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NEWS DESK

2021

Celebration: The musicians of Spirit Lines Daniel Jauregui, Uncle Kutcha Edwards and Adrian Hearn acknowledge the applause of the first live audience at Frankston Arts Centre in 258 days. Picture: James Terry Collective

The FAC welcomes back first live audience

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Mornington News

8 December 2020

FRANKSTON Arts Centre welcomed back its first live audience in 258 days on Saturday 28 November for a musical performance of Spirit Lines: A Musical Reconciliation. Frankston City Manager Arts and Culture Andrew Moon said it was fantastic to welcome an audience of close to 100 invited guests as Centre staff trialled new COVID-safe practices. “The guests were socially distanced throughout the 800 seat theatre. Other safety measures included all audience members wearing masks, regular cleaning of touch points and new layout of the foyer space to improve traffic flow and encourage physical distancing,” he said. Originally programmed as part of the 2020 Theatre season and re-scheduled twice, Spirit Lines: A Musical Reconciliation embarks on the journey of harmony and reconciliation. Joining the musical energies of Indigenous Australian singer Uncle Kutcha Edwards, three-time Latin Grammy guitarist Daniel Jauregui and AngloBrazilian percussionist and scholar Adrian Hearn, it was a fusion of traditions. Regular theatregoers Colin and Myrtle Hughes said the reopening of Frankston Arts Centre had brought them great joy. “Thank you so much for opening the theatre

and your hearts to us. It was glorious to be back among you all and the show was very special. We just loved Uncle Kutcha’s rich voice, Daniel’s delicate guitar playing and Adrian’s sensitive percussion.” Spirit Lines was filmed on the night and will be made available on the FAC YouTube and Facebook channels from 7pm on Sunday 6 December. It’s free to view online, but if patrons can support by buying a ticket it would be appreciated. Frankston Arts Centre will host a Christmas Variety Special on Thursday 10 December at 1.30pm starring musical theatre star Michael Cormick. There are many shows scheduled for 2021, however, most will not open for ticket sales until six weeks prior to ensure that the venue complies with the latest capacity restrictions. Patrons are encouraged to join a waiting list for particular events on the FAC website to be the first to know about ticket sales. Frankston Art Centre Box Office and main foyer are open for reduced hours Monday to Friday, 11am to 4pm. For more information, visit www.thefac.com. au or phone 9784 1060.

‘Worst year on record’ – More support for women facing family violence PENINSULA Community Legal Centre has received extra funding to fight rising levels of family violence on the Mornington Peninsula. This comes as the United Nations declares the global increase in domestic violence for women and children a “shadow pandemic”. “Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 will be remembered by many of those working in the family violence sector as the worst on record,” PCLC’s CEO Jackie Galloway said. “Our family violence team has not only seen an increase in the frequency and severity of family violence across the Mornington Peninsula and Melbourne’s south east, but also a surge in people affected by family violence for the first time.” To meet this demand the centre, which has branches and outreach services at Rosebud, Frankston, Hastings and Cranbourne, has doubled the size of its specialist family violence team in the past two months. “Families being stuck at home, job losses and increased financial stress have contributed to increased violence in many households”, Ms Galloway said. “International Human Rights Day (Thursday 10 December) marks the culmination of the United Nation’s 16 days of activism against gender-based violence. This highlights the urgent need for better support for the increasing numbers of women affected by the scourge of family violence.” PCLC’s new family violence lawyers have been recruited to play an integral role in the implementation of the new specialist family violence courts at Frankston and Moorabbin. These courts are intended to take a more therapeutic and specialist approach to family violence matters. Jane’s (not her real name) story is typical of many women helped by PCLC’s family

violence lawyers. The Mornington Peninsula resident suffered a long history of psychological abuse and controlling, coercive behaviour at the hands of her long-term partner and father of her two young children. After years of “walking on egg shells”, the turning point came when his aggressive verbal outbursts escalated into physical violence against her and the children. Jane realised that she needed to act to stop the physical and psychological harm being done to her kids and that she needed professional help. Jane contacted PCLC to help her through the legal system to escape her violent partner. “The PCLC team has been by my side helping me every step of the way through this nightmare,” Jane said. “It’s hard to list all the ways they helped me get through: from putting intervention orders in place to keep me and my kids safe; settling the separation and divorce; arranging for my lease to be broken when my former partner tracked us down and terrorised us at our new home; providing a financial counsellor and social worker to help us get on our feet again; as well as referring us to family violence support services to help with new accommodation when we had to keep moving to get away from him.” Jane’s nightmare came to an end recently with the finalisation of all the legal proceedings, meaning she and her children were free to move on with their lives. A survey by the Australian Institute of Criminology found that almost one-in-10 Australian women in a relationship experienced domestic violence during the coronavirus crisis. Anyone needing free confidential legal advice on family violence, family law or other general legal issues is urged to contact the Peninsula Community Legal Centre on 9783 3600.

Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

Mornington News 8 December 2020  

Mornington News 8 December 2020

Mornington News 8 December 2020  

Mornington News 8 December 2020

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