hermes.com 5. Aka stool by Konstantin Grcic for Magis. Available at superstudio.me 6. Original Check-In M suitcase in quartz by MyTheresa x Rimowa. Available at mytheresa.com

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library

Small action, big impact Us & Our Planet: This is How We Live is an inspiring new book that showcases how we can make the world a better place, one step at a time WORDS BY KARINE MONIÉ

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ince 1943, Swedish company IKEA has revolutionised the design and furniture market. Throughout the years, IKEA has expanded worldwide, thanks to its strength: producing –— with care for the environment – and selling affordable, easy-to-assemble and install, quality home furnishings. The company’s aim has been to improve both the lives of its customers and the state of the environment through design pieces that combine functionality, beauty and sustainability. This spirit nurtures the 256 pages and 300 illustrations of Us & Our Planet: This is How We Live, a new book presented by Phaidon and IKEA. Showcasing the home life of 12 individuals – including activists, artists, athletes and gardeners – as well as young families in different parts of the world

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– including Beirut, Nigeria and New York – the aim of the book is to explore sustainable living through small actions that can have big impacts. “We wanted to ask ourselves what was possible… If it’s up to us to do something, let’s do it,” says Gabriela Martin from Mexico, one of the book’s interviewees. For architect Elora Hardy, who specialises in designing sustainable bamboo structures in Bali, “it’s not enough to be better or create less harm – we need ways to be good, be proud of what we do and make.” Others sharing their experiences and thoughts throughout the pages include fourteen-year-old

Indian activist Ridhima Pandey, the young Leven family who live in a small apartment near Moscow, and Los Angeles-based gardener Ron Finley, known for transforming neglected roadside areas into community gardens in low-income neighbourhoods. The book draws inspiration from the home visits IKEA has conducted all over the world since the 1950s to find out how people live and how lifestyles can be improved, using the feedback for product development. Us & Our Planet comprises six thematic chapters that refer to some of our most precious resources: time, space, food, rest, play and togetherness. “Food is an important common ground to build on,” says Kamal Mouzawak from Lebanon. “It breaks boundaries and misconceptions.” Along with these personal stories, the book highlights iconic and ‘democratic’ IKEA pieces (three per chapter) created according to the core principles of the brand: form, function, quality, sustainability and affordability. Among the examples are the Lövet table, which led IKEA to launch its ‘flat pack’ concept, and the soon-to-be-released tap adaptor, which reduces water usage and will only cost 10 euros. As educational as it is inspiring, Us & Our Planet is a call to action for each and every one of us.


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The Rodriguez-Martin Family

Right: The Soh family gathers around the dining table. Calvin and Arlette, their children Evan and Dylan and Ng Swee Hiah (“Mummy Soh”), between the Katong and Siglap districts, in the suburbs of Singapore

Photography by Pia Riverola

Bubu Ogisi, fashion designer

Photography by Maganga Mwagogo

Photography by Juliana Tan

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id most wanted

It was the power of volcanoes that inspired these whimsical rugs, aptly called The Floor is Lava, designed by PLACéE. The rugs are made from New Zealand wool and Tencel using a hand-tufting technique. Comprising six pieces, the bi-chromatic rugs feature unconventional shapes interpreted in a pop style and depict various terrains after the force of an explosion creates a chaotic river of magma and lava.

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Photography by Omar Sartor

The Floor is Lava by PLACéE for Carpet Edition 74