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NEWS DESK

Gambling addiction ‘society’s blind spot’ ALTHOUGH gambling has become part of mainstream society, deeply entrenched within the Aussie culture, it has many losers. “For most, gambling is fun, but for others a loss can be devastating,” Peninsula Voice chairperson Peter Orton said. In a bid to highlight gambling’s downside Peninsula Voice has organised a forum next month called Is gambling harm our blind spot? “Gambling has a built-in addictive component and to break the cycle can be extremely challenging,” Mr Orton said. “The glib advertising statement that you should gamble responsibly is grossly inadequate for some and illustrates a lack of accountability by betting organisations.” Mr Orton said the forum will “provide our community with vital information on how we can reduce the negative effects of gambling”. Tim Costello AO, one of the key forum speakers, suggests that if gambling was an interna-

tional sport, Australia would win gold, silver and bronze against other nations. “Sad but true,” Mr Orton said. Other speakers will be former Mornington Peninsula Shire mayor and now with mentoring organisation COACH (Creating Opportunities And Casting Hope) Sam Hearn, Deakin University’s Professor Public Health Samantha Thomas and Jeremy Forbes, of HALT (Help Assistance Local Tradies). The Alliance for Gambling Reform says that since COVID-19 the nature of gambling has changed, with 80 per cent of all gambling now done online. “It’s not local pokies and Tabs anymore, but international mega businesses,” Mr Orton said. The Is gambling harm our blind spot? forum will be held 6pm-8pm Thursday 20 May at Peninsula Community Theatre, Wilson Road, Mornington. Details: peninsulavoice.org.au

Retirement planning at Mt Eliza PLANS for a retirement village on the site of the old Mount Eliza Centre site at 33 Jacksons Road, Mt Eliza have been shown to the public. Shanghai-based developer Hengyi reportedly paid Peninsula Health $17.5 million for the vacant 3.4 hectare site in 2019. Mornington Peninsula Shire planning services manager Lucas Gardiner said Monday’s drop-in information session at Mount Eliza Community Hall was to discuss plans for a retirement village was part of the ongoing assessment of a planning application for the village overlooking Canadian

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Bay. “It is not a decision-making forum, but a chance for queries or concerns that have been raised during the public consultation process to be further discussed,” he said. “These types of sessions, known as planning application conferences, are routinely held as part of the assessment process following advertising.” Residents who lodged 44 submissions during the public notification period had been invited to discuss the proposal with the permit applicants.

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Sorrento offers mental health care MENTAL health care patients can now seek treatment at Sorrento in Mornington. Beleura Private Hospital has increased the number of patients needing mental health care by 50 per cent - from 32 beds to 48 - with the opening of its Sorrento Unit. Chief executive officer Michelle Henderson said the $20 million expansion included “two tranquil courtyards, a dedicated art therapy room and large dining space”. Patients could now access inpatient care, day programs and alcohol rehabilitation “in a private, calm and luxurious new setting”. “After supporting the mental health needs of the Mornington Peninsula for more than 30 years, we’re really delighted to open this brand new, purpose built unit,” Ms Henderson said. “We now have 48 single, private rooms with ensuite plus multiple therapy areas - with a dedicated space for day programs. “We also have our specialist consulting suites

on-site, giving patients access to the support and care they need.” Ms Henderson said the Sorrento unit “aims to support patients to reach their wellness and recovery goals using programs that have been developed in collaboration with Beleura’s psychiatrists, which are then tailored to an individual’s needs”. The hospital’s mental health team included psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurses and allied health professionals. The inpatient program combined “individual counselling and psychotherapy, group therapy, skill development, activities and medical treatment to ensure the best outcome for each patient”. “For patients no longer in acute care, the day therapy programs give them the support and tools they need to continue their wellness path and avoid a future hospital admission,” Ms Henderson said.

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Mornington News

20 April 2021

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Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

Mornington News 20 April 2021  

Mornington News 20 April 2021

Mornington News 20 April 2021  

Mornington News 20 April 2021

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