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NEWS DESK Chemical dump

Sea ponies a high tide delight

SHEREE Marris gets up close and personal with one of the many baby sea ponies taking their chances off Blargowrie. Picture: Jules Casey GIVEN her scientific knowledge, underwater experience and background it takes something really special in the marine world to excite Sheree Marris. But what she saw during a dive off Blairgowrie a couple of weeks ago left her scrambling to find a comparison. “I was greeted by a sea of baby sea ponies. It was like a thick soup of these delicate little jewels,” Marris said of what she described as “one of the most spectacular events I’ve seen in all of my years exploring Port Phillip”. “These baby sea ponies - or fry - measuring a tiny two to three centimetres, were jostling for po-

sition on floating seagrass, each other and anything that floated by.” The young short-headed seahorses had been delivered by the males of species all giving birth (to about 60 “ponies”) around the time of extremely high tides “Yes, they’re the only males in the animal kingdom to do so and I'm all here for I” Marris said. Although there were thousands of “sea ponies” Marris said most would be eaten by wrasse and other predators. “The few that survive will spend their first two or three weeks of life floating around and moving

where the currents take them until they eventually settle down on seaweed,” she said. “It was a memorable and unique experience. It’s part of the magic and lure of our local marine environment, one that I’m incredibly grateful for. “Our blue backyard is a showcase of incredible marine life and habitats that changes with the seasons; rivalling any tropical reef in colour and diversity.” More of Sheree Marris’s underwater imagery is on Instagram @shereemarris Keith Platt

OLD and unwanted household chemicals can be disposed of responsibly and for free at the Detox Your Home event at Mornington transfer station, 9am-3pm, Saturday 5 December. The Sustainability Victoria pop-up event will accept a specific range of highly toxic household chemicals, such as cleaning products, pool chemicals, and weed killer. These products are not accepted at most transfer stations because they pose a high risk to safety when combined or stored in large volumes. However, no paint, fluorescent lights or batteries will be accepted. Organisers say household chemicals can harm people and pets, fuel a house fire, release toxic fumes and pollute the environment. They should not be thrown out at regular rubbish collections as they can explode, ignite, leak or mix with other chemicals. Pouring household chemicals down the drain pollutes our waterways, harms animals and vegetation, contaminates our water supply and makes rivers and beaches unsafe for swimming. Items collected on the day will be recovered and diverted from landfill. Register at detoxyourhomemornington.eventbrite.com.au to attend the contactless, COVIDsafe drive-through-only event. Bring the confirmation email to check in. Only one person per car. The on-ground chemist will do the heavy lifting. The transfer station is at 134 Watt Road.

I will buy... • COPPER • BRASS • ALUMINIUM • CAR/TRUCK BATTERIES • STAINLESS STEEL • ELECTRICAL CABLE PAYMENT FOR COMMERCIAL QUANTITIES OF STEEL. BINS SUPPLIED.

Merry Christmas

Terms and conditions apply

Keep Safe!

N E P O W O N E G ID R B H IG E W S, FOR CARS, BOATS, TR AILER

AND TRUCKS UP TO SEMI

CHRISTMAS

TRADING HOURS

TR AILERS

CLOSING MIDDAY THURSDAY 24TH DECEMBER Reopen Monday 28th December at 8am CLOSING MIDDAY THURSDAY 31ST DECEMBER Reopen Monday 4th January 2021 AND ONWARDS WITH NORMAL TRADING HOURS

MON - FRI

WESTERN PORT METAL RECYCLERS 1953 Frankston Flinders Road, Hastings

SAT 9AM to 12PM

email: scrap@westernpor tmetalrecyclers.com.au

8AM to 5PM

PHONE: 5979 3928

Mornington News

1 December 2020

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Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

Mornington News 1 December 2020  

Mornington News 1 December 2020

Mornington News 1 December 2020  

Mornington News 1 December 2020

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