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Mobile libraries may be shelved Keith Platt keith@mpnews.com.au THE weekly mobile library service to 16 Mornington Peninsula towns may be taken off the road permanently as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The service was stopped in March due to state government coronavirus restrictions and replaced by a home delivery service. Mornington Peninsula Shire says the alternative has been so popular that it had decided to review the future of the mobile service. Libraries, arts and culture manager Karina Lamb said the online “click and deliver” was used 1729 times during its first three weeks. “We’ve received exceptional feedback on this service, and it has prompted us to take a fresh look at how we can best deliver library services to our residents,” Ms Lamb said. “A review is currently under way and no decisions have yet been made. As part of the review, we will shortly be sending out a survey to ensure the community has input into the decision-making process.” However, not all mobile library users were not happy to learn that the service may end. “Many residents in towns without a library rely on this weekly service and can pick up their reservations there as well as drop books off,” Julie Lewis, of Balnarring, said. “Browsing the shelves, I have often found a good book to read and our grandchildren have enjoyed going in to the library bus to choose a book. “This proposal [to end the mobile service] has not been discussed with the community and people affected by a closure. “It’s a wonderful resource and a book delivery service once a month is no substitute for being able

to choose your own books and maybe discovering a new author or unknown gem on the shelves.” Before it closed the mobile library, the shire said it stopped at 16 towns each week “and has over 2500 of the latest books, talking books, DVDs and magazines to choose from”. Shoreham Community Association secretary David Day says some residents are unable to access libraries in Rosebud, Mornington, Hastings and Somerville. “In the Western Port area people live outside of major townships and do not have public transport available on a regular basis to access the main libraries,” Mr Day stated in a letter to councillors. “The mobile library is seen as essential service, plus it also enables people to meet together socially on a weekly basis. “The library also caters for young children which is a bonus for young mothers who can feel somewhat isolated. Adding a toy library to the service would be a bonus.” Mr Day said that during lockdown some communities had created their own libraries. “Shoreham used the local Post Office as a book exchange, others used a local shopping centre. Residents in our communities were able to deliver books to others during this uncertain time to ensure they had provision of reading matter and a source of sanity.” He a review of the mobile library could be made by a group including councillors and shire officers and should consider “how the service is delivered and what adaptions could be made to enrich and continue the service”. “In fairness, while a swimming pool has proved a costly venture in Rosebud, the area of Western Port, especially the Red Hill Ward, which is the largest ward on the peninsula, still has unmet social needs.”

Sea the influence WENDI Seymour lives by the sea and finds it as a great inspiration for her art. Appropriately, her exhibition which opened on Sunday (16 January) is titled At Sea and features her sometimes whimsical view of life in the waters that cover most of the planet. Before coming under the spell of the sea, Seymour was influenced by such artists as E H Shepard, Aubrey Beardsley and Ronald Searle. “After that, every artist I meet inspires me,” she said. “While looking out to sea, I love to scan the horizon, always hopeful of spotting a

whale or a least a blow from the water, the fins of leaping dolphins or the lazy flipper of a seal. And of course, I play with my inner child and I always imagine mermaids.” Seymour is pictured with Myth of the Sea, a painting featuring a pearl-wearing mermaid, weedy sea dragons, octopus and seaweeds. “Her presence is calm and serene in the churning movement of the water and her eyes find yours as if she’s invited you, and you alone to see her at sea,” Seymour said. At Sea runs until 2 February at Southern Bouy Studios, 1/19 Carbine Way, Mornington, phone 0401 062 222. Keith Platt

in Mornington Tuesday 26 January 2021 Shop, dine and experience all Main Street, Mornington has to offer on Australia Day. Peninsula Playlist

This year we’ve partnered with RPP FM to create an Australia Day playlist just for the Peninsula. Our curated playlist of a selection of songs voted for by you will feature in a special live broadcast between 1– 3pm.

The broadcast will air from the corner of Main and Queen Streets, Mornington and will feature interviews, local music and much more. Tune in to RPP FM (98.7FM) between 1– 3pm to listen.

We hope you can join in safely as we reflect, respect and celebrate our great community this Australia Day.

mornpen.vic.gov.au/ausday Mornington News

19 January 2021

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Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

Mornington News 19 January 2021  

Mornington News 19 January 2021

Mornington News 19 January 2021  

Mornington News 19 January 2021

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