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.. OR ' II OXFORD (SE R I E S V)

WORKSHOP MANUAL Welcome to the digital workshop manual. This document is fully searchable by using the FIND button. If you click on an Index entry that has a box around it you will taken directly to that page. There are Bookmarks set for each chapter and you can also use the arrow buttons to scroll pages.


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MO• •us OX FORD (SERIES V)

WORKSHOP MANUAL

NOTE

Refer to the end of the appropria te Section for the latest instructions when car rying out work on the vehicle. Additional copie s of this publ ication (Part No. AKDl029B) can only be obtained from a Morris Distributor.

Issued by

MORRIS COWLEY

MOTORS OXFORD

LIMITED ENGLAND

Sale Exporters

NUFFIELD

EXPORTS LIMITED

Propriet ors: MORRIS MOTOR S LIMI T ED

COWLEY Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 32056

OXFORD

ENGLAND


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Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 32056


www.morrisoxford.com

CONTENTS Sec/ion

Introduction General Data General Information Maintenance Engine

A and AA

Ignition System

Band BB

Cooling System

C and CC

Fuel System

DD

Clutch

E and EE

Gearbox

F and FF

Propeller Shaft

G

Rear Axle and Rear Suspension

Hand HH

Steering Gear

JJ

Front Suspension

KK

Hydraulic Dampers

LL

Braking System

MM

Electrical Equipment

Nand NN

Wheels and Tyres

o

Lubrication

P and PP

Body . .

Rand RR

Heater Unit . .

S

Lubrication Chart

End of Manual

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29549

3


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INTRODUCTION This Manual has been prepared to provide the service operator with the necessary information for the maintenance and repair of the Morris Oxford (Series V). The Manual also serves as a ready-reference book for service supervi sion and covers items of procedure for the guidance of both the fully qualified and the less-experienced mechanic.

UNIT ARRA GEME T

In the Manual the complete vehicle is divided into sections each of which deals with an assembly or major component and carries a reference letter. Where necessary , a section is divided into two parts, one part having a single and the other a double reference letter. A section having a single reference letter contains information and instructions which apply to the particular assembly or component when fitted to other B.M.C. vehicles. A section having a double reference letter contains information and instructions which apply only when the assembly or component is fitted to the Morris Oxford (Series V).

NUMBERING OF PAGES AND ILLUSTRATIONS

The pages and illustrations are numbered consecutively within each section, and the section title and letter(s) are shown at the top of each page.

SERVICE TOOLS

Use of the correct tools contributes to an efficient, economic, and profitable repair. References have therefore been made to such tools throughout the Manual.

4

Mor ris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 29549


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GENERAL DATA ENGINE Type Number of cylinders Bore Stroke Capacity Firing order Compression ratio Capacity of combustion chamber (valves fitted ) B.M .E.P. : High compression Low compression Torque: High compression Low compression Valve operation .. Oversize bore : 1st Max.

15MC; later models 15AMW.

4. 2·875 in. (73'025 mm .), 3·5 in. (88'9 mm.). 90·88 cu. in. (1489 c.c.). 1,3,4,2. 8·3 : 1 or 7·2 : 1. 2·4 cu. in. (39'2 c.c.). 137 lb.jsq, in. (9,64 kg.jcm.s) at 2,100 r.p.m. 127 lb.jsq, in. (8'93 kg./cm .2) at 2,000 r.p.m. 82·5 lb . ft. (11,41 kg. m.) at 2,100 r.p.m. nib. ft. (10,65 kg. m.) at 2,000 r.p.m. Overhead by push-rod. ·010 in. (,254 mm.). ·040 in. (1'016 mm.).

CRANKSHAFf Main journal diameter Minimum regrind diameter Crankpin journal diameter Crankpin minimum regrind diameter

2·0005 to 2·001 in. (50,813 to 50·825 mm.). 1·96 in. (49,78 mm .), 1-8759 to 1·8764 in. (47'648 to 47·661 mm .). 1·835 in. (46,61 mrn.) .

Main bearings Number and type Material: Bottom half Top half Length . . End-clearance . . End-thrust Running clearance

3 shell-type. Steel-backed white metal. Steel-backed white metal. 1·375 in. (34'925 mm.) . ·002 to ·003 in. (-051 to ·076 mm.). Taken by thrust washers at centre main bearing. ·0005 to ·002 in. (,0127 to ·0508 mm .),

CONNECTING RODS 6·5 in. (165,1 mm .).

Length between centres

Big-end bearings Steel-backed, lead-bro nze-, lead- ind ium- , o r lead- tinplated . Steel-backed, lead-bronze-, lead- ind ium- , or lead -tinplated. ·008 to ·012 in. (,203 to ·305 mm.) . ·001 to ·0025 in. (,0254 to ·063 mm.).

Material : Bottom half Top half Bearing side-clearance Bearin g diametrical clearance

PISTONS Aluminium alloy. Split skirt. Anodized. ·0006 to ·0014 in. (,0152 to ·0355 mm.). ·0022 to ·0034 in. (,0558 to ·0863 mm .). +·010 in., + ·020 in., +·030 in., + 040 in. (+ ·254 mm., + ·508 mm ., + 762 mm ., + 1·02 mm.) .

Type Clearances: Bottom of skirt Top of skirt Oversizes . .

PISTON RINGS Compression: Plain Tapered Width (plain) Thickness Fitted gap Clearance in groove

Top ring. Second and third rings . ·0771 to ·0781 in. ( )' 95 to 1·98 mm ). ·119 to ·126 in. (3,02 to 3·20 mm .), ·008 to ·013 in. (,20 to ·33 mm.). ·0015 to ·0035 in. (-038 to ·089 mm .).

Oil control type Width Thickness Morris Oxford (Series V).

Slotted scraper. ·1552 to ·1562 in. (3,94 to 3·99 mm.). ·119 to ·126 in. (3,02 to 3·20 mm.). Issue 3. 30713

A

General Data 1


www.morrisoxford.com GENERAL

D A T A - c o n ti n u e d

Fitted gap Clearance in groove

·008 to ·013 in. (,20 to ·33 mm.). ·0016 to ·0036 in. ('040 to ·091 mm.),

GUDGEON PIN Type Fit in piston

.. ..

Fit in connecting rod Diameter (outer) ..

1 Clamped. ·0001 to ·00035 in . ('0025 to ·009 mm.). Hand push. fit at 68° F. (20° C.). ·0001 to ·0006 in. ('0025 to ·0150 mm.). ·6869 to ·6871 in. (17'447 to 17·452 mm.).

VALVES AND VALVE GEAR Valves Seat angle: Inlet Exhaust Head diameter: Inlet Exhaust Stem diameter: Inlet .. Exhaust Valve lift Valve stem to guide clearance: Inlet Exhaust Valve rocker clearance: Running Timing Timing markings Chain pitch and number of pitches

Inlet valve: Opens Closes Exhaust valve: Opens . . Closes . .

.. ..

.. " .. ..

..

45°. 45°. 1·370 to 1·375 in. (34'79 to 34·92 mm .). 1·182 to 1·187 in. (30'02 to 30·16 mm.). ·3422 to ·3427 in. (8,691 to 8·704 mm.). ·34175 to ·34225 in. (8'680 to 8·693 mm.) . ·312 in. (7,925 mm .). ·0015 to ·0025 in. (,038 to ·063 mm.). ·002 to ·003 in. (,051 to ·076 mm.). ·0 15 in. (,38 mm .) (hot). ·021 in. ('53 mm .). Dimples on timin g wheels. i in. (9'52 mm.), 52 pitches.

5° B.T.D.C. 45° A.B.D.C. 40° B.B.D.C. 10° A.T.D.C.

From Engine Nos. 15AMW-U-H-10I l5 AMW-U-L -60l 15AMW-N-H-70 1 l 5AMW-N-L-801 T .D.C. ] With ·021 in. (,53 50° A.B.D.C. mm.) val ve rocker 35° B.B.D.C clearance (for tim15° A .T .D.C. ingcheckonly).

VALVE GUIDES Length : Inlet Exhaust . . Diameter-inlet and exhaust: Outside . . Inside . . Fitted height above head

..

Ii in. (47,63 mm .). 2M in. (55'95 mm .). ·5635 to ·5640 in. (14'312 to 14·325 mm.). ·34425 to ·34475 in. (8'744 to 8·757 mm .). ·625 in. (15'87 mm.) .

VALVE SPRINGS Free length: Inlet and exhaust Number of working coils Pressure: Valve open: Inlet and exhaust Valve closed: Inlet and exhaust

2-h in. (51'2 mm.).

41· ..

130 lb. (59 kg.). 77·5 ±2lb. (35,1 ± ·9 kg.).

TAPPETS Type Diameter Length

..

Flat base. Barrel type . ·81125 to ·81175 in. (20'605 to 20·618 mm .). 2·293 to 2·303 in. (58'25 to 58·5 mm.).

RO CKERS Bore of rocker arms Rocker ratio General Data 2

·7485 to ·7495 in. (19'01 to 19·03 mm.). 1·4 : 1. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713


www.morrisoxford.com GENE RAL

DATA-continued

'HAFT u rnal diameters

Front Centre [ Rear

2nd-float .. Bearing: number and type Outside diameter (befor e fitting) Inside diameter (ream ed in position ) Clearance ..

1·78875 to 1·78925 in. (45,43 to 45·44 mm.). 1·72875 to 1·72925 in. (43'91 to 43·92 mm.). 1·62275 to 1-62325 in. (41,22 to 41·23 mm.). _ ·003 to ·007 in. ('076 to ·178 mm.). . . 3 thinwall steel-backed white metal. Front 1·920 in. (48,76 mm.), centre 1·860 in. (47,24 mm.), rear 1·754 in. (44,55 mm.). Front 1·790 in. (45,47 mm .), centre 1·730 in. (43,94 mm.), rear 1-624 in. (41,25 mm.). ·00 1 to ·002 in. (,0254 to ·0508 mm.).

E GINE LUBRICAn ON SYSTEM Oil pump Type Relief pressure valve operates Relief valve spring: Free length Fitted length Oil filter Type Capacity

.. ..

..

Oil pressure Normal running Idling (minimum)

Eccentric rotor. 50 lb. jsq . in. (3,52 kg.jcm."). 2·859 in. (72'638 mm.). 2·156 in. (54,769 mm.) at 131 lb. (6,12 kg.) load. Tecalemit or Purolator. I pint (,57 litre). 50 lb.jsq. in. (3'52 kg.jcm. s). 15 lb.jsq. in. (1,05 kg.jcm.s).

TORQUE WRENCH SETTINGS Cylinder head nuts Main bearing nut s Connecting rod set screws Clutch assembly to flywheel Bevel pinion nut . . Flywheel securing bolt s .. Steering-wheel nut Road wheel nuts .. Rear shock absorb er mounting bolts . .

..

..

40 lb. ft. (5'53 kg. m.). 70 lb. ft. (9,7 kg. m.). 35 lb. ft. (4'83 kg. m.). 25 lb. ft. (3,46 kg. m.). 140 lb. ft. (19,35 kg. m.). 35 to 40 lb. ft. (4'84 to 5·53 kg. m.). 41 lb. ft. (5'76 kg. m.). 60 to 62·5 lb. ft. (8,3 to 8·64 kg. m.). 40 lb. ft. (5,53 kg. m.),

FUEL SYSTEM Carburetter Make and type Diameter Needle .. Jet Piston spring

..

S.U. HS2 semi-downdraugbt. It in. (31,75 mm.). Standard M. ·090 in. (2'29 mm.). Red.

..

Cleaner and silencer.

.. .. ..

S.U. electric-PD. 45 pints per hr. (25'5 Iitres per hr.). 2 to 3 lb.jsq, in. (,14 to ·21 kg./cm .2) .

Type

..

Thermostat setting

.,

Pressurized radiator. Thermo-siphon, pump- and fan-assisted . 700 C. (1580 F.).

AIR CLEANER Type FUEL PUMP

Make and type Delivery rate Delivery pressure .. CO OLI G SYSTEM

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

General Data 3


www.morrisoxford.com GENERAL IGNITION SYSTEM Sparking plugs Size Plug gap .. Coil Distributor Distributor contact points gap Timing: High compression Low compression CLUTCH Make and type Diameter .. Facing material .. Pressure springs Colour .. Damper springs . . Colour .. Release lever rat io GEAR BOX Number of forward speeds Synchromesh Ratios: Top Third Second First Reverse Overall ratios: Top Third Second First Reverse Speedometer gear ratio STEERING Type Steerin g-wheel turns-lock to lock Steerin g-wheel diameter . . Camber angle Castor angle King pin inclination Toe-in FRONT SUSPENSION Type Free length Mean coil diameter Number of effective coils Working load Spring rate Dampers (front) Damper settings: Rebound: Blow-off Time setting Compression: Blow-off Time setting General Data 4

DATA - c o n t i n u e d Champion N5. 14mm. ·024 to ·026 in. (,625 to ·660 mm.). Lucas LAI2. Lucas. Type DM2. ·014 to ·016 in. (,35 to ·40 mm.), 5° B.T.D.C. . . T.D.C.

.. .. ..

Borg & Beck A6-G. Single dry plate. 8 in. (20,3 cm.) , Wound yarn.

6. Black and yellow.

6. .. ..

Black and light green. 4·6: 1.

4. ..

Second, third, and fourth gears. 1·0 : 1. 1·373 : 1. .. 2·215: 1. 3·637 : 1. 4·755 : 1. 4·55 : 1. 6·25 : 1. 10·08 : 1. 16·55 : 1. .. 21·64: 1. . . 9/28. Cam and lever. 2§ (earli er models 3). 17 in. (43,2 cm. ), to to 1°.

ItO.

..

61-°. to t in. (1,59 to 3·18 mm.).

..

Independent. Coil springs. 11fr in. (29,7 cm.). 4 1\ in. (106,4 mm.).

-n

.. 7t· ..

678 lb. (307'4 kg:). 300 lb. in. (3·45 kg. rn.). Lever arm type.

1,900±150 lb. in. (21·9±1 ·73 kg. m.) at 60° F. (15,6° C.). .. 450±50 lb. in. (5·02± ·576 kg. m.) at 60° F. (15·6° C.). . . 850±100 lb. in. (9·79±H5 kg. m.) at 60° F. (15,6° C.). . . 450±50 lb. in. (5'02 ±'576 kg. m.) at 60° F. (15,6° C.).

at 1600 /sec. at 14°/sec. at 1600 /sec. at 14°/sec.

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


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GENERAL REAR SUSPENSION Type Spring details : Number of leaves Width of leaves Working load .. Free camber Dampers (rear) Damper settings : Rebo und: Blow-off

DA TA-continued Semi-elliptic. 6.

..

Time setting Compression: Blow-off Time setting

PROPELLER SHAFT Type Make and type of joints . . Propeller shaft length (between centres of joints) Diameter ..

., ..

..

Ii in. (44,45 mm.). 625 lb. (283 kg.). 3 in. (76'2 mm.), Lever arm type. 1,300±IOO lb. in. (I4·95±1·15 kg. m.) at at 60° F. (15,6° C.). 225±50 lb. in. (2'59±'576 kg. m.) at at 60° F. (15'6° C.). 700±80 lb. in. (8·07±·920 kg. m.) at at 60° F. (15,6° C.). 225±50 lb. in. (2·59± ·576 kg. m.) at at 60° F. (15,6° C.).

I79·5°/sec. l5·5r/sec. 179·5°/sec. 15·52°/sec.

Tubular. Reverse spline. Hardy Spicer. Needle-roller. 42i in. (108,6 em.). 2-!- in. (63,5 mm.).

REAR AXLE

Type Ratio Adjustment ELECfRICAL EQUIPMENT System Charging system . . Battery Starter motor Dynamo .. Control box Cut-out: Cut-in voltage Drop-off voltage Reverse current Regulator (at 1.500 r.p.m. dynamo speed) : Open -circuit setting at 20° C. (68° F.)

Three-quarter-floating. 9/41. Shims.

12-volt. Positive earth. Compensated voltage control. Lucas BT7A. Lucas 4-brush . M35G/1. Lucas. C39PV/2 or C40/1. Lucas. RB106/2 or modified RBI06/2. 12·7 to 13·3. 8·5 to 11·0. 5·0 amps . (max.), 15·4 to 16·4 volts (RBI06/2), 16·0 to 16·6 volts (modified RB106/2).

For ambient temperatures other than 20° C. the following allowances should be made to the above setting: For every 10° C. (18° F.) above 20° C. subtract ·1 volt. For every tOOC. (18° F.) below 20° C. add ·1 volt. BRAKES

Type Front Rear Drum size •• Lining dimensions: Front Rear Lining area: Front Rear Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 29550

Girling hydraulic (front and rear). Two leading shoes. Single leading shoe. 9 in. (22,8 em.). 8·625 in. X 2·5 in. (21'91 em. X 6·35 cm.). 8·625 in. X 1·75 in. (21,91 em. X 4·445 em.). 86·25 sq. in. (556,3 em). 60·4 sq. in. (389,6 em). General Data 5


www.morrisoxford.com GE N ER A L

DATA- c o n t i n u e d

WHEELS Type: Ventilated disc

..

4tJx 14. Traveller

Saloon

TYRES Size Tyre pressures: Normal: Front

Rear . . Fully loaded: Front: . . Rear

..

General Data 6

18 lb.jsq. in. (1,265 kg.jcm. "). 22 lb.jsq. in. (1,546 kg./cm .2) . 24 lb.jsq, in. (1-68 kg. jcm."). 30 lb. jsq. in. (2' 10 kg.jcm.").

23 lb. jsq. in. (1,62 kg./cm. 2) . .. 25 lb.jsq, in. (1,76 kg.jcm.'). .. 23 lb. jsq. in. (1,62 kg.rcm."). . , 25 lb.jsq. in. (1,76 kg.jcm,").

Imp. ·. .. .. ·.

GENERAL DIMENSIONS Wheelbase Overall length Overall width Overall height Ground clearance . . Turning circle : Left lock . . Right lock Track: Front Rear

6·40-14.

..

CAPACITIES Engine sump (including filter) .. Gearbox .. Rear axle .. Cooling system .. Fuel tank . .

5·90-14.

U.S.

7·5 pIS. 4·5 pts. 2·25 pts. 11·5 pts. 10 gal.

9·0 pIS. 5·4 pts . 2·75 pts. 13·8 pts. 12 gal.

Saloon

.. ·. ·. ·. ·. ·.

Litres

4·25 2·56 1·28 6·52 45·4

Traveller

99 -& in. (2,520 m.). 1751 in. (4,453 m.). 63t in. (1-61 rn.). 59i in. (1,52 rn.). 6t in. (16' 5 cm.). 37 ft. 6 in. (11,43 m.). 37 ft. 6 in. (11,43 m.), 48,\ in. (1,230 rn.). 49k in. (1,267 m.).

99 -& in. (2,520 m.). 1781 in. (4,524 m.). 63t in. (1'61 m.). 60 in. (1,52 m.). 6A- in. (17,4 cm.). 37 ft. 5 in. (11,40 m.). 35 n. lOin. (lO'922 m.), 48-& in. (1,230 m.). 49k in. (1,267 m.).

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29550


www.morrisoxford.com

GENERAL INF ORMATI ON CONTROLS

Gear lever The lever positions for both floor and steering column gear change are clearly shown in the illustration below. To engage reverse gear on vehicles fitted with floor gear change move the lever to the left in the neutral position until resistance is felt. Continue moving the lever to the left against the spring pressure until the stop is reached, and then move it rearwards to engage the gear. To select reverse gear on vehicles fitted with steering column gear change pull the knob in the end of the gear lever outwards, and move the lever up the column in the neutral position and then down towards the driver. Synchromesh engagement is provided on second , third, and fourth gears. Hand brake The hand brake is applied by pulling upwards on the lever situated between the driving seat and the door. The ratchet mechanism will be heard to engage, holding it in the 'on' position. To release the hand brake pull upwards on the lever, depress the plated button on the end, and push the lever downwards to the 'off' position.

The controls I. Accelerator. 2. Bonnet lock control. 3. Gear lever (floor control type). 4. Gear lever (column control type). 5. Hand brake lever.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Dip switch. Clutch pedal. Brake pedal. Direction indicator. Seat lock.

II. Horn ring 12. Gear change positions (R.H.D. steering column control). 13. Gear change positions (floor control and L.H.D. steering column control).

Direction indicators and horns The self-cancelIing direction indicator control is mounted on an arm on the steering column below the steeringwheel. The direction indicators will operate only when the ignition is switched on, and a warning light in the end of the lever flashes when they are operating. The horns are operated by pressing the ring surrounding the steering-wheel hub.

INSTRUMENTS AND SWITCHES Headlamp dip switch The foot-operated headlamp beam dipping switch is to the left of the clutch pedal. It is of the repeating type, lowering the beams on one application and raising them on the next. The headlamp beam warning light glows when the beams are in the raised position. Ignition and starter switch The ignition and starter are both controlled by a single switch operated with a removable key. To switch on the ignition insert the key and turn it in a clockwise direction until a slight resistance is felt. Further movement in the same direction will operate the starter motor. Release the key immediately the engine starts. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2.

25520

General Information I


www.morrisoxford.com GENE RAL

INFO RMATION-continued

The switch must not be left on when the engine is not running or the battery will discharge itself through the coil should the contact breaker points be closed. The fuel pump and fuel and temperature gauges are brought into action by this switch, which is also the master switch for the windshield wipers, indicators, ventilation blower motor, and stop lamps. Choke or mixture control (mark ed 'C') To enrich the mixture pull out the knob marked 'C'. The control is self-locking in several positions, giving the richest mixture when it is fully out. Weaken the mixture by turning the knob clockwise and pushing it inwards. Return the control to its normal running position (pushed right in) as soon as possible after starting the engine. Do not use the control when the engine is warm.

The instruments and switches I. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Heater temperat ure cont rol. Clock. Heater a ir control. Speedometer. Ignit ion and startin g switch. Oil pressure gauge.

7. 8. 9. 10. II. 12.

Temperature gauge. Windshield washer control. Choke control. Lamp switch. Trip distance setting . Blower switch.

13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Headlamp main beam warn ing. Ignit ion warning light. Fuel gauge. Panel lamp switch. Windshield wiper switch.

Windshield wiper switch Move the switch downwards to set the wipers in motion. The blades are automatically parked when the control is returned to the 'off' position. The wiper switch will operate only if the ignition switch is on . Lam p switch Move the switch downwards to the half- way position to bring the sidelamps into operation and into the fully down position for the headlamps. The headlamp beams may be raised or lowered by use of the foot-operated dipping switch. Panel lamp switch Move the switch downwards to operate the panel lamps. The lamps will only operate when the sidelamps or headlamps are in operation. Tem perature gauge The needle registers the coolant temperature only when the ignition is switched on. Should there be a sudden change from the usual running temperature, immediate attention should be given to the cooling system and the cause of the trouble rectified. Oil pressure gauge The normal working pre ssure when the engine is warm is between 30 lb. jsq, in. (2,1 kg.jcm. s) and 50 lb.jsq, in. (3,52 kg.jcm. s), Fuel gauge This shows the amount of fuel in the tank and operates only when the ignition is switched on. General Information 2

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com GENERAL

INFORMATION- continu ed

Speedometer In addition to showing the car speed this has total dis tance and trip recorders. The trip recorder can be set to zero by p ushing the resett ing knob upwards and turning it anti-clockwise. Warning lamps The ignition warning lamp is in the speedometer dial on the right. The light will go ou t as the engine speed is increased; should it glow at all engine speeds, the dynamo is not charging the battery, and after ascertaining that the dynamo belt is not broken the circuit should be examined. O n the left-hand side of the speedometer is the headlamp mai n beam warning la mp. Co loured dark red to avoid dazzle, the warning light glows when the headlamp beams are in the raised position and is extinguished when the beams are dipped for approaching traffic. The warning lamp situated in the direction indicator switch flashes when the indicators are operating. Interior lamp The interior lamp is controlled by a separate switch on the lamp and also by an automatic switch fitted on each front door pillar. With both front doors closed the lamp may be switched on or off by operating the switch. The act of opening a front door will switch on the lamp and closing the door will extin guish it. Windshield washer The windshield-washing equipment is operated by pumping the knob situated at the lower edge of the fascia panel on the driver's side. As the knob is pressed towards the panel a jet of cleaning fluid is ejected onto the windshield from no zzles below the windshield. Set the windshield wipers in motion before operating the cleaning jets. Spec ial anti-freeze fluids are available and a mixture of one of these with water should be used in cold weather to prevent freezing in the container and on the windshield. Do not use radiator anti-freeze in the washer.

GE ERAL Door locks Front and rear doors are locked from the inside by pushing the interior handles downwards; both front handles will return to their central position and the rear handles will remain forward . Lift the handles upwards to unlock and open the doors. Front doors cannot be locked by pushing the handles forwa rd prior to clo sing the doors : the closing action will automatically release the lock and so obviate the risk of locking oneself out of the car. The doors can be locked by this method if the push-buttons are kept depressed while clo sing the doors . Either front door may be locked from the outside with the ignition key. Luggage boot Release the catch by pressing upwards on the under side of the boot lid motif. The lid is held by a counterbalance in the open position. The luggage boot lid may be locked in the closed position with the key provided. Bonnet Release the bonnet catch by pulling the knob marked 'B'. Insert a finger between the top of the radiator grille and the bonnet, push the safety catch lever towards the left-hand side, and raise the bonnet. As the bonnet is raised the support rod will automatically spring into engagement and the bonnet will be held in the open position. To close, raise the bonnet slightly, slide the sleeve on the bonnet stay upwards to release the locking mechanism, lower the bonnet, and apply double hand pressure to force the bonnet down into the fully closed position. The safety catch and bonnet lock will both be heard to engage. Fuel filler The fuel filler is concealed by the panel above the left-hand rear wheel. The tank is sealed against theft after closing and locking the filler panel with the key provided. Spa re wheel The spare wheel is secured on a tray beneath the luggage boot by a bolt in the rear right-hand corner of the luggage boot. The spare wheel should always be maintained in good repair and inflated to the recommended pressure, otherwise its value in an emergency is reduced and tiresome roadside pumping may be involved. The spare wheel should also be exchanged with the road wheels periodically to ensure even wear on all tyres -every 3,000 miles (4800 km.) is recommended. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

General Information 3


www.morrisoxford.com GENERAL

INFORMATION-continued

Heating and ventilating system The heating and ventilating system is provided for two purposes: (a) heating or ventilating the interior of the car, (b) demisting and defrosting the windshield. The air may be cold, or heated by water from the engine cooling system. Air distribution is regulated by dashboard controls which can be used to vary the temperature and quantity of the air delivered to the car interior or to the windshield, and in warm weather the same controls can be used to deliver fresh air at atmospheric temperature for ventilation. Correct use of the heater controls will ensure complete comfort for the driver and passengers under all weather conditions, and the following notes are provided in order that the owner may become fully conversant with the functions of the various controls and thus obtain the best results from the heating equipment.

4512H

The controls set to remove ice from the windshield

4512G

The controls set to prevent mist from forming on the windshield and to provide a circulation of hot air

Booster blower To meet extreme conditions an electric booster blower is incorporated in the heater system and its use greatly increases the quantity of air fed into the heater. The blower may be brought into operation when the car is stationary or travelling at low speed in order to compensate for the lack of the ram effect into the air intake normally caused by the forward motion of the vehicle. The blower is brought into operation by a switch located on the lower edge of the fascia.

4512F

The controls set to provide a general circulation of cold air

4512E

The controls set to provide a supply of cool air at head level

Temperature control This control regulates the temperature of the air supplied to the car interior. When moved to the 'HOT' position maximum heat will be obtained, and when moved to the 'COLD' position the heat supply is completely shut off. When the control is moved to the 'OFF' position the air supply at toeboard level is cut off. Intermediate positions can be selected to meet varying conditions. Air control This control regulates the quantity of air delivered to the windshield for demisting or defrosting. To obtain the maximum delivery at the windshield tum the control to the 'BOOST' position. Should delivery to both car and windshield be desired, set the control at 'DEFROST'. Freezing conditions To remove ice from the windshield the temperature control should be set in the 'HOT' position and the air control set in the 'BOOST' position. The air control should remain in the 'OFF' position until the engine is warm enough to heat the incoming air. Switch on the blower if stationary or travelling at a low speed. General Information 4

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com GENERAL

INFORMATION-continued

Cold weather To prevent mist forming on the windshield and to ensure maximum circulation of warm air to the interior of the car the air control should be set midway between the 'DEMIST' and 'DEFROST' positions and the temperature control in the 'WARM' position. The air intake control should remain in the 'OFF' position until the engine is warm enough to heat the incoming air. Switch on the blower if stationary or travelling at a low speed. Warm weather When a general circulation of cold air through the interior of the car is required the air control should be moved to the 'DEFROST' position and the temperature control moved to the 'COLD' position. Switch on the blower to increase the supply of air. Hot weather To ensure a supply of air at head level the air control should be moved to the 'BOOST' position and the temper ature control moved to the 'OFF' position. Switch on the blower to increase the supply of air.

CAR NUMBER IDENTIFICATION CODE The car number symbol consists of three letters and one figure followed by a fifth prefix letter (L) if the vehicle is left-hand drive, and then by the serial number of the vehicle. The first letter when related to the code provides an indication of the make of the vehicle- Morris, etc. The second letter pro vides an indication of the model's cubic capacit y. The third letter indicates the type of body-4-door Saloon, etc. The first figure indicate s the series of model, I, 2, etc. 1st Prefix Letter- arne A-Austin M-Morris G--M.G. R-Riley H-Healey W-Wolseley

A-Ambulance C-Chassis D'--Coupe E-G.P.O. Engineers G-G.P.O. Mail H-Hearse

2nd Prefix Letter-Model (cubic capacity) A-SQO-999 c.c, G -lOOO-1399 c.c, B-2000-2999 c.c. H-1400-1999 c.c, D-3000-3999 c.c, L-up to 799 C.c

3rd Prefix Letter-Body type J-Convertible P-Hard top K-Truck Q-Chassis and Cab R-Chassis and Scuttle L-Hire-car M-Limousine S-4-door Saloon N-2-seal Tourer 2S-2-door Saloon

T-4-seat Tourer U-Pick-up V-Van W-Dual-purpose X-Taxi

4th Prefix-Series of model (1, 2, etc., used to record a major change) 5th Prefix (used when vehicles differ from standard R.H.D.) L-Left-hand drive. Code Example MHSI 1001

Morris Oxford (Series V). l ssue 2. 29549

General Information .5


www.morrisoxford.com GENERAL

INFORMATION-continued

LOCATION OF MAJOR COMPONENT SERIAL NUMBERS The major components of the vehicle have serial numbers. When in communication with the Comp any or your Dealer always quote the car and engine numbers. The registration number is of no assistance and is not required. The engine number is stamped on a plate fixed to the right-hand side of the cylinder block. Other major components have their serial numbers sta mped upon them and their locations are illustrated below.

COMMUNICATING WITH THE COMPA NY For all Home Trade inquiries the add ress is: MORRIS MOTORS LIMITED, OXFORD.

For all Overseas inquiries the add ress is: NUFFIELD EXPORTS LIMITED, COWLEY , OXFORD, ENGLAND.

Telegraphic address: VOITUREITE, T ELEX, OXFORD. Telephone: OXFORD 77777. Telex: VOITURE, OXFORD 15- 531.

Cab les: MOR EX, OXFORD, ENGLAND. Telephone: OXFORD, ENG LAND, 77733. Telex: 83133 MOR EX, OX FORD, ENGLAND.

Engine Numb er. This is stamp ed on a plate secured to the right-hand side of the cylinder block above the oil filter

Car (Chassis) Number. This is stamped on a plate mounted on the bulkhea d under the bonnet

--~

9372

Gearbox Number. St amped on top of the gearbox casing adjacent 10 the dipstick

Gene ral Informat ion 6

5145

Rear Axle Number. St amped on the left-hand rear axle tube adjacent to the blimp rubber

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 29549


www.morrisoxford.com GENE RAL

INF O RMATION-continued

POWER UNIT SERIAL NUMBER CODING The engine number on later models compri ses a series of letters and numbers, presenting in code the capacity, make and type of unit, ancillaries fitted , and the type of compression together with the serial number of the unit. 1st Prefix Group-Cubic capacity, make, and type Ist Prefix number 8-803 C.c. Ist Prefix letter 9-950 C.c. 12-1200 C.c. 15-1500 C.c. 16-1600 C.c. 22-2200 C.c. 25-2500 c.c, 26-2600 c.c. 2nd Prefix letter A-Z used for the variations of engine type 2nd Prefix Group-Gearbox and ancillaries A-Automatic gearbox M-Manumatic clutch N-Steering column gear change gearbox O -Overdrive (Borg-Warner) P-Police specification U-Centre or side gear change gearbox

A-Z A-Austin B-B.M .C. Industrials G-M.G. H-Miscellaneous special J-Commercial M-Morris R-Riley W-Wolseley

3rd Group-Compression and serial number H-High compression . and serial number of umt L- Low compressIOn

J'

.

Code Example 15M C - U -HI234 - - , - - - - - - - - - - -,Serial Number " - - - - - - - - - - - - H i g h Compression

I- - - - - - - - - - - - C e n t r e Gear Change Gearbox

I· - - - - - - - - - - -- --1500 c.c. Morris Oxford

A new engine number prefix consisting of the letters 'AMW' has been introduced from the following engine numbers: 15AMW-U-H101 15AMW-N-H701 l5AMW-U-L601 l5AMW-N-L801 The new prefix letters supersede the first and second prefix letters of the power unit serial number coding. RECO NDITIONED ENGINES _ The engine bore and crankshaft sizes on a factory-reconditioned engine are indicated by code letters following the . , engine numbers stamped below and to the rear of the petrol pump aperture. The bore size is indicated by the first letter and the crankshaft size by the last letter. The code used is as follows: Bore DIS Standard

·020 in. ·030 in.

Code A B C D E F G

Crankshaft VIS Standard ·012 in. ·015 in. ·020 in. ·025 in. ·030 in. ·035 in.

Bore DIS ·040 in.

·060 in.

Code H J K L M

Crankshaft otS ·040 in. ·045 in. ·050 in. ·055 in. ·060 in.

Exa mples Engine No. Z698DD would indicate a reconditioned engine have a bore ·020 in. oversize and a crankshaft ·020 in. undersize. Engine No. Z896MD would indicate a reconditioned engine having a bore ·060 in. oversize and a crankshaft ·020 in. undersize. CLAIMS UNDER WARRANTY Claims for the replacement of material or parts under Warranty must always be submitted to the supplying Distributor or Dealer, or, when this is not possible, to the nearest Distributor or Dealer, informing them of the Vendor's name and address. Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 30713

General Information 7


www.morrisoxford.com GENERAL

INFO RMATION-continued

PRESERVATIVE ON EXPORT CARS To remove the hard film preservative from the external plated parts a cloth dipped in a solution of equal parts of white spirit and petrol (gasoline) should be used. Take care to keep this solvent from anything other th an the plated components.

IDENTIFICAn ON OF UNIFIED SCREW THREADS The general standardization of Unified screw threads makes it necessary to identify all nuts, bolts, and set screw s with the se threads in order to ensure their being matched with correspondingly threaded components and the fittin g of correct replacements. Identification has been standardized a nd is effected in the following manner : Nuts. By a circular groove turned on the end face of the nut or by connected circles stamped on one flat of the hex agon . Bolts and set screws. By a circular depression turned on the head or by connected circles stamped on one flat of the hexagon. Wheel stu d nuts. By a notch cut in all the corners of the hexagon. It is of the utmost importance that any nuts, bolts, or set screws marked with the above identifications a re used only in conjunction with associated components having Unified threads and that only replacement parts with Unified threads are used, as these are not interchangeable with Whitworth, B.S .F., or Metric threads. The Unified thread is, however, interchangeable with the American National F ine (A.N.F.) thread for all practical purposes. S panners. It is to be noted that all A.N.F.- and Unified-threaded nuts and hexagon-headed bolts ar e made to the standard American hexagon sizes and that spanners of the appropriate size mu st be used when tightening or loosening them.

KEY TO SPANNER SIZES (Nominal widths between jaws) Diameter ofscrew thread (inches)

-.t"

I

1\ "

i"

-ii" "

·f

-&"

i"

r

r

I"

For B.S.F. screws and nuts

·448

·529

·604

·705

·825

·925

1·016

1·207

1·309

1·489

For A.N.F. screws and nuts

·440

·504

·566

·629

·755

·880

·944

1·132

1·320

1·508

For Unified screws

·440

·504

·566

·630

·755

·817

·943

1·132

1·321

1·509

For Un ified nuts (normal)

·440

·504

·566

·692

·755

·880

·943

1·132

1·321

1·509

-

-

-

1·069

1·258

1·446

-

For Unified nuts (heavy)

-

-

-

-

NOTE.-In the case of some Unified-threaded components the size of the hexagon for the nut is different from that of the bolt. Where this occurs the spanner size is shown in heavy type in the above table. .

PART NAME ALTERNATIVES Part Name Engine

Gudgeon pin Scraper ring Core plug Oil sump

Alt ernatives Piston pin. Small-end pin . Wrist pin . Oil control ring. Expansion plug. Welch plu g. Sealin g disc . Oil pan. Oil reservoir.

Controls

Mixture control

Choke. Strangler.

Gearbox

Gear lever Change speed fork First motion shaft Layshaft

Shift lever . Shift fork. Selector fork . Clutch shaft. First reduction pinion. Main dri ve pinion. Drive gea r Countershaft.

Axle

Crown wheel Bevel pinion 'U' bolts Axle shaft Differential gear Differential pinion

Ring gear. Spiral drive gear. Small pinion. Spiral drive pinion. Spring clips. Half-shaft. Hub driving shaft. Jack driving shaft. Sun wheel. Planet wheel.

Ge nera l Information 8

Morris Oxford (Series V) . Issue 3. 30713


www.morrisoxford.com GENERAL

INFORMATION-continued

Steering

Swivel pin Stub axle Track-rod Draglink

Pivot pin. Steering pin. King pin. Swivel axle. Cross-tube. Side-tube. Steering connecting rod.

Electrica l

Dynamo Control box

Generator. Voltage regulator. Cut-out. Voltage control.

Exhaust

Silencer

Muffler.

Body

Bonnet Wing

Hood. Mudguard. Fender.

FROST PRECAUTIONS Steps must be taken to prevent the water in the cooling system from freezing during frosty weather. Water, when it freezes, expands, with the result that there is a very considerable risk of bursting either the radiator, heater elemen or the cylinder block by the pressure generated. Since no provision is made for draining the heater unit, draining the radiator and cylinder block is not a sufficient safeguard. The cooling system is of the sealed type and relatively high temperatures are developed in the radiator upper tank. For this reason anti-freeze solutions having an alcohol base are unsuitable owing to their high evaporation rate producing a rapid loss of coolant and a consequent interruption of circulation. Only anti-freeze of the ethylene glycol type incorporating the correct type of corrosion inhibitor is suitable, and owners are recommended to use Bluecol , Shell Snowflake, Esso Anti-freeze, or any other anti-freeze which conforms to Specification B.S.315 1 or B.S.3152. The recommended quantities of anti-freeze for different degrees of frost are:

Down to F. (-14° C.) 15% solution Quantity I i pints (I litre)

r

Down to 0° F. (-18° C.) 20% solution Quantity 2!- pints (1,42 litres)

Where temperatures below 0° F. (-18° C.) are likely to be encountered a solution of at least 25 per cent. of antifreeze must be used to ensure immunity from trouble. Consult the makers on this matter. First decide what degree of frost protection is required before adding the anti-freeze. Make sure that the cooling system is watertight and examine all joints, renewing any defective rubber hose. Before adding anti-freeze to the cooling system it is advisable to clean the cooling system thoroughly by swilling out the water passages with a hose inserted in the filler, and with the drain taps open. Avoid excessive topping up, otherwise there is a risk of losing valuable anti-freeze due to expansion of the solution. Top up only when the system is at its normal running temperature. Generally speaking, anti-freeze is not injurious to cellulose paint provided it is wiped off in reasonable time. Do not use radiator anti-freeze in the windshield-washing equipment. ROOF RACK (WHE FIITED AS A ACCESSO RY) The roof rack must be regarded as a means of carrying bulky rather than heavy articles of luggage, i.e. articles which by virtue of their shape or size cannot be stowed conveniently inside the vehicle. Any weight carried on the roof must have an adverse effect on the handling of the vehicle, which must be driven with due discretion. A straight ride will not be influenced to any great degree, although cornering and behaviour in a cross-wind will be different due to the change in position of the centre of gravity and the centre of pressure. Weight in excess of 75 lb. (34 kg.) should not be carried on the roof. RUt

I I lG-IN SPEEDS The treatment given to a new car will have an important bearing on its subsequent life, and engine speeds during this early period must be limited. The following instructions should be strictly adhered to.

During the first 500 miles (800 km.) DO NOT exceed 45 m .p .h. (72 km .p.h.), DO NOT operate at full throttle in any gear. DO NOT allow the engine to labour in any gear.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

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General Information 9


www.morrisoxford.com GENE RAL INFO RMATION-continued REPLE SHING THE FUEL TA1'\TJ{ Considerable loss of fuel can occur as a result of filling the fuel tank until the fuel is visible in the filler tube. If this is done, and the vehicle is left in the sun, expansion due to heat will cause leakage, consequent loss of, and danger from exposed fuel. When filling up the tank: (1) Avoid filling the tank until the fuel is visible in the filler tube. (2) If the tank is inadvertently overfilled, take care to park the vehicle in the shade with the filler as .high as possible

General Information 10

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 29549


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MAINTENANCE ATTENTION 500 MILES (800 Km.) FREE SERVICE ATIENTION During the early life of the ear, soon after it has completed 500 miles (800 km.), you are entitled to have it inspected free of charge by the Morris Dealer from whom you purchased it, or, if this should not be convenient, by any other Morris Dealer by arrangement. This attention given during the critical period in the life of the ear makes all the difference to its subsequent life and performance.

This service includes: I. Tighten cylinder head a nd manifold nuts to recommended pressures. 2. Check tightness of valve rocker shaft brackets to recommended pressures. 3. Check valve rocker clearances, and reset if necessary. 4. Tighten fan belt if necessary. 5. Check all water connections , and tighten clips if necessary. 6. Examine and clean carburetter, and reset slow-running adjustment if necessa ry. 7. Examine, and adjust if necessary, sparking plugs and distributor points. 8. Check working of automatic ignition controls and, if necessary, reset ignition timing. 9. Check clutch pedal for free movement, and bleed if necessary. 10. Check Girting fluid level in master cylinder, and top up if necessary. II. Check front wheel alignment and steering connections. Adjust if necessary.

12. Check braking system functionally, and bleed lines if necessary. 13. Check Girting fluid level in master cylinder, and top up if necessary. 14. Inspect hydraulic dampers for leaks, and check the mounting bolts for tightness. Examine oil levels, and top up if necessary. IS. Check doors for ease in opening and closing. If necessary, lightly smear with a suitable lubricating agent all dovetails and striking plates. 16. Check electrical system functionally. 17. Examine battery and top up to correct level with distilled water as necessary . Clean and tighten terminals. 18. Check tightness of universal joint nuts, spring clips, and wing (fender) bolts. 19. Drain oil from engine, gearbox, and rear axle and refill. 20. Top up oil level in steering box and steering idler. 21. Oil and grease all points of the car. 22. Test tyres for correct pressures. 23. Check tightness of wheel nuts.

Regular servicing, as proven by presentation of completed voucher counterfoils, could well enhance the value of your vehicle in the eyes of a prospective purchaser. ALL MATERIALS CHARGEABLE TO THE CUSTOMER PERIODICAL Daily Check oil level in crankcase. Top up if necessary. Check water level in radiator. Top up if necessary.

Weekly Test tyre pressures, and regulate if necessary. 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service I. Engine Top up carburetter piston dashpot Lubricate carburetter controls. Top up radiator. Check level of oil in air cleaner (oil bath type only). 2. Clutch Check level of Girling fluid in the hydraulic clutch master cylinder. 3. Brakes Check brake pedal free travel and report if adjustment is requ ired. Make visual inspection of brake lines and pipes. Check level of Girting fluid in hydraulic brake master cylinder. 4. Hydraulic dumpers Examine all hydraulic dampers for leaks. 5. Electrical Check battery cell specific gravity readings and top up to correct level. 6. Lubrication Top up oil levels in engine, gearbox, rear axle, steering box, and steering idler. Lubricate all nipples. 7. Wheels and tyres Check tyre pressures. Check wheel nuts for tightness.

2,000 miles (3200 km.) service Carry out the 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service.

3,000 miles (4800 km.) service I. Engine Top up carburetter piston dashpot, Lubricate carburetter controls. Top up rad iator. Clean and re-oil air cleaner (oil bath type only). Check dynamo drive belt tension. 2. Ignition Clean and adjust sparking plugs.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29549

3. Clutch Check level of Girling fluid in the hydraulic clutch master cylinder. 4. Brakes Check brakes, and adjust if necessary. Make visual inspection of brake lines and pipes. Check level of Girting fluid in the hydraulic brake master cylinder. 5. Hydraulic dampers Examine all hydraulic dampers for leaks. 6. Body Lubricate door locks and hinges, bonnet lock, and operating mechanism. 7. Electrical Check battery ceIl specific gravity readings and top up to correct level. 8. Lubrication Change engine oil. Top up oil levels in gearbox, rear axle, steering box. and steering idler. Lubricate all nipples. 9. Wheels and tyres Change wheels round diagonaIly, including spare, to regularize tyre wear. Check tyre pressures. 4,000 miles (6400 krn.) service Carry out the 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service. 5,000 miles (8000 km.) service Carry out the 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service. 6,000 miles (9600 km.) service I. Engine Top up carburetter piston dash pot. Lubricate carburetter controls. Top up radiator. Check dynamo drive belt tension. Lubricate water pump sparingly. Check valve rocker clearanc es, and adjust if necessary. Clean and re-oil air cleaner (oil bath type only). 2. Ignition Check automatic ignition control. lubricating drive shaft, cam, and advance mechanism. Check, and adjust if necessary, distributor contact points. Clean and adjust sparking plugs. 3. Clutch Check level of Girling fluid in the hydraulic clutch master cylinder.

Maintenance Attention 1


www.morrisoxford.com MAINTENANCE

ATTENTION-continued

6,000 miles (9600 km.) service-continued 4. Brakes Check brakes , and adjust if necessary. Make visual inspection of brake lines and pipes. Check level of Girling fluid in the hydraulic brake master cylinder. S. Hydraulic dampers Examine all hydraulic dampers for leaks, and top up if necessary. 6. General Tighten rear road spring seat bolts. 7. Body Check, and tighten if necessary, door hinges and striker plate securing screws. Lubricate door locks and hinges, bonnet lock, and operating mechanism. 8. Electrical Check battery cell specific gravity readings and top up to correct level. 9. Lubrication Change oil in engine, gearbox, and rear axle. Fit new oil filter element. Top up oil level in steering box and steering idler. Lubricate all nipples. Repack front hub caps with grease. 10. Wheels and tyres Change wheels round diagonally, including spare, to regularize tyre wear. Check tyre pressures. Check wheel alignment. 7,000 miles (11200 km.) service Carry out the 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service. 8,000 miles (12800 km.) service Carry out the 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service. 9,000 miles (14400 km.) service Carry out the 3,000 miles (4800 km.) service. 10,000 miles (16000 km.) service Carry out the 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service. 11,000 miles (17600 km.) service Carry out the 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service. 12,000 miles (19200 km.) service 1. Engine Remove carburetter suction chamber and piston, clean, reassemble, and top up. Remove carburetter float-ehamber, empty sediment, and refit. Lubricate carburetter controls. Check valve rocker clearances, and adjust if necessary. Clean and re-oil air cleaner (oil bath type only). Check dynamo drive belt tension. Lubricate water pump sparingl y. Fit new air cleaner element (dry type only).

Maintenance Attention 2

2. Ignition Check automatic ignition control, lubricating drive shaft, cam, and advance mechanism. Check, and adjust if necessary, distributor contact points. Fit new sparking plugs. 3. Clutch Check level of Girling fluid in the hydraulic clutch master cylinder. 4. St eering Check steering and suspension moving parts for wear. 5. Brakes Check brakes, and adjust if necessary. Make visual inspection of brake lines and pipes. Check level of Girling fluid in the hydraulic brake master cylinder. 6. Hydraulic dampers Examine all hydraulic dampers for leaks, and top up if necessary. 7. Radiator Drain, flush out, and refill radiator. 8. General Tighten rear road spring seat bolts. 9. Body Check, and tighten if necessary, door hinges and striker plate securing screws. Lubricate door locks and hinges, bonnet lock, and operating mechanism. 10. Electrical Check battery cell specific gravity readings and top up to correct level. Lubricate dynamo bearing. II. Lubrication Drain engine oil, flush out with flushing oil, and refill with engine oil. Change oil in gearbox and rear axle. Fit new oil filter element. Lubricate all nipples. Top up oil level in steering box and steering idler. Repack front hub caps with grease. Lubricate speedometer cable. 12. Wheels and tyres Change road wheels round diagonally, including spare, to regularize tyre wear. Check tyre pressures. Check wheel alignment. 13. Headlamps Check headlamp beam setting, and reset if necessary.

24,000 miles (38400 km.) service Carry out the 12,000 miles (19200 km.) service, with the following amendment: 11. Lubrication Remove engine sump and pick-up strainer, clean, and reassemble, filling with fresh oil.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

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A

SECTION A THE ENGINE Section Description Lubrication system Bearings- main and big-end

A.5

Camshaft Bearings Middle bearing liner Modified camshaft Removing and replacing

A.25 A.28 A.29 A.24

Crankshaft-removing and replacing

A.27

Cylinder head -removing and replacing

A.8

Deca rbonizing

A.15

Flywheel -removing and replacing

A.26

Gudgeon pins-fitting

A.II

Oil pressure .. Relief valve

A.3 A.2

Oil pump-removing and rep lacing

AA

Piston and connecting rods Dismantling and reassembling Removing and replacing

A. 10 A.9

Piston rings-removing and replacing

A.12

Piston sizes and cylinder bores

A.13

Rocker clearances

A.19

Rocker shaft Assembly-removing and replacing .. Bushes-removing and replacing

A.6 A.7

Sump - draining

A.I

Tappets-removing and replacing

A.18

Timing chain Cover-removing and replacing Removing and replacing Tensioner-dismantJing and reassembling

..-\.21 A.22 A.23 End of Section

Tools-service Valves Grinding Guides-removing and replacing Removing and replacing Timing ..

A.16 A.17 A.14 A.20

For additional information see Section AA

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 30713

A.I


www.morrisoxford.com

A

THE ENGINE DESCRIPTION

The overhead-valve engine is built in unit construction with a single dry-plate clutch. The valves are set in line in the detachable cylinder head and are operated by rockers and push-rods from the camshaft in the left-hand side of the engine. Oil seals are fitted to the valves and there is the normal provision for clearance adjustment. The camshaft, running in three steel-backed, whitemetal bearings, is chain driven and the timing chain is provided with a synthetic rubber slipper-type tensioner. The oil pump, distributor, and, when fitted, engine revolution counter are driven from the camshaft, each having its own drive shaft. The pistons are of aluminium alloy with anodized finish, and carry three compression rings and a slotted oil control ring. The gudgeon pins are clamped in connecting rods which have steel-backed renewable big-end bearings. Three steel-backed white-metal renewable bearings support the forged-steel counterbalanced crankshaft. The thrust is taken by special washers at the centre main bearing. The renewable element oil filter is secured by its centre-bolt to the right-hand side of the engine. A centrifugal water pump and fan are driven from the crankshaft pulley by the dynamo belt.

LUBRICATION SYSTEM An eccentric-type oil pump inside the crankcase is driven from the camshaft by a short vertical shaft. Oil is drawn into the pump through a gauze strainer and is delivered through crankcase drillings to a non-adjustable plunger-type relief valve located at the rear of the engine on the left-hand side. From the relief valve oil passes to the main oil gallery. Drillings from the main oil gallery supply oil to the main, big-end, and camshaft bearings. The connecting rod ends are drilled and supply oil to the cylinder walls. From the rear camshaft bearing oil passes through the block and a drilling in the rear rocker shaft bracket to lubricate the rockers, returning to the sump via the pushrod holes.

Section A.2 OIL PR ESSURE RELIEF VALVE The non-adjustable oil pressure relief valve is situated at the rear of the left-hand side of the cylinder block and is held in position by a domed hexagon nut sealed by two fibre washers. The relief valve spring maintains a valve cup against a seating machined in the block. The valve should be examined to ensure that the cup is seating correctly and that the relief spring has not lost its tension. The latter can be checked by measuring the length of the spring. The valve seating can be examined by applying engineers' blue to the valve surface and testing for a continuous marking. Should the seating be damaged, the valve must be lapped in, using service tool 18G69. The small knurled knob on the end of this tool is turned to compress the rubber sleeve and increase the diameter until, when pressed into the valve, it will hold it securely while it is lapped to its seat. The correct relief pressure and the spring length are given in ' GENE RAL DATA'.

Section A.3 OIL P RESSU RE The oil pressures under normal running and engine idling conditions may be found in ' GENE RAL DATA'. Should there be a noticeable drop in pressure, the following points should be checked: (1) That there is a good supply of the correct grade of oil in the engine sump. (2) That the strainer in the sump is clean and not choked with sludge. (3) That the bearings, to which oil is fed under pressure, have the correct working clearances. Should the bearings be worn and the clearances excessive, the oil will escape more readily from

Section A.I DRAINING THE SUMP The sump on new and reconditioned engines must be drained and then filled with new oil after the first 500 miles (800 km.) and at intervals of every 3,000 miles (4800 km.). The hexagon-headed drain plug is at the rear of the sump on the right-hand side. The sump should be drained when the engine is hot as the oil will flow more readily; allow it to drain for at least 10 minutes before the drain plug is replaced. Fit a new oil filter element every 6,000 miles (9600 km.) or every alternate oil change. A.2

Fig. A.I The oil relief valve grinding-in tool 18G69 Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713

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THE ENGINE the sides of the bearings, particularly when the oil is warm and becomes more fluid. This will cause a drop in pressure on the gauge as compared with that shown when the bearings are in good order. (4) That the external oil filter element is not becoming choked. A drop of between 10 to 15 lb.jsq. in. ('7 to 1路05 kg.jcm.") below normal pressure is an indication that the element is being by-passed and that it should be renewed to restore the oil pressure to normal. The automatic relief valve in the lubrication system deals with any excessive oil pressure when starting from cold. When the engine is hot the oil is more fluid and the pressure drops. Continuous cold running and unnecessary use of the mixture control are often the cause of serious oil dilution by fuel, with a consequent drop in oil pressure. Particular attention is called to the recommended change of oil every 3,000 miles (4800 km.) .

Section A.4 REMOVI G AND REPLACING THE OIL PUMP

Remove the sump (Section AA.6) and the oil pump strainer. Unscrew the three nuts from the studs securing the pump to the crankcase and remove the pump and drive shaft. The oil pump cover is attached to the body of the pump by two bolts and spring washers, and when these bolts are removed the oil pump cover, the outer rotor, and the combined oil pump shaft and inner rotor may be extracted .

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Reassembly is a reversal of the above procedure, but remember to use a new joint washer when refitting the pump.

Section A.5 REMOVL~G

A D REPLACI G MAIN AND BIG-E D BEARINGS

Unless the bearing journals are badly worn the bigend bearings may be renewed without removing the crankshaft. To renew the main bearings it is necessary to withdraw the crankshaft as detailed in Section A.27. Liners are used both for the main and big-end bearings, which are of the shimless type and therefore non-adjustable. Big-end bearings

Drain the engine oil and remove the sump as detailed in Section AA.6. As the bearings are of the shimless type it is essential that no attempt should be made to adjust bearings that are worn. Always fit new bearings in place of worn parts. If the crankshaft journals are found to be in a worn condition it is advisable to fit a service reground crankshaft, complete with main and big-end bearings, as supplied by B.M.C. Service Ltd. Both the big-end and main bearing liners are located in position in the bearing housings by a small tag on one side of each half-bearing, and it should be noted that the bearings are fitted so that the tags come on the same joint edge of the bearing housing, although on opposite corners. To detach the big-end bearings bend down the locking strips so that the bolts may be removed. Remove the connecting rod caps and extract the bearings. Care should be exercised to see that the bearing journals, etc., are thoroughly cleaned before installing new bearings. No scraping is required, as the bearings are machined to give the correct diametrical clearance. Main bearings

Fig. A.2 The arrows indicate the oil pump securing nuts Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

Remove the engine from the vehicle and remove the clutch and flywheel, the timing chain, the sump and strainer, and the rear engine mounting plate. Remove the self-locking nuts securing the main bearing caps to the cylinder block and the two bolts securing the front cap to the front engine bearer plate. The removal of the main bearing caps is made easier by the use of the impulse extractor 18G284 together with the adaptor 18G284A. Note that a thrust washer is fitted on each side of the centre main bearing to take the crankshaft end-thrust. These thrust washers each consist of two semicircular halves, one half having a lug which is located in a recess in the detachable half of the bearing and the other being plain. When fitting new bearings no scraping is required as the bearings are machined to give the correct diametrical clearance. In the case of a 'run' bearing it is always essential to clean out thoroughly all the oilways in the crankshaft

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Fig. A.3 A connecting rod bearing assembly. Note the bearing locating tab and block,wash out the engine base in paraffin (kerosene), and clean the oil pump and pump strainer to ensure that no particles of white metal are left anywhere in the lubricating system. The rear main bearing cap horizontal joint surfaces should be thoroughly cleaned and lightly covered with Wel-Seal (manufactured by Messrs. Wellworthy Ltd.) sealing compound before the cap is fitted to the cylinder block. This will ensure a perfect oil seal when the cap is bolted down to the block. Replace each main bearing and cap, replacing the thrust washers in their correct positions at the centre main bearing with the oil grooves away from the bearing. Refit the locking strips or plates to each bearing cap and bend them to lock the bolts after tightening them to the recommended torque (see 'GENERAL DATA'). NOTE.-The two bolts securing the front main bearing cap to the front bearer plate are locked by a common plate.

a turn at a time, in the order shown in Fig. A.6, until all the load has been released . NOTE.-It may be seen from Fig. A.6 that four of the rocker shaft bracket fixing nuts also serve to retain the cylinder head; therefore it is essential to drain the cooling system and slacken all 11 cylinder head nuts to avoid distortion of the cylinder head and the possibility of water entering the cylinder and sump. Unscrew the remaining four rocker shaft bracket nuts and remove the rocker assembly complete with brackets and rockers. Withdraw the eight push-rods. storing them carefully so that they may be replaced in their original positions. To dismantle the rocker shaft assembly, first remove the grub screw which locates the rocker shaft in the rear rocker mounting bracket and remove the split pins, flat washers, and spring washers from each end of the shaft. Slide the rockers, brackets, and springs from the shaft. Unscrew the plug from the front end of the shaft and clean out the oilways. Reassembly and replacement is a reversal of the above procedure. Remember to replace the rockers and springs in their original positions on the shaft and to replace the rocker shaft locating screw lock plate. Replace the rocker cover with the vent pipe to the front. Check that the two cap nut rubber bushes and the rocker cover cork gasket are undamaged; if they are found to be faulty fit new ones or oil leaks may result.

Section A.7 REMOVII 'G AND REPLACING ROCKER SHAFT B SHES The removing and replacing of rocker shaft bushes is assisted by the lise of service tool 18G226. The anvil of this tool is recessed to retain the rocker while the bush is removed and replaced and the flange of the bush driver is recessed to prevent the split bush from opening (sec Fig. A.7).

Section A.6 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE ROCKER ASSEMBLY Drain the cooling system, using a clean container for the coolant if it contains anti-freeze which is to be used again. Release the breather pipe from the front of the rocker cover. On models where the air cleaner is fitted above the rocker cover the cleaner should be removed as instructed in Section AA.I. Unscrew the two nuts and lift off the rocker cover, taking care not to damage the cork gasket or lose the washers and rubber seals. Notice that under the right-hand rear rocker stud nut is a special locking plate (see Fig. A.5). Unscrew the 11 cylinder head retaining nuts gradually

AA

Fig. AA Using the impulse extractor 18G284 and adaptor 18G284A to withdraw the main bearing caps Morris Oxford (Series V).

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When fitting a new bush the split joint must be in line with a point just above the oil hole on the adjusting screw side. When the bush is in position remove the small plug from the end of this oil hole, and, using a ·OJ3 in. (2,355 mm.) diameter drill , drill through the bu sh. Use a No. 47, ·0785 in . (1'98 mm.) diameter drill in the second oil hole on top of the rocker and drill through the bush. Burnish-ream the bush to ·6255 to ·626 in. (15,883 to 15·895 mm.) diameter to remove any b urr s and, finally, re-plug the oil hole on the adjusting screw side, using a new plug, which should be welded in pos ition.

Section A.S REMOVING AND REPLA CI NG THE CYLINDER H EAD AS SEM BLY Drain the water from the cooling system. One drain tap is at the base of the radiator and the other is at the rear of the engine on the right-hand side . If anti-freeze mixture is being used it should be drained into a suitable container an d placed aside for future use. Remove the top water hose . Remove the three thermostat housing securing nuts and washers and remove the ho using and thermostat. Remove the ai r cleaner and carburetter as detailed in Section AA.I. Remove the inlet and exhaust manifolds as detailed in Sectio n AAA. The heater pipe, if fitted, should be withdrawn from the studs. Rem o ve the rocker assembly as detailed in Section A .6 a nd remove the seven externa l cylinder head nuts at th e same ti me, slackening them in t he same order as t hat show n in Fig. A .6. Wi thd raw the push-rods, kee ping the m in th e orde r of t heir removal. Detach t he high -tension cables and remove t he spa rk ing plugs, taking care not to damage the porcelai n insulators.

Fig. A .6 The correct order of tightening and slackening the cylinder head retaining nuts Unscrew and remove the thermal transmitter from t he front of the cylinder head Release the ignit ion vacuum contro l pipe from the rear cylinder hea d stud and remove the cylinder head. To facilitate breaking the joint, tap each side of the cylinder head with a hammer. using a piece of wood interposed to check the blow. When lifting the head a direct pull should be given to withdraw it evenly up the studs. Refitting th e cylinder head M ake sure that the surfaces of bot h the cylinder head an d the cylinder block are clean . It will be noticed that the cylinde r head gasket is marked 'FRONT' a nd

Fig. A.5

Fig. A.7

The rock er shaft locating screw is lock ed by this plate on the rear rocker shaft bracket

Renewing a rock er shaft bush with the aid of service too/18G226

Morri s Oxford (Series V)

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'TOP' to assist in replacing it correctly. With the gasket in position over the studs, lower the cylinder head into position. Replace the vacuum control pipe clip and fit the seven external cylinder head nuts finger-tight. Replace the push-rods in the positions from which they were taken. Replace the rocker assembly and tighten the securing nuts finger-tight. Tighten the II nuts securing the cylinder head a turn at a time in the order given in Fig. A.6 and to the torque figure given in ' GE ERAL DATA'. Finally, tighten the four remaining rocker bracket nuts. Reassembly continues in the reverse order to the dismantling procedure. Switch on the ignition and check the fuel system for leaks. Start the engine and allow it to run until the normal running temperature is reached. Remove the rocker cover and check once more that the cylinder head nuts are to the correct torque tightness. Check the valve rocker clearances (see Section A. I9) and refit the rocker cover, using a new gasket if the condition of the old one is at all doubtful.

Section A.9 REMOVING AND REPLACING PISTONS AND CO ECTI G RODS Remove the cylinder head (see Section A.8). Drain and remove the sump and oil strainer (see Section AA.6). The pistons and connecting rods must be withdrawn from the top of the cylinder block. Unlock and remove the big-end bolts and remove the bea ring caps. Release the connecting rod from the crankshaft. Withdraw the piston and connecting rod from the top of the cylinder block an d refit the bearing cap. The big-end bearing caps are offset, and the caps on the big-ends in os. I and 3 cylinders are interchangeable when new, as are those for os. 2 and 4 cylinders. When used parts are replaced after dismantling it is essential that they are fitted in their original positions. In order to ensure this, mark the caps and connecting rods on the sides which are fitted together with the number of the cylinder from which each was taken. If the piston rings have been removed see Section A. 12 for refitting procedure. Replacement of the piston and connecting rod is a reversal of the above procedure, but the piston ring gaps must be set at 180 to each other. Compress the piston rings with service tool 18G55A and gently tap the crown of the piston with the end of a hammer handle until the piston is clear of the piston ring clamp. It is essential that the connecting rod and piston assemblies are replaced in their own bores and fitted the same way round, i.e. with the gudgeon pin clamp screw on the camshaft side of the engine. The piston crowns are marked 'FRONT' to assist correct assembly to the connecting rods. Refit the big-end bearings in their original positions. 0

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Fig. A.8 Inserting a piston with the aid of service tool 18G55A to compress the piston rings

Section A.IO DISMA 'T LING Ai 'D REASSEMBLIi G P ISTO Ai D CONNECTlJ.~G ROD ASSEMBLIES The gudgeon pin is rigidly held in the split little-end of the connecting rod by a clamp bolt engaging the central groove of the gudgeon pin. Before the piston and gudgeon pin can be dismantled fro m the connecting rod it is necessary to remove the clamp screw. To enable the assembly to be held in a vice for this operation without damage holding plugs should be inserted in each end of the gudgeon pin. Unscrew the gudgeon pin clamp screw and remove it completely. Push out the gudgeon pin. Reassembly is a reversal of the above. IMPORTANT.- Att ention must be given to the following points when assembling the piston to the connecting rod : (I) That the piston is fitted the correct way round on the connecting rod. The crown of the piston is marked 'FRO T' to assist this, and the connecting rod must be fitted with the gudgeon pin clamp screw on the camshaft side. (2) That the gudgeon pin is positioned in the connecting rod so that its groove is in line with the clamp screw hole. (3) That the clamp screw spring washer has sufficient tension. (4) That the clamp screw will pass readily into its hole and screw freely into the threaded portion of the little-end, and also that it will hold firmly onto the spring washer.

Section A.II FITTI G GU DGEON PI 'S A certain amount of selective assembly must be used when fitting new gudgeon pins. They must be a thumbpush fit for three -quarters of their travel, to be finally tapped in with a raw-hide mallet. This operation should be carried out with the piston and the gudgeon pin cold . Morris Oxford (Series V).

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Section A.13 PISTON SIZES AND CYLI DER BORES Besides pistons suitable for a nominal standard bore of 2·875 in. (73'02 mm.) there is a range of four oversize pistons available. Oversize pistons are marked with the actual oversize dimensions enclosed in an ellipse. A piston stamped ·020 is only suitable for a bore ·020 in. ('508 mm.) larger than the standard bore; similarly, pistons with other markings are only suitable for the oversize bore indicated. After reboring an engine, or whenever fitting pistons differing in size from those removed from the engine, ensure that the size of the piston fitted is clearly stamped on the top of the cylinder block alongside the appropriate cylinder bore. Pistons are supplied in the sizes indicated in the table below. Suitable bore size

Metric equivalent

2·8757 in. 2·8760 in.

73·043 rom. 73·050 mm.

2·8857 in. 2·8860 in.

73·297 mm. 73·304 mm.

+020 in. (-508 mm.) ..

2·8957 in. 2·8960 in.

73·551 rom. 73·558 mm.

+030 in. (,762 mm.) ..

2·9057 in. 2·9060 in.

73·805 mm. 73·812 mm.

+040 in. (1,016 mm.) ..

2·9157 in. 2·9160 in.

74·059 mm . 74·066 mm.

Piston marking Fig. A.9

Standard . .

Remove and replace piston rings over the crolVn of the piston. A disused feeler gauge makes removal easier

Section A.12 REMOVING AND REP LACING PISTON RI NGS If no special piston ring expander is available use a piece of thin steel such as a smoothly ground hacksaw blade or a disused ·020 in. (,50 mm.) feeler gauge. Raise one end of the ring out of the groove and insert the steel strip between the ring and the piston. Rotate the strip around the piston, applying slight upward pressure to the raised portion of the ring until it rests on the land above the ring grooves. It can then be eased off the piston. Never remove or replace the piston rings over the piston skirt but always over the top of the piston. Before fitting new rings clean the grooves in the piston to remove any carbon deposit. Care must be taken not to remove any metal, or side-play will result between the ring and the groove, with consequent excessive oil consumption and loss of gastightness. OTE.-Second and third compression rings are ta pered and marked 'T' (top) for correct assembly. Pistons and rings are available in '010, '020, '030, and ·040 in. ('254, '508, '762, and 1·016 mm.) oversizes, and when fitting new rings it is advisable to test them in the cylinder bore to ensure that the ends do not butt together. To do this insert the piston approximately 1 in. (25,4 mm.) into the cylinder bore, insert the ring above it, and press it down onto the top of the piston to ensure that the ring is square with the bore. The gap between the piston ring ends may now be measured with a feeler gauge and ·008 to ·013 in. ('20 to ·33 mm.) are the limits allowed. Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

Oversize: +010 in. (,254 mm.) ..

Section A.14 REMOVI G AND REPLACIN G VALVES Remove the cylinder head as in Section A.8. Remove the valve circlip. Compress the valve spring, using service too118G45, and remove the two valve cotters. Release the valve spring and remove the compressor, valve spring cap, shroud, springes), and bottom collar (if fitted). Remove the valve packing ring from the cotter groove and withdraw the valve from the guide. Keep the valves in their relative positions when removed from the engine to ensure replacement in their original valve guides. The exhaust valve heads are concave and they are smaller in diameter than the inlet valves. To replace the valves place each valve into its guide and fit the bottom collars (if fitted), valve springs, shrouds, and caps. Compress the valve springes) and push a new synthetic rubber packing ring over the tip of the valve stem down to the bottom of the cotter

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Fig. A.IO Parts of the valve assembly. The inset shows the valve packing ring fitted correctly at the bottom of the cotter groove below the cotters groove (see Fig. A.IO). Refit the two valve cotters and remove the compressor. Replace the valve circlip. NOTE.-Do not fit old valve packi ng rings or oil sealing may suffer. The rings are fitted more easily if they have been soaked in clean engine oil for a short period before use.

Section A.IS DE CARBOI TIZ m G Remove the cylinder head as in Section A.8. Withdraw the valves as described in Section A.14. Remove the cylinder head gasket and plug the wate r\\ ays with clean rag.

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If special equipment is no t available for decarbonizing it will be necessary to scrape the carbon deposit from the piston crowns, cylinder block, and cylinder head, using a blunt scraper. A ring of carbon should be left round the periphery of the piston crown and the ring of carbon round the top of the cylinder bore should not be disturbed. To facilitate this an old piston ring can be sprung into the bore so that it rests on top of the piston crown. The cylinder head is next given attention. The sparking plugs must be cleaned, and adjusted. Clean off the carbon deposit from the valve stems, valve ports, and combustion spaces of the cylinder head. Remove all traces of carbon dust with compressed air or by the vigorous use of a tyre pump and then thoroughly wash with paraffin (kerosene) and dry off. Fit a new cylinder head gasket when replacing the head if the old one has been damaged, noting that it is marked to indicate the top face and front end.

Section A.16 GRI DI I G VALVES A D SEA TINGS Remove the valves as in Section A.14. Each valve must be cleaned and carefully examined for pitting. Valves in a pitted condition should be refaced with a suitable grinder or new valves should be fitted. If a valve seat shows signs of pitting or unevenness it should be refaced with the aid of one or more of the special cutting tools that are available, details of which are at the end of Section AA. Special glaze-breaker cutters are available for valve seats which have attained a glasshard surface, also other cutters enable valve seats to be restored to their original dimensions. None of these

Fig. A.ll Shown in the illustration is the use of the spring compressor (service /001 18G45) while replacing the cotters. The arrow indicates the position of the packing ring in the cotter groove below the valve cotters A .8

Fig. A.12

_

Allow the valve to rise f requently from its seat when grinding ill to avoid grooving Morris Oxford (Series V)

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cutters must be used on hardened valve seat inserts; the inserts shou ld be renewed . When grinding a valve onto its seating the valve face should be smeared lightly with fine- or medium-grade carborundum paste and then lapped in with a suctiontype grinding tool (see tool 18G29). The valve must be ground to its seat with a semi-rotary motion. A light coil spring interposed between the valve head and the port will assist considerably when lifting the valve in order to rotate the face to a different position. This should be done frequently to spread the grinding compound evenly. It is necessary to continue the grinding process until an even, mat surface is produced on the seating and the valve face. On completion, the valve seats and ports should be thoroughly cleaned with a fuel-soaked rag, dried , and then subjected to a compressed-air blast. The valves should be washed in fuel and all traces of grinding com pound removed.

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Fig. A.14 The method of adjusting the valve rock er clearance and the correct position for measuring it

Section A.IS

Section A.17

REMOVING A D REPLACING TAPPETS REMOVING AND REPLACI NG VALVE GU IDES Remove the cylinder head as instructed in Section A.8. Remove the valves and springs as in Section A.14. Rest the cylinder head with its machined face downwards on a clean surface and drive the valve guide downwards into the combustion space with a suitable-sized drift. Th is should be in the form of a hardened-steel punch iIr in. (14 mm.) in diameter and not less than 4 in. ( 10 em.) in length , with a locating spigot 166 in. (7'9 mm.) diameter machined on one end for a length of I in. (25'4 mm.) to engage the bore of the guide. OTE.- The exhaust valve guide is longer than the inlet. When fitting new valve guides they should be pressed in from the top of the cylinder head. The inlet valve guid es must be inserted with the end ha ving the largest chamfer at the top, and the exhaust valve guides should have their counterbored ends to the bottom. The valve guides should be driven into the cylinder head until they are ยง in. (15,8 mm.) above the machined surface of the valve spring seating (see Fig. A.13).

Remove the rocker cover. Disconnect and lower the exhaust pipe. Disconnect all attachments to the carburetter(s). Remove the exhaust and inlet manifolds complete with the carburetter(s) . Disconnect the high-tension leads from the sparking plugs. Remove the rocker assembly as instructed in Section A.6 and withdraw the push-rods, keeping them in their order of removal to ensure replacement onto the original tappets. Release the breather pipe, remove the tappet covers, and lift out the tappets, also keeping them in their original order. New tappets should be fitted by selective assembly so that they ju st fall into their guides under their own weight when lubricated. Assembly is a reversal of the above procedure, but care should be taken to see that the tappet cover joints are oiltight and that the rockers a re adjusted to give the correct clearance.

Section A.19 ADJUSTI TG VALVE RO CKER CLEARA CES

Fig. A.13 Showing the correct fitting of a valve guide Morris Oxford (Series V).

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If the engine is to give its best performance and the valves are to retain their maximum useful life it is essential to maintain the correct valve clear ance. It is recommended that the clearance be checked at regular intervals an d any necessary adjustments made. T he cor rect clearance for both the exhaust and inlet valves, when the engine is ho t, may be fou nd in 'G E ERAL DATA ' . The engine has been designed to operate with this clearance and no departure from it is permissible. A.9


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The indicating notch in the flange of the crankshaft pulley should then be opposite the centre pointer on the timing cover, i.e. No. I inlet valve should be about to open at 5째 B.T.D.C. and No.4 piston will be at 5째 B.T.D.C. on its compression stroke. Do not omit to reset the inlet valve to its correct running clearance when the timing check is complete. The clearance given for the timing check is necessary to bring the opening position of the valve to 5째 B.T.D.C. as it is not po ssible to check the valve timin g accurately with the normal running valve clearance.

Section A.21 Fig. A.15 The notch in the pulley approaching the T.D.C. position for pistons I and 4. The inset shows the timing set at 5째 B.T.D.C. Provision for adjusting the clearance is made in the rocker arm by an adjustable screw and locknut. The adjusting screw is released by slackening the hexagon locknut with a spanner while holding the adjusting screw against rotation with a screwdriver. The valve clearance can then be set by carefully rotating the rocker screw in the desired direction until the correct clearance is obtained, that is, when the feeler gauge can just be pushed between the rocker face and the valve stem. The adjusting screw locknut is then tightened while the screw is held against further rotation with the screwdriver. Re-check the gap after the locknut has been tightened. It is important to note that while the clearance is being set the tappet of the valve being operated upon is on the back of its cam, i.e. opposite to the peak . As this cannot be accurately observed, the rocker adjustment is more easily carried out in the following order (this also avoids turning the engine over more than is necessary): Adjust No. I rocker with No. 8 valve fully open

REMOVING AND REPLACING THE TIMING CHAIN COVER Drain the cooling system and remove the radiator. Slacken the dynamo attachment bolts and remo ve the driving belt. Straighten the tab on the starting dog nut lock washer Unscrew the starting dog nut by using service too118G98. A few sharp blows in an anti-clockwise direction will slacken the nut. Remove the crankshaft pulley. The timing cover is secured by nine bolts, each with a spring washer and an elongated plain washer. Remove all nine bolts and washers and remove the timing cover. Care should be taken not to damage the timing cover gasket. If it is damaged clean the face of the cover flange and the front engine mounting plate and fit a new gasket on reassembly. The felt washer situated in the timing cover should also be renewed if necessary . It should be noted that the oil thrower, which is located behind the crankshaft pulley, is fitted with its concave side facing away from the engine. Replacement of the timing cover is a reversal of the above procedure.

,,3 " " " 6 ,,5 " 4 ,,2 " 7 "8,, " 1 ,,6 " 3 " ,, 4 ",, 5 "7,, 2 " " " It is helpful to remember that each of the above sequ ences totals nine.

Section A.20 CHECKING VALVE TIMING Set No. I cylinder inlet valve to the timing check clearance recommended in 'GENERAL DATA' and then turn the engine until the valve is about to open. NOTE.-This clearance is for valve timing check only and must not be confused with the normal running tappet clearance also given in 'GENERAL DATA'. A.lO

Fig. A.16 Releasing the starter dog, using service tool 18G98 Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


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THE ENGINE Section A.22 REMOVIN G AND REPLACING THE TIMING CHAIN Remove the timing cover and oil thrower as in Section A.21. On engines fitted with a chain tensioner remove the bottom plug from the chain tensioner body. Insert a tin. (3'18 mm .) Allen key to engage the cylinder and turn the key clockwise until the rubber slipper is completely free from spring pressure. Between a half and one full turn is all that is necessary. If it is required to remove the tensioner assembly complete, un lock and remove the two securing bolts, and the assembly and backplate may be removed from the engine. Note, however, that it is not necessary to remove the tensioner in order merely to remove the timing chain. Unlock and remove the camshaft chain wheel nut and lock washer. Note that the locating tag on the lock washer fits into the keyway of the camshaft chain wheel. The camshaft and crankshaft chain wheels may now be removed, toge ther with the timing chain, by easing each wheel forward, a fraction at a time, with suitable small levers. As the crankshaft gear wheel is withdrawn care must be taken not to lose the gear packing washers immediately behind it. When reassembling, replace the same number of washers as was found on dismantling, unless new crankshaft or camshaft components have been fitted, in which case re-alignment will be necessary. To determine the thickness of washers required place a straightedge across the sides of the camshaft wheel teeth an d measure with a feeler gauge the gap between the straightedge and the sides of the teeth on the crankshaft chai n wheel. Subtract 路005 in. (,13 mm.) from the feeler gauge

Fig. A .l? When replacing the chain wheels the timing marks indicated by the arrows must be in line to give correct valve timing . Release the chain tensioner by inserting the AI/en key as shown and turning it in a clockwise direction B

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reading and add the resultant thickness of crankshaft gear packing washers. When replacing the timing chain and wheels set the crankshaft with its keyway at T.D.C. and the camshaft with its keyway approximately at the one o'clock position when seen from the front. Assemble the wheels into the timing chain with the two dimples on the chain wheels opposite to one another, as in Fig. A.l? Keeping the wheels in this position, engage the crankshaft wheel keyway with the key on the crankshaft and rotate the camshaft until the camshaft wheel keyway and the key are aligned. Push the gears onto the shafts as far as they will go and secure the camshaft wheel with the lock washer and nut. If the engine is fitted with a chain tensioner and the assembly has been removed from the engine, replace the back plate and secure the assembly to the cylinder block. The tensioner is released for operation by inserting the Allen key and turning in a clockwise direction until the slipper head moves forward under spring pressure against the chain. Do not attempt to turn the key anti-clockwise or force the slipper head into the chain by ext ernal pressure. Secure the bolts with the locking plate, replace the bottom plug, and lock with the tab washe r. Replace the oil thrower, concave side forward, and the remaining components as detailed in Section A.21.

Section A.23 DISMA TUNG AND REASSEMBLING THE TIMING CHAIN TENSIONER Remove the tensioner assembly from the block as detailed in Section A.22. Withdraw the plunger and slipper assembly from the tensioner body and engage the lower end of the cylinder with the Allen key. Turn the key clockwise, holding the key and plunger securely until the cylinder and spring are released from inside the plunger. The components should be cleaned thoroughly in clean fuel, and the 路125 in. (3,18 mm.) diameter inlet oil hole in the spigot and the 路040 in. (1,02 mm.) outlet oil hole in the slipper should be cleaned with compressed air before reassembling. When the tensioner is in operation and the engine is running, oil from the lubrication system enters the spigot on the back face under pressure and lubricates the bearing surface through a hole in the slipper pad. The pad is held against the chain by the coil spring. Should the chain stretch with use, the slipper plunger rises and the limiting peg, bearing on the top of the helical slot, rotates the cylinder until the next recess in the lower edge of the slot comes into line with the limiting peg and prevents the plunger returning to its original position and allowing the timing chain to become slack again. When reassembling, insert the spring in the plunger and place the cylinder on the other end of the spring. A .ll


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Remove the timing cover, timing chain, and gears (see Sections A21 and A22). Disconnect the suction advance unit pipe from the distributor and take out the two bolts with flat washers securing the distributor to the housing. Do not slacken the clamping plate bolt or the ignition timing setting will be lost. Withdraw the distributor. Take out the screw securing the distributor housing to the cylinder block and withdraw the housing. Using a -& in. UNF. bolt 2! in. (63'5 mm.) or more long as an extractor, screw it into the tapped end of the distributor drive spindle and withdraw the spindle. Remove the sump (see Section AA.6), the oil pump, and the oil pump drive shaft (see Section A.4). Disconnect the engine revolution indicator drive if fitted, remove the securing nuts and washers, and withdraw the indicator drive gear. Take out the three set screws and shakeproof washers which secure the camshaft locating plate to the cylinder block (Fig. A.19) and withdraw the camshaft. Replacement of the camshaft is a reversal of the above procedure.

Section A.25

Fig. A.18 The chain tensioner components

Compress the spring until the cylinder enters the plunger bore, engaging the helical slot with the peg in the plunger. Hold the assembly compressed in this position and engage the Allen key. Turn the cylinder clockwise until the end of the cylinder is below the peg and the spring is held compressed. Withdraw the key and insert the plunger assembly in the body. Replace the back plate and secure the assembly to the cylinder block. When the timing chain is in position the tensioner is released for operation by inserting the key and turning it clockwise until the slipper head moves forward under spring pressure against the chain. Do not attempt to tum the key anti-clockwise or force the slipper head into the chain by external pressure. Secure the bolts with the locking plate, replace the bottom plug, and lock with a tab washer.

CAMSHAFf BEARINGS If the camshaft bearing clearances are excessive new bearings must be fitted. Thinwall white-metal bearings are used and removing and refitting is facilitated by the use of a special camshaft liner removing and replacing tool. New bearings must be reamed to give the correct running clearance (see 'GENERAL DATA') and the use of the special camshaft liner reamer tools is strongly recommended.

Section A.24

Removing the front and rear liners Insert the small end of the adaptor 18Gl24F into the camshaft front liner from the inside of the cylinder block, thread the body of the tool onto the centre screw, and pass the screw through the adaptor from the front of the block. Place the slotted washer on the flat at the rear of the centre screw and insert the tommy-bar into the centre screw behind the slotted washer. Tighten up the wing nut to withdraw the worn liner. The rear liner is withdrawn by the same method, using the adaptor 18G124B and withdrawing the liner from the rear of the block.

REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CAMSHAFf Remove the power unit from the vehicle (see Section AA5) and separate the engine from the gearbox. Remove the inlet and exhaust manifold assembly (see Section AA.4). Remove the push-rods and take out the tappets (see Section AI8).

Removing the centre liner Insert the stepped pilot adaptor 18G124H into the camshaft liner front bore from the inside of the block and the adaptor 18G124C into the centre liner from the rear, small end first. With the body of the tool positioned on the centre screw, pass the screw through the pilot adaptor and the adaptor in the centre liner.

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THE ENGINE

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the butt joint of the liner; this joint must be covered by the washer. Place the slotted washer on the flat at the rear of the centre screw and insert the tommy-bar into the screw behind the slotted washer. Tighten the wing nut to pull the liner squarely into position. The rear liner is replaced by the same method, using the adaptor 18G124B and pulling the liner into position from the rear of the block.

Fig. A.I9 The arrows indicate the three camshaft locating plate securing screws

Place the slotted washer on the flat at the rear of the centre screw and insert the tommy-bar into the screw behind the slotted washer. Tighten up the wing nut to withdraw the liner. Replacing the front and rear liners Place the new liner on the smallest diameter of the adaptor 18G124F and insert the adaptor into the camshaft front liner bore from the inside of the block, largest diameter first. Line up the oil holes in the liner and the cylinder block and make certain that they remain correctly positioned during the whole operation. Thread the body of the tool onto the centre screw and pass the screw through the adaptor located in the front liner from the front of the block. Position the larger of the two 'D' washers on the centre screw with the cut-away portion turned away from

LOCAT E IN No .6 POSITI O N ON THE ARBOR

~GI23B

Replacing the centre liner Insert the stepped pilot adaptor into the camshaft front liner from the inside of the block. Place a new liner on the small end of the adaptor 18G124C and position the adaptor in the centre liner bore from the rear, largest diameter first. Ensure that the oil holes in the liner and the cylinder block are lined up and remain so during the whole operation. With the body of the tool positioned on the centre screw insert the screw through the pilot adaptor and the adaptor in the centre liner bore. Position the larger of the two 'D' washers on the centre screw with the cut-away portion turned away from the butt joints of the liner; this joint must be covered by the washer. Place the slotted washer and the tommy-bar in the centre screw and tighten up the wing nut to pull the liner into position. Reaming the front and rear liners Insert the taper pilots 18Gl23AB and 18GI23AC into the centre and rear liners respectively. Place the plain pilot 18Gl23L on the arbor, followed by the cutter I8G I23E. Pass the arbor through the front liner and the pilot located in the centre liner. Place the cutter 18Gl23B on the arbor and push the arbor through the taper pilot in the rear liner.

LOCATE IN Nâ&#x20AC;˘ .l O POSITION O N THE ARBOR

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Fig. A .20 Showing the cutters and pilots positioned for reaming the front and rear liners Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 30713

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THE ENGINE

Fig. A.21 Cutter and pilots positioned for reaming the centre liner

Secure the cutters and pilots in their respective positions shown in Fig. A,20, ensuring that the cutter locating pins are engaged in the correct numbered hole provided in the arbor. The cutter for the front liner will cut first with the arbor piloting in the centre and rear liners. Clear away the swarf frequently during the operation. The cutter for the rear liner will follow with the arbor piloting in the front and centre liners. Clear away all the swarf before the plain pilot is allowed to enter the front liner. When the cut in the rear liner is finished free the cutters and withdraw the arbor. â&#x20AC;˘ Reaming the centre liner Set up for the second part of the operation by inserting the pilots 18Gl23T and 18Gl23AD in the front and rear liners. Pass the arbor through the pilot in the front liner and place the cutter for the centre liner on the arbor. Push the arbor through the centre liner and the pilot located in the rear liner. Secure the cutter and pilots in position as shown in Fig. A.21, ensuring that the locating pin of the cutter engages the correct numbered hole in the arbor. Ream the centre liner, release the cutter, and withdraw the arbor. IMPORTA T.-It is essential that the cutter flutes are kept clear of swarf at all times during the cutting operation, preferably with air-blast equipment. The cutter should be withdrawn from the liner half-way through the cut and the swarf removed from the cutter and the liner. Feed the reamer very slowly and keep the cutters dry. The arbor should be lightly lubricated before assembling the cutters and pilots.

Section A.26 REMOVll GAD REPLACING THE FLYWHEEL (Engine Out of Vehicle) Remove the clutch by unscrewing the six bolts and spring washers securing it to the flywheel. Release the bolts a turn at a time to avoid distortion of the cover flange. Two dowels locate the clutch cover on the flywheel. Unlock and remove the six nuts and three lock plates A .14

which secure the flywheel to the crankshaft and remove the flywheel. When replacing the flywheel ensure that the 1/4 mark on the periphery of the flywheel is in line with and on the same side as the first and fourth throws of the crankshaft. To assist the correct location of the flywheel the depression in the crank shaft flange is stamped with a similar timing mark which should be in line with the one on the flywheel periphery. To release the special flywheel bolts the engine sump and rear main bearing cap must also be released.

Section A.27 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CRANKSHAFT (Engine Out of Vehicle) Take off the clutch and the flywheel, the timing cover, the timing wheels and chain, the sump and oil pump strainer, and finally the rear engine mounting plate. Disconnect the big-end bearings and remove the main bearing caps. Mark each big-end bearing and bearing cap to ensure that they are replaced onto their correct journals. Take care when marking the bearings that they are not damaged in any way. On no account use a punch for this purpose. Note that each main bearing cap is stamped with a number which is also stamped on the centre web of the crankcase near each main bearing. Lift the crankshaft out of the bearings. Replacement is a reversal of the above instructions. Do not forget to refit the thrust washers in their correct positions at the centre main bearing with the oil grooves away from the bearings and also the packing washers behind the crankshaft chain wheel (see Sections A,S and A.22).

Section A.28 CAMSHAFT MIDDLE BEARI G LINER An alternative liner for the camshaft middle bearing is available under Part No . 12H159. The alternati ve liner has a clinch-type joint, chamfered outside edges, and an arrow stamped on its outer face; the arrow must point towards the front of the engine durin g assembly. The fitting instructions for this liner are the same as those given in Section A.25.

Section A.29 MODIFIED CAMSHAFT A camshaft having a modified cam profile was introduced at engine number 15AMW-U-H-IOl and 15AMW-U-L-601. The camshaft is available under Part No. 12H34. The valve tip running clearance and the timing clearance remain unaltered. Mor ris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 30713


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SERVICE TOOLS

18G29. Valve Grinding-in Tool

This suction-type tool has a rubber handle of convenient length to enable it to be rotated backwards and forwards between the palms of the hands when grinding the valves into the seats. The detachable rubber suction pads 18G29A may be obtained separately. 18G29

18G29A. Suction Pad-Valve Grinding-in Tool

This detachable pad is available to replace a worn rubber pad on tool 18G29. 18G29A

18G45. Valve Spring Compressor This tool is lever- and cam-operated, providing both easy and quick action. The adaptor ring which contracts the valve spring caps is particularly suitable for the removal and replacement of split collets. A screw adjustment is also provided.

18G45 Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

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THE ENGINE

18G55A. Piston Ring Compressor A clamping device to compress the piston rings, enabling the operator to insert the piston assembly into the cylinder bore with the minimum of pressure, thus avoiding damage to the piston and the piston rings.

18G55A

18G69. Oil Pump Relief Valve Grinding-in Tool This tool is designed for the removal and grinding in of the oil relief valve. Tightening the knurled set screw will expand the rubber plunger, which ensures that the tool is a tight fit when inserted into the hollow oil relief valve. 18G69

18G98. Starting Nut Spanner A shock-type spanner designed to remove and replace the starting dog without having to lock the crankshaft by improvise means, which invariably damages the engine components. 18G98

18Gl24A. Camshaft Liner Remover and Replacer (basic tool) Camshaft liners can be removed and replaced accurately and without the damage invariably associated with the use of improvised drifts. Adaptors for use with this basic tool are supplied separately.

18Gl24A

.4.16

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THE ENGINE

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18G124F. Camshaft Liner Remover Adaptor-Front 18G124C. Camshaft Liner Remover Adaptor-Centre 18G124B. Camshaft Liner Remover Adaptor-Rear 18G124H. Camshaft Liner Remover Adaptor The adaptors 18GI24F, 18G124C, and 18GI24B are used in conjunction with the basic tool 18G 124A to remove old and worn liners and to pilot new liners into position. Adaptor 18G124H is a pilot to be inserted into the front bearing when the centre liner is being removed or replaced.

18G124F

18Gl24H

18Gl24C 18G124B

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18G123A 18G123A. Camshaft Liner Reamer (basic tool) This tool is essential when reconditioning cylinder blocks, otherwise camshaft liners cannot be reamed in true and in consequence the clearance between the camshaft journal and the liner will be incorrect. The cutters and pilots for use with this basic tool are supplied separately.

18G123E. Camshaft Liner Reamer Cutter-Front 18G123B. Camshaft Liner Reamer Cutter-Rear 18G123L. Camshaft Liner Reamer Pilot-Front 18G123AB. Camshaft Liner Reamer Pilot-Centre 18G123AC. Camshaft Liner Reamer Pilot-Rear 18G123F. Camshaft Liner Reamer Cutter-Centre 18G123T. Camshaft Liner Reamer Pilot-Front 18G123AD. Camshaft Liner Reamer Pilot-Rear The abo ve cutters and pilots are required for use with basic tool 18Gl23A to line-ream the front, centre, and rear camshaft liners. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

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THE ENGINE

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18G226. Valve Rocker Bush Remover and Replacer The flange of the dri ver is recessed to prevent the split bush from opening when being driven into position; the anvil is also recessed to retain the rocker during the operation. Use of a light press is desirable when using this tool: alternatively, a vice or copper-faced hammer may be used.

18G226

18G284. Impulse Extractor-UNF. (basic tool) This extractor with the adaptor positioned in the screwed end will remove the most difficult main bearing cap quickly and without damage. Alternatively, 18G42A may be used.

!8G284

18G284A. Main Bearing Cap Removal Adaptor For use with impulse extractor 18G284. Alternatively, 18G42C may be used with extractor 18G42A. 18G284A

18G372. Torque Wrench (30-140 lb. ft.) A universal torque wrench for use with standard sockets. This type of tool is essential if the recommended maximum torque for cylinder head studs, etc., is not to be exceeded. 18G372 A.18

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520


THE ENGINE

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18G2. Crankshaft Gear, Pulley, and Propeller Shaft Flange Remover A multipurpose tool with alternative legs readily interchangeable: one pair with thin, flat ends designed for removing crankshaft gears and propeller shaft and bevel pinion flanges, the other pair has tapered ends suitable for fan pulley grooves other than later-type models fitted with narrow-section fan belts. AD913

18G2

18G3. Engine Front Cover Locating Bush The tool ensures that the felt oil seal and cover are concentric with the crankshaft, thus safeguarding against oil leaks. The tool is double-ended to make its use applicable to crankshaft and front covers of different dimensions. 18G3

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue I.

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SECTION AA THE ENGINE This Section is a Supplement to Section A Section Carburetter-removing and replacing

AA.l

Cylinder liners

AA.8

D istributor drive gear-removing and replacing

AA.2

Flywheel starter rings-fitting

AA.7

Manifolds-removing and replacing

AA.4

Oil filter-external ..

AA .3

Power unit-removing and replacing

AA.5

Sump and oil pump strainer-removing and replacing

AA.6

Tools-service Valve seat inserts

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

End of Section

AA.9

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I. Block assembl y. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31.

32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40.

Plug for core hole . Plug for oil gallery. Taper plug for block oil hole. Plug for oil relief valve hole. Blanking plug . Stud for cylinder head (long). Stud for cylinder head (short). Stud for main bearing cap. Nut for bearing cap stud . Spring washer for bearing cap stud. Stud for oil pump (long). Stud for oil pump (short). Joint for front and rear main bearing cap . Oil gauge pipe union. Washer for union. Dowel for gearbox mounting plate. Water drain tap. Fibre washer. Dust cap. Oil level indicator. Oil level indicator tube. Block side rear cover with elbow. Block side front cover. Joint-s-cover to block. Screw-s-cover to block. Washer for screw. Cylinder block vent pipe with clip. Manifold drain tube bracket. Stud-bracket to block. Spring wash er for stud. Nut for stud. Grommet-drain tube bracket. Cylinder head. Plug for oil hole. Rocker bracket stud (short). Rocker bracket stud (long). Nut for br acket stud. Washer for bracket stud. Spring washer for bracket stud.

No. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81.

Description Joint to block. Nut for cylinder head stud. Washer for cylinder head stud. Stud for exhaust manifold. Nut for stud. Washer for stud. Rocker gear cover. Cap with cable. Joint. Cap nut for cover. Bush for cap nut (rubber). Cup washer for cap nut. Washer for cap nut. Nut-pump to block. Spring washer for pump stud. Washer for pump stud. Oil pressure relief valve. Spring. Cap. Fibre washer for cap. Sump. Joint-sump to block. Drain plug. Washer for drain plug. Screw-sump to block . Shakeproof washer. Water outlet elbow. Joint. Stud for water outlet elbow. Nut for stud. Washer for stud. Thermostat. Joint. Thermal transmitter. Water pump body. Plug for pump oil filler hole. Washer for plug. Spindle with vane and bearing. Wire-bearing retaining. Pulley. Fan and water pump pulley hub.

No. 82. 83.

84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. III.

112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. 119. 120. 121. 122.

Description Joint-water pump to block. Screw-water pump to block (long). Screw-water pump to block (short). Spring washer for screw. Fan blade. Screw-fan blade to pulley. Spring washer for screw. Belt. Cylinder block cover-front. Felt. Joint to front mounting plate. Screw to mounting plate. Screw. Washer for screw. Spring washer for screw. Screw. Front mounting plate. Joint-front plate to block. Screw-front plate to block. Spring washer for screw. Rear mounting plate. Joint-rear plate to block. Screw-rear plate to block . Spring washer. Distributor housing. Screw-housing to block. Screw-distributor to housing. Spring washer for screw. Ignition control pipe. Olive (carburetter end). Olive (distributor end). Tube nut. Clip-pipe to cylinder head. Bolt for vacuum pipe . Nut for bolt. Spring washer. Vacuum pipe bracket. Blanking plug. Washer for plug. Oil filter pipe. Washer for union.

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3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

13. 14. 15. 16.

17. 18. 19. 20.

21. 22. 23

24. 25.

26

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31. 32.

33. 34. 35. 36.

Description Crankshaft main bearing . Upper thrust washer. Lower thrust washer. Front camshaft bearing liner. Centre camshaft bearing liner. Rear camshaft bearing liner. Piston assembly. Compression ring-top. Compression ring-second and third. Scraper ring. Gudgeon pin. Exhaust valve guide. Inlet valve guide. Inlet valve. Exhaust valve. Spring . Packing ring. Spring cup . Valve cotter. Circlip for cotter. Guide shroud. Valve rocker shaft. Plain plug. Screwed plug. Bracket with tapped hole. Plain bracket. Spring. Valve rocker . Rocker bush. Adjust ing screw. Locknut for screw. Locating screw. Screw locating plate. Spring washer (D/C). Washer for rocker. Split pin.

No. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72.

Description Tappet. Push-rod. Crankshaft. Oil restrictor. First motion shaft bush. Timing gear. Key for gear and pulley. Gear packing washer. Oil thrower (front). Pulley. Nut for starting handle dog. Nut locking washer. Rod and cap (Nos. 1 and 3). Rod and cap (Nos. 2 and 4). Set screw for cap. Cap set screw locking plate. Connecting rod bearing. Gudgeon pin clamp set screw. Spring washer for clamp set screw. Camshaft. Locking plate. Screw-plate to block. Shakeproof washer for plate screw. Timing gear. Key for gear. Dowel for pump body. Nut for camshaft. Nut locking washer. Timing chain. Oil pump body. Cover. Screw-cover to body. Spring washer for cover screw. Shaft with rotors. Joint to block. Driving spindle.

Description No. 73. Oil strainer. 74. Centre-bolt. 75. Washer. 76. Felt washer. 77. Circlip. 78. Element . 79. Oil filter head assembly. 80. Container. 81. Pressure plate. 82. Joint washer -filter head to block. 83. Sealing washer (bottom). 84. Spring. 85. Joint washer---container to filter. 86. Oil pipe. 87. Nut for nipple. 88. Screw for banjo union. 89. Washer for screw. 90. Flywheel. 91. Starter ring. 92. Dowel for clutch. 93. Bolt---crankshaft to flywheel. 94. Bolt locking plate. 95. Nut for bolt. 96. Distributor drive spindle. 97. Timing chain tensioner. 98. Slipper head and cylinder. 99. Spring washer for screw. 100. Screw-pump cover to strainer. 101. Joint to oil strainer. 102. Spring. 103. Body backplate. 104. Joint. 105. Lock washer for plug. 106. Plug for body. 107. Bolt-tensioner to block. 108. Lock washer.

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Section AA.l REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CARBURETIER Remove the air cleaner as detailed in Section DD.12. Remove the split pin and disconnect the accelerator rod, taking care not to misplace the washer and spring. Slacken the pinch-bolt to remove the mixture control cable from the lever on the carburetter. Unscrew the clip and pull off the rubber main fuel pipe from the top of the float-chamber. Remove the rubber pipe to the vacuum control (carburetter to distributor). Unscrew the two nuts and spring washers securing the carburetter to the inlet manifold and withdraw the carburetter. Note the heat washer and two gaskets at the carburetter flange. Replacement is a reversal of these instructions, but make sure that the gaskets are in good condition or replace them with new ones.

Fig. AA.l Replacing the distributor drive. Notice the slot angle. The large offset is uppermost

Section AA.3 EXTE RNAL OIL FILTER

Section AA.2 REMOVING AND REPLACI NG THE DISTRIBUTOR DRIVE GEAR Withdraw the distributor as detailed in Section B.S. Take out the special screw securing the distributor housing to the cylinder block. Using a -& in. UNF. bolt 21 in. (63,5 mm.) or more long as an extractor, screw it into the tapped end of the distributor drive spindle and withdraw the spindle. To refit the drive gear turn the engine until the No. 1 piston is at T. D.C. on its compression stroke. When the valves on No.4 cylinder are 'rocking' (i.e, exhaust just closing and inlet just opening) No. I piston is at the top of its compression stroke. If the engine is set so that the notch in the crankshaft pulley is in line with the longest pointer on the cover, or the 'dimples' in the crankshaft and camshaft gears are in line, the piston is exactly at T.D.C. Screw a bolt, of the dimensions given above, in the threaded end of the distributor drive gear and, holding the drive gear with the slot just below the horizontal position and the large offset uppermost, insert the gear. As the gear engages with the camshaft the slot will turn in an anti-clockwise direction until it is approximately in the one o'clock position. Remove the bolt from the gear, insert the distribu tor housing, and secure it with the special bolt.

The external oil filter is of the full-flow type, thus ensuring that all oil in the lubrication system passes through the filter before reaching the bearings. The element of the filter is of star formation in which a special-quality felt, selected for its filtering qualities, is used. To remove the element unscrew the hexagon bolt at the base of the filter bowl, lower the bowl, and lift out the filter element. Oil is passed through the filter from the pump at a pressure controlled by the relief valve at 50 lb.jsq, in. (3'5 kg.jcm.s). This pressure will, of course, be somewhat higher until the oil reaches a working temperature. Some pressure is lost in passing the oil through the filter element : this will only be a pound or two per square inch ('07 to 路14 kg.jcm.") with a new element, but will increase as the element becomes progressively contaminated by foreign matter removed from the oil. Should the filter become completely choked due to neglect, a balance valve is provided to ensure that oil will still reach the bearings. This valve, set to open at a pressure difference of 13 to 17 lb.jsq. in. ('91 to 1路2 kg./cm. 2) , is non -adjustable and is located in the filter head casting. When the valve is opened unfiltered oil will by-pass the filter element and reach the bearings .

Section AA.4

Ensure that the correct bolt is used and that the head does not protrude ab ove the face of the housing.

REMOVING AND REPLACING THE MANIFO LDS

Refit the distributor, referring to Section BB.2 for retiming instructions if the clamp plate has been released.

Remove the air cleaner, carburetter air intake, and carburetter as detailed in Section AA.l.

AA.8

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


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THE ENGINE Remove the bolt securing the copper heater pipe clip to the top of the inlet manifold. Disconnect the exhaust flange. Unscrew the four set screws with their washers, and the brass nut and washer at each end of the manifold securing it to the engine. Note that the heater water pipe is held at the front by a clip to the manifold stud. Withdraw the manifolds. Replacement is a reversal of this procedure; use a new gasket.

Section AA.5

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e

e

REMOVING AND REPLACING THE POWER UNIT Power unit only Detach the bonnet from the bonnet hinges after removing the screws from the bonnet prop. Disconnect the leads from the battery, and remove the retaining clips, battery, and battery tray from its mounting on the wing valance. Drain the oil from the engine and gearbox. Remove the air cleaner and carburetter as detailed in Section AA.l. Remove the radiator as detailed in Section ec.l. Disconnect the lamp and hom wires at each wing valance and remove the radiator bridge piece. Unscrew the oil pressure pipe union nut from the adaptor on the right-hand side of the cylinder block and also the vacuum pipe support clip from under the rear cylinder head nut. Slacken the clips and remove both heater hoses. Unscrew the nut and remove the cable from the starter. Disconnect both leads from the dynamo, the lowtension leads from the distributor and coil, and the water temperature cable in the front of the cylinder head. Release the exhaust pipe by releasing the clip attaching the pipe to the manifold. Withdraw the rubber dust excluder from the floor around the gear lever; remove the spring ring from the gear lever tower and withdraw the washer, spring, and gear lever. If the vehicle is fitted with steering column gear change, remove the selector control rod and the change speed rod from their levers on the gearbox. Remove the clevis pin from the slave cylinder push-rod, take out the two bolts, and remove the cylinder. Tie the slave cylinder to one side out of the way. Do not remove the pipe or fluid will be lost, necessitating bleeding. Disconnect the speedometer cable from the gearbox. Mark the rear universal joint flange with its location on the axle flange, unscrew the four self-locking nuts, remove the bolts, and withdraw the propeller shaft. Place a rope sling around the power unit and attach the lifting tackle. Arrange the sling so that the unit may Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713

AA

be lifted slightly and moved forward and finally lifted from the frame at a sharp angle with the front considerably higher than the rear. Take the weight of the engine. The two rear, one front, and one front side set screws should now be slackened on each mounting. On the inner face of each mounting are two nuts which must be removed, the mountings can then be moved slightly to allow them to be separated from the engine. Place a jack under the gearbox to support the weight at the rear end and remove the cross-member from the chassis (six set screws). Remove also the engine steady rod to the cross-member from its rubber mounting on the gearbox extension, and remove the bolts securing the gearbox mounting rubbers to the cross-member. The jack can now be removed from below the gearbox, but it is advisable to recruit the aid of a second operator to steady the extension end of the gearbox to avoid the possibility of it fouling the ground when the power unit is in the acute angle for removing from the frame . The power unit is now free to be manoeuvred from the frame. Take care that the gear selector rods are not damaged when removing the assembly if the vehicle is fitted with steering column gear change. Replacement is a reversal of the above instructions. To determine the correct shimming required for the engine front mountings, loosen the nuts on the engine side of the mounting rubbers, rock the engine, and allow it to assume a free position. Measure the gap between the engine and the mountings, fit shims as required between the mountings and the brackets and then tighten the nuts. The shims are available in thicknesses of ¡048 in. (1,22 mm.) and ¡036 in. (,914 mm .). Refill the engine and gearbox with the correct grade of oil (Section P), and refill the radiator before starting the engine. Power unit with front suspension This alternative method of power unit removal may be found more advantageous in the case of severe accident damage. Drain the cooling system by opening the radiator and cylinder drain taps. Remove the battery and its supporting tray. Remove the upper and lower radiator hoses. The heater hoses (if fitted) must be removed at the bulkhead. Disconnect the capacitor lead from the distributor and the high-tension and switch wires from the coil; remove also the sparking plug cables from the plug terminals. Take off the distributor cap and remove the rotor arm to a safe place. Remove the dynamo lead and disconnect the starter motor cable at the motor end. Unscrew the oil pressure pipe union nut from the right-hand side of the engine and the water temperature cable from its connection in the cylinder head. AA.9


AA

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THE ENGINE

Remove the throttle and choke cables from their connections at the carburetter. Release the fuel feed pipe from the ca rburetter. Release the exhaust pipe from the manifold. From below the vehicle take out the clevis pin securing the clutch operating lever to the operating cylinder and remove the two set screws securing the cylinder to the housing, when the cylinder can be removed. Remove the selector control rod and the change speed rod from their levers on the gearbox if the vehicle is litted with steering column gear change. Disconnect the earth strap from the starter motor at the body end. Remove the hand brake connection from its bracket. Disconnect the speedometer cable from the gearbox. Uncouple the propeller shaft at the rear axle after marking it (so that it can be assembled the same way) and support the shaft. At the front of the vehicle remove the hydraulic brake pipes from their connections at the wing valance. Remove the steering draglinks from their respective levers. Place a trolley jack under the centre of the gearbox cross-member and jack up to just take the weight. The engine and front suspension complete can be released from the body by removing the four nuts, spring washers, and rubber packing pieces at the front and rear of the suspension assembly (two each side). Remove the set screws securing the gearbox crossmember to the frame (three each side). The power unit is now free. Suitable lifting tackle must now be attached to the front of the vehicle and the body raised. The front suspension complete with power unit and propeller shaft attached can now be wheeled away from the raised body. To remove the power unit from the front suspension release the engine mounting bolts (two each side), taking the weight of the power unit before doing so on a hoist, and wheel the suspension assembly away. It should be remembered that as yet the sump has not been drained.

Section AA.6 REMOVI 'G A TO REPLACI 'G THE SUMP A TO OIL PUMP STRAI TE R Remove the hexagonal drain plug on the right-hand side of the sump and drain the contents. Remove the 19 bolts and washers and lower the sump. With the sump away it is possible to remove the oil strainer from which oil is taken to the oil pump. To remove the strainer undo the three screws securing it to the pump cover. Clean out the sump and strainer with paraffin (kerosene) and a stiff brush; never use rag. AA.lO

When refitting the sump to the engine give particular attention to the sealing gaskets for the crankcase face and the two oil seal packings for the crankshaft which fit into recesses in the crankcase. If the gaskets are in good condition and have not been damaged during removal of the sump they may be used again, but it is always advisable to fit new ones. Before fitting new gaskets remove all traces of the old ones from the sump and crankcase faces. Smear the faces of the crankcase joint with grease and fit the two halves of the large gasket. Lift the sump into position on the crankcase, insert the 19 bolts, and tighten them evenly.

Section AA.7 FITTING FLYWHEEL STARTER RINGS To remove the old starter ring from the flywheel flange split the ring with a cold chisel, taking care not to damage the flywheel. Make certain that the bore of the new ring and its mating surface on the flywheel are free from burrs and are perfectly clean. To fit the new ring it must be heated to a temperature of 300 to 400 0 C. (575 to 752 0 F.), indicated by a light-blue surface colour. If this temperature is exceeded the temper of the teeth will be affected. The use of a thermostatically controlled furnace is recommended. Place the heated ring on the flywheel with the lead of the ring teeth uppermost. The expansion will allow the ring to be fitted without force by pressing or tapping it lightly until the ring is hard against its register. This operation should be followed by natural cooling. when the 'shrink fit' will be permanently established and no further treatment required.

Section AA.8 CYLI OER LI ERS Should the condition of the cylinder bores be such that they cannot be cleaned up to accept the recommended oversize pistons, it is possible that dry cylinder liners can be fitted. This operation may be carried out by the use of specialized proprietary equipment or with a power press using pilot adaptors to the dimensions shown in Fig. AA.2. The press must be capable of a 3-ton (3048-kg.) pressure to fit new liners, and a 5- to 8-ton (5080- to 8128-kg .) pressure to remove old liners. If liners have not previously been fitted, then the bores must be machined and honed to the dimension given in the table on page AA.l I. To remove worn liners Remove and dismantle the engine and remove the cylinder head studs. Place the cylinder block face downwards on suitable wooden supports on the bed of the press, ensuring that there is sufficient space between the block and the bed of the press to allow the worn liner to Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 30713


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THE ENGINE Cylinder bore diameter before fitting liner

3·0165 to 3·0170 in. (76,619 to 76·632 nun.)

Outside diameter of liner

Interference fit of liner in cylinder bore

Finish bore diameter of liner after fitting

3·0185 to 3·0192 in. (76,670 to 76·688 mm.)

·0015 to ·0027 in. (,038 to ·069 mm.)

2·8745 to 2·8760 in. (73,012 to 73·050 mm.)

pass down. Insert the pilot with its extension in the bottom of the liner and carefully press the liner out of the bore. To install new liners Thoroughly clean the cylinder block and liner contacting surfaces. Stand the cylinder block face upwards on the bed of the press, insert the pilot in the top of the liner, and position the liner with its chamfered end in

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the top of the cylinder block bore. Ensure that the liner is square with the top of the block and that the ram of the press is over the centre of the pilot. Press the liner fully into the bore. Finally, bore the cylinder liners to the dimensions given in the table above.

Section AA.9

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VALVE SEAT INSERTS

Should the valve seating become so badly worn or pitted that the normal workshop cutting and refacing tools cannot restore them to their original standard of efficiency, special valve seat inserts can be fitted. To fit the inserts machine the seatings in the cylinder head to the dimensions given in Fig. AA.3, and press in the inserts, which have an interference fit of ·0025 to ·0045 in. ('063 to ·114 mm.), Finally, grind or machine the seatings to the dimensions given in Fig. AA.3. Normal valve grinding may be necessary to ensure efficientvalve sealing.

Cylinder liner pilots should be made to the dimensions given from 50-ton hardening and tempering steel and hardened in oil at a temperature of 1,020 0 F. (550 0 C.)

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Pressing-out pilot

::gosin. (75'8 ::b27 rnm.), 8. 2-862 ::805in. (72-69 ::?27rnm.).

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Pilot extension M. 14t in. (36'8 3 cm.), N. tin. (22-22 mrn.) , P. i in. (15-87 mm.), Q. i in. (15-87 mm.). R. Two flats, 1 in. (25'4 mm.) across So tin. B.S.W. thread. T . 11 in. (31'75 mm.).

Issue 2.

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Morris Oxford (Series V).

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tin. B.S.W. thread.

Press ing-in pilot P. 3;r.. in. (87-31 mm.), o . 3.& in. (77'39 mm.). 2-850 in. (72,39 : :~27 rnm.), J. 11 in. (31,75 mm.). K. tin. (19,05 mm.), L . ·015 in. ('38 rnm .),

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c. Itin. (44'45 rnm.), D. tin. (19'05 mm. ).

Exhaust (A)

c. 1·312 to 1·313 in. (33'32 to 33'35 mm.). ' 186 to ·188 in. (4'72 to 4·77 rnm.), E. Maximum radius ·015 in. ('38 mm.), P. 1'221 to 1·241 in. (31'01 to 32-12 mm.). G. 1·0805 to H005 in. (27'44 to 27·95 mm.). H. 45·.

D.

Inlet (8) 1·437 to 1·438 in. (36'50 to 36·52 rnm.). K. '186 to ·188 in. (4'72 to 4'77 mm.). 1.. Maximum rad ius ·0 15 in . ('38 mm .). M. 1·396 to 1·416 in. (35-46 to 35·97 rnm.). N. 1·240 to 1'260 in. (31'50 to 32·00 mm.). P. 45·.

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THE ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEM l

RE S TR IC TO R .

2. O IL SQUIR T TO CYLINDE R WALLS. 3. ROC KE R FEED HOLE. O I L F I L LE R 5 OIL RETUR N TO SUMP. 6. EXTERN AL PI P E . 7 . L O W P RE S SURE GA L L ER Y. B R E LI EF VALV E . 9 FE ED T O GEARS. 10 M A I N FEED II O IL PUMP. 12 M A IN HIGH PRESS URE GA L L E RY. 13 FEED TO CHAIN TEN SIONER . 14 OIL BLE ED TO CHAIN . 15. FULL FLOW FILTER ( SEE DETAIL ) 16 O I L BLEED FOR VAL VE STEM TIP. 17. PRES SURE FEED TO BALL TIP. 18 INLET. 19 O I L GALLERY. 20 TO MAIN BEARING. 21. RELEASE V A LV E. 22 . FEED TO ROCKER GEAR (I N T ERM ITT E NT) 4

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THE ENGINE

AA

SERVICE TOOLS

/

18G27A. Valve Seat Cutter and Pilot Handle A stand ardi zed type of handle for use with a wide ran ge of cutters, including those below.

18G27A

18G174D. Valve Seat Cutter-Pilot For use with all the cutters listed below. 18G174D

18G25. Valve Seat Finishing Cutter 18G25A. Valve Seat Glaze Breaker 18G25B. Valve Seat Narrowing Cutter-Top 18G25C. Valve Seat Narrowing Cutter-Bottom

18G25 and 18G174

18G25A and 18G174A

18G174. Valve Seat Finishing Cutter 18G174A. Valve Seat Glaze Breaker 18G174B. Valve Seat Narrowing Cutter-Top The use of these cuttin g tools will save lengthy and wasteful grinding in when the valve seats are pitted. The narrowing cutters will enable the width of the valve seats to be maintained at their original dimensions.

90:t1

18G25C

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

18G25B and 18G174B

AA. 13


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B

SECTION B THE IGNITION SYSTEM Section

Description

B.?

Capacitor Coil

B.9

..

B.4

Contact breaker Distributor Dismantling

B.6

Reassembling

B.8

Removing and replacing

B.5

High-tension cables ..

B.3

Locating the cause of uneven firing

B.l

Sparking plugs

B.1O

Testing the low-tension circuit

B.2

For additional information see Section BB

B.l


www.morrisoxford.com THE IGNITION SYSTEM

B DESCRIPTIO

At slow engine speeds the ignition point is retarded. At high speeds the ignition point is advanced by an automatic timing control mechanism operated by centrifugal force. A vacuum-operated timing control is also fitted, designed to give additional advance under part-throttle conditions. The combined effects of the centrifugal and vacuum-operated timing controls give added efficiency over the full operating range of the engine with a corresponding economy in fuel consumption. A micrometer adjustment is fitted by which fine alterations to the timing can be made to allow for changes in running conditions as a result of carbonization or change of fuel. A completely sealed, metallized paper capacitor is fitted to the distributor. This has the property of being self-healing in the event of a break-down, so that trouble arising from this source should be very infrequent. The high-tension pick-up brush in the distributor cover is of composite construction, the top portion consisting of a resistive compound and the lower of softer carbon to prevent wear taking place on the rotor electrode. The resistive portion of the bru sh is in circuit betwee n the coil and distributor and gives a measure of radio interference suppression. Under no circumstances must a short, non-resistive brush be used as a replacement for one of the longer, resistive type.

may have formed between two or more of the electrodes or between one of the electrodes and some part of the distributor in contact with the cap. Evidence of a tracked cap is shown by the presence of a thin black line. A replacement distributor cap must be fitted in place of one that has become tracked.

Section B.2 TESTING T HE LO W-TENSION CIRCUIT Spring back the securing clips on the distributor and remove the moulded cap and rotor. If the rotor is a tight fit it can be levered off carefully with a screwdriver. Check that the contacts are clean and free from pits, burns, oil, or grease. Turn the engine and check that the contacts are opening and closing correctly and that the clearance is correct when the contacts are fully opened. Correct the gap if necessary to between 路014 and 路0 16 in. (,36 and 路40 mm .). D isconnect the cable at the contact breaker terminal of the coil and at the low-tension terminal of the distribu to r, an d connect a test lamp between these terminals. If the lamp lights when the contacts close and goes out when the contacts open the low-tension circuit is in order. Should the lamp fail to light, the contacts are dirty or there is a broken or loose connection in the lowtension wiring. The procedure for isolating the fault is detailed in Section BB.

Section B.1 LOCATI G THE CAUSE O F U EVE

FIRI G

Start the engine and set it to run at a fairly fast idling speed. Short-circuit each plug in turn by pulling the insulator sleeve up the cable and placing a hammer head or the blade of a screwdriver with a wooden or insulated handle between the terminal and the cylinder head. No difference in the engine performance will be noted when shortcircuiting the plug in the defective cylinder. Shorting the other plugs will make uneven running more pronounced. Having located the cylinder which is at fault, stop the engine and remove the cable from the terminal of the sparking plug. Restart the engine and hold the end of the cable about -h- in. (4,8 mm.) from the cylinder head. If the sparking is strong and regular, the fault probably lies in the sparking plug. Remove the plug, clean it, and adjust the gap to the correct setting (see 'GE TERAL DATA '), or alternatively fit a new plug . If there is no spark or if it is weak and irregular examine the cable from the sparking plug to the distributor. After a long period of service the insulation may be cracked or perished, in which case the cable should be renewed. Finally, examine the distributor moulded cap, wipe the inside and outside with a clean dry cloth, see that the carbon brush moves freely in its holder, and examine the moulding closely for signs of breakdown. After long service it may become tracked, that is, a conducting path B.2

Section B.3 HIGH-TENSION CABLES The high-tension cables must be examined carefully and any which have the insulation cracked, perished, or damaged in any way must be renewed. To fit the cables to the terminal of the ignition coil thread the knurled moulded terminal nut over the lead,

Fig. 8.1 The method of connecting H. T. leads t. Carbon brush.

2. Screw securing cable.


www.morrisoxford.com THE IGNITION SYSTEM

B

bare the end of the cable for about tin. (6 mm.), thread the wire through the brass washer removed from the original cable, and bend back the strands over the washer. Finally, screw the terminal into the coil. To make the connections to the terminals in the distributor moulded cap first remove the cap and slacken the screws on the inside of the moulding till they are clear of the cables. Cut the new cables off to the required length, push them completely home, and tighten the securing screws. The cables from the distributor to the sparking plugs must be connected up in the correct firing order, which is I, 3, 4, 2. Secure them firmly to the connectors.

Section B.4

Fig. B.3

CONTACT BREAKER The distributor has a pretilted contact breaker unit. The moving contact breaker plate is balanced on two nylon studs and the angle through which the plate may be tilted is controlled by a stud riveted to the moving contact breaker plate locating in a slot in the base plate. The plate carrying the fixed contact is secured by one screw only. After the first 500 miles (800 km.) and subsequently every 3,000 miles (4800 km.) check the contact breaker as follows: (I) Turn the engine until the contact breaker points are fully opened and check the gap with a gauge having a thickness of 路014 to 路016 in. (,36 to 路40 mm.). If the gap is correct the gauge should be a sliding fit. Do not alter the setting unless the gap varies considerably from the gauge thickness. To adjust the setting keep the engine in the position which gives maximum opening of the contacts and then slacken the fixed contact plate securing screw and adjust the contact gap by inserting a screwdriver in the notched hole and

Fig. B.2 The distributor with the cover and rotor arm removed, showing the contact breaker mechanism

Showing the distributor clamp bolts

turning clockwise to reduce the gap and anticlockwise to increase it. Tighten the securing screw. (2) If the contacts are dirty or pitted they must be cleaned by polishing them with a fine carborundum stone, and afterwards wiping them with a cloth moistened with petrol (gasoline). The moving contact can be removed from its mounting in order to assist cleaning. Check and adjust the contact breaker setting after cleaning the contacts. (3) Check that the moving arm is free on its pivot. If it is sluggish remove the arm and polish the pivot pin with a strip of fine cloth. Afterwards clean off all traces of emery dust and apply a spot of clean engine oil to the top of the pivot. The contact breaker spring tension should be between 20 and 24 oz. (567 and 680 gm.) measured at the contacts.

Section B.5 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE DISTRIBUTOR The distributor can be removed and replaced without interfering with the ignition timing, provided the clamp plate pinch-bolt is not disturbed. To facilitate the replacement of the distributor turn the engine over until the rotor arm is pointing to the segment in the cover for No. I cylinder plug lead to provide a datum for replacement. Remove the distributor cover and disconnect the lowtension lead from the terminal on the distributor. Disconnect the suction advance pipe at the union on the distri buto r. Extract the two bolts securing the distributor clamp plate to the distributor housing and withdraw the distributor. To replace the distributor insert it into the distributor housing until the driving dog rests on the distributor B.3


B

www.morrisoxford.com THE IGNITION SYSTEM

drive shaft. The rotor arm should then be rotated slowly until the driv ing dog lugs engage with the drive shaft slots, both of which are offset to ensure correct replacement. Tum the distributor body to align the clamping plate holes with those in the housing. The remainder of the assembly is now in the reverse order to that of remov al. NOTE.-Provided that the engine has not been turned, the rotor arm will be opposite the segment for No. 1 plug lead. The high-tension leads can then be replaced on their respective plug terminals in tbe order of firing, l.e, 1, 3, 4, 2, remembering that the distributor rotation is anticlockwise when viewed from above.

Section B.6 DISMANTLING THE DISTRIBUTOR The contact breaker plate may be removed as an assembly to give access to the centrifugal weights without completely dismantling the distributor. To do this first remove the rotor arm and then withdraw the slotted nylon low-tension terminal post from the distributor bod y. Take out the two screws which secur e the plate assembl y to the distributor body, ease up the plate, and unhook the flexible actuating link connected to the con tact breaker plate. The following procedure is necessary if the distributor is to be completely stripped. Before dism antling make a careful note of the positions in which the various components are fitted in order that they may be replaced correctly. (1) Spring back the clips and remove the moulded cap. (2) Lift the rotor off the top of the spindle. If it is a tight fit it must be levered off carefully with a screwdriver. (3) Remove the nut and washer from the moving contact anchor pin. Withdraw the insulating sleeve from the capacitor lead and low-tension lead connectors, noting the order in which they are fitted. Lift the moving contact from the pivot pin and remove the large insulating washer from the anchor pin. (4) Take out the screw, spring washer and flat washer securing the fixed contact plate and remove the plate. (5) Take out the securing screw and remove the capacitor. (6) Extract the two screws securing the base plate to the distributor body, noting that one also secures the earthing lead , and lift out the base plate. Unhook the flexible actuating link connecting the diaphragm in the vacuum unit with the moving contact breaker plate. IMPORTANT.-Note the relative position of the rotor arm drive slot in the cam spindle and the offset drive dog at the driving end of the spindle to B.4

(7) (8)

(9)

(10)

ensure that the timing is not 1800 out when the cam spindle is engaged with the centrifugal weights during assembly. Take out the cam retaining screw and remove the cam spindle. Take out the centrifugal weights. These may be lifted out as two assemblies, each complete with a spring and toggle. To release the suction advance unit remove the circlip, adjusting nut, and spring. Withdraw the unit. Take care not to lose the adjusting nut lock spring clip . To release the spindle from the body drive out the parallel driving pin passing through the collar of the driving tongue member at the lower end of the spindle.

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CA M

CONTACT BR EAKER BAS E PLA TE

MICROM ET ER ADJUST ING NUT

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Fig. B.4 The component parts of the distributor


www.morrisoxford.com THE IGNITION SYSTEM

B

Section B.7 CAPACITOR A 路2 microfarad metallized capacitor is fitted and the eyelet on the cable connected to the contact breaker terminal post is squared and slotted to prevent it twisting round and short-circuiting against the distributor. The best method of testing the capacitor is by substitution. D isconnect the original capacitor and connect a new one between the low-tension terminal of the distributor and earth.

Section B.8 REASSEMBLING THE DISTRmUTOR Reassembly is a direct reversal of the dismantling proced ure given in Section B.6, although careful attention must be given to the following points: (1) As they are assembled the components of the automatic advance mechanism, the distributor shaft, and the portion of the shaft on which the cam fits must be lubricated with thin, clean engine oil to Ref. D. (2) Tum the vacuum control adjusting nut until it is in the half-way position when replacing the control unit. (3) When engaging the cam driving pins with the centrifugal weights make sure that they are in the original position. When seen from above, the small offset of the driving dog must be on the right and the driving slot for the rotor arm must be in the six o'clock position. (4) Adjust the contact breaker to give a maximum opening of 路014 to 路016 in. 06 to 路40 mm.).

Section B.9 COIL The coil does not require any attention beyond seeing that the terminal connections and the coil mounting bolts are tight, and that the exterior is kept clean and dry, particularly between the terminals.

Se ction B.10 SPARKING PLUGS It is recommended that the plugs be inspected, cleaned, and tested every 3,000 miles (4800 km.) and new ones fitted every 12,000 miles (19200 km.). When sparking plugs are removed from the engine their gaskets should be removed with them and replaced on the plugs, which should be placed in a suitable holder. It is advisable to identify each plug with the number of the cylinder from which it was removed so that any faults revealed on examination can be traced back to the cylinder concerned. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

Fig. 8.5 An overheated plug may be identified by severely eroded electrodes and a white, burned or blistered insulator When examining the plugs place a new plug of the same type beside the others to afford a ready comparison of the relative condition of the used plugs. Examine for signs of oil fouling. This will be indicated by a wet, shiny, black deposit on the insulator. This is caused by oil pumping due to worn cylinders and pistons or gummed-up or broken rings. Under such conditions oil from the cylinder walls is forced up past the rings on the suction stroke of the piston and is eventually deposited on the plugs. A permanent remedy for this cannot be effected, the only cure being the fitting of a new piston and rings. or, in extreme cases, a rebore may be necessary. Next examine the plugs for signs of petrol (gasoline) fouling. This is indicated by a dry, fluffy, black deposit which is usually caused by over-rich carburation, although ignition system defects such as a run-down battery, faulty distributor, coil or condenser defects, or a broken or worn-out cable may be additional causes. If the plugs appear to be suitable for further use proceed to clean and test them. First remove the plug gaskets and examine them for condition. A large proportion of the heat of the plug is normally dissipated to the cylinder head through the steel gasket between the plug and the head. Plugs not screwed down tightly can thus easily become overheated so that they operate out of their proper heat range, thus producing pre-ignition, short plug life, and 'pinking', On the other hand, it is unnecessary and unwise to tighten up the plugs too much. What is required is a reasonably good seal between the plug and the cylinder head and the use of a torque wrench is recommended to tighten the plugs to a figure of 30 lb. ft. (4'15 kg. m.). If the plugs require cleaning it is preferable to make use of a proper plug cleaner of the type recommended by the plug manufacturers, and the makers' instructions for using the cleaner should be followed carefully.

B.5


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B

Occasionally a blistered insulator or a badly burnt electrode may be noticed when examining the plugs (see Fig. B.5). If the plug is of the type normally recommended for the engine and it was correctly installed (down tightly on the gasket), this condition may have been brought about by a very lean mixture or an overheated engine. There is, however, a possibility that a plug of another type is required, but as a rule the recommended plug should be adhered to. After cleaning carefully, examine the plugs for cracked insulators and wear of the insulator nose due to excessive previous cleaning. In such cases the plugs have passed their useful life and new plugs should be installed. Examine th e insulator for deposits un derneath the side electrode which have possibly accumulated and which act as a 'hot-spot' in service. After cleaning the plugs in a special cleaner blow all surplus abrasive out of the body recesses, and off the plug threads, by means of an air blast. Next examine the threads for carbon. Any deposits can be removed and the threads cleaned with a wire brush. A wire buffing wheel may also be utilized, but reasonable care must be used in both methods in order not to injure the electrodes o r the tip of the insulator. The thread section of the plug body is often neglected when cleaning the plugs, owing to the fact that it is not generally realize d that, like the gaskets, the threads are a means of heat dissipation and that when they are coated with carbon it retards the flow of the heat from the plug, producing overheating. This simple procedure will also ensure absence of binding on the threads on replacement an d also avoid unnecessary use of the plug spanner. When replacing a plug always screw it down by hand as far as possible and use the torque wrench for final tightening only. Whenever possible, use a socket to avoid possible fracture of the insulator. Examine the electrodes for the correct gap (see 'GEl ERAL DATA ' ). A void an incorrect reading in the case of badly pitted electrodes. Remember that electrode corrosion and the development of oxides at the gap area vitally affects the sparking efficiency. The special cleaner can remove the oxides and deposits from the insulator, but the cleaner stream

B.6

www.morrisoxford.com

THE IGNITION SYSTEM

does not always reach this area with full effect owing to its location, and cannot necessarily deal with corrosion effectively as this sometimes requires too strong a blast for proper removal. When plugs appear worthy of further use it is good practice to dress the gap area on both centre and side electrodes with a small file before resetting them to the correct gap. The intense heat, pressure, explosion shock, and electrical and chemical action to which the plugs are submitted d ur ing miles of service are so intense that the molecular structure of the metal points is eventually affected. Plugs then reach a worn-out condition and resetting the points can no longer serve a good purpose. When points are burnt badly it is indicative that the plug has worn to such an extent that its further use is undesirable and wasteful. Before replacing the plug in the engine test it for correct functioning under air pressure in a plug tester, following out the instructions issued by the makers of the plug tester. Generally speaking, a plug may be considered satisfactory for further service if it sparks continuously under a pressure of 100 lb.jsq. in. (7 kg .jcm.") with the gap between the points set at 路022 in. (,56 mm.), It is essential that the plug point should be reset to the recommended gap before the plug is refitted to the engine (see 'GENERAL DATA ' ). While the plug is under pressure in the tester it should be inspected for leakage by applying oil round the terminal. Leakage is indicated by the production of air bubbles, the intensity of which will serve to indicate the degree of leakage. The leakage gases have a 'blowtorch' effect when the engine is running which rapidly raises the temperature of the plug, raising it above its designed heat range, thus producing overheating, preignition, and rapid electrode destruction. The top half of the insulator is frequently responsible for poor plug performance due to the following faults: splashes, accumulation of dirt and dust, cracked insulators caused by a slipping spanner, overtightness of the terminals. Examine for a cracked insulator at the shoulder and the terminal post and remove any accumulation s of dirt and dust.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520


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BB

SECTION BB THE IGNITION SYSTEM This Section is a Supplement to Section B

Section

Locating a low-tension circuit fault

BB.I

Timing the ignition ..

BB.2

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713

BB.I


www.morrisoxford.com THE IGNITION SYSTEM

BB Section BB.I

LOCATING A LOW-TENSION cmCUIT FAULT Having determined, by testing as described in Section B.2, that the fault lies in the low-tension circuit, switch on the ignition and turn the engine until the contact breaker points are fully opened. Refer to the wiring diagram and check the circuit with a voltmeter (0-20 volts) as follows: NOTE.-If the circuit is in order the reading on the voltmeter should be approximately 12 volts. (1) Battery to starter switch terminal. Connect a voltmeter to the starter switch terminal and to earth. No reading indicates a faulty cable or loose connections. (2) Starter switch to control box terminal 'A' (brown lead). Connect a voltmeter to the control box terminal 'A' and to earth. No reading indicates a faulty cable or loose connections. (3) Control box terminal 'At '. Connect a voltmeter to the control box terminal 'AI' and to earth. No reading indicates a fault in the series winding of the control box . (4) Control box terminal 'At' to terminal on ignition switch (brown with blue lead). Connect a voltmeter to the ignition switch terminal and to earth. No reading indicates a faulty cable or loose connections. (5) Ignition switch. Connect a voltmeter to the second ignition switch terminal (white lead) and to earth. No reading indicates a fault in the ignition switch. (6) Ignition switch to fusebox terminal 'A3' (white lead). Connect the voltmeter to the fusebox terminal 'A3' and to earth. No reading indicates a faulty cable or loose connections. (7) Fusebox terminal 'A3' to ignition coil terminal 'SW' (white lead). Connect a voltmeter to the ignition coil terminal 'SW' and to earth. No reading indicates a faulty cable or loose connections. (8) Ignition coil. Connect a voltmeter to the ignition terminal 'C B' (white with black lead) and to earth. o readin g indicates a fault in the primary winding of the co il and a new coil mu st be fitted. (9) Ignition coil to distributor (white with black lead). Connect a voltmeter to the distributor low-tension terminal and to earth . No reading indicates a fa ulty cable or loo se connection s. (10) Contact breaker and capacitor. Connect a voltmeter across the breaker points. No reading indicates a fault in the capacitor.

if the timing has been lost the following procedure should be followed: (1) Turn the engine in the direction of rotation until No. I piston is at T.D.C. on its compression stroke. This can best be effected by turning the engine and observing the valves. When the valves are 'rocking' (i.e. exhaust just closing and inlet just opening) on No.4 cylinder No. I piston is approximately at T.D.C. on its compression stroke. On low-compression engines rotate the crankshaft pulley until the notch in the rear flange of the pulley is in line with the long pointer on the timing cover. Alternatively, align the dimples on the crankshaft and camshaft gears. No. I piston will then be at T. D.C. on compression stroke. On high-compression engines rotate the crankshaft pulley until the notch in the rear flange of the pulley is in line with the centre pointer. No.1 piston will then be at 5° B.T.D.C. on compression stroke. (2) Set the contact breaker points to ·014 to ·016 in. ('36 to ·40 mm.) when in their position of maximum opening. (3) Insert the distributor into its housing, and engage the drive dog lugs with the drive shaft slots (both of which are offset) by slowly rotating the rotor arm. (4) Screw in the two bolts securing the distributor clamp plate to the distributor housing. (5) Position the distributor so that the vacuum control unit side of the body is to the rear and the unit is vertical. (6) Rotate the distributor body anti-clockwise until the points are fully closed. Then slowly rotate it in a clockwise direction until the points just commence to open. Secure the distributor body in this position by tightening up the clamp plate pinchbolt and nut. Finally, check that the rotor arm is opposite the correct segment for the cylinder which is at the top of its compression stroke.

Section BB.2 TIMING THE IGNITION The static ignition timing should be set so that firing occurs at 5° B.T.D.C. (high compression) or T.D.C. (low compression). To set the distributor in the correct position for firing

BB.2

Fig. BB.l The notch in the pulley approaching the T.D.C. position for pistons I and 4 Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713


www.morrisoxford.com THE IGNITION SYSTEM IMPORTANT.- To obtain an accurate setti ng an electr ical method should be used to determine the actual position at which the points break , and the following method can be used. With the low-tension lead connected to the distributor, turn on the ignition switch and connect a l2 -volt lamp in parallel with the contact breaker points (i.e. one lead from the dis tributor low-tension terminal and the other to earth) and turn the distributor as detailed in paragraph (6) until the lamp lights, indicating that the points have just opened.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3.

30713

BB

NOTE.-If the distributor drive gear assembly has been removed from the engine it should be refitted in accordance with instructions given in Section AA.2 before the above operation is carried out. Should a stroboscopic lamp be used , care must be taken that with the engine running the speed is low enough to ensure that the centrifugal advance weights are not in operation. If the vacuum advance take-off is direct from the induction manifold the take-off must be disconnected before attempting the timing check, otherwise engine timing will be retarded.

B8 .3


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c

SECTION C THE COOLING SYSTEM Section

Description Cold weather precautions

c.s

Draining the system

C.3

Fan and dynamo belt adjustment ..

C.6

Filler cap -removing

C.2

Filling the system

CA

Thermostat ..

C.l End of Section

Tools -service Water pump

C.?

Removing

For additional information sec Section CC

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

C.l


c

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THE COOLING SYSTEM D ES CRIPTION

The cooling system is pressurized and the water circulation is assisted by a pump attached to the front of the engine an d d riven by a belt from the crankshaft pu lley. A re lief valve is incorporated in the radiator filler cap which controls the pressure at approximately 7 lb.jsq, in. (路49 kg. jcm."). The water circulates from the base of the radiator and pas ses round the cylinders and cylinder head, reaching the header tank of the radiator via the thermostat and top hose. From the header tank is passes down the radiator core to the base tank o f the radiator. Air is drawn through the radiator by a fan attached to the water pump pulley.

Section C.I THERMOSTAT For maximum efficiency the engine operating temperature is maintained within certain limits by a bellowstype thermostat fitted in the water outlet at the front of the cylin der hea d. When the engine is cold this valve is closed, and when the engine is started th e flow o f wate r to the radiato r is temporarily restricted . Due to this, the temperature of the water in the cylinder head and cylinder jackets will quickly rise, thus ensuring rapid warming up . The heat so generated will gradually expand the bellows, so opening the valve and ultimately permitting a full flow of water to the radiator. The the rmostat is de tachable. A small ho le d rilled in the head of the valve provides a by-pass to cope with any expansion of the cooling water. Wh en the system has been completely drained it is essen tia l, whe n refilling, to allow sufficient time for any trapped air to escape through the by-pass ho le in the valve before finally topping up. The thermostat opening is set by the manufacturer and cannot be altered. The opening temperature is given in the ' GE l ERAL DAT A' section. During decarbonizing it is policy to test this opening by immersing the thermostat in water raise d to the requisite temperature. The valve should open u nd er these conditions, but if it fails to open a new unit must be fitted.

spout cam, and wait until the press ure in the radiator is fully released before finally removing the cap. It is advisable to protect the hand against escaping steam while removing the cap.

Section C.3 DR AINI I 'G T HE CO O LING

YSTEM

Remove the radiator header tank filler cap. Open the two drain taps. One is fitted at the rear of the cylinder block on the right-hand side and the other at the base of the radiator. If anti-freeze mixture is being used it should be drained into a suitable container and carefully preserved for future use. In the event of a drain tap becoming clogged it is advisable to completely remove the tap from the cylinder block or radiator and then remove any foreign matter. The use of stiff wire to dislodge any obstruction would prove ineffective as the construction of the taps is such as to prevent complete penetration behind them. When the system is completely drained and refilling is to be deferred until some later date a su itable notice sho uld be fixed to the front of the radia tor, indicating t hat the coo lant has been d rai ned. As an alternative, place the radiator filler cap on the driver's seat or leave the bonnet propped open as a reminder to fill the cooling system before the car is used again. 'OTE.- If a heater is fitted , under no circum stances should draining of the cooling system be resorted to as an alternative to the use of anti-freeze, due to the fact tha t complete draining of the heater unit by means of the cooling system drain tap s is not possible. Flushing the radiator To ensure efficient circulation of the coolant and to reduce the formation of scale and sediment in the radiator the system should be periodically flushed out with clear running water, preferably before putting in anti-freeze and again after taking it out. ,',*.'

..

Section C.2 REMOVI G T HE FILLER CA P The cooling system is under pressure while the engine is hot, and the radiator filler cap must be removed very carefully o r left in position until the water has cooled. If it is necessary to remove the filler cap when the engine is hot it is absolutely essential to release the cap gradually, and the filler spout is provided with a specially shaped cam to enable this to be done easily. Unscrew the cap slowl y until the retaining tongues are felt to engage the small lobes on the end of the filler C.2

Fig. C.I Showing (I) the radiator filler cap retatntng cam, (2) stop, and (3) safety catch Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE COOLING SYSTEM The water should be allowed to run through until it comes out clear from the taps. This method is adequate under normal conditions, but in extreme cases where excessive 'furring up' is experienced a more efficient method is to completely remove the radiator and flush in the reverse way to the flow, i.e. turn the radiator upside-down and let the water flow in through the bottom hose and out of the top connection.

FILLING THE COOLING SYSTEM Close the radiator and cylinder block drain taps. Ensure that all hose connections are tight. Fill up the system through the filler in the radiator header tank until the level of water can just be seen. Run the engine until it is hot and then add sufficient water to raise the level to within I in. (25'4 mm.) of the bottom of the filler neck. When possible, soft water, such as clean rain-water, should be used to fill the system. When using anti-freeze avoid overfilling and prevent loss due to expansion. Screw the filler cap firmly into position. The cooling system is unsuitable for use with antifreeze mixtures having an alcohol base owing to the high temperatures attained in the top tank. Only anti-freeze mixtures of the ethylene glycol or glycerine type should be employed. (See Section C.5.)

Section C.S

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DOWIl to 0° F. ( -18° C.) 20% solution

Where temperatures below 0° F. ( -18° C.) are likely to be encountered a solution of at least 25 per cent. of anti-freeze must be used to ensure immunity from trouble. Consult your local Dealer on this matter. Before introducing anti-freeze mixture to the radiator it is advisable to clean out the cooling system thoroughly by swilling out the passages with a hose inserted in the filler cap, keeping the drain taps open. Only top up when the cooling system is at its normal running temperature, in order to avoid losing anti-freeze due to expansion. Make sure that the cooling system is watertight and examine all joints, replacing any defective rubber hose with new. The capacity of the cooling system may be found in 'GENERAL DATA'.

Section C.6 FAN AND DYNAMO BELT ADJUSTMENT

COLD WEATHER PRECAUTIONS As the cooling system is sealed, relatively high temperatures are developed in the radiator upper tank. For this reason anti-freeze solutions having an alcohol base .....-

are unsuitable owing to their high evaporation rate producing rapid loss of coolant and a consequent interruption of the circulation of coolant. Only anti-freeze of the ethylene glycol or glycerine type is suitable for use in the cooling system , and recommended makes are Bluecol, Shell Snowflake, and Esso Anti-freeze. The correct quantities of anti-freeze for different degrees of frost resistance are given here: Down to 7° F. ( -14° C.) 15% solution

Section C.4

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To fit a new fan belt slacken slightly the two bolts on which the dynamo pivots and release the bolt securing it to the slotted link and the nut securing the slotted link to the engine. Move the dynamo to the eng ine as far as possible. Slide the belt over the fan and onto the fan pulley; ease the belt onto the crankshaft pulley and dynamo pulley. It may be found helpful to turn the engine with the starting handle whilst casing the belt over the dynamo pulley. Adjustment is made by raising the dynamo upwards away from the engine . A gentle hand pull only must be exerted on the dynamo, or the belt tension will be excessive and undue strain will be thrown onto the dynamo bearings. Tighten up the bolts with the dynamo in this position. The belt should be sufficiently tight to prevent slip, yet it should be possible to move the belt laterally I in. (2·5 cm.) in the centre of its longest run.

Section C.7 Fig. C.2 The dynamo mounting bolts which must be slackened for belt tension adjustment Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

REMOVING THE WATER PUMP D rain the water from the cooling system by opening the two drain taps as described in Section C.3; remember to collect the water for re-use if it contains anti-freeze. C.3


c

www.morrisoxford.com THE COOLING SYSTEM

Release the clips on the top and bottom water hoses, detaching the bottom hose from the connection on the water pump. Remove the radiator as detailed in Section Cc. Disconnect the dynamo leads, remove the dynamo a ttachment bolts, and take off the dynamo. Take out the four bolts securing the fan and pump assembly to the front of the cylinder block and withdraw the assembly. Replacement of the fan and pump assembly is a reversal of this procedure, but care must be taken to see that the joint gasket between the pump body and the cylinder block is in good condition. It is always advisable to fit a new gasket.

C.4

SERVICE TOOLS 18G187. Radiator Reverse-flush Adaptors These adaptors should be used in pairs, one for the radiator inlet hose and one for the outlet hose. The brass inlet pipe is 1 in. (25,4 mm.) in diameter. This is the size of the water mains supply hose generally used ; if there is any variation a reducing sleeve can be used.

18G187

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


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cc

SECTION CC THE COOLING SYSTEM This Section is a Supplement to Section C Section

Radiator- removing and replacing

eCI

Water pump- removing , dismantling, and reassembling

ec.2

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

eCI


cc

www.morrisoxford.com THE COOLING SYSTEM Section CC.2

Sec tion CC.! REMOVING AND REP LACING THE RADIATOR

REMO VING, DISMANTLING, AND REASSEMBLING THE WATER PUMP

Drain the water from the cooling system as in Section C.3. Release the clips from the top and bottom water hoses and detach the hoses from their connections. Remove the two set screws and spring and plain washers securing each side of the radiator to the body. Lift out the radiator. Replacement of the radiator core is a reversal of the above procedure. Close the drain taps and refill the system until the surface of the coolant is 1 in. (25,4 mm.) below the bottom of the filler neck.

A

B

Fig. CC.1 A section through the water pump showing the compone/Its. When assembled, the hole (A) in the bearing must coincide with the lubricating hole in the water pump and the face of the hub (n) must be flush with the end of the spindle

CC.2

Removing Remove the radiator as detailed in Section CC.I. Remove the dynamo attachment bolts and take olf the dynamo. Unscrew the four bolts attaching the pump assembly to the front of the cylinder block and remove the fan and pump assembly. Replacemen t of the fan and pump assembly is a reversal of the above procedure. Disma ntlin g Unscrew the four set bolts which attach the fan and belt pulley to the hub and remove the fan and pulley. Remove the fan hub with a suitable extractor. Pull out the bearing locating wire through the hole in the top of the pump body. Gently tap the pump bearing assembly rearwards out of the pump body. This will release the combined bearing and spindle assembly, together with the seal and vane. Remove the vane from the bearing assembly with a suitable extractor and remove the pump seal assembly. Reassembling Reassembly is a reversal of the dismantling procedure, but care must be taken to see that the seal assembly is in good condition. If there is any sign of damage the seal sho uld be replaced by a new component. When the bea ring assembly is fitted into the pump the hole (A) in the bearing must coincide with the lubricating hole in the pump body. Should the interference fit of the fan hub have been impaired when the hub was withdrawn from the spindle, a new hub should be fitted.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520


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DD

SECTION DD THE FUEL SYSTEM Section

Air cleaner

00.12

Fuel tank Gau ge unit -removing

OD .7

Removing (Car)

DD .6

Remo ving (Traveller)

DD.I3

S.U. carburetter Adjustments

00.9

Description

DD.4

Jet-centring

00.10

Removing and replacing

00.11

Troubles-location and rectification

00.5

S.U. fuel pump Action

..

00.2

Construction

00.1

Removing

00.8

Servicing

00.3

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29550

DD. l


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KEY TO CARBVRElTER COMPONENTS No.

Description

No.

Description

No .

I!

Description

I.

Body assembly.

19. Washer for jet bearing (brass) .

38.

Pin-split.

2.

Pin-piston lift.

20.

39. Lever and rod assembl y.

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Spring-jet adjusting.

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3. Circlip .

21. Spindle throttle.

40. Chamber-float.

4. Spring.

22. Disc-throttle.

41.

Lid assembl y.

5. Chamber and piston assembly.

23. Screw for throttle.

42.

Lever-hinged.

24. Washer for spindle nut.

43.

Pin-hinged lever.

7. Spring-piston (red).

25.

Nut for throttle spindle .

44. Needle and seat assembly .

8. Damper assembly-piston.

26.

Lever assembly-throttle.

45. Screw-lid to chamber.

6.

Washer for dampe r.

28. Spring-throttle stop screw.

46.

10.

Screw-s-chamber to body.

29. Screw-lever stop.

47. Gasket-lid to chamber.

II.

Screw-needle locking.

30. Washer for cam lever.

48.

12. Needle-jet.

31. Lever-s-cam.

49. Joint washer.

13. Jet assembly.

32. Bolt-pivot.

50. Distance piece.

14.

33. Tube-pivot bolt.

51. Nut for stud .

IS. Nipple.

34. Washer.

52. Washer.

16. Bearing- jet.

35. Spring-return.

53. Washer.

17. Screw-jet.

36.

18. Screw-jet adjusting .

37. Washer.

9.

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Gland nut.

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DB

THE FUEL SYSTEM

Section DD.! CO STRUCTION OF THE S.U. FUEL PUMP The fuel pump is an S.U. type PO 12-volt electric pump, which consists of a main body and top and bottom covers. The top cover gives access to the points. The bottom cover retains the filter in position. Only the parts shown in Fig. 00.2 can be serviced; if trouble is suspected in any other part of the fuel pump the unit must be replaced by another pump.

Section DD.2 ACTIO

OF THE S.U. FUEL PUMP

The action of the pump is as follows . The diaphragm is actuated magnetically through the medium of a hydrostatic connection. By this arrangement the lost motion between the volumetric displacement of the pump diaphragm and its centre plate by mechanical means is eliminated. The pumping diaphragm suffers very little flexure, and it is therefore possible to make use of Terylene film in the construction of this item. Three pressings soldered to a central tube comprise the main structure of the pump. The tube (made of brass) houses a permanent magnet with two steel pole pieces, a steel plunger separated from the magnet by an insulated distance piece, and a coil spring to impel the magnet and plunger downwards. The tube is completely filled with a light mineral oil (OT0585) and is hermetically sealed by the upper and lower diaphragms. The contact breaker mechanism is mounted on a plate above the solenoid windings, and is not serviced separately.

Section DD.3 SERVICING THE S.U. FUEL PUMP Cleaning the filter Blockage of the filter will result in a gradual falling off in maximum delivery of the pump, and will be detected by a tendency to fuel starvation at high engine speeds and loads. When such symptoms are detected, release the bottom cover-plate and cork gasket and withdraw the filter. Wash the filter in fuel, lightly blow through with air, and clean any sediment from the bakelite moulding. When replacing the cover-plate it is advisable to renew the cork gasket. Contact points If trouble from the contact points be suspected, the pump must be renewed. No attempt must be made to clean the points. OTE.- There is no adjustment provided for the contact points. DDA

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Air leakage Rapid operation accompanied by a diminished fuel delivery is indicative of air leakage into the suction side of the pump. This fault is best detected by disconnecting the delivery pipe at the carburetter and allowing fuel to discharge into an open receptacle with the end of the pipe submerged in the fuel. Should any significant quantity of air bubbles be observed, check and, if necessary, renew the cover-plate gasket. The rubber connections at either end of the suction line should be examined and renewed if they show any signs of damage or deterioration. TO TE.- A peculiari ty of this pump is that when the ignition is on, the engine not running, and the float-chamber of the carburetter full, the pump will continue to ' tick' .

Section DD.4 DESCRIPTIO

O F T HE S. . CAR BURE1TER

The HS2 carburetter is of the automatically expanding choke type in which the size of the main air passage (or choke) over the jet, and the effective area of the jet , are variable according to the degree of throttle opening used on the engine against the prevailing road condition (which may differ widely from light cruising to heavy pulling). Therefore, to serve the complete throttle range a single jet only is used, being a simple metal tube sliding in a single bearing bush, fed by fuel along a small-diameter nylon tube leading direct from the base of the floatchamber. The jet is varied in effective area by a tapered fuel metering needle sliding into it.

Section DD.5 LOCA TI ON AND RECTI FICATI O N O F CARBURETTER TR OU BLES Piston sticking The piston assembly comprises the suctio n disc and the piston forming the choke, into which is inserted the hardened and ground piston rod which engages in a bea ring in the cent re of the suction chamber and in which is, in turn, inserted the jet needle . The piston rod running in the bearing is the only part which is in actual contact with any other part, the suction disc, piston, and needle all having suitable clearances to prevent sticking. If sticking does occur the whole assembly should be cleaned carefully and the piston rod lubricated with a spot of thin oil. No oil must be applied to any other part except the piston rod. A sticking piston can be ascertained by removing the piston damper and lifting the piston by pressing the piston lifting pin; the piston should come up quite freely and fall back smartly onto its seating when released. On no account should the piston retu rn spring be stretched or its tension altered in an atte mp t to improve its rate of return. Water and dirt in the carburetter When this is suspected lift the piston with a pencil, when the jet can then be seen. Floo d the carburetter and Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2.

25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE FUEL SYSTEM

DD

Remove the slo tte d dr ain plug and empty t he ta nk .

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Slack en the two clips on the filler neck hose a nd wit hdraw the filler cap extension . Pull th e ho se from the tan k. Disconnect the fuel pipe at the uni on a nd the fuel gau ge cable from the tank unit , each locat ed o n the front end of th e tank. Remove the two nut s a nd spring washers fro m the bolts securing the rear tan k a ncho rage bracket to the frame and remo ve the nut s and spring washers from the two bolt s which secure the front tank anch or age bracket to the bod y. Replacement is a reversal of the a bove instru ct io ns.

Fig. DD.l The method of check ing the correct adjustment of the fl oat lever

Section DD.7 watch the jet ; if fuel doe s not flow freely there is a blockage. To remedy this sta rt the engine, open the throttle, and block up the a ir inlet momenta rily without closing the throttle, keeping the throttle op en until the engine starts to race . If the jet is completely blo cked and the engine will not run , the jet must be removed a nd thoroughly cleaned.

REMOVING THE FUEL TANK GAUGE UNIT Remove the slotted dr ai n plug and em pty the tank . Remo ve the lead fro m the ga uge un it.

Float-chamber flooding This is indicated by fuel flowing from the drain hole in the top of the float-chamber lid below the main fuel feed pipe, and is generally cau sed by grit between the float-chamber needle and its guide. Th e float-chamber lid should be removed and the needle and its guide thoroughly cleaned. Float needle sticki ng If the engine stops, apparently through lack of fuel. when there is plenty in the tank and the pump is working properly, the probable cause is a sticking float needle . An ea sy test for this is to disconnect the pipe from the electric pump to the carburetter and switch the ignition on and off quickly while the end of the pipe is directed onto a cloth or into a container. If fuel is delivered, sta rvation ha s almost cert ainl y been caused by the float needle sticking to its seating, and the float-chamber lid should therefore be remo ved and the needle and seating remo ved , cleaned, and refitt ed . At the same tim e it will be ad visable to clean out the enti re fuel feed system, as thi s trouble is caused by for eign matter in the fuel and unle ss thi s is removed it is likely to recur. It is of no use whatever rene wing any of the compon ent parts of the carburett er , and th e onl y cure is to mak e sure that the fuel tank and pipe lines are entirely free from an y kind of forei gn matt er o r sticky substance capa ble of cau sing thi s trouble.

2

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-----7 5 8 23

Fig. DD.2

Section DD.6

The P D pump

REMOVING THE FUEL TANK Remove the screws securing the petrol tank cover inside the luggage boot and remove the cover. Morris Oxfor d (Series V) .

1.._-3

Issue 2.

25520

1. 2. 3. 4.

Cover- top. Pu mp bod y. Filter. Washer---dished .

5. Gasket (cork). 6. Plate-cover . 7. Nut. 8. Washer- spring.

DD .5


DB

THE FUEL SYSTEM

Unscrew the six special hexagon-headed screws (screwdriver slots are provided in the screws) securing the gauge unit in the top of the tank. Extract the gauge unit, taking particular care not to bend the float arm as the unit is withdrawn. Before replacing the gauge unit ensure that all traces of the old gasket are removed from both the tank and the unit. Always use a new gasket and apply a suitable jointing compound to each of the screws before replacing them. Ensure that the unit is fitted the correct way up; the cover is marked 'TOP' to assist this. Check for leaks immediately after filling the tank with fuel.

Section DD.8 REMO VING THE S.U. FUEL PUMP The fuel pump is housed in the luggage boot on the left-hand side. Remove the screws securing the millboard cover to gain access to the pump. Slacken the clip screws and remove the fuel hoses from the inlet and outlet adaptors on the pump body. Remove the nuts and bolts securing the mounting bracket to the body and disconnect the leads from the pump. Replacement is a reversal of the above procedure.

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(l mm.). This should cause a very slight momentary increase in the speed of the engine without impairing the evenness of the running. If the engine stops the mixture is too weak. If the speed increases and continues to increase when the piston is raised as much as tin. (6 mm.) the mixture is too rich. When the carburetter is correctly adjusted for mixture set the throttle adjustment screw to give the required slow-running.

Slow-running Turn the throttle adjustment screw to give a fast idling speed. Then unscrew, a fraction of a turn at a time, until the desired slow-running is obtained. Float-chamber The position of the float lever in the float-chamber must be such that the level of the float (and therefore the height of the fuel at the jet) is correct. This is checked by inserting a -{'If in. (7,94 mm.) round bar between the float lever and the machined lip of the float-chamber lid. The forked end of the lever should just rest on the bar (see Fig. 00.1) when the needle is on its seating. If this is not so the lever should be reset at the point where the forked end meets the shank. Do not bend the shank, which must be perfectly flat and at right angles to the needle when it is on its seating.

Section DD.tO Section DD.9 S.U. CARBURETIER ADJUSTMENTS Slow-running is governed by the setting of the jet adjusting nut and the throttle stop screw, both of which must be set and synchronized if satisfactory results are to be obtained. Before blaming the carburetter setting for bad slowrunning make certain that the trouble is not caused by badly adjusted distributor contact points, faulty plugs, incorrect valve clearance, or faulty valves and springs. Adjusting the jet Run the engine until it attains its normal running temperature. Unscrew the throttle lever setting screw until the throttle is completely closed. Turn the adjusting screw in a clockwise direction approximately one turn to set the throttle for fast idling. With the engine running, set the jet adjusting nut so that a mixture strength is obtained which will give the best running speed for this particular throttle opening, taking care to see that the jet head is in firm contact with the adjusting nut the whole time. The correctness or otherwise of this setting can be checked by raising the suction piston about :& in. DD.6

CENT RIi G THE S.U. CARBURETIER JET When the suction piston is lifted by the spring-loaded piston lifting pin it should fall freely and hit the inside jet bridge with a soft metallic click-that is, with the jet adjusting nut (2, Fig. 00.4) in its topmost po sition. If this click is not audible, but is so when the test is repeated with the jet in the fully lowered position, then

Fig. DD.3

Indicates an incorrectly centred jet which is eccentric to the jet aperture in the carburetter body Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2.

25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE FUEL SYSTEM the jet unit requires recentring on the needle, as described below. (l) Disconnect the rod between the jet lever and the jet head (7, Fig. DD.5). (2) Unscrew the union holding the nylon feed tube into the base of the float-chamber, and withdraw the tube and jet together. Unscrew the jet adjusting nut and remove the nut and lock spring. Replace the jet and feed tube. (3) Slacken off the large jet locking screw (l, Fig. DDA) until the jet bearing is just free to rotate by finger pressure. (4) With the damper removed and using a pencil on top of the piston rod, gently press the piston and needle down onto the jet bridge. (5) Tighten the jet locking screw, observing that the jet head is still in its correct angular position. (6) Lift the piston and check that it falls freely and evenly, hitting the jet bridge with a soft metallic click. Then fully lower the jet and re-check to see if there is any difference in the sound of the impact; if there is and the second test produces a sharper impact sound, the centring operation will have to be repeated until successful, the nut and lock spring being replaced after the conclusion of the operation.

DD

Fig. DD.5 5. Slow-run adjusting screw. 6. Fast-idle adjusting screw. 7. Link rod .

Section DD.11 REMOVING AND REPLACI NG THE S.U. CARBURETfER Remove the air cleaner as detailed in Section DD.12. Remove the split pin and disconnect the accelerator rod, taking care not to misplace the washer and spring. Slacken the pinch-bolt to remove the mixture control cable from the lever on the carburetter. Unscrew the clip and pull off the rubber main fuel pipe from the top of the float-chamber. Remove the rubber pipe to the vacuum control (carburetter to distributor). Unscrew the two nuts and spring washers securing the carburetter to the inlet manifold and withdraw the carburetter. Note the heat washer and two gaskets at the carburetter flange. Replacement is a reversal of these instructions, but make sure that the gaskets are in good condition or replace them with new ones.

Section DD.12

Fig. DDA I. Jet locking screw. 2. Jet adjusting nut. Morris Oxford (Series V).

3. Jet head. 4. Nylon petrol pipe. Issue 3. 29550

AIR CLEANER Dr y type Every 12,000 miles (19200 km .) remove and dismantle the air cleaner. Blowout all traces of dust and reassemble, using a new paper element. In dusty territories it is advisable to clean out the element every 3,000 miles (4800 km.). Remove the dust either by lightly tapping the element on a flat surface or by blowing out with a low-pressure air blast. DD.7


DD

THE FUEL SYSTEM

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retaining bolt from the centre of the top cover. Lift off the top cover and filter element. Examine the oil container for sludge. If sludge is presen t the cleaner must be serviced completely as described below. If there is no accumulation of sludge top up the oil container with engine oil to the level indicated by the arrow on the inside of the bowl. Make sure that the gasket is in good condition, then replace the element and top cover. Secure with the winged bolt. It is important to maintain the correct oil level in the cleaner. Too high a level will result in oil being drawn into the combustion spaces and too Iowa level will result in failure to keep the element saturated.

Fig. DD.6 The component parts of the dry-type air cleaner are clearly shown in this illustration Removing Release the clip and disconnect the rubber breather pipe from the air cleaner. Unscrew the two bolts securing the air cleaner to the carburetter air intake and the set screw securing the air cleaner to the support strap, and remove the air cleaner.

Cleaning and re-oiling The cleaner should be cleaned periodically and filled with new oil every 3,000 miles (4800 krn.), or more frequently if inspection shows this to be necessary. Wash the filter element in a bowl of paraffin (kerosene) and allow it to drain and dry thoroughly. Lift out the oil container, empty the oil, and scrape out the accumulated sludge. Wash the entire oil conta iner in paraffin (kerosene) and fill to the level with engine oil. It is not necessary to re-oi l the filter element; it is done automatically as soon as the engine starts up. Make sure that the gasket is in good condition and reassemble the cleaner.

Dismantling Remove the spring clip from the under side of the cleaner and remove the base. The paper element is now exposed and can be removed and replaced by a new element. Reassembly is a reversal of the above instructions.

Oil bath type Most of the dust and dirt suspended in the ingoing air is precipitated into the oil in the bottom of the cleaner when the air stream reverses above the oil shelf, and settles in the bottom of the oil sump as sludge. Subsequently, a cleaning operation also takes place as the partly cleaned air is drawn upwards through the woven metallic mesh. The filter element is automatically oiled and washed by oil picked up from the shelf by the incoming air.

To inspect for sludge The air cleaner must be inspected every 1,000 miles (1600 km .), or more often in dusty conditions. Release the spring clip and disconnect the rubber breather pipe from the air cleaner. Unscrew the clip securing the air cleaner to the carburetter air intake and lift off the air cleaner with an up and sideways movement to clear the locating spigot from its rubber bush. Transfer the assembly to a bench and remove the DD .8

Fig. DD.7 The arrows indicate the two clips securing the air cleaner (oil bath type) and breather pipe, and the rubber-mounted spigot

Section 00.13 REMOVING AND REPLACI G T HE FUEL TA lK (TRAVELLER) The fuel tank on the Traveller is located under the rear bo dy floor panel. Before removing thc tank unscrew the slotted drain plug and drain the fuel into a clean container. To gain access to the fuel filler extension remove the two bolts securing the rear seat back stop to the body Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29550


THE FUEL SYSTEM and then release the snap-on connectors that secure the rea r left-hand trim panel to the body. Remove the lefthand tail/stop lamp closing panel. Slacken the two clips on the filler neck hose and withdraw the filler extension piece from the outside of the car. Lift the floor carpet, unscrew the four screws securing the floor pa nel to the body, and remove the panel.

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue I.

29550

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DD

Disconnect the fuel gauge earth wire from the body and the fuel gauge lead from the tank unit. Release the hose clips securing the vent pipe and unscrew the fuel pump flexible hose union nut. Unscrew an d remove the six screws securing the tank flanges to the body and lift the fuel tank out from the inside of the car. Replacement is a reversal of the removal instructions.

DD .9


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E

SECTION E THE CLUTCH Section

Description Assembling

E.2

Dismantling

E.I

Release lever adjustment

E.3 End of Section

Tools-service

For additional information see Section EE

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

E.I


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Retainer.

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Lever-release.

9.

Plate-pressure.

16.

Washer - spring--eover screw.

3.

Reta iner- lever.

10.

Spring-pressure plate .

17. Serew--eover to flywheel.

4.

P in-lever.

II.

Plate assembly-driven.

18.

5.

Spring-anti-rattle.

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Lining.

19. Bushes.

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Strut.

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Bolt for lever.

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Eyebolt with nut.

14. Ring-s-carbon.

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Description

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Morris Oxford (Series V).

it

Issue 2. 25520


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THE CLUTCH DESCRIPTION The clutch is of the sin gle-plate dry-disc type operated hydraulically. No adjustment for wear is provided in the clutch itself; individual adjustment is provided for locating each lever during initial assembly. The adjusting nuts are locked in place and must never be disturbed unless the clutch is dismantled. Driven plate assembly This consists of a splined hub and flexible steel d riven plate (c), to the outer diameter of which are fixed the annular friction facings. This plate is attached to the splined hub by a spring mounting which provides a torsional cushion.

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E

forward into contact with the release plate and thus applying pressure to the release levers. Cover assembly Each release lever is pivoted on a floating pin (N), which remains stationary in the lever and rolls across a short flat portion of the enlarged hole in the eyebolts (M) (see Fig. E. I). The outer ends of the eyebolts extend through holes in the clutch cover and are fitted with adjusting nuts (L) by means of which each lever is located in its correct position. The outer or shorter ends of the release levers en gage the pressure plate lugs by means of struts (0) which provide knifeedge contact between the outer ends of the levers and the pressure plate lugs , eliminating friction at this point. Thus the pressure plate (r-) is pulled away from the driven plate (c), compressing the six thrust coil springs (E) which are assembled between the pressure plate and the clutch co ver (D). When th e foot pre ssure is removed from the clutch pedal the clutch sprin gs force the pre ssure plate forward against the driven plate, gradually and smoothly applying the power of the engine to the rear wheels. Hydraulic operation A master cylind er is mounted on th e engine side of the bulkhead and op erated directly by the clutch pedal. Fluid pressure is transmitted to the sla ve cylinder, mo ving the piston, push-rod, and clutch lever to disengage the clutch. Master cylinder The clutch ma ster cylind er is of the Girl ing type c.y. with integral supply tank. The assembly is simil ar to that of the brake master cylinder, a description of which is given in Section MM. Slave cylinder This is bolted to th e clutch hou sing and normally requ ires no maintenance; its ass embly is similar to that of the front wheel brake cylinder. If the system is drained of fluid it will be necessary to bleed the cylinder after reassembly and refilling.

Section E.I Fig. E.I Flywheel. Secur ing bolts. c . Driven plate. D. Clutch cover. E. Thrust coil springs. F. Release bearing cup. G . Graphite release bea ring. II. Release plate.

Lever retainer springs. Release levers. K. Anti-rattle springs. L. Adju stin g nuts. M. Eyebolts. N. Floating pins. o. Stru ts. P. Pressure plate.

A.

I.

B.

J.

Withdrawal bearing assembly This comprises the graphite release bearing (G) mounted in a cup attached to the throw-out fork and a release plate (H) attached to the inner ends of the release levers (J) by means of the retainer springs (I). Release is accomplished by moving the release bearing

DISMANTLI G THE CLUTCH Two methods are possible in dismantling the clutch: (a) using the clutch assembly gauging fixture 18G99A, and (b) using a press and blocks of wood. Using the clutch assembly gauging fixture (Fig. E.2) Consult the code card to determine the correct spacers for the particular clutch. Place the spacers on the base plate in the positions indicated on the code card and place the clutch on the spacers. Screw the actuator into the central hole in the base plate and press the handle to clamp the clutch. Screw the set bolts firmly into the base plate. The clutch can now be compressed or released as required. E.3


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E

THE CLUTCH

'.400

Fig. ÂŁ.2 Using the actuator to compress the clutch springs for dismantling or setting the assembly Compress the clutch with the actuator and remove the adjusting nuts gradually to relieve the load of the thrust springs. Lift the cover off the clutch and carry out whatever additional dismantling may be necessary. Using a press and wood blocks (Fig. E.3) Place the cover on the bed of a press with the pressure plate resting on wood blocks so arranged that the cover is left free to move downwards. Place a block or bar across the top of the cover, resting it on the spring bosses. Apply pressure to the cover with the spindle of the press and, holding it under compression, remove the three adjusting nuts. The pressure from the press may now be released gradually until the clutch springs are fully extended. While stripping down the cover-plate assembly the parts should be marked so that they may be reassembled in the same relative position to each other to ensure that the correct balance is maintained. When a new pressure plate is fitted it is essential that the complete cover an d pressure plate assembly be accurately balanced, and it is not a practical proposition to fit new pressure plates unless balancing facilities are available. All parts are available for inspection when the cover is lifted off. To remove the release levers grasp the lever and eyebolt between the thumb and fingers so that the inner end of the lever and the threaded end of the eyebolt are as near together as possible, keeping the eyebolt pin seated in its socket in the lever. The strut can then be lifted over the ridge on the end of the lever, making it possible to lift the eyebolt ofT the pressure plate. It is advisable to renew any parts which show signs of wear.

position, seating them on their small locating bosses. Clean all parts and renew any which show appreciable wear. Assemble the release levers, eyebolts, and eyebolt pins, holding the threaded end of the eyebolt and the inner end of the lever as close together as possible. With the other hand insert the strut in the slots of the pressure plate lug just sufficiently to allow the plain end of the eyebolt to be inserted in the hole in the pressure plate. Move the strut upwards into the slots in the pressure plate lugs, over the ridge on the short end of the lever, and drop it into the grooves formed in the lever. Lay the cover over the parts, taking care that the anti-rattle springs are in position as shown in Fig. E.l and that the springs are directly under the seats in the cover. Also make sure, if using the original parts, that the eyebolts, eyebolt nuts, pressure plate lugs, and cover are fitted in their correct relative positions, as marked when dismantling, to ensure correct balance being maintained. Compress the springs either by the actuator, if the gauging fixture is being used, or by the use of a wooden block across the cover and a press. Take care to guide the eyebolts and the pressure plate lugs through the correct holes in the cover. Make sure also that the thrust springs remain correctly in their seats. Replace the eyebolt nuts on the eyebolts and release the pressure compressing the cover assembly.

Section E.3 ADJUSTIl G T HE REL EASE LEVERS Satisfactory operation of the clutch is dependent upon accurate adjustment of the release levers so that the pressure plate face is maintained parallel to the flywheel face. This cannot be accomplished by setting the levers parallel to the face of the release bearings after the clutch has been assembled to the flywheel because of the variations in the thickness of the driven plate.

Section E.2 ASSEMBLING T HE CLUTCH Lay the pressure plate on the wood block on the bed of the press (or on the base plate of the clutch assembly gauging fixture) and place the springs on it in a vertical ÂŁ.4

Fig. E.3 Compressing the springs with wood blocks and press


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THE CLUTCH

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E

Turn the adjusting nuts until the finger just touches each release lever, pressing downwards on the finger assembly to ensure that it is bearing squarely on the adaptor. Remove the finger and the pillar and replace the actuator; operate the actuator several times. Re-check with the finger assembly and make any necessary further adjustments. Lock the adjusting nuts.

SERVICE TOOLS 18G99A. Clutch Assembly Gauging Fixture

Fig. ÂŁ.4

With the use of this tool a clutch assembly can be quickly dismantled, rebuilt, and finally adjusted with a high degree of accuracy. This is a universal tool for clutch assemblies from 6t to 11 in. (158 to 279 mm.) diameter.

Checking the setting of the release levers For an accurate adjustment the universal gauging fixture must be used. Using the clutch assembly gauging fixture After carrying out any necessary servicing reassemble the parts on the clutch pressure plate, and place the cover on it and the whole assembly on the base plate of the gauging fixture. It is essential that the correct spacers be used, as indicated on the code card. Bolt the cover to the base plate and screw the adjusting nuts onto the bolts until the tops of the nuts are flush with the tops of the bolts. Screw the actuator into the base plate and work the handle a dozen times to settle the mechanism. Remove the actuator. Screw the pillar firmly into the base plate and place the appropriate adaptor (see code card) on the pillar with the recessed side downwards; place the gauge finger in position.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

18G99A

ÂŁ.5


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EE

SECTION EE THE CLUTCH This Section is a Supplement to Section E Clutch

Section

Bleeding

EE.6

Refitt ing

EE .2

Removing

EE .I

Servicing

EE .3

Master cylinder

EEA

Slave cylinder

EE.5

Tools- service

Morris Oxford (Series V).

End 01 Section

Issue 3. 30713

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EE.1


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EE

THE CLUTCH

Section EE.l REMOVING THE CLUTCH Remove the gearbox as detailed in Section FF.l. Loosen each of the hexagon bolts securing the clutch to the flywheel by slackening them a turn at a time until spring pressure is released. The clutch cover can now be disengaged from the flywheel dowels and the whole assembly lifted from the flywheel.

Section EE.2 REFTITING THE CLUTCH Position the driven plate assembly on the flywheel, taking care to place the larger-chamfered spline end of the driven plate hub away from the flywheel. Centralize the driven plate by means of the alignment bar (service tool 18G39) which fits the splined bore of the driven plate hub and the pilot bearing in the flywheel. As an alternative a spare first motion shaft can be used. Locate the cover assembly on the flywheel dowels and secure with the bolts, tightening them a turn at a time by diagonal selection. Do not remove the clutch alignment bar until all the bolts are securely tightened.

Lubrication of the splines of the driven plate is provided at assembly only, when CS881 graphite grease or zinc-based Keenol is used. It is essential to install a complete driven plate assembly when renewal of the friction surfaces is required. If the facings have worn to such an extent as to warrant renewal, then slight wear will ha ve taken place on the splines and also on the torque reaction springs and their seatings. The que stion of balance and concentricity is also involved. Under no circumstances is it satisfactory to repair or rectify faults in clutch driven plate centres, and we do not countenance this as manufacturers.

Condition of clutch facings in service It is natural to assume that a rough surface will give a higher frictional value against slipping than a polished one, but this is not necessarily correct. A roughened surface consists of small hills and dales , only the 'highspots' of which make contact. As the amount of useful friction for the purpose of taking up the drive is dependent upon the area in actual contact, it is obvious that a perfectly smooth face is required to transmit the maximum amount of power for a given surface area.

SERVICING THE CLUTCH

Since non-metallic facings of the moulded asbestos type have been introduced in service the polished surface is common, but it must not be confused with the glazed surface which is sometimes encountered due to conditions to be detailed subsequently. The ideally smooth or polished condition will therefore provide proper surface contact, but a glazed surface entirely alters the frictional value of the facing , and will result in excessive clutch slip. These two conditions might be simply illustrated by a comparison between a piece of smoothly finished wood and one with a varnished surface; in the former the contact is made directly by the original material, whereas in the latter instance a film of dry varnish is interposed between the contact surfaces and actual contact is made by the varnish.

Spring pressure A tolerance of not more than 10 to 15 lb. (4,5 to 6·8 kg.) pressure is allowable on the compression load of the operating springs when at their assembled height, and all clutch springs are tested for this before assembly.

If the clutch has been in use for some time under satisfactory conditions the surface of the facing assumes a high polish through which the grain of the material can be seen clearly. The polished facing is of light colour when in perfect condition.

Remove the clutch alignment bar and refit the gearbox. The weight of the gearbox must be supported during refitting in order to avoid strain on the shaft and distortion or displacement of the release plate or driven plate assembly.

Section EE.3

The clutch operating springs are not affected by high clutch temperatures, as the pressure plate absorbs heat rapidly, the springs have only line contact, and a draught is continually passing under them when the engine is running. Tolerances Wear on the working faces of the driven plate is about ·00 1 in. (,02 mm.) per 1,000 miles (1600 km.) under normal running conditions. The accuracy of the alignment of the face of the driven plate must be within ·015 in. ('38 mm.) . Driven plates It is important that neither oil nor grease should contact the clutch facings. ££.2

Should oil in small quantities gain access to the clutch and find its way onto the facings, it will be burnt off as a result of the heat generated by the slipping occurring under normal starting conditions. The burning of this small quantity of lubricant has the effect of gradually darkening the facings, but provided the polish of the facings remains such that the grain of the material can be distinguished clearly, it has little effect on clutch performance. Should increased quantities of oil obtain access to the facing, then one of two conditions, or a combination of these, may arise, depending upon the nature of the oil. (I) The oil may burn off and leave a carbon deposit on the surface of the facings, which assume a high glaze, producing further slip. This is a very Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713

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THE CLUTCH definite, though very thin, deposit, and in general it hides the grain of the material. (2) The oil may partially burn and leave a resinous deposit on the facings. This has a tendency to produce a fierce clutch, and may also cause excessive 'spinning' due to the tendency of the face of the linings to adhere to the surface of the flywheel or pressure plate. (3) There may be a combination of conditions (1) and (2) which produces a tendency to 'judder' on such engagement. Still greater quantities of oil produce a dark and soaked appearance of the facings, and the result will be further slip, accompanied by fierceness or 'juddering'. If the conditions enumerated above are experienced the clutch driven plate should be replaced by a new one. The cause of the presence of the oil must be traced and removed. It is, of course, necessary for the clutch and flywheel to be cleaned out thoroughly before assembly. Where the graphite release bearing ring is badly worn in service either a complete replacement assembly or a new graphite ring should be fitted. These graphite rings are inserted into their metal cup by heating the metal cup to a cherry red, then forcing the graphite ring into position. Immediately the ring is forced into position the whole should be quenched in oil, Alignment of the thrust pad in relation to its face and the trunnions should be within 路005 in. ('12 mm.). In almost every case of rapid wear on the splines of the clutch driven plate misalignment is responsible. Looseness of the driven plate on the splined shaft results in noticeable backlash in the clutch. Misalignment also puts undue stress on the driven member, and may result in the hub breaking loose from the plate, with consequent total failure of the clutch.

It may also be responsible for a fierce chattering or dragging of the clutch, which makes gear changing difficult. In cases of persistent difficulty it is advisable to check the flywheel for truth with a dial indicator. The dial reading should not vary more than 路003 in. ('07 mm.) anywhere on the flywheel face.

EE

washers from the master cylinder mounting flange, The master cylinder may now be withdrawn from the vehicle. Dismantling Remove the retarrung circlip with a pair of longnosed pliers and extract the dished washer and pushrod. When the push-rod has been removed the plunger with seals attached will be exposed; remove the plunger assembly complete. The assembly can be separated by lifting the thimble leaf over the shouldered end of the plunger. Depress the plunger return spring, allowing the valve stem to slide through the elongated hole in the thimble, thus releasing the tension on the spring. Remove the thimble, spring, and valve complete. Detach the valve spacer, taking care of the spacer spring washer which is located under the valve head, and remove the seal from the valve head. Examine all parts, especially the seals, for wear or distortion and fit new parts where necessary. Assembly Replace the valve seal so that the flat side is correctly seated on the valve head. The spring washer should then be located with the domed side against the under side of the valve head, and held in position by the valve spacer, the legs of which face towards the valve seal. Replace the plunger return spring centrally on the spacer, insert the thimble into the spring, and depress until the valve stem engages through the elongated hole of the thimble, ensuring that the stem is correctly located in the centre of the thimble. Check that the spring is still central on the spacer. Fit a new plunger seal with the flat face of the seal against the face of the plunger. Refit the plunger end seal, using a new seal if necessary. Insert the reduced end of the plunger into the thimble until the thimble leaf engages under the shoulder of the plunger. Press home the thimble leaf. Smear the plunger assembly with the recommended fluid, and insert the assembly into the cylinder bore, valve end first, carefully easing the plunger seal lips into

Section EE.4 MASTER CYLI DER Descriptiom The inner assembly of the master cylinder is made up of the push-rod, circlip, dished washer, plunger, end seal, plunger seal, spring thimble, plunger return spring, valve spacer, spring washer, valve stem, and valve seal. The open end of the cylinder is protected by a rubber dust seal. Removal Extract the split pin and withdraw the clevis pin from the push-rod yoke. Disconnect the pressure pipe union from the cylinder and remove the two screws and spring Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

Fig. EE.I

The master cylinder. The arrow indicates the thimble leaf 拢拢.3


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EE

THE CLUTCH 8

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Dismantling Remove the ru bber dust cover, and with an air-line blowout the piston and seal. Extract the spring. Examine all parts, espec ially the seal, and renew if worn or damaged.

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The clutch master cylinder components I. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Master cylinder body. Plunger. End seal. Plunger seal. Spring thimble. Spring. Valve spacer. Spring washer. Valve stem.

bolts an d sp ring washers securing the cylinder to the clutch ho using. The cylinder may now be removed from th e vehicle, leaving th e push- ro d attached to the clutch fo rk.

10. Valve seal. II. Push-rod. 12. Retaining washer. 13. Circlip. 14. Dust cover. IS. Outlet. 16. Cap washer. 17. Filler cap . 18. Air vent.

the bore. Replace the push-rod, with the dished side of the washer under the spherical head, into the cylinder, followed by the circlip, which engages in the groove machined in the cylinder body. Replacement Locate the master cylinder on the mounting bracket on the bulkhead and fit the bolts, washers, and selflocking nuts. Replace the rubber dust cover. Line up the push-rod fork with the hole in the clutch pedal lever, insert the clevis pin, and secure it with a new split pin. Finally, bleed the system as detailed in Section EE.6.

Assembly Place the seal on the stem of the piston with the back of the seal against the piston (see Fig . EE.3). Replace the spring with the small end on the stem, smear well with the recommended fluid , and insert into the cylinder. Replacement Replace the rubber dust cover on the cylinder and locate the cylinder in its correct position on the clutch housing, ensuring that the push-rod enters the hole in the rubber boot. Replace the two mounting bolts and spring washers. Refit the pressure pipe union, taking care to fit the copper washers correctly, and bleed the system as described in Section EE.6.

Section EE.6 BLEEDING THE CLUTCH SYSTEM Open the bleed screw on t he slave cylinder threequarters of a turn and attach a tube, immersing the open end in a clean receptacle containing a small quantity of the recommended hydraulic fluid. Fill the master cylinder reservoir with fluid. The use of Girling Hydraulic Brake Fluid is recommended, but if this is not available an alternative fluid conforming to Specification S.A.E. 70.RI should be used. Using slow, full strokes, pump the clutch pedal until the fluid entering the container is completely free from air bubbles. On a downstroke of the pedal tighten the bleed screw and remove the bleed tube. 2

3

5

4

6

Section EE.5 SLAVE CYLINDER Description The slave cylinder is of simple construction, consisting of an alloy bo dy, piston with seal, spring, and bleed screw. The open end is p rotected by a rubber dust cover. Two bo lts with spring washers secure the slave cylinder to the clutch housing. 5434

Removal Attach a rubber tu be to the bleed screw and open the screw three-q ua rters of a turn. P ump the clutch pedal until all the fluid has been d rained in to a clean container. Unscrew the pressure pipe union an d remove the two EE.4

Fig. EE.3

The clutch slave cylinder components I. Spring. 2. Seal. 3. Piston .

4. Body. 5. Dust cover. 6. Circlip.

Morris Oxford (Series V) .

Issue 2.

25520


THE CLUTCH

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EE

SERVICE TOOLS 18G39. Clutch Centralizer This tool is essen tial when bolting the clutch cover assembly to the flywheel to centralize the driven pia re. It ensures that when fitting the gearbox to the engine the first motion shaft passes easily through the clutch driven plate hub and locates in the spigot bearing in the end of the crankshaft.

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 30713

18G39

EE.5


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F

SECTION F THE GEARBOX Section Description First motion shaft-dismantling and assembling

F.5

Layshaft gear Assembling

FA

Dismantling

F.3

Third motion shaft (mainshaft) Assembling

F.2

Dismantling

F.I

Tools-service

End of Section

For additional information sec Section FF

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

ÂŁ.1


F

THE GEARBOX DESC RIPTION

The gearbox has four forward speeds and one reverse. Top gear is obtained by direct drive, third and second by gears in constant mesh , and first and reverse by sliding spur gears. A sliding joint of the reverse spline type is fitted to the rear end of the third motion shaft and is lubricated from the gearbox.

Section F.l DISMANTLING THE TID RD M OTION SHAFT (Ma inshaft)

Remove the following items in this order: baulk ring, top and third synchromesh sleeve and hub, second baulk ring. If the synchromesh sleeve is removed from the hub take care not to lose the three locating balls and springs that will be released in consequence. Press down the third speed cone thrust washer locati ng plunger; rotate the thrust washer to align its splines with those on the shaft and remove the washer. Withdraw the third speed gear and its splined bush . Withdraw the bush interlocking washer to release the second speed gear with its bush and bau lk ring. Remove the rear thrust washer from the splines on the shaft and withdraw the first speed gear and second speed synchronizer; if it is necessary to slide the gear from the synchronizer take care not to lose the three balls and springs. Tap up the locking washer and unscrew the rear retaining nut; withdraw the washer, speedometer drive gear and key, and the distance sleeve from the shaft. Press the rear bearing and its housing from the shaft.

Section F.2

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(7) Thread on the front thrust washer, machined face towards the gear, while holding down the plunger by means of a thin punch through the hole in the gear cone, and push the washer over it; turn the washer to allow the plunger to engage in one of the splines. (8) Fit the three springs and balls to the third speed synchronizer and , with the aid of service tool 180223, push on the synchronizer sleeve (striking dog). (9) Push on the top and third gear synchromesh assembly hub with its two baulk rings. The plain side of the hub faces the rear. Assemble the following items from the rear: (I) Insert the three balls and springs in the second gear hub and, with the aid of service tool 180222, push the synchronizer sleeve (striking dog) into position on the hub. (2) Fit the first speed gear and synchromesh hub assembly and the baulk ring to the splines on the shaft. (3) P ress the rear bearing into its housing and fit it to the shaft, the flange of the housing to the rear. (4) Push on the distance sleeve, speedometer drive gear, and key and secure with the lock washer and nut.

Section F.3 DISM ANTLING THE LAYSHA FT GEAR

Extract one of the circlips from the layshaft gear and push out the bearing and distance tube assembly; there are three needle races and one distance tube spaced in the layshaft gear which are retained by a circlip at each end, two races being fitted at the front end and one at the rear .

ASSEMBLING THE THIRD MOTION SHAFT (M ainshaft)

Assemble fro m the front end . (I) Locate the rear thrust washer on the front end of the splines, ground face to the fro nt. (2) Push the longer phosphor-bronze bush up to the splines with the dogs towards the front. The bush is a tight fit on the shaft and must be immersed in warm oil to facilitate fitting . The oil hole in the bush must register with the hole in the shaft. (3) Fit the second speed baulk ring and gear onto the bush with the plain side of the gear towards the front. (4) Slide on the bush interlocking washer and the shorter-splined bush, locating the dogs of both bushes in the interlocking washer. Immerse the bush in warm oil to facilitate fitting. (5) Insert the spring and plunger into the hole in the shaft. (6) Fit the third speed gear onto the bush with the cone towards the front. F.'2

Fig. F.l The arrow indicates the third speed thrust washer and locating peg Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


THE GEARBOX Section F.4

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F

SE RVICE TOOLS

ASSEM BLING THE LAYSHAFT GEAR The following method for refitting the layshaft gear bearing assemblies is suggested. Fit a circlip to the innermost groove in the gear. Hold the shaft vertically in the vice; assemble a roller bearing on the shaft against the vice jaws and then slide the gear over the shaft and the bearing with the large gear downwards. Remove the shaft from the vice and push the bearing into the gear against the circlip. Fit a circlip, the end roller bearing assembly, and the retaining circlip. Slide the distance tube into the other end of the gear, followed by the other end bearing and circlip. Remove the gear from the shaft.

18G222. Synchromesh Unit Assembly Ring Designed to facilitate the assembly of mated synchronizer and sleeve by enabling the springs and balls to be inserted quickly and easily. 18G223. Synchromesh Unit Assembly Ring

Section F.5 8991A

DISMANTLING AND ASSEMBLING THE FIRST MOTION SHAFT Unlock and remove the securing nut and withdraw the locking washer. Press the bearing from the shaft and remo ve the circ1ip from the bearing.

18G222 18G223

Reassembling Fit the bearing to the shaft with the spring ring away from the gear. Replace the locking washer and tighten the retaining nut; bend over the locking washer to secure the nut.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

F.3


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FF

SECTION FF THE GEARBOX This Section is a Supplement to Section F Section

Gearbox Assembling

FF.4

Dismantling

FF.2

Front cover-fitting

FF.7

Linkage adjustment

FF.6

Removing

FF.l

Rear extension Assembling

FF.5

Dismantling

FF.3 End of Section

Tools-service

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713

FF.l


FF

THE GEARBOX

Section FF.l REMOVIN G THE GEARBOX Drain the oil from the gearbox. Raise the rear of the car as high as possible and support the back carefully for safety. Release the exhaust pipe at the manifold to avoid possible damage to the flange due to engine movement. Remove the rubber dust excluder from the gear lever. Extract the spring ring from the gear lever tower and withdraw the spring cover, spring, and gear lever (floor change only). If the vehicle is fitted with steering column gear change, disconnect the change rods at the levers on the side of the gearbox. Remove the clevis pin from the slave cylinder push-rod, take out the two securing bolts, and remove the cylinder. Tie the slave cylinder to one side out of the way. Do not remove the pipe or fluid will be lost, necessitating bleeding. Disconnect the speedometer cable from the gearbox. Mark the rear universal joint flange with its location on the axle flange, unscrew the four self-locking nuts and remove the bolts, and withdraw the propeller shaft from the vehicle. Place a jack or other support at the rear of the engine so that the engine will remain in its normal position when the gearbox rear mounting is removed. Remove the six screws securing the rear cross-member to the body. Disconnect the rear cross-member from the gearbox rear mounting and remove the cross-member. Remove the screws securing the gearbox bell housing to the engine backplate, when the gearbox may be withdrawn from the vehicle. Replacement of the gearbox is a reversal of the above procedure.

Section FF.2 DISM A TLI G T HE GEA RBOX Remove the rear power unit mounting. Unscrew the speedometer drive , but do not withdraw the pinion from the bush unles s ab solutely necessary, or damage to the oil seal may result on replacement. Un screw the set screws and remove the gear lever tower and joint washer. Unscrew and remove the six bolts and the rear extension cover and joint washer. Remove the interlock arm and bracket from the aperture in the rear extension. Unscrew the three countersunk screws and the seven hexagon-headed set screws holding the gearbox cover; remove the cover. Remove the two nuts and six set screws securing the gearbox extension to the gearbox. Pull the extension from the gearbox, at the same time man ceuvring the remote control shaft selector lever down and out from the selectors. Cut the locking wire and unscrew the three change FF.2

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speed fork set screws. Release the three locknuts and slacken the fork locating screws. Unscrew the two set screws and remove the shifter shaft locating block with shifter shafts from the gearbox; note the two dowels in the block. If the rods are withdrawn from the locating block take care to catch the three selector balls and springs. Withdraw the forks from the box in the following order: reverse, top and third, and first and second. Unscrew the clutch lever pivot nut; extract the pivot bolt and remove the lever with the thrust bearing. Unscrew the nuts and remove the gearbox front cover complete with oil seal; note the bearing shims between the cover and the front bearing. Tap out the layshaft, allowing the gear unit to rest in the bottom of the box . Unscrew the retaining set screw and remove the reverse shaft and gear. Withdraw the third motion shaft (mainshaft) assembly to the rear. Withdraw the first motion shaft a nd drive gear. OTE.- Rctricvc the 18 spigot needle rollers. Lift out the layshaft gear unit and the two thrust washers.

Section FF.3 DISM ANT LI NG THE REA R EXTE SIO Remo ve the rear remote control rod selector arm set screw and withdraw the selector arm and key; unscrew the set screw at the forward end and remove the front remote control selecto r arm and key. Withdraw the remote control rod from the rear extension. To remove the oil seals from the extension use the service tool 18G389 and adaptor 18G389B (see Fig. FF.2). Should it be necessary to remove the sliding joint bush, this must be drawn from the extension and not driven inwards.

Section FF.4 ASSEMBLING THE GEAR BOX Place the layshaft gear in the gearbox complete with the end-thrust washer but do not fit the layshaft; usc dummy layshaft 18G471 (see Fig. FF.I) to retain the thrust washers in position. Replace the first motion shaft and insert the 18 needle-roller bearings. Insert the third motion shaft assembly from the rear of the gearbox; enter the spigot in the needle rollers of the first motion shaft. Use the gasket fitted between the gearbox and the rear extension to position the dowel and bearing hous ing. Push the shaft right home. Fit the layshaft, lining up the cut-away portion of the front end with the locat ing groove in the front cover. Fit the reverse gear an d shaft; tighten the set screw and secure with the locking washer. Refit the front end cover (see Section FF.7), replacing the bearing shims that were removed on dismantling. Morris Oxford (Seties V).

Issue 3. 30713


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4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. II. 12. 13. 14. 15. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 37. 38. 39.

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Description Gearbox casing. Stud for front cover. Drain plug. Stud for gearbox exten sion. Blanking plug. Washer for plug. Oil seal. Dowel. Front cover . Joint-cover. Nut for front cover stud . Spring washer for stud. Side cover. Joint-cover to casing . Set screw for cover. Countersunk screw for cover. Shakeproof washer. Gearbox extension. Bush for extension. O il seal assembly. D ipstick. Joint-extension to gearbox. N ut for stud for extension to gearbox. Set screw for extension to gearbox. Spring washer for studs and set screws . Gearbox extension taper plug. Extension side cover. Joint- cover. Set screw for cover. Spring washer. Breather assembly. Washer-plain. Washer-fibre. Change speed lever tower. Dowel for tower. Joint-tower. Set screw for tower. Spring washer. Plug. Joint-plug. Change speed lever. Lever knob. Lever ball snug. Spring washer. Lever ball spring. Spring cover . Circlip for cover. Remote control shaft

No. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102.

Description Front selector lever. Set screw for front lever. Spring washer for screw. Key for lever. Rear selector lever. Bush for lever. Circlip for bush. Set screw for rear lever. Spring washer for screw. Key for lever. First and second speed fork. Fork locating screw. First and second speed fork shaft. Ball for shaft. Spring for ball . Third and fourth speed fork. Locknut. Third and fourth speed fork shaft. Reverse fork . Spring washer. Reverse fork shaft. Locating block for shafts. Set screw for block to casing. Spring washer for screw. First and second gear selector. Selector locating screw. Third and fourth gear selector. Selector locating screw. Reverse selector. Spring washer. Selector locating screw. Reverse selector plunger. Spring for plunger. Bolt for plunger. Dowel for plunger. Ball for plunger. Spring for ball. Arm-interlock with plate assembly. First motion shaft. Nut for shaft. Lock washer for nut. Shaft ball bearing. Spring ring for bearing. Shim for bearing. Shaft needle rollers. Third motion shaft. Oil rcstrictor. Front thrust washer.

No. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. II I. 112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. 119. 120. 121. 122. 123. 124. 125. 126. 127. 128. 129. 130. 13 I. 132. 133. 134. 135. 136. 137. 138. 140. 141. 142. 143. 144. 145. 146. 147. 148. 149.

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Description Rear thrust washer. Peg for front thrust washer. Spring for peg . Third motion shaft rear bearing. Bearing housing. Locating peg. Speedometer gear distance piece. Nut for shaft and speedometer gear. Lock washer for nut. Speedometer drive gear. Key for gear. Speedometer drive pinion. Bush for pinion. Pinion oil seal. Oil seal retaining ring. Joint-pinion bush to rear cover. First speed gear. Second speed gear. Second speed synchronizer. Synchronizer ball. Spring for ball. Second speed gear baulk ring. Second speed gear bush . Third speed gear. Third and fourth gear baulk ring. Third speed gear bush . Interlocking ring for second and third gear bushes. Third and fourth speed sliding coupling. Third and fourth speed gear synchronizer. Synchronizer ball. Spring for ball. Layshaft. Layshaft gear unit. Layshaft needle-roller bearing assembly (outer). Layshaft needle-roller bearing assembly (inner). Spring ring for needle roller. Di stance piece for bearing. Front thrust washer. Rear thrust washer. Reverse sha ft. Shaft locking screw. Lock washer for screw. Reverse gear. Bush. Bolt-gearbox to mounting plate. Nut for bolt. Spring washer for bolt.

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FF

THE GEARBOX

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ADI403A

Fig. FF.l Using tool l8G471 as a pilot when installing the layshaft 1. Pilot.

2.

Layshaft .

Fig. FF.3 Installing a new oil seal assembly with service tools l8G134 and l8G134N

Refit the clutch lever an d fork. Position the gear change forks in the gearbox in the following order: first and second, thi rd and top, reverse. Bolt the shifter shaft locating block to the rea r face of the gearbox; replace the balls and springs and push the shifter shafts through the block into their respective change speed forks. Insert, tighten, and lock the three locating screws. Position the selectors on the rear end of the shifter shafts; insert, tighten, and wire up the set screws.

Section FF.5 ASSEMBLING T HE REAR EXTENSION Fit the rear extension oil seal, using service tool l 8G 134 with its adaptor l 8G 134N. Locate the remote control rod in the rear extension. Fit the front and rear selector levers to the remote control rod; note that they are secured and located by keys and set screws. Fit the rear extension to the gearbox, locating the con trol rod selector arm in the shifter rod selectors. Fit the interlock arm to the rear extension and refit the cover. Bolt the gear lever tower to the rear extension. Place the two halves of the brass gear lever snug on the lower end of the lever and secure with the circlip. Fit the lever to the tower and secure it with the cover, spring, and circlip. Replace the side cover, using a new joint as necessary. Fit the speedometer drive gear assembly, drain plug, and breather. Fill with oil to Ref. A (page P.2) to the level indicated on the dipstick.

Section FF.6 GEAR LINKAGE ADJUSTMENT (St eering Column Control Only)

Fig. FF.2 Removing a rear oil seal assembly with service tools l 8G389 and l 8G389B FF.6

The steering column gear change linkage is correctly set during the assembly of the vehicle and will not norm ally require adj ustment in service. If at any time the adjustment of the link rods has been affected by dam age or the fitting of replacement parts, etc., proceed as follows to regain the correct setting. D isconnect the selector lever and shifter lever rods from their levers on the side of the gearbox. Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


THE GEARBOX With the gears in the neutral position move the selector lever (see Fig. FFA) on the gearbox back and forth to ascertain the full extent of the travel. The midpoint of the travel is the position at which first and second gears should be selected. Move the shifter lever as far forward as possible (see Fig. FFA) so that first gear is engaged. In order to do this it may be necessary to rock the car back and forth until the gear is fully engaged. The selector lever will now be locked in mid-position but will have a small amount of free play. Having observed the extent of this free play, place the selector lever in the mid-position of the free movement. Place the hand lever on the steering column in the first gear position, where it must remain until the following adjustments are completed. Line up the selector rod ball joint with the hole in the selector lever. In order to do this and obtain free entry of the threaded pin it may be necessary to slacken the joint locknut and vary the position of the joint on its thread on the rod. Do not omit to tighten the locknut when the adjustment has been completed. Line up the yoke on the shifter rod, adjusting the length of the rod as necessary. The adjus tment is made at the uppe r end of the rod. orrn-----...- - - {f -i } - - -- - - -- 路/

Fig. FFA

The shifter lever (A) and the selector lever (B) in their correct relative positions when first gear is engaged

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713

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FF

It will be seen that the principle of the method described here is to adjust the link rods to the correct length with the levers on the gearbox and the hand lever on the steering column in their natural relative positions when first gear is engage d. When this condition is achieved all other gear positions will be correct also.

Section FF.7 RE FITTING THE GEA RBOX FR ONT COVER To prevent oil leaking past the gearbox front cover oil seal, the cover must be correctly fitted to ensure that the seal is concentric with the first motion shaft. When refitting the cover, proceed as follows. Clean off the cover and examine it carefully for burrs and bruising, particularly around the bore, stud holes and machined surfaces. Check the flat surfaces for twist and warp and correct it if necessary. If the condition is too bad to correct, fit a new cover. Remove and discard the front cover to gearbox gasket and clean off the flat surfaces around the base of all studs. Offer the front cover (less oil seal) to the gearbox and push it fully home on the studs. The cover should be free to move in all directions and points at which the holes may be binding on the studs must be relieved until the cover is free to 'float'. Remove the cover and, using service tool 180134 with adaptor 180134Q, fit the oil seal so that its lip faces inwards towards the gearbox. Lightly grease and fit a new gasket to the gearbox front face and then fit the centralizer (service tool No. 180598) to the bore of the front cover and push it in until it is tight. Lightly oil the seal and pass the cover over the first motion shaft taking particular care not to cut or damage the knife edge of the seal. Keep the centralizer firmly in position, push the cover onto the studs and fit the spring washers and nuts tightening the nuts finger-tight only . Use a suitable socket spanner and long extension to tighten the nuts a half turn at a time by diametrical selection until all nuts are fully tightened. Remove the centralizer and refit the clutch-operating components.

FF.7


FF

THE GEARBOX

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SERVICE TOOLS

18G389. Gearbox Rear Oil Sea l Remover (basic tool) This basic tool together with the appropriate adaptor is essential for removing the gearbox extension oil seal easily without damage and without removing the gearbox from the vehicle. The appropriate adaptor for use with the basic tool is supplied separately.

9161

18G389

18G389B. Gearbox Rear Oil Seal Remover- Adaptor Used in conjunction with basic tool 18G389 it screws into the end of the oil seal and withdraws it without damage to the rear extension .

9168

18G389B

18Gl34. Bearings and Oil Seal Remover and Replacer (basic tool) Used with adaptor 18G 134N it enables oil seals to be fitted to the gearbox extension withou t removal from the vehicle. STR829XX

18G134

18G134N. Gearbox Rear Oil Seal Replacer-Adaptor For the correct and easy replacement of the gearbox extension oil seal. Use in conjunction with 18G134.

18Gl34N

18G471. Dummy La yshaft A pilot for lining up the gears and retaining the thrust washers in positio n prior to inserting the layshaft proper, it being necessary to drop the laygear for the first mot ion shaft to be inserted. 18G471

FP.8

Morris Oxford (Series V).

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THE GEARBOX

FF

18G41. Selector Fork Rod Guide

This tool greatly assists the assembly of the selector balls and springs.

4349L

18G41

18G4. First Motion Shaft Asse mbly Replacer

For all-correct and easy replacement of the first motion shaft assembly.

8711A

18G4

18GS. First Motion Shaft Nut Spanner.

Thi s sturdy spanner provides amp le leverage to move the tightest nut .

9166

18GS

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue I.

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SECTION G THE PROPELLER SHA FT Section Description Propeller shaft Dismantling

G.4

Lubrication

G .I

Reassembling

G.6

Removing

G .3

Replacing

G.7

Wear Examination an d check

G.5

Testing ..

G .2

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Is sue 2. 25520

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G

THE PROPELLER SHAFT

DESCRIPTION The propel1er shaft and universal joints are of the Hardy Spicer type with needle-roller bearings. A single shaft connects the rear axle and the gearbox. To accommodate fore and aft movement of the axle a sliding joint of the reverse spline type is fitted between the gearbox and the front universal joint flange. Each joint consists of a centre spider, four needle-rol1er bearing assemblies, and two yokes.

Fig. G.I Where to apply light blows to the yoke after removing the retaining circlip

flange carefully mark the flanges to assist in refitting them in their original positions. This is important. Remove the bolts securing the propel1er shaft to the rear axle flange. The shaft can now be removed from the car downwards and rearwa rds.

Section G.4 DISMANTLI NG TH E PROPELLER SHAFf Remove the enamel and dirt from the snap rings and bearing faces. Remove al1 the snap rings by pinching thei r ears together with a pair of thin-nosed pliers and prising them out with a screwdriver. If a ring does not slide out of its groove readily tap the end of the bearing race slightly to relieve the pressure against the ring. Remove the lubricator from the journal and, holding the joint in one hand, tap the radius of the yoke lightly with a copper hammer (Fig. G.l). The bearing should begin to emerge; turn the joint over and finally remove with the fingers. If necessary, tap the bearing race from inside with a small-diameter bar (Fig. G.2), taking care not to damage the bearing face, or grip the needle bearing race in a vice and tap the flange yoke clear. Be sure to hold the bearing in a vertical position, and when free remove the race from the bottom side to avoid dropping the needle rol1ers. Repeat this operation for the opposite bearing.

Section G.I LUBRICATI G THE UNIVE RSAL JOINTS A lubricator is fitted to each front and rear spider, and should be charged fully after overhauling and subsequently given three or four strokes with the grease gun every 1,000 miles (1600 km.). The correct lubricant is detailed under Ref. C (page P.2). If a large amount of lubricant exudes from the oil seal the joint should be dismantled and new oil seals fitted. The sliding joint is automatically lubricated from the gearbox.

Section G.2 TESTI NG FOR WEAR Wear on the thrust faces is ascertained by testing the lift in the joint either by hand or with the aid of a length of wood suitably pivoted. Any circumferential movement of the shaft relative to the flange yokes indicates wear in the needle-rol1er bearings, or in the splined shaft in the case of the forward joint.

Section G.3 REMOVING THE PROPELLER SHAFf Before removing the bolts and nuts securing the propeller shaft universal joint flange to the rea r axle G.2

2631 B

Fig. G.2 When dismantling a universal joint the bearings may be tapped out with a small-diameter rod from the inside as shown. Take care not to damage the roller races Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520


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G

THE PROPELLER SHAFT Rest the two exposed trunnions on wood or lead blocks to protect their ground surfaces, and tap the top lug of the flange yoke to remove the bearing race. Turn the yoke over and repeat the operation.

Section G.5 TO EXAMINE A D CHECK FOR WEAR The parts most likely to show signs of wear after long usage are the bearing races an d the spider jo urnals. Should looseness, load markings, or distortion be observed, the affected part must be renewed complete; no oversized journals or races are provided. It is essential that the bearing races are a light drive fit in the yoke trunnions. In the event of wear taking place in the yoke cross-holes, rendering them oval, the yokes must be renewed. In case of wear in the cross holes in the fixed yoke , which is part of the tubular shaft assembly , it should be replaced by a complete tubular shaft assemb ly.

.. .

.............~

... ..

,

~

..--.....J

-'- .. -

"--' .. -. . ......

' â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

.. .....

,

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43JJI A

Fig. GA The sliding joint, showing the oilways which conduct oil from the gearbox

Section G.6 REASS EMBLING THE SHAFf See that all the drilled holes in the journals are thoroughly cleaned out and free of grease. Assem ble the needle rollers in the bearing races and fill with grease. Should difficulty be experienced in retaining the rollers under control, smear the walls of the races with grease to Ref. F (page P.2) to retain the needle rollers in position while reassem bling. Insert the spider in the flange yoke , ensuring that the lubricator boss is fitted away from the yoke. Using a soft-nosed drift, about -h in. (,8 mm.) smaller in diameter than the hole in the yoke, tap the bearing into position. Repeat this operation for the other three bearings. Replace the circlips and be sure that these are firmly located in their grooves . If the joint appears to bind , tap lightly with a wooden mallet: this will relieve any pressure of the bearings on the end of the journals. It is always advisable to replace the cork gasket and the gasket retainers on the spider journals by means of a tubular drift shown in Fig. G.3 . The spider journal shoulders should be shellacked prior to fitting the retainers to ensure a good oil seal.

Section G.7 REPLACING THE PROPELLER SHAFf

Fig. G.3 When replacing the gasket retainer use a hollow drift to tap it into place without damage

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

Wipe the faces of the flanges clean and place the propeller shaft in position on the car. Ensure that the flange registers engage correctly, that the components are replaced in exactly the sa me relation as before removal, and that the joint faces bed down evenly all round. Insert the bolts and tighten the self-locking nuts.

G.3


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H

SECTION H THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION Section

Description Lubrication Brake-drum and axle shaft-removing and replacing

H.I

Crown wheel and pinion Assembling and setting

H.7

Dismantling

H.6

Differential pinions Removing

HA

Replacing

H.5

Hub -removing and replacing

H.2

Pinion-oil seal renewing

H.3

Tools - service

End of Section

For additional information see Section HH

. Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

H.I


H

www.morrisoxford.com THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSIO N DESCRIPTION

The rear axle is of the three-quarter-f1oating type incorporating hypoid final reduction gears . The axle shafts, pinion, and differential assemblies can be withdrawn without removing the axle from the vehicle.

As the rear springs are mounted in rubber. spraying with oil should be strictly avoided. If squeaks develop the springs sho uld be sprayed with Lockheed brake fluid or treated with graphite mixed with water.

Section H.t REMOVli G Ai D REP LACI ' G A BRAKE-DR UM AND AXLE SHAFf

Fig. fl.1 Withdrawing a rear axle shaft The rear wheel bearing outer races are located in the hubs, and the inner races are mounted on the axle tube and secured by nuts and lock washers. Wheel studs in the hubs pass through the brake-drums and axle shaft driving flanges. Brake-drums are located on the hub flange by two countersunk screws in each. The differential and pinion shaft bearings are preloaded, the amount of preload being adjustable by shims. The position of the pinion in relation to the crown wheel is determined by a spacing washer. The backlash between the gears is adjustable by shims. The semi-elliptic leaf springs provided for rear suspension are secured beneath the rear axle by 'U' bolts. The front ends of the springs are anchored in flexing rubber bushes, while the rear ends are mounted in similar bushes in swinging shackles.

Jack up the car and place blocks under the spring as close as possible to the axle. Remove the wheel. Release the hand brake. Unscrew and remove the two countersunk drum locating screws and tap the drum from the hub . It may be necessary to slacken off the brake adjustment slightly if the shoes hold the drum. Unscrew the countersunk locating screw in the axle shaft driving flange. Withdraw the axle shaft by gripping the flange or carefully prising it with a screwdriver. If the latter method is used the paper washer may be damaged and must then be renewed when reassembling. To replace the shaft and drum reverse the above sequence of operations.

Section H.2 REMOVING AND REPLACI 'G A HUB Remove the brake-drum and axle shaft as detailed in Section H .1. Knock back the tab of the locking washer and unscrew the nut with service tool l8G 152. The left-hand hub bearing nut on the axle has a left-hand thread (tum clockwise to unscrew). The right-hand hub nut is righthand-threaded. Tilt the locking washer to disengage the

LUB RICAn ON The axle is filled or topped up through the filler level plug at the rear of the axle casing by means of an oil gun with a special adaptor. It is of the utmost importance that only Hypoid oils of the approved grades and manufacture be used if satisfactory service is to be obtained from the hypoid gears. Inspect the oil level every 1,000 miles (1600 km.) and top up as necessary to the level of the filler opening with oil to Ref. B (page P.2). After the first 500 miles (800 km.) and subsequently every 6,000 miles (9600 km.) drain off the old oil and refill with new. The hub bearings are automatically lubricated from the axle and no provision is made for any other attention. H.2

Fig. H .2 Using the hub withdrawing 1001 18G304 with the appropriate adaptors Morris Oxford (Series V).

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THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION peg from its location in the threaded end of the axle casing and remove the washer. Withdraw the hub assembly, using service tool ISG304 together with bolts ISG304B and thrust pad ISG304 J. The bearing and oil seal will be withdrawn with the hub and can be removed from the hub and replaced with service toollSGI34 and adaptor ISGI34 P. The bearing is not adjustable and is replaced in one straightforward operation. Repack the bearings with grease to Ref. C (page P.2). When reassembling, the outer face of the bearing spacer must protrude from 路001 to 路004 in. (,025 to ' 102 mm .) beyond the outer face of the hub and the paper joint washer when the bearing is pressed into position. This ensures that the bearing is gripped between the abutment shoulder in the hub and the driving flange of the axle shaft. Refit the hub assembly onto the axle casing and drift it into position with service tool ISG 134 and adaptor 1SG134P. Replace the locking washer and nut, tighten the nut, and bend the locking washer over one of the flats. Assemble the axle shaft and brake-drum.

Section H.3

H

Fig. HA Using service tool 18G47C and adaptors 1SG47T to remove the differential bearings

Replace the driving flange and end cover, taking care not to damage the edge of the oil seal, and tighten the nut with a torque wrench (service tool 18G372) to a reading of 140 lb. ft. (19'3 kg. m.). Reconnect the propeller shaft, taking care to fit the two flanges with the locating marks in alignment.

Section H.4

RENEWING THE PINION OIL SEAL

REMO VING THE DIFFERENTIAL PINIO NS

Mark the propeller shaft and pinion shaft driving flanges so that they can be replaced in the same relative positions and disconnect the propeller shaft, carefully supporting it. Knock back the lock washer and unscrew the nut in the centre of the driving flange. Remove the nut and washer and withdraw the flange and pressed-steel end cover from the pinion shaft. Extract the oil seal from the casing. Press a new seal into the casing with the edge of the sealing ring facing inwards.

D rain the oil from the axle and remove the axle shafts as detailed in Section H.t. Mark the propeller shaft and pinion shaft driving flanges so that they can be replaced in the same relative positions; unscrew the self-locking nuts and disconnect the joint. Unscrew the eight nuts securing the bevel pinion and gear carrier to the axle banjo. Withdraw the carrier complete with the pinion shaft and differential assembly. Make sure that the differential bearing housing caps are marked so that they can be replaced in their original pos itions, then remove the four nuts and spring washers. Withdraw the bearing caps and the differential assembly. Tap out the dowel pin locating the differential pinion shaft. It must be tapped out from the crown wheel side as the hole into which it fits has a slight ly smaller diameter at the crown wheel end to prevent the pin passing right th rough. It may be necessary to clean out the metal peened over the entry with a i\r in. drill to facilitate removal of the dowel pin. Drive out the differential pinion shaft, when the pinions and thrust washers can be removed from the case.

Section H.5 REPLACING THE DIFFERENTIAL PINIONS

Fig. H.3 Refi tt ing a hub, using service tools 1SGl34 and ISG 134P to drift it into position Morr is Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

Examine the pinions and thrust washers and renew as required. Replace the pinions, thrust washers, and pinion shaft in the differential cage and insert the dowel pin . Peen over the entry hole. H. 3


H

www.morrisoxford.com THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION ing outer race remover (service tool 18G264), together with the adaptors 18G264E and 18G264F (see Fig. H.6). Slide the distance piece and shims from the pinion shaft and withdraw the inner race, using the bevel pinion inner race remover and replacer 18G285 (see Fig. H.7).

Section H.7 ASSE MBLI G AD SETTIN G THE CROWN WH EEL A D PI ION

Fig. H.5 The bevel pinion flange wrench l8G34A used to hold the flange against rotation while the securing nut is slackened or tightened

Reassembly is a reversal of the instructions given in Section HA. Refill with fresh oil to Ref. B (page P.2). OTE .-If it proves necessary to fit any new parts other than those detailed in Sections H. 3, H.4 , and H.S the axle assembly must be set up as in Section H.7.

Section H.6 DISMANTLING THE CROWN WHEEL AND PINION Remove the differential assembly as detai led In Section H A. Remove the differential bearings from the differential cage, using the differential bearing remover 18G47C together with the adaptors l8G47T. Note that the thrust face of each bearing is marked with the word 'THRUST' and that shims are fitted between the inner ring of each bearing and the differential cage. Knock back the tabs of the locking washers, unscrew the nuts from the bolts securing the crown wheel to the differential, and remove the crown wheel from the differential cage. Unscrew the pinion nut, using a bevel pinion flange wrench (service tool l8G34A) to prevent the flange from turning during this operation. Remove the driving flange and the pressed-steel end cover. Drive the bevel pinion rearwards through the carrier, using a soft-metal drift. The pinion will carry with it the inner race and rollers of the rear bearing, distance piece, and shims, leaving the outer race and the complete front bearing in position. The inner race of the front bearing may be removed with the fingers and the outer race of both the front an d rear bearings removed with the special bevel pinion bearH.4

Apart from the fitting of components as detailed in Sections H.3, HA, and H.5, it is not permissible to fit any new parts (e.g. crown wheel and pinion, pinion bearings, differential bearings, etc.) to the axle assembly without working through the procedure given in this Section. Furthermore, if a new crown wheel or a new pinion is needed, a mated pair-erown wheel and pinion -must be fitted. Fitting a new crown wheel and pinion involves four distinct operations: (1) Setting the position of the pinion. (2) Adjusting the pinion bearing preload. (3) Setting the crown wheel position. (4) Adjusting the backlash between the gears. The following service tools are required to enable these operations to be carried out correctly: (I) Bevel pinion and differential setting gauge. (2) Bevel pinion inner race remover and replacer. (3) Bevel pinion outer race remover and replacer. (4) Bevel pinion preload gauge. 1. SETTI NG THE PI NIO N POSITION (I) Fit the bearing outer races to th e gear carrier, using the pinion race replacing tool. (2) Smooth off the pinio n head with an oil-stone but do not erase any markings tha t may be etched on the pinio n head. (3) Assemble the pinion and rear bearing with a washer of known thickness behind the pinion head.

Fig. H.6 Both front and rear bearing outer races may be removed, using service tool l8G264 with adaptors 18G264E and 18G264F Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

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THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION

H

(4) Position the pinion in the gear carrier without the shims, bearing spacer, and oil seal. (5) Fit the inner ring of the front bearing and the universal joint driving flange and tighten the nut gradually until a bearing preload of 10 to 12 lb. in. (-12 to ·14 kg. m.) is obtained.

(6) Remove the keep disc from the base of the magnet. Adjust the dial indicator to zero on the machined step 'B' of the setting block. (7) Clean the pinion head and place the magnet and dial indicator in position (Fig. H.9). Move the indicator arm until the foot of the gauge rests on the centre of the differential bearing bore at one side and tighten the knurled locking screw. Obtain the maximum depth reading and note any variation from the zero setting. Repeat the check in the opposite bearing bore. Add the two variations together and divide by two to obtain a mean reading. (8) Take into consideration any variation in pinion head thickness. This will be shown as an unbracketed figure etched on the pinion head and will always be minus (-). If no unbracketed figure is shown the pinion head is of nominal thickness. Using the mean clock gauge reading obtained and the unbracketed pinion head figure (if any), the following calculations can be made: (a) If the clock reading is minus add the clock reading to the pinion head marking, the resulting slim being minus. Reduce the washer thickness by this amount.

Example Clock reading Pinion marking Variation from nominal

- ·002 in. - ·005 in.

- ·007 in.

Reduce the washer thickness by this amount. (b) If the clock reading is plus and numerically less

Fig. H.8 Setting the gauge to zero 011 the special block for determination of the pillion position. The arrow indicates the extension to the contact foot than the pinion marking reduce the washer thickness by the difference. Example - ·005 in. Pinion marking Clock reading + ·003 in. Variation from nominal

- ·002 in.

Reduce the washer thickness by this amount. (c) If the clock reading is plus and numerically greater than the pinion marking increase the washer thickness by the difference. Example +,008 in. Clock reading - ·003 in. Pinion marking

Variation from nominal

+ ·005 in.

Inc rease the washer thick ness by this amou nt. The only cases where no alterations are required to the washer thickness are when the clock reading is plus and numerically equal to the unbracketcd pinion marking, or the clock reading is zero and there is no unbracketed marking on the pinion head. (9) Allowance should then finally be made for the mounting distance marked on the pinion head in a rectangular bracket as follows. If the marking is a plus figure, reduce the washer thickness by an equal amount. If the marking is a minus figure increase the washer thickness by an equal amount. A tolerance of ·001 in. is allowed in the thickness of the washer finally fitted. 2. ADJUSTING THE PINION BEARING PRELOAD

Fig. H.7 Using service tool 18G285 to remove the bevel pinion bearing inner race Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

A washer of the thickness indicated by use of the tool and calculations should now be fitted under the pinion head and the pinion assembled with bearings, pinion bearing distance piece, shims to the value of approximately ·012 in. (,30 mm.), oil seal, and universal

H.5


H

www.morrisoxford.com THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION

Fig. H.9 The service tool in position on the pinion with the dial indicating the variation of the setting from standard Fig. H.II joint flange . Prevent the universal joint from turning and tighten the pinion nut gradually to a torque spanner reading of 140 lb . ft. (19'4 kg. m.). Checks should be made during the tightening to ensure that the pinion bearing preload does not exceed 15 lb. in. ('173 kg. m .). When the nut is correctly tightened it should provide a pinion bearing preload of 13 to 15 lb. in. (,149 to 路173 kg. m.). The shim thickness must be increased if the preload is too great or reduced if it is insufficient. When the correct

To measure variations in bearing thickness first zero the gauge on the portion of the gauge block marked' B' preload is obtained no further attention is needed so far as the pinion is concerned. 3. SETTING THE CROWN WHEEL POSITION Before fitting the crown wheel and differential assembly to the differential carrier it is necessary to calculate the

~- D颅 :----C~----.,

Fig. H .lO Variations from the standard dimensions between the registers indicated are stamped on the differential carrier or cage H.6

ik..-.- .

_

Fig. H.12 Checking the variation in bearing thickness Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


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THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION amount of shim thickness. To assist in the calculation of the thickness of shims to be fitted behind each differential cage bearing, variations from the standard dimen sions are indicated by stamped numbers on the carrier adjacent to the bearing bores. The variations to be considered are shown in Fig. H.I 0, (A) being the distance from the centreline to the bearing register of the carrier on the left-hand side and (n) the distance from the centre-line to the bearing register of the carrier on the right-hand side. The (c) dimension is from the bearing register on one side of the cage to the register on the other side, while the (0) dimension is from the rear face of the crown wheel to the bearing register on the opposite side. Any variation from standard on the (A) dimension will be found stamped on the carrier adjacent to the bearing bore, and similarly with the (n) dimension. The (c) and (0) variations are stamped on the machined face of the differential cage. It is possible to calculate the shim thickness required on the left-hand side by the use of the following formula: A+o - c +'007 in. Substituting the actual variations shown, this formula gives the shim thickness required to compensate for the machining tolerances plus the extra ·002 in. to give the necessary bearing pinch. In addition, allowance must be made for variations in bearing thickness in the following manner. Rest the bearing, with the inner race over the recess and outer ring thrust face downwards, on the small surface plate of the bevel pinion and differential bearing setting gauge. Drop the magnet on the surface plate and zero the clock gauge to the small gauge block on its step marked 'B' (see Fig. H. I I : this is the thickness of the

H

P I~: ION HEAD TH ICK N E~ ~ .

MAX - ·007'''5

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NEVER' )

~AX+ ·OO4 i .. 1

I

C ROWN WH E EL~ MARKED f£!'E

PINION MOUN TI NG 0IS'WlCE

I .

MAX- -004l1u

CROWN WHEEL

MOUrnING

_ --..... 1 M&.X-

DI~TANC£ .

" f I,.

·O OSi.."

Fig. H. 14 Crown wheel and pinion markings

standard bearing). Swing over the indicator until it rest s on the plain surface of the inner race and, holding the inner race down against the balls, take a reading (Fig. H.12). Normally the bearing will be standard to - ·003 in., though in some cases variations may be standard to - ·005 in. A negative variation shown by this test indicates the additional thickness of shimming to be added to that side of the differential cage. The formula for the right-hand side is: n-0 +'006 in. and here again final allowance must be made for variation in bearing thickness. When a framed number is marked on the back of the crown wheel, e.g. + 2, it must be taken into account before assembling the shims and bearings to the differential cage. This mark assists in relating the crown wheel with the pinion. If, for example, the mark is + 2, then shims to the value of ·002 in. ('05 0101.) must be transferred from the left-hand side (the crown wheel side) to the right-hand side. If the mal king is - 2, then shims to the value of ·002 in. (,05 0101.) must be moved from the right-hand side to the left-hand side 4. ADJUSTING THE BACKLASH

Fig. H.13 Measuring the crown wheel backlash with service tool18GI91B Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

Assemble the bearings (thrust faces outwards) and shims as calculated to the differential cage. Bolt the crown wheel to the differential cage but do no t knock over the locking tabs. Tighten the bolts to a torque wrench reading of 60 lb. ft. (8'3 kg. 01.). Mount the assembly on two 'V' blocks and check the amount of run -out of the crown wheel, as it is rotated, by means of a suitably mounted dial indicator. The

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www.morrisoxford.com THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION

maximum permissible run-out is ·002 in. ('05 mm.) and any greater irregularity must be corrected. If there is excessive run-out detach the crown wheel and examine the joint faces on the flange of the differential cage and on the crown wheel for any particles of dirt. When the parts are thoroughly cleaned it is unlikely that the crown wheel will not run true. Tighten the bolts to the correct torque wrench reading and knock over the locking washers. Fit the differential to the gear carrier. Replace the bearing caps and tighten the nuts to a torque wrench reading of 65 lb. ft. (8,99 kg. m.). Bolt the special tool surface plate to the gear carrier flange and mount the clock gauge on the magnet bracket in such a way that an accurate backlash figure may be

H.'d

obtained (see Fig. H.l3). The recommended backlash will be found etched on the rear face of the crown wheel. The minimum backlash allowed in any circumstances is ·005 in. (,127 mm.) and the maximum is ·007 in. (,178 mm.). A movement of ·002 in. (,05 mm.) shim thickness from one side of the differential to the other will produce a variation in backlash of approximately ·002 in. (,05 mm .). Thus it should be po ssible to set up the differential. even though the backlash is incorrect, by removing the bearings on one occasion only. Great care must be taken to ensure absolute cleanliness during the above operations, as any discrepancies resulting from dirty assembly would affect the setting position of the crown wheel or pinion.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2.

25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION

H

SERVICE TOOLS

18G264E and 18G264F. Bevel Pinion Bearing Outer Race Remover-Adaptors-Rear Use in conjunction with basic tool l8G264. 91S4A

18G264E and 18G264F

18G264. Bevel Pinion Bearing Outer Race Remover (basic tool) Comprising a body, centre screw with extension and tommy-bar, wing nut, guide cone, and two distance pieces. A plain ring is also included to serve as a pilot when the rear bearing outer races are being replaced.

18G134P. Rear Hub Replacer Adaptor Use in conjunction with detachable handle l8G 134. STR829X

18G134P

18G34A. Bevel Pinion Flange Wrench This wrench prevents the rotation of the bevel pinion flange when releasing or tightening the flange securing nut. The pegs of the holding wrench fit into the bolt holes of the flange. 18G34A Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

H.9


H

www.morrisoxford.com

THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION

18G47C. Differential Bearing Remover (basic tool) This standardized basic tool used in conjunction with adaptors 18G47T permits easy and safe withdrawal of the differential bearings.

ani

18G47C

18G47T. Differential Bearing Remover-Adaptor For use with basic tool 18G47C.

9023

18G47T

18G207. Bevel Pinion Bearing Preload Gauge The movable arms of the tool are located in opposite holes of the bevel pinion flange and the weight moved along the rod to the poundage required.

43488

18G207

18G191B. Bevel Pinion and Differential Bearing Setting Gauge Correct assembly and adjustment of the pinion and differential gear is impossible without this tool. Alternatively, 18G191 and 18Gl91A may be used.

43138

18G191B

H.lO

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


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THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION

H

18G285. Bevel Pinion Bearing Inner Race Remover and Replacer A tool which is essential when withdrawing or replacing the inner bearing race of the pinion shaft.

18G285

18G152. Rear Hub

ut Spanner

919<4

18G152

18G304. Front and Rear Hub Remover (basic tool) The remover 18G304 is a basic tool for use with various adaptor bolts supplied separately. Screw the two adaptor bolts 18G304B onto the wheel studs and insert the thrust pad into the axle tube . The rear hub can then be removed by screwing up the centre screw against the thrust pad. Alternatively, 18G220 may be used.

8251

18G304

18G304B. Bolt Adaptor-*" in. U F. Alternatively, 18G220B may be used (with basic tool 18G220 only).

8251

18G304B

18G304J. Hub Remover Thrust Pad Alternatively, 18G220C may be used (with basic tool 18G220 only).

825 1

18G304J Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

H.lI


H

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THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION

18G264K. Partitioned Fibre Box

A strong fibre box for storing the bevel pinion bearing outer race remover adaptors.

18G264K

18G372. Torque Wrench (30-140 lb. ft.)

This type of tool is essential if the recommended maximum torque for the bevel pinion flange securing nut is not to be exceeded. This tool is used with a standardtype socket and in conjunction with the flange holding wrench 18G34A . 18G372

H.12

Morns Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com

SECTION

uu

na

THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION This Section is a Supplement to Section H

Section

Axle assembly-removing and replacing . .

HH.l

Springs Disma ntling and reassemblin g

HH.3

Removal and replacement

HH.2

Morr is Uxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

H H. l


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Case.

17. Washer-bearing packing .

33.

Seal-oil.

2.

Nut.

18. Cage-differential.

34.

Cover-dust.

3. Stud -differential carrier.

19.

35.

Flange-universal joint.

4.

20. Thrust washer-gear.

36.

Nut to pinion .

5. Nut for stud.

21.

37.

Spring washer for nut.

6.

22. Thrust washer-pinion.

38.

Shaft-axle.

7. Plug-oil drain .

23.

Pin for pinion .

39. Joint-hub to shaft.

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8. Plug-oil filler.

24.

Peg for pinion pin.

40.

Screw- shaft to hub .

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9. Breather.

25.

Crown wheel and pinion.

41.

Hub assembl y.

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10. Joint-differential to axle case.

26.

Bolt-crown wheel to cage

42.

Stud -wheel.

II.

27.

Lock washer for bolt.

43.

Nut for wheel stud

44.

Ring -oil seal.

Lock washer for nut.

Spring washer for nut.

Carrier (with caps).

12. Serrated.bolt for cap. 13.

Gear.

Pinion .

28. Thrust washer-pinion .

Plain washer for bolt.

29.

Bearing-pinion inner.

45.

Seal-oil.

14. Spring washer for bolt.

30.

Spacer-bearing.

46.

Bearing-hub.

15.

31.

Bearing-pinion out er.

47.

Spacer-bearing

32.

Shim-outer bearing.

Nut for bolt.

16. Bearing-differenti al.

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6.

Washer for bolt (spring).

18.

Plate-clip.

30.

Washer (spring).

7.

Nut for bolt.

19.

Buffer -bump.

31.

Nut-inner shackle to bottom pin.

8.

Button (plastic).

20.

Clip-spring to axle.

32.

21.

Nut for clip.

9. Clip (short). 10.

Insulator for clip.

22. Shackle (outer).

34.

Washer for pin (spring) .

= =


BB

www.morrisoxford.com THE REAR AXLE AND REAR SUSPENSION

Section HH.l REMOVI TG AND REPLACING THE AXLE Raise the rear of the car and place suitable stands under the frame forward of the rear springs. Remove the road wheels and release the hand brake.

OTE.-Before tightening the spring bolts it is essential that the normal working load be applied to the springs so that the flexing rubber bushes are deflected to an equal extent in both directions during service, Failure to take this precaution will inevitably lead to early deterioration of the bushes.

Disconnect the flexible brake hose at the union on the right-hand chassis side-member. Disconnect the brake cable from the relay lever.

Section HH.3

Support the axle on a stand or trolley jack. Unscrew the 'U' bolt nuts and locknuts and remove the spring clamp and damper bracket plates.

DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE REAR SPRINGS

Mark the propeller shaft coupling flanges and disconnect the shaft from the driving flange. Support the rear end of the propeller shaft.

Remove the nuts and bolts, and spring open the clips. Release the locknut and nut from the spring centrebolt and remove the distance piece and bolt. The leaves may now be separated. The spring eye bushes are of the Silentbloc type and must therefore be pushed clear of the spring eyes by applying pressure to the outer diameter of the bush. When replacing the bush it must be so positioned that its outer diameter is perfectly central in the spring eye. Again, pressure must only be applied to the outer diameter of the bush. The rear upper spring shackle bushes are of the phosphor bronze type and are in two halves. Each half of the bush can be driven clear of the body housing by inserting a narrow drift through the shackle pin opening to bear against the inner end of the bush. Before removing old bushes check that the lubricating nipple is clear of the bushes. New bushes may be pressed or driven into their housings. Lightly grease the shackle pin, insert it into the bushes and assemble the shackles, nuts, spring washers, and the locknuts. Tighten the nut and locknut sufficiently to eliminate end play in the shackle and ensure that the shackle is able to move backwards and forwards.

Remove the rear shackle nuts and plates and lower the rear ends of the springs to the ground. Withdraw the axle from the car. Reassembly is a reversal of the dismantling procedure, but it will be necessary to bleed the brakes to make sure that no air remains in the system. If the hand brake cable adjustment has been altered it must be readjusted as detailed in Section MM.8.

Section HH.2 REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT OF THE REAR SPRINGS Raise the rear of the car by means of a suitable sling attached to the bumper brackets and place a support beneath the axle casing. Slacken off the 'U' bolt locknuts and remove the nuts. Raise the 'U' bolts and remove the plate clip, the locating plate and the seating pad. Remove the nuts from the rear shackle pins, withdraw the lower pin and remove the shackles. Remove the nuts and spring washers from the front anchor pins and withdraw the pins. The anchor pin has a flat on one side to permit it to be held against rotation while loosening or tightening up the nut. The spring is now free to be removed. Replacement of the spring is a reversal of the above procedure. Before replacing the spring inspect the front bracket bush plates and the shackle bolts, bushes, and plates for wear and replace with new parts where necessary. Ensure that the rubber pads are positioned correctly and that the head of the spring centre-bolt registers with the spring bracket on the axle case.

HH.6

Inspection Clean each leaf thoroughly and examine for cracks or breakage. Check the centre-bolt for wear or distortion (this bolt forms the location for the spring on its axle pad and should be in good condition). IMPORTANT.-When fitting new leaves it is important that they are of the correct length and thickness and have the same curvature as the remaining leaves. It is advisable, even when no leaves are broken, to fit replacement springs when the originals have lost their camber due to settling. Reassembling Place the leaves together in their correct order, locating them with the centre-bolt. The dowel head of the bolt must be on top of the spring. Replace the spring clips with their respective nuts and bolts.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue I


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JJ

SECTION JJ THE STEERING GEAR Section

Description Maintenance Side levers-removing and replacing

JJ.3

Steering gear Adjusting

JJ.lO

Dismantling and assembling

JJ.9

Removing and replacing

JJ.8

Steering idler Dismantling and assembling

JJ.5

Removing

JJ.4

Refitting

JJ.6

Tools-service

.. End of Section

Track adju stment

JJ.I

Track-rod and draglinks Removing

JJ.2

Refitting

JJ.7

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

JJ.l


www.morrisoxford.com

JJ

THE STEERING GEAR DESCRIPTIO

The steering gear is housed in a steering-box that is attached to an outer column tube. The gear is integral with an inner column and takes the form of a worm drive that is supported in the box by an upper and a lower ball race ; a felt bush is fitted between the upper ends of the inner and outer columns. A rocker shaft incorporating a lever and a conical peg is located in the steering-box where the conical peg engages the cam groove of the steering gear. The other end of the shaft is splined and pa sses through a plain bush and an oil seal in the bottom of the box. A side lever is secured to the bottom of the shaft by a castellated nut that is locked with a split pin. Wear between the cam groove and the peg may be taken up by an adjusting screw in the side cover of the box; the screw abuts a thrust pad on the inner end of the rocker shaft. A steering idler body secured to the opposite side of the chassis has an internal recess in its upper end and a plain bore into which are pressed an upper and a lower bush and an oil seal. The body houses a splined idler shaft having a flanged head that locates in the recess in the body; the lower end of the shaft passes through the bushes and the oil seal. Oil grooves are cut in both the shaft and the bu shes to permit lubrication of the bearing surfaces. A side lever is secured to the bottom of the shaft by a castellated nut that is locked with a split pin. The top of the body is closed by a cover having an oil filler plug; the cover is secured to the body by three bolts, and jointing washers are interposed between the cover and body. The side levers on the rocker shaft and the idler shaft are connected to each other by an adjustable track-rod; a short draglink connects each side lever to its respective steering arm.

A

B

-t=============~ .'!l l".. . . ,

Fig. JJ.2 In this illustration the dimension (A) should be between and tin. (1,59 and 3'18 mm.) smaller than dimension (n), this being the amount of toe-in required

nr

Every 1,000 miles (1600 km.) use the grease gun filled to Ref. C (page P.2) on the following points: (1) Steering track-rod ball joints 2 nipples. (2) Draglink ball joints 4 nipples (2 each side). (3) Lower wishbone arm outer bearing 2 nipples (I each side). (4) Swivel pin bushes. . 2 nipples (I each side). The steering gear and steering idler also should be topped up with the recommended oil at every 1,000 miles (1600 km.).

MA INTENANCE Lubrication of the nipples on the steering connections and swivel bearings is most important to maintain accurate steering.

Section JJ.l ADJUSTI G THE TRACK The track-rod is threaded right-hand at one end and left-hand at the other, so that turning the rod in the required direction effects the correct setting after releasing the locknuts (Fig. JJ.I). Always retighten the locknuts at each end of the track-rod after an adjustment has been made.

Section J J.2 REMOVING THE T RACK- RO D A D D RAGLINKS

Fig. JJ.l The arrows indicate the track-rod locknuts JJ.2

The ends of the track-rod and the draglinks are attached to the side levers and the steering arms by ball joints. To break the joints, remove the castellated nuts and split pins, support the lever to which the joint is attached, and use service tool 18G 125 to separate the joint. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520


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THE STEERING GEAR Section J J.3 REMOVING A D REPLACING THE SIDE LEVERS These are held to the steering gear rocker shaft and the steering idler gear respectively by a castellated nut and split pin. After removal of the nut and split pin the side levers can be withdrawn from their splined shafts . Never attempt to lever or hammer the side levers from their locations, otherwise serious damage to the steering gear may well ensue. Reverse the above instructions for replacement.

Section J J.4 REMOVING THE IDLER ASSEMBLY The idler assembly is secured to the chassis by two nuts and bolts and a set bolt. To remove the assembly disconnect the track-rod, draglink, and the side lever, unscrew and remove the two nuts and bolts and the set bolt, and detach the idler assembly from the chassis frame.

Section J J.5 DISMANTLING AND ASSEMBLING THE IDLER Remove the idler assembly as described in Section JJ.4 and drain off the oil. Unscrew and remove the top cover screws, remove the cover and the joint washers, and push the idler shaft from the body. The oil seal must not be removed unless it is to be renewed. During assembly ensure that when the shaft is replaced it is correctly entered in the oil seal and that when the top cover has been refitted the shaft will turn freely without end-float. The end-float may be adjusted by inserting or removing joint washers .

Section JJ.6 REFITTING THE IDLER The refitting of the idler is a reversal of the removal procedure, but care should be taken to ensure that it is secured firmly against the frame by means of the two nuts and bolts and the set bolt with a spring washer beneath its head.

Section J J.7 REFITTING THE TRACK-ROD AND DRAGLINKS First connect the two draglinks to their respective steering arms and levers. Fit the track-rod and ensure that all the nuts are tightened and then split-pinned. E

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

JJ

Check the steering lock to ascertain that the lock stop on each swivel axle comes into effect before the stop in the steering box. Finally, check the track as detailed in Section 11.1.

Section J J.8 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE STEERING GEAR Remo ve the negative lead from the battery. Drain the water from the radiator. Disconnect the horn wire (brown with black tracer) at the snap connector below the steering box. Slacken the three grub screws in the steering-wheel hub and withdraw the hub centre and horn cable. On earlier models remove the three set screws securing the wheel to the hub . Remo ve the steering-wheel retain ing nut and withdraw the wheel from its splines, using tool 18G70 if necessary. Remove the four screws securing the lower half of the steering column cowl. Pull off the Lucar connectors from the ignition /starter switch and direction indicator switch. If the car is fitted with steering column gear change unscrew the two nuts and remove the clamp bracket from the lower end of the gear change shaft , remove the locking wire from the square-headed screw at the bottom of the shaft , and slacken the screw to release the levers. Slacken the locking screw in the top bracket and withdraw the lever and shaft from inside the car. Remo ve the four nut s securing the upper half of the steering column cowl and withdraw the cowl, packing plate, wooden packing block, and rubber strip. Remove the direction indicator switch. If steering column gear change is fitted remove the top bracket. Remove the cable clips from the steering column. Disconnect the remaining battery terminal, release the battery strap, and remove the battery from the vehicle (R.H.D. vehicles only). Disconnect the water and air pipes and remove the windshield washer bottle (R.H.D. vehicles only). Remove the radiator as detailed in Section Ce.l. Unscrew the two steering gearbox attachment bolts accessible from abo ve and pull the steering column sealing grommet away from the bulkhead. Jack up the front of the car and disconnect the trackrod and draglink baIl joints from the steering gearbox drop-arm, using tool 18G125. Remove the two steering gearbox attachment bolts accessible from beneath the car. Pull the steering box downwards, twisting it slightly, and remove the unit from beneath the vehicle. When replacing the steering gear reverse the above procedure, but do not tighten the set screws securing the steering gearbox to the frame until the column has been correctly positioned inside the car. Ensure that with the road wheels in the straightJJ.3


www.morrisoxford.com THE STEERING GEAR

JJ

ahead position the steering-wheel is correctly located on its splines. Make certain that the steering column cowl plate and indicator switch are correctly positioned in relation to each other and to the steering-wheel and fascia panel so that the indicator self-cancelling mechani sm is operative. Finally, check the front wheel alignment, and adjust if necessary.

Section JJ.9 DISMA TLI G Ai D ASSEMBLI 'G THE STEERI G GEAR Remove the steering box double lever. Remove the drain plug and drain the oil. Remove the side cover-plate by taking out the four bolts. Turn the steering gear over and , with the side face suitably supported, tap out the rocker shaft, using a soft-metal drift. Withdraw the follower peg from the needle-roller bearing in the rocker shaft lever and support the shaft over an open-jawed vice. Press out the needle-roller bearing and its end cap. Remove the set screws from the end cover. Stand the complete unit upright with the steering gearbox uppermost; by bumping the end on a block of wood on the floor the worm with its ball bearings will be displaced. The complete inner column can now be removed from the casing through the open end of the steering gearbox. Using a piece of strong hooked wire, extract the felt bush at the top of the column, the hook pulling on the under side of the bush. To fit a new bush smear with hypoid oil and simply press into place. Adjusting shims should be fitted behind the end cover so that there is no end-play on the column; at the same time they should not be preloaded, otherwise damage to the ball races may well occur. Press the end cap and the needle-roller bearing into the rocker shaft lever and insert the follower peg into the needle bearing. Release the rocker shaft adjustment locknut and unscrew the adjuster a few turns before fitting the cover

JJ.4

,j

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Fig. JJ.3 The arrow indicates the adjuster screw

plate to ensure an oiltight joint. Adju st the gear as detailed in Section JJ.lO . For the remainder of the assembly reverse the dismantling procedure.

Section JJ .I0 ADJUSTING THE STEERING GEAR The adju ster in the cover-plate should be slackened by releasing the locknut. Screw the adjuster down until there is no free movement of the gear when in the strai ghtahead position. Lock the adjuster with its locknut. Final adjustment is made when the gear has been refitted to the chassis. It should be noted that, as wear in use is usually greater in the straight-ahead position than on lock, provi sion is made for this in the design of the cam and it will be found that there is a slight endplay towards each lock . It is essential , therefore, that adjustment should be made in the straight-ahead position to avoid the possibility of tightness. The steering gear should be filled with the recommended oil (page P.2) via the filler plug in the cover-plate and then a final test made to ensure that the movement is free from lock to lock.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE STEERING GEAR

JJ

SERVICE TOOLS

18G125. Ste ering Ball Joint Se parator

This too l is designed on the shock and wedge principle to remove steering ball joints from their levers. On no account must the tool be used to lever the components apart: the handle is short to obviate its misuse in this way. 18G125

18G70. Steering-wheel Remover

A movable leg enables the tool to be placed quickly into position and the soft plastic ring is proof against damage to the surface of the wheel. The centre screw incorporates a hardened steel ball to reduce friction when engaging the thrust pad provided for insertion into the inner steering column. 18G70C. Universal Thrust pad

Used in conjunction with 18G70. This thrust pad may be used on both current and early models.

3895

18G70

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 30713

1J.5


~I

THE STEERING GEAR COMPONENTS

63 18~

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Box and outer column .

No.

No.

Description

Description

49. Cover assembly-steering column.

25. Washer-bent.

2. Bush for rocker shaft.

26.

Washer-retaining.

50.

Cover-steering column.

3. Seal for rocker shaft.

27.

Nut-lever to steering gear.

51. Stud for upper cover.

4.

Column with cam (inner).

28. Washer for lever.

52. Washer for stud.

5.

Ring (rubber).

29. Seal---dust.

53. Washer for stud (spring).

tv

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8. Bush (felt).

32. Bolt for steering-box.

56. Washer for screw.

9.

33. Washer for bolt .

57. Clip for steering column.

·· ·i

Shaft-rocker (with thrust disc).

i

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35. Bolt-bracket to frame.

59. Distance piece for clip.

12. Cover-side.

36. Nut for bolt.

60. Stud-clip to column.

13. Joint for side cover.

37.

61. Washer for stud .

14. Screw-thrust.

38. Washer for bolt.

15. Nut for thrust screw.

39.

Bolt-bracket to body.

63. Wheel-steering.

j j

16.

40.

Screw-bracket to body.

64.

ij

17. Washer for bolt.

41.

Washer for screw.

65. Screw-wheel to hub.

Plug-oil.

42.

Bracket support-steering column.

66. Washer for screw.

43.

Plate---distance-support bracket.

67. Nut for steering-wheel.

j

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i

55. Screw-c-cover to cover .

Cup for ball cage.

58.

I··

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31. Bracket-steering-box.

7.

Lever-side and cross .

34. Washer for bolt (spring) .

I

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30.

10. Disc-thrust.

I

:

54. Nut for stud.

6. Cage assembly-ball.

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18.

Roller assembly-cam.

Bolt for side cover.

19. Washer for plug. 20.

Washer for bolt (spring).

62. Nut for stud.

44. Plate---distance-support bracket.

Cover-end.

Packing piece.

68.

Hub-steering-wheel.

Washer for nut.

21. Joint for cover.

45.

Screw-bracket to dash.

69. SeaI---dust.

22. Shim(s).

46.

Screw-bracket to dash .

70.

23. Bolt for end cover.

47.

Washer for screw.

71. Cover assembly (upper) .

24. Washer for bolt .

48 .

Grommet for steering column.

72. Grommet for gear control lever.

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VI VI

No.

Description

Description

12. Nut for shaft.

Body-idler.

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No.

Description

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23. Cover ball joint.

Lever-side.

24.

Lubricator.

2. Seal.

13.

3.

Bush.

14. Bolt-idler to frame.

25. Nut -lock (R .H .T.).

4.

Shaft-idler.

15. Nut for bolt.

26.

5.

Seal-s-dust.

16. Washer for bolt .

27. Nut for ball pin.

6.

Cover-idler body.

17. Washer for bolt (spring).

28. Rod assembl y-side.

7. Joint for cover.

18. Bolt-idler to frame.

29. Cover-ball joint.

8.

Screw.

19. Washer.

30.

Retainer-s-dust cover.

9.

Washer.

Nut-lock (L.H.T.).

20.

Rod assembly.

31.

Lubricator.

10. Plug-oil filler.

21.

End assembly (R.H.T.).

32.

Lubricator.

J I. Washer.

22.

End assembly (L.H .T.).

33. Nut for ball pin.

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www.morrisoxford.com

KK

SECTION KK THE FRONT SUSPENSION Section

Description Maintenance Brake-drum and hub-removal and replacement

KK.6

Brake-plate -removal and replacement

KK.7

Coil spring-removal and replacement

KK.I

Front suspension -removal and replacement

KK.2

Suspension unit Assembling

KK.5

Dismantling

KK.3

Examining parts for wear

KK.4

Tools-service

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2.

End of Section

25520

KK.I


www.morrisoxford.com THE FR ONT SUSPENSION

II

DESCRIPTION To facilitate repair after accidental damage and to simplify servicing the front cross-member complete with the front suspension units is attached by four main bolts to the underframe and four bolts each side to the engine mounting plates. The four mounting bolts are on rubber packing pieces, which considerably reduce body noises and steering-wheel rattles excited by road irregularities. ' The two independent suspension units are of wishbone construction. Road shocks are absorbed by low-periodicity coil springs mounted between the upper and lower linkages, the springs being controlled by double-acting dampers on the upper linkages. MAINTENANCE NOTE. -Rubber bushes are used in the suspension. It is therefore of the utmost importance not to use oil or grease on these components. Normal maintenance is confined to lubrication of the fulcrum pins and SWIvel pins. G rease nipples are provided for this purpose and grease or oil to Ref. C (page P.2) should be used.

Section KK.l

Section KK.2 REMO VING Ai D REP LACING THE FRO T SUSPENSION U IT Jack up the front of the car, placing stands under the body cross-member, and remove the road wheels. Support the engine by an overhead sling. Disconnect the negative lead from the battery and remove the horn wires. Drain the hydraulic brake system through one bleed screw into a clean container. Remove the two flexible brake pipes by first removing the upper pipe union nuts. Then, holding the hexagon on the rubber pipes, remove the locknuts retaining the pipes to the engine side-members. Unscrew the pipes from the brake backplates. Remove the split pins and castellated nuts from the draglink ball joints on the steering box and the steering idler drop-arm. Remove the ball joints, using tool 18G125. Remove the engine bearer bolts (four on each side). Position a movable lifting jack under the suspension to just support the unit and remove the four chassis mounting nuts and spring washers with their rubber packing pieces. The unit is now free to be removed from under the car. Replacement is a reversal of the above procedure. Bleed the brakes on completio n.

RE MO VING A D REPLACIi G A COIL SPRING Jack up the side of the car from which the spring is to be removed and place a stand under the frame sidemember to the rear of the suspension assembly. In the absence of tool 18G37, two i in. (9'52 mm.) slave bolts will be needed to release the compression from the coil spring. These bolts must be at least 4 in. (101,6 mm.) long and threaded their entire length. There are four nuts and bolts securing the spring plate to the lower wishbone arm. Remove two which are diagonally opposite to each other and replace with the previously prepared slave bolts, screwing the nuts down hard onto the wishbone arms. Remove the other two short bolts and unscrew the nuts from the slave bolts, each a little at a time until the spring is fully extended, and the bolts together with the spring plate and spring can be removed. When the spring has been removed it should be checked for free length (see ' GENERAL DATA'), and if there is any excess variation from nominal the spring should be renewed. Replacement of the coil spring is a reversal of the above procedure. NOTE.-Some earlier models are fitted with a packing cup in conjunction with the coil spring. When fitting the later-type spring (part o. 11H53), which is of greater length than the first type, the packing cups are not required. KK.2

A I ) 9 ')

Fig. KK.l

Position of service tool 18G37 releasing a coil spring Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2.

25520

e


www.morrisoxford.com THE FRONT SUSPENSION

KK

Section KK.3 DISMANTLING THE SUSPE SION UNIT Remove the hub (Section KK .6) and backplate (Section KK.7). Release the draglink from the steering arm. Remove the coil spring (Section KK. I). The top wishbone arms are connected at their narrowest point by a clamping bolt. Unscrew the nut and remove the spring washer and bolt. Then, remove the split pin and castellated nut from the upper trunnion fulcrum pin on the outer end of the top wishbone arms. The forward arm of the top wishbone is secured to the shock absorber spindle by a clamping bolt. Slacken the clamping bolt and partially withdraw the arm. The trunnion fulcrum pin can now be withdrawn and the shock absorber removed complete with the top wishbone arms. Withdraw the rubber bearing from each end of the upper trunnion. These bearings fit into a groove in the swivel pin and MUST be taken out before the swivel pin can be removed. Remove the split pin and castellated nut from the top of the swivel pin. Remove the upper trunnion and washers and lift off the swivel pin, stub axle, and hub assembly. Detach the cork washer from the lower end of the swivel pin.

Fig. KK.3 General view of suspension showing coil spring, lower wishbone, and swivel pin

The outer bearing of the lower wishbone can now be dismantled. Slacken the nut on each of the cotters located in the ends of the lower wishbone arms and screw out the threaded bushes. Remove the cotter pin nuts and washers and detach the wishbone arms. Unscrew the nut located in the centre of the lower trunnion and tap out the cotter. Withdraw the fulcrum pin and remove the cork washer from each end of the trunnion. The suspension unit is now dismantled and worn or damaged parts can be renewed.

Section KK.4 EXAMINING T HE P ARTS FO R WEAR Swivel pin If wear on the swivel pins and bushes is suspected, carefully examine the swivel pin for wear by checking for ovality with a micrometer. Should the pin not show any appreciable signs of wear, renewal of the swivel pin bushes may effect a satisfactory cure. When refitting the top bush the greasing hole must line up with the grease hole in the swivel housing and the top of the bush must be flush with the top of the housing. The lower bush must be flush with the housing at the bottom and protrude about t in. (3' I8 mm.) above the upper face of the housing. Before fitting the swivel pins into their respective housings the bushes must be reamed to their correct size, using service tools 18G64 and 18G65. The use of tool 18G85 is recommended for removing and replacing the bushes. The two-piece dust cover is easily removed by telescoping the spring-loaded tubes.

Fig. KK.2

Service tool 18G85 is used for the removal and replacement of the swivel pin bushes Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

Wishbone arm screwed bush bearin g If the screwed bushes can be moved forwards or backwards on the fulcrum pin thread they should be renewed. Should new bushes still produce end-play, then renew the fulcrum pins.

KK.3


KK

www.morrisoxford.com THE FRONT SUSPENSION Remove the road wheel and prise off the hub cap. Remove the cotter pin, castellated nut, and flat washer from the stub axle. The brake-drum can be removed independently of the hub by the removal of the two countersunk screws. Withdraw the hub, using service tool 18G304 and adaptor bolt 18G304B (Fig. KK.4). Care must be taken not to damage the oil seals at the rear of the bearing.

Fig. KK.4 Using sen-ice tool 18G304 to remove a front hub assembly

Section KK.5 ASSEMBLl G THE SUSPEI SION UNIT First fit the screwed fulcrum pin into the lower trunnion at the bottom end of the swivel pin, ensuring that it is centralized, and then secure it with its cotters. Fit a cork ring into the recess provided on the ends of the lower trunnion and fit the lower wishbone arms into position. The screwed bushes should now be greased and fitted. For the rest of the assembly reverse the dismantling procedure.

Section KK.6

Reassembly Insert the inner ball race into the hub with the thrust side of the race facing inwards towards the pressed-steel spacer. The thrust side of the bearing has the part number stamped on it. Pack the hub with grease to Ref. F (page P.2) and insert the spacer so that the domed end faces the outer bearing. Replace the outer bearing with the thrust side facing the spacer. Use a soft-metal drift to replace both bearings, tapping them on diametrically opposite sides in order to move them evenly into their housings. Replace the oil seal over the inner bearing with its hollow side facing the bearing. Renew the bearing if it is damaged. Replace the hub on the stub axle, using a hollow drift evenly on both inner and outer races of the outer bearing. Tap the hub into position until the stub axle nut can be screwed onto the thread. Continue to tighten the nut until the inner race bears against the stub axle shoulder. Tighten the nut and align the slots with the cotter pin hole in the stub axle. Never slacken back the nut to achieve alignment. Finally, lock the nut with the cotter pin and replace the hub cap .

Section KK.7

REMOVING AND REPLACI NG A BRAKE-DRUM A D HUB

RE MOVING AND REPLACING A BRAKE-PLATE ASSEMBLY

Jack up the ear on the side from which the hub is to be removed.

Remove the brake-drum and hub as detailed in Section K K.6.

AI 394

Fig. KK.5 Thefront suspension cross-member complete with suspension units, hubs, etc. KK.4

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com

THE FRONT SUSPENSION

II

Disconnect the flexible brake pipe from its union at the wing valance. If the desired attention can be given without disconnecting the flexible brake pipe the brake-plate assembly can be hung on a suitable portion of the frame to take the load off the flexible pipe. Unscrew the flexible pipe from the brake backplate. Knock back the tabs of the locking washers, remove the four set screws retaining the brake backplate, and take off the backplate complete with brake-shoes and wheel cylinders. Reverse the above instructions for replacing.

Fig. KK.6 The use of service tools 18G89 and 18G56 for checking and assembling a front suspension unit

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

KK.5


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Description

No .

Description

No .

Description

I.

Cross-member.

14. Bolt for shock absorber arm.

27.

Bolt-spring seat to lower link.

2.

Bolt-cross-member to body.

15. Nut for bolt.

28.

Nut for bolt.

3.

Nut for bolt.

16.

29.

Washer for nut (spring).

4.

Washer for bolt .

17. Bolt-clamp.

30.

Spindle with fixed bracket -lower link .

5.

Washer-cross-member mounting (rubber).

18.

Nut for bolt.

31.

Bracket for spindle (detachable).

6.

Washer-cross-member mounting (rubber).

19.

Washer for nut (spring).

32.

Screw-bracket to cross-member.

7.

Nut-cross-member to body.

20. Bolt for shock absorber mounting.

33.

Nut for screw.

34.

Washer for screw (spring) .

8.

Washer for nut.

21.

Washer for bolt (spring). 35.

Bearing for lower link.

9.

ButTer- rebound.

22.

Pin- fulcrum.

36.

Washer-locating-lower link spindle.

Washer for nut (spring).

10. Packing piece for rebound buffer,

23. Bearing -top link.

37.

Nut for spindle.

11. Screw-rebound butTer to cross-member.

24.

Nut for fulcrum pin.

38.

ButTer-suspension.

25.

Spring-road (coil).

39.

Nut for butTer.

12.

Washer for screw (spring).

13. Absorber-shock (with arms).

26. Seating for spring.

40. Washer for nut (spring).

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THE FRONT SUSPENSION COMPONENTS

14

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No.

Description I. Pin- swivel. 2. Axle assembly-swivel. 3. Bush (top). 4. Bush (bo ttom). 5. Lubricator fo r swivel axle (upper). 6. Lubricator for swivel axle (lower). 7. R ing (cork). 8. T ube-<lust excluder (bottom). 9. Spring for dust excluder. 10. Tube-<lust excluder (top). II. Washer-thrust. 12. Wa sher-floating thrust.

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13. Trunnion-suspension link. 14. Nut-trunnion to swivel pin . 15. Link-Iower-L.H . front and R.H . rear. 16. Link -Iower-L.H. rear and R.H . front. 17. Pin -fulcrum-lower link. 18. Ring for fulcrum pin. 19. Pin---<:o tt er- fulcrum pin to swivel pin. 20. Nut for cotter. 21. Washer for nut (spring). 22. Bushes (front) for link-swivel pin end . 23. Bushes (rear) for link-swivel pin end . 24. Lubricator.

No. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37.

Description Pin---<:otter-Iink to bushes. Nut for cotter. Lever-steering-L.H. Hub assembly. Stud-wheel. Nut for wheel stud. Bearings for hub (outer). Distance piece for bearing. Bearings for hub (inner). Seal---oil. Washer-bearing ret aining. Nut for swivel axle. Cup-grease-reta ining.

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www.morrisoxford.com

II

THE FRONT SUSPENSION SERVICE TOOLS

18G304. Hub Remover (basic tool) Alternatively, 18G220 may be used.

8151

18G304

18G304B. Adaptor Bolts-* in. UNF. (2) The remover 18G304 is a basic tool used for numerous applications. When used with the adaptor bolts 18G304B screwed onto the wheel studs the most difficult hub can be withdrawn with ease and without damage.

8151

18G304B

Alternatively, 180220A and 180220B may be used (with basic tool 180220).

18G37. Coil Spring Compressor The spring compressor thrust pad is ball-mounted to assist in lining up the spring and spring seat.

9212

18G37

18G56. Front Suspeusion Checking Plate The checking plate has four pegs accurately positioned to enable the lower wishbone arms to be correctly aligned when assembling the front suspension unit.

9167

18G56 Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue I.

25520

KK.9


KI

www.morrisoxford.com

THE FRONT SUSPENSION

18G64. Swivel Axle Bush Reamer-Top For use in conjunction with 18G68.

18G64

18G65. Swivel Axle Bush Reamer-Bottom For use in conjunction with 18G68.

18G65

18G68. Swivel Axle Bush Reamer-Wrench For use with reamers 18G64 and 18G65. The weight has been carefully determined to ensure that the reamer will pass through the bushes during rotation without any undue pressure by the operator.

4347F

18G68

18G85. Swivel Axle Bush Remover and Replacer This tool enables swivel axle bushes to be removed and fitted without the distortion which would occur if an improvised drift were used. The shoulder of the driver is recessed to prevent the split bushes from opening when being pressed into position. The tool should be used with a press.

9271

18G85 K.lO

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 1. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE FRONT SUSPENSION

KK

18G89. Front Suspension Assembly Fixture Designed to serve the dual purpose of accurately assembling a front suspension unit for fitting as a replacement to a vehicle, and also as a means of checking a unit suspected of damage or misalignment. This tool must be used in conjunction with checking plate 18G56.

43HE

18G89

18G89A. Front Suspension Checking Fixture Adaptor For use with 18G89.

18G89A

18G260. Front Hub Bearing Outer Race Remover (basic tool) The outer race of a front hub bearing frequently remains inside the hub when dismantling. This remover with the appropriate adaptor will ensure easy extraction from the hub.

4350C

18G260

18G260C and 18G260D. Front Hub Bearing Outer Race Remover Adaptors For use with basic tool 18G260 to remove the outer race of the outer bearing and the outer race of the inner bearing respectively. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue I.

25520

4349E

18G260C and 18G260D KK.l1


www.morrisoxford.com


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LL

SECTION LL THE HYDRAULIC DAMPERS Section

Description Maintenance Front dampers -removing and replacing . .

LL.3

Rear dampers -removing and replacing ..

LL.4

Testing hydraulic dampers ..

LL.l

Topping up with fluid

LL.2

LL.I


www.morrisoxford.com www.morrisoxford.com THE HYDRAULIC DAMPERS

LL

DES CRIPTIO The hydraulic dampers are Armstrong double-acting, resistance being offered to the compression and to the recoil of the road springs. All the working parts of the dampers are submerged in oil and no adjustment is required or provided for. The dampers are carefully set before dispatch, using special equipment, and any attempt to dismantle the piston assembly will seriously affect the performance of the damper. A faulty damper should be returned to the makers for attention. MAINTENANCE The maintenance of the hydraulic dampers should include a periodical examination of their anchorage to the chassis and axle and tightening the fixing bolts as required. When examining and replenishing the fluid level every 6,000 miles (9600 km.) the filler plugs and surrounding surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned to ensure that no dust or dirt enters the damper interior. Ensure that only Armstrong recommended fluid is used for topping up. While adding fluid the lever arm must be worked through its full stroke to expel any air that may be trapped in the working chamber. Fluid should be added up to the level of the bottom of the filler plug hole. The screws securing the cover-plate must be kept fully tightened to prevent leakage of the fluid.

Section LL.l TESTING H YDRAULIC DAMPERS If there is any doubt that the road springs are adequately damped the condition of the springs and the tyre pressures should also be considered, as these have an appreciable bearing on the results obtained.

Fig. LL.2 A rear damper. Topping-up is best carried out after the damper has been removed from the vehicle

If the hydraulic dampers do not appear to function satisfactorily an indication of their resistance can be obtained by carrying out the following check. Remove the dampers from the car. Hold them in a vice and move the lever arm up and down through its complete stroke. A moderate resistance throughout the full stroke should be felt; if, however, the resistance is erratic, or free movement in the lever is noted, lack of fluid is indicated, or there may be air in front of the piston. The free movement should not exceed i in. (3 mm.) at the outer end of the arm. If the addition of fluid (added to the level given in 'MAINTENANCE') and working the arm over its full range of travel a number of times give no improvement a new damper should be fitted. Too much resistance, i.e. when it is not possible to move the lever arm slowly by hand, indicates a broken internal part or a seized piston; in such cases the damper should be changed for a new or reconditioned one.

Section LL.2 TOPPIN G UP WITH FLUID

5H2w

Fig. LL.I A fro nt damper. The arrow indicates the damper fi ller plug LL.2

The front dampers may be replenished in position, provided the tops have been thoroughly cleaned to ensure that when the filler plug is extracted no dirt falls into the filler orifice. This is most important, as it is absolutely vital that no dirt or foreign matt er should enter the operatin g chamber. The rear dampers must be removed from the vehicle as described in Section LL.4. The use of Armstrong Super (Thin) Shock Absorber Fluid in th e Armstrong dampers is recommended. (If this fluid is not available any good-quality mineral oil to Specification S.A.E. 20/20W should be used, but this alte rnative is not suitable for low-temperature operation.) Fluid should be added to the level of the bottom of the filler plug hole.


www.morrisoxford.com THE HYDRAULIC DAMPERS When fluid has been added the damper arm shou ld be worked throughout its full stroke before the filler plug is replaced to expel any air that might be present in the operating chamber.

Section LL.3 REMO VING AND REPLACING A FRONT DAMP ER

Raise the front of the car and remove the road wheel. Place a stand beneath the front body cross-member to support the car in the unlikely event of the jack slipping. Place a further jack beneath the outer end of the lower wishbone arm and raise it until the damper arms are clear of their rebound rubbers on the top of the wishbone arms. Extract the cotter pin and castellated nut from the upper trunnion fulcrum pin and take out the pin. On removing the four set screws and spring washers the damper may be removed from its mounting on the front suspension cross-member assembly. When handling dampers that have been removed from the car it is essential to keep the assemblies upright as far as possible, otherwise air may enter the operating chamber, resulting in free movement.

LL

Replacement is a reversal of the removing procedure, but before fitting the upper trunnion fulcrum pin, work the damper arms a few times through their full travel to expel any air which may have found its way into the operating chamber.

Section LL.4 REMOVI NG AND REPLACING A REAR DAMPER

To remove a rear damper unscrew and remove the nut securing the damper arm link to the spring bracket. Remove the two bolts, nuts, and spring washers securing the damper to the bracket on the body frame. When handling dampers that have been removed from the vehicle for any purpose it is important to keep the assemblies upright as far as possible, otherwise air may enter the operating chamber, resulting in free movement. Replacement of the dampers is carried out in the reverse way to the above procedure. Before fitting the damper arm link to the chassis it is advisable to work the damper arm through its full range of movement to expel any air which may have found its way into the operating chamber.

LL.3


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MM

SECTION MM THE BRAKING SYSTEM Section

Description Maintenance Bleeding the system

MM .?

Brake-shoes Adjusting

MM.I

Removing and replacing

MM.3

Braking irregularities

MM.9

Flexible hose-removing

MM.6

Hand brake ..

MM.8

Master cylinder

MM.2 End of Section

Tools-service Wheel cylinders Dismantling and assembling

MM.5

Removing and replacing

MM.4

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29549

MM.l


www.morrisoxford.com www.morrisoxford.com THE BRAKING SYSTEM

MM DES CRIPTION

The brakes on all four wheels are hydraulically operated by a foot pedal directly coupled to a master cylinder in which the hydraulic pressure of the brake operating fluid is originated. A supply tank on the master cylinder provides a reservoir. Steel pipe lines, flexible hoses, and unions interconnect the master and wheel cylinders. The pressure generated in the master cylinder is transmitted with equal and undiminished force to all wheel cylinders simultaneously. This moves each wheel cylinder piston outwards, expanding the brake-shoes and thus producing automatic equalization and efficiency in direct proportion to the effort supplied at the pedal. In the rear drums a single wheel cylinder operated both hydraulically and mechanically floats on the backplate and operates the brake-shoes, giving one leading shoe and one trailing shoe in each direction of rotation, and provides adequate braking in reverse. The hand brake is mounted between the end of the seat and the door on the driver's side. It is of the conventional ratchet and pawl type , operating on the rear wheels only by means of cables, a compensator mounted on the rear axle, and transverse cables to the wheel cylinder levers. Brake-shoes-front Two leading shoes in each front assembly are expanded by individual, single-acting hydraulic cylinders connected by tubing and bolted to the backplate. Each shoe pivots and slides on one of the cylinders with its opposite end in contact with the piston of the cylinder diametrically opposite. Two pull-off springs are fitted, each connected from one shoe to the backplate. An adjuster controls the movement of each shoe without interfering with its normal braking function.

Fig. MM.2 A rear brake assembly (early type)

Brake-shoes- rear Two shoes, one leading and one trailing, are expanded in each assembly by a single-acting hydraulic cylinder and piston assembly floating on the backplate. Two springs are fitted and connected between the shoes. The shoes are not fixed but are able to slide on their abutments and centralize in the drum. At the cylinder end the leading shoe is located in a slot in the piston while the trailing shoe rests in a slot formed in the cylinder body; at the a djuster ends they rest in slots in the adjuster links . The shoes are supported by steady pins and anti-rattle springs. Inclined inner faces on the adjuster link s bear on the inclined faces of the adjuster wedge, which has a finely threaded spindle and a squared end projecting through the backplate. Rotating the spindle therefore will expand the shoes or allow them to come together under the influence of the return springs. The hand brake lever is pivoted in the cylinder body, and when operated the lever tip expands the leading shoe independently of the hydraulic piston and the pivot moves the cylinder body to apply the trailing shoe. MAINTENANCE

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Fig. MM.l A front brake assembly (early type)

MM .2

Periodically check the level of the fluid in the master cylinder reservoir and maintain it about three-quarters full by the addition of Girling Crimson Brake Fluid. If this fluid is not available an alternative fluid conforming to Specification S.A.E. 70.RI should be used. The necessity for frequent topping up is an indication of a leak in the system which should be immediately traced and rectified. Adjust the brake-shoes to compensate for wear of the linings. The need for this is shown by excessive movement of the pedal before solid resistance is felt. For brake-shoe adjustments see Section MM. I. Adjustment of the shoes in the manner indicated also automatically adjusts the hand brake, and no separate adjustment is required. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29549


www.morrisoxford.com THE BRAKING SYSTEM

MM

Removal Disconnect the pressure pipe union from the cylinder an d remove the clevis pin from the yoke. Remove the two screws and spring washers fr om the master cylinder mounting flange. The master cylinder may now be withdrawn from the vehicle.

Fig. MM.3 A f ront brake. The arrows indicate the brake -shoe adjusters

IMPORTANT.-Always exercise extreme cleanliness when dealing with any part of the hydraulic system. Do not handle any rubber or internal parts with greasy hands or greas y rags, and clean all par ts with the recommended brake fluid from clean containers ; do not use a container tha t has been washed with trichlor-ethylene. Examine all seals, hoses, and other par ts for damage when overhauling the system and renew any damaged or unserviceable component. Do not refill the reservoir with dirt y fluid when bleeding the system ; use new fluid from a sealed container. Do not allow par affin, petrol , or trichloroethylene to contact any part of the system.

Dismantling Pu ll back the dust cover and remove the circlip; the push-rod and dished washer can then be removed. Remove the plunger assembly complete. Lift the thimble leaf over the shouldered end of the plunger (Fig . MM.5). Depress the plunger return spring to allow the valve stem to slide through the elongated hole of the thimble and release the spring tension. Remove the thimble, spring, and valve complete; detach the valve spacer, taking care of the spacer spring washer located under the valve head. Remove the seal from the valve head . NOTE . Later models incorporate an additional taper seal on the piston. Examine all parts for wear and distortion and renew where necessary. Use only clean Girling Brake Fluid for cleaning. Assembly Assembly is mainly a reversal of the dismantling procedure, but note the following. Make sure that the flat side of the valve seal is correctly seated on the valve head.

Section MM.! ADJUSTING THE BRAKE-SHOES Front Jack up the wheel or wheels requiring adjustment. Turn one of the squared adjuster screws on the backplate in a clockwise direction until the drum is locked against rotation and then slacken off just enough to free the drum (two 'clicks'). Repeat the adjustment with the other shoe.

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Rear Jack up the wheel or wheels to be adjusted. Rotate the squared adjuster screw in a clockwise dir ection until the dru m is locked and then slacken off enough to free the drum (two 'clicks').

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Fig. MMA The master cylinder components

Section MM.2 MASTER CYLINDE R Girling type C.V. with integral supply tank. The inner assembly consists of a push-rod, dished washer, circlip, plunger, seal, spring thimble, plunger return spring, valve spacer, spring washer, valve stem, and valve seal. A rubber dust cover protects the open end of the cylinder. Morris Oxford (Series V).

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Issue 3. 29549

1. Master cylinder body. 2. Plunger. 3. Plunger seal. 4. Spring thimble. 5. Spring. 6. Valve spacer. 7. Spring washer. 8. Valve stem. 9. Valve seal.

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Push-rod. Retaining washer. Circlip. Dust cover. Outlet. Cap washer. Filler cap. Air vent.

MM.3


www.morrisoxford.com THE BRAKING SYSTEM

MM

Locate the spring washer with the domed side agai nst the under side of the valve head. The legs of the valve spacer must face towards the valve seal. Replace the plunger return spring centrally on the spacer, insert the spring, and depress until the valve stem engages through the elongated hole of the thimble. Make sure the stem is correctly located in the centre of the thimble. Check that the spring is still central on the spacer. Fit the plunger seal with the flat of the seal against the face of the plunger. Insert the reduced end of the plunger into the thimble until the thimble leaf engages under the shoulder of the plunger; press home the leaf (Fig. MM.5). Smear the assembly with the reconunended fluid and insert the assembly into the cylinder bore. Do not damage the seal as it is pushed into position. Refit the push-rod, circlip, and rubber dust-cover.

Section MM.3

If replacement brake-shoes are fitted or if there is any sign of uneven wear across the surface of the linings it will be necessary to adjust the steady posts. Slacken the locknut at the rear of the backplate and unscrew the post about three or four turns. Apply the brakes hard and then rotate the post in a clockwise direction until it contacts the shoe web; hold the post and tighten the locknut. Rear Jack up and remove the wheel and brake-drum; it may be necessary to slacken off all the adjustment in order to fit replacement shoes. ote that the lining of the leading shoe is fitted towards the trailing end and that of the trailing shoe towards the leading end. Both springs are connected between the shoes, the lighter spring at the wheel cylinder ends. Before fitting the shoes lightly smear the steady posts and both ends of the shoes with Girling White Brake Grease, but take care to keep all grease from the rubber pa rts and pistons, and from the linings. Fit the shoes and drum and adjust as detailed in Section MM.!.

REMOVING AND REPLACING BRAKE-SHOES Front Jack up and remove the wheel and brake-drum. Remove the anti-rattle springs and take out the steady pins from the rear of the backplate. Lift the trailing end of a shoe from the abutment on the wheel cylinder and the leading end from the piston of the opposite cylinder; detach the spring and shoe. Repeat with the other shoe. Prevent the pistons from falling out of the cylinders by the use of rubber bands or wire. Before refitting the shoes lightly smea r the steady posts an d both ends of the shoes with Girling White Bra ke Grease, but take care to keep all grease from the rubber parts and pistons, and from the linings . Fit the shoes. The shorter hook of each spring must be connected to a brake-shoe. Refit the anti -rattle springs. Fit the brake-drum an d adjust as detailed in Section MM.!.

Fig. MM.5 The master cylinder. The arrow indicates the thimble leaf MM.4

Section MM.4 REMOVI G AD REPLACI G A WHEEL eYLI DER Front Jack up and remove the wheel, drum, and shoes Disconnect the bridge pipe unions from the cylinder. Unscrew the two securing nuts and remove the cylinder(s). When refitt ing, tighten the wheel cylinder nu ts to a torque wrench reading of 5 to 7路5Ib. ft. ('69 to 1路03 kg. m.). After refitting bleed the brakes. Rear Jack up the wheel and remove the wheel, drum, and shoes. Disconnect the pipe from the union, the cable at the han d brake lever, an d remove the rubber boot from the rea r of the backplate. With a screwdriver prise the retainer and spring plates apart an d tap the reta ining plate fro m below the neck of the wheel cylinder. Withdraw the hand brake lever from between the backplate and wheel cylinder. Remove the spring plate and distance pieces, and finally the cylinder from the backplate. To refit, smear the backplate and cylinder with Girling White Brake Grease and mount the cylinder onto the backplate with the neck through the large slot. Replace the distance piece between the cylinder neck and the backplate with the open end away from the hand brake location; the two cranked lips must also be away from the backplate. Replace the hand brake lever. Locate the retaining plate between the distance piece and the spring plate Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29549


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2. Bolt-backplate to axle case

17. Spring.

3. Nut for bolt.

18. Piston.

4. Washer for bolt (spring).

19. Seal for piston.

5. Brake-shoe assembly.

20. Cover (dust) for piston.

6. Liner.

21. Retainer for dust cover.

7. Spring-shoe return-cylinder end.

22. Screw-bleeder.

8. Spring-shoe return-adjuster end.

23. Cover (dust) for bleed screw.

9. Pin-brake-shoe steady.

24. Spring-retaining-wheel cylinder.

10. Spring-brake-shoe steady,

25. Plate-locking.

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26. Washer-distance.

Adjuster assembly.

12. Tappet.

27. Cover-dust-wheel cylinder to backplate.

13. Wedge.

28. Lever assembly-hand brake.

14. Nut-adjuster to backplate.

29. Drum-brake.

IS. Washer for nut (shakeproof).

30. Screw-drum to brake.

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Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

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13. Cylinder assembly-wheel-R.H.

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15. Seal. 16. Spring.

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18. Screw-wheel cylinder to brake-plate

7. Shoe assembly-brake.

19. Screw-bleed.

8. Liner.

20. Cover (dust) for bleed screw.

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Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE BRAKING SYSTEM

MM

Section MM.7 BLEEDING THE SYSTEM (Expelling Air)

Fig. MM.6 Front brake assembly details (drawn out of position for clarity) (open end towards the hand brake lever) and tap into position until the two cranked lips of the spring plate locate in the retaining plate. Fit the rubber cover. Connect the pipe to the union and the cable to the hand brake lever. Replace the shoes, drum, and wheel. Bleed and adjust the brakes.

Section MM.5 DISMANTLING AND ASSEMBLING A WHEEL CYLINDER Front Remove the cylinder as detailed in Section MM.4. Remove the rubber dust cover; withdraw the piston seal, spreader, and spring; use air pressure to extract the remaining components from the cylinder.

Bleeding the system is not a routine maintenance job, and should only be necessary when some portion of the hydraulic equipment has been disconnected or the fluid drained off, or if the fluid has been allowed to fall so low that air has entered the master cylinder. Fill the master cylinder with Girling Crimson Brake Fluid (if this fluid is not available an alternative fluid conforming to Specification S.A .E. 70.R I sho uld be used ) and keep it at least half-full throu ghout the operation, otherwise air will be drawn into the system , necessitating a fresh start. Attach the bleeder tube to the wheel cylinder bleeder screw and allow the free end of the tube to be submerged in a small quantity of fluid in a clean glass jar. Open the bleeder screw one full turn. Depress the brake pedal slowly , and allow it to return without assistance. Repeat this pumping action with a slight pause before each depression of the pedal. Watch the flow of fluid into the glass jar, and when air bubbles cease to appear hold the pedal firmly against the floorboards while the bleeder screw is securely tightened. Tighten the bleeder screws to a torque wrench reading of 5 to 7路5 lb. ft. (,69 to 1路03 kg. m.). Repeat the operation on each wheel. After bleeding top up the master cylinder to its correct level. NOTE.-Clean fluid bled from the system must be allowed to stand until it is clear of air bubbles before it is used again. Dirty fluid should be discarded.

Rear Remove the cylinder as detailed in Section MM.4. Remove the spring clip and rubber dust cover. Blowout the piston and seal. Replacement in both front and rear cylinders is a reversal of the dismantling procedure.

Section MM.6 REMOVING A FLEXIBLE HOSE Do not attempt to relea se a flexible hose by turning either end with a spanner; it should be removed as follows. Unscrew the metal pipe line union nut from its connection to the hose. Hold the hexagon on the flexible hose and remove the locknut securing the flexible hose union to the bracket. Unscrew the flexible hose from the cylinder. Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 30713

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Fig. MM.7 Rear brake assembly details (drawn out of position for clarity) MM.7


www.morrisoxford.com THE BRAKING SYSTEM

MM Section MM.8 HAND BRAKE

The hand brake operates the rear brake-shoes through cables, a compensator mounted on the rear axle, and transverse cables to the wheel cylinder levers. Do not attempt to adjust the brakes by interfering with the cables. Slackness in the hand brake mechanism may be removed as follows: (l) Adjust the brake-shoes as detailed in Section MM.I. (2) A cable adjusting nut and a locknut are fitted to the front end of the brake cable assembly. Pull the hand brake up three or four notches, hold the flats on the end of the cable assembly , slacken the locknut and turn the adjusting nut until the rear brakes are hard on. NOTE.-Under no circumstances must the cable be allowed to twist during adjustment. (3) Check that the drums are free to rotate when the hand brake is off. Tighten the adjuster locknut after the correct setting has been obtained.

Section MM.9 travel excessive (requires pumping) Brake-shoes require adjusting. Leak at one or more joints. .' Master cylinder cup worn.

Pedal (l) (2) (3) (4)

feels springy System requires bleeding. Linings not bedded in. Master cylinder fixing loose. Master cylinder cup worn.

Brakes grab (1) Shoes require adjusting. (2) Drums distorted. (3) Greasy linings. (4) Broken or loose road spring. (5) Scored drums. (6) Worn suspension linkage. Brakes drag (1) Shoes incorrectly adjusted. (2) Shoe springs weak or broken. (3) Pedal spring weak or broken. (4) Hand brake mechanism seized. (5) Wheel cylinder piston seized. (6) Blocked pipe line. (7) Filler cap vent hole choked. Brakes remain on (I) Shoes over-adjusted. (2) Hand brake over-adjusted. (3) Compressor port in master cylinder covered by swollen rubber cup, or incorrect adjustment of push-rod. (4) Swollen wheel cylinder cups. (5) Choked flexible hose.

BRAKING ffiREGULARITIES Pedal (l) (2) (3)

(3) Linings greasy. (4) Linings wrong quality. (5) Drums badly scored. (6) Linings badly worn. (7) Wrongly fitted cup fillers.

Unbalanced braking (I) Greasy linings. (2) Distorted drums. (3) Tyres unevenly inflated. (4) Brake-plate loose on the axle. (5) Worn steering connections. (6) Worn suspension linkage. (7) Different types or grades of lining fitted.

Brakes inefficient (l) Shoes not correctly adjusted. (2) Linings not bedded in.

SERVICE TOOLS

18G546. Brake Adjusting Wrench This small wrench is designed to facilitate turning the squared adjusters of the front and rear brakes. 18G546

MM.8

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 30713


www.morrisoxford.com

N

SECTION N THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Section Description N.! and N.I2

Battery maintenance

N.9

Control box .. Modified control box

N.14

Dynamo

N .2 and N.1 3

Dismantling

'.

NA

Removing and replacing

N.3

Servicing

N.S

Location and remedy of faults

N.II

Starter

N.6

Removing and replacing

N.7

Servicing

N.8

N.lO

Windshield wiper

For additional information see Section NN

F

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

N.t


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT DES CRIPTION The 12-volt electrical equipment incorporates compensated voltage control for the charging circuit. The positive earth system of wiring is employed. Battery details may be found in ' GENERAL DATA' . The dynamo is mounted on the right of the cylinder block and driven by endless belt from the crankshaft pulley. A rotatable mounting enables the belt tension to be adjusted. The voltage control unit adjustment is sealed and should not normally require attention. The fuses are carried in external holders mounted in an accessible position on the engine bulkhead together with spare fuses. The starter motor is mounted on the flywheel housing on the right-hand side of the engine unit and operates on the flywheel through the usual sliding pinion device . The head lamps employ the double-filament dipping system. Both lamps are fitted with double-filament bulbs, both dipping either vertically or to the left according to the regulations existing in the country concerned.

Section N.] BATTERY MAINTENANCE In order to keep the battery in good condition a periodical inspection must be made: the cell spec ific gravity should be checked and the electrolyte should be topped up if necessary. Topping up Remove the filler plug from each cell and examine the level of the electrolyte. Add distilled water as required to bring the level of the electrolyte in each cell just above the separators. OTE.-Do not use tap-water and do not use a naked light when exa mining the condition of the cells. Wipe away all dirt and moisture from the top of the batte ry. Testing the condition of the battery Every 1,000 miles (I 600 km.) examine the condition of the battery by taking hydrometer readings. There is no better way of asce rtaining the state of charge of a battery. The hydrometer contains a graduated float on whic h is indicated the specific gravity of the acid in the cell from which the same is taken. The specific gravity readings and their indications are as follows : Climates normally below 90° F. (32° C) 1·270 to 1·290 Cell fully charged. 1·190 to 1·210 Cell about half-discharged. 1·110 to 1·130 Cell completely discharged. Climates frequently above 90° F. (32° C) 1·210 to 1·230 Cell fully charged . 1·130 to 1·150 Cell about half-discharged. 1·050 to 1·070 Cell completely discharged . These figures are given assuming an electrolyte temperature of 60° F. (16° C.). If the temperature of the electrolyte exceeds this ·002 must be added to hydrometer N.2

readings for each 5° F . rise to give the true specific gravity. Simila rly ·002 must be subtracted from hydromete r rea dings for every 5° F. below 60° F. The readings of all the cells should be approximately the same. If one cell gives a rea ding very different from the rest it may be tha t the elect rolyte has been spilled or has leaked from the cell or there may be an internal fault. In this case it is advisable to have the battery examined by a battery specialist. Should a battery be in a low state of charge, it should be recharged by taking the car for a long daytime run or by charging from an external source of D .C. supply at a current rate of 4 amps. (5 amps. for nine-plate batteries) until the cells are gassing freely. After examining the battery check the vent plugs, making sure that the air passages are clear, and screw the plugs into position. Wipe the top of the battery to remove all dirt and moisture. Storage If a battery is to be out of use for any length of time it should first be fully charged and then given a freshening charge about every fortnight. A battery must neve r be allowed to remain in a discharged co ndition as this will ca use the plates to become sulphated. Initial filling and chargin g The specific gravity of the electrolyte necessary to fill a new battery which has been supplied dry and uncharged (for dry-charged batteries see Section .12) and the specific gravity at the end of the charge are as follows: S.C. of SiG. at end filling acid of charge Climate (corrected to 60° F. [16° C]) Normally below 90° F. (32° C.) 1·270 1·270 to 1·290 Frequently over 90° F. (32° C.) 1·210 1·210 to 1·230 The electrolyte is prepared by mixing distilled water and concentrated sulphuric acid 1·835 S.G. The mixing must be carried out in a lead-lined tank or a suitable glass or earthenware vessel. Steel or iron containers must not be used. The acid must be added slowly to the water while the mixture is stirred with a glass rod. Never add the water to the acid, as the severity of the resu lting chemical reaction may give dangerous con sequences. Heat is produced by the mixture of acid and water, and electrolyte should, therefore, be allowed to cool before it is poured into the battery, otherwise the plates, separators, and moulded container may be damaged. The temperature of the filling-in acid, battery, and charging room should be above 32° F. (0° C.). To produce electrolyte of the correct specific gravity: Add I part by volume of To obtain specific gravity ),835 S.C. acid to distilled water by volume as below (corrected to 60° F. [16° 1·270 2·8 parts ),210 4·0 parts

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Carefully break the seals in the filling holes a nd halfMorris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT fill each cell in the battery with dilute sulphuric acid solution of the appropriate specific gravity (according to temperature) (see table above). The quantity of electrolyte required to half-fill a two-volt cell is i pint (,2 15 litre) or 1 pint (,28 litre) for nine-plate batteries. Allow to stand for at least six hours, then complete the filling of the cells by the addition of more diluted acid of the same specific gravity as before until the level reaches the bottom of the filling holes, and allow the battery to stand for at least another two hours before commencing the first charge. Charge at a constant current of 2·5 amps. (3'5 amps. for nine-plate batteries) until the voltage and temperaturecorrected specific gravity readings show no increase ove r five successive hourly rea dings. This period is dependent upon the length of time the battery has been stored since manufacture, and will be from 40 to 80 hours, but usually not more than 60. Throughout the charge the acid must be kept level with the tops of the separators in each cell by the addition of acid solution of the same specific gravity as the original filling-in acid. If, during charge, the temperature of the acid in any cell of the battery reaches the maximum permissible temperatur e (for climates normally below 90° F. [32° C] the maximum permissible temperature is 100° F. [37,7° C] whilst for climates frequently above 90° F. [32° C] the maximum permissible temperature is 120° F. [48,8 ° Cn , the charge must be interrupted and the battery temperature allowed to fall at least 10° F. (5'5 ° C.) before charging is resumed. At the end of the first charge, i.e. when specific gravity and voltage measurements remain substantially constant, carefully check the specific gravity in each cell to ensure that it lies within the limits specified. If any cell requires adjustment the electrolyte above the plates must be siphoned off and replaced either with acid of the strength used for the original filling in, or distilled water, according to whether the specific gravity is too low or too high respec tively. After such adjustment the gassing charge should be continued for one or two hours to ensure adequate mixing of the electrolyte. Re-check, if necessary, repeating the procedure until the desired result is obtained.

Section N.2

N

and all three bolts sho uld then be tightened firmly. (2) Check that the dynamo and control box are connected correctly. The dynamo terminal '0' should be connected to the control box termina l '0' and the dynamo terminal ' F' connected to the control box terminal 'F'. (3) After switching off all lights and accessories disconnect the cables from the dynamo terminals marked '0' and 'F' respectively. (4) Connect the two terminals with a short length of wire. (5) Start the engine and set to run at normal idling speed. (6) Clip the negative lead of a moving-coil-type voltmeter, cali brated 0-20 volts, to one dynamo Terminal and the other lead to a good earth.ing point on the dynamo yoke. (7) G rad ually increase the engine speed, when the voltmeter reading should rise rapidly and without fluctuation. Do not allow the voltmeter reading to reach 20 volts . Do not race the engine in an attempt to increase the voltage. It is sufficient to run the dynamo up to a speed of 1,000 r.p.m. If There is no reading check the brush gear. If the read ing is low (approximately 1 volt) the field winding may be faulty. If the reading is approximately 5 volts the armature winding may be faulty. If the dynamo is in good order leave the temporary link in pos ition between the terminals and restore the original connections, taking care to connect the dynamo terminal '0' to The control box terminal ' 0' and the dynamo terminal 'F' to the control box terminal 'F'. Remove the lead from the ' D' terminal on the control box and connect the voltmeter between this cable and a good earthing po int on the vehicle. Run the en gine as before. The reading should be the same as that measured directly on the dynamo. No reading on the voltmeter indicates a break in the cable to the dynamo. Carry out the same procedure for the 'F' terminal, connecting the voltmeter between cable and earth. Finally, remove the link from the dynamo. If the reading is correct test the control box (Section N .9).

Section N.3 DYNA MO

To test on vehicle when dynamo is not charging (I) Make sure that belt slip is not the cause of the tro uble . It should be possible to deflect the belt app roximately! in. (13 mm.) at the centre of its lo ngest run between two pulleys with moderate hand pressure. If the belt is too slack tightening is effected by slackening the two dynamo suspension bolts and the bolts of the slotted adjustment link. A gentle pull on the dynamo outwards will enable the correct tension to be applied to the belt Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

REMOVI NG AND REPLA CI NG T HE DY NAMO To remove the dynamo disconnect the dynamo leads from the dynamo terminals. Slacken all four attachment bolts and pivot the dynamo towards the cylinder block to enable the fan belt to be removed from the dynamo pulley. The dynamo can then be removed by completely removing the two upper and one lower attachment bolts. Replacement of the dynamo is an exact reversal of this proced ure. N.3


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

Section N.4

Brushes are preformed, so th at bedding to the commutator is unnecessary.

DISMANTLI NG TH E DYNAMO Remove the securing nut and take off the drive pulley. Remove the Woodruff key from the commutator shaft. Unscrew and remove the two through-bolts and take off the commutator end bracket. The driving end bracket together with the armature and its ball bearing, can now be lifted out of the yoke. Unless the ball bearing is damaged or requires attention it need not be removed from the armature. Should it be necessary to remove the bearing, the armature must be separated from the end bracket by means of a hand press. Reassembly of the dynamo is a reversal of the dismantling procedure except that when assembling the commutator end bracket the brushes must first be held clear of the commutator by partially withdrawing them from their boxes until each brush is trapped in position by the side pressure of its spring. The brushes can be released onto the commutator by a small screwdriver or similar tool when the end bracket is assembled to within about tin. (12'7 mm.) of the yoke . Before closing the gap between the end bracket and the yoke see that the springs are in correct contact with the brushes.

Section N.S SERVICING THE DYNAMO Brushes Test if the brushes are sticking. Clean them with petrol and, if necessary, ease the sides by lightly polishing with a smooth file. Replace the brushes in their original positions. Test the brush spring tension with a spring scale if available. The correct tension is 20 to 25 oz. (567 to 709 gm.). Fit a new spring if the tension is low. If the brushes are worn so that the flexible lead is exposed on the running face new brushes must be fitted.

12

Commutator A commutator in good condition will be smooth and free from pits or burned spots. Clean the commutator with a petrol-moistened cloth. If this is ineffective carefully po lish with a strip of fine glass-paper while ro tating the armature. To remedy a badly worn commutator mount the armature (with or without the drive end bracket) in a lathe, rotate at high speed, and take a light cut with a very sharp tool. Do not remove more metal than is necessary. Polish the commutator with very fine glass-paper. Undercut the mica insulation between the segments to a depth of ~ in. ('8 mm.) with a hacksaw blade ground down to the thickness of the mica . Field coils Test the field coils, without removing them fro.n the dynamo yoke, by means of an ohmmeter. T he reading on the ohmmeter should be between 6路0 and 6路3 ohms. If this is no t avai lable connect a 12-volt D.C. supply with an ammeter in series between the field terminal and the dynamo yoke. The ammeter reading should be approximately 2 amps. If no reading is indicated the field coils are open-circuited and must be renewed. To test for earthed field coils unsolder the end of the field winding from the earth terminal on the dynamo yoke and, with a test lamp connected from supply mains, test across the field terminal and earth. If the lamp lights the field coils are earthed and must be renewed. When fitting field coils carry ou t the procedure outlined below, using an expander and wheel-operated screwdriver: (1) Remove the insulation piece which is provided to prevent the junction of the field coils from connecting the yoke.

13

I

'

i

14

15

16

9 138 E

17

Fig. N.l The windowless yoke dynamo Felt pad. Aluminium disc . 3. Bronze bush. ~ Fibre washer. 5. Commutator. 6. Field coils.

I. 2.

NA

Armature. Shaft key. Bearing. 10. Felt washer. 11. O il-reta ining washer. 12. Commutato r end bracket. 7. 8. 9.

13.

14. 15. 16. 17.

Field terminal post. Bearing retaining plate. Cup washer. Corrugated washer. Driving end bracket.

Mo rris Oxfor d (Series V).

Issue 2.

25520


www.morrisoxford.com

THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT INSULATOR

-.

SEGMENTS

RIGHT WAY

INSULATOR

WRONG WAY

1452

Fig. N.2 The correct method of undercutting the dynamo commutator (2) Mark the yoke and pole-shoes in order that they can be refitted in their original positions. (3) Un screw the two pole-shoe retaining screws by means of the wheel-operated screwdriver. (4) Draw the pole-shoes and coils out of the dynamo yoke and lift off the coils. (5) Fit the new field coils over the pole-shoes and place them in position inside the yoke. Take care to ensure that the tapping of the field coils is not trapped between the pole-shoes and the yoke. (6) Locate the pole-shoes and field coils by lightly tightening the fixing screw. (7) Insert the pole-shoe expander, open it to the fullest extent, and tighten the screws. (8) Finally, tighten the screws by means of the wheeloperated screwdriver and lock them by caulking. (9) Replace the insulation piece between the field coil connections and the yoke. Armature The testing of the armature winding requires the use of a voltage drop-test and growler. If these are not available the armature should be checked by substitution. No attempt should be made to machine the armature core or to true a distorted armature shaft. Bearings Bearings which are worn to such an extent that the y will allow side-movement of the armature shaft must be replaced by new ones. To fit a new bearing at the commutator end of the dynamo proceed as follows : (I) Press the bearing bush out of the commutator end bracket. (2) Pre ss the new bearing bush into the end bracket, using a shouldered mandrel of the same diameter as the shaft which is to fit in the bearing. Before fitting the new bearing bush allow it to stand completely immersed in thin engine oil for 24 hours to fill the pores of the bush with lubricant. The ball bearing at the driving end is renewed as follows: (I) Knock out the rivets which secure the bearing retaining plate to the end bracket and remove the plate. (2) Press the bearing out of the end bracket and remove the corrugated washer, felt washer, and oilretaining washer. (3) Before fitting the replacement bearing see that it is clean and pack it with a high-melting-point grease. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

N

(4) Place the oil-retaining washer, felt washer, and corrugated washer in the bearing housing in the end bracket. (5) Locate the bearing in the housing and press it home by means of a hand press. (6) Fit the bearing retaining plate. Insert the new rivets from the inside of the end bracket and open the rivets by means of a punch to secure the plate rigidly in position. Reassembly The reassembly of the dynamo is a reversal of the operations described in Section N.4. If the end bracket has been removed from the armature in dismantling, press the bearing end bracket onto the armature shaft, taking care to avoid damaging the end plate and armature winding. Add a few drops of oil through the hole in the armature end cover.

Section N.6 STARTER To test un vehicle Switch on the lamps and op erate the starter control. If the lights go dim , but the starter is not heard to operate, an indication is given that current is flowing through the starter windings but that the starter pinion is meshed permanently with the geared ring on the flywheel. This was probably caused by the starter being operated while the engine was still running. In this case the starter must be removed from the engin e for examination.

Fig. N.3 The method of pressing in the commutator end bracket bush is shown in this illustration 1. Shouldered mandrel. 2. Hand press.

3. Bearing bush. 4. Support block.

N.5


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELE CTRICAL EQUIP MENT Should the lamps retain their full brilliance when the starter switch is operated, check that the switch is functioning. If the switch is in order examine the connections at the battery, starter switch, and starter, and also check the wiring between these units. Continued failure of the starter to operate indicates an internal fault, and the starter must be removed from the engine for examination. Sluggish or slow action of the starter is usually caused by a poor connection in the wiring which produces a high resistance in the starter circuit. Check as described above. Damage to the starter drive is indicated if the starter is heard to operate but does not crank the engine.

Section N.7 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE STA RTER Release the starter cable from the terminal and unscrew the two starter securing bolts. Maneeuvre the starter forwards below the oil filter, then rearwards and upwards. Replacement is a reversal of this procedure.

Hold back each of the brush springs (7) (Fig. NA) and move the brush by pulling gently on its flexible connector. If the movement is sluggish remove the brush from its holder and ease the sides by lightly polishing with a smooth file. Always replace brushes in their original positions. If the brushes are worn so that they no longer bear on the commutator, or if the brush flexible lead has become exposed on the running face. they must be renewed. If the commutator is blackened or dirty clean it by holding a petrol-moistened cloth against it while the armature is rotated. Secure the body of the starter in a vice and test by connecting it with heavy-gauge cables to a battery of the correct voltage. One cable must be connected to the starter terminal and the other held against the starter body or end bracket. Under these light load conditions the starter should run at a very high speed. If the operation of the starter is still unsatisfactory the starter should be dismantled for detailed inspection and testing. Dismantling Take off the cover band (3) (Fig. NA) at the commutator end, hold back the brush springs (7) (Fig. NA), and take out the brushes (8) (Fig. NA) from their holders. Withdraw the jump ring and shims from the armature shalt at the commutator end and remove the armature complete with drive from the commutator end bracket and starter frame.

Section N.S SERVIC L~G

THE STA RTE R

Examination of commutator and brush gear Remove the starter cover band (3) (Fig. NA) and examine the brushes (8) (Fig. NA) and the commutator.

10

II

12

13

14

\

174 6 C

15

Fig. NA All exploded I'iew of the star ter and drive I.

Terminal nuts and washers.

2. Through-bolt. 3. Cover band. 4. Terminal post. 5. Bearing bush.

N.ÂŁ'

6. 7.

Bearing bush. Brush spring. 8. Brushes. 9. Sleeve. 10. Restraining spring.

Control nut. 12. Retaining ring. 13. Main spring. 14. Shaft nut. 15. Cotter pin . II.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2.

25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Remove the terminal nuts and washers (I) from the terminal post (4) at the commutator end bracket and also withdraw the two through-boits. Remove the commutator end bracket and the attachment bracket from the starter frame. Brushes (I) Test the brush springs with a spring scale. The correct tension is 30 to 40 oz. (850 to 1134 gm.) . Fit a new spring if the tension is low. (2) If the brushes are worn so that they no longer bear on the commutator, or if the flexible connector has become exposed on the running face, they must be renewed. Two of the brushes are connected to terminal eyelets attached to the brush boxes on the commutator end bracket. The other two brushes (Fig. NA) are connected to tappings on the field coils. The flexible connectors must be removed by unso ldering and the connectors of the new brushes secured in place by soldering. The brushes are preformed, so that bedding of the working face to the commutator is unnecessary. Dri ve If the pinion is tight on the sleeve wash in paraffin; renew any worn or damaged parts. To dismantle the drive extract the split pin and remove the shaft nut ( 14) (Fig. N.4); withdraw the main spring an d co llar. Ro tate the barrel to push out the sleeve; remove the barrel and pinion. The barrel and pinion are supplied as an assembly but the parts may be separated by extracting the retaining ring ( 12). NOTE.- Should either the control nut or screwed sleeve be dam aged, a replacement assembly, consisting of a scr ewed sleeve and control nut, must be fitted. These components must not be fitted individually. Commutator A commutator in good condition will be smooth and free from pits and burned spots. Clean the commutator with a cloth moistened with petrol. If this is ineffective carefully po lish with a strip of fine glass-paper while rotating the armature. To remedy a badly worn commutator dismantle the starter drive as described above and remove the armature from the end bracket. Now mount the armature in a lathe, rotate it at a high speed , and take a light cut with a very sharp tool. Do not remove any more metal than is absolutely necessary, an d finally polish with a very fine glass-paper. The mica on the starter commutator must not be undercut. Field coils The field coils can be tested for an open circuit by connecting a 12-volt battery, having a 12-volt bulb in one of the leads, to the tapping point of the field coils to which the brushes are connected and the field terminal

N

post. If the lamp does not light there is an open circuit in the wiring of the field coils. Lighting of the lamp does not necessarily mean that the field coi ls are in order, as it is possible that one of them may be earthed to a pole-shoe or to the yoke. This may be checked by removing the lead from the bnsh connector and holding it on a clean part of the starter yoke. Should the bulb now light, it indicates that the field coils are earthed. Should the a bove tests indicate that the fault lies in the field coils, they must be renewed. When renewing field coils carry out the procedure detailed for the dynamo in Section N.S. Armature Examin ation of the armature will in many cases reveal the cause of failure, e.g. conductors lifted from the commutator due to the starter being engaged while the engine is running and causing the armature to be rotated at an excessive spee d. A damaged armature must in all cases be renewed-no attempt should be made to machine the armature core or to true a distorted armature shaft. Bearings (commutator end) Bearin gs which are worn to such an extent that they will allow excessive side-play of the armature shaft must be renewed. To renew the bearing bush proceed as follows . Press the new bearing bush into the end bracket, using a sho uldered mand rel of the same diameter as the shaft which is to fit the bearing. The bearing bush is of the porous phosphor-bronze type, and before fitting, new bushes should be allowed to stand complet ely immersed for 24 hours in thin engine oil in order to fill the pores of the bush with lubricant. Reassembly The reassembly of the starter is a reversal of the opera tions described in this section.

Section N.9 CONTROL BOX Description T he control box contains two units-a voltage regulator and a cut-out. Although combined structurally, the regulator and cut-out are electrically separate (see Fig. N .S). Both are accurately adjusted during manufacture, and the cover protecting them should not be removed unnecessarily. Cable connections are secured by grub-screw-type terminals. Regulator The regulator is set to maintain the dynamo o utput between close limits at all speeds above the regu lating point, the field strength being co ntrolled by the au tomatic insertion and with drawal of a resista nce in the N .7


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

N

CUT-OUT

REGULATOR AND CUT- OUT

FRAME

â&#x20AC;˘ FI ELD RESISTA NCE

~

@

-g

SH UNT ~ CO IL ~

~

Cg \=

1 -= .:g '-=

SHUNT COIL

Cg tg

TAPPED SER IES COIL

CONTROL BOX

4876

Fig. N.S The internal wiring and connections of the regulator and cut-out

dynamo field circuit. When the dynamo output reaches a predetermined value the magnetic flux in the regulator core, induced by the shunt or voltage winding, becomes sufficiently strong to attract the armature to the core. This causes the contacts to open, thereby inserting the resistance in the dynamo field circuit. The consequent reduction in the dynamo field current lowers the dynamo output, and this in turn weakens the magnetic flux in the regulator core. The armature therefore returns to its original position, and with the contacts closed the dynamo output rises again to its regulated maximum. This cycle is then repeated, and an oscillation of the armature is maintained. As the speed of the dynamo rises above that at which the regulator comes into operation the periods of contact separation increase in length, and as a result the mean value of the dynamo output undergoes practically no increase once this regulating speed has been attained. The series or current winding provides a compensation on this system of control, for if the control were arranged entirely on the basis of voltage there would be a risk of seriously overloading the dynamo when the battery was in a low state of charge, particularly if the lamps were in use simultaneously. Under these conditions, with a battery of low internal resistance the dynamo output rises and, but for the series winding, would exceed its normal rating. The magnetism due to the series winding assists the shunt winding, so that when the dynamo is delivering a heavy current into a discharged battery the regulator comes into operation at a somewhat reduced voltage, thus limiting the output accordingly. As shown in Fig. N.S, a split series winding is used, terminal 'A' being connected to the battery and terminal 'A I' to the lighting and ignition switch. By means of a temperature compensation device the

N.S

voltage characteristic of the dynamo is caused to conform more closely to that of the battery under all climatic conditions. In cold weather the voltage required to charge the battery at a given rate increases, whilst in warm weather the voltage required is lower. The compensation device is in the form of a bi-metal spring located behind the tensioning spring of the regulator armature. By causing the operating voltage of the regulator to be increased in cold weather and reduced in hot weather the bi-metal spring compensates for the changing temperature characteristics of the battery and prevents undue variation of the charging current which would otherwise occur. The bi-metal spring also compensates for effects due to increases in resistance of the copper windings from cold to working values. Cut-out The cut-out is an electro-magnetically operated switch connected in the charging circuit between the dynamo and the battery. It automatically connects the dynamo with the battery when the dynamo output exceeds that of the battery and disconnects the two when the dynamo output falls below that of the battery, and so prevents the battery from discharging and possibly damaging the dynamo windings. The cut-out consists of an electro-magnet fitted with an armature which operates a pair of contacts. The electro-magnet employs two windings-a shunt winding of many turns of fine wire and a series winding of a few turns of heavier-gauge wire. The contacts are normally held open and are closed only when the magnetic pull from the armature is sufficient to overcome the tension of the adjusting spring. The shunt coil is connected across the dynamo. When starting, the speed of the engine and thus the output of the dynamo rises until the electro-magnet is strong enough to overcome the spring tension and close the cut-out contacts. The effect of the charging current flowing through the cut-out windings creates a magnetic field in the same direction as that produced by the shunt winding. This increases the magnetic pull on the armature so that the contacts are firmly closed and cannot be separated by vibration. When the speed of the dynamo falls to a point where its output is lower than that of the battery, current flows from the battery through the cut-out series winding and dynamo in a reverse direction to the charging current. This reverse current through the cut-out will produce a differential action between the two windings and partly demagnetize the electromagnet. The spring, which is under constant tension, then pulls the armature away from the magnet and so separates the contacts and opens the circuit. Like the regulator, the operation of the cut-out is temperature-controlled by means of a bi-metal tensioning spring. Regulator adjustment The regulator is carefully set before leaving the Works to suit the normal requirements of the standard equipment, and in general it should not be necessary to alter it.


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT If, however, the battery does not keep in a charged condition, or if the dynamo output does not fall when the battery is fully charged, it may be advisable to check the setting, and if necessary, to readjust it. It is important, before altering the regulator setting, when the battery is in a low state of charge, to check that its condition is not due to a battery defect or to the dynamo belt slipping. Electrical setting (with unit cold) The electrical setting of the control unit can be checked without removing the cover. Use a good-quality movingcoil voltmeter (0-20 volts). Withdraw the cables from the control box terminals 'N and 'AI' and connect these cables together. Connect the negative lead of the voltmeter to the control box terminal 'D' and connect the other lead to terminal 'E'. Slowly increase the speed of the engine until the voltmeter needle flicks and then steadies. This should occur at a voltmeter reading between the appropriate limits given in ' GENERAL DATA' , according to the ambient temperature. If the voltage at which the reading becomes steady occurs outside these limits the regulator must be adjusted. Switch off the engine and remove the control box cover. Slacken the locknut of the voltage adjusting screw (1) (Fig. N.?) and turn the screw in a clockwise direction to raise the setting or in an anti-clockwise direction to lower the setting. Turn the screw only a fraction of a turn at a time and then tighten the locknut. Repeat as above until the correct setting is obtained. The adjustment of the regulator open-circuit voltage should be completed within 30 seconds, otherwise heating of the shunt winding will cause false settings to be made.

4

467 6 A

Fig . N.6 I.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Regulator moving contact. Regulator series windings. Regulator adjusting screw. Cut-out adjusting screw. Fixed contact blade.

6. Armature tongue and moving contact. 7. Stop arm. 8. Regulator fixed contact screw.

5

4

3

N

.

6

I\~~~ ~

=-=- ----r

0路015

"

7 2 48798

Fig. N.?

Mechanical setting of the regulator I. Locknut. 2. Voltage adjusting screw. 3. Armature tension spring. 4. Armature securing screws.

5. Fixed contact adjustment screw. 6. Armature. 7. Core face and shim.

A generator run at high speed on open circuit will build up a high volLage. Therefore, when adjusting the regulator increase the engine speed slowly until the regulator operates, otherwise a false setting may be made. Reconnect the wires. M echanical settin g The mechanical or air gap settings of the regulator shown in Fig. N.7 are accurately adjusted before leaving the Works, and, provided that the armature carrying the moving contact is not removed, these settings must not be tampered with. If, however, the armature has been removed the regulator will have to be reset. To do this proceed as follows. Slacken the fixed contact locking nut and unscrew the contact screw until it is quite clear of the armature moving contact. Slacken the voltage adjusting screw locking nut and unscrew the adjuster until it is well clear of the armature tension spring. Slacken the two armature assembly securing screws. Using a 路015 in. (,381 mm.) thick feeler gauge, wide enough to cover completely the core face, insert the gauge between the armature and the core shim, taking care not to turn up or damage the edge of the shim. Press the armature squarely down against the gauge and retighten the two armature assembly securing screws. With the gauge still in position, screw the adjustable contact down until it just touches the armature contact. Retighten the locking nut. Reset the voltage adjusting screw as described under 'Regulat or adjustment'. Cleaning contacts After long periods of service it may be found necessary to clean the regulator contacts. Clean the contacts by means of a fine carborundum stone or fine emery-cloth. Carefully wipe away all traces of dust or other foreign matter with methylated spirits. N.9


www.morrisoxford.com TH E ELECTRICAL EQUIPME T 4

6 0·030'

_.1

--f -

- -- ' . ~

4877... .

2

Fig. N.8 Mechanical setting of the cut-out Cut-out adjusting screw. Armature tension spring. 'Follow through'-·OIO to ·020 in. (·254 to ·508 mm.). 4. Stop arm.

I. 2. 3.

5. Armature tongue and moving contact. 6. Armature securing screws. 7. Fixed contact blade.

Cut-out adjustment Electrical setting If the regulator is correctly set but the battery is still not being charged the cut-out may be out of adjustment. To check the voltage at which the cut-out operates remove the control box cover and connect the voltmeter between terminals '0' and 'E'. Start the engine and slowly increase its speed until the cut-out contacts are seen to close, noting the voltage at which this occurs. It should be 12·7 to 13·3 volts. If the cut-out operates outside these limits it will be necessary to adjust it to within the limits. To do this slacken the locknut securing the cut-out adjusting screw and turn the screw in a clockwise direction to raise the voltage setting or in an anti-clockwise direction to reduce the setting. Turn the screw only a fraction of a turn at a time and then tighten the locknut. Test after each adjustment by increasing the engine speed and noting the voltmeter readings at the instant of contact closure. Electrical settings of the cut-out, like the regulator, must be made as quickly as possible because of the temperature rise effects. If the cut-out does not operate there may be an open circuit in the wiring of the cut-out and regulator uni t, in which case the unit should be removed for examination or replacement.

Mechanical setting If for any reason the cut-out armature has to be removed from the frame care must be taken to obtain the correct air gap settings on reassemb ly. These can be obtained as follows. Slacken the adjusting screw locknut and unscrew the cut-out adjusting screw until it is well clear of the armature tension spring. Slacken the two armature securing screws. Press the armature squarely down against the coppersprayed core face and retighten the armature securing screws. N.I O

Using a pair of thin-nosed pliers, adjust the gap between the armature stop arm and the armature tongue by bending the stop arm. The gap must be ·030 in. (,762 mm.) when the armature is pressed squarely down against the core face. Similarly. the fixed contact blade must be bent so that when the armature is pressed squarely down against the core face there is a 'follow through' of blade deflection of ·010 to ·020 in. (,254 to ·508 mm.). See (3) (Fig. N.8). Reset the cut-out adjusting screw in accordance with the instructions already given. Clea ning contac ts Do not use emery-cloth or a carborundum stone for cleaning cut-out contacts. If the contacts appear dirty, rough, or burnt place a strip of fine glass-paper between the contacts and then, with the contacts closed by hand, draw the paper through. This should be done two or three times with the rough side of the glass-paper towards each contact. Wipe away all dust or other foreign matter, using a clean. fluflless cloth moistened with methylated spirits.

Section N.IO WINDSH IELD WIPER Normally the windshield wiper will not require any servicing apart from the occasional renewal of the rubber blades. Should any trouble be experienced, first check for loose connections, worn insulation, etc., before dismantling the motor. 1. To detach the cable rack from the motor and gearbox Unscrew the pipe union nut. Remove the gearbox cover. Remove the split pin and washer from the crankpin and final gear wheel.

Lift off the connecting link . 2. Commutato r dirty Remove the connecting leads to the terminals and withdraw the three screws securing the cover at the commu tator end. Lift 01T the cover. Clean the commutator with a cloth moistened with petrol (gasoline) and carefully remove any carbon dust from between the commutator segments. 3. Brush lever stiff or brushes not bearin g on commutator Check that the brushes bear freely on the commutator. If they are loose and do not make contact a replacement tension spring is necessary. The brush levers must be free o n their pivots. If they are stilT they should be freed by working them backwards and forwards by hand and by applying a trace of thin machine oil. Packing shims are fitted beneath the legs of the brush to ensure tha t the brushes a re cen tral and that there is no possibility of


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPME T the brush boxes fouling the commutator. If the brushes are considerably worn they must be replaced by new ones.

4. Motor oper ates but does not transmit motion to spindles Remove the cover of the gearbox. A push-pull motion should be transmitted to the inner cable of the flexible rack. If the cross-head moves sluggishly between the guides lightly smear a small amount of medium-grade engine oil in the groove formed in the die-cast housing. When overhauling, the gear must be lubricated by lightly packing the gearbox with a grease to Ref. F (page P .2). 5. T hrus t scre w adjust ments The thrust screw is located on the top of the crosshead housing. To adjust, slacken the locknut, screw down the thrust screw until it contacts the armature, and then turn back a fraction of a turn. Hold the thrust screw with a screwdriver and tighten the locknut.

6. T o remove th e motor Detach the cable rack from the motor and gearbox as detailed above. Disconnect the lead. Remove the two screws securing the mounting bracket to remove the motor.

(b)

(c)

(d) (e)

N

meter rea di ngs below 1路200. It may be d ue to the dynamo not cha rging or giving low or intermittent output. T he ignition warning light will not go out if the dynamo fails to charge, or will flicker on and off in the eve nt of intermittent o utput. Examine the charging an d field circui t wiring, tighten any lo ose connections, or renew any broken cables. Pay particular attention to the battery connections , Examine the dy namo driving belt ; take up any undue slackness by swinging the dynamo outwards on its mounting after slackening the attachment bolts. Check the regulator setting and adj ust if necessary. If, after carrying ou t the above, the trouble is still not cu red have the equipment examined by a Lucas Service Depot or Agent.

2. Batteri es overch arged This will be indicated by burnt-out bulbs, very frequent need fo r topping u p the ba tteries and high hydrome ter readings. Check the charge reading with an ammeter when the car is running. It should be of the order of only 3 to 4 amps. If the ammeter reading is in excess of this value it is advisa ble to chec k the regu lator setting and adj ust if necessary . STA RTER MOTO R

Section N.II LO CATI ON AND REMED Y O F FAULTS Although every precaution is taken to eliminate possible causes of trouble failure may occasionally develop thro ugh lack of attention to the equipment or da ma ge to the wiring. The following pages set out the recommended procedure for a systematic examination to locate and remedy the causes of some of the more usual faults encountered. T he sources of trouble are by no means always obvious, and in some cases a considerable amount of deduction from the symptoms is needed before the cause is disclosed. Fo r instance, the engine might not respond to the sta rter switch; a hasty infe rence would be tha t the sta rter motor is at fault. However, as th e motor is dependent on the batteries it may be that the batteries are exhausted. This in turn may be due to the dynamo failing to charge the batteries, and the final cause of the tro uble may be, pe rhaps, a loose connec tion in some pa rt of the charging circuit. If, after carrying out an examination, the cause of the tro uble is not found the equipment should be checked by the nearest Lucas Service D epo t or Agent. CHA RGING CI RCUIT

1. Batterie s in low state of charge (a) T his state will be shown by lack of power when starting, poor light from the la mps, a nd the hyd ro Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 29549 B

1. Starter motor lacks power or fails to turn engine (a) See if the engine can be tu rn ed over by ha nd. If not, the cause of the stiffness in the engine must be located and remedied. (b) If the engine can be turned by hand first check th a t the tro uble is not d ue to a discharged battery. (c) Examine the connections to the batteries, starter, and starter switch, making sure that they are tight and that the cables connecting these units are not damaged. (d) It is also possible tha t the starte r pinion may have jammed in m esh with th e flywhee l, although this is by no means a common occurrence. To disengage the pinion rotate the squared end of the starter shaft by means of a spanner.

2. Starter operates but does not crank th e engine T his fau lt will occur if t he pinion of the starte r drive is not allowed to move along the screwed sleeve into engagement with the flywheel, due to di rt having collected o n th e screwed sleeve. Re move the starter and clean the sleeve ca refull y with pa ra ffin (kerosene) .

3. Starter pinion will not disengage from flywheel when engine is running Stop the engine and see if the starter pinion is jammed in mesh with th e flywheel, releasin g it if necessa ry by rotation of the squa red en d of the starte r shaft. If th e pinio n persis ts in sticking in mesh have the equipment examined at a Service D ep ot. Serious damage may result to the starter if it is driven by the flywheel. N. l l


N

www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT LIGHTING CIRCUITS

I . Lamps give insufficient illumination (a)

Test the state of charge of the battery, recharging it if necessary from an independent electrical supply.

(b) Check the setting of the lamps. (e) If the bulbs are discoloured as the result of long

service they should be renewed. 2. Lamps light when switched on but gradually fade out As paragraph I (a).

3. Brilliance varies with speed of car (a) As paragraph 1 (a).

be maintained between 60° F. (15'5 ° C.) and 100° F. (37'7° C.). If the battery has been stored in a cool place it should be allowed to warm up to room temperature before filling. When time permits, a freshening charge at the normal recharge rate of the battery will ensure that the battery is fully charged. During the charge keep the electrolyte level with the top of the separators by the addition of distilled water. Check the electrolyte specific gravity at the end of the charge. If 1·270 acid was used to fill the battery, the specific gra vity should now be between 1·270 and 1·290; if 1·210 acid was used , the specific gravity should be between 1·210 and 1·230.

Section N.13

(b) Examine the battery connections, making sure that

they are tight, and renew any faulty cables.

Section N.12 DRY-CHARGED BATfERIES 'Dry-charged' batteries are supplied without electrolyte but with the plates in a charged condition. This ensures that there is no deterioration of the battery if it is stored for a period before use. These batteries have the type suffix letter 'Z' (e.g. GTZ, etc.). Filling the cells with electrolyte of the correct specific gra vity (see 'Initial filling and charging' of Section N .l), in one operation, renders the battery capable of giving a starting discharge one hour after filling. The temperature of the filling-in solution, battery, and filling room should

2

3

TYPE C40/1 DYNAMO Later cars are fitted with a Lucas type C40/l dynamo. The dynamo incorporates a smaller fan pulley and a newtype fan that pro vides increased cooling capacity ; the dynamo is used in conjunction with a modified type RB106/2 control box. The instructions for servicing the C40jl dynamo are basically the same as those given in Section N.5, with the following exceptions. Brushes The minimum permissible length of a worn brush is i in. Badly worn brushes must be renewed and the new brushes bedded to the commutator. The correct brush spring tension is between 18 and 26 oz. (510 and 737 g.m.) Commutator Some commutators fitted to the C40jl dynamos are of the moulded type and may be reskimmed to a minimum diameter of 1·45 in. (36,909 mm .). The undercut must conform to the following dimensions: Width ·040 in. (1,016 mm.). Depth ·020 in. (,508 mm. ). It is important that the sides of th e undercut clear the material by a minimum of ·015 in. (,381 mm .). Field coil The resistance of the field coil is 6·0 ohms. Bearings To remove the bearing bush in the commutator end plate screw a i in. tap squarely into the bush and withdraw the bush ; then remove the felt ring and its retainer. When refitting the bearing plate to the front bracket insert the rivets from the outer face of th e br acket. An oil-retaining ring is not fitted to this bracket.

AI

A.

F

D

E

Fig . N.7

The modified RBI 06/2 control box I. Regulator adjusting screw. 2. Cut- out adju sting screw. 3. Fixed cont act blade . 4. Stop arm.

N.12

5. Arm ature tongue and moving cont act. 6. ~~~~I.ator fixed contact

7. Regulator moving cont act. 8. Regulator series windings.

Section N.14 MODIFIED CONTROL BOX This control box is fitted in conjunction with the Lucas type C40/1 dynamo to cater for the increased output of the dynamo. The instructions for adju sting the modified type RBI06/2 control box are given in Section N.9 and the settings are given in the 'GENERAL DATA'. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29549


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NN

SECTION NN THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT This Section is a Supplement to Section Section

Wiring diagram Flashing direction indicators

NN .2

Fuses . .

NN.14

Headlamps

NN .3

Replacing bulbs

NN .8

Sealed-beam light units

NN.17 NN.7 and NN.16

Setting Horns

NN.I

Interior lamp

NN.13

Light units

NNA

Removing

NN.5

Replacing

NN.6

Number-plate lamp ..

NN.12

Panel and warning lamps

NN .ll

Pilot lamps and front flashing indicators

NN.9

Replacement bulbs ..

NN.15

Tail, stop, and flashing indicator lamps (Car) ..

NN .lO

Tail, stop, and flashing indicator lamps (Traveller)

N . 18

Windshield wiper assemblies

NN.19

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 4.

30713

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www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

Section NN.! ELECTRIC HOR S If either horn fails or becomes uncertain in its action it does not follow that the horn has broken down. First ascertain that the trouble is not due to a loose or broken connection in the wiring of the horn. If the fuse has blown examine the wiring for the fault and replace with the spare fuse provided. The performance of a horn may be upset by a loose fixing bolt, or by some component near the horn being loose. If after carrying out the above examination the trouble is not rect ified the horn may need adjustment. Adjustment does not alter the pitch of the note : it merely ta kes up wear of moving parts. When adjusting the horn short-circuit the fuse, otherwise it is liable to blow. Again, if the horn will not sound on adjustment release the push instantly. Adjustm ent Remove the fixing screw from the top of the horn and take otTthe cover. Detach the cover securing bracket by springing it out of its location. Slacken the locknut on the fixed contact and rotate the adjusting nut until the contacts are just separated (indicated by the horn failing to sound). Turn the adjusting nut half a turn in the opposite direction and secure it in this position by tightening the locknut.

Section NN.2 FLASHING DIRECTIO N I DICATOR S The flashing direction indica to rs are operated by a hand-actu at ed switch on the steering column through a flasher unit to the bulbs in the sidelam ps and tail lamps. In the event of failure ca rry out the following procedure: (I) Check bulbs for broken filamen ts. (2) Refer to the wiring diag ram and check over flasher circuit connections. (3) Switch on the ignition and check that terminal 'B' on the flasher is at 12 volts with respect to earth. (4) Connect together terminals 'B' and 'L' at the flasher unit an d operate the direction indicator switch. If the flasher bulbs light the flasher unit is defective and must be renewed. If the lights do not work the switch or circu it is defective an d a furthe r check mu st be mad e.

Anti-dazzle device The double-filament bulbs are controlled by a footoperated dipping switch deflecting both headlamp beams downwards to avoid dazzle.

Certain countries have lighting regulations to which the foregoing arrangements do not conform, and cars exported to such countries have suitably modified lighting equipment.

Section NN.4 LIGHT UNITS The light units consist of a la mp glass, reflector, and a back-shell. The light unit is located to the front wing by three spring-loaded attachment screws in a domed shield attached to the wing. The back of the lamp is therefore sealed to give complete protection. A dust- and weather-excluding rubber is fitted in the recess of the rim of the light unit and a plated rim is fitted over this to complete the weather sealing.

Section NN.5 REMO VI G THE LIG HT U ITS To remove the light unit for bulb replacement unscrew the retaining screw at the bottom of the plated lamp rim and lift the rim away from the dust-excluding rubber. Remove the dust-excluding rubber, which will reveal the three spring- loaded screws. Press the light unit inwards against the tension of the springs an d turn it in an a nti-clockw ise direction until the heads of the screws ca n pass through the enlarged ends of the keyho le slots in the lam p rim. This will ena ble the light unit to be withdrawn sufficiently to give attention to the wiring and bulbs.

Section NN.3 HEADLAMPS The headlamps are built into the wings and are fitted with double-filament bulbs. The design is such that the bulb is correctly po sitioned in relat ion to the reflector, and no focu sing is requ ired when a replacement bulb is fitted. NNA

Fig. NN.l

The headlamp light unit removed, showing the bulb holder and back-shell, etc., with the European lamp inset Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

NN

Section NN.6 REP LACING THE LIGHT UNITS Position the light unit so that the heads of the adjusting screws coincide with the enlarged ends of the attachment slots. Push the light unit towards the wing to compress the springs and turn the unit to the right as far as it will go, that is, approximately 1- in. (13 mm.). Replace the dust-excluding rubber on the light rim with its flanged face forward and refit the plated rim.

Section NN.7 SETTI NG THE HEADLAMPS The lamps should be set so that the main driving beams are parallel with the road surface or in accordance with local regulations. Vertical adjustment is made without disturbing the rim by turn ing the screw at the top of the lamp, which can be reached by inserting a thin screwdriver in the groove provided on the under side of the rim at the top. A slot is provided in the dust-excluding rubber to permit this. Horizontal adjustment can be made by using the adjusting screws on each side of the light unit after removing the rim as described in Section NN.5. When replacing the dust-excluding rubber make sure that the moulded slot is fitted at the top to coincide with the vertical setting screw.

Section NN.8 REPLACI G T HE H EADLAMP BULBS Except European type Twist the back-shell anti-clockwise and pull it off. Withdraw the bulb from the holder. Insert the replacement bulb in the holder, making

sure that the slot in the periphery of the bulb llange engages the projection in the holder. Engage the projections on the back- shell with the slots of the holder, press it on , and twist it clockwise until it engages with its catch. European type The headlamps on left-hand-drive car s for use in European countries are fitted with special front lenses and bulbs giving an asymmetrical light beam to the righthand side. Access to the bulb is achieved in the same way as on right-hand-drive cars , but the bulb is released from the reflector by withdrawing the three-pin socket and pinching the two ends of the wire retaining clip to clear the bulb flange. When replacing the bulb care must be taken to see that the rectangular pip on the bulb flange engages the slot in the reflector seating for the bulb. Replace the spring clip with its coils resting in the base of the bulb flange and engaging the two retaining lugs on the reflector seating.

Section NN.9 PILOT LAM PS AND FRONT FLASHING INDICATORS To gain access to the pilot and front flashing indicator bulbs it is necessary to remove the three screws securing the lamp glass. Both bulbs are of the bayonet-fixing type. When fitting replacement bulbs refer to Section NN.15 for the correct bulb part numbers.

Section NN.I0 Fig. NN.2 The head/amp setting screws 2. Horizontal setting adjusting Vertical setting adjusting screws which can only be screw which can be reached with the rim in reached after removal of the rim. posit ion. Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 30713

I.

TAIL, STOP, AND FLASffiNG INDICATOR LAMPS The tai l lamps are of the double-filament type, the second filament giving a marked increase in brilliance when the brakes are applied. NN.5


www.morrisoxford.com www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

NN

5520W

Fig. NN.6 I

5524 B

Fig. NN.4 Access to the tail lamp bulbs is gained from inside the luggage boot Access to the bulbs is gained from inside the luggage boot. Pull the bulb holder from its socket in the lamp back-plate. The flashing indicator bulb has a single filament and may be fitted either way round. The tail and stop lamp bulb must be fitted one way only and has offset bayonet pegs to ensu re this.

Section NN .11 PA EL A D WAR I G LAMPS The panel and warning lamp bulbs are accessible from behind the instrument panel. Each bulb is secured in position by a push-fit holder. To release a bulb pull out the holder from the rear of the instrument panel and unscrew the bulb from the holder. Screw in a new bulb and push the holder back in position.

Section NN.12 NUMBER-PLATE LAMP

Remove the two screws and lift.off tire cover to obtain access to the number-plate lamp bulb Later cars are fitted with a twin bulb number-plate lamp. Both bulbs are of the bayonet-fixing type and may be replaced either way round.

Section NN.13 I TERIOR LAMP The interior lamp is located at the top of the centre door pillar. The lamp has a switch incorporated in it and an automatic switch is fitted to each front door pillar. T o gain access to the festoon-type bulb gently squeeze the plastic cover, which is secured in position by four sma ll tongues.

Section NN.14 FUSES Two fuses (one 35-amp. and one 50-amp.) are mounted in a separate fuse block and are therefore accessible with out removing the control box cover (see Fig. NN.7). Remove the moulded rubber cover to gain access to the fuses.

The number-plate is illuminated by a separate lamp and the domed cover is removed for bulb replacement by unscrewing the two screws and withdrawing the cover.

- - --

Fig. NN.7 Fig. NN. 5 The location of the panel lamp bulbs NN .6

The fuses are located in a separate f use block mounted on the bulkhead Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 30713


www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT UmUts protected The units which are protected by each fuse can readil y be identified by referrin g to the wiring diagram on page NN. 2.

Blown fuses A blown fuse is indicated by the failure of all the units protected by it, and is confirmed by examination of the

fuse, which can easily be withdrawn from the spring clips. If it has blown the fused sta te of the wire will be visible inside the glass tube. Before renewing a blown fuse inspect the wiring of the units that have failed for evidence of a short circuit or oth er faults which may have cau sed the fuse to blow, and remedy the cause of the trouble.

Section NN.15 REPLACEMENT BlJLBS

B.M.C.

Volts 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

Headlamps (R.H.D. except Sweden-dip left) Headlamps (R.H.D. Sweden-dip vertical -hooded) Headlamps (Europe except France-dip vertical ) Headlamps (L.H.D. France-dip vertical-yellow) Headlamps (L.H.D. except Europe-dip right) Pilot lamps Stop and tail lamps Flashing direction indicators Number-plate lamp Panel illumination and warn ing lamp s Interior lamp Direction indicator warning (Lilliput bulb)

Watts 50/40 45/40 45/40 45/40 50/40 6 21/6 21 6 2路2 6 1路5

Part No 13Hl40 3H921 13H138 13HI39 13HI41 2H4817 IF9026 IF9012 2H4817 2H4732 2H9504 IG2894

Section NN.17

Section NN.16 HEADLAMP BEAM SETTING

SEALED-BEAM LIG HT U ITS

Reference should be made to Section N .7 for details of the headlamp adjustment screws. I n the absence of specialized proprietary equipment the setting of the lamps can be best carried out by placing the laden vehicle in front of a blank wall at a distance of 25 ft. (7,6 m.) or more, taking car e that the surface on which the ca r is standing is level and not sloping in relation to the wall. It will be found an advantage to cover one lamp while settin g the other.

Cars exported to the U.S.A. are fitted with headlamps that incorporate sealed-beam light units . To change a sealed-beam light unit, remove the plated headlamp rim, slacken the three screws that secure the light unit rim. then rotate the rim anti-clockwise to disengage the slotted holes from the heads of the retaining screws. Pull the light unit forward and disconnect the three-pin socket from the back of the lamp unit.

Section NN.18 DISTANCE BETWEEN CENTRES OF HEADLAMPS

CONCENTRATED AREA OF LIGHT

TAIL, ST OP, AND FLASHING INDICATOR LAMPS (TRAVELLER)

r------A--1 i ! ~IGHT

OF CENTRE OF LAMPS FROM GRO UND AD 655

Fig. NN.8 JIeadlamp-alignment I. The front of the vehicle is to be square with the screen. 2. The vehicle is to be loaded and on level ground. 3. The recommended distance for setting is at least 25 ft. (7'6 m ). 4. For ease of setting one headlamp should be covered.

Morris Ox-ford (Series V).

Issue 4.

30713

The tail, stop, and flashin g indicator lamps are similar to those described in Section NN .10. Access to the lamps is gained by remo ving the lamp closing panels that are situated at the rear inside quarter of the body . Each closing panel is secured by two screws.

Section NN.19 MODIFI ED WI DSHI ELD WIPER ASSEM BLIES To eliminate the excess throw of water from the passenger's windshield wiper blade and to improve the driver's field of vision, R.H.D. vehicles are now being NN.7


NN

www.morrisoxford.com THE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

fitted with L.H.D. wiper assemblies and L.H .D. vehicles with R.H.D. assemblies. Unmodified cars may be modified as follows. Lift the spring clips that secure the wiper arm and blade assembl ies to their spindles and withdraw the arms. Then remove the air duct grille. Disconnect the electrical connections from the motor and unscrew the union nut that secures the cross-head and rack outer casing to the motor casing. Unscrew the three nuts from the motor mounting studs and detach the motor from the valance. The cross-head and rack will be withdrawn from its outer casing by the motor. Remove the side cover from the motor and disconnect the rack. To enable the blades to be parked on the passenger's side of the windshield, unscrew the knurled park adjusting nut (c) and disconnect the switch assembly (B) from the spring (D) and screw (E). Reverse and refit the switch assembly and replace the knurled nut. Fig. NN.9 shows (I) a R.H.D. switch assembly and (2) a L.H .D. switch assembly. Remove the top fascia panel as described in Section RR.17. Loosen the two screws on each wheelbox assembly and detach the ends of the outer casings. Unscrew the nuts on the end of each wheel box spindle housing, remove the distance collars and withdraw the wheel boxes from the inside of the car. Change the wheelboxes over, ensuring that the smaller of the two is fitted to the driver's side, replace the distance collars and nuts and refit the outer casings. Connect the cross-head and rack to the motor and refit the motor side cover. Feed the cross-head and rack through the outer casing and secure the motor to the

NN.~

A ,

E

c

'

D

Fig. NN.9

The wiper motor switch assembly valance. Refit the electrical connections after referring to the wiring diagram on page N .2. Replace the air duct grille and fit wiper arm assemblies (Part No. BMK45) to R.H.D. cars and wiper arm and blade assemblies (Part No. BMK44) to L.H.D. cars. Push the arms onto the spindles until the spring clips engage in the waisted portion of the spindles. It is important that the correct wiper arm assemblies are fitted to R.H.D. and L.H.D. cars respectively. Functionally test the motor and adjust the wiper arms as required.

Moms Oxford (Series V).

Issue 4.

30713


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o

SECTION 0 THE WHEELS AND TYRES (TUBELESS TYRES) Section Tyrc

Balance ..

0 .5

Care

0.8

Fitting

0 .6

Maintenance

0 .1

Remova l

0.4

Repa iring

0.7

0.2

Valves Wheel-removing

Morris Oxford (Series V).

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Issue 2. 2552U

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0 .1


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www.morrisoxford.com THE WHEELS AND TYRES

Section 0.1 TYRE MAINTE 'A Te E Even tyre wear is promoted by changin g the positions of the tyres on the car at intervals of about 3,000 miles (4800 km.). The spare tyre should be brought into use with the others.

Fig. 0.1 Simple tool for fitting tubeless tyre valves Attention should be paid to the following points with a view to obtaining the maximum mileage from the tyre equipment of the vehicle . Test the pressures of the tyres every week by means of a suitable gauge and restore any air lost. It is not sufficient to make a visual inspection of the tyre for correct inflation. Inflate the spare wheel tyre to the correct rear wheel pressure. Keep the treads free from grit and stones and carry out any necessary repairs. Clean the wheel rims and keep them free from rust. Paint the wheels if necessary. Keep the clutch and brakes adjusted correctly and in good order. Fierceness or uneven action in either of these units has a destructive effect upon the tyres. Misalignment is a very costly error. Suspect it if rapid wear of the front tyres is noticed and correct the fau lt at once. See Section JJ . l for details on front wheel alignment. Should the tyres get oily, petrol (gasoline) should be applied sparingly and wiped ofTat once. Avoid under- and over-inflation. Avoid kerbing and other causes of severe impact. Have any damage repaired immediately. Remove tyres when smooth for remoulding .

Section 0.2 VALVES A mushroom-headed rubber valve is used with tubeless tyres. The valve is secured in the wheel by a small stepped flange on the rubber valve and by the pressure of air inside the tyre. A simple but effective tool (Fig. 0. 1) for fitting the valve can be made up from a 7 in. (177,8 mm.) length of -1 in. (12,7 mm.) steel bar or 13 S.W.G. steel tubing. Using a letter'S' (8,83 mm.) drill, in one end drill a hol e to a depth of approximately i in. (I5路ln mm.).

0 .2

Obtain an ordinary valve dust cap and solder the cap in the drilled hole. The opposite end of the tool requires a hole drilling about ! in. (12,7 mm.) from the end to accept a short piece of in. (6'35 mm .) diameter rod to provide a handle. To fit the valve with the aid of the tool, first liberally coat the rubber valve and the perimeter of the valve hole in the wheel with soapy water. Insert the valve into the hole and screw on the special tool. A sharp pull will seat the valve correctly. The valves may be tested for airtightness by rotating the wheel until the valve is at the top and inserting the end of the valve in a small container of water. If bubbles appear the seating is faulty and the valve interior should be replaced with a new one. It is advisable to change the valve interiors every 12 months. Valve caps, in addition to preventing dirt entering the valve, form a secondary air seal and should always be fitted.

*

Section 0.3 REMOVI G A WHEEL Remove the hub cover by inserting the blade of a screwdriver in the recess provided adjacent to the securing lobes. Employ a twisting motion to the screwdriver, not a levering movement. Slacken t he four nuts securing the road wheel to the hub. Lift the vehicle with the jack, remove the nuts, which have right-hand threads, and lift the wheel from the hub. Refitt ing a wheel is a reversal of these instructions, but ensure that the whee l nuts are fitted with the tapered side towards the wheel and tighten them in the order I, 3, 4, 2, imagining them to be numbered 1 to 4 in rotation. The wheel nuts should be tightened to the correct torque figure given in 'GE E RAL DAT A' .

Section 0.4 TY RE REMOVAL Remove the valve interior to completely deflate the tyre. Push both cover edges into the well-base of the wheel. and at a point diametrically opposite lever the cover edge over the rim of the wheel, using two levers at intervals of 6 in. (15 cm.) apart. Continue working round the wheel until the cover on one side is completely free.

9009A

Fig. 0.2 Valve for tubeless tyres Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE WHEELS AND TYRES

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NOTE.-Do not attempt to stretch the edges of the tyre cover over the rim edge and only use thin, narrow levers in good condition without rust or burrs. Do not widely space the levers. Force is entire ly unnecessary a nd is detrimenta l, as it tend s to dam age the wire edges. Fitting or remo ving is quite easy if the tyre edges are carefully adjus ted int o the rim ba se; if found difficult, the op eratio n is not being performed correctly. Stand the tyre and wheel upri ght, keepin g th e bead in the ba se of the rim . Lever the bead over the rim flan ge and at th e same tim e push th e cover away from the wheel with the other hand. IB3 bl BW

Section 0 .5

Fig. 0.4 Push the cover bead into the well-base of the wheel as indicated by the arrow

TYRE BALANCE In order to obtain good steering it is of importance to ensure that the wheels with tyres fitted are in good balance. To assist this the tyre manufacturers are now marking their tyres with a white spot in the neighbourhood of the bead at the lightest point of the cover. When fitting tyres to the wheels ensure that they are assembled with the white spot 011 the cover in line with the valve. Special balance weights , which cover a range of t to 31 oz. (14,2 to 99 gm.) in steps of t oz., are supplied by the Dunlop R ubber Co . under Part Nos. WBW/I to 7 for attachment to the wheel rim. Their use is advised to maintain the correct balance for the wheels, which must be within 12 in. oz. (-85 em. kg.). The balance weights are fitted to the outside rim of the wheel.

Section 0.6 TYRE FITTING The tubeless tyre relies primarily on a good air sea l between the tyre bead and the rim, and also between the rim and the valve. Great care is therefore necessary to avoid the slightest damage to the tyre bead, and the following instructions are of great importance :

Rim prepar ation (1) Remove any visible dents in the flange by careful hammering. (2) Clean the flange and rim seat with steel wool , emery , or other cleaning medium and remove all foreign matter, rust, rubber, etc. Paint need not be removed but irregularities in the surface should be smoothed out. In extreme cases of rusting it may be necessary to use a wire brush or a file.

184b C

I. Insert lever between bead and rim, with curved end against tyre. Press lever towards tyre. 2. Insert second lever in space between lever and rim, with curved end outwards, and pull lever away from tyre. Repeat at intervals round tyre until bead is free. Several circuits of tyre may be necessary.

Fig. 0.3 The tyres have wired edges and no attempt must be made to stretch them. If the cover fits tightly on the rim seating it should be freed by using the tyre levers as indicated

Fig. 0 .5 Lever the cover edge over the rim all round the wheel 0.3


o

www.morrisoxford.com TH E WHEELS AND TYRES With the wheel in an upright position inflate the tyre. If a seal cannot be obtained at the first rush of air bounce the tyre again with the air-line attached. In cases of diffi culty apply a tourn iquet of strong cord around the circumference of the tyre and tighten. When a seal is obtained inflate until the beads are completely forced against both rim flanges. Remove the air-line, insert the valve interior, and inflate to 50 lb.jsq. in. (3'52 kg.jcm.s) for testing.

c

Allow the tyre to stand for a few minutes so that any free air trapped between the flange and the bead clinch can escape. Test the complete assembly in a water tank, paying special attention to the areas at the beads, valve, an d wheel rivets.

8820lW

Sealing leak s locat ed during testing Loss of air may occur at any or all of the following points:

Fig. 0.6 A section through a tubeless tyre A.

Air-retaining liner. B. Rubber air seal. c. Rubber-scaled valve.

(3) File or buff away any high-spot at the butt-weld joint. (4) Wipe the flange and bead scat with a watermoistened cloth. Before fitting moisten the beads of the tyre, the rim flange, and the tyre levers with water; do not use petr ol (gaso line). Mount the tyre on the rim and push one edge of the cover over the edge of the rim; continue working round the tyre towards the valve position. The portion of the tyre first fitted should be kept pushed into the well-base of the wheel rim and then no difficulty will be encountered in fitting the last portion of the cover. Do not forget that the white ba lance spot on the tyre must be in line with the valve position. Before inflation bounce the crown of the tyre on the ground at various points to snap home the beads of the tyre against the rim of the wheel and provide a partial seal.

H31W

Fig. 0.7 Rolling the plug into the needle eye 0.4

(1) The area of the bead seat, showing as a leak at the top of the flange. This is normally due to a high-spot on the rim and can usually be cured by holding the bead away from the rim to allow further cleaning. (2) The wheel rivets . In this case, and in extreme cases of leakage in the area of the bead seat (I), it is necessary to remove the tyre. Before doing so mark the position of the leak on the tyre and rim. Loss of air at the rivets can be cured by peening over the rivet heads. (3) The base of the valve or the valve interior. Provided the valve is correctly fitted , this may be due only to dirt under the valve seat. Clean the area of the valve seat on the wheel and fit a new valve in terior. Inflat e the tyre to the correct pressure before fitting the wheel assembly to the "chicle and driving.

Fig. 0 .8 Inserting the plug and needle through the hole in the tyre


www.morrisoxford.com THE WHEELS AND TYRES

o

4331D

4331C

Fig. 0.9

Fig. 0.10

The inserted plug prior to withdrawing the needle

Plug inserted in tyre and cut off to the correct length

Section 0.7 REPAIRING TYRES Penetrations Normally a tubeless tyre will not leak as the result of penetration by a nail or other puncturing object provided that it is left in the tyre. It is necessary to examine the tyres after every 2,000 miles (3200 km.) and to withdraw such objects at a time when loss of air pressure will cause least inconvenience. Use of plugging kit-location and preparation If a hole fails to seal mark the spot and extract the puncturing object, taking note of the direction of penetration. If the tyre is leaking and the puncturing object cannot be located by sight it is necessary to immerse the inflated tyre in water. Dip the plugging kit needle into the flask of solution and insert it into the hole in the tyre, following the same direction as the penetration. Repeat the operation until the hole is well lubricated with solution. Repair Select a plug about twice the diameter of the puncturing object, stretch it, and roll it into the eye of the needle tin. (6'35 mm.) from the end (Fig. 0.7). After dipping the plug into the solution insert the needle into the hole and push the plug through the tyre (Figs. 0.8 and 0.9). Withdraw the needle and cut off surplus plug about kin. (3,18 mm.) from the surface of the tread (Fig. 0.10).

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 2. 25520

The tyre can now be inflated and used immediately. More severe injuries which are outside the scope of simple puncture repair methods are dealt with in nearly the same way as similar injuries to conventional covers. If the tyre deflates on the road following an unusually large penetration a tube can be fitted to enable the owner to remain on the road until it is convenient for the necessary repairs to be carried out. (The valve used for the tubeless tyre must be removed before the fitting of the tube.)

Section 0 .8 CARE OF TYRES To obtain the best tyre mileage and to obviate irregular wear on the front tyres it is essential that the wheels be interchanged diagonally with the rear wheels and the spare wheel every 3,000 miles (4800 km .). (

.- --

Fig. 0.11 System of wheel changing to regularize tyre wear

0.5


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SECTION P LUBRICATION Se ction

Key to recommended lubricants ..

P.I

Correct lubrication of any piece of mechanism is of paramount importance, and in no instance is it of greater importance than in the correct choice of lubricant for a motor-car engine. Automobile engines have different characteristics, such as operating temperatures, oiling systems, size of oilways, clearances, and similar technicalities, and the use of the correct oil is therefore essential. NOTE.-The letters given in brackets throughout the Manual refer to the appropriate section of the recommended lubricants table given on page P .2.

For additional information see Section PP

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

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LUBRICATION

Section P.I The following is a list of lubricants recommended:

A

E GI

E AND AIR CLEANER

Climatic conditions

Duckham 's

Castro l

Esso

Mo bil

Shell

T ropi cal and ternperate down to 3ZO F. (0° C.)

Duckham's OL Th irty

Castro! X.L.

Esso Extra Mot or Oil 20W/30

Mobiloil A

Shell X-IOO 30

Extreme cold down to 10° F. (_12' C.)

Duckh am's OL Twenty

Castrolite

Esso Extra Motor Oil 20W/30

Mobiloil Arcti c

Arctic consistently below 10° F. (-I ZO

Du ckharn's

Castrol Z

Esso Motor Oil 10

Castrol X.L.

Esso Extra Motor Oil 20W/30

C,)

NOL Ten

BP Energo l

Filtmte

S ternol

Energol S.A.E.30

Medium Filtrate 30

Stern ol W.W.30

Shell X-IOO 20/20W

Ener gol S.A.E.20W

Zero Filt rat e 20

Sternol W.W.20

Mobiloil lOW

Shell X-IOO lOW

Energo l S.A.E . lOW

Sub-Zero Filtrate lOW

Sternol W.W.IO

Mobilo il A

Shell X-IOO 30

Energol S.A.E.30

Medium Filtrate 30

Sternol W.W.30

GEA RBOX All conditions

B

D uckham's NOL Thirty

REAR AXLE (HY POID) AND STEERI 'G GEAR

All conditions down to 10° F. ( _12° C.)

D uckharn's

Arcti c consistently below 10° F. (- 12° C.)

Duckham's H ypoid 80

C

Shell Spirax 90 E.P.

Energol E.P. S.A .E.90

Hypoid Filtrate Gear 90

Ambroleum E.P.90

Castrol Hypoy Light

Esso Expee Compound 80

Mobilube G .X. 80

Shell Spirax 80 E.P.

Energol E.P. S.A.E.80

Hypoid Filtrate Gear 80

Arnbroleum E.P.80

D uckham's L.B. I0 Grease or D uckharn's NOL E. P.140

CastroJease L.M. or Ca strol Hi-Press

Esso Multi- Mobilgrease purpose M.P. or Grease H or Mobilube Esso Expee G ,X, 140 Compound 140

Shell Retinax A or Shell Spirax 140 E.P.

Super Energrease Lithium L. 2 or Filtrate Energol E.P. Grease or S.A.E.14O E.P. Filtrate Gear 140

Ambroline L.H.T. or Ambroleum E.P.140

D uckham's NO L Twenty

Cas trolite

Esso Extra Motor Oil 20W/30

Mobiloil Arctic

Shell X- IOO 20/20W

Energol S.A.E.20W

Zero Filtrate 20

Sternol W.W.20

D uckham's Adcoid Liquid

Castrollo

Esso Upper Cylinder Lubricant

Mobil Upperlube

Shell Upper Cylinder Lubricant

Energol U.C.L.

Filtrate Petroyle

Sternol Magikoyl

Shell Retinax A

Energrease L.2

Super Lithium Filtrate Grease

WHEEL HUBS, HAND BR AK E CA BLE, SPEE D O METER CA BLE

All condi tio ns

P.2

Mobilube G.X. 90

U PPE R CY LINDE R LUBRICA NT

All conditions

F

Esso Expee Compound 90

UT ILITY LU BR ICANT, S.U. CA RBURETTER D ASHPOTS, OILCA N POI NT S, ETC.

All conditions

E

Castrol Hypoy

LUBRICATION N IPPLES (EXCEPT HAND BRAKE CABLE)

All conditions

D

Hypoid 90

Du ckh am's L.B. 10 G rease

Castrolease L.M .

Esso Mu ltipurpose G rease H

Mob ilgrease M .P.

Morris Oxford (Series V).

I I

Am bro line L.H.T.

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SECTION PP LUBRICATION This Sectio n is a Supplement to Section P Section Daily service

PP.)

Engine 1,000 miles (1600 km.) service

PP.2

Steering gearbox Steering idler Lubrication nipples Hand brake cable Gearbox Rear axle Carburetter dampers Carburetter controls Air cleaner (oil bath type only ) 3,000 miles (4800 krn.) service

PP.3

Engine oil change Air cleaner (oil bath type only) Miscellaneous items 6,000 miles (9600 km.) service

PPA

Distributor Gearbox oil change Rear axle oil change Front wheel hub s Engine oil filter Water pump 12,000 miles (19200 km.) service

PP.s

Dynamo Engine-flushing Speedometer cable

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 29549

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LUBRICATION

www.morrisoxford.com ' "11Iu â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘l l~

n,

III

Fig. PP.3 The steering idler filler plug. Top up to the level of the bottom of the filler hole

Section PP.l DAILY SERVICE ENGINE (A) Inspect the oil level in the engine and refill if necessary to the 'MAX' mark on the dipstick. The oil filler cap is on top of the engine valve cover and is released by turning it anti-clockwise.

Section PP.2

grit enters the steering gearbox when removing or replacing the filler plug. STEERING IDLER (B) Check the level of the oil, and top up if necessary with oil to Ref. B (see page P.2). NOTE.-On no account should the steering idler be overlooked with regard to lubrication, as the load thus imposed on the steering gearbox will be very severe and may well cause serious damage to the gearbox.

1,000 MILES (1600 Km.) SERVICE

LUBRICATION NIPPLES (C)

Carry out the instructions detailed in Section PP.I and then continue with the following.

Check the oil level, and top up if necessary with oil to Ref. B (see page P.2). The correct level is flush with the bottom of the filler hole. Take care that no dirt or

Lubrication nipples are situated at the points listed below and should receive several strokes of the grease gun filled to Ref. C (page P.2): (1) Front suspension outer fulcrum pins (one nipple each side). (2) Swivel pins (two nipples each side). This is best done when the vehicle is partly jacked up as the

Fig. PP.2

Fig. PP.4

STEERING GEARBOX (B)

The lubrication nipple for the front universal joint. The sliding joint is lubricated from the gearbox PP.2

The hand brake cable lubricating nipple Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 29549


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LUBRICATION

- -- -

--::>

;

5;) ,-;,...,')')' .' ,.., ,, ' ,,',

<;';;' ;> ,

> /:> > ;>:;', ,, >'//> ':>' / / ; " .

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Fig. PP.7

The arrows indicate the steering lubrication nipples

A rear spring shackle lubrication nipple

lubricant is then able to penetrate properly around the bushes. (3) Steering track-rod and draglink ball joint nipples (one on each joint-six in all). (4) Rear spring shackle pins (one nipple on each rear shackle). (5) Propeller shaft universal joint (two nipples).

The combined filler and level plug situated on the rear of the axle case is reached from below the rear of the car. Use the special key provided in the tool kit. The oil level should be replenished if necessary to the level of the filler plug hole. OTE.-It is essential that only Hypoid oil be used in the rear axle.

HAND BRAKE CABLE (F)

CARBURETTER DAMPER (D)

The nipple on the hand brake cable should be given three or four strokes of the grease gun filled with grease to Ref. F (page P.2).

Unscrew the cap from the top of the suction chamber. pour in a small quantity of thin engine oil, and replace the cap. Under no circumstances should a heavy-bodied lubricant be used. Failure to lubricate the piston damper will cause the piston to flutter and reduce acceleration. An oil indicated under Ref. 0 (page P.2) should be used.

GEARBOX (A) Check the level, and top up if necessary. To reach the combined filler plug and dipstick lift the carpet and remove the rubber cover on the top of the gearbox covering. Remove the plug and dipstick and fill up to the indicated level with oil to Ref. A (page P.2).

e

REAR AXLE (B)

CARBURETTER CONTROLS (D) Using an oil to Ref. 0 (page P.2), lubricate lightly all carburetter linkage.

Fig. PP.8 Fig.PP.6 The engine oil filler cap Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

The combined dipstick and filler plug is located beneath the carpet on the gearbox cover PP.3


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LUBRICATION

Fig. PP.9

Fig. PP.ll

The oil-bath-type air cleaner. The arrows indicate the two clips and rubber spigot mounting

Use thin engine oil to lubricate the carburetter piston damper

Section PP.3 AIR CLEANER (A) Oil bath type only Remove the air cleaner as detailed in Section PP .3. Examine the oil container for sludge. If sludge is present the cleaner must be serviced completely as described in Section PP .3. If there is no accumulation of sludge top up the oil container with engine oil to the level indicated on the side of the bowl. Make sure that the cork gasket is in good condition, then replace the element an d top cover assembly. Secure with the winged bo lt. It is important to maintain the correct oil level in the cleaner. Too high a level will result in the oil being drawn into the combustion spaces and too Iowa level will result in failure to keep the element saturated.

Fig. PP.1O The rear axle oil filler and level plug PP.4

3,000 MILES (4800 Krn.) SERVICE Carry out the instructions detailed in Section PP.2 and continue with the following. ENGINE OIL CHANGE (A) Drain the oil from the engine by removing the drain plug on the right-hand side of the engine sump after a journey when the oil is still warm. The sump capacity is 7路5 pints (9,0 U.S. pints, 4路2 litres), including the oil filter. AIR CLEANER (A) Oil bath type only Release the spring clip and disconnect the rubber breather pipe from the air cleaner. Unscrew the clip securing the air cleaner to the air intake manifold and lift off the air cleaner with an up and sideways movement to clear the locating spigot from its rubber bush.

e

Fig. PP.12 The sump drain plug Morris Oxford (Series V).

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25520


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pp

Remove the retaining bolt from the centre of the top cover. Lift off the top cover and filter element. Wash the filter element in a bowl of paraffin (kerosene), and allow it to drain and dry thoroughly. Lift out the oil container, empty the oil, and scrape out the accumulated sludge. Wash the oil container in kerosene and fill to the level indicated on the side of the bowl with engine oil. It is not necessary to re-oil the filter element; it is done automatically as soon as the engine starts up. Make sure that the cork gasket in the cover is in good condition, reassemble the cleaner, and refit on the engine. MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS With an oilcan filled with oil to Ref. D (page P.2) lubricate lightly all door locks and hinges, the bonnet lock, and operating mechanism.

Fig. PP.14

The gearbox drain plug

Section PP.4 6,000 MILES (9600 Km.) SERVICE Carry out the instructions detailed in Sections PP.2 and PP.3 except those under 'GEARBOX' and 'REAR AXLE' (Section PP.2), and continue with the following. DISTRIBUTOR Cam bearing (D) Lift the rotor off the top of the spindle by pulling it squarely and add a few drops of thin engine oil (Ref. D, page P.2) to the cam bearing. Do not remove the screw which is exposed. There is a clearance between the screw and the inner face of the spindle for the oil to pass. Replace the rotor with its drive lug correctly engaging the spindle slot and push it onto the shaft as far as it will go.

•\

Cam (F) Lightly smear the cam with a very small amount of grease (Ref. F, page P.2), or if this is not available clean engine oil can be used. Automatic timing control (D) Carefully add a few drops of thin engine oil (Ref. D, page P.2) through the hole in the contact breaker base through which the cam passes. Do not allow the oil to get on or near the contacts. Do not over-oil. Contact breaker pivot (D) Add a spot of engine oil (Ref. D, page P.2) to the moving contact pivot pin . GEARBOX OIL CHANGE (A) Drain the gearbox oil. When the gearbox has been drained completely 4·5 Imperial pints (2'56 litres, 5·4 U.S. pints) of oil are required to fill it. The oil should be poured in through the combined filler and dipstick hole shown in Fig. PP.8.

~\\\\W,

Fig. PP.13 The lower arrow indicates where to lubricate the cam bearing. Apply a smear of grease to the cam as indicated by the upper arrow Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 3. 29549

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LUBRICATION

Fig. PP.l6 A front wheel hub grease-retaining cap

REAR AXLE OIL CHANGE (B) Remove the drain plug and drain out the oil. Refill with Hypoid oil (Ref. B, page P.2) to the level of the filler plug hole. Approximately 2-1 pints (1,28 litres, 2路7 U.S. pints) of oil are required to refill the axle. FRONT WHEEL HUBS (F) Remove the front wheel hub covers and prise off the grease-retaining cap from the end of each hub. Refill with grease (Ref. F, page P.2) and replace. ENGINE OIL FILTER Fit a new external engine oil filter element. The filter element is released by unscrewing the centre-fixing bolt and withdrawing the filter. Fit a new felt-type element and replace the filter bowl, ensuring that the joint washer is correctly positioned, clean, and serviceable. Care must also be taken to ensure that the washers below the element inside the bowl are fitted correctly. The small felt washer must be positioned between the element pressure plate and the metal washer above the pressure spring. It is essential for correct oil filtration that the felt washer should be in good condition and be a snug fit on the centre-securing bolt. WATER PUMP Every 6,000 miles (9600 km.) remove the water pump oiling plug on the water pump casing and add a small quantity of S.A.E. 140 oil. The oiling of the pump must be done very sparingly, otherwise oil will flow past the bearings onto the face of the carbon sealing ring and impair its efficiency.

Fig. PP.17 Indicated by the arrow is the centre-securing bolt for the engine filter

ENGINE-FLUSHING (A) Remove the engine sump drain plug and allow the old oil to drain completely. Replace the drain plug and partially refill the engine with approximately 4 pints (2,27 litres, 4路8 U.S. pints) of flushing oil manufactured by one of the approved oil companies on page P.2. Run the engine at a fast idling speed for three minutes. After stopping the engine special care must be taken to ensure complete drainage of the flushing oil. Replace the sump drain plug and fill the engine with oil to Ref. A (page P.2). SPEEDOMETER CABLE (F) Every 12,000 miles (19200 km.) the speedometer outer casing should be unscrewed from the speedometer head and the inner cable extracted and lubricated sparingly with grease to Ref. F (page P.2); oil must not be used. After returning the inner cable into its outer casing the upper end should be withdrawn approximately 8 in. (20 cm.) and the surface grease wiped off before reconnecting it to the speedometer head.

Section PP.5 12,000 MILES (19200 Km.) SERVICE Carry out the instructions detailed in Sections PP.2, PP.3, and PPA BDd continue with the following. DYNAMO (D) Add two drops of engine oil (Ref. 0, page P.2) in the lubrication hole in the centre of the rear end bearing plate. Do Dot over-oil. PP.6

Fig. PP.18 The water pump oiling plug Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3. 29549


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R

SECTION R THE BODY Section

Repair procedure

Rol

00

R.4

Torch-soldering Welding Methods

R.2

Technique

R.3

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue I.

25520

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R

THE BODY

Sec tion R.t REPAIR PROCEDURE Body jack The specially designed body jack, obtainable under Part No. 18G308, is an absolutely essential item when rectifying any misalignment of the body construction. The jack is provided with a ratchet turnscrew, and the pitch of the centre spindle thread is such that considerable force (either pulling or pushing) can be exerted. The extension pieces are made from solid drawn steel tubes and their lengths are such that the effective length of the jack can be made to vary between 21 and 94 in. (546 and 2362 mm.), The body jack is supplied in a metal box by B.M .C. Service Ltd. at current prices. When using the jack care must be taken to use it in the correct positions to rectify the fault or misalignment. Reference should be made to the end of Section R R fo r the necessary alignment checks. With the addition of a suitable oxy-acetylene ou tfit (Section R .3) any type of mono-construction repair can be effected. The initial outlay need only be small, and, considering the wide range of operations covered, there should be no hesitation in deciding that the kit must figure as part of the equipment of your repair shop. Rectification of buckled panels or underframe Experience will prove that parts of the body which at first sight would be considered beyond repair can be rectified easily by the use of the body jack. It is of paramount importance to return the damaged portion of the body to its original position before decid ing whether rep lacement panels are necessary or not. With the use of the special jack this method enables a buckled or damaged structure to be returned to its original relative position without straining the surrounding metal, which would be the inevitable result if the

Fig. R.I

Removing a dent by tapping with a spoon; a dolly is held below the dent R.2

Fig. R.2

A dolly block and mallet da maged portion were pounded by means of a hammer. At this stage a decision can be reached as to whether any damaged panel is to be repaired or renewed. Spoon for removal of small dents To remove small dents a spoon which is made from a coarse-cut file, specially shaped and having the teeth intact, is used in conjunction with a suitably shaped dolly block (Fig. R.l). The use of a hammer to remove small dents is to be deprecated, as hammer-blows tend to stretch the surrounding metal, giving rise to further complications. It is for this reason that the spoon is recommended, as by its use a depression can be raised to its original level without stretching. O n panel work such as doors, or where inside reinforcements prevent the use of a dolly block, a hole can be punched or drilled through the inside panel and a suitable drift pin, about! in. (13 mm.) in diameter, used in conjunction with the spoon in place of the dolly block. Sharper dents or a dent or collection of dents covering a large area will require the use of heat, a dolly, and a spoon in the following manner. With the welding torch heat a small area at the outside of the collection of dents, then, holding the dolly below, hammer the raised portion with a wooden mallet. When the metal cools remove the dolly and place a large handful of wet asbestos over the heated area to prevent the heat spreading. Continue to heat and tap, working from the outside of the damaged area, until something like the original contour and level is attained. Lightly file the surface to show up the high-spots and remove these with the dolly and spoon without further heating. Take care when using the file not to thin the metal more than is necessary to show up the high-spots. Alternative checking by filing and raising with the dolly block and spoon will eventually produce a flat an d clean surface without weakening the metal unduly, pr ovided excessive filing is avoided. Care should be Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 1. 25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE BO DY

R

Fig. R.3 Heating the damaged area before tapping with a mallet exercised to reduce filing to a minimum as otherwise the thickness of the panel will be seriously reduced. On completion, the surface may be tinned and any small indentations filled with plumber's solder. Preservation of paintwork A special spoon, having the teeth removed and its surface planished and polished, is required to enable small dents to be removed without damage to paintwork. Where it is possible to preserve paintwork when rectifying comparatively large dents a sandbag should be placed against the painted surface of the panel and the dent removed from the under side by the use of a wooden mallet. A suitable sandbag for this operation may be mad e from a leather oval bag 8 in. (203 mm.) long, 6 in. (152 mm.) wide. and 4 in. (102 mm.) thick which is packed tightly with sand. Stretched panels Stretched panels which are liable to cau se drumming can be rectified by local shrinking. A liberal heap of wet asbestos is placed over the stretched panel at the point of greatest resiliency, and a hole just large enough to apply

Fig. R.5 Piercing holes in the wet asbestos prior to heating the flame of the oxy-acetylene tor ch is made with a finger through the centre of the as bestos. Th e portion of the panel which is visible is heated to a cherry-red colour and is afterwards cooled off by the wet asbestos which surrounds it. For large panels it may be necessary to repeat this operation several times at different locations over the area. Where a panel is stretched over a fairly extensive area an d produces what is kn own as an 'oilcan' effect the following shrinking method should be used to restore the original conto ur. Mix a quantity of wet asbestos sufficient to cover the damaged area with a thickness as shown in Fig . R.5 Press the asbestos down firmly to ensure that no air is

-

- ". .

'",

..... ,....

8974

H

Fig. R.4

Fig. R.6

Cooling the damaged area with wet asbestos

Heating a stretched panel through holes in the asbestos

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 1. 25520

R.3


R

THE BOD Y

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trapped below, as it is important to confine the applied heat to the points of application. With a finger pierce a series of holes in the asbestos extending to the surface of the metal. Direct the flame of the welding torch to one of the holes near the perimeter of the asbestos and heat the metal to cherry red, remove the torch, and immediately press the surrounding asbestos into the hole (Fig. R.6). Carry out the same procedure with the remaining holes, working around the asbestos and inwards towards the centre. When the asbestos is removed the surface is cleaned up in the usual manner.

Patching It is frequently more economical to patch an extensively damaged panel than to renew the entire assembly. This type of repair does not in the least weaken the surrounding structure, as a patch which is correctly

Fig. R.8

The formed patch held in position by gas-weld tacks

The patch is now fastened at intervals of 2 to 3 in. (51 to 76 mm.) to the panel by means of gas-weld tacks (Fig. R.8). During the tacking operation it should be reshaped to the panel to ensure that the contour is correct. To prevent expansion and possible buckling of the surrounding panel during the welding operation a liberal quantity of wet asbestos must be placed on the panel round the patch, approximately Âąin. (6 mm.) away from the joint (Fig. R.9). The joint is now gas-welded between the tacks, whilst precautions are taken to keep the patch to the correct contour by using a suitable dolly block and bumping hammer. On completion, any excrescences in the welding are removed by filing and,

Fig. R.7

A damaged panel with piece removed for patching

gas-welded in position is equal in strength to the original structure. A patch can be introduced so efficiently that it is impossible to trace its presence. The damaged portion of the panel should be cut out with a cold chisel or, if possible , by means of a hacksaw. The edges of the opening should then be filed until an even contour is obtained (Fig. R.7) . The patch to be fitted should preferably be cut from sheet metal of similar gauge and specification to that being repaired. First, it is rough-shaped to the contour of the panel, after which it is fitted to the opening to allow a clearance on all sides equal to the gauge of the metal. In all probability, particularly during welding operations, difficulty will be experienced in holding the patch in place. This can be overcome satisfactorily by welding one or two short pieces of welding wire to act as convenient handles. R.4

Fig. R.9

Surround the joint with wet asbestos to prevent buck ling during welding Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue I.

25520


www.morrisoxford.com THE BOD Y after straightening with the dolly block and bumping hammer, the patching is finally finished by tinning and solder-filling as described on pages R.8 and R.9. Patch forming Where it is necessary to 'form' a patch from the flat sheet to any particular contour a wooden or lead raising block is generally employed. The raising block should have several elliptical depressions of varying depths and diameters. The patch is placed over the selected depression and is raised by hammering with the ball-peen end of a hammer, starting from the outer edges and gradually working towards the centre. A mistake frequently made is to strike too hard whilst raising the centre, with the result that the curve is of greater depth than that required. Repair of beadings and mouldings Where difficulty is experienced in straightening or renewing a beading, moulding, or corner the original contour may be obtained by careful tinning and filling with plumber's solder. The finished work will be equal in appearance and equal in strength, whilst the substitution of soldering for straightening, or renewing, will save the necessity for removing inside trimmings, etc. Filing It should be clearly understood that in every case filing must be reduced to a minimum owing to the thinness of the material. Wrinkles or ridges should be removed by the spoon or dolly block, as explained on page R.2, and finished finally by tinning and solderfilling. Replacing panels In cases of extreme damage it will be found more economical to remove the damaged portions and replace them with new panels which are obtainable from B.M.C. Service Ltd. Owing to the fact that damage is usually localized, it will only infrequently be found necessary to remove a complete panel or unit. In the great majority of cases the damaged portion can be removed and a corresponding part cut from a replacement unit and located in position by gas-welding.

Section R.2 WELDING METHODS Spot-welds This form of welding is used extensively throughout the assembly of the mono-construction body. The units to be joined are pressed together between two copper electrodes through which an electric current of low voltage and high amperage is passed. The resistance of the steel to the electric current raises the metal to welding temperature and the pressure between the electrodes produces complete fusion. The resulting joint Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue I.

25520

R

is as strong as the surrounding structure, and a correctly made spot-weld will not break or become loose by vibration. Spot-welds cannot be broken satisfactorily by inserting a cold chisel or lever between the two panels. Each weld must be carefully drilled in the centre, using a drill approximately ilr in. (4,76 mm .) in diameter. There is no necessity to drill through both panels as it is sufficient if the point of the drill merely penetrates the second panel. The weld is finally broken by inserting a thin, sharp, cold chisel between the joint and tapping it lightly with a hammer. On panels where the spot-welds are covered by paint it is necessary to use a suitable paint remover to clean the paint from the joints. The spot-welds will easily be located by the discoloration of the metal. Reference to the body buil d-up illustrations will facilitate tracing the various joints. Gas-weld s A gas-weld may be broken either by cutting with a hacksaw or, alternatively, with a sharp cold chisel. Place a suitable support at the back of the panel to act as an anvil whenever possible. Lap-welds Most lap-welds used in the mono-construction body are hidden from view by solder-filling. Reference should be made to the illustrations showing the build-up of the body in order to obtain the location of the various lap joints. This will enable the operator to direct the flame of the oxy-acetylene blowpipe onto the joint so that the solder filling can be melted and removed by the use of a duster. A lap-weld is broken by drilling out the spotwelds as previously explained. Butt-welds A butt-weld can be broken by the use of a hammer and chisel, the blows being directed against the panel which is to be renewed. If this method does not quickly break the weld heat applied from the oxy-acetylene torch will soften the fused edges, thus assisting the operation . Alternatively, the joint may be cut by a hacksaw. Remaking welds The special section of this Manual devoted to welding should be studied carefully before any attempt is made to re-weld a joint on the body by an operator who has not had the necessary experience in this class of work. When ajoint is remade it is necessary , prior to painting, to clean the surface of the weld. During this operation, as previously mentioned, care should be taken to see that the structure is not unnecessarily weakened by excessive grinding or filing. It is preferable to hammer the joint so that it lies slightly lower than the surrounding metal and to flow solder into the depression . No amount of filing on the surface of the solder can reduce the strength of the joint below (see Section RA). When placing a new panel in po sition it should be joined where possible by gas welding through the holes R.5


R

THE BODY (8) (9) (10) (11)

A

Fig. R.lO High-pressure oxy-acetylene welding outfit Outlet pressure gauge (0). Cylinder contents gauge (0). c. Valve. D. Pressure regulating screw. E. Oxygen cylinder (BLACK). F. Outlet pressure gauge (A). A.

G.

D.

H. I.

J. K.

Cylinder contents gauge (A). Valve. Pressure regulating screw. Acetylene cylinder (MAROON). Blowpipe interchangeable nozzles.

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Welding goggles and spark lighter. Welding rods. Welding fluxes. TrolIey for accommodating complete equipment and cylinders.

Assembly (I) Stand bo th cylinders vertical1y on the ground or on a trolIey. Oxygen cylinders are painted BLACK. Acetylene cylinders are painted MAROON. Never attempt to interfere with the colour of cylinders or to repaint them. (2) See that jointing surfaces in cylinder valves and regulato rs are free from oil or grease. (3) O pen the valve on the oxygen cylinder momentarily in order to dislodge dirt or obstruction in the cylinder valve, then close. (4) Screw the oxygen regulator (painted BLACK) into the oxygen cylinder valve. The oxygen cylinder valve o utlet and oxygen regulator connection have right-hand screw threads. (5) Screw the acetylene regulator (painted MA RO ON) into the acetylene cylinde r valve. The acetylene cylinder valve outlet and acetylene regulator connection have left-hand screw threads. (6) Tighten the regulator in the cylinder valve. Do not use excessive force, bu t make certain that the joints are gas tight. (7) Co nnect the hose (acetylene RED, oxygen BLACK) to the screwed outlets of the regulators by means of the screwed connections secured in the ends of the hose. Blow the hose through before attaching to the regulator or blowpipe in order to remove dust or dirt and to remove chalk when the hose is new. (8) Connect the other end of the hose, that fitted with a hose protector, to the blowpipe-the acetylene

drilled in breaking the original spot-welds. During the welding operations a liberal heap of wet asbestos should be placed over the surrounding panels to prevent buckling and distortion due to heat.

Section R.3 WELDI G TEC H IQ UE The folIowing techniques apply to equipment supplied by the British Oxygen Co. Ltd ., although they also apply, in the main, to other similar equipment. Welding equipment High-pressure oxy-acetylene welding equipment using dissolved acetylene is recommended. This consists of: (1) Supply of acetylene in cylinders. (2) Supply of oxygen in cylinders. (3) Blowpipe with necessary nozzles. (4) Acetylene pressure regulator. (5) Oxygen pressure regulator. (6) Tw o lengths of rubber-canvas hose. (7) Set of spanners and spindle key.

R.6

,,"'A Fif:. R.II Type 1l.O.R.12A two-stage oxygen regulator Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue I.

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THE BODY

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WELDING HIGH-PRESSURE BLOWPIPES Nozzle Sizes, Working Pressures, and Gas Consumptions for Various Metal Thicknesses M.S. plate thickness Nozzle size in.

mm. (approx.)

-b

·8

-A

1·2 1·6 2·4 3·2 4·0 4·8 6·4 8·0

*:&i **t -&

Regulator pressures, oxygen and acetylene Saffire equipment

Approximate consumption of each gas

lb.lsq. in.

kg.lcm?

cu. ft.lhr.

2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 4

·14 ·14 ·14 ·14 '14 ·21 ·21 ·21 ·28

2 3 5 7 10 13 18 25

I 2 3 5 7 10 13 18 25

hose to the connection marked 'A', the oxygen to the connection marked 'a'. Keep the blowpipe control valves closed. (A high- or low-pressure blowpipe can be used with the dissolved acetylene. If a low-pressure blowpipe is used the acetylene pressure should never exceed 2 lb.jsq. in. [,14 kg./cm.2].) (9) Fix the appropriate nozzle to the blowpipe. (See the table above.) (10) Open the cylinder valves very slowly by means of the cylinder key. Do not open suddenly, or there may be serious damage to the regulator and the possibility of an accident. Open the cylinder valve spindle one turn only.

1

m. 3/hr . ·028 ·056 ·084 ·140 ·196 ·283 ·367 ·504 ·700

Fig. R.13 The welding blowpipe (II) Set the regulators at the correct working pressures. (See the table.) (12) Open the acetylene control valve on the blowpipe, wait a few seconds until the air is blown out and pure acetylene is coming from the blowpipe nozzle, then light. preferably by means of a spark lighter, type S.L.I . (13) Reduce or increase the acetylene supply by the blowpipe valve until the flame just ceases to smoke. (14) Turn on the oxygen by the blowpipe control valve until the white inner cone in the flame is sharply defined, with the merest trace of an acetylene haze. The blowpipe is now adjusted for welding steel, and work may be commenced. The size of nozzle given for a particular thickness of steel is for general guidance only and will vary according to the skill of the welder, mass of metal, etc. The capacity of each nozzle overlaps the capacities of those next in size to it. The values given are for down hand butt-welds in mild steel. For other techniques nozzle size and pressure may have to be varied slightly, e.g. for copper select a larger nozzle, for aluminium a smaller nozzle. in. (1'59 On thin-gauge steel up to and including mm.) thickness tacks should be slightly closer togethersay, 1 to l-!- in . (25 to 38 mm.) apart-to keep the edges in alignment and minimize distortion. For the same reason patches should, wherever possible be oval or circular. Before welding, these should be slightly 'dished' below the level of the surface to be

n

Fig. R.12 Type B.A.R.9 two-stage acetylene regulator Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 1. 25520

R.7


R

THE BODY

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Fig. R.16 Tinning by heating the flux painted area Fig. R.14 Painting the hollow area with flux patched, since welding-even by the correct 'sequence'will cause them to expand and rise. Do not light the blowpipe until everything else has been prepared for welding in accordance with the instructions given above. On completion of the job proceed as follows: (I) Turn off the acetylene first by the blowpipe control valve, and then the oxygen. (2) Close the cylinder valves. (3) Open the blowpipe valves one at a time to release the pressure in the hose-open the oxygen valve and shut it, open the acetylene valve and shut it. (4) Unscrew the pressure regulating screws on the oxygen and acetylene regulators. (5) In the case of backfire turn off the oxygen first.

Section R.4 TORCH-SOLDERING Torch-soldering is the method employed to obtain the desired contour of a panel without weakening the struc-

R.8

ture and with the minimum amount of straightening, filing, and polishing. The solder used is an alloy of lead and tin. Lead melts at a temperature of 621 0 F. (32r C) and tin at 450 0 F. (232 0 C). Alloys of the two metals change from a solid to a liquid state over this range of temperature within which they are in a plastic condition. The alloys used for torch-soldering are known as tinrnan's solder (which contains 60 per cent. lead and 40 per cent. tin) and plumber's solder (which contains 70 per cent. lead and 30 per cent. tin). Tinman's solder, as a result of its higher tin content, alloys more readily with the surface of the sheet steel and is applied as a 'base' to which the plumber's solder adheres firmly. Plumber's solder remains plastic over a wide range of temperature (from 509 to 358 0 F. [265 to 1810 C]), and within this range can be moulded to any desired shape. For this reason it is used to obtain the required contours. Where it is desired to build up a contour with solder the surface of the steel must first of all be cleaned thoroughly. Rust, scale, welding oxide, or any other impurity must be removed by means of a wire brush,

Fig. R.l5

Fig. R.17

Applying the solder

Spreading the solder Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue I.

25520


THE BODY file, and emery-cloth. A polishing wheel, if available, is useful for this operation. The surface of the metal is heated gently with a blowlamp or gas-torch, and soldering flux applied with a brush (see Fig. R.14). The flux will melt and act upon the heated surface so that when tinrnan's solder is applied and rubbed with a wad of hemp the metal will become evenly coated with a thin layer of solder, or 'tinned' (Fig. R.16). The secret of successful torch-soldering lies in the thoroughness with which the tinning operation is carried out as it is the foundation on which the plumber's solder is to be built up. A second application of flux should be made and gently heated by means of the torch. When wiped by the

Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue I.

25520

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wad of hemp the entire surface of the metal should have a spotlessly clean and bright appearance. Plumber's solder is now melted onto the surface (Fig. R.lS) and maintained by careful use of the torch in the plastic condition whilst it is moulded to the desired contour with a hardwood paddle coated with palm oil (Fig. R.l?). During the moulding operation frequent immersion of the paddle in palm oil assists in the manipulation of the solder. If palm oil is not available boiled linseed, lard or machine oil will be found satisfactory. The final contour is obtained by filing or, if available, by the use of a polishing wheel. If the work is carefully carried out it should be impossible to trace the presence of the filling.

R.9


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RR

SECTION RR THE BODY Section

Lubrication Adjusting the door striker ..

RR .6

Back-light (First-type surround) removing and replacing

RR.2

(Second-type surround) removing and replacing

RR.15

Body-checking data Bumpers-removing and replacing

End of Section RR.ll

Door Glasses-removing and replacing

RR.3

Locks-removing and replacing

RR .5

Trim panel-removing and replacing

RR.4

Fascia panels -removing and replacing

RR .17

Front grille assembly-removing ..

RR.lO

Instruments and controls-removing and replacing

RR.16

Maintenance of bodywork and upholstery

RR .12

Outside door handle-removing and replacing

RR .9

Rear quarter-tights-removing and replacing

RR.18

Rear seat and seat frame-removing and replacing

RR.21

Tail gate assembly-removing and replacing

RR.19

Tail gate window assembly-removing and replacing

RR .20

Trunk lid lock-removing and replacing

RR.8

Window regulator-removing and replacing

RR.7

Windshield glass (First-type surro und) removing and replacing

RR.l

(Second-type surround) removing and replacing

RR.14

Windshield washer-fitting instructions Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 4. 29550

RR.13 RR.l


RR

THE BODY

LUBRICATION An oilcan filled with oil to Ref. D (page P.2) should be used sparingly on the door locks and hinges, bonnet lock mechanism, and the front lid prop every 3,000 miles (4800 km.). Coat the door and trunk lid striker plates lightly with grease at the same time.

Section RR.l REMOVING AND REPLACING THE ~SH[ELD GLASS First-type surround Remove the five screws securing the demister vent rail to the fascia top and lift off the rail. Unscrew the three screws securing each interior side capping and remove the cappings from the windshield pillars. When the rail has been removed the fascia top rear fixing screws will be revealed, and these should be removed also. The fascia top is secured at the front by five screws located along the under side of the crash pad. After extracting these screws the fascia top can be lifted away. Pull back the inner flange of the rubber channel and remove the screws securing the outer finishers. Slide the centre cappings along onto one of the finishers and remove the finishers. Press the glass out from the inside of the car, commencing at a corner, and carefully ease the sealing rubber from the windshield aperture flange. To refit the windshield, first place the glass on a bench (suitably covered to prevent scratching the windshield), and fit the rubber channel. Make sure that the glass is right home in the channel. To ease fitting insert a length of cord (approximately 15 ft. [4,57 m.] long) into the channel to be fitted over the windshield aperture flange. The cord should be passed all round the windshield until the free ends overlap and hang from the channel.

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The ends should be long enough to allow a good pull when the windshield is fitted. The windshield should be offered up to the windshield aperture from outside the car and pressed against the flange by a second operator. One end of the cord can now be pulled from the inside of the car to draw the inner lip of the rubber channel over the windshield flange. Ensure that the glass is central in the rubber channel. Seelastik sealing compound should be injected between the outer lip of the rubber seal and the glass, using, if possible, an Expandite pressure applicator gun fitted with a special f6" in. (4'5 mm.) bore brass tube nozzle. The Seelastik compound must be evenly distributed around the windshield, and to ensure this the outside lip should be firmly pressed down with the fingers or a wooden roller to spread the sealing compound under the rubber seal. Press the two exterior finishers against the rubber surround whilst a second operator lines up the clips with the flange holes from inside the car. Replace and tighten the securing screws evenly to pull the finishers against the rubber surround. Slide the centre cappings over the joints and finishers. Refit the fascia top, demister vent rail, and interior side cappings. NOTE.-For information on the fitting of the secondtype windshield surround, and the clearance of demister tubes and ducts, refer to Section RR.14.

Section RR.2 REMOVI G AND REPLACI G THE BACK-LIGHT First-type surround Pull back the rubber moulding inside the car, and with the moulding held in this position remove the screws securing the outer finishers. Push out the light from the inside of the car complete with outer finishers, starting at the corners and taking care not to damage the sealing rubber. To refit the back-light follow the instructions given in Section RR.l for the windshield. NOTE.-For information on the fitting of the secondtype back-light surround refer to Section RR.15.

Section RR. 3 REMOVING AND REPLACING DOOR GLASSES

Fig. RR.l The method of securing the windshield (first-type surround) is clearly shown in this illustration 1. Rubber channel. 2. Finisher.

RR.2

3. Clip. 4. Securing screw.

Remove the door inner trimming as detailed in Section RR.4. Remove the three screws retaining the window stop. Remove the bolt at the bottom of the quarter-light vertical window channel (the bolt is located behind a sealing patch). Remove the contour strips from the lower edges of the window aperture. Wind the window down to its fullest extent and turn the glass round through 90째 to disengage it from the channels and regulator lever. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 4. 29550


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RR

THE BODY

Fig. RR.2

Fig. RRA

The recessed-head screws securing the exterior windshield finisher (first-type) are located behind the inner lip oj the rubber moulding

The glass is now free to be removed from the aperture in the top of the door. Replace by reversing these instructions.

Quarter-lights Remove the door inner trimming as detailed in Section RRA. Unscrew the three screws securing the window stop and remove the stop. Lower the window to its fullest extent and remove the bolt at the bottom of the quarter-light vertical channel. Remove the contour strips from the lower edges of the window aperture and the 'silent channel' from the top of the aperture. The quarter-light is secured by two recessed-head screws located in the door sealing rubber fixing channel. Lift away the sealing rubber and remove the screws. Pull the quarter-light towards the centre of the window aperture and remove it complete with vertical channel. Replacement of the quarter-light is a reversal of these instructions.

Fig. RR.3 The method ofpulling out the cord to draw the lip ofthe rubber moulding over the windshield aperture flange Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 25520

Ashtray removal

Section RR.4 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE DOO R TRIM PANEL Remove the two screws to release the front door-pull. The rear door-pull is secured to the trim panel and is removed with it. Open the ashtray and press in the top spring (A) to withdraw the container. Remove the two self-tapping screws (B) to release the holder (see Fig . RRA). Push the inner escutcheon (c) clear of the shank of the interior remote control and window regulator handles and push out the exposed pins (D) to release the handles (see Fig. RR.5). The trim panel is held in position by spring clips (H) and should be carefully prised away from the door, starting at the bottom edge and working up the sides until the door capping is reached . Careful bumping on the top of the door capping, at the same time pulling up the trim panel, will release the clips retaining the capping,

",

"

: :.,;

...

." . 6.

"

..

; , ' ".: . ' . 5548

Fig. RR.5 Pushing out the interior handle retaining pin

RR.3


RR

THE BODY

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contact with the lock case as shown; the holes in the remote control are elongated for this purpose. Tighten the screws securing the remote control. On front doors remove the locking peg. Replace the door trim as described in Section RRA. Lubricate all working parts with oil to Ref. D (page P.2).

Fig. RR.6 Door lock assembly

which is attached on its reverse side to the trim panel. The rear panel is removed in the same way. Replacement is a reversal of the above instructions.

Section RR.5 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE DOOR LOCKS Removing the door locks Remove the door trim panels as described in Section RRA. Remove the circlip and washer that hold the remote control lever connecting link to a dowel on the lock lever (I). Unscrew the three screws that secure the remote control to the door panel and remove the remote control. Remove the three screws that secure the lock unit to the door panel and remove the lock unit. It is not normally necessary to disturb the outside door handle, except when fitting a replacement handle or adjusting its position on the door panel. In the latter event the nut (L) and the Phillips screw (M) should be slackened sufficiently to allow the handle to be repositioned; both are accessible through plastic-plugged apertures in the inner door panel. The striker unit is retained by three screws (N) to an adjustable tapping plate inside the door pillar. Do not disturb the assembly unless it is necessary to fit a new striker plate or to make adjustments. Fitting the door locks Secure the appropriate handle to the door from the inside by a nut (L) and a Phillips screw and washer. Do not finally tighten the handle at this stage. Insert the push button through its aperture in the door, ensure that the button moves freely through the outside handle, then secure the lock unit with the three washers and screws and tighten the nut and screw on the handle; refit the plastic plugs in the inner door panel. The remote control lock must be fitted in the locked position. In the case of front doors the remote control lock is supplied pegged in the locked position. Fit the connecting link onto the stud on the lock lever and secure it with the washer and circlip. Align the assembly by sliding the remote control towards the lock assembly until the lock lever (I) is in

RRA

Section RR.6 ADJUSTING THE DOOR STRIKER Adjustment of the striker position is only necessary when the striker itself has been replaced. Do not interfere with its setting otherwise. Positioning is carried out by a process of trial and error-proved by checking the door closing action and the position of the door when closed. Slacken off the striker screws just enough to allow the striker to be tapped into a slightly different position and retighten the screws.

Section RR.7 REM OVING AND REPLACING THE WINDOW REGULATOR Remove the interior door trimming as in Section RRA. Front Remove the four set screws from the spindle plate and the four set screws securing the winding mechanism to the door shell. Remove the half-bolt from the bottom of the window channel. The mechanism and regulator are now free to be removed through the apertures in the lower half of the door. For the replacement, reverse these instructions. Rear Remove the four set screws which secure the mechanism to the door shell. Slide the regulator from its channel at the base of the window. To replace, reverse the above instructions.

B

C

Fig. RR.7 The door lock and remote control mechanism Morris Oxford (Series V).

"001

Issue 2. 25520


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RR

THE BODY Section RR.8 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE TR UNK LID LOCK To remove the trunk lid lock extract the four set screws and washers securing the lock mechanism to the lid. The trunk handle is retained by the two lower lock retaining bolts.

Section RR.12 MAINTENANCE OF BOD YWORK AND UPHOLSTERY

Section RR.9 REMOVING AND REPLACIN G THE O UTSIDE DOOR HANDLE Remove the trim panel as in Section RR.4. Remove the door lock as detailed in Section RR.5. Withdraw the Phillips recessed screw securing the front of the handle to the door from the inside of the panel. Remove the 2 B.A. nut and spring washer from the stud locating the rear of the handle to the panel. Replacement is a reversal of the above procedure.

Section RR.I 0 REMOVING THE FR ONT GRILLE ASSEMBLY Remove the two screws, spring washers, and flat washers which secure the top half of the grille to the valance at each end. Remove the recessed-head screws retaining the three vertical grille supports to the apron. Remove the pilot lamp glass and extract the four screws securing the rim to the front wing. Access to these screws is gained from inside the wing. The grille assembly complete with pilot lamp rims is now free to be withdrawn from the vehicle. Replacement is a reversal of the above procedure.

It is advisa ble to wash the coachwork of the car with an abundant quantity of water to remove all traces of dust, mud, and traffic film. Polish the paintwork frequently with a good-quality car polish free from abrasive. Wash the chromium parts frequently with soap and war m water, and when the dirt has been removed polish the surface with a clean dry cloth, or a chamois-leather until bright. Metal polishes, or abrasives of any sort, must not be used on chromium, but a good-quality metal polish may be used on stainless steel. When cleaning windshields it is advisable to use methylated spirits (denatured alcohol) to remove tar spots and other stains. It has been found that the use of some silicon- and wax-based polishes for this purpose can be detrimental to the windshield wiper blades. The upholstery of the car should be cleaned periodically by wiping over with a damp cloth; a little neutral soap may be used if necessary. Neither detergents, caustic soaps, nor spirits of any kind must be used. Accumulations of dirt, if left too long, eventually work into the pores of the leather, giving a soiled appearance.

Section RR.13 WINDSHIELD WASHER FITTING INSTRUCTIONS

Section RR.l l REMOVING AND REPLACING THE BUMPERS Fro nt The bumper is attached to the body frame at each side by two arms which protrude from below the bumper apron. These arms are secured at the body by set screws and spring washers (two each side) and by nuts, spring washers, and studs (the studs being an integral part of the bumper) at the bumper end. Remove the set screws, spring washers, and rubber packing pieces (one each side) attaching the ends of the bumper to the body. If over-riders are fitted they are retained by a nut and spring washer, the stud (integral with the over-rider) passing through the bumper support arms. Rear The rear bumper is attached to the body in an identical manner to the front but with one exception, i.e. the battery must be disconnected, following which the number-plate lamp must be removed from its location and put in the boot out of harm's way. Morris Oxford (Series V).

As can be seen from the instructions, either the bumpers alone or bumpers complete with their support arms can be rem oved. Replacement is a reversal of these instructions in both cases.

Issue 3. 29549

Fluid container bracket Secure the fluid container bracket to the right-hand radiator support using the two existing bolts in the support. Place the fluid container in the bracket and secure it with the clamp bolt provided. P ump assembly Unscrew the knob and the screwed bush from the pump assembly and remove the washer. Fit the pump to the bracket beneath the fascia panel and secure it with the washer and the screwed bush. Refit the knob. Jet assemblies The jet assemblies are fitted to the vehicle during production. Delivery hoses Connect one end of the 1\ in. (4,76 mm .) diameter tubing to anyone of the pump connections; connect the other end of the tubing to the cap and tube assembly on the container. Connect one end of the shortest tube to the remaining pump connection and the other end of the RR.5


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RR

THE BODY

Fig. RR.8 The windshield surround (second type) in section 1. Windsh ield aperture flange. 2. Windshield glass.

3. Rubber channel. 4. Exterior finisher.

tube to the three-way junction piece. Fit one end of each jet hose to the three-way junction piece and the other end of each hose to its respective jet. Priming Fill the container to within I in. (25,4 mm.) of the top with clean water or windshield washer fluid. Depress and release the plun ger continuously until fluid emerges from the jets. Adjust the jet nozzles so that the jets make contact with the wind shield at the top of the wiper sweep.

Section RR.14 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE WINDSHIELD GLASS Second-type surround The second-type windshield surround incorporates a modified rubber channel and exterior finishers. The exterior finishers are retained by the rubber only and securing screws are not required. The rubber channel and exterior finishers are interchangeable with the first type. To remove and replace proceed as follows. Unscrew the five screws securing the demister vent rail to the fascia top and lift off the rail. Remove the three screws from each interior side capping and remove the cappings from the windshield pillars. Insert a screwdriver or similar tool behind the inside lip of the rubber moulding, forcing it over the windshield aperture flange. Great care should be taken here, especially if a laminated glass windshield is fitted. After pressing the rubber lip over the flange at the top of the windshield and along the windshield pillars, the glass, complete with moulding and finishers, can be pushed out of the aperture from inside the vehicle. RR.6

Fig. RR.9 Sealing the windshield I. Seelastik. 2. Glastikon Caulking Compound.

3. Seel-a-strip. 4. Wooden wedge.

Slide the centre cappings onto one of the exterior finishers and remove the finishers. The rubber moulding can now be removed from the windshield glass. To prepare the windshield for fitting, place the glass on a bench (suitably covered to protect the glass) and fit the rubber channel. Inject Seelastik sealing compound between the outside lip of the rubber seal and the glass, using an Expandite pressure applicator gun fitted with a special -it in. (4,8 mm.) bore brass tube nozzle. The Seelastik compound must be evenly distributed around the windshield, and to ensure this the outside lip should be firmly pressed down with the fingers or a wooden roller to spread the sealing compound under the rubber seal. Fit the exterior finishers complete with centre cappin gs to the rubber moulding. Before fitting the windshield, the aperture must be prepared by the application of Gla stikon Caulking Compound and Seel-a-strip (1- in. by --h- in. [12,7 mm. by 1路59 mm .]) all round the frame in the position s indicated in Fig. RR.9. Insert a length of cord into the rubber channel and fit the windshield to the windshield aperture as described in Section RR .1. The excess Seel-a-strip is best remo ved with a wedgeshaped piece of hardwood (see Fig. RR.9 ). IMPORTANT.-If the windshield has been broken, disconnect the demister ducts and blowout the tubes and ducts to remove the dust particles of glass. NOTE.-If the second-type rubber channel is being fitted to a vehicle originally employing the first type it is not essential to use the later-pattern exterior finishers. Modify the old finishers by making six to eight saw-cuts in the finisher flange at each corner. This will make the finisher flexible enough to fit snugly in the new rubber. Make certain that the redundant holes are sealed to prevent leakage. Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3.

29549


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THE BODY Section RR.15

design to the windshield surround described in Section RR.14.

REM OVING AND REPLACIN G THE BACK-LIGHT S econd-type surround

The second-type back-light surround incorporates a modified rubber channel and exterior finishers similar in

Morris Oxford (Series V). Issue 3.

RR

29549

The rubber channel and exterior finishers are interchangeable with the first type but modified rear quarter trimmed assemblies will be required also. The back-light is removed and replaced in the same way as the windshield (see Section RR .14).

RR.7


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To check the body a lignment of a car which has been damaged a system of diagona l and measureme nt checks from points projected from the underfra me onto a level floor is used. To ensure that the alignment check is performed accurately the car must first be raised so that its datum line is parallel with the floor. Use the compa ra tive measurements given on page RR.9 to achieve this condition . Elevate the rear of the car to a convenient working height, and then adjust the height of the fro nt of the vehicle un til the points given on page RR .9 for the front and rear on both sides of the car are in the correct vertical positi on relati ve to each other; for example, if the rear point is 36 in. (91'4 cm.) fro m the floor and is quoted as 2 in. (5'1 cm.) above the vehicle datum line, the front point quoted as J in. (2'54 cm.) below the datum line must be 33 in. (83'8 cm .) above the floor. At the same time it will be helpful to check the relative heights of all the intermediat e points given on page RR.9 so that any distortion of the car in the vertical plane will be ascertained . Chalk over the area of the floor directl y below the points shown above. Using a plumb -line, project the points from the car onto the floor, ma rking the positions with a pencilled cross . The centre between each pair of points can be established by means of a large pair of compasses and the central points marked on the floor . In add ition, diagonals can be determined between an y two pairs of point s and the point s of intersection marked on the floor. At this stage a length of thin cord covered with chalk can be held by two operators in such a position that it passes through as many of the central points a nd intersection mark s as possible. While the cord is held taut a third operator raises the centre of it and then allows it to spring smartly to the floor. If the resulting white line passes through a ll the point s the bod y alignment is satisfactory. Any points through which the white line does not pass will be in a position where the underframe is out of alignment. Con siderable deviations in the tran sverse and longitudinal measurements given on page RR.9 confirm body misalignment. It must be"understood that allowance must be made for normal manufacturing tolerances and that a reasonable departure from nominal dimensions can be permitted without detri ment to road performance.

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Description Panel assembly-fascia-top. Support assembly. Screw-support assembly to body . Washer for screw (spring). Washer for screw (p lain). Panel assembly-fascia-front. Screw-panel to body. Washer for screw (spring). Washer for screw (plain) . Bracket -outer support. Screw-bracket to body. Washer for screw (spring). Washer for screw (plain). Screw-fascia to support bracket. Washer for screw (spring). Washer for screw (plain). Nut for screw. Finisher-'A' post-R .H. Finisher-'A' post-L.H. Screw-finisher to body. Screw-finisher to body. Box-glove. Rivet-glovebox to fascia. Lid-glovebox. Screw-lid to fascia. Washer for screw (spring). Nut for screw. Catch-glovebox lid.

No. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42 . 43 .

44. 45. 46 . 47. 48. 49 . 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56.

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Description Pull-s-catch. Arm-s-check.

Descript ion 57. Screw-support to dash side. 58. Washer for screw-s-cup. 59. Tray-parcel-R.H. 60. T ray-parcel-L.H. 61. Rivet- tray to support. 62. Washer for rivet (plain). 63. Screw-parcel tray to dash.

Screw-s-check arm . Washer for screw (spring). Duffer-glovebox lid. Panel-mounting- speaker. Screw-panel to fascia. Washer for screw (spring). Washer for screw (plain) . Bezel- speaker and instrument fret. Push-on fix for bezel. Plate-<:over-radio aperture. Nut-s-cover plate to fascia. Washer for nut (spring) . Plate-c-cover-c-clock aperture. Bracket -s-clamping -c-cover plate . Stud-s-co ver plate to fascia. Washer for stud (spring). Nut for stud . Plug-heater control hole. Push-on fix for plug. Beading - glovebox. Beading-fascia-<:entre. Beadin g-fascia. Beadin g-fascia. Clip-bead ing to fascia. Rail-protection-fascia. Support-parcel tray.

64. Centre-piece-parcel tray. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82.

Screw-s-centre piece to tray . Nut for screw (spire). Bracket sup port-parcel tray . Rivet-bracket to tray. Screw- bra cket to dash. Strip-protection. Finis her-fascia fro nt. Screw- finisher to fascia. Finisher-lower-fascia-R. H . Finisher-Iower-fascia-L.H. Screw-lower finishertobody. Block-support. Block- support. Block-s-support.

Material-speaker fret . Vyweld material-black. Clip-trim-fascia top. Clip -trim-fascia top (rear) .

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Section RR.16 REMOVING AND REPLACI G THE 11 STRUME TS AND CO ITROLS It is possible to gain access to the rear of the instrument panel from the underside of the front fascia panel, but as the space between the panel and parcel tray is limited it is advisable to remove the top fascia panel as described in Section RR.17 paras. (2) (3) (4) and (5). Replacement of the instruments and controls is a reversal of the removal sequence but reference must be made to Section S.l when refitting the heater controls and to the wiring diagram on page N.2 before replacing the electrical connections. Heater controls Depress the spring-loaded pin in the control knob and pull the knob from the spindle. Disconnect the inner and outer cables from the clamp bracket and trunnion, unscrew the locking rings, and remove the control plates from the fascia panel. Choke control Disconnect the choke control from the carburetter, unscrew the locking ring, and withdraw the choke control and its cable from the fascia panel. Speedometer Remove the main beam, panel, and ignition warning light bulb holders, unscrew the speedometer and trip reset control cables, release the two fixing clamps and withdraw the speedometer and rubber ring from the panel. Temperature, fuel, and oil pressure gauges Disconnect the electrical leads, remove the panel light bulb holder, unscrew the oil pressure gauge pipe union, release the three fixing clamps and withdraw the instrument from the panel. Switches Disconnect the electrical leads, unscrew the locking rings and remove the switches from the panel. Windshield washer Unscrew the knob and the screwed bush from the pump spindle and withdraw the pump from the rear of the pump bracket.

Section RR.17 REMOVING A D REPLACING THE FASCIA PANELS Disconnect the battery leads . Disconnect the hoses from the demist nozzles. Remove the three screws in each 'A' post finisher and the single screw in each lower fascia finisher and remove the finishers. RR.12

www.morrisoxford.com

Unscrew and remove the five screws securing the demist finisher to the top fascia support and remove the finisher and its support pads. Remove the five bolts and washers that secure the top of front fascia to the front of the top fascia and lift off the top panel. Disconnect the speedometer cable from the speedometer head and the oil pressure pipe union from the oil pressure gauge. Disconnect the heater control cables from the heater controls. Pull the main beam warning light, the ignition warning light, and the panel light bulb holders from the rear of the speedometer and instrument cases and disconnect the electrical leads from the fuel and temperature gauges, ammeter, clock (if fitted), and the ignition/starter, panel lamp, blower, and windshield wiper switches. Unscrew the knob on the windshield washer plunger, remove the locking ring and detach the plunger from its bracket. Disconnect the choke control cable from the carburetter, unscrew the choke control locking ring and withdraw the choke control and its cable from the front of the panel. Remove the four screws from the steering column lower cowl and detach the trip distance reset cable and the cowl. Remove the steeling-wheel as described in Section H.8. Slacken the two bolts on the steering column top clamp bracket. Unscrew the two bolts that secure the sides of the fascia panel to the outer support brackets and lift the panel over the steering column. To replace the fascia panels reverse the above operations. Refer to Section S.l before connecting the heater controls and to the wiring diagram on page NN.2 before connecting the electrical connections. After replacing the panels and controls ensure that the controls and switches function correctly.

Section RR.18 REMOVING AND REPLAC~G THE REAR QUARTER-LIGHTS (TRAVELLER) To remove the rear quarter-lights slide the finisher clips to one side and remove the two finisher strips. Ease one corner of the rubber moulding over the aperture flange and press the window out from the inside of the car. To replace the quarter-light fit the rubber moulding to the window and then fit the light to the body aperture, using cord as shown in Fig. RR.3. Refit the finisher strips and clips.

Section RR.19 REMOVING Al\'D REPLACING THE TAIL GATE ASSEMBLY (TRAVELLER) Open and support the tail gate and remove the nuts and bolts that secure the tail gate brackets to the body. Morris Oxford (Series V).

Issue 2. 2955

,


THE BODY Remove the carpet from the inner panel of the gate ; the carpet is secured by two screws and snap-on connectors. Remove the bolts securing each hinge to the tail gate and lift the gate from the car . Access to the tail gate locks and the remote control handle is gained by removing the screws that secure the tail gate inner panel. Unscrew the nut securin g the handle to the lock plate and disconnect each stay from its respective lock . Ease the stays from their guides and remove the remote control plate complete with stays. Remove the two screws that secure each lock to the tail gate and withdraw the locks. Replacement is a reversal of the removal sequence , but before tightening the hinge bolts ensure that the gate is a good fit to the body and that the locks engage the strikers correctly.

Section RR.20 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE TAIL GATE WINDOW ASSEMBLY (TRAVELLER) The top of the tail gate window assembly is secured to the body by two hinges. A telescopic stay supports the window in the open position ; the stay is secured to the window frame and the body by two bolts. The window is locked by a central bolt assembly having two transverse stays that each locate in a striker secured to the side of the body. The bolt is operated from the inside of the car. To remove the window assembly open and support the window and remove the nut and washers from the bottom of the support stay . Unclip the ends of the rear

Morris' Oxford (Series V) .

Issue 1.

29550

www.morrisoxford.com

RR

headlining to gain access to the hinge bolts, remove the bolts, and lift the window from the body . Alternatively, remove the rubber sealing strip from the window frame and unscrew the bolts securing the lower half of the hinges to the frame. To remove the lock bolt unscrew the four screws that secure the lock to the window frame, ease the lock stays from their guides, and remove the lock and its rubber pad. Replacement is a reversal of the removal sequence , but before tightening the hinge bolts ensure that the frame is a good fit to the body and that the stays register with their locating plates on the body. The window is secured to the window aperture flange by a moulded rubber channel piece ; external finishers are fitted to the rubber moulding. The instructions for removing and replacing the window are basically the same as those given in Section RR .14.

Section RR.21 REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR SEAT AND SEAT FRAME (TRAVELLER) The rear seat is secured to the seat frame foldin g support by four nuts and bolts and the seat frame is secured to the body by eight nuts and bolts. To remove the seat and its support unscrew the bolts securing the support to the body, fold the seat squab forward, and lift the seat and support out through the rear of the car. Replacement is a reversal of this sequence.

RR .13


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21. Nut for bolt.

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2. Hinge-upper tail gate.

22. Washer for bolt (plain).

42. Key.

3. Screw-hinge to tail gate.

23. Washer for bolt (plain).

43. Washer-handle seating.

4. Washer (shakeproof).

24. Rubber- sealing.

44. Nut-handle to door.

5. Screw-hinge to body.

25. Buffer-upper tail gate.

45. Washer for nut (shakeproof).

6. Washer for screw (plain).

26. Tail gate-lower.

46. Plate (with rods).

7. Washer for screw (shakeproof).

27. Hinge-lower tail gate.

47. Catch assembly.

8. Bolt assembly-upper tail gate.

28. Screw-hinge to tail gate.

48. Screw-lock to tail gate.

9. Screw-bolt to tail gate.

29. Washer for screw (plain).

49. Washer for screw (shakeproof).

10. Nut for screw (Spire).

30. Washer for screw (shakeproof).

50. Nut for screw.

11. Striker-bolt.

31. Nut for screw.

51. Striker-lock.

12. Plate- tapping- striker.

32. Nut-hinge to body

52. Plate-tapping-striker.

13. Screw-striker to body.

33. Washer for nut (plain).

53. Screw-striker to body.

14. Washer fer screw (shakeproof)

34. Washer for nut (spring).

54. Washer for screw (shakeproof).

15. Stay-telescopic.

35. Stay-lower tail gate.

55. Plate-cover-Iower tail gate.

16. Block-stay fixing.

36. Screw- stay to tail gate.

56. Screw-cover-plate to tail gate.

17. Washer (rubber) .

37. Washer for screw (spring).

57. Rubber-sealing.

18. Screw-block to body.

38. Screw-stay to body.

58. Nameplate- 'Morris Oxford'.

19. Bolt for stay.

39. Washer for screw (plain).

59. Push-on fix.

20. Washer for bolt (anti-rattle).

40. Washer for screw (spring).

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