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May/June 2008 Vol. XVIII, No. 4, $7.00

NATAon ti Conven e Issu

Unmasking Pain A look at the latest research

Making a Career Change Soccer Conditioning


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May/June 2008, Vol. XVIII, No. 4

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Student Corner What You’re Worth By Dr. Greg Frounfelter Q&A Diana Palmer Westmont College, USA Olympic Triathlon Team Sponsored Pages Power Systems Life Fitness

67 112

Convention Section NATA Show Planner NSCA Convention Preview

116 119 121

Product News Chest & Back Product Launch More Products

122

Advertisers Directory

128

CEU Quiz For NATA and NSCA members

132

Next Stop: Web site

Cover photo: AP Photo/Chuck Burton TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

CONTENTS 39

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Leadership

Different Route 16 AAs new professional opportunities continue to arise for athletic trainers, there is no longer one career path to follow. In this article, three trailblazers explain the twists and turns that brought them to where they are today. By Maria Hutsick, Brian Goodstein, & Brian FitzGerald Optimum Performance

Take a Load Off

29 Low-impact training and active rest aren’t synonyms for slacking off after the season. When planned properly, they let athletes recharge body and mind while still being challenged in their workouts. By R.J. Anderson Special Focus

from Steroids? 39 Safe More than ever before, there is pressure to find out how serious steroid use is at the college and high school levels. Is more testing the answer? By Laura Ulrich Treating The Athlete

Pain 51 Unmasking Recent research into the physical and psychological mechanisms of pain is revealing new ways to help ease the hurt without the use of medication. By Dr. Daniel Drury & Dr. Karen Wonders Sport Specific

Stopping ’Em 59 No Carefully designed aerobic workouts and sport-specific movement drills lay the training foundation for the high-flying University of Portland women’s soccer team. By Dr. Terry Favero T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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Editorial Board Marjorie Albohm, MS, ATC/L Director of Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Research, Orthopaedics Indianapolis

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Jon Almquist, ATC Specialist, Fairfax County (Va.) Pub. Schools Athletic Training Program Brian Awbrey, MD Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Instructor in Orthopaedics, Harvard Medical School Jim Berry, MEd, ATC, SCAT/EMT-B Director of Sports Medicine and Head Athletic Trainer, Myrtle Beach (S.C.) High School Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD Director, Sports Medicine Nutrition Program, University of Pittsburgh Medical Ctr. Health System

Cho-Pat Tennis Elbow Support Secures and supports forearm muscles that are over-exercised or strained during athletic activities. Sizes: Sm – XXL

Dual Action Knee Strap Patented strap provides relief from knee pain caused by degeneration and overuse. Easy to use, comfortable, allows full mobility. Sizes: Sm - XL

Shin Splint Compression Sleeve

Christine Bonci, MS, ATC Asst. A.D. for Sports Medicine, Women’s Athletics, University of Texas Cynthia “Sam” Booth, ATC, PhD Manager, Outpatient Therapy and Sportsmedicine, MeritCare Health System Debra Brooks, CNMT, LMT, PhD CEO, Iowa NeuroMuscular Therapy Center Cindy Chang, MD Head Team Physician, University of California-Berkeley Dan Cipriani, PhD, PT Assistant Professor Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State Univ. Gray Cook, MSPT, OCS, CSCS Clinic Director Orthopedic & Sports Phys. Ther. Dunn, Cook, and Assoc. Keith D’Amelio, ATC, PES, CSCS Head Strength & Conditioning Coach/ Assistant Athletic Trainer, Toronto Raptors

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Joe Gieck, EdD, ATR, PT Director of Sports Medicine and Prof., Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia (retired)

May/June 2008 Vol. XVIII, No. 4 Publisher Mark Goldberg

Brian Goodstein, MS, ATC, CSCS, Head Athletic Trainer, DC United

Editorial Staff Eleanor Frankel, Director R.J. Anderson, Kenny Berkowitz, Nate Dougherty, Abigail Funk, Dennis Read, Greg Scholand

Gary Gray, PT, President, CEO, Functional Design Systems Maria Hutsick, MS, ATC/L, CSCS Head Athletic Trainer, Medfield (Mass.) High School

Circulation Staff David Dubin, Director John Callaghan

Christopher Ingersoll, PhD, ATC, FACSM Director, Graduate Programs in Sports Medicine/Athletic Training University of Virginia

Art Direction Message Brand Advertising

Allan Johnson, MS, MSCC, CSCS Sports Performance Director Velocity Sports Performance

Production Staff Don Andersen, Director Jim Harper, Neal Betts, Natalie Couch

Tim McClellan, MS, CSCS Director of Perf. Enhancement, Makeplays.com Center for Human Performance

Business Manager Pennie Small

Michael Merk, MEd, CSCS Director of Health & Fitness, YMCA of Greater Cleveland

Special Projects Dave Wohlhueter

Jenny Moshak, MS, ATC, CSCS Asst. A.D. for Sports Medicine, University of Tennessee

Administrative Assistant Sharon Barbell

Steve Myrland, CSCS Owner, Manager, Perf. Coach, Myrland Sports Training, LLC, Instructor and Consultant, University of Wisconsin Sports Medicine

Advertising Materials Coordinator Mike Townsend Marketing Director Sheryl Shaffer

Mike Nitka, MS, CSCS Director of Human Performance, Muskego (Wisc.) High School

Marketing/Sales Assistant Danielle Catalano

Bruno Pauletto, MS, CSCS President, Power Systems, Inc. Stephen Perle, DC, CCSP Associate Prof. of Clin. Sciences, University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic

Advertising Sales Associates Diedra Harkenrider (607) 257-6970, ext. 24

Brian Roberts, MS, ATC, Director, Sport Performance & Rehab. Ctr.

Pat Wertman (607) 257-6970, ext. 21

Bernie DePalma, MEd, PT, ATC Head Athl. Trainer/Phys. Therapist, Cornell University

Ellyn Robinson, DPE, CSCS, CPT Assistant Professor, Exercise Science Program, Bridgewater State College

Lori Dewald, EdD, ATC, CHES Health Education Program Director, Salisbury University

Kent Scriber, EdD, ATC, PT Professor/Supervisor of Athletic Training, Ithaca College

Jeff Dilts, Director, Business Development & Marketing, National Academy of Sports Medicine

Bicep/TricepS Cuff

P.J. Gardner, MS, ATC, CSCS, PES, Athletic Trainer, Colorado Sports & Spine Centers

T&C editorial/business offices: 31 Dutch Mill Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 257-6970 Fax: (607) 257-7328 info@MomentumMedia.com

Chip Sigmon, CSCS Strength and Conditioning Coach, Carolina Medical Center

David Ellis, RD, LMNT, CSCS Sports Alliance, Inc.

Bonnie J. Siple, MS, ATC Coordinator, Athletic Training Education Program & Services, Slippery Rock University

Boyd Epley, MEd, CSCS Director of Coaching Performance, National Strength & Conditioning Association

Chad Starkey, PhD, ATC Visiting Professor, Athletic Training Education Program, Ohio University

Peter Friesen, ATC, NSCA-CPT, CSCS, CAT, Head Ath. Trainer/ Cond. Coach, Carolina Hurricanes

Ralph Stephens, LMT, NCTMB Sports Massage Therapist, Ralph Stephens Seminars

Lance Fujiwara, MEd, ATC, EMT Director of Sports Medicine, Virginia Military Institute Vern Gambetta, MA, President, Gambetta Sports Training Systems

Fred Tedeschi, ATC Head Athletic Trainer, Chicago Bulls Terrence Todd, PhD, Co-Director, Todd-McLean Physical Culture Collection, Dept. of Kinesiology & Health Ed., University of Texas-Austin

Training & Conditioning (ISSN 1058-3548) is published monthly except in January and February, May and June, and July and August, which are bimonthly issues, for a total of nine times a year, by MAG, Inc., 31 Dutch Mill Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850. T&C is distributed without charge to qualified professionals involved with competitive athletes. The subscription rate is $24 for one year and $48 for two years in the United States, and $30 for one year and $60 for two years in Canada. The single copy price is $7. Copyright© 2008 by MAG, Inc. All rights reserved. Text may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or in part, without the permission of the publisher. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Periodicals postage paid at Ithaca, N.Y. and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Training & Conditioning, P.O. Box 4806, Ithaca, NY 14852-4806. Printed in the U.S.A.

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Student

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Showing What You’re Worth An end-of-season report can make sure everyone appreciates all that you do. BY DR. GREG FROUNFELTER

I

f you ask a coach, athlete, or administrator how important athletic trainers are to their teams, they’ll say “very.” Even though we don’t often receive public recognition, those who work with us understand that we provide valuable and much-needed services. But how can we quantify that? What are we really worth to the organizations we work with? As you prepare to enter the field of athletic training, it’s important to realize that no matter what setting you choose, there is more to the job than simply being a great healthcare provider. To be successful, you also have to know how to promote yourself to your supervisors. This can seem like an unpleasant task, but for everything from earning a fair salary to ensuring that your program gets the resources it needs, communicating your value is essential. A useful tool for doing just that is an end-of-season report. The conclusion of the season is when coaches and athletic directors step back to look at what has worked and what hasn’t. It’s also Greg Frounfelter, DPT, SCS, LAT, ATC, CSCS, is an Athletic Trainer and Physical Therapist in the Physical Medicine Department at Agnesian Healthcare-Waupun Memorial Hospital in Waupun, Wis. He can be reached at: frounfelterg@agnesian.com.

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T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

when decisions are made about where to spend money in the upcoming year. Too many athletic trainers ignore this crucial decision-making time. We move on to the next season and a new sport. Instead, we should be treating this as an opportunity to show all that we’ve done. I recommend that athletic trainers develop a memo that reviews the season and send it to all relevant parties. Depending on the setting, this can include coaches, athletic directors, supervisors, principals, superintendents, and possibly even boosters. It’s best to keep the document short and concise (one page), and divide it into individual sections. Introduction: First off, list how many practices and games the athletic training staff covered, how many hours were spent in coverage and treatments, and how many sports medicine personnel were involved. If members of the audience may not know what athletic trainers do, this section should also briefly explain the profession, including our specialized training and certification. Season/Year Breakdown: Here you can discuss specifics of the season. List the types of injuries seen, how many athletes were treated, and how many referrals were made for further medical treatment, including any injuries or conditions that required surgery. This is also a good place to talk about any catastrophic or season-ending injuries that occurred and the athletic trainer’s role in dealing with them. Finances: Use this section to highlight just how cost-effective and valu-

able your services are. Compare the amount of money spent on salaries for the athletic training staff to how much all the assessments and treatments would have cost if they were outsourced. You can also do some research to find out how much your colleagues at peer institutions and other nearby athletic training settings are being paid. If your department’s current salaries are below market value for your area, that should be noted here. Recommendations: Once you’ve laid out the way things are, it’s time to talk about the way you think they should be. You can list any thoughts or ideas on changes in the program that could result in more efficient or effective treatment of athletes. You can also review and evaluate changes that were put into place for the previous year. This section demonstrates that you are interested, above all else, in improving the quality of care you provide to the team. Wrap things up with a brief conclusion and thank-you to the readers for considering your thoughts and ideas. Keep the conclusion positive, and say that you’d be happy to discuss this information and your recommendations at any time. An end-of-season document can open an important dialogue with the stakeholders in an athletic program. It can help others understand your role, and it can show them your importance to the athletes and program you serve. It demonstrates your professionalism, and puts you in a position to ensure that your value will never be overlooked. ■ TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


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Q&A Diana Palmer Westmont College, USA Olympic Triathlon Team It would be easy to assume that Diana Palmer’s life calling is as a world traveler, not an athletic trainer. Palmer, MS, ATC, EMT, has been to Hawai’i to work the Ironman World Championship, Santo Domingo with the USA Cycling team for the Pan American Games, Australia and New Zealand with the International Triathlon Union Sport Development Program, and in August is headed to Beijing with the USA Olympic Triathlon team. And that’s just a sampling of her overseas experience. While she admits that visiting sought-after vacation destinations has been rewarding, Palmer says her true home is Westmont College in Santa Barbara, Calif., where she has been Head Athletic Trainer for almost 20 years. Palmer graduated from Linfield College, where she received two bachelor’s degrees, and then attended the University of Oregon, where she earned her master’s while serving as Head Athletic Trainer at Thurston High School from 1987-88, and Head Athletic Trainer for the Oregon women’s volleyball team from 1988-89. From Oregon, Palmer went straight to Westmont, where in addition to her role as Head Athletic Trainer, she was also an Assistant Professor of Kinesiology until athletic training duties took over her teaching time this year. Soon after starting at Westmont, Palmer agreed to provide athletic training services for the Santa Barbara (equestrian) Polo Club, which she has continued doing for the past 15 years. In 2001, she started working with America’s elite athletes through the Olympic Training Center residency program. Since then, she has worked with the USA Triathlon and Cycling teams at World Cup events and Pan Am Games, and is currently serving as Athletic Trainer for USA Triathlon. In Beijing this summer, she will cover the modern pentathlon, triathlon, and badminton events. In this interview, Palmer talks about the upcoming Olympics, working with elite-level athletes, and how her job at Westmont has changed over the years. T&C: How did you get involved with the Olympics and USA Triathlon team? Palmer: I went to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado 8

T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

AP PHOTO/ANDRE PENNER

Julie Ertel holds the U.S. flag after winning the women’s Triathlon at the 2007 Pan American Games. Diana Palmer will be the Athletic Trainer for the U.S. men’s and women’s triathlon team at the Olympics this summer. Springs in 2001 for a two-week athletic training residency program. The program serves as a trial period to see whether an athletic trainer’s skills, personality, and adaptability fit the needs of the Olympic program and national teams. Though triathlon wasn’t one of my primary sports at the time, I worked on a number of their athletes and met Team Director Libby Burrell. We found it was a good fit, and since then I have worked and traveled with the USA Triathlon and Cycling teams for the Pan American Games in the Dominican Republic and Brazil, and for World Cup events throughout the year. What are your duties as Athletic Trainer for USA Triathlon? Occasionally, I travel to Colorado Springs—for instance, if an athlete needs a specific type of rehab—but my primary duties are helping the team at World Cup events and Pan Am Games. At those events, I’m responsible for injury evaluation, TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


Circle No. 105

NATA Booth No. 1125


Q&A referral to physicians when needed, massage, rehabilitation programs, acute injury care, and triage. I also help establish medical “networks” if an athlete outside the Colorado Springs area wants to find a chiropractor, physical therapist, or other medical professional closer to home.

“Working events like the Pan Am Games requires flexibility, a willingness to take on diverse roles—such as helping with equipment, transportation, cleanup—and a readiness to put in extremely long workdays.” What is different about working with elite athletes? Over the years I have worked with professional soccer, cycling, equestrian polo, and triathlon teams. Elite athletes often have a team of professionals around them who work together, and we have to communicate frequently about their care—diagnosis, treatment plans, medications, possible restrictions, and so on. It’s also critical for us to educate athletes regarding injury prevention, nutrition, the need for massages and other prophylactic medical care, and the importance of prompt attention to any injuries that occur. Since it is their livelihood, implementing the right care quickly is crucial.

How has your schedule at Westmont changed since you started working with the Olympic team? I prioritize Westmont. I only choose to go on trips with the national teams when it won’t impact the care of my college athletes. I am able to take trips during the year because of a great assistant athletic trainer, a strong student health center, and two very attentive and involved team physicians. When I’m off campus at professional sporting events or conferences, I use the time to closely watch and interact with other athletic trainers and physical therapists. Later on, I might ask some of those people to travel with the national triathlon and cycling teams or to cover various other events when I am not available. How will your experience with the Pan Am Games help you at the Olympics? Working events like that require flexibility, a willingness to take on diverse roles—such as helping with equipment, transportation, cleanup—and a readiness to put in extremely long workdays. I would not want to try working at an Olympic Games without having first worked at the Pan Am Games or another big event. Knowing the flow of the day and how to work with team directors and athletes, and being familiar with the rest of the medical staff, will make Beijing go smoothly.

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Q&A Do you think the pollution in Beijing will be a problem for Olympians? The pollution, as well as the heat and humidity, are a big concern for the endurance athletes. The team had a test event in Beijing last fall, at which our High Performance Director worked with Olympic Training Center Head Exercise Physiologist Randy Wilber and the team nutritionist to perform pulmonary function tests on team members. Using that data, they put together detailed information for each athlete on how to prepare for the heat, humidity, and pollution they will face at the Games. How has the athletic training program at Westmont changed since you started? Westmont had a full-time athletic trainer in place before I arrived, and he had already laid the groundwork by showing coaches what athletic trainers do and how our skills can best be utilized. An assistant athletic training position was approved about 10 years ago, and the biggest change since my arrival was adding that second staff member. We can now offer more prophylactic care, extended clinic hours, and more rehabilitation programs on-site. We have also added new sports and increased the number of athletes on our teams, so my overall workload has increased. Do you often travel with your teams? Not usually. We are able to send our athletic training students as first responders, and they work under the host university’s athletic trainer, providing prevention care and immediate first aid. We rely on the host school’s staff to evaluate injuries and recommend a course of treatment if necessary. All the schools in our conference notify each other when an athletic trainer is not traveling with the team so the host school can staff accordingly. The agreement works out well because it allows our students to watch how other athletic trainers interact with athletes and study their evaluation technique, which is a great way to learn. When our teams are going to large tournaments or if a host school is short-staffed, my assistant athletic trainer and I work it out so that one of us can accompany the team while the other stays on campus to cover practices and home contests. If that causes one of us to work a 12-hour day, we shorten up the next day’s shift to control burnout and avoid excessive overtime. What is it like working at the NAIA level? It’s great because we are still allowed to build personal relationships with students, take them out for meals, give them a ride somewhere, help tutor them, and serve as mentors. I even allow students to house sit if I am on vacation. The downside is that we are so much more restricted financially. There are many supplies and pieces of equipment I would love to use at Westmont, but we just can’t afford them. What is the toughest injury you’ve ever treated? There have been a few! I’ve had a college soccer goalie with TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

■ Diana Palmer Head Athletic Trainer, Westmont College Athletic Trainer, USA Olympic Triathlon Team Medical Director, Santa Barbara (Calif.) Polo Club Education: MS, University of Oregon, 1989 BS, Physical Education, Linfield College, 1986 BS, Psychology, Linfield College, 1986

bilateral shoulder reconstructions and a professional cyclist with two spinal stress fractures, two levels of disc degeneration, and a scar from falling on a stake during a race. The challenges have been fun to say the least. Honestly, I use my psychology degree as much as my exercise science and athletic training background. The mental state of an athlete ties directly into his or her physical healing and perception of pain. Many times, helping athletes recognize and deal with the psychological issues affecting their injury is more difficult than their physical treatment. For that reason, we work closely with our student health and counseling departments. What is it like working at the Ironman Championship? Endurance sports of this nature are a completely different world than collegiate sports and even most other endurance sports. Being in the medical tent to see the illnesses and conditions that result from the intense demands of an Ironman is worthwhile for any athletic trainer. The cases of dehydration, heat exhaustion, and hyponatremia are much T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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Q&A the trust of our international players for years—they had never heard of athletic trainers or seen what we do, so they needed time to observe who I was and how I could help them. I have been with the club for 15 years now, and I’m happy to see a similar level of care now being provided at other clubs as well.

more severe than they are anywhere else. And seeing the speed at which an athlete’s condition can worsen was very eye-opening for me. I am much more aware of medical conditions, the importance of knowing an athlete’s medical history, and compounding variables like medications, food choices, and the stress level surrounding an event. The nature of the Ironman is such that nursing and physician skills are much more needed than athletic training skills, so aside from acute injuries on the course—like a bike crash or fall—most problems require medical intervention in the form of IVs, ischemic colitis evaluation, heat stroke treatment, and care for other systemic conditions.

How do you balance your personal life with a very busy professional life? I did not do a good job of that in my first four or five years out of graduate school. It took time to realize that giving everything to my work was not only burning me out, but also capping my potential on the job. Early on, a colleague told me how he blocked out one hour a day on his calendar as his “appointment” with himself. He spent that hour exercising, having lunch with friends, going for walks, or reading for fun. I implemented this practice, and started treating myself as well as I treat my clients and athletes. This entails a great nutritional program, regular sleep, daily exercise, time with close friends, and trying to learn a new skill or hobby each year. As a result, I am actually much more productive and creative at work. I enjoy my job, I have more time for outside work opportunities like the triathlon, cycling, and polo teams, and I can learn new skills to add to my “tool bag” each year. ■

How did you end up as Medical Director of the Santa Barbara Polo Club? A friend had been covering polo for a few years, but didn’t really like it—at that time, the athletic trainer was responsible only for medical triage during competition and practices. I agreed to work for the club for one year, and during that time, the shortcomings of what was being offered to the players became painfully obvious to me. So I took on the responsibility of expanding my position. It took a long time to develop the program that is in place now. Players were not used to having someone available who could evaluate injuries, help with medical referrals, and implement rehabilitation programs. And I didn’t earn

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LEADERSHIP

Brian FitzGerald, BSN, LAT, ATC, Community Outreach and Projects Coordinator in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery’s Division of Sports Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston, prepares for a media presentation this past April. MAY/JUNE 16 HisT&C story begins on2008 page 22.

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM MARK MORELLI


LEADERSHIP

A Different Route As new professional opportunities continue to arise for athletic trainers, there is no longer one career path to follow. In this article, three trailblazers explain the twists and turns that brought them to where they are today.

The growth of the athletic training profession has brought lots of changes. Upgraded educational requirements, new professional and legal standards, and changing insurance coverage are just a few of the issues. But what may be most dramatic are the evolving opportunities for nontraditional career paths. The typical route of starting as an assistant athletic trainer at one college, then moving to another, and one day landing a head athletic training job is no longer the norm. The number of jobs in clinics, hospitals, high schools, and industry are increasing every year. For some athletic trainers, the changing job market has meant veering off the traditional path and finding a new route. In this article, three athletic trainers offer their stories on their roads less taken.

FROM D-I TO HIGH SCHOOL BY MARIA HUTSICK

F

or 26 years, I was the Head Athletic Trainer at Boston University, an NCAA Division I institution. Last August, I turned in my resignation and took the same position at Medfield (Mass.) High School, 19 miles southwest of Boston. Many of my colleagues in the profession were shocked at my sudden move. In some ways, I shocked myself. The first few weeks at Medfield, I asked myself several times a day, “What did I do?” I loved my staff and the coaches and athletes at BU, and I had worked extremely hard to build the sports medicine program into something I was proud of. I had been very active on national committees and put a ton of ef-

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

fort into improving working conditions for college athletic trainers. But I was tired. Not of treating athletes, or travel, or taking on new challenges. I was tired of fighting athletic administrators. At Medfield, the administration is very supportive and has given me all the tools I need to do my job. I am respected and thanked by everyone from my principal to the athletes’ parents. One season ends before another one begins. There is little travel and the coaches are very professional. Maria Hutsick, MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS, is the Head Athletic Trainer at Medfield High School in Massachusetts. She can be reached at: mhutsick@medfield.mec.edu. T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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LEADERSHIP After two weeks, I no longer questioned my decision, and I am thoroughly and wonderfully happy in my new position. I know I am making a huge impact on the school and its athletic programs. My career began in 1978, when I took the position of Assistant Athletic Trainer at Yale University after earning a Master’s degree from Indiana University. I moved to BU in 1980, and two years later found myself in the position of Head Athletic Trainer, becoming one of very few females heading up an athletic training department at an NCAA Division I school.

in the department. We are their surrogate parents, healthcare providers, and counselors. We drive them to medical appointments and accompany them into the operating room when they undergo surgery. We answer their phone calls in the middle of the night when they are ill or in trouble. We meet with parents and initiate insurance claims. We may even offer a guest bedroom to an international student who has no place to go over vacation. I enjoyed all of it. I loved the controlled chaos of Division I athletics and being there for young people who needed us. I loved working with the football

Making a change after nearly 30 years was hard—no doubt about it. And if anyone had asked me just a few years ago if I would ever leave the Division I level for high school, I would have answered no. Over the next 26 years at BU, I watched and participated in our profession’s amazing growth. When I took the position of head athletic trainer, it was a nine-month job with summers off. There were only 14 teams and sport seasons had very little overlap. HMO’s did not exist and drug testing was only done during the Olympic Games. The decade of the 90’s brought a whirlwind of change. The growth of women’s sports, insurance issues, and the increasing length of seasons were only a few of the factors placing new demands on collegiate sports medicine staffs across the country. At the same time, our educational standards were brought to a new level—we became healthcare professionals with many legal and professional standards that needed to be met. It all happened so fast that many athletic departments did not even realize all that was being asked of their athletic training staffs. And many have remained unwilling to recognize our vital and varied roles. We are the athletic department’s first line of defense and prevent many litigation issues. We act as liaisons to parents, physicians, insurance companies, sport coaches, strength and conditioning coaches, and academic advisors. When there is a crisis, we are part of the response team. We are often the first to arrive and the last to leave. We know every athlete 18

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program especially, as well as many other teams that I was a part of during my tenure at BU. But I was not completely happy. When the university dropped the football program in 1997—which I had worked with for 15 years—I looked for another job. I interviewed for the Head Athletic Trainer position at Princeton University. When I learned that a staff of seven (no students or graduate assistants) was supposed to cover 40 teams, four of them full-contact football, I asked if the administration was willing to commit to an increase in staff to meet the demands and needs of the department. They said no, and I remained at BU. I took my Massachusetts teacher’s certification exam in 1998. I had obtained my real estate license in 1990 and became a certified strength and conditioning specialist in 1992. I worked part-time as both a realtor and personal strength coach. I sold a few houses and worked with several clients. I thought there must be a better way to make a living and have a few days off, but I did not leave athletic training because I could not leave the profession I was passionate about. Along the way, I strived to improve working conditions for not only myself and my staff, but for all athletic trainers. I was a founding member and served as President of the College Athletic Trainers Society (CATS), which was formed to address salaries, staff-

ing issues, length of seasons, nontraditional seasons, and quality-of-life issues in our profession. I wanted athletic departments to recognize the athletic trainer as an integral professional in the department. Being involved with this group inspired me to dig in at BU and fight to improve the sports medicine department. I began compiling information on staff needs and salaries, and I was able to make progress. My staff went from four to 11, salaries improved, and I was able to allow my staff some time off through the use of per diem athletic trainers. With the help of my staff and the athletic training education program staff at BU, we lobbied for improvements every year and continually upgraded all aspects of our operations. We developed a common injury database for insurance, PPEs, and medical records. We compiled statistics on our needs and were able to purchase capital items each budget cycle. But when it came to asking for salary upgrades for my staff, I hit many roadblocks. I was continually losing assistants to better pay and less hours offered elsewhere. It seemed as if I was training three to five new athletic trainers every year, and the strain of hiring and trying to keep experienced staff members happy was difficult. I began to look for another position at the college level. But after many discussions with colleagues across a wide spectrum of schools, I learned we were all fighting the same battle. I knew I did not want to leave BU just to have the same struggles elsewhere. In 2003, our athletic director hired a consultant to evaluate my department. He interviewed my staff, coaches, athletes, administrators, our curriculum staff, our physicians, and the Dean of our Allied Health School. All supported an increase in our salaries along with improvements in facilities. I proposed a raise for myself and my top assistant, and administrators told me they agreed and would work it into the budget soon. Nine months later, they changed their minds. That was the last straw for me. A friend told me about the job at Medfield, and I interviewed for it and accepted the position inside a week. I gave BU my two-week notice. Yes, I took a slight decrease in my salary. And, certainly, the types of injuries and the rate of injury are not as challenging. But I am treated with respect. I TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


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LEADERSHIP have been given gifts, bonuses, support, and praise. My athletic director tries to provide me with anything that I request, within reason. I have seen many positive results from my work ethic and dedication. I was able to negotiate for the top step in salary and to have my years of teaching at BU count toward my salary level at Medfield. I have an annual review, and the more I do to stay current and on the cutting edge of the profession, the more salary I can earn—I know specifically what I have to do to increase my earning power. And I can actually reach my final salary at BU by taking a few classes this summer. I have also greatly improved my quality of life. I have many more days off, including weekends. In my first semester at Medfield, I attended more family functions than I had over the previous three years. I celebrated Christmas with family in Florida. My paradigm has shifted from living to work to working to live. Making a change after nearly 30 years was hard—no doubt about it. And if anyone had asked me just a few years ago if I would ever leave the Division I level for high school, I would have answered no. I was not ready to leave the excitement of that level and all that goes with it. I also needed all that I saw on the road to Medfield. I needed the experience I gained at the Division I level, where I was exposed to a wide variety of injury scenarios, overcame many challenges, and learned how to maneuver politically and be a leader. If you are a college athletic trainer looking for a change, I encourage you to look at high school positions. But do your homework first. Find out what the hiring norms are where you live. For example, many high schools require you to fill dual roles as a teacher and athletic trainer, so you may need to get your teaching license. And carefully research any school before you accept a position. Public high schools everywhere are experiencing severe budget cuts and that can mean you are walking into a stressful atmosphere as well as a position that is not stable. You also don’t want to work at a school with a lot of parent problems and staff turnover. At Medfield, the community is very committed to keeping an athletic trainer on staff, and the parents are good TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

advocates. The superintendent, principal, athletic director, and nurse are professional and great to work with. The coaches are teachers and very committed to the kids. The Massachusetts Teachers Association is an extremely powerful bargaining unit. Retirement and work hours are closely monitored.

I loved working at Boston University, and I intend to stay active in the NATA and CATS. But I now love working at the high school level and am excited about becoming involved in its organizations. I am glad for all the experiences I had at BU, and I now look forward to where this road will lead me.

WORKING WITH ELITE ATHLETES BY BRIAN GOODSTEIN

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t the age of seven, I fell out of a tree and broke the head of my femur. I was put in traction for a week, placed in a body cast for eight weeks, and needed to go to physical therapy to learn to walk again. After that experience, I knew I wanted to help people return to health and physical activity. I also loved participating in athletics as a kid. I played many sports, excelling in wrestling. Those two experiences pushed me toward the path of athletic training. But I ended up on a different road than the one my peers were taking. In our undergraduate athletic training program, the goal of most students was to work with the football team. But I found that taught me more about being a hydration specialist than it prepared me to be a certified athletic trainer. My program prepared me very well academically, but I wanted to find an additional way to challenge my practical learning experience. I reached out to a local semipro basketball team called the Delaware Blue Bombers to see if I could land an internship. The Blue Bombers responded positively to my request, and I did a two-season internship with the team. This may have been the best decision of my young career. I found that working with elite athletes was what I wanted to do. I knew this was a high aspiration for someone still in school, and I realized I would need to do some things differently to achieve this goal. I would need to look for nontraditional opportunities. And I would need to look behind doors that others walked by. But another huge piece of the puzzle for me has been to network. The maxim, “life is who you know,” has proven true for me in my career. During that first internship with the Blue Bombers, I met Jeff Konin, PT, ATC, who has been my mentor and a friend ever since. At the completion of graduate school in 1996, I started looking for a way to work with elite athletes again. I knew Jeff and his wife Gina had worked with the Olympic Committee, so I inquired if they knew of any opportunities to volunteer at the Atlanta Summer Games. Nothing was available, but they told me about a new program the Olympic Committee had created where it would hire athletic trainers just out of school at each of its training centers. The position was titled “research assistant,” and it entailed serving as the on-site athletic trainer for all the athletes at the center. It was a one-year position, similar to that of a graduate assistantship, and it paid like one. But I knew it would get me closer to where I wanted to be. I had decent grades, a strong interview, and a good referral. I was offered the position at the Olympic Training Center (OTC) in Chula Vista, Calif., and I was ecstatic about the opportunity. I would like to think I was offered the position on my own merits, but having Jeff as a referral was probably very important. The experience I had at the OTC was invaluable. I learned the newest techniques in therapeutic exercise, modalities, and manual therapy. The OTC in Chula Vista hosts National Governing Bodies (NGB) like soccer, field hockey, track and field, rowing, and archery, so my eyes were opened to some sports I had never competed in or covered. I was even privileged to work at an international track and field competition for Brian Goodstein, MS, ATC, CSCS, is Head Athletic Trainer and Strength and Conditioning Coach for Major League Soccer’s D.C. United. He can be reached at: bgoodstein@hotmail.com. T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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LEADERSHIP lower-leg amputees (flex-foot). While I was responsible for the care of all athletes training at the OTC, I primarily covered teams with the United States Field Hockey Association (USFHA) and the United States Soccer Federation (USSF). After my one-year position ended, I kept in touch with the contacts I had made with these NGBs. And that paid

Many of the players from the U-17 teams turned professional, and in 2001, I joined them, becoming the Head Athletic Trainer and Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Tampa Bay Mutiny in Major League Soccer (MLS). Unfortunately for me, and the Mutiny, the team folded because it could not find an owner.

Even though the pay for this position was low, there were many perks. In the four years I held the position, I was able to visit 12 countries, provided three meals a day, and given a small Nike allotment. off, as I was offered the Head Athletic Trainer position for the Women’s National Field Hockey team for the 1998 World Cup, in Utrecht, Holland. It is an amazing feeling to be part of a team representing your country, wearing the colors, and hearing your national anthem on a world stage. Although the team finished a disappointing eighth, I found international travel and competition very exciting. I knew I was on the right path, so I kept in contact with everyone I could who worked with national team athletes. In 1999, I was contacted by the USSF, inquiring if I would be interested in being the head athletic trainer with the under-17 (U-17) men’s national team. The USSF initiated a residency program at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., with a goal of preparing the team for the U-17 World Championships held every two years. The initiative was considered a success as the 1999 team finished in fourth place, the United States’ best showing in a world competition since 1930. Along with serving as the team’s athletic trainer, I expanded my role as a strength and conditioning specialist. I was responsible for all the team’s warmups, speed and agility training, weight training, prehab, and reconditioning. I was very fortunate to learn many of the newest methods in conditioning from the International Performance Institute, also located at IMG. Even though the pay for this position was low, there were many perks. In the four years I held the position, I was able to visit 12 countries, provided three meals a day, and given a small Nike allotment. At a young age, these things go a long way. 22

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But with all the contacts I had made over the past seven years, I quickly landed on my feet. A coach who worked with the U-17’s had taken an assistant position with D.C. United. He heard about my situation and recommended me for the Head Athletic Trainer position. It came back to “who you know” again. I have been the Head Athletic Trainer for D.C. United for six seasons now. During the past four years, I have also held the responsibilities of strength and conditioning coach. I feel that by filling both roles it helps reduce the number of injuries our players incur. I take great pride in preventing injuries, and have been asked to write and present on this topic. Being an athletic trainer with a professional sports team means you are on call 24 hours a day. There is an increased pressure to return injured players to the field as soon as possible, and the season is 10 months long from the beginning of preseason to the final games. Our preseason is spent traveling domestically and abroad for weeks at a time.

There are a number of positives to the job. In my second season with the team, we won the MLS Cup, and my peers voted me MLS Athletic Trainer of the Year. My friends and family have gotten to see me tend to a player on the field, both in person and on national television. And I can’t forget to mention all the cool athletic gear I have accumulated. While I am happy with the path I have taken in my career, it did require some sacrifices. Between stints with national teams, I often had to take jobs that were not ideal for me. I worked as a high school athletic trainer in Tennessee before I joined the USFHA. And, while with the USSF, I worked for a physical therapy clinic in Florida for a while to supplement my salary. As for my future goals, I would like to work as an athletic trainer for the US wrestling team at a future Olympics. And I’d love to work at the World Cup, covering soccer on the largest stage. I’m also thinking about how to combine my professional aspirations with my personal life. I’d like to start a family, and I know that means less travel. So I’m researching the idea of opening a sport performance institute, which will allow me to work with elite athletes, but at more regular hours. When starting in this profession, I can’t say it was my dream to work with a professional soccer team. But after working with soccer and seeing it played internationally, I have grown to love the game. There is a lot more contact involved than people give it credit for. It is the world’s most popular game and is growing here in the U.S. It has been exciting to see how MLS and the players I have worked with have evolved.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE BY BRIAN FITZGERALD

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grew up in inner-city Boston, one of seven children, and by the time I was 15 years old, I knew I wanted to be an athletic trainer. I have been involved in the profession some 40 years now since becoming a student athletic trainer as a freshman at Marquette University in 1968. Back in those days, the athletic training profession was only 16 years old, there was no state regulation or licensure, and very few good job opportunities were available. So I decided to get a bachelor’s degree in nursing and become a school nurse/athletic trainer so I would have a license to practice and be able to work with young athletes. Three years after receiving my degree in nursing from Fitchburg State College and completing my internship in athletic training at Boston State College, I was offered the Head Athletic Trainer position at Boston State. Three years later we merged with the University of Massachusetts-Boston. We had a 19-sport NCAA Division III interTR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


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LEADERSHIP collegiate athletics program, and I spent the next two decades in the traditional setting, working as an athletic trainer, lecturer, and clinical instructor. Working at the NCAA Division III level was a perfect setting for me. We had a competitive sports program, I enjoyed teaching, and I loved working with our student-athletes and my athletic training students. Being at an urban commuter college, I was able to get involved in the community, working with some inner city schools and supporting them with their sports medicine health care needs. I also felt it was very important to get involved in my state and national professional organizations to advance our profession both publicly and politically. I have served for over 20 years now as Legislative Committee Chair for the Athletic Trainers of Massachusetts. I was appointed to our state’s regulatory commission and served as Chair of the Board of Registration in Allied Health Professionals, which oversees athletic trainers, physical therapists, and occupational therapists. I also served on the national board of directors for the NATA Research & Education Foundation.

I highly recommend working in a setting like this, but it’s still a new frontier … I suggest starting at the grassroots level by establishing yourself in your community and finding physicians who understand the value of athletic training. After 18 years of working 60 or 70 hours a week, being on the road with teams many weekends, and having only one full time assistant, I felt it was time for a change and a new challenge. I also wanted to spend more time with my family as well as watch my nephews and nieces participate in their high school and collegiate sports. Over those same years, while volunteering as an athletic trainer for the Boston Marathon, Bay State Games, and Boston Shoot-Out Basketball Tournaments, I came to know Lyle Micheli, MD, Director of the Division of Sports Medicine here at Children’s Hospital Boston. Dr. Micheli is widely considered to be the father of pediatric sports medicine, having founded the first clinic of its kind in this country. In addition, he has always been a strong and active supporter of the athletic training profession. A mutual friend suggested that Dr. Micheli hire a full-time athletic trainer in his sports medicine clinic, and I was very interested in the job. This was a tremendous opportunity for me to work for a world renowned pediatric sports medicine orthopaedic surgeon whose vision and research was on the cutting edge. The hiring process was very interesting because the hospital

NATA Booth No. 1139

Brian FitzGerald, BSN, LAT, ATC, is Community Outreach and Projects Coordinator in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery’s Division of Sports Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston. He was recently inducted into the Athletic Trainers of Massachusetts (ATOM), University of Massachusetts-Boston Athletics, and Massachusetts Amateur Sports Foundation/Bay State Games Halls of Fame.

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LEADERSHIP did not know what an athletic trainer does, nor did it have a job description for one. Therefore, Dr. Micheli created a position through Human Resources and hired me as his Research and Projects Coordinator. At first, the transition was a challenge because my position was not well-defined and we were developing it as we went along. I generally assisted Dr. Micheli, his two sports medicine fellows, and our sports podiatrist in the clinical setting. I would sometimes observe in surgery and also consult with patients, parents, and athletic trainers pre-operatively and post-operatively to prescribe programs and protocols. I helped monitor ongoing research, submitting reports for IRB approval and reviewing projects on an annual basis. I also coordinated medical coverage for sports and performing arts events as well as for symposiums sponsored by the Division. I served with Dr. Micheli on the Massachusetts Governor’s Committee on Physical Fitness and Sports. Over the past 11 years, the Division of Sports Medicine has grown consid-

erably and now boasts four orthopaedic surgeons, seven primary care sports medicine specialists, two podiatrists, two physician assistants, three athletic trainers, two radiology techs, a sports nutritionist, a sports psychologist, and a research assistant, as well as 28 administrative and ancillary staff. The next major phase for Dr. Micheli, which is underway, is to build a world-class pediatric-adolescent sports and fitness research facility. One of the most meaningful aspects of my work at Children’s Hospital Boston has been our outreach to local athletes. In 2001, understanding that there were no athletic trainers in any of the Boston Public Schools (BPS), we helped negotiate to allow any BPS athlete to seek direct access to sports medicine healthcare by going to the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center (RLTAC), where Dr. Micheli is the supervising physician. We solicited funds to support physician coverage by our Harvard trained orthopaedic residents and assigned them to provide sideline coverage at BPS varsity football contests along with a city

assigned ATC or EMT. We then expanded further by offering free preparticipation physical evaluations at the RLTAC so no inner-city athletes would lose the opportunity to participate in sports because of an inability to get a physical in time. Many of the coaches in the BPS are former athletes or students from my Boston State College and UMass-Boston days, which reinforces our trust and relationship to their programs. As our practice expanded, so have my duties and responsibilities. We have established administrative and clinical athletic trainer job descriptions here at the hospital, and my role has changed to Community Outreach and Projects Coordinator. Along with our expansion, I have helped establish our Affiliated Group Program, which serves 35 schools, colleges, and performing arts organizations. Our physicians are team physicians for many of these schools or groups, and their athletes or performing artists have direct clinical access for appointments through our Affiliated Group Liaison.

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LEADERSHIP We have provided medical coverage for the Boston Ballet, Radio City Rockettes, Cirque du Soleil, USA Track & Field, USA Rugby, US Figure Skating, Bay State Games, and many Broadway shows that come to town. Since our practice also specializes in figure skating injuries, I have become heavily involved with US Figure Skating and have been recruited as Assistant Medical Director for five National and two Synchronized Skating National Championships. I’ve also been fortunate to travel to Europe and Asia as US Figure Skating’s Team Athletic Trainer. Our practice performs over 2,100 hours of community service each year, providing medical coverage, in-service programs, lectures, and free ACL injury prevention programs in middle schools for parents, coaches, physical educators, and athletic trainers. I currently sit on the Board of Directors for our Children’s Sports Medicine Foundation, and serve on the Children’s Hospital Boston Community Health Team and Fitness and Nutrition Task Force. My dream is to incorporate athletic trainers into community health centers to help educate those practitioners who admittedly have little musculoskeletal knowledge and understanding of sports medicine. I also hope these athletic trainers would help bridge the gap between the community and the health centers by working with local schools and sports organizations, providing quality sports medicine healthcare, and promoting the tools for injury prevention. They can work with these groups to establish emergency action plans and proper referral of athletic injuries, along with advancing other programs related to healthcare such as nutrition and drug and alcohol prevention. I highly recommend working in a setting like this, but it’s still a new frontier. You can’t just walk into a hospital and say, “I’d like to work here.” I suggest starting at the grassroots level by establishing yourself in your community and finding physicians who understand the value of athletic training. Then, ask a lot of questions of any potential employer. What’s included in the job description? What is the potential for an athletic trainer working at the particular setting? Who’s working there now? Are there specialists in primary care, sports medicine, and orthopedics? Our clinical athletic trainers act as

physician extenders, performing initial evaluations on patients and presenting them to the physicians, thereby saving time and allowing physicians to see many more patients each day. They also respond to patients’ calls and prepare requisitions for patient diagnostic testing and follow-up appointments. Sure, I dreamt of becoming the athletic trainer for the Boston Celtics in my younger days and came very close one time. But right now I would not change a thing because I love what I do and in a small way have been able

to give back to the community I grew up in. I try to make a difference in the sports health care available to our young athletes. I’m 57 now, and I count myself very blessed for all the opportunities I’ve had. The career move I made 11 years ago has allowed me to accomplish a lot more than I would have if I’d stayed in the traditional setting. It has given me the chance to spend more time with my family as well as develop professionally in so many ways. I had a great opportunity, and I’m glad I took it. ■

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

Take a Load Off Low-impact training and active rest aren’t synonyms for slacking off after the season. When planned properly, they let athletes recharge body and mind while still being challenged in their workouts.

© GETTY IMAGES

BY R.J. ANDERSON

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t’s a December morning in Plymouth, Minn., and a large group of sweat-soaked Wayzata High School football players are running around a padded wrestling room hurling dodge balls at one another. Meanwhile, the school’s weightroom is unoccupied, its equipment and free weights sitting in idle silence. Some strength and conditioning coaches may cringe at the thought of their athletes “wasting time” playing games when they could be pumping iron and preparing for next season, but Ryan Johnson, CSCS, Coach Practitioner and Strength and Conditioning Coach at Wayzata, actually organized this dodge ball game. Johnson believes that after the season ends, each player needs to slow down and take some time to rest his mind and recharge his body. So he offers activities

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like dodge ball as a break from traditional weight-based workouts. “We don’t want them to sit down and atrophy during the two to three weeks immediately following the season,” says Johnson, whose former players at Wayzata include Marion Barber of the Dallas Cowboys, Ben Hamilton of the Denver Broncos, and Ohio State University All-American James Laurinaitis. “But we do want to give them a mental break from the demands of the football season. My goal is to break their routine and keep them active, but not push them too hard.” While most strength and conditioning professionals use active rest or active recovery at some points in their periodization models, these terms have a variety of meanings and applications. We talked to a handful of coaches about

their methods for incorporating active rest and low- or non-impact training in their off-season strength and conditioning programs. MAKE REST A GAME When football season ends at Wayzata, Johnson has his hands full designing off-season workouts for the program’s 300-plus football players. As a high school strength and conditioning coach, he works with athletes of all strength and ability levels. From 120pound freshmen to future NFL draft picks, Johnson’s players come off each season with a variety of strength and conditioning needs. So before drawing R.J. Anderson is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning. He can be reached at: rja@MomentumMedia.com. T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE up an off-season plan, Johnson engages his athletes in a low-impact training cycle he believes is essential for athlete development. Though he always keeps the weightroom open and won’t turn a studentathlete away, Johnson does not issue any workouts for a couple weeks after the final game. Instead, he encourages his players to play pickup basketball, use an elliptical machine, or run the three-quarter mile cross country trail in the woods behind the school. Recognizing a need to fuel his athletes’ competitive juices, Johnson orga-

nizes competitive games such as dodge ball to replace selected morning weightroom workouts. Another game Johnson uses is called Power Ball, in which two large garbage cans at either end of the gymnasium serve as goals. The rules allow players to run three steps before they must pass a football to a teammate or attempt to score. Johnson describes Power Ball as a running, throwing, twisting, spinning, and jumping game that uses the entire gym. “I try to create morning activities that serve as team-bonding drills,” Johnson says. “We’ll play games two or three

LOWER IMPACT, FEWER INJURIES

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ow-impact training is a vital part of the Michigan State University men’s and women’s basketball teams’ summer and preseason conditioning workouts. With an eye on minimizing overuse injuries, the Spartans’ three-day-a-week on-court agility workouts are patterned in a two-weeks on, one-week off cycle during their six-week conditioning program. “We follow that cycle because the literature shows that after two weeks of intense exercise, the various bone growth tissues are maturing,” says Associate Strength and Conditioning Coach Mike Vorkapich, SCCC, CSCS. “The risk for overuse stress injuries can be avoided when functional activity is reduced during this phase. So from the second half of summer into the preseason, we really start watching how much pounding our kids take between their conditioning workouts, individual skill workouts, and playing in an open-gym environment.” Vorkapich is a big believer in using cross training as a substitute for cutting and agility work during rest periods. He replaces on-court work with pool and spin bike workouts. In addition to swimming, his pool workouts include underwater variations of running and jumping movements. Prior to 2007, Vorkapich implemented the three-week cycle at the beginning of preseason, but last summer the Spartan athletic trainers and strength and conditioning coaches wanted to try something new, so they implemented two six-week functional conditioning cycles beginning in July. “Part of the reason was that we had four freshmen join the men’s team, three of whom were going to see significant playing time,” says Vorkapich. “Freshmen suffer the majority of the overuse injuries we see because they’re not used to the work intensity, the amount of weight bearing activities, and the sharp cutting activities they have to perform at the collegiate level.”

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times a week. It’s completely optional, but attendance is always tremendous.” MANAGING LOW-IMPACT When the women’s soccer team at Washington State University finishes its season, Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach Cori Metzgar-Deacon, MA, SCCC, CSCS, is faced with an array of challenges. She needs to design the active rest portion of each player’s off-season strength and conditioning program. She needs to allow for the athletes’ widely varying degrees of rest and recuperation time. And she needs to work around end-of-semester scheduling constraints. “Soccer finishes in November, so depending on whether we have a postseason, we usually have two to five weeks until the kids leave for winter break,” Metzgar-Deacon says. “In all, we have about six to eight weeks before we be-

When working with female athletes, Metzgar-Deacon says it’s important to realize the significance they place on body image, which she takes into account when designing low- or non-impact workouts. gin our more rigorous off-season conditioning program in mid-January.” After the athletes take a week off to recharge their mental batteries, Metzgar-Deacon begins implementing a cycle of non-impact conditioning workouts free of Olympic lifting, but incorporating a lot of body weight work. She wants her athletes to maintain their strength levels without stressing their joints, while also getting the mental satisfaction that accompanies a completed workout. Those sessions may include a number of Pilates-based movements, foam rollers, dumbbell work, med ball core work, and a long dynamic flexibility routine. “The entire workout might take them 25 to 30 minutes, including warmup and a cooldown consisting of static stretching with partners or bands,” Metzgar-Deacon says. “They’re working their muscles and getting the blood pumping, but not stressing their bodies too much.” TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE Because of NCAA-mandated training dead periods, Metzgar-Deacon faces a bit of a twist the week before and during Washington State’s academic finals period. “During those two weeks, our workouts have to be completely voluntary so we plan activities that make the athletes want to come in,” she says. “I give them the same kinds of dynamic, body weight-type workouts as before, but try to make them more fun and with a quicker pace, and I don’t hound them or time their sets and rest periods. It’s a way for them to be around their teammates in a relaxed setting, but still get a good workout.” When working with female athletes, Metzgar-Deacon says it’s important to realize the significance they place on body image, which she takes into account when designing low- or non-impact workouts. “Because they are so body-conscious, they want to keep up with their cardio to keep their weight down,” she says. “No matter how beat their bodies are, they still want to get on the treadmill or be out running. During this rest phase, I have to constantly communicate to them the im-

portance of not doing those things.” To effectively drive the point home, Metzgar-Deacon talks about the why behind each aspect of her training program. “Every week I lay out a plan for what we’ll be focusing on,” she says. “When I’m talking to them, I also sympathize with them and explain that they will actually feel better after following my plan. “I tell them their bodies need a rest, and a three-mile run or a treadmill workout isn’t going to do anything for them,” she continues. “As an alternative, I tell them to do a bike workout— maybe even some bike sprints, followed by a stretching routine and foam roller work, then evaluate how they feel.” Another way Metzgar-Deacon cuts down on unnecessary pounding is by incorporating swimming and other hydrotherapy into her workouts. “We try to get them in the water as often as possible during that active rest time,” she says. “That way, they feel like they’re still getting their cardiovascular work in, but they’re not taking the pounding because it’s in a non-weight bearing environment.”

SPARTAN IMPACT At Michigan State University, Mike Vorkapich, SCCC, CSCS, Associate Strength and Conditioning Coach, utilizes active rest in a variety of ways. For Vorkapich, who oversees strength and conditioning training for the Spartan men’s and women’s basketball teams, a low-impact training phase means staying active, but with minimal stress to the mind and body. For his players, active rest can take place in the weightroom, and it can also involve hard work. Once the basketball season ends, players are given a week or two off, during which time the sport coaches tell the players to stay away from the court and the weightroom. When they return, Vorkapich designs workout programs that allow each athlete to make strength gains, but without any pounding on their joints, ligaments, and tendons. To start, he gives the Spartans a mental break by changing the location of their workouts. “Once the basketball season is over, we spend a lot of time in the football building, which is our main strength training facility—but

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE which we don’t use much during the basketball season,” he explains. “Inseason, we work out in the basketball arena and it’s a nice change to get away from that.” To further ease the transition into the off-season, Vorkapich has his players work out just three times a week. “The athletes haven’t worked with a high volume level during the season, so we gradually increase the volume and give them a little more recovery time between workouts,” he says. Though the workouts are intense, by limiting the team’s lifting to three days a week the players still get a break from their in-season routines. “When they’re lifting during those first few weeks, they’re not really doing any basketball or conditioning work yet,” says Vorkapich. “If all they have to do is lift and not even think about the other stuff, that’s pretty restful. “Exactly how hard we go really depends on the exercise,” he continues. “If it’s an exercise on a machine, we’ll go at it pretty hard, maybe working to concentric failure. If it’s a free-weight exercise like a squat, and we haven’t

really squatted with much weight inseason, we’ll concentrate more on technique rather than lifting a lot of weight at a high intensity.” ACTIVE RECONDITIONING After the final horn sounds on another season for the Montreal Canadiens, Scott Livingston, CATC, CSCS, the team’s Strength and Conditioning Coach and Athletic Therapist, knows

trying to train their athletes, even during times when they should back off,” he says. Livingston makes clear that his first goal for the off-season is simply for players to heal their aches and pains by relaxing their bodies and minds. It’s a running joke in hockey circles that players are making tee times at their local country club before they even leave the locker room after the team’s final game. Livingston encour-

“A lot of times, when athletes are doing what they think is active rest, they’re not doing anything to fix their imbalances … Our physical screening and assessment process allows us to look at their entire body.” that each player is nursing his share of aches and pains, especially in years when the team makes a playoff run. So before he hands out any serious off-season work, he gives everyone at least a week or two to rest and recuperate. “Too many strength and conditioning people think they have to justify their existence, so they’re constantly

ages this habit since he feels golf is a great way for hockey players to get active rest. He says walking the course and striking a golf ball is perfect for unwinding physically and mentally while incorporating rotational movements. After a week or two of relaxation, most of the players begin coming back

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE to the Canadiens’ facilities, and Livingston shifts his focus to resolving any nagging injuries. “I use a fourweek period at the start of the off-season as a reconditioning phase,” says Livingston, who is also President of High Performance, Inc., in Montreal, where his clientele includes Olympic athletes. “I take it slow and prepare the players for the off-season conditioning programs to come.” By slowing athletes down during this time and working on what Livingston calls “energy leaks,” players are fully prepared for the intensive strength and conditioning and skill development they will see in the next phase of the training cycle. “A lot of times, when athletes are doing what they think is active rest, they’re not doing anything to fix their imbalances.” Livingston says. “So I prioritize assessing and correcting any orthopedic imbalances and shortcomings, which will give them a solid foundation once the intensive training phase begins. Our physical screening and assessment process allows us to look at their entire body for physical imbalances that may have led to chronic injuries, performance limitations, or energy leaks during the season.” Livingston’s postseason evaluation includes watching how an athlete performs a variety of movements, such as single- and double-foot jumps, looking for ability to complete the tasks and any compensation patterns. He also does manual tests that delineate range of motion and strength levels for the athlete’s muscles and joints. Livingston says it generally takes 60 to 90 minutes to do an evaluation. “We’ve found that if we don’t work on the imbalances, when they start training, the little things that were bugging them during the season start creeping up again and we end up trying to fix those things in the middle of a training phase,” Livingston adds. “It’s much more difficult to do it then because we’re trying to manage two different goals at once: one, fix the problem, and two, get the athlete in peak physical condition.” Once he locates the leaks, Livingston draws up plans addressing individual athletes’ problems while balancing their reconditioning and recuperation. Cross training is usually the key to striking the proper balance. “For example, an athlete with a back problem might swim for their active NATA Booth No. 1342

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OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

FROM SPORT TO SPORT

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igh school strength and conditioning professionals often struggle to set aside active rest periods for multi-sport athletes who go from one team directly to the next. For example, when the Wayzata High School football team from Plymouth, Minn., made a playoff run that went deep into November, players also competing on the school’s basketball, ice hockey, and wrestling teams were forced to switch sports with little or no layoff between seasons. One challenge in these cases is integrating football players into their new team’s preseason weightlifting program. To make sure they don’t over-train, Ryan Johnson, CSCS, Coach Practitioner and Strength and Conditioning Coach at Wayzata, decreases those athletes’ workloads significantly in terms of weight, volume, and intensity. “That’s when I have to be really careful, because the other hockey and basketball

rest and an athlete with an upper-body or trunk injury might do some cycling,” Livingston says. “You want to combine the therapy with low-grade activities that permit active rest but don’t impair the athlete’s reconditioning. “Most of what I prescribe is not physically taxing,” Livingston adds. “If it addresses an injury or corrects an imbalance, it might be mentally taxing because they have to focus on a lot of things at once, but it’s not a high-intensity or overload type of training. I definitely don’t want them to over-train during that period.” When the more rigorous workouts begin later in the off-season, Livingston hopes the four to six weeks spent doing low-impact conditioning will pay off in the form of symmetrical movement. He considers that an ideal way to construct what he calls the three pillars of physical capacity: mobility, basic strength, and stability. “Because I lean less toward strength development and more toward recuperation with my athletes, a low-impact conditioning and active rest period fits perfectly within my off-season training philosophy,” Livingston says. “I feel my job is more about keeping these guys from getting injured than transforming them into training beasts.” ■

players come in chomping at the bit and ready to hit it hard, especially when we’re doing our preseason baseline testing,” he says. “But we can’t take the guys coming off a tough football season and throw them right into the squat rack to do a max test. “For those athletes, we strictly control their workload,” Johnson adds. “If the rest of the team is doing three sets of eight, the football players will do one or two sets of eight. We want them to work alongside their teammates and get that team bonding experience, but we don’t want them to do so much that they over-train.” Johnson says getting young, eager athletes to buy into the value of rest is another challenge. “The hardest part is that the kids feel they have to be gassed after every workout,” he says. “It’s tough to convince them that rest is just as important as those really hard workouts.”

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ACTION PHASE: Once in a squat position, explode through the lower body while lifting the CorBall® Plus overhead reaching with one arm. With the power from the lower body, the feet will leave the ground for a brief second. When your feet return to the ground, get back in the starting position and repeat. Perform this action the appropriate number of repetitions.

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SPECIAL FOCUS

Safe from

Steroids? More than ever before, there is pressure to find out how serious steroid use is at the college and high school levels. Is more testing the answer? BY LAURA ULRICH ention the phrase “Mitchell Report” and you’ll likely end up deep in conversation. The controversial report, released in December by former Senator George Mitchell and alleging steroid use by many Major League Baseball players, has the subject of performance-enhancing drugs on everybody’s mind. Implicating 89 athletes from all 30 ball clubs, the report chronicles baseball’s “steroids era” and claims that more than a decade of inadequate testing and willful ignorance have created a culture of widespread use. Coupled with news of high-profile track and field and cycling athletes being caught doping, the report is raising questions about whether professional and elite sports will ever be clean again. For some, it’s also raising another question: Is steroid use a problem in high school and college athletics? With just four percent of college athletes tested by the NCAA every year, only three states currently conducting high school testing, and individual schools’ testing programs varying widely, many are

SPORTS-N-MOTION PHOTOGRAPHY

M Baseball athletes at Washington Township High School undergo random screening for steroids at their high school, and were also tested by the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association after winning the state championship in 2007.

Laura Ulrich is a contributing writer for Training & Conditioning. She can be reached at: laura@MomentumMedia.com. T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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SPECIAL FOCUS wondering whether the same quiet epidemic exists in educational athletics. There’s no consensus on how widespread high school and college steroid use is, or on what should be done to address it. One thing is clear, however—schools cannot afford to ignore the subject. “It would be naive to say it’s not an issue at our level,” says Kevin Murphy, Athletic Director at Washington Township High School in Sewell, N.J. “High school kids pay attention to what’s happening in college athletics and college athletes look to the culture of professional sports.” “The most important thing we can do is communicate openly about perfor-

sion I college athletes in 2005 was the lowest since the study began in 1985, with 1.2 percent of respondents reporting they had used steroids in the past 12 months—down from 1.6 in 2001 and a high of 4.8 in 1989. In Division II, reported use fell from 2.5 percent in 2001 to 1.2 in 2005, and in Division III, 1.0 percent of athletes reported using steroids, compared to 1.4 in 2001. At the high school level, a University of Michigan study called “Monitoring the Future” polls 50,000 students each year on steroid use. In its 2007 report, 1.1 percent of eighth grade males, 1.7 percent of 10th grade males, and 2.3 percent of 12th grade males reported

Individual athletes understand the odds of being selected are slim. “If no one you know or know of has been tested, you’re not going to be very scared of being tested yourself. I think college athletes might be saying, ‘I’ll take my chances.’” mance-enhancing drug use,” says Herman Frazier, former Athletic Director at the University of Hawai’i, who served on the Board of Directors of the United States Olympic Committee for over 20 years and helped to establish the United States Anti-Doping Agency. “We have to acknowledge that our athletes are highly motivated to get bigger, stronger, and faster to excel at their sports, and that it’s not inconceivable for that motivation to take a wrong turn.” RUNNING THE NUMBERS If someone collected data for the equivalent of a Mitchell Report in high school and college athletics, what would they find? No one knows for sure, but efforts are being made on a few fronts to determine the prevalence of performance-enhancing drug use. At the college level, the largest source of information about steroid use is the NCAA Study of Substance Use Habits of College Student-Athletes. Conducted every four years, this report surveys athletes from every NCAA institution in all three divisions. The most recent edition, published in 2005, included responses from 19,676 college student-athletes about their use habits and attitudes on a variety of substances, including steroids. According to the anonymous, selfreport study, steroid use among Divi40

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having tried steroids. Use among high school girls ranged from 0.4 percent to 0.6 percent across the grade levels. In November, the LA84 Foundation, an organization established to manage California’s share of the profits from the 1984 Olympic Games, announced the results of a study of California high school students’ self-reported steroid use. Of 252 students representing 11 sports and 12 schools, less than one percent said they had used steroids. While those numbers may sound encouraging, there is a growing concern that the reports and statistics don’t tell the real story. The decline in user rates in self-reported studies may come because athletes are more aware of the consequences of getting caught using steroids. And some experts believe high school and college programs rarely see positive steroid tests not because few athletes are using, but because testing programs aren’t looking hard enough. “Does the fact that we’re seeing few positives mean high school and college athletes aren’t using steroids? I don’t think so,” says Andrew Gregory, MD, FAAP, FACSM, Team Physician at Vanderbilt University, Belmont University, and Hillwood High School in Nashville, Tenn., who is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Executive Committee of the Council of Sports Medicine and Fitness and a

frequent lecturer on the topic of performance-enhancing drugs. “I believe we’re seeing low numbers simply because we aren’t doing very many tests.” Charles Yesalis, ScD, MPH, Professor Emeritus at Pennsylvania State University, who has authored books on performance-enhancing drugs and testified before Congress six times on the topic, told The Salt Lake Tribune that the college testing system is “disastrously flawed.” Yesalis said college administrators who deny that steroids are a major problem are turning a blind eye. COLLEGE TESTING QUESTIONED The NCAA conducts a small amount of year-round drug testing in Divisions I and II, and also screens athletes who are involved in its national championships at all levels. Division III, currently conducting a two-year pilot program, may soon see a permanent year-round testing program in place as well. One frequent criticism of the NCAA program is that it tests just four percent of participants each year, so individual athletes understand the odds of being selected are slim. “If no one you know or know of has been tested, you’re not going to be very scared of being tested yourself,” Gregory says. “I think college athletes might be saying, ‘I’ll take my chances.’” More criticism has been leveled at individual institutions, mostly because of the wide variation across programs. In November, The Salt Lake Tribune conducted a broad investigation into college athletes’ steroid use. It found that institutional budgets for drug testing range from $3,000 to $160,000, and that schools’ penalties for a positive steroid test run the gamut from counseling to expulsion. For example, according to the article, an athlete who tests positive at the University of Houston is suspended for one calendar year and loses a year of eligibility, whereas an athlete who tests positive for the same anabolic agent at the University of Idaho faces counseling and periodic re-testing. “The inconsistencies are a problem,” says Rod Walters, DA, ATC, a sports medicine consultant and former Head Athletic Trainer and Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Medicine at the University of South Carolina. “Even within a conference, programs vary widely. That sends a confusing message and sets up an unfair situation.” In addition, most institutions that TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


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SPECIAL FOCUS have extensive testing programs in place focus on education, not punishment. At Hawai’i, a student-athlete’s first positive test for steroids isn’t even reported to the athletic director. “A first positive is between the athlete and the team physician, and it’s done that way on purpose,” Frazier says. “This is about education.” At Vanderbilt, a first positive for any drug, including steroids, has no institutional penalty. “The athlete may have a penalty from his or her coach, and there will be mandatory counseling and regular screening,” Gregory says. “But there is no loss of playing time from the athletic department.” Frank Uryasz, MBA, CAE, President of the National Center for Drug Free Sport, which handles the NCAA drugtesting program, does not believe the NCAA needs to expand its program, but he would like to see schools, conferences, and the NCAA work more in concert. “The NCAA program is excellent, but it’s true that the likelihood of any one athlete being tested by the NCAA is fairly small,” he says. “I think the key is to have all three entities—the NCAA, the conference, and the individual school—conduct strong testing programs.” HIGH SCHOOL TESTING INCREASES At the high school level, the past few years have seen a growing emphasis on statewide testing programs. Prior to 2006, there were no statewide programs testing high school athletes for steroids. Today, at least 10 states have testing programs or are thinking about developing them. New Jersey was the first state to implement testing. Now completing its second year, the program randomly screens athletes who are competing for state championships. In 2006-07, the program tested 500 athletes and detected one steroid user. Lawmakers are looking to expand the program to 1,000 athletes per year over the next few years and extend it to the regular season. The state’s Senate Education Committee advanced a bill in March that would introduce random testing in middle school age student-athletes as well as require the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association to develop a prevention program for coaches and athletic directors to use. Florida is in the first year of a program that screens athletes in six 42

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ill the Mitchell Report’s allegations that 89 Major League Baseball players used steroids to achieve their success encourage high school and college players to follow the same path? Or will the very public humiliation of the accused players deter younger athletes from trying performance-enhancing drugs? Opinions vary greatly. “In my mind, there’s no question that knowing elite athletes are using steroids pushes younger athletes to use them,” says Herman Frazier, former Athletic Director at the University of Hawai’i, who served on the Board of Directors of the United States Olympic Committee for over 20 years and helped to establish the United States Anti-Doping Agency. “Take Marion Jones for example. My women’s track and field team looked up to her and aspired to be like her. When she admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs, it couldn’t help but have an effect.” Frank Uryasz, President of the National Center for Drug Free Sport, disagrees. “I don’t believe steroid use in professional sports has as much impact on high school and college athletes’ use as people think,” he says. “The decision to take a steroid is a very private, immediate decision. It’s not a decision about how you can compete better down the road. It’s a decision about how to gain an advantage today, next week, or next month. It’s not as calculated as seeing someone else take the drug and deciding to jump on the bandwagon.” Kevin Murphy, Athletic Director at Washington Township High School in Sewell, N.J., believes the effect will depend on how Major League Baseball and other professional sports organizations respond. “If they take a hard-line stance, barring former athletes who are found guilty from halls of fame, taking away records, and toughening up testing, it will act as a deterrent,” he says. “If they don’t, it will encourage kids to use steroids.” Besides the role modeling effect of athletes at higher levels, there are several other factors that can sway an athlete’s decision. “Surveys show that an athlete who feels they are not genetically gifted is more likely to take steroids,” says Andrew Gregory, MD, FAAP, FACSM, Team Physician at Vanderbilt University, Belmont University, and Hillwood High School, in Nashville, Tenn. “An athlete who feels like they have to make big changes to their body composition in a short amount of time is also at greater risk.” “The athlete who has fallen behind because of an injury or because they are growing or maturing slower than their peers is more likely to use steroids,” Uryasz adds. “They may feel like they need to turn to something other than exercise and diet to keep up.” Because the choice to use steroids is a very personal one, building relationships with athletes and working to understand their goals can be a big help. At Washington Township, Athletic Trainer Tonya Dargusch, MS, ATC, pays close attention to individual athletes’ body goals so she can spot red flags. “If we have an athlete who says, ‘I’m 185 pounds this summer and I want to be 215 by the fall,’ Tonya takes notice,” Murphy says. “She spends extra time talking to that athlete about how to set realistic goals and how to improve through diet and exercise. She builds relationships with athletes and they know she cares about them. I believe that relationship helps counteract unhealthy messages they may be getting elsewhere.”

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SPECIAL FOCUS sports—football, baseball, boys’ and girls’ weightlifting, girls’ flag football, and softball. Six hundred athletes will be tested this year, and out of the 425 conducted so far, one test came back

25,000 athletes per year for the next two years, making it the largest steroid testing program in the world. Testing will take place multiple times throughout the school year and both

“Before you start designing a program, you need to know where the rest of the administration stands. Are they supportive? What do they want a testing program to accomplish? Does the school want the program to act as a deterrent or to catch every offender?” positive. The Illinois High School Association Board of Directors voted in January to begin testing in the 2008-09 school year. New Mexico, West Virginia, Connecticut, Indiana, Missouri, and Delaware have considered starting programs, and discussions within the California legislature about testing were reopened this winter after the Mitchell Report was released. In Texas, a program mandated by the state legislature and developed by the University Interscholastic League (UIL) began this spring. It will test 20,000 to

male and female athletes in all sports will be randomly selected. “Because we’re testing so many athletes, over the next few years we’ll accumulate a lot more data than has been available in the other states with testing programs,” says Mark Cousins, Athletic Coordinator at the UIL. The program’s random selection process will be weighted toward Texas’s larger high schools, with more studentathletes tested at schools in the state’s higher classifications. Results will be confidential, released only to the ath-

lete, his or her parents, and school administrators. Students will be notified immediately before they are tested, and those who do not appear for testing without receiving an excused absence will be treated as if they had tested positive. Under the program, a student-athlete who tests positive once will be suspended from competing for 30 competition days and required to produce a negative test result before resuming play. A second positive will result in suspension for one calendar year, and an athlete who tests positive a third time will be banned for the remainder of his or her high school career. Student-athletes with one or two positives will still be allowed to participate in practices. Murphy believes both state-led and individual-school programs are important. Washington Township added steroid testing to its overall drug screening program last year, testing only in-season athletes at first. This year, out-ofseason athletes were tested as well. “Having programs at both the state and school levels means there is a greater chance of getting tested, so there’s

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SPECIAL FOCUS more of a deterrent effect,” Murphy says. “It also ensures that athletes are getting the message from multiple sources to not use steroids.” Murphy says it was clear his athletes had received that message after Washington Township’s baseball team won the state championship last year. “A few minutes after hoisting the trophy, six of our players were sitting in a room waiting to be tested by the state program,” he says. “I was proud of them because they handled it so well—they knew they had nothing to worry about. I believe they understand the importance of testing and keeping a level playing field because we have a testing program back at home.” MAKING IT WORK When administrators decide to set up a steroid testing program at their institution, they often begin by talking about how many athletes will be tested and the details of collecting and processing samples. According to Walters, that approach leaves out a critical step. “Before you start designing a program, you have to make sure everybody at the institution is on the same page,” he says.

“You need to know where the rest of the administration stands. Are they supportive? What do they want a testing program to accomplish? Does the school want the program to act as a deterrent or to catch every offender? “Answering those questions involves sitting down with all the key players and having an open discussion about the school’s philosophy on testing,” Walters continues. “These are hard questions to ask, but they’re necessary.” Murphy agrees. When Washington Township considered steroid testing two years ago, his first step was to assemble a task force with representation from administrators, parents, and coaches. “You need to start by getting in tune with what your community wants,” Murphy says. “If your institution and your community don’t see the need for testing, you’re not going to get anywhere. In that case, I’d advise putting the idea on hold and first working to educate people on the need.” Once there is a consensus and a shared philosophy, the next step is to bring in your school’s legal counsel. “They need to be actively involved in drafting the plan,” Walters says. “They can also help

you determine what local, state, and federal laws you need to consider when setting up your program.” The third step is to examine other schools’ policies and think through the logistics. Several key elements need to be in place for a program to work: Year-round testing: Confining testing to in-season athletes, the school year, or the postseason is less effective than testing throughout the year. “It has to be yearround, and by that I mean 12 months,” Uryasz says. “Otherwise, you’re opening a window when athletes can use steroids and escape detection.” Adequate numbers: As the percentage of athletes tested goes down, so does the deterrent effect. For that reason, Washington Township tests 50 percent of its student-athletes. “Kids run the numbers,” Murphy says. “We have 1,500 student-athletes, so they know 750 of them are going to be selected for our overall drug-testing program, and they don’t know which of those 750 will be selected for steroid testing.” There is no magic percentage that creates a deterrent effect, however. “The reality is that testing costs money, so ad-

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SPECIAL FOCUS ministrators are always going to try to figure out the smallest number that will prevent use,” Uryasz says. “There’s no perfect answer, but the more individuals you can test, the better.” Short notice: The less time between when an athlete is notified that he or she will be tested and when the test actually occurs, the more accurate the results will be. “One of the best things we did at South Carolina was to make our tests very spontaneous,” Walters says. “The smaller the window of notification, the less chance an athlete will manipulate the result.” A clear plan for positives: “There must be a complete, written document that states what is going to happen if an athlete tests positive,” Walters says. “Is there an appeal process? Will you retest? If you do, and the re-test is positive, is that considered a second positive or just confirmation of the first? These are all policy elements that need to be spelled out.” A plan should also specify how selfreferrals will be handled. “If an athlete comes in and says, ‘If you test me, I will be positive,’ what will you do?” Walters says. “Some programs treat that more leniently than a positive test and others don’t. I believe leniency for athletes who self-refer is a good idea, but your plan must address it.” Informed athletes: Broad awareness of the testing policy will help ensure it deters use. Walters advises having the person in charge of testing meet with each team every season to go over the details of the program. Strict adherence: Everyone involved must follow the testing plan to the letter, Walters says. “Whenever you deviate from your procedure, even in a small way, you will have problems,” he explains. “The plan has to be carried out in its entirety every time.” Re-evaluate frequently: At Hawai’i, Frazier met annually with all sport administrators, the compliance coordinator, the team physician, and the strength and conditioning and athletic training staffs to discuss how the testing program was working. “We’d review our numbers, look at trends, and talk about whether the program was doing what we wanted it to do,” he says. Walters took a similar approach at South Carolina. “We created a policy annually and lived with it for a year,” he says. “During the year, I made notes about any concerns or any changes we might want to consider. Then we’d take

all that into consideration and revamp the program the next year. It was an involved process, but it worked.” GOOD LESSONS As both high schools and colleges continue to hear calls for more steroid testing, Walters advises athletic trainers and strength coaches to listen carefully. He feels that if high school and college sports take the issue of steroids seriously, through both testing and education, lasting changes can be made. And for him, that’s the most impor-

tant part. “I believe when you have an athlete for four years and educate him or her about steroids, real learning takes place,” he says. “They leave your program not believing in taking shortcuts and they understand that hard work and honest effort can get them where they want to go. Those are good lessons for the rest of their lives.” ■ A version of this article previously appeared in Athletic Management, a sister publication to T&C.

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TREATING THE ATHLETE

Unmasking

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AP PHOTO/CHUCK BURTON

Recent research into the physical and psychological mechanisms of pain is revealing new ways to help ease the hurt without the use of medication.

BY DR. DANIEL DRURY & DR. KAREN WONDERS

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hether it’s dull or sharp, focused or diffused, acute or chronic, there’s no doubt that pain matters a great deal in athletic training. It helps us detect and diagnose athletic injuries, and it serves as a gauge for monitoring progress in rehab. Athletes often have their own vocabulary for describing the pain they feel, and it’s not always easy to interpret. While you know that pain is important, you may not know exactly what’s going on under the skin, and in the brain, to cause it. You also might not know about everything you can do to help relieve it. Recent studies on the mechanisms of pain in athletes are providing new information in both these areas. Research TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

is also shedding more light on a phenomenon called exercise-induced hypoalgesia, which—though not yet fully understood—could play a significant role in your approach to assessing and treating injuries. WHAT IT IS & WHAT IT DOES According to the International Association for the Study of Pain, pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. This definition is broad, and it has to be. While the major physical mechanisms of pain are well understood, interpretations of pain can differ widely, so comparing one person’s pain to another person’s is a difficult and inexact process. Biologically, pain results from the

stimulation of nerve endings called nociceptors. In scientific terms, nociception is the division of the afferent central nervous system that responds to noxious stimuli. Put more simply, pain is a specific type of message that alerts the brain to potentially damaging or dangerous situations. Pain fibers are distributed throughout the entire body and come in two Daniel Drury, DPE, FACSM, is Associate Professor and co-chair of the Health Sciences Department at Gettysburg College. He can be reached at: ddrury@gettysburg.edu. Karen Wonders, PhD, is an exercise physiologist and Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation at Wright State University. She can be reached at: karen.wonders@wright.edu. T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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TREATING THE ATHLETE basic forms. Type III fibers (also known as A-Delta fibers) are thick in diameter and have a thin myelin sheath. They respond primarily to structural deformation and mechanical pressure, and are therefore associated with sharp, piercing pain. Type IV fibers (also known as C-fibers) are thin and un-myelinated, so they transmit signals much more slowly than Type III fibers. They are associated primarily with dull, aching types of pain.

Both kinds of fibers have nerve endings that are dispersed in muscle tissue, tendons, and the skin. The nerve endings are well positioned to receive various noxious stimuli, which can depolarize or activate the nerve receptor, thereby triggering the sensation of pain. In addition, algesic (pain causing) substances within the body are released when a muscle is injured or damaged, and these substances, such

EIH & INJURY ASSESSMENT Research has demonstrated that exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH)—a decrease in the sensation of pain during physical activity—affects athletes during competition. Combine that with the psychological side of participating in sports, and it’s easy to conclude that the middle of a game may not be the best time to evaluate the pain associated with an athletic injury. But injury assessment is a big part of why you’re on the sidelines. To provide the most accurate diagnosis possible, on gamedays and off-days alike, it’s important to consider the effects of EIH when assessing an injury on the field versus in the athletic training room. The key fact to remember is that X level of pain one afternoon before practice may be far different from X level of pain in the heat of competition. In an article published in the Journal of Athletic Training in 2000, O’Connor et al., reviewed 184 articles from a six-year period and made observations about how pain was assessed. They found that athletic trainers and researchers most often used pain scales that measured pain intensity alone and overlooked the affective or cognitive (in other words, situational) component of pain. As a result, the assessments were probably not as comprehensive as they could have been. The authors provided some valuable recommendations for athletic trainers when assessing pain. They included the following: When assessing the location of pain, drawings may be helpful to show the distribution of pain the athlete is experiencing. A numerical pain intensity scale should be used to help quantify the intensity of pain at the time of assessment. This numerical score can help track the progression of an injury and the effects of treatment over time. A numerical affective scale should be used to determine to what degree the pain is unpleasant. Because exercise has the potential to diminish pain perception both during and after exercise, the athletic trainer should be sure to consider the athlete’s activity level during initial diagnosis and when evaluating rehab progress.

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as histamine, bradykinin, serotonin, and potassium, can activate the nearby nociceptors. Other substances, like hydrogen ions and prostaglandins, can heighten the sensitivity of nociceptors and make them more likely to fire. Everyone knows what pain feels like, but by definition it’s a subjective experience. This often presents a challenge to athletic trainers because a similar physical injury can be perceived very differently by different athletes. “Really hurts” to one individual might be the same as “kind of aches” to another and “throbs, but not badly” to a third. Furthermore, pain does not necessarily increase or decrease depending on the amount of tissue damage. Although pain is an important factor when assessing an injury, it’s not a completely reliable guide. You can never feel what the athlete feels, so you rely on them to communicate the type, location, and severity of their pain. Rehab professionals are often curious about the extent to which pain is actually useful. Once an athlete is aware of his or her physical condition—a sprained knee, a bruise, a wound—it may seem like pain no longer serves a purpose. You could even argue that chronic pain can be counterproductive to the healing process. When athletes and healthcare providers see pain as unnecessary, they often turn to analgesic drugs to reduce or eliminate it. While these medications can be very effective, particularly after an injury, they also have a key drawback—in some cases, they can mask functional pain, which provides necessary feedback for the recovery process. While the athlete is made more comfortable, the athletic trainer may be losing important information that’s critical to a successful rehab. MIND OVER MATTER? Remember when Kerri Strug nailed her second vault at the 1996 Olympics to help secure the U.S. women’s gymnastics team’s first all-around gold medal? If so, you probably recall that she did so with two torn ligaments in her ankle, sticking her final landing in obvious pain with most of her weight on one leg. And if you’ve been in the profession long enough, you have probably witnessed a performance like it in your own setting—an athlete displaying remarkable focus and tenacity, finding the will to compete despite beTR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


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TREATING THE ATHLETE

The precise level of intensity needed to induce EIH is not known, and it almost certainly varies by individual. However, several researchers have reported that an intensity near 70 percent of maximal oxygen consumption is sufficient to induce EIH. but an exercise-induced decrease in the ability to transmit noxious stimuli has been observed through tests of the nervous system, suggesting that the best explanation involves a blend of both mental and physical elements. Based on the information available now, it appears there are a number of contributing factors in EIH. One is an

deal with pain. One of the most important is a phenomenon called exerciseinduced hypoalgesia (EIH). Early case studies of pain being diminished during physical effort date back to the American Civil War and World War I. Doctors in the field noticed and reported that while a soldier was engaged in battle, he felt less pain than when in

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increase in endogenous circulating opioids (endorphins). Another is an increase in catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline, also known as norepinephrine), leading to an increase in blood pressure, along with neurological gate-controlling from local muscular afferents. Untangling and isolating these factors is an area of intense study with important ramifications for athletes and anyone else who suffers from pain, and the research is ongoing. But even if we’re not yet sure exactly how it works, it’s still important to recognize that it works. Research has shown that a key determining factor for the onset of EIH is the intensity of exercise. The precise level of intensity needed to induce EIH is not known, and it almost certainly varies by individual. However, several researchers have reported that an intensity near 70 percent of maximal oxygen consumption (VO 2 max) is sufficient to induce EIH. Running and cycling are the most common activities used to study aerobic exercise and pain perception, but other forms of aerobic work have also

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the safety of a hospital. In more modern times, anecdotal evidence and scientific research have documented a similar effect during athletic competition. So what is actually happening in these situations? How much is mental (“in the heat of battle”) and how much is physiological? The exact mechanisms of EIH are not completely understood,

ing hampered by a clearly painful injury or condition. We often credit these athletes with Herculean courage and character, and wonder just how they do it. As it turns out, science is helping answer that question by shedding light on several key internal mechanisms—both physiological and psychological—that help athletes

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TREATING THE ATHLETE been found to be effective. Anaerobically, strength training, gripping exercises, and several types of isometric exercise have all produced a temporary decrease in pain perception as well, al-

relationship between beta-endorphins and decreased pain is not fully understood. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia occurs even when chemicals called opioid antagonists are used to block the

Accomplished athletes have credited their success in part to increasing their pain threshold through rigorous training and competition. At this point, however, there is very little clinical evidence suggesting that muscular pain tolerance actually contributes to athletic success. though not to the same degree as comparable aerobic exercise. One of the most studied and controversial mechanisms of EIH centers on endogenous opioids—chemicals produced by the body that reduce pain. Beta-endorphins (a neurotransmitter) have been found to affect the peripheral and central portions of the nociceptive system, which essentially means they modulate pain sensation. While it’s well established that the body’s beta-endorphin levels increase during exercise, the

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body’s opioid receptors, leading many researchers to conclude that there are several mechanisms (opioid and nonopioid) causing the analgesic effects. Exercise is also a potent stimulus for increasing sympathetic activity. As part of the sympathetic response, catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) are secreted to prepare the body for exercise by increasing cardiac output and constricting peripheral blood vessels. Consequently, an increase in arterial blood volume increases systemic blood

pressure, which may contribute to a temporary diminishing of pain perception. Interestingly, there seems to be a neural link between the control of blood pressure and the modulation of pain perception. Studies have found that people with chronic untreated hypertension actually have a higher tolerance for pain than people with normal blood pressure. This relationship has led researchers to explore how elevated blood pressure might be involved in pain perception during exercise, but firm conclusions have not yet been reached. PRACTICAL EFFECTS Imagine an athlete (or anyone else, for that matter) who has just received a blow that results in a contusion. What’s the first thing they do? They rub it. Everyone knows that rubbing an area after a hard impact seems to decrease pain— but have you ever wondered why? The answer may help explain why all this research matters to you as a sports medicine professional. Pain can be diminished by rubbing an injured area because the un-myelinated C-fibers that transmit the pain messages must

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TREATING THE ATHLETE compete for access through the spinal cord with neuromuscular proprioceptors from the active muscles and pressure receptors in the skin. In what is called the Gate Control Theory, only a certain number of messages can be sent to the brain at any given time, and sending non-pain related stimuli (“this area is being rubbed”) helps prevent more pain stimuli (“this area was just bumped and now it hurts!”) from being processed by the nervous system. In short, the Gate Control Theory holds that the actual amount of painful impulses reaching the brain is reduced when multiple sources of sensory input are introduced simultaneously from different types of afferent fibers. Many athletes believe the ability to tolerate pain is an important aspect of both training and competition. Whether they’re “feeling the burn” in the weightroom or taking a punishing hit on the field, they accept that pain is part of athletics. But does pain tolerance really correlate well with performance? Anecdotally, accomplished athletes like cyclist Lance Armstrong have credited their success in part to increasing their

pain threshold through rigorous training and competition. At this point, however, there is very little clinical evidence suggesting that muscular pain tolerance actually contributes to athletic success. There is also little evidence that muscular pain tolerance can truly be trained or improved. For the most part, pain tolerance plays a minor role in determining athletic performance, but it’s not surprising that the athletes most willing to endure pain would ascribe their success in part to their “toughness.” Even so, an understanding of pain and how to ameliorate it can help make rehab more effective. In terms of EIH, taking advantage of the analgesic effects of exercise may be a useful way to promote rehab compliance. For example, some athletes find soaking in an ice bath to be very painful. Stretching and other range of motion exercises are extremely uncomfortable after certain injuries. Even sustained muscle exercise can cause serious pain and discomfort. Athletic training and rehab are not just driven by science and rigid protocols—they’re also grounded in the art of deciding how much pain an athlete

can tolerate and knowing when to push them or pull back. So let’s say you have an athlete who dreads submerging their arm in an ice bath because it hurts. But if this treatment is necessary, to reduce inflammation for example, try having them perform moderate-intensity aerobic exercise beforehand to induce EIH. Or perhaps an athlete is recovering from a torn or strained muscle and finds strength and range of motion work excruciating. Warmup activities involving semi-vigorous aerobics will not only increase blood flow, but may also temporarily raise the athlete’s pain tolerance. In many ways, pain is fascinating. Everyone knows what it is, but we still haven’t figured out all the positive and negative ways it affects the body. However, as we continue to learn more, the possible applications to sports medicine are numerous and exciting. Even without fully understanding all the mechanisms behind a phenomenon like exerciseinduced hypoalgesia, we can take advantage of what we do know to make rehab and injury treatment more tolerable, and ultimately more successful. ■

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SPORT SPECIFIC The Pilots finished the season ranked fifth in the nation last fall.

WILL CREW

No Stopping ’Em Carefully designed aerobic workouts and sport-specific movement drills lay the training foundation for the high-flying University of Portland women’s soccer team.

BY DR. TERRY FAVERO aving worked with soccer players for years, I fully understand how important conditioning is to a team’s success. But if I ever need a reminder, I simply recall the University of Portland women’s team’s run to the 2005 NCAA Division I national championship. On Dec. 2, the squad played a gru-

H

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eling 110-minute match against Penn State—90 minutes of regulation and two 10-minute overtimes. That physically and mentally draining contest, broadcast on national television, wasn’t over until we won 4-3 on penalty kicks. Less than 48 hours later, the Pilots took on UCLA in the national championship game. Despite playing on short

Terry Favero, PhD, is Professor of Biology and Conditioning Coordinator for the two-time national champion women’s soccer team at the University of Portland. He has also worked with the U.S. men’s soccer team in preparation for the 2000 Olympics and the regional Olympic Development Program. He can be reached at: favero@up.edu. T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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SPORT SPECIFIC rest, we came out strong, scoring in the first two minutes and adding another goal before the 10-minute mark of the first half. Our offense and defense fired on all cylinders, and we captured the title with a 4-0 victory. With so little re-

a six-mile run. Players must sprint, jump, slide, change direction on a dime, kick, and sustain muscle contractions. With that in mind, I employ drills that address all aspects of movement and allow me to identify and correct any flaws.

For aerobic development, my favorite workout is called aerobic-acceleration intervals. Its goal is twofold: to enhance aerobic capacity, and to increase the anaerobic power required in starting and accelerating. covery time, I have no doubt that our athletes’ excellent physical condition helped make the difference. Portland’s women soccer players take great pride in their conditioning level. They love seeing their opponents being “subbed out” due to fatigue and the decline in technique and skill that comes with it. As the team’s conditioning coach, it’s my job to prepare them to both outplay and outlast their opponents.

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WORKOUT SPECIFICS How do I translate our program goals and my aerobics-first philosophy into actual workouts? I start by asking the coach for the particulars of his practice schedule. I also touch base with the players to gather any thoughts they may have about the team’s progress. And finally, I take into account the time of year—we have different priorities during the season, in the off-season, and over the summer, which I’ll explain in detail later on. For aerobic development, my favorite workout is called aerobic-acceleration intervals. It mirrors the interval-heavy nature of soccer, and its goal is twofold: to enhance aerobic capacity, and to in-

20 yds: 85% 40 yds: 80% 60 yds: 75% 80 yds: 70% 100 yds: 65%

GOAL ORIENTED We have three main goals for our soccer training program. The most important is increasing aerobic capacity, which in turn increases lactate threshold, spares precious glycogen, delays fatigue, and improves running economy. During a typical 90-minute game, elite-level players run roughly six miles at an average intensity near their anaerobic threshold. Studies have shown a significant positive correlation between VO2 max and soccer performance during match play (see Bangsbo, J., et al., in the “References” box on page 63 for one example), and aerobic training has been shown to increase VO2 max and lactate threshold. A recent study from Norway indicates that aerobically trained athletes average almost twice as many sprints per game, cover greater distances, and have more contact with the ball. It was also found that fitter players connect on more of their pass attempts (see Helgerud, J., et al., in the “References” box). Our second goal is to develop proper form and movement mechanics. We do this by eliminating incorrect or suboptimal movement patterns and improving motor skills used for running, jumping, changing direction, and overall agility. The average player may run six miles per match, but a soccer game is nothing like

The third goal is developing functional strength. This includes muscle power related to acceleration, explosive jumping, safe landing, deceleration, and increasing core-hip strength to combat weakness in the lateral hip complex and prevent knee injuries. Each workout I design takes these goals into account, but they’re not my only considerations. Our soccer training regimen is designed to complement and support the coach’s practice schedule, and never duplicate activities or overwork the players. For instance, team practices with the ball are intense and involve many sprinting and agility movements, so I don’t prescribe highintensity work to coincide directly with those sessions. In addition, because our soccer players don’t have time to devote exclusively to anaerobic and aerobic conditioning, speed, agility, and strength, each workout addresses multiple objectives. Rather than have a “speed day” or an “agility session,” I blend our workouts to provide several levels of challenges that dovetail with what the coach is doing.

crease the anaerobic power required in starting and accelerating. I place a row of cones at 20-yard intervals over a distance of 100 yards (see Figure One below). Beginning at one end of the row, the athletes run to each successive cone and back, starting with the nearest one. For each interval, I tell them to maintain a certain percentage of max effort on the way out: 85 percent for the first interval (the 20-yard run), 80 percent for the second (40 yards), then 75 percent (60 yards), 70 percent (80 yards), and finally 65 per-

Figure One: This illustration shows the aerobic-acceleration intervals workout. The percentages represent percent of max effort as the athletes run out to each successive cone. When running back to the starting point, they always jog at 50 percent of max effort. TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


Circle No. 141

NSCA Booth Nos. 322, 324, 326, 423, 425, 427


SPORT SPECIFIC

IN THE ZONE

D

uring functional movement workouts, the athletes complete four series of continuous loops through the three-zone setup shown here. They jog through the recovery zones before and after performing a specific movement for the full length of the activity zone. In a typical session, I choose several movements from the Forward Series, Lateral Series, Backward Series, and Carioca/Footwork Series (see below). I vary my selections to emphasize different movement skills.

10 YDS

RECOVERY ZONE

30-40 YDS ACTIVITY ZONE

10 YDS RECOVERY ZONE

Depending on the time of year and our priorities for the workout, I can select activities from each series that focus on fundamental movements and rhythms, or that train power applications, or that train advanced power movements. After completing each movement series, the athletes jog one lap around the field and then perform three lower-extremity strength-building exercises, such as body weight squats, alternating-side lunges, and squat jumps.

Forward Series:

Backward Series:

Fundamental Movements and Rhythms Skip for tempo Skip-hop with high knees Skip with leg extension

Fundamental Movements and Rhythms Backward running, easy Backward open-groin skip Backward skip with high knees

Power Applications Skip for height Skip for distance

Power Applications Backward bounding Backward lunge walk

Advanced Power Movements Alternate-leg bounding 2R, 2L bounding

Advanced Power Movements Backward lunge with alternating heel touches

Lateral Series:

Carioca/Footwork Series:

Fundamental Movements and Rhythms Lateral shuffle, easy Lateral shuffle, easy with arm swing Lateral push-offs, quick tempo Back-leg snap-overs

Fundamental Movements and Rhythms Carioca with 180-degree hip rotation Easy carioca Short, quick carioca

Power Applications Lateral push-offs, long strides Lateral hops for height Lateral hops for distance Advanced Power Movements Lateral hops with crossing legs in the air

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Power Applications Strides (almost straight-legged) High-knee carioca Advanced Power Movements 180-degree twist jumps

cent when running the full 100 yards. After rounding each cone, on the way back they run at 50 percent of max effort (slightly faster than a jog). One full cycle of this drill covers a total distance of 600 yards, and a set consists of two consecutive cycles. Each set is followed by a jogging lap around the entire field. We perform five sets in a typical workout. At the end of an aerobic-acceleration intervals session, each athlete has completed 50 total accelerations and covered about 6,000 yards (not including warmup and cooldown activities). Even though almost all the running is performed below 80 percent of max effort, the athletes’ heart rates typically exceed the anaerobic or lactate threshold during each set. Our players say they like the challenge of running a variety of distances at different intensities—and more importantly, they report that the variety of paces and distances mirrors the demands of a soccer game more closely than typical high-intensity sprint repetitions. The drill also emphasizes active recovery. There is no walking or standing between intervals, so the athletes teach themselves to “recover on their feet.” This is important, because during games they don’t get to choose when they’ll have to sprint and when they can move at a slower pace. For movement workouts, I focus on the mechanics of key sport-specific agility movements. Many college soccer players, even at highly successful programs like ours, have received little functional training in areas such as running form, jumping and landing, acceleration, deceleration, and turning mechanics. I try to remedy that with drills targeting individual movement patterns, and I combine this work with appropriate strength training, since muscular weakness is often an underlying cause of poor mechanics. The key is to break down sport-specific movement patterns into their component parts, and then train and build upon those patterns. Once the foundation is laid, players find they are quicker, more agile, and better able to take advantage of their advanced soccer skills. During our movement training sessions, I use cones to set up an “activity zone” of 30 to 40 yards, book-ended by two aerobic “recovery zones” of 10 yards each. In each drill, athletes jog through the first recovery zone before performing a targeted movement in the TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


SPORT SPECIFIC activity zone (see “In the Zone” on page 62 for a complete list of the movements I choose from). When they reach the second recovery zone, they jog 10 more yards before rounding the last cone and making a return trip. I break the activity zone work into four different movement planes, each with its own biomechanical focus, and the athletes loop continuously through

ics during each individual movement and correct inefficiencies or poor mechanics. By refining such skills as proper jumping and landing mechanics, we have significantly reduced our injury rates while adding anaerobic muscle power. PLANNING BY SEASON The aerobic interval work and movement drill sequences form the bedrock

This workout is a favorite of the players ... the variation in activities mimics soccer demands and trains multiple movement skills, thus addressing a major shortcoming of straight-ahead running. the setup as they complete the movement skills within a plane. The Forward Series engages the flexor-extensor muscles. The Lateral Series centers on hip abductor and adductor development. The Backward Series addresses navigation and balance while taking advantage of the 30 percent greater energy requirement of backward movements. And while the core muscles are engaged throughout most of the movements, they become the main priority in the Carioca/Footwork Series. Following each movement series, the athletes jog one lap and then perform three lower-extremity strength-building activities, such as body weight squats and squat jumps. After finishing all four series, they perform a dynamic cooldown. This workout is a favorite of the players, as it provides great variety, dynamic challenges, and continuous movement. I also like how the jogging surrounding each activity enhances the aerobic benefits. Average heart rates for each series exceed the anaerobic threshold, and some athletes elevate their heart rates into the 190s during the most explosive power movements. The athletes don’t think of this as an aerobic workout because of the variety and sequencing of the movement patterns, but their heart rate response is similar to what we’d see during 45 minutes of soccer. Plus, the variation in activities mimics soccer demands and trains multiple movement skills, thus addressing a major shortcoming of straight-ahead running. Another major benefit of this work is that it helps prevent serious injuries to our athletes. As players pass through the activity zone, I can observe their mechanTR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

of my soccer conditioning program all year long. But I adjust the frequency and content of the activities to accommodate our team’s training and competitive cycles, and our strength coach complements my work with his own strength-training regimen. The off-season, from January to May,

cycles in three sets (2-2-2 or 2-3-2), and advance to 10 cycles as the players’ conditioning and aerobic capacity improve. During the season (from August to December), I incorporate the movement development activities into our extended warmups two or three times a week, emphasizing fundamental/rhythmic and power activities in the first two weeks of competition when we’re developing “game fitness” by playing our schedule. Because of the high physical demands and stresses of the advanced power movements, we rarely perform those during the season. When the predictable mid-season fatigue sets in, I scale back the intensity of the aerobic-acceleration intervals. For instance, I might eliminate the most demanding 20-yard effort or allow the athletes to take a jogging start instead of having to accelerate from a standing position. But as we approach the end of the season and the playoffs loom, we return to our regular workouts to ensure that we’re in optimal physical condition when the games matter most.

The athletes don’t think of this as an aerobic workout because of the variety and sequencing of the movement patterns, but their heart rate response is similar to what we’d see during 45 minutes of soccer. is a time for coaches to teach techniques and skills, and that’s when we can focus on developing athletes’ strength base and eliminating any functional movement weaknesses. With no games to work around, we usually conduct aerobic training twice a week during the early winter months and once a week after formal spring training starts. Players also perform resistance training at least three times per week using activities such as circuit training, medicine ball work, and exercises with resistance bands. They do some traditional power lifting at this time as well. From June through August, the movement development sessions are held twice a week, and progress from fundamental/rhythmic and power activities early on to advanced power movements after the first month or so. For aerobic development, I typically use the acceleration interval workout once a week, and supplement it with another weekly aerobic workout. Early in the training season, we may complete only six or seven total

All coaches want fast, agile athletes. At Portland, we want fast, agile athletes who can compete for 90 minutes—or more—with little or no deficit in their work rate. By focusing on aerobic development and fundamental movement activities, we’re building soccer players with the power, quickness, skill, and stamina to become great—and maybe even become champions. ■

References: Bangsbo, J., L. Norregaard, et al. “Activity profile of competition soccer.” Canadian Journal of Sport Sciences 16, no. 2 (1991): p. 85. Helgerud, J., L. Engen, et al. “Aerobic endurance training improves soccer performance.” Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 33, no. 11 (2001): 1925-1931.

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S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Performance Points

brought to you by

Focus on Core Training for Basketball With Andrea Hudy, MA, CSCS, USAW-1, Associate Director of Strength and Conditioning, University of Kansas

What is the primary challenge of designing a core training program for basketball players? I think the biggest challenge is simply defining the core and deciding what “core training” really means—there are several interpretations, and I used to struggle with finding the best possible way to define it. Several years ago, when I was working at the University of Connecticut, another strength coach introduced me to the Paul Chek approach to core training, and I now follow that philosophy as a template when designing a core training program for basketball. The CHEK system breaks the core into four sub-systems: the anterior oblique, the posterior oblique, the lateral, and the deep longitudinal. My core movement training program for our basketball teams is based around those four sub-systems, and we have exercises that specifically target each one. Can you give an example? For the anterior oblique sub-system, we frequently use lateral squatting with some type of med ball chop that involves a cross-body contraction of the hip and torso. A good example would be a lateral squat with a wood chop. For the posterior oblique sub-system, the movement is just the opposite. We might have the players do a lateral lunge with an up-chop using a med ball. We’ll also do reverse crossover lunges with an up-chop. For the lateral sub-system, a typical exercise is the overhead rip using a med ball—the player moves the ball from one hip to the other with an overhead movement. We also use several different types of lateral bends with med balls. For the deep longitudinal sub-system, we often rely on Swiss ball hamstring curls or glute-ham work with weight. We’ll also have the athletes perform Romanian deadlifts to train this sub-system. How does that type of work transfer to the demands of basketball? A good example is the overhead rip that we use to develop the lateral sub-system. This movement with a med ball simulates what happens when a player rebounds the ball in traffic—he needs the strength and stability to rip it across his body to secure possession. Core strength is essential for many movements required in basketball, and after getting our players to buy into our core strengthening philosophy based around the four sub-systems, they’ve told me they can feel it making them more effective on the court.

How do you incorporate core work into the basketball team’s other strength training activities? I like to superset our core movement exercises with some of our traditional lifts, like the clean, squat, and bench. If we’re doing cleans, for instance, we’ll do some hip work immediately before or after it to help engage the gluteus medius. This way, a lift and a core movement complement each other. My template for a strength workout provides several opportunities for these supersets. In a typical workout, we’ll use an explosive lift, any variation of the clean (such as a box jump or dumbbell clean), and/or some kind of snatch— anything that creates resisted triple extension of the ankle, knee, and hip. We’ll then use a variation of the squat or lunge, bench press, pull-up, and military press. How does your core development work change from the season to the off-season? In-season the players do a lot of work on the court, so I incorporate core work into their warmups. For instance, we might do some Swiss ball work, hip work, or ab work before practice. During the season, training for the abs, lower back, and hips is not usually part of our weightroom activities. In the off-season, my template provides an easy way to vary the workouts. A typical session might include an explosive lift such as the snatch supersetted with some type of hip work such as fire hydrants and hip circles, front squats, and overhead rips. Then I will superset a lowerbody functional exercise with an exercise for the lateral sub-system. Following that I’ll prescribe a variation of the bench, like a dumbbell incline, and superset it with an exercise for the deep longitudinal sub-system. The rest of the workout follows the same template. I use many different movements that are based around the four sub-system philosophy. This is the definition of the core that I can best relate to for our athletes.


We didn’t design these racks. You did. We’ve forged your ideas with our experience and commitment to quality. You asked for top band pegs for overspeed training and pull-up handles with multi-grip angles for a variety of pull-up and chin-up options. You got ‘em. You wanted an always-centered locking bench. No problem. You decide what you want each rack system to accomplish–and we make them fit your precise needs. That’s the power of Hammer Strength Heavy Duty Racks. The only racks big and bold enough to carry the Hammer Strength name. To add more muscle to your weightroom, call 800.634.8637 or visit hammerstrength.com for more information. NSCA Booth Nos. 101, 103

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Training & Conditioning’s Preview of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Show June 17-21, 2008 America’s Center Convention Complex St. Louis, Missouri Sponsored by:

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Exhibitor Listings The information presented in the T&C NATA Show Preview is current as of April 25, 2008. For updates and more information, please refer to the official NATA Trade Show Planner and Exhibitor Directory available in the June NATA News, in each edition of the Convention Daily News, and on-site at the 59th NATA Annual Meeting and Trade Show. Company

Booth

Academy for Sports Dentistry. . . . . . . . . . 2004 118 Faye St., P.O. Box 364, Farmersville, IL 62533 800-273-1788 • www.sportsdentistry-asd.org Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Educational Materials Accelerade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1621 100 Matawan Rd., Ste. 420, Matawan, NJ 07747 www.accelerade.com Categories: Nutrition Accelerated Care Plus Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . 1528 Electro/Laser/Light Therapy modalities 4850 Joule St., Ste. A1, Reno, NV 89502 800-350-1100 • www.acplus.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 91

Active Ankle Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1609 Foot/Ankle products for protective/preventive purposes. 233 Quartermaster Court, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 800-800-2896 • www.activeankle.com Categories: Braces & Supports See ad on page 19

Adams USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1617 P.O. Box 489, Cookeville, TN 38502 800-251-6857 • www.adamsusa.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Antimicrobial Products ADVANCE Newsmagazines . . . . . . . . . . . . 2038 2900 Horizon Dr., King of Prussia, PA 19406 610-278-1400 • www.advanceweb.com Categories: Publishing Aegis Sciences Corp.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1137 345 Hill Ave., Nashville, TN 37210 615-255-2400 • www.aegislabs.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Alert Services, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1803 P.O. Box 1088, San Marcos, TX 78667 830-372-3333 • www.alertservices.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room AlignMed, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2002 2400 Pullman St., Santa Ana, CA 92705 800-916-ALIGN • www.alignmed.com Categories: Rehab Equipment Ambra LeRoy Medical Products . . . . . . . . . 836 4335-C Taggart Creek Rd., Charlotte, NC 28208 866-203-4760 • www.ambraleroy.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 6300 N. River Rd., Rosemont, IL 60018 www.aaos.org Categories: Professional Association American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413 www.aapsm.org Categories: Professional Association

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American Optometric Association Sports Vision Assn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2126 243 N. Lindbergh Blvd., 1st Fl., St. Louis, MO 63141 800-365-2219 • www.aoa.org Categories: Educational Materials, Consumer Healthcare American Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2025 First aid, CPR, and AED training for the lay responder to the professional athletic trainer level 780 Township Line Rd., Yardley, PA 19067 800-667-2968 • www.shopstaywell.com; www.redcross.org Categories: Educational Materials See ad on page 85

American Specialty Insurance & Risk Services, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 142 North Main St., Roanoke, IN 46783 www.amerspec.com Amrex Electro/Laser/Light Therapy Equipment 418 641 E. Walnut St., Carson, CA 90746 800-221-9069 • www.amrex-zetron.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy Andover Coated Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 1817 9 Fanaras Dr., Salisbury, MA 01952 800-432-6686 • www.andovercoated.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Antibody, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1543 1211 Euclid St. N.W., Washington, DC 20009 202-669-1994 • www.antibodywear.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports See ad on page 72

Aquality Water Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2102 12125 Jones Maltsberger, #7 San Antonio, TX 78247 210-493-4545 • www.aqualitywater.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment Ari-Med Diversa Products Group . . . . . . . . 916 The original developer of Flexall® 454 Pain Relieving Gel and the manufacturer of Bushwalker Bags. 1615 University Dr., Ste. 135, Tempe, AZ 85281 800-527-4923 • www.ari-med.com; www.bushwalkerbags.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 94

Arrowhead Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1220 220 Andover St., P.O. Box 4264 Andover, MA 01810 800-225-1516 • www.aatape.com Categories: Trainer’s Room ASICS America Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1742 16275 Laguna Canyon Rd., Irvine, CA 92618 800-678-9435 • www.asicsamerica.com/asicstech Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

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AthletiClean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443 Hygiene products designed to keep athletes on the field 900 W. Main St., Sedalia, MO 65302 800-528-8295 • www.athleticlean.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Educational Materials, Antimicrobial Products See ad on page 96

ATI-PRO Physical Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517 211 Executive Drive Suite 11, Newark, DE 19702 www.propt.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Private Therapy Facilities Avazzia . . (Seen at Alert Services’ Booth 1803) 13154 Coit Road, Suite 200 Dallas, TX 75240 214-575-2820 • www.avazzia.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy See ad on page 56

Bailey Manufacturing Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1419 118 Lee St., Lodi, OH 44254 800-321-8372 • www.baileymfg.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room Ball Dynamics International, LLC . . . . . . . 1238 Professional-quality FitBALL® products for core strength, balance, and functional rehab. 14215 Mead St., Longmont, CO 80504 800-752-2255 • www.fitball.com Categories: Educational Materials, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 92

Bike Athletic Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1837 3330 Cumberland Blvd., Atlanta, GA 30339 www.bikeathletic.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Bio Compression Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 120 W. Commercial Ave., Moonachie, NJ 07074 800-222-7867 • www.biocompression.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment Bio Skin®/Cropper Medical, Inc. . . . . . . . . 608 240 E. Hersey St., Ste. 2, Ashland, OR 97520 800-541-2455 • www.bioskin.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports Biodex Medical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1424 20 Ramsay Rd., Shirley, NY 11967 631-924-9000 • www.biodex.com Categories: Rehab Equipment BioEx Systems Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 814 P.O. Box 926, Smithville, TX 78957 800-750-2756 • www.bioexsystems.com Categories: Software

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Circle No. 144

NATA Booth No. 1410


Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

Biomechanics Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2016 600 Harrison St., San Francisco, CA 94107 415-947-6000 • www.biomech.com Categories: Publishing BioMedical Life Systems, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . 1218 Manufacturer of portable electromedical devices and accessories P.O. Box 1360, Vista, CA 92085 800-726-8367 • www.bmls.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy See ad on page 26

Biomet Bracing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1838 100 Interpace Pkwy., Parsippany, NJ 07054 800-526-2579 www.ebimedical.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy, Rehab Equipment Biowave Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 16 Knight St., Norwalk, CT 06851 877-BIOWAVE • www.biowave.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy Bledsoe Brace Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 2601 Pinewood Dr., Grand Prairie, TX 75051 888-253-3763 • www.bledsoebrace.com Categories: Braces & Supports Blue Bay Medical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2216 Board of Certification, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1826 4223 S. 143rd Cir., Omaha, NE 68137 402-559-0091 • www.bocatc.org Categories: Educational Materials, Certification/ Credentials Bob McCloskey Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1638 Categories: Insurance Body Support Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 328 1040 Benson Way, Ashland, OR 97520 800-448-2400 • www.bodysupport.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Bodyblade/Hymanson, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2021 P.O. Box 5100, Playa Del Rey, CA 90296 800-772-5233 • www.bodyblade.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

in-vitro

Boiron. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1342 Homeopathic medicines, including Arnicare to safely treat sports injuries such as muscle pain, swelling, and bruising 6 Campus Blvd., Newtown Square, PA 19073 888-264-7668 • www.boironusa.com; www.arnicare.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 34

Borden Perlman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1142 2000 Lenox Dr., Ste. 202, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 800-932-4476 • www.bordenperlman.com BREG, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 711 2611 Commerce Way, Vista, CA 92083 800-897-2734 • www.breg.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment

Hibiclens, Hibiclens

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Mölnlycke

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NATA Booth No. 525

Briggs Medical Supply Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2042 P.O. Box 1698, Des Moines, IA 50306 www.briggscorp.com Categories: Clinical Care

Company

Booth

BSN Medical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1524 5825 Carnegie Rd., Charlotte, NC 28209 800-537-1063 • www.bsnmedical.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 50

BSN-Collegiate Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2110 1901 Diplomat Dr., Dallas, TX 75234 800-527-7510 • www.bsncp.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room BTE Technologies, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1736 7455-L New Ridge Rd., Hanover, MD 21076 800-331-8845 • www.btetech.com Categories: Rehab Equipment BTL Industries, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2138 P.O. Box 1752, Greeneville, TN 37745 423-638-6171 • www.btlnet.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Cajun Sports Cream. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 877-441-9555 • www.cajunsportstuff.com Categories: Trainer’s Room California University of Pennsylvania. . . . 1042 California University of Pennsylvania is an accredited state university that is over 150 years old. 250 University Ave., California, PA 15419 866-595-6348 • www.cup.edu/go Categories: Educational Materials See ad on page 44

Canberra Corp.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2037 3610 Holland-Sylvania Rd., Toledo, OH 43615 www.canberracorp.com Categories: Educational Materials, Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room Cardiac Science Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012 3303 Monte Villa Pkwy., Bothell, WA 98021 800-426-0337 • www.cardiacscience.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Care-Tech Laboratories, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . 1818 3224 S. Kingshighway Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63139 800-325-9681 • www.caretechlabs.com Categories: Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room CDM Sport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1431 816 Ladera Dr., Fort Worth, TX 76108 800-400-7542 • www.cdmsport.com Categories: Rehab Equipment Centennial Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2103 P.O. Box 1437, Englewood, CO 80150-1437 877-350-2500 • www.centennialsales.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Chattanooga Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609 4717 Adams Rd., Hixson, TN 37343 800-592-7329 • www.chattgroup.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy, Rehab Equipment CherryPharm, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 500 Technology Farm Dr., Geneva, NY 14456 800-699-0460 • www.cherrypharm.com Categories: Nutrition China-Gel Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439 501 W. Golf Rd., Arlington Heights, IL 60005 800-898-4GEL • www.chinagel.com Categories: Massage Products, Trainer’s Room

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

Circle No. 191


Circle No. 145

NATA Booth No. 525


Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

CleenFreek® SportsHygiene® . . . . . . . . . 2131 1248 Ticonderoga, St. Louis, MO 63017 800-591-3585 • www.sportshygiene.com Cleveland Chiropractic College. . . . . . . . . 1643 10850 Lowell Ave., Overland Park, KS 66210 800-467-2252 • www.cleveland.edu Categories: Educational Materials, Certification Clinton Industries, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336 1140 Edison St., York, PA 17403 800-441-9131 • www.clinton-ind.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room

Company

Booth

CogState. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1816 Categories: Educational Materials, Software/Testing Collins Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1529 370 Paramount Dr., Raynham, MA 02767 800-886-2825 • www.collinssportsmedicine.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Insurance, Antimicrobial Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Colorado Altitude Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . 739 3125 Sterling Circle, Ste. 105, Boulder, CO 80301 877-ALTITUDE • www.altitudetraining.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Company

Booth

Concentra, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1905 5080 Spectrum Dr., Ste. 1200 West Addison, TX 75001 800-232-3550 • www.concentra.com Categories: Patient/Employer Services Cooline USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2224 48-50 Chestnut St., Lancaster, PA 17603 717-393-9075 • www.coolineusa.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Hot & Cold Treatment Coretection Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 719 2111 McCallum Rd., Abbotsford, BC, Canada V2T 5W8 877-853-CORE • www.coretection.com Categories: Braces & Supports Corganics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 25 Highland Park Village, #100-764 Dallas, TX 75052-2789 866-939-9541 • www.corganics.com Categories: Massage Products, Nutrition, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Covidien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 829 15 Hampshire St., Mansfield, MA 02048 800-962-9888 • www.covidien.com Categories: Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1410 Founding member of the NATA 153 W. Warren; P.O. Box 1001, Gardner, KS 66030 800-345-2231 • www.cramersportsmed.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 69

Creative Custom Products, LLC . . . . . . . . . 816 P.O. Box 414, Cedarburg, WI 53012 800-368-8182 • www.creativecustomproducts.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room CSMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 725 101 Tosca Dr., Stoughton, MA 02072 800-359-6851 • www.csmisolutions.com Categories: Software

FEELS LIKE SKIN … ACTS LIKE MUSCLE

CSG/Coatings Specialist Group. . . . . . . . . 1237 2849 Product Dr., Rochester Hills, MI 49309 888-510-2847 • www.csggrp.com/sas Categories: Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room CustMBite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 Categories: Trainer’s Room CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 743 Functional hydration and sport nutrition products 4795 Industrial Way, Benicia, CA 94510 888-298-6629 • www.cytosport.com Categories: Nutrition

Using Stored Elastic Energy Transfer (SEET), BodyGuards are a new generation of

See ad on back cover

performance apparel that work with your body to alleviate muscle strains and pulls,

Delcorean, LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2218 800-696-1490 • www.cramp911.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

delay fatigue and keep muscles warm while enhancing your performance.

877 546-BODY (2639) www.AntibodyWear.com Sales@AntibodyWear.com NATA Booth No. 1543

72

T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

Antibody_TC1705.indd 1

Delmar Cengage Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1628 5 Maxwell Dr., Clifton Park, NY 12065 800-648-7450 • www.delmarlearning.com Categories: Software

Circle No. 146

7/19/07 2:53:28 PM

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

Company

Booth

DeniBan, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2136 P.O. Box 229, Harrisburg, OR 97446 866-995-8122 • www.deniban.net Categories: Trainer’s Room

Econoline Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 920 1800 Industrial Center Circle, Charlotte, NC 28213 800-367-8319 • Fax: 704-598-3948 Categories: Trainer’s Room

DJO, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1925 1430 Decision St., Vista, CA 92081 800-321-9549 • www.djortho.com Categories: Braces & Supports

Ekho Heart Rate Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2107 3500 Nicollet Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55408 612-922-3766 • www.ekho.us Categories: Trainer’s Room

DM Systems, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1824 Resistive exercise products and shoulder brace for training and rehabilitation 1316 Sherman Ave., Evanston, IL 60201 800-254-5438 • www.dmsystems.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment

Elrey Enterprises, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 220 Hurst Ln., Corydon, IN 47112 877-964-4537 • www.thewoggler.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

See ad on page 57

doczac™ Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2112 1124 Fir Ave., #114 , Blaine, WA 98230 www.doczac.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Dynatronics Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1725 Dynatronics manufactures and distributes advanced technology medical devices, supplies, treatment tables, and rehabilitation equipment 7030 Park Centre Dr., Salt Lake City, UT 84121 800-874-6251 • wwww.dynatronics.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room

Elsevier-Saunders Mosby Churchill . . . . . 1814 P.O. Box 945, New York, NY 10159-0945 888-437-4636 • www.intl.elsevierhealth.com Categories: Publishing Eternal Interactive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2213 P.O. Box 11994, Fort Worth, TX 76110 866-838-3762 • www.eternalinteractive.com Categories: Software evoShield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509 1260 Mars Hill Rd., Watkinsville, GA 30677 770-725-2724 • www.evoshield.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

Company

Booth

Exertools, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510 320 Professional Center Dr., Ste. 100 Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (800) 235-1559 • www.exertools.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Extreme Endurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 Eyeblack.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 P.O. Box 281, Kensington, MD 20895 877-393-2522 • www.eyeblack.com Categories: Trainer’s Room F.A. Davis Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 810 1915 Arch St., Philadelphia, PA 19103 800-323-3555 • www.fadavis.com Categories: Publishing Farrell Sports Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442 25 Walpole Park South, Bldg. 1, Unit 12 Walpole, MA 02081 508-660-1388 • www.farrellsports.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Fastech Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1830 1100 Owendale Dr., Ste. J, Troy, MI 48033 www.fastechfootsupport.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

See ad on page 96

See ad on inside back cover

Model 329 Ankle Support

Effective

& affordable

Created with Quality Materials Specifically for the Athletic Market!

ankle injury protection that is better than tape. The high compression sock portion of the brace applies significant but comfortable compression to both the lateral and deltoid ligaments, to help support them in both an inversion and eversion situation.

Fits left or right foot Launders great Will not effect shoe sizing Patent pending

In addition, the permanently attached heel lock design provides a solid strap on both the medial and lateral sides of the ankle, to assist in stabilizing the tibia to the subtalar joint, to help reduce the potential of a ligament strain. The additional 4" wide medial and lateral straps help to anchor the heel lock straps in place, and creates solid support that provides additional resistance in helping to prevent an ankle injury.

For more information email info@stromgren.com or go to www.stromgren.com Circle No. 147

NATA Booth No. 813


Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

Ferno-Washington, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 928 70 Weil Way, WIlmington, OH 45177 877-773-0911 • www.ferno.com Categories: Rehab Equipment Ferris Mfg. Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1343 16W300 83rd St., Burr Ridge, IL 60527 800-765-9636 • www.polymem.com Categories: Trainer’s Room FieldTurf Tarkett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1519 8088 Montview, Montreal, PQ, Canada H4P 2L7 800-724-2969 • www.fieldturftarkett.com Categories: Sport surfaces Fitter International, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1624 3050 - 2600 Portland St. S.E., Calgary, AB, Canada T2G 4M6 800-FITTER-1 • www.fitter1.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 109

Fleming Pharmaceuticals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 13746 Victory Blvd., Ste. 301, Van Nuys, CA 91401 www.flemingpharma.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Flight Form Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 6543 S. Laramie Ave., Bedford Park, IL 60638 800-334-4884 • www.flightform.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Foot Management, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 908 P.O. Box 100 , Pittsville, MD 21850 800-468-3668 • www.footmanagement.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room Fozo Cast Covers, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room Game Ready. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1615 2201 Dwight Way, Berkeley, CA 94704 888-426-3732 • www.gameready.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment Gatorade Co., The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1109 555 W. Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60661 800-88-GATOR • www.gatorade.com Categories: Nutrition Gear 2000/Z-Cool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 817 13 Fern Ct., Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 800-527-1988 • www.gear2000.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Antimicrobial Products General Tools & Instruments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .717 A one-stop-shop for all athletic trainers’ instrument needs 80 White St., New York, NY 10013 800-697-8665 • www.generaltools.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 76

Graston Technique® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1820 3833 N. Meridian St., Ste. 307, Indianapolis, IN 46208 888-926-2727 • www.grastontechnique.com Categories: Educational Materials, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment Grimm Scientific Industries, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2018 P.O. Box 2143, Marietta, OH 45750 800-223-5395 • www.grimmscientific.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment

Booth No. 909 74 NATA T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

Circle No. 148

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

GTM Sportswear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2114 520 McCall Rd., Manhattan, KS 66502 800-377-8527 • www.gtmsportswear.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

ThermaSplint

Hammer Strength®/Life Fitness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .431 Hammer Strength is a leading global brand of plate-loaded equipment 5100 N. River Rd., Ste. 3, Schiller Park, IL 60103 800-634-8637 • www.lifefitness.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Splint Material Heating Unit

See ad on page 65

Hapad, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1626 5301 Enterprise Blvd., Bethel Park, PA 15102 800-544-2723 • www.hapad.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Hartmann-Conco, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1637 481 Lakeshore Pkwy., Rock Hill, SC 29730 803-985-1130 • www.hartmann-conco.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Henry Schein, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1509 135 Duryea Rd., Melville, NY 11747 800-972-2611 • www.henryschein.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

Model # TS-1A

Hibiclens® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .525 Antimicrobial antiseptic skin cleanser 3585 Engineering Dr., Ste. 250, Norcross, GA 30092-2820 800-805-0585 • www.hibigeebies.com Categories: Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room

THERMASPLINT The therapists asked and we answered with the next generation of Whitehall ThermaSplints.

See ads on pages 70 and 71

FEATURES:

HQ, Inc. CorTemp™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .325 Core-body temperature monitoring systems, featuring the CorTemp™ ingestible temperature pill. 210 9th St. Dr., W. Palmetto, FL 34221 941-723-4197 • www.hqinc.net Categories: Heat Stress, Trainer’s Room

Microprocessor Heat Control Removable Lids Temperature Range of 140˚F to 180˚F BENEFITS:

Minimal Heat Loss When Open Correct Temperature for Thermo Plastics Vertical Clearance for Overhead Cabinets

See ad on page 49

Human Kinetics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1716 P.O. Box 5076, Champaign, IL 61825 800-747-4457 • www.humankinetics.com Categories: Educational Materials HydroWorx International, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1625 Premium-quality aquatic therapy pools and services. 1420 Stoneridge Dr., Ste. C, Middletown, PA 17057 800-753-9633 • www.hydroworx.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room See ad on pages 14 and 15

Hygenic Performance Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1715 Thera-Band® systems of progressive exercise and Biofreeze® topical analgesics 1245 Home Ave., Akron, OH 44310 800-321-2135 • www.Thera-BandAcademy.com; www.biofreeze.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

9” (229) 20-1/2” (521)

Overall height with hinged cover completely closed

Overall height with hinged cover fully open

Inner Pan

Backside

12” x 20” x 4”

Drain valve, fuse panel & power outlet

(305 x 508 x 100 mm)

7-1/2” (191)

See ad on page 7

Hyland’s/Treatment Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .943 Hyland’s provides all-natural pain relief for sports injuries and rehabilitation 714 La Roda, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 800-456-7818 • www.txoptions.com Categories: Trainer’s Room, Natural Medicines See ad on page 97

23-1/2” (597)

16-1/4” (413)

Temperature On/Off Power Switch

Controller

TS-1A BRIM CAPACITY 14.2 quarts (13.5 liters) Larger Capacity Model Available

Ideal Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1143 1287 Country Road 623, Broseley, MO 63932 800-321-5490 • www.idealproducts.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room

Whitehall Manufacturing member of acorn engineering’s family of companies

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

www.whitehallmfg.com

Circle No. 149

15125 Proctor Ave. City of Industry, CA 91746 800-782-7706 626-968-6681 Fax 626-855-4862 T&C MAY/JUNE 2008 75 NATA Booth No. 809


Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

ImPACT Concussion Management Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1030 P.O. Box 23288, Hilton Head, SC 29925 877-646-7991 • www.impacttest.com Categories: Software Innovative Sports Training, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 531 3711 N. Ravenswood, Ste. 150, Chicago, IL 60613 773-244-6470 • www.innsport.com Categories: Software Jaybird & Mais, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1525 360 Merrimack St., Lawrence, MA 01843 www.jaybird.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

Company

Booth

Company

Booth

Johnson & Johnson Sports Medicine. . . . 1009 199 Grandview Rd., Skillman, NJ 08558 908-874-2403 • www.jnj.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

K&K Insurance Group, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1318 1712 Magnavox Way, Ft. Wayne, IN 46804 800-441-3994 • www.kandkinsurance.com Categories: Insurance

Jones & Bartlett Publishers, Inc. . . . . . . . 2006 40 Tall Pine Dr., Sudbury, MA 01776 800-832-0034 • www.jbpub.com Categories: Publishing

Keffer Development Services, LLC . . . . . . 2043 24 Village Park Dr., Grove City, PA 16127 www.keffersoftware.com Categories: Software

Journal of Athletic Training . . . . . . . . . . . 2203 Categories: Publishing

Keiser Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1739 Keiser provides low impact, pneumatic resistance equipment utilized by athletes, fitness enthusiasts, and rehabilitation experts worldwide. 2470 S. Cherry Ave., Fresno, CA 93706 800-888-7009 • www.keiser.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 13

Kerasal® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2036 89 Headquarters Plaza, Ste. 1409 Morristown, NJ 07960 www.kerasal.com Categories: Trainer’s Room KEY Functional Assessments, Inc. . . . . . . . 616 300 Carlsbad Village Dr., #99, Carlsbad, CA 92008 800-333-3KEY • www.keymethod.com Categories: Functional Capacity Assessments Kinesio USA, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1719 3901 Georgia St., N.E., Bldg. F, Ste. 2 Albuquerque, NM 87110 888-320-8273 • www.kinesioproducts.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Kinetic Innovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1539 P.O. Box 19066, Omaha, NE 68119 712-347-5152 • www.kineticinnovations.com Categories: Braces & Supports Kneebourne Therapeutic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1642 Elite Seat is a portable knee extension device designed for the non-operative treatment of degenerative knee conditions. 15299 Stoney Creek Way, Noblesville, IN 46060 866-756-3706 • www.eliteseat.com Categories: Rehab Equipment See ad on page 54

Liberty Mutual Group, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2017 175 Berkeley St., Boston, MA 02116 Categories: Insurance Life University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2105 1269 Barclay Circle, Marietta, GA 30060 www.life.edu Categories: Educational Materials, Certification Lifexpand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2120 P.O. Box 880223, Boca Raton, FL 33488-0223 866-399-LIFE • www.lifexpand.com Categories: Nutrition Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. . . . . . . . . . 1038 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106 800-638-3030 • www.lww.com Categories: Educational Materials, Publishing M.S. Plastics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 937 10 Park Pl., Butler, NJ 07405 800-593-1802 • www.msplastics.com Categories: Trainer’s Room NATA Booth No. 717

76

T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

Untitled-3 1

Circle No. 150

7/24/07 1:29:41 PM

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

Magister Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2121 Rep Band® exercise bands/tubing and Airex mats and balance products P.O. Box 4323, Chattanooga, TN 37405 800-396-3130 • www.magistercorp.com Categories: Rehab Equipment See ad on page 27

Magnatherm-IME, Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620 P.O. Box 45030, Kansas City, MO 64171 800-432-8003 • www.magnatherm.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment

Company

Booth

Company

Booth

Medical Solutions Management, Inc. . . . . . 314 237 Cedar Hill St., Marlborough, MA 01752 866-901-4800 • www.medsmi.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Software

Mettler Electronics Corp.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1919 1333 S. Claudina St., Anaheim, CA 92805 800-854-9305 • www.mettlerelectronics.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy

MedZone Corp.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1537 P.O. Box 2068, Sun City, AZ 85372 866-MEDZONE • www.medzonecorp.com Categories: Massage Products, Trainer’s Room

Meyer Distributing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2111 1810 Summit Commerce Park Twinsburg, OH 44087 800-472-4221 • www.meyerdist.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room

Metron Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524 www.metron.com.au Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy, Rehab Equipment

Markwort Sporting Goods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 1101 Research Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132 800-937-4824 • www.markwort.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Marsh U.S. Consumer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2019 1440 Renaissance Dr., Park Ridge, IL 60068-1400 800-503-9230 • www.seaburychicago.com Categories: Insurance

©2006 OPTP

MBT Physiological Footwear. . . . . . . . . . . 1437 515 River St., Unit D, Hailey, ID 83333 866-326-2724 • www.swissmasai.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

There’s a difference in foam rollers.

McDavid Sports Medical Products . . . . . . 617 Sports medicine and protective apparel 10305 Argonne Dr., Woodridge, IL 60517 800-237-8254 • www.mcdavidusa.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment See ad on pages 2 and 3

McGraw-Hill Higher Education . . . . . . . . . 1429 1285 Fern Ridge Pkwy., Ste. 200 St. Louis, MO 63141 800-338-3987 • www.mhhe.com Categories: Publishing McKenzie Institute USA, The . . . . . . . . . . . 1036 126 N. Salina St., Syracuse, NY 13202 800-635-8380 • www.mckenziemdt.org Categories: Educational Materials Med Spec (ASO). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1037 Med Spec offers the ASO and ASO EVO ankle stabilizer. 4600-K Lebanon Rd., Charlotte, NC 28227 800-582-4040 • www.medspec.com Categories: Braces & Supports

OPTP’s wide selection of foam rollers offer long-lasting durability with high quality foam. For professional use, choose the heat-molded 36” round OPTP PRO-ROLLER in regular or new soft density. Or our new OPTP AXIS Rollers that will not lose their shape with daily use. And OPTP’s Standard White Foam Rollers offer an economical solution for treatment and rehab. AXIS and White Rollers are available in round and half-round models in 12” and 36” lengths, and you can save on sets. If you want more quality and more choices, roll with OPTP.

See ad on page 89

Medco Sports Medicine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 917 500 Fillmore Ave., Tonawanda, NY 14150 800-556-3326 • www.medco-athletics.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Educational Materials, Electro/Laser/ Light Therapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, Insurance, Antimicrobial Products, Massage Products, Nutrition, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Trainer’s Room

Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products. . . . . . . . 1936 1812 Industrial Blvd., Colleyville, TX 76034 800-810-1740 • www.medi-dyne.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room

www.optp.com/ad 1-800-367-7393 T O O L S F O R F I T N E S S • K N O W L E D G E F O R H E A LT H

Circle No. 151 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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NATA Booth No. 931 T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

Booth

Company

Booth

National Medical Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1907 12415 N. Old Meridian, Carmel, IN 46032 800-662-7283 • www.nmadirect.com Categories: Sports Medicine Supplier

OrthoRx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1339 2700 Research Dr., Ste. 400, Plano, TX 75074 877-679-6796 • www.orthorx.net Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment

Microceutical Scientific, LLC . . . . . . . . . . 1937 2033 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 318 Riverwoods, IL 60015 888-478-7479 Categories: Nutrition

Neuro Resource Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2011 1100 Jupiter Rd., Ste. 190, Plano, TX 75074 877-314-6500 • www.nrg-unlimited.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy

OrthoScan, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428 8212 E. Evans Rd., Scottsdale, AZ 85260 480-503-8010 • www.orthoscan.com Categories: Rehab Equipment

Microplane Personal Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2125 614 SR 247, Russellville, AR 72802 866-968-6665 • www.microplane.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

neurotech® Bio-Medical Research . . . . . 2129

Mile High Orthotics Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2104 4970 Monaco St., Unit A, Commerce City, CO 80022 866-710-4880 Categories: Braces & Supports Millennial Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2106 1351 East 700 North, Ste. B, Logan, UT 84321 877-753-5556 • www.millennialmedical.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room Mineral Resources International, Inc.. . . . 1043 1990 West 3300 South, Ogden, UT 84401 801-731-7040 • www.mineralresourcesint.com Categories: Nutrition Mission Pharmacal Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1320 P.O. Box 786099, San Antonio, TX 78278-6099 210-696-8400 • Fax: 210-581-8719 Categories: Nutrition, Trainer’s Room Mona Vie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436 10855 S. River Front Pkwy., Ste. 100 Salt Lake City, UT 84095 www.monavie.com Categories: Nutrition Morning Pride/Total Fire Group. . . . . . . . . . 337 1 Innovation Ct., Dayton, OH 45413-0616 800-688-6148 • www.korekoolerrehabchair.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Heat Stress See ad on page 87

Mueller Sports Medicine, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 1125 One Quench Dr., P.O. Box 99 Prairie du Sac, WI 53578 800-356-9522 • www.muellersportsmed.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 9

Muscletrac Technologies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2113 9121 East Tanque Verde Road, Ste. 105-319 Tucson, AZ 85749 520-360-4595 • www.muscletrac.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. MyoMed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1843 NATA International Committee . . . . . . . . . 2211 NATA Member Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2202 NATA PAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2207 NATA Public Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2206 National Center for Drug Free Sport, Inc.. 1517 2537 Madison Ave. Kansas City, MO 64108 816-474-8655 • www.drugfreesport.com Categories: Educational Materials

78

Company

Michael Fluegge Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 1955 Old Mill Rd., Campobello, SC 29322 888-873-7261 • www.stretchaminute.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

See ad on page 12

NewHouse Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 1 Newhouse Center, Box 454, Pittsburgh, PA 15065 800-675-9597 • www.newhousemedical.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

Ossur Americas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1025 27412 Aliso Viejo Pkwy., Aliso Viejo, CA 92656 800-222-4284 • www.ossur.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment Oznax Sports, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1842

New Option Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2130 2545 Merrell Rd., Dallas, TX 75229 800-872-5488 • www.newoptionssports.com Categories: Braces & Supports

Palumbo Orthopaedics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2117 8206 Leesburg Pike, Ste. 402, Vienna, VA 22812 703-790-2000 • www.palumbobraces.com Categories: Braces & Supports

NExTT Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542 218 W. Washington Ave., Ste. 830 South Bend, IN 46601 574-233-3960 • www.nexttsolutions.com Categories: Software

Parker Laboratories, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2031 286 Eldridge Rd., Fairfield, NJ 07004 973-276-9500 • www.parkerlabs.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

Noble Biomaterials /X-Static® . . . . . . . . . . 437 300 Palm St., Scranton, PA 18505 877-978-2842 • www.x-staticfiber.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment NormaTec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537 44 Glen Ave., Newton Center, MA 02459 800-335-0960 • www.normatecsports.com Categories: Rehab Equipment See ad on page 35

NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . . . . 2013 The NSCA Certification Commission offers CSCS and NSCA-CPT credentials 3333 Landmark Circle, Lincoln, NE 68504 888-746-2378 • www.nsca-cc.org Categories: Educational Materials, Certification See ad on page 105

Octogen Pharmacal Co., Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . 914 2750 Cambridge Hills Rd., Cumming, GA 30041 770-888-8881 • www.octagen.com Categories: Trainer’s Room ONS Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 A leading provider of collegiate compliant, tested, and certified nutritional products P.O. Box 2555, Rock Hill, SC 29732 800-817-9808 • www.onsperformance.com Categories: Nutrition See ad on page 44

OPTP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 931 OPTP provides quality fitness and rehabilitation products and resources P.O. Box 47009, Minneapolis, MN 55447 800-367-7393 • www.optp.com Categories: Educational Materials, Massage Products, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 77

PCC, Inc. Air Purification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 PO Box 22294, Little Rock, AR 72221 Categories: Air Purification Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 819 A complete catalog of functional training and rehabilitation equipment P.O. Box 8090, 11 Amflex Dr., Cranston, RI 02920 800-556-7464 • www.performbetter.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Educational Materials, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ads on pages 25 and 131

Perry Dynamics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014 P.O. Box 2255, Decatur, IL 62524 217-872-1530 • www.perrydynamics.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. PHI Pilates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2007 Cutting-edge Pilates education 442 W. Main St., Monongahela, PA 15063 877-716-4879 • www.phipilates.com Categories: Educational Materials, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 97

Philips Medical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1219 3000 Minuteman Rd., Andover, MA 01810 800-453-6860 • www.medical.philips.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Physiomed North America . . . . . . . . . . . . 2003 401 Lakeview Dr., Farmerville, LA 71241 318-368-7266 • www.deeposcillation.com Categories: Massage Products, Rehab Equipment Power Plate North America. . . . . . . . . . . . 2119 400 Skokie Blvd., Ste. 105, Northbrook, IL 60062 www.powerplateusa.com Categories: Vibration Therapy Power Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1618 P.O. Box 31709, Knoxville, TN 37930 800-321-6975 • www.power-systems.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


Exhibitor Listings Company

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Company

Booth

Powerade Glaceau. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625 P.O. Drawer 1734, Atlanta, GA 30301 www.powerade.com Categories: Nutrition

Renfrew Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 837 111 Great Pond Dr., Windsor, CT 06095 860-688-8000 • www.renfrewathletics.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

Premier Software, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1911 Sports medicine documentation software for the athletic trainer P.O. Box 203, Winfield, IL 60190 630-906-6630 • www.simtrak.com Categories: Software

Rich-Mar Naimco, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1811 4120 South Creek Rd., Chattanooga, TN 37406 888-549-4945 • www.richmarweb.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy

See ad on page 98

PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1438 Rehabilitation/exercise equipment for use in the clinic, gym, and at home 4055 Oceanside Blvd., Ste. L, Oceanside, CA 92056 800-544-7257 • www.prepakproducts.com Categories: Massage Products, Nutrition, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Riddell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1017 669 Sugar Ln., Elyria, OH 44035 800-275-5338 • www.riddell.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

Company

Booth

Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1636 1662 W. 820 North, Provo, UT 84601 866-780-4107 • www.rmuohp.edu Categories: Educational Materials SAM® Medical Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630 P.O. Box 3270, Tualatin, OR 97062 800-818-4726 • www.sammedical.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room

See ad on page 81

Presagia Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 618 651 Notre-Dame St. West, Ste. 400 Montreal, PQ, Canada H3C 1H9 866-696-7198 • www.presagia.com Categories: Software

We provide the tools, you provide the results

PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 909 2884 E. Ganley Rd., Tucson, AZ 85706 800-523-5611 • www.proorthopedic.com Categories: Rehab Equipment See ad on page 74

Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1139 Sports medicine supports and hot/cold therapy products 2743 152nd Ave. N.E., Redmond, WA 98052 800-779-3372 • www.injurybegone.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment, Massage Products, Trainer’s Room

Together we can... • Gain Strength • Increase Speed • Boost Power

See ad on page 24

• Improve Quickness

Professional Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1243 54 Hugh Adams Rd., DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435 800-234-9004 • www.ezywrap.com Categories: Braces & Supports

• Achieve Success • STOP the competition

ProMera Health, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 536 61 Accord Park Dr., Norwell, MA 02061 781-878-8798 • www.con-cret.com, www.aminoactiv.com Categories: Nutrition See ads on pages 45 and 66

Ch our N eck out ew at NA Produc ts TA B ooth #942

PROTEAM™ by Hausmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . 731 Modular taping stations, split leg tables, whirlpools, taping tables, and lockers 130 Union St., Northvale, NJ 07647 888-428-7626 • www.proteamtables.com Categories: Rehab Equipment See ad on page 83

Pulsed Energy Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 8217 Lankershim Blvd., #35 North Hollywood, CA 91605 www.pulsedenergytech.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy, Rehab Equipment R.E. Belt Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430 494 Hwy. 71 W, Suite 140-206, Bastrop, TX 78602 800-882-2977 • www.dentagard.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Trainer’s Room

www.spriproducts.com 800-222-7774

Circle No. 152 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

NSCA Booth No. 516, 517 T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

TC1804_SPRI63v1.indd 1

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Exhibitor Listings Company

Booth

Schering-Plough Healthcare Products (Tinactin®) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1119 2000 Galloping Hill Rd., Kenilworth, NJ 07033 908-298-4000 • www.schering-plough.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

Thirsty?

Schutt Sports Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2124 1200 East Union Ave., Litchfield, IL 62056-0426 www.schutt-sports.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Secondary School ATC Committee . . . . . . 2205 Shield Mfg., Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 843 425 Fillmore Ave., Tonawanda, NY 14150 800-828-7669 • www.shieldsports.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Trainer’s Room Shuttle Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1709 Shuttle Systems products provide closed-chain/ plyometrics better than anyone else P.O. Box 5089, Glacier, WA 98244 800-334-5633 • www.shuttlesystems.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 53

SIMS (Sports Injury Monitoring Systems) . . 1743 329 E. Court, Iowa City, IA 52240 www.flantech.net Categories: Software

Hydration is our only Passion.

Slack, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614 6900 Grove Rd., Thorofare, NJ 08086 800-257-8290 • www.slackbooks.com Categories: Educational Materials

It’s everything we do!

Sonic Imaging, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1943 239-595-5314 • www.sonicimaging.net Categories: Trainer’s Room, Testing Spenco Medical Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 838 P.O. Box 2501, Waco, TX 76712 800-877-3626 • www.spenco.com Categories: Trainer’s Room SportPharm Pharmaceuticals . . . . . . . . . . 1913 381 Van Ness Ave., Ste. 1507, Torrance, CA 90501 800-272-4767 • www.sportpharm.com Categories: Drug Management Services Sportsguard Laboratories, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 1942 5960 Horning Road, Ste. 100, Kent, OH 44240 800-401-1776 • www.sportsguard.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel Sports Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1319 865 Murfield Drive, Hanover Park, NC 28213 800-323-1305 • www.esportshealth.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room

For a free brochure www.waterboysports.com

888.442.6269 NATA Booth No. 318

80

T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

Untitled-5 1

Sports Medicine Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . 1825 P.O. Box 173, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-346-0240 • www.sportsmedicineconcepts.com Categories: Educational Materials Sports-O-Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 53847 N. Park Ave., Ste. B, Elkhart, IN 46514 574-903-8895 • www.sportsozone.com

Company

Booth

SPRI Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 942 Sports conditioning products for speed, quickness, power, and much more 1600 N. Wind Blvd., Libertyville, IL 60048 800-222-7774 • www.spriproducts.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip. See ad on page 79

StaphAseptic by Tec Laboratories, Inc. . . 2010 StaphAseptic antiseptic gel kills 99.93% of MRSA, helping to prevent skin infections 7100 Tec Labs Way S. W., Albany, OR 97321 800-482-4464 • www.staphaseptic.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 101

Stromgren Supports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 813 Manufacturer of compression protective performance apparel, compression clothing, and sports medicine products 600 Main St., P.O. Box 1230, Hays, KS 67601 800-527-1988 • www.stromgren.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports, Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 73

Summit America Insurance Services, LC . . 926 2180 S. 1300 E., Ste. 520 Salt Lake City, UT 84106 800-955-1991 (KS) • www.summitamerica-ins.com Categories: Insurance Swede-O, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 925 Swede-O new and innovative ankle braces, along with Thermoskin thermal supports 6459 Ash St., North Branch, MN 55056 866-317-5678 • www.swedeo.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment See ad on page 93

SwimEx, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1428 Athletic therapy pool with patented propulsion and fiberglass design 846 Airport Rd., Fall River, MA 02720 800-877-7946 • www.swimex.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip., Aquatic Therapy See ad on page 86

Tanita Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 939 2625 S. Clearbrook Dr., Arlington Heights, IL 60005 800-826-4828 • www.tanita.com Categories: Trainer’s Room The BioMat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2220 P.O. Box 163511, Sacramento, CA 95816 877-246-6286 • www.thebiomat.com Categories: Electro/Laser/Light Therapy The Clorox Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2128 1221 Broadway, Oakland, CA 94612 510-271-7000 • www.thecloroxcompany.com Categories: Antimicrobial Products, Trainer’s Room

SportsMedic, Inc. (Med Pac) . . . . . . . . . . . 1121 P.O. Box 373, Buffalo, MN 55313 800-414-9031 • www.medicalbags.com Categories: Trainer’s Room

Circle No. 153

3/11/08 9:34:56 AM

TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


Company

Booth

The Stick/RPI of Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1630 120 Interstate North Pkwy. East, Ste. 424 Atlanta, GA 30339 888-882-0750 • www.thestick.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Therapy Innovations, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526 2525 Twin Knolls Dr., Ste. 4, Bend, OR 97701 541-598-3939 • www.therapyinnovation.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment ThermoTx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 8330 Lincoln Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90045 888-354-3223 • www.thermotx.com Categories: Braces & Supports Thought Technology, Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 2180 Belgrave Ave., Montreal , PQ Canada H4A 2L8 800-361-3651 • www.thoughttechnology.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Biofeedback Instruments Today in PT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427 Categories: Publishing Topical Biomedics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 P.O. Box 494, Rhinebeck, NY 12572 www.topicalbiomedics.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Total Gym® by efi Sports Medicine® . . . 1337 Incline resistance training equipment, including the Total Gym PowerTower® GTS®, and PlyoRebounder® 7755 Arjons Dr., San Diego, CA 92126 800-541-4900 • www.efisportsmedicine.com Categories: Educational Materials, Rehab Untitled-1 Equipment, Strength Training & Cardio Equip.

Circle No. 154

WEB SLIDE® EXERCISE RAIL SYSTEM

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See ad on page 5

Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1425 Townsend Design fabricates bracing solutions that provide the best fit, functional control and patient compliance 4615 Shepard St., Bakersfield, CA 93313 800-432-3466 • www.townsenddesign.com Categories: Braces & Supports See ad on page 23

Training & Conditioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 The only trade magazine serving athletic trainers and professionals who work on the treatment/ prevention of injuries and the conditioning of competing athletes 31 Dutch Mill Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850 607-257-6970 • www.training-conditioning.com Categories: Publishing See ad on page 124

Trigger Point Technologies, LLC . . . . . . . . . 543 7801 N.Lamar Blvd., Ste. C65, Austin, TX 78752 888-321-2557 • www.tpmassageball.com Categories: Educational Materials, Massage Products VitalWear, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 384 Oyster Point Blvd., Ste. 16 South San Francisco, CA 94080 www.vitalwear.com Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment Water-Thing Hydration Wagon . . . . . . . . . . 924 Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment

This fixed point exercise station is for regular users of low cost exercise equipment such as tubing, bands and pulleys. It is compact and includes everything you need--fixtures, exercise devices, instructional materials--to quickly and effectively train and monitor patients in need of rehab and fitness exercise programs.

A

Easy as 1-2-3

B

1.

Select an Exercise Device (E) from the Storage Rack (C) and choose an exercise from the Wall Poster (B). 2. Slide the device onto the Exercise Rail (A) at the desired elevation and have the patient perform the assigned exercise routine.

C

E

3.

Use a "Tear-Off" Exercise Sheet (D) to prescribe exercises, chart progress, and maintain a patient history. • • • •

No assembly or maintenance is required. No moving parts. Exercise Rails easily attach to any wall stud. Installation instructions & materials provided.

D

Ask about our NEW value added features Meet us in St Louis - Booth 1438 Dept TC07ER

Stop by our booth and drop off your business card for a chance to win a deluxe Web-Slide Exercise Rail System.

Call for a FREE Catalog (800) 544-7257 X 287

4055 Oceanside Blvd Ste L Oceanside CA 92056-5821 Fax: (800) 577-3725 www.prepakproducts.com

Circle No. 155 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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Exhibitor Listings Company

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WaterBoy Sports, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318 WaterBoy offers premier hydration and misting systems for athletes of all kind 1717 Minnesota Ave., Ste. C, Winter Park, FL 32789 888-442-6269 • www.waterboysports.com Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room, Heat Stress, Hydration See ad on page 80

Whitehall Manufacturing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 809 Stainless steel fabricator of hot and cold physical therapy equipment P.O. Box 3527, City of Industry, CA 91744 800-488-8999 • www.whitehallmfg.com Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room See ad on page 75

Wilson Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 825 Manufacturer of athletic cases for athletic trainers P.O. Box 1106, Hastings, NE 68902 800-322-5493 • www.wilsoncase.com Categories: Trainer’s Room See ad on page 82

Wisstech Enterprises. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1737 The Hydration Station portable drinking fountain P.O. Box 1002, Sugar Land, TX 77487 800-809-8184 • www.wisstechenterprises.com Categories: Trainer’s Room, Heat Stress, Hydration

Company

Booth

Woodway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1903 W229 N591 Foster Ct., Waukesha, WI 53186 800-966-3929 • www.woodway.com Categories: Strength Training & Cardio Equip. Workflow.com, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2137 24651 Center Ridge Rd., Ste. 575 Westlake, OH 44145 440-808-2700 • www.workflow.com Categories: Software

Check out the tickets in the middle of this issue of Training and Conditioning and be sure to stop by the

WrapIT Bandages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2226 927 Main St., Lexington, MO 64067 660-259-9160 • www.lexwrapit.com Categories: Trainer’s Room Xenith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 672 Suffolk Street, 3rd Fl., Lowell, MA 01854 978-328-5280 • www.xenith.com Categories: Team Equipment/Apparel

Booth #521 at the NATA convention.

Xtreme Research Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1938 P.O. Box 336, Port Richey, FL 34673 888-732-0665 • www.xgun.com Categories: Radar/Weather Detetectors

While there you can pick up your issue packet,

Zoll Medical Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1721 269 Mill Rd., Chelmsford, MA 01824 800-348-9011 • www.zoll.com Categories: Insurance, Trainer’s Room

find the gold sticker inside,

and win!

See ad on page 90

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: ACP is proud to have been selected as the equipment of choice by numerous professional, collegiate, and Olympic sports organizations worldwide.

What athletic trainers should know: Active Ankle has been making innovations in the field of ankle support since 1989 with the introduction of the original semi-rigid brace.

Visit their booth to... learn more about the new Pro Series physical agent modality line, including the Omnistim® 500 Pro, Omnistim® FX2 Pro Sport, Omnisound® 3000 Pro, Megapulse® II Pro, and Neuroprobe® 500B Pro.

Visit their booth to... discover the latest in athletic ankle protection, the Volt, along with an ever-expanding line of ankle braces designed for protection and ankle injury prevention.

What’s new this year: ACP recently launched a new line of therapeutic modality devices called the Pro Series, introducing yet another level of clinical integrity, reliability and ease of use through a variety of new features.

What’s new this year: The Volt ankle brace features a carbon-fiber reinforced shell engineered for support and an improved molded-bearing design for smoother range of motion. It also has strengthening ribs for a thinner profile and better fit in the shoe.

Accelerated Care Plus 800-350-1100 www.acplus.com

Active Ankle Systems, Inc. 800-800-2896 www.activeankle.com

Visit their booth to... receive a free gift, register to win an iPod, and to learn about the American Red Cross’s new consumer series: A Family Guide to First Aid and Emergency Preparedness, Dog First Aid, and Cat First Aid. What’s new this year: The American Red Cross has launched several new consumer safety books with DVDs.

American Red Cross 800-667-2968 www.redcross.org www.shopstaywell.com

Booth No. 1528

Booth No. 1609

Booth No. 2025

Circle No. 500

Circle No. 501

Circle No. 502

What athletic trainers should know: Ari-Med is the original developer of Flexall® 454 Pain Relieving Gel and has been marketing to the sports medicine community since the product was developed in 1987.

What athletic trainers should know: AthletiClean products protect against MRSA and other bacteria, to help keep athletes out of the doctor’s office and in the game.

What athletic trainers should know: Avazzia has developed the convenient, durable, economical handheld Med-SportT device with biofeedback technology and micro-current electrostimulation medical devices for relieving pain longer.

Visit their booth to... pick up free samples of Flexall Regular Strength and information on methods of application, including use with ultrasound.

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What athletic trainers should know: The American Red Cross offers first aid, CPR, and AED training at all levels.

Visit their booth to... learn more about AthletiClean’s non-alcohol, no-drip body foam that does not crack and dry the skin.

What’s new this year: Pricing remains unchanged for 2008.

What’s new this year: AthletiClean’s ProTex Sport is trademarked and testing confirms efficacy on CA-MRSA.

Ari-Med 800-527-4923 www.ari-med.com

AthletiClean 508-878-8739 www.athleticlean.com

Visit their booth to... see the difference that economical, interactive biofeedback technology can make for your athletes, and enter a daily drawing for a free device. What’s new this year: The Med-SportT device modes have been improved for a more powerful BEST-RSIT device, which is often covered by the athlete’s insurance. Avazzia 214-575-2820 www.avazzia.com

Booth No. 916

Booth No. 443

Booth No. 1803

Circle No. 503

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it U NA at s TA #20 Booth 25

Team Up with the Leaders in Sport Safety Training to Protect Your Athletes Sport Safety Training As a coach or athletic trainer, your greatest concern is for your athletes. That’s why the American Red Cross and the United States Olympic Committee have teamed up to bring you Sport Safety Training—to help coaches and trainers like you prevent, prepare for and respond to sports-related injuries. Sports Safety Training lets you choose from the following training options: • Sports Injury Prevention and First Aid • Adult and/or Child CPR • Adult and/or Child Automated External Defibrillation Sport Safety Training Handbook Red Cross Stock # 655535 ISBN: 978-1-58480-309-6

CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer Designed for individuals with a duty to respond, CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer will give you the confidence and skills to provide care for victims of cardiac and breathing emergencies. This training includes: • Respond to breaking and cardiac emergencies in adults, children and infants • Use an AED on an adult or child victim of cardiac arrest • Use personal protective equipment to stop bloodborne pathogens and other diseases from spreading CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer Red Cross Stock # 652162 ISBN: 978-1-58480-304-1

Through your participation in American Red Cross health and safety programs, you enable the Red Cross to provide lifesaving programs and services within our community. We truly value your support! For more information, contact your local American Red Cross chapter or visit www.redcross.org. Order materials through your local chapter or by calling StayWell at (800) 667-2968.

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: Ball Dynamics has been supplying the professional market since 1991 with products for core strength, balance and functional rehab. Visit their booth to... view the majority of the FitBALL® product line, which will be available to try out. What’s new this year: Many new FitBALL® brand products, as well as the original Pezzi® product line from Italy, will be on display.

Ball Dynamics International, LLC 800-752-2255 www.fitball.com

What athletic trainers should know: CalU Global Online offers 100-percent online programs for Certified Athletic Trainers and other health professionals, including sport performance training, rehabilitation science, sport psychology, and wellness and fitness. More than 40 graduates now work as athletic trainers in professional sports.

Visit their booth to... enter a free daily drawing for a combination TENS/NMS device.

Visit their booth to... learn more about why CalU Global Online is the answer for graduate education for the working athletic trainer.

What’s new this year: The introduction of a new muscle stimulator, Impulse EMS D.

BioMedical Life Systems, Inc. 800-726-8367 www.bmls.com

What’s new this year: CalU now offers a fully online degree track in sport psychology, as well as a Graduate Distantship program. California University of Pennsylvania 866-595-6348 www.cup.edu/go

Booth No. 1238

Booth No. 1218

Booth No. 1042

Circle No. 506

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Circle No. 508

NATA Booth No. 1428

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What athletic trainers should know: BMLS has been manufacturing portable electro-medical devices since 1983. Their product line includes analog and digital TENS units, NMS units, INF units, HVPS units, digital TENS/NMS/INF/HVPS combination devices, and a large assortment of electrodes.

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: Cramer Products was instrumental in founding the NATA and helped host the first meeting in 1950. Today, Cramer continues to support the NATA as an Official Supplier, the Official Supplier of ankle braces, and by funding several scholarships through the Research and Education Foundation. Visit their booth to... sign a special wall commemorating Cramer’s 90th anniversary.

What athletic trainers should know: CytoSport offers both functional hydration and post-workout nutrition products. Visit their booth to... sample the company’s new line of functional hydration products. What’s new this year: The company has revamped its CytoMax line for more functional hydration offerings.

Visit their booth to... see updated designs, new models, and offer comments on prototypes. What’s new this year: The introduction of a new and improved retractable handle for the Superskate Med Bag.

What’s new this year: The Eco-Flex stretch tape, the Active Ankle Volt brace, the Power Lacer ankle brace, the Direct Kick Soccer Brace, the AT Accessory Wallet, the Carry-On kit, the Elite Organizer kit, and several other new products. Cramer Products, Inc. 800-345-2231 www.cramersportsmed.com

What athletic trainers should know: Diversa Products Group manufactures Bushwalker Bags—an American-made line of soft-sided medical bags, belt packs, specialty equipment bags, and custom designs—using top-quality materials and construction methods.

CytoSport 888-298-6629 www.cytosport.com

Diversa Products Group 800-527-4923 www.bushwalkerbags.com

Booth No. 1410

Booth No. 743

Booth No. 916

Circle No. 509

Circle No. 510

Circle No. 511

Athletic Trainers #1 Priority...the Health and Safety of Athletes!

KORE KOOLER REHAB CHAIR Allows Athletic Trainers to Affordably, Portably, and Effectively Cool Down their Athletes to Get them Back in the Game Sooner, and Most Importantly, Safely! Latest Research Shows Limb Immersion to be the Most Effective Rehab Protocol. Contact us for copies!

Available Through Medco Sports Medicine 2008 Catalog (Page 136)

ho w at the NATA S ) y la p is D n O 7 heuim is (Booth 33 naLo in ASt.

800-688-6148 www.korekoolerrehabchair.com Email: sportsrehab@morningpride.com Circle No. 160

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What athletic trainers should know: evoSHIELD has taken a proven medical application and developed patented custom-forming products for protective and preventive purposes. Visit their booth to... get a hands-on demonstration of evoSHIELD products and learn more about this groundbreaking technology that many professional teams are using to protect their players.

What athletic trainers should know: General Tools & Instruments is a source for heat stress prevention instrumentation. Visit their booth to... check out heat stress prevention and environmental meters. What’s new this year: The company has a new name and look.

What’s new this year: After an enormous inaugural year, evoSHIELD has launched several new products for football, lacrosse, hockey, baseball, soccer, and many other sports. Showcased will be the A300 Attack rib protector shirt. evoSHIELD 770-725-2724 www.evoShield.com

What athletic trainers should know: Hammer Strength is a world-leading brand of plate-loaded equipment. Visit their booth to... see why with more than 30 years of research, development, and expertise in the fitness world, Life Fitness and Hammer Strength can offer what many other companies cannot: innovative products with unparalleled support. What’s new this year: Life Fitness’s most sophisticated line of cardiovascular equipment to date: the Elevation™ Series—an inspired lineup of engaging products.

General Tools & Instruments 800-697-8665 www.generaltools.com

Hammer Strength®/Life Fitness 800-634-8637 www.lifefitness.com

Booth No. 509

Booth No. 717

Booth No. 431

Circle No. 512

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: The Hibiclens® active ingredient, four-percent chlorhexidine gluconate, kills germs on contact, bonds with the skin, and keeps killing microorganisms for up to six hours. Visit their booth to... gather educational brochures and CDs about MRSA and athletics, and learn how to halt the spread of MRSA and other staph infections. What’s new this year: Hibiclens is now available with a foam pump dispenser.

Hibiclens® 800-805-0585 www.hibigeebies.com

What athletic trainers should know: The CorTemp™ system is used by professional and collegiate teams across the country. Teams that have used it in the past continue to use it today to protect athletes who are at risk for heat illness. The CorTemp system is validated by research to be more accurate than external methods of body temperature measurement. Visit their booth to... see a live demonstration of the CorTemp Ingestible Core Body Temperature Pill system.

What athletic trainers should know: HydroWorx is a premier provider of aquatic therapy pools and has products for all applications. Visit their booth to... see how HydroWorx is celebrating its 10-year anniversary and the big prizes the company is giving away. What’s new this year: Several new products have been introduced to the market. HydroWorx now has pools that can accommodate any installation application.

What’s new this year: CorTemp now offers long-range RF data transmission of core body temperature in outdoor athletic environments. HQ, Inc. CorTemp™ 941-723-4197 www.hqinc.net

HydroWorx 800-753-9633 www.hydroworx.com

Booth No. 525

Booth No. 325

Booth No. 1625

Circle No. 515

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Circle No. 517

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What athletic trainers should know: Sign up today at www.TheraBandAcademy.com, which provides protocols and exercises for products that athletic trainers use every day.

What athletic trainers should know: Hyland’s products provide safe, effective, and all-natural pain relief without side effects or contraindications.

Visit their booth to... learn how Biofreeze® gel, roll-on, and spray effectively relieve sore muscles and pain from muscle spasms, strains, sprains, tendonitis, backaches and sore joints.

Visit their booth to... pick up free samples of several of the company’s most effective products for sports injuries and rehabilitation.

What’s new this year: Check out the new Thera-Band® Rehab & Wellness Station and new PRO Series SCP™ exercise balls for strength, balance, and core training. Hygenic Performance Health 800-321-2135 www.Thera-BandAcademy.com www.biofreeze.com

What’s new this year: Hyland’s ear drops are the official ear drop of USA Water Polo.

Hyland’s/Treatment Options 800-456-7818 www.txoptions.com

What athletic trainers should know: Keiser equipment provides athletes the ability to train at any speed without risk of injury. Visit their booth to... learn more about how Keiser has been changing the way people exercise while improving their performance and quality of life for nearly 30 years. What’s new this year: Improved pneumatic/free weight hybrid Power Racks.

Keiser Corp. 800-888-7009 www.keiser.com

Booth No. 1715

Booth No. 943

Booth No. 1739

Circle No. 518

Circle No. 519

Circle No. 520

n o i t a r d ion y H tat S www.wisstechenterprises.com NATA Booth No. 1737

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P.O. Box 1002 Sugar Land, TX 77487 800-809-8184 Fax: 281-491-6319

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: The Elite Seat® is a highly effective non-operative treatment to obtain full “terminal extension” on an injured knee with a flexion contracture. It helps accelerate the rehab process, allowing the athlete to increase function, decrease pain, and strengthen the injured leg. Visit their booth to... Try the Elite Seat and see for yourself how effective and valuable it can be.

What athletic trainers should know: McDavid, chosen by elite athletes worldwide, is a leader in sports medicine. Visit their booth to... see new products and fabrications on display. What’s new this year: Product enhancements and additions to product lines.

What’s new this year: The Elite Seat is becoming an international icon for athletic trainers and athletes rehabbing injured knees with a flexion contracture worldwide. Kneebourne Therapeutic 866-756-3706 www.eliteseat.com

What athletic trainers should know: NRG manufactures InterX products, which are used by athletic trainers and other sports and medical professionals in the treatment and management of a range of acute and chronic conditions. Visit their booth to... watch demonstrations and learn more about associated research regarding the effects and results of InterX therapy. What’s new this year: A peer reviewed clinical trial was published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

McDavid Sports Medical Products 800-237-8254 www.mcdavidusa.com

Neuro Resource Group 877-314-6500 www.nrg-unlimited.com

Booth No. 1642

Booth No. 617

Booth No. 2011

Circle No. 521

Circle No. 522

Circle No. 523

Introducing The New Pro Series from ACP Superior Outcomes, Ease-of-use & Efficiency With 30 years of experience, more than 100 scientific studies documenting clinical efficacy and a solid track record for superior outcomes, ACP is proud to be the “equipment of choice” for over 100 professional and collegiate sports teams around the country. With the introduction of the new Pro Series, ACP has taken its game to the next level with sports specific “condition-driven” operational protocols, improved portability and larger display area. Developed around evidence-based practice, ACP's product line includes Electrical Stimulation, Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation (PENS), Ultrasound, Shortwave Diathermy, Infrared Therapy and a new MotorAssist Therapeutic Cycling System.

Pittsburgh Steelers Training Staff with ACP equipment John Norwig, ATC (center), Head Athletic Trainer Ryan Grove, ATC (left) and Ariko Iso, ATC (right)

ACP

Accelerated Care Plus

Visit us online at www.acplus.com

Omnistim® FX2 Pro Sport

®

Neuroprobe 500 Pro

®

Omnisound 3000 Pro Circle No. 164

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: NormaTec manufactures and distributes the NormaTec MVP, a stateof-the-art pneumatic compression device that goes way beyond simple intermittent compression.

What athletic trainers should know: ONS Performance products are collegiate-compliant and have been tested and certified for banned and illegal substances in accordance with the WADA, IOC, and USADA.

Visit their booth to... try the NormaTec MVP’s patented Peristaltic Pulse Pneumatic Waveform, check out brand new MVP updates, and sign up for the grand prize giveaway.

Visit their booth to... pick up a free interactive copy of ONS Performance’s exclusive nutrition guidebook and enter to win an iPod.

What’s new this year: Information on how the MVP’s patented technology has been incorporated as the modality of choice by top pro and college teams. See how the MVP excels at pre/post-workout, post-injury, post-surgical rehabilitation. NormaTec 800-335-0960 www.normatecsports.com

What’s new this year: ONS Performance will be highlighting new products with plenty of sample giveaways.

ONS Performance 800-817-9808 www.onsperformance.com

What athletic trainers should know: OPTP carries only the highest-quality products and resources from industry experts. Visit their booth to... try out the large selection of products, books, and DVDs on hand. What’s new this year: OPTP’s classic Stretch Out Strap has a new, updated poster with detailed illustrations and descriptions.

OPTP 800-367-7393 www.optp.com

Booth No. 537

Booth No. 519

Booth No. 931

Circle No. 524

Circle No. 525

Circle No. 526

Club Solutions

DISCOUNT PRICES FITNESS TESTING PRODUCTS & EXERCISE EQUIPMENT

CREATIVE HEALTH PRODUCTS We stock popular brand name instruments for Fitness Measuring and Testing at the lowest prices.

BIG SAVINGS ON FitBALL® MedBalls with Straps:

FitBALL® Donut:

• Adjustable straps fit small or large hands • Rubber outer shell - they bounce!

• New fitness tool • Unstable surface for core training • Dynamic prop for mat exercises

See all of our new Club Fitness Products at NATA Booth 1238

• HEART RATE • BREATHING MONITORS EXERCISERS • BODYFAT • FLEXIBILITY CALIPERS TESTERS • BLOOD PRESSURE • LUNG CAPACITY TESTERS TESTERS • STRENGTH TESTERS • SCALES • STETHOSCOPES • GONIOMETERS • ERGOMETERS • METRONOMES • EXERCISE BANDS • STOPWATCHES • FITNESS APPRAISAL KITS • ANTHROPOMETRIC CALIPERS • BLOOD CHEMISTRY ANALYZERS QUALITY PRODUCTS GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES PROMPT FRIENDLY SERVICE

CREATIVE HEALTH PRODUCTS 5148 Saddle Ridge, Plymouth MI 48170

800-742-4478

WWW.CHPONLINE.COM e-mail: sales@chponline.com

FitBALL 5/1 Balance Board: ®

• Complete kit for 5 training options • Includes sturdy wood rack to hold all 5 pieces

© 2008 Ball Dynamics International, LLC

AUTHORIZED

Call For FREE ‘08 Catalog • 800-752-2255 • www.fitball.com Circle No. 165

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: Perform Better offers exceptional selection and value on quality training aids and rehabilitation equipment. Visit their booth to... pick up a copy of the 2008 catalog and take advantage of a special 15percent discount coupon. What’s new this year: More than 50 new products are available, each proven to perform to a high standard of excellence.

What athletic trainers should know: PHI Pilates provides Pilates education for rehabilitation and conditioning professionals as well as NATA BOC continuing education credits. The company offers support materials, including DVDs and books, and can assist you in purchasing Pilates equipment or planning your Pilates program. Visit their booth to... see all the resources PHI Pilates has to offer. What’s new this year: New programs on the Pilates spine corrector—a simple, inexpensive piece that’s great for spinal mobility, core strength, and flexibility.

Perform Better 800-556-7464 www.performbetter.com

PHI Pilates 877-716-4879 www.phipilates.com

What athletic trainers should know: Power Systems offers one of the most complete lines of training equipment on the market. Visit their booth to... get quality product knowledge, great customer service, and show discounts. What’s new this year: The size of Power Systems’ warehouse has tripled, allowing more inventory to be ready to ship faster than ever before.

Power Systems, Inc. 800-321-6975 www.power-systems.com

Booth No. 819

Booth No. 2007

Booth No. 1618

Circle No. 527

Circle No. 528

Circle No. 529

The Ankle Brace Innovators... X8

Tarsal Lok®

TM

800.525.9339 www.swedeo.com

Best warranty in the industry! Swede-O lace-up ankle braces are covered by a 12 month warranty. Patent #5,741,222, other patents pending.

TCX8TL 4.08

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: As the world of medical information moves from paper to digital records, and as further and more detailed documentation becomes standard practice in the athletic trainer profession, Premier Software, Inc. products are becoming more and more the standard in demand.

What athletic trainers should know: ProMera Health’s goal is to develop safe and effective supplements that assist in strength building, endurance, recovery, and overall wellness.

Visit their booth to... get an idea of what software version you may need for your size and scope of athletic training services function.

AminoActiv capsules and cream, an all-natural pain reliever and anti-inflammatory, is a safe, effective alternative to NSAIDs that’s proven to stave off lactic acid. Con-Cret Creatine, available in capsules and powder, is a pure, highly concentrated creatine with no side effects. With Con-Cret Micro-Dosing, experience endurance and recovery to the muscles as never before.

Visit their booth to... learn more about ProMera Health’s products, which have been tested for NCAA Division I, and receive free samples.

What’s new this year:

What’s new this year: The release of Simtrak version 9.1 with special paperwork tracking feature for high schools and colleges.

ProMera Health, LLC 781-878-8798 www.con-cret.com www.aminoactiv.com

Premier Software, Inc. 630-562-4100 www.simtrak.com

What athletic trainers should know: PRO was founded by an NATA Hall of Fame athletic trainer and has been exhibiting at the NATA national convention for more than 40 years. The company’s current President, Gerry Detty, was made an honorary member of the NATA in 1998 and has 33 years of experience at the convention. Visit their booth to... view new products, especially sportspecific products developed with athletic trainers’ feedback. What’s new this year: PRO will be featuring the Ankle Anchor ankle support system, which imitates support taping. This brace works equally well on high ankle sprains and chronic instability. PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. 800-523-5611 www.proorthopedic.com

Booth No. 1911

Booth No. 536

Booth No. 909

Circle No. 530

Circle No. 531

Circle No. 532

www.bushwalkerbags.com tel.800.527.4923 fax.480.966.9806 WHEELED MED BAGS

A25SI Skatewheel Deluxe

A28SI Superskate

CARRY MED BAGS

A25 Deluxe Med Bag

BELT PACKS B22 Medium

B20 Small

BUSHWALKER Validated, SINCE 1 9 8 0 BAGS adding Flexall® to ultrasound therapy. A25C Wheeled Deluxe

TRAVEL BAGS

A18 Large Fold-up

MED BAG ACCESSORIES A11 Combo Kit A10 Vial Kit

Learn how a 25:75 Flexall and ultrasound gel mixture provided results equal to 100% ultrasound gel, with an added analgesic sensation of warmth. For a copy of our latest study supporting the addition of Flexall pain relieving gels to your therapeutic ultrasound treatments and a free sample, call us toll free at 800-527-4923 or request by email at info@ari-med.com PAIN RELIEVING GELS

B25 Deluxe

Circle No. 168

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NATA Booth No. 916

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: PROTEAM provides clients with customized modular taping stations, split-leg tables, taping tables, and lockers. Visit their booth to... find out details about an iPod giveaway. What’s new this year: The company has expanded its product line and can produce logos on tables.

PROTEAM™ by Hausmann 888-428-7626 www.proteamtables.com

What athletic trainers should know: Pro-Tec Athletics’ supports and braces are designed based on taping techniques and include compression strips or pads to provide targeted compression. Visit their booth to... receive one free product sample and review the company’s entire line of braces, supports, and hot/cold therapy products.

What athletic trainers should know: For more than 20 years, Shuttle Systems has designed and manufactured state-of-the-art rehab and fitness equipment. Visit their booth to... see why the Shuttle-MVP and Shuttle 2000-1 are recognized worldwide for excellence, versatility, and highly sophisticated training and conditioning of Olympic champions.

What’s new this year: Improved design for the XL Hot/Cold Therapy Wrap, Arch Pro-Tec, Knee Pro-Tec, and Hamstring Wrap. The new Calf Sleeve support is available as well.

What’s new this year: The Shuttle Mini Press: It is a portable, affordable strength-throughmotion training device.

Pro-Tec Athletics 800-779-3372 www.injurybegone.com

Shuttle Systems 800-334-5633 www.shuttlesystems.com

Booth No. 731

Booth No. 1139

Booth No. 1709

Circle No. 533

Circle No. 534

Circle No. 535

Lifting your patients to a new level may help control: Heel Lift, Inc.

• Leg Deficiencies • Back Pain • Achilles Tendonitis • Gait Problems

Please call for information, samples & a catalog

1-800-235-4387 or Fax 573-885-3202 www.gwheellift.com Circle No. 170


Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: SPRI provides a large assortment of products to help in the conditioning and rehabilitation of athletes. Visit their booth to... try out some brand new products and take a look at some classics that have been redesigned. What’s new this year: Slanted Risers, new Med Balls, and Braided Tubing, to name just a few.

What athletic trainers should know: StaphAseptic is committed to helping you educate your athletes about MRSA. The company also prides itself on making products that work better and are higher in quality than the typical OTC product.

What athletic trainers should know: Swede-O provides unique, patented, and effective sports medicine products for all parts of the body.

Visit their booth to... receive free skin infection identification cards, product samples, and other educational materials.

What’s new this year: Thermoskin Thermal Supports are now available in black. Swede-O has made many upgrades to their existing product line. Many new products are also being shown at NATA.

What’s new this year: Oregon State University performed a study that showed StaphAseptic was the best OTC wound care product to help prevent skin infections.

SPRI Products 800-222-7774 www.spriproducts.com

StaphAseptic by Tec Laboratories, Inc. 800-482-4464 www.staphaseptic.com

Visit their booth to... win prizes and see all the new Swede-O and Thermoskin products.

Swede-O, Inc. 800-525-9339 www.swedeo.com

Booth No. 942

Booth No. 2010

Booth No. 925

Circle No. 536

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Circle No. 538

WHY TRAINERS NO LONGER TRUST FOAM.

Custom-Fit in Minutes 1. Rip open pack 2. Form evoSHIELD to body 3. Hardens permanently in minutes

Learn more at evoSHIELD.com

PROTECTING PERFORMANCE.

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Exhibitor Snapshots

What athletic trainers should know: SwimEx offers one of the most versatile therapy pools currently on the market, with multiple water depths (deepest and widest). Visit their booth to... see SwimEx’s life-size cross-sectional pool. What’s new this year: The new SwimEx pool model 900T.

What athletic trainers should know: Established in 1974 as Total Gym and renamed in 1986 as efi Sports Medicine, the creator of the incline resistance training exercise equipment category is a leading provider to all wellness and fitness markets. Visit their booth to... participate in the 11th annual Total Gym contest, see the Total Gym PowerTower® upgrade special pricing, and experience the new Scrunch™. What’s new this year: The new Scrunch accessory, which is compatible with the Total Gym PowerTower, GTS®, and Total Gym 26000. Total Gym® by efi Sports Medicine® 800-541-4900 www.efisportsmedicine.com

SwimEx, Inc. 800-877-7946 www.swimex.com

What athletic trainers should know: Townsend Design is the only manufacturer that makes OTS knee braces from three leg measurements, for clients with disproportional legs. All products are made in the USA. Visit their booth to... enter a drawing for a leather briefcase, and find out how Townsend can help athletic trainers achieve higher levels of patient function and compliance. What’s new this year: There are several new knee braces for athletes, a new measurement device that eliminates the need for casting most patients for a custom brace, and a new compliance/suspension feature for Townsend’s knee braces to absolutely eliminate brace migration. Townsend Design 800-432-3466 www.townsenddesign.com

Booth No. 1428

Booth No. 1337

Booth No. 1425

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The study of movement Education for Athletic Training Professionals

Please visit us at booth #2007 at the NATA convention. www.phipilates.com • 877-716-4879

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What athletic trainers should know: Waterboy is the longest-running company that exclusively specializes in hydration.

What athletic trainers should know: Whitehall Manufacturing is a leader in producing quality equipment used by athletic trainers.

Visit their booth to... receive a free quick-fill bottle while supplies last.

Visit their booth to... see the additional array of sports medicine equipment from Whitehall’s acquisition of Thermoelectric.

What’s new this year: Waterboy will display its brand new trailer power models.

What’s new this year: Whitehall Manufacturing has acquired Thermoelectric.

What athletic trainers should know: Wilson Case offers tough, smartly designed athletic trainer cases. They have many stock athletic cases available, and offer free custom case design. Visit their booth to... see their new SplitTopXL and TablePro portable treatment/taping stations, as well as many styles of athletic trainer cases. What’s new this year: Bring the treatment room to the field fast with Wilson Case’s TablePro. It has ample storage and sets up in minutes.

Waterboy Sports, Inc. 888-442-6269 www.waterboysports.com

Whitehall Manufacturing 800-488-8999 www.whitehallmfg.com

Wilson Case 800-322-5493 www.wilsoncase.com

Booth No. 318

Booth No. 809

Booth No. 825

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Hydrate Your Athletes

Hydrate Cart

Hydrate A-Frame

50-gallon tank with 8 drinking stations 8” opening at the top of the tank allows ice/water to be easily loaded Two battery-operated pumps Custom-built four-wheeled aluminum cart, built-in hitch All components FDA approved NO ASSEMBLY REQUIRED

Simply attaches to a water source (spigot) Provides unlimited water supply Water pressure controlled by easyflow nozzles A-frame legs adjustable/removable without tools Improved drinking nozzles with “never lose” tips and levers Lightweight -only 20 pounds

LIFETIME WARRANTY 407-694-1034

jack@hydrate1.com

www.hydrate1.com Circle No. 175

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Sponsor Profiles

Over the past 90 years, athletic training and Cramer Products have progressed side by side. A clear vision and a sensible approach to the needs of the physically active are common qualities shared by the men and women of Cramer Products and the thousands of dedicated professionals who serve as athletic trainers and sports medicine clinicians. The Cramer approach of hard work and a tireless allegiance to athletic training has led to the introduction of numerous product innovations, from state-of-the-art braces and supports to the first electrolyte-replacement sports drink and the recently introduced Cramer Stay Cool Towel® and ProShox® mouthguard. Cramer’s approach is straightforward and simple: a commitment to support athletically active individuals with proven treatments. Perhaps that’s why Cramer remains one of the most trusted names in athletic training rooms the world over. Cramer Products is proud to have been the NATA’s original corporate supporter, and is pleased to advance its solid relationship with the organization today. www.cramersportsmed.com

is an antiseptic antimicrobial skin cleanser with bactericidal properties. It contains four-percent w/v chlorhexidine gluconate, a chemically unique cationic bisbiguanide with inactive ingredients: fragrance, isopropyl alcohol (four percent), purified water, Red 40, and other ingredients, in a mild, sudsing base adjusted to pH 5.0-6.5 for optimal activity and stability as well as compatibility with the normal pH of the skin. With its formulation of 70-percent isopropyl alcohol plus 0.5-percent chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) and emollients, Hibistat® hand antiseptic for healthcare personnel is proven to offer fast-acting antimicrobial protection on contact. It provides a broad spectrum of activity, continuing to fight germs much longer than soap and water or isopropyl alcohol alone. Requiring no water, Hibistat is ideal for use in the field or the facility, serving as a portable defense you can carry with you when regular handwashing isn’t an option. Because it is safe for frequent daily use, medical professionals of all kinds—from EMS workers out on calls to nurses and doctors going patient to patient—can benefit from Hibistat’s quick-drying formula. www.hibigeebies.com/sports

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New Products at the Show Accelerated Care Plus 800-350-1100 www.acplus.com The Omnistim® FX2 Pro is a multimodality e-stim system with PENS, IFC, MFAC, LVPC, and HVPC waveforms for circulation, pain management, and muscle reeducation. Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation (PENS) technology extends traditional e-stim capabilities by simulating normal muscle firing patterns for neuromuscular re-education. Sportspecific PENS protocols promote high-speed, high-intensity muscle capabilities during the advanced stages of recovery from surgery, injury, and muscle disuse atrophy. Circle No. 545

prolonged physical effort. Athletes throughout the world use it for muscle recuperation. These chewable lemon-flavored tablets are stimulant-free. Sportenine, manufactured by Boiron, is available at select health food stores and independent pharmacies nationwide. Go online to learn more. Circle No. 547

the body of the brace, creating a better fit for a variety of foot shapes. Four spring steel stays (two on each side of the ankle) help support the ankle and prevent heel release by supporting the body of the brace. The circumferential strap helps stabilize the brace, preventing unwanted slippage and providing a comfortable fit. Circle No. 549

Shuttle Systems by Contemporary Design Co. 800-334-5633 www.shuttlesystems.com

The Dynatron X5 is a highly effective treatment for both acute and chronic pain. This remarkable machine features two independent channels and six treatment modes, and it includes both

Facilitate a safe, speedy, and functional recovery for a wider variety of patients with the Shuttle 2000-1. Countless therapists worldwide have discovered that the 2000-1 allows

Active Ankle Systems, Inc. 800-800-2896 www.activeankle.com The new Volt ankle brace from Active Ankle is engineered to include the latest carbon fiber technology. The polypropylene shell is reinforced with carbon fiber—the same high-performance material used in racing cars and bicycles. It also features a molded bearing-design performance hinge for smoother range of motion, strengthening ribs for a thinner profile, and fabric-backed EVA foam pads for durability and comfort. Call today for more information. Circle No. 546 Boiron 888-264-7668 www.arnicare.com Sportenine, a homeopathic sports medicine product with Arnica, helps improve stamina, promotes recovery, and reduces the risk of cramps, aches, pains, exhaustion, and muscle fatigue due to

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Dynatronics 800-874-6251 www.dynatronics.com

treatment of virtually any lowerextremity injury early in rehab. It effectively addresses patients’ trunk and upper-body rehabilitation, along with strengthening needs. It is the complete transition tool for bridging the gap between injury and full functional movement. From a basic bilateral press to the advanced activity of jumping, you will not find a better therapy device. Circle No. 548 Cramer Products, Inc. 800-345-2231 www.cramersportsmed.com The Power Lacer ankle brace from Cramer Products features unique Y-shaped vertical stabilization straps to offer unprecedented control over both the forefoot and the heel in a laceup brace. Totalcontrol lacing allows for an even pull throughout

large and small treatment probes. It features four frequency sweeps, frequency ranges from 0-200 Hz, a conductance meter, and a two-year warranty. The X5 is lightweight and affordable. Feeling is believing—for a free demonstration, contact your Dynatronics dealer or call the company directly. Circle No. 550 Fitter International, Inc. 800-348-8371 www.fitter1.com With WobbleSmart Boards, you can dial in to six different levels in just one second. A rubberized non-slip base makes this the most versatile board that Fitter International has ever offered. It’s suitable for all ages and most skill

levels. The unique design provides a very stable feeling on the lowest setting and a fast, challenging feel on the highest setting. Fitter is an industry leader in bringing new advancements to the athletic training and personal training professions, and WobbleSmart is a great example of how to improve on an already good product. Circle No. 551

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Get a FREE MRSA Education Kit Call 1-888-MRSAHELP (677-2435) or email info@teclabs.com to request your kit.

You’ve probably heard a lot about MRSA, or antibiotic-resistant staph, in recent months. That’s because the number of reported cases has increased significantly— and every medical professional is taking notice. Now you can help protect yourself and your athletes from MRSA with StaphAseptic® First Aid Antiseptic. Apply it to cuts, scrapes and abrasions to relieve pain and prevent skin infections from MRSA, staph, strep and other germs. 101 staphaseptic.com

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New Products at the Show HydroWorx International, Inc. 800-753-9633 www.hydroworx.com The HydroWorx 5000 Series recreation and sports pools are revolutionizing large-group hydrotherapy. These

awe-inspiring pools create a modern dimension for water and wellness. Their groundbreaking design maximizes a health or fitness facility’s efficiency by delivering up to 10 underwater treadmills or 12 underwater spinning bikes for treatment and exercise sessions. The first aquatic therapy pools of their magnitude, the 5000 series pools make underwater treadmills, dynamic technologies, and Hydrorider bikes available to several individuals at a time. This revolutionary concept of large-group or ensemble hydrotherapy is an industry first. Circle No. 552 Thera-Band/Hygenic Performance Health 800-246-3733 www.thera-band.com The new Thera-Band® Rehab and Wellness Station is designed for strength, balance, and core training. It features TheraBand clip-connect resistance tubing, stability trainers, and the new Pro Series SCP™ exercise ball. It provides three planes of movement for upper- and lowerextremity strength training. Slide tracks with one-hand lockdown capability provide significant flexibility for user setup, charting, and documentation. Circle No. 553 Perform Better 800-556-7464 www.performbetter.com Combining durability, stability, and safety is the goal of Perform Better’s

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new lineup of Plyo-Safe G2 boxes. They are made of 1005 foam core that will not break down or soften over time. Each Plyo-Safe box comes with three two-inch strips of Velcro™ to enable stacking while preventing any boxes from slipping apart. Handles on the 12-, 18-, and 24inch boxes allow for easy repositioning. They’re available as a complete set of five boxes, a set of three boxes, or individually by size. Custom colors and logos are available. See them at the convention, where you can also get a 2008 catalog. Circle No. 554 McDavid 800-237-8254 www.mcdavidusa.com McDavid’s Dual Density HexPad is built around the same concept as the regular HexPad, with individual pads allowing the garment to flow with the body while moving moisture through the pads. But in this advanced version, McDavid uses two densities of foam. Impact tests show Dual Density equipment to be twice as protective as regular HexPads. The outer part of the pad is denser for added protection, and the inner pad is softer to cushion the impact. Circle No. 555

for the treatment of ankle injuries and to reduce the severity and frequency of future ankle injuries. The ASO EVO is bilateral and fits either the left or right foot. Circle No. 556 Mueller Sports Medicine 800-356-9522 www.muellersportsmed.com Mueller TapeWrap is the cohesive, breathable, sweat-resistant alternative

to prewrap. TapeWrap doesn’t trap moisture so it won’t slip. Your tape job stays tight, and that means more support. Cohesive TapeWrap applies directly to the skin so you don’t need prewrap or adhesive spray. Thin, flexible, easy-to-tear TapeWrap will help you perform the most sophisticated taping techniques quickly and accurately. With its flexibility, it conforms to any body part and won’t inhibit the natural movements of the athlete while acting as a fixation bandage for pads or splints. Cold packs, blister care, bleeding—they’re all covered with TapeWrap. Circle No. 557 Neuro Resource Group 877-314-6500 www.nrg-unlimited.com The new Dual Flex Array electrode from Neuro Resource Group is used with the InterX Professional Sport

Medical Specialties, Inc. 800-582-4040 www.medspec.com The ASO EVO ankle stabilizer is an evolutionary step forward in ankle protection with its unique stabilizing straps and dynamic cuff. This new design enables the ASO EVO to comfortably provide exceptional ankle support and stability

device and offers completely new treatment options for athletic trainers. Each of the 18 electrodes delivers stimulation, which is drawn to the optimal treatment point within an area. Use it strapped onto an extremity during dynamic function or as an unattended treatment before or after rehab. It’s an excellent option for knee, elbow, and ankle injuries. Circle No. 558

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New Products at the Show NSCA Certification Commission 888-746-2378 www.nsca-cc.org Now in its third edition, Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning is one of the most comprehensive references available for strength and conditioning professionals. Developed by the NSCA Certification Commission, this is the most preferred preparation text for the CSCS exam. The research-based approach, extensive exercise technique section, and unbeatable accuracy make it the text readers have come to rely on for CSCS exam preparation. Pre-order now (ships in July). Circle No. 559 OPTP 800-367-7393 www.optp.com OPTP’s new inflatable Disco Sport is larger than other discs, providing more versatility. The wider 22-inch diameter allows you to add stability and proprioceptive challenges to more exercises than ever before. The Disco Sport’s size makes it great to use in sitting, prone, and standing positions—even with a wide stance. It easily inflates to any desired height between 2.5 inches and 7.5 inches. Call or go online to learn more. Circle No. 560 PrePak Products 800-544-7257 www.prepakproducts.com NutriMirror.com is a free Web site that helps you manage your weight and nutrition. Log your food and exercise choices, and in a single glance, NutriMirror gives the feedback you need to control your body weight and nutritional balance. A per-

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sonal summary of your nutrient information, including 18 additional vitamins and minerals, is available on your Reflection Analysis. Circle No. 561 PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. 800-523-5611 www.proorthopedic.com Starting with the popular and very effective 610 Arizona ankle brace, PRO has taken ankle support to a new level. By combining the ankle brace with a non-elastic strapping system that’s anchored on the calf, PRO has created the 611 Ankle Anchor, a very supportive inversion resistant bracing system. Ideal for chronic ankle conditions and high ankle sprains, the Ankle Anchor system is lightweight and machine washable. For more information, please contact PRO. Circle No. 562 Swede-O, Inc. 800-525-9339 www.swedeo.com The new and improved Swede-O X8 ankle brace has an upgraded top strap material and additional side stabilizers for extra support. The exclusive dualpurpose straps serve as both the figureeight straps and top-locking straps. The straps are also pre-positioned halfway through the figure-eight configuration. This exclusive strap design offers easy application and ensures proper strap placement. Circle No. 563 SwimEx, Inc. 800-877-7946 www.swimex.com SwimEx, maker of highly versatile aquatic therapy pools, is introducing the 900T model,

which delivers the ultimate in flexibility. With an overall depth of 5.5 feet, the 900T can be adapted with a raised inset floor to offer a second water level anywhere from 3.5 to 4.5 feet. Therapists gain the options of shallow workstations, an integrated treadmill, and deep-water exercise, all in the same pool. Circle No. 564 Total Gym® by efi Sports Medicine® 800-541-4900 www.totalgym.com The Scrunch™ accessory facilitates a simple progression of abdominal workouts, lengthens and sculpts muscles, and supports proper posture. With a stabilized upper body, closedchain exercises fortify muscles and bones. Unlike with a normal crunch, the user’s legs drive the abdominals in every Scrunch for overall function and correct biomechanics. It’s perfect for any fitness level. The Scrunch accessory is compatible with the Total Gym Power Tower, GTS, and Total Gym 26000, and is retrofittable for other models. Circle No. 565 Wilson Case 800-322-5493 www.wilsoncase.com Wilson Case’s new TablePro is the ultimate portable treatment station. Simply roll in the heavy-duty trunk,

swing it open, lock down the wheels, and slip on the padded cover. The TablePro is built tough enough to handle the heaviest patients—no wobbly folding table legs or removable lids. All your supplies are organized in handy tilt-bins, removable trays, and tape spindles. Go online to learn more. Circle No. 566

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Products on Display Accelerated Care Plus 800-350-1100 www.acplus.com The Neuroprobe 500 Pro is a versatile pain-management system combining electrostimulation and infrared therapy. It utilizes modality-based protocols to provide electrical stimulation, point stimulation, and infrared therapy for the temporary relief of minor muscle and joint pain, minor arthritis pain, and muscle spasms. It also relieves stiffness, promotes relaxation of muscle tissue, and temporarily increases local blood circulation. The combination of infrared therapy and two channels of electrical stimulation provides the therapist with superior treatment flexibility and efficient concurrent treatment. Circle No. 567 American Red Cross 800-667-2968 www.redcross.org With CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer, available from the American Red Cross, you can learn about responding to breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, children, and infants; using an AED on an adult or child victim of cardiac arrest; and using personal protective equipment to stop bloodborne pathogens and other diseases from spreading. There are optional new lessons on epinephrine auto-injectors and asthma inhalers. Circle No. 568 Antibody, Inc. 877-546-2639 www.antibodywear.com The Bodyguard Open Patella Compression Knee Brace is designed to add comfort, stability, and performance enhancement to the sprained or bruised knee while taking direct pres-

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sure off the kneecap itself. In the uninjured knee it reduces the incidence of sprains/strains and bruises from impact trauma while adding stability and performance enhancement. As with all Bodyguards, it provides compression, support, muscle and tendon heat circulation, strain distribution, and impact absorption. Circle No. 569 Antibody offers the custom-made Double shoulder sleeve. It is designed to have a shorter arm on the existing (less severe) injury that covers only the shoulder itself, and a normal longer arm on the new (more severe) injury. It includes an abduction strap for the longer arm, and the compression ratio is increased on the shorter arm to compartmentalize the entire shoulder joint. Circle No. 570 Ari-Med Pharmaceuticals 800-527-4923 www.ari-med.com Depend on Flexall 454® topical pain-relieving gels from Ari-Med Pharmaceuticals for clinical and athletic training room settings. Flexall gels are used by leading athletic trainers to treat the world’s top athletes. Enhance ultrasound, cryotherapy, TENS, and massage therapy. Flexall gels feature unique vitamin E-enriched aloe vera gel formulas with menthol as the active ingredient. They’re absorbed quickly and are greaseless, non-staining, and gentle on the skin. Professional sizes are available. Circle No. 571 Since 1980, Bushwalker Bags have been handcrafted in America to exacting standards for quality and durability. Discover Ari-Med’s complete line of Bushwalker medical bags, belt packs, crutch bags, field kits, equipment bags, luggage, and specialty bags that are some of the best in the industry.

They come with a lifetime warranty on workmanship. The bags are available in six standard colors, and custom embroidery is also available. Bushwalker Bags set the standard. Circle No. 572 AthletiClean 508-878-8739 www.athleticlean.com Don’t let MRSA throw you a curve ball. Pro Tex Sport hand and skin sanitizing foam has an efficacy rate of up to 99.999 percent for reducing MRSA, staph, strep, E coli, and more. It’s alcohol-free so your hands won’t crack or dry out. Unlike alcohol-based products, Pro Tex Sport has an active ingredient that actually increases with daily usage. Pro Tex Sport is non-flammable, non-staining, fragrance-free, and leaves your skin with a smooth, natural, non-sticky feeling. Circle No. 573 Avazzia Med-Sport 800-688-3767 www.AlertServices.com The next generation of the Med-Sport interactive biofeedback therapy device from Avazzia detects and adapts to the microcurrent stimulus, so every output signal is modified according to the body’s response. The result is improved nonpharmaceutical relief and accelerated return to activities. It offers microcurrent electrotherapy with automatic interactive biofeedback, all in an economical handheld unit with auto timeout. This device is not just a TENS unit. Administer an automatic biofeedback system with various frequencies of pulsed or damped bi-phasic sinusoidal waveforms. Avazzia has earned the prestigious ISO13485 quality supplier certification. Circle No. 574

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The CSCS and NSCA-CPT certifications are accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies.

YOU WORK HARD. YOU PUT IN LONG HOURS. IT’S TIME TO DEMONSTRATE YOUR EXPERTISE AND ADVANCE YOUR CAREER. IT’S TIME TO GET CERTIFIED. SAVE

$25

NATA MEMBERS ONLY: Receive $25 off the CSCS exam fee and 30% off select preparation materials in addition to earning BOC CEUs for exam preparation time. Get your discount code through the NATA Affinity Program online at www.nata.org.

VISIT US AT THE 2008 NATA ANNUAL MEETING (BOOTH 2013) FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN a CSCS Exam Registration and to save on professional resources and preparation materials including the newly updated Exercise Technique Manual for Resistance Training and DVDs and the soon to be released Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning, Third Edition textbook. For more information or to place an order now, visit us online or call 888-746-2378. Circle No. 178

GO FARTHER www.nsca-cc.org NSCA Booth No. 127


Products on Display Avazzia Med-Sport 800-688-3767 www.AlertServices.com The BEST-RSI™ is an FDA-cleared microcurrent biofeedback electrostimulation device from Avazzia that interactively detects the body’s response and adapts the microcurrent stimulus, so every output signal is modified according to the body’s response. The result is improved non-pharmaceutical relief from pain, quicker return of range of motion, and accelerated return to activities. This battery-operated, handheld unit is easy to use and delivers outstanding results. Circle No. 575 BioMedical Life Systems, Inc. 800-726-8367 www.bmls.com The BioStim NMS+ is a digital muscle stimulator/TENS combo unit. When chronic pain, post-surgical pain, acute pain, range of motion, increased blood circulation, muscle disuse atrophy, muscle re-education, or venous thrombosis are indicated, the BioStim NMS+ is an ideal choice. The waveform can be switched from asymmetrical biphasic square to symmetrical biphasic square. The unit has five preset therapies and rivals the most powerful portable e-stim units on the market. Circle No. 576 Boiron 888-264-7668 www.arnicare.com Boiron offers the natural healing benefit of homeopathic Arnica montana in a topical gel formula. Unlike other topical pain relievers, Arnicare Gel not only treats muscle aches and stiffness but also relieves swelling and bruis-

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ing caused by trauma, overexertion, or surgery. The odorless gel absorbs quickly and does not leave a greasy residue. Arnicare Gel is available at select drug store chains and independent pharmacies nationwide. Go online for more information. Circle No. 577 BSN Medical, Inc. 800-537-1063 www.bsnmedical.com Lightplast Pro is a lightweight stretch tape that’s ideal for all-purpose taping and strapping of ankles, wrists, and fingers. It’s easy to tear and unwinds consistently for smoother, faster wrapping. It even holds securely in the presence of moisture. This tape is available in black or white. Circle No. 578 Coverlet adhesive bandages by BSN Medical are made to absorb liquid quickly. In addition, each Coverlet features an extra-large wound pad capable of absorbing 10 times its weight in water. The 360-degree adhesive surrounding the island pad helps seal the afflicted area against dirt and contamination, keeping wounds clean and providing an environment conducive to healing. Coverlet bandages are available in 13 different shapes and sizes, making them perfect for use on knees, elbows, chins, noses, knuckles, and other hard-to-bandage areas. The elastic fabric moves with the curves and contours of the skin and the body, sticking with athletes wherever they go. Circle No. 579 CytoSport, Inc. 888-298-6629 www.cytosport.com Cytomax Collegiate Performance Drink is a blend of complex carbohy-

drates and electrolytes that optimizes hydration during exercise and keeps energy at peak levels longer to help improve stamina. Alpha L-polylactate acts to prevent acid buildup and minimizes post-exercise muscle soreness. Cytomax is available in convenient ready-to-drink or powder formulas. Circle No. 580 Muscle Milk Collegiate RTD (ready-todrink) formula from CytoSport provides a high-quality protein blend that helps promote recovery from exercise and is permissible under NCAA bylaw 16.5.2.2 for nutritional supplements. Due to its unique multi-source protein, maltodextrin carbohydrate, and healthy fat structure, this product is second to none for collegiate athletic programs. It is available in convenient ready-to-drink chocolate, vanilla, and banana flavors. Visit CytoSport online to learn more. NCAA is a registered trademark of the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

Circle No. 581 DM Systems, Inc. 800-254-5438 www.dmsystems.com AnkleTough offers a system of progressive resistance straps specifically designed for the ankle and customizable for a variety of athletes. AnkleTough can help prevent the recurrence of ankle injuries by strengthening and conditioning the ankle muscles and tendons. The system comprises color-coded resistive tension straps in four strengths (light, medium, strong, and tough). AnkleTough is available in a four-pack featuring one unit of each strength, and in an eightpack with each unit having the same resistance level. Circle No. 582

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Products on Display The Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer®, a dynamic multi-sport shoulder-stabilizing brace from DM Systems, significantly reduces subluxations and dislocations. In a recent survey, 93 percent of respondents confirmed that when worn during athletic activity, Cadlow reduced shoulder injuries. Cadlow’s unique and patented pull system strengthens the shoulder, allowing athletes to fully function in their sport without the fear of shoulder pain or re-injury while maintaining a full range of motion. An improved design makes fitting Cadlow easier than ever, requiring less than 15 minutes, and its reduced price makes Cadlow an affordable solution. Circle No. 583

Your First String Defense Against Dehydration GEORGIA TECH * PENN STATE * NFL PRO BOWL * KANSAS * LOUISIANA STATE * MACALESTER

Accept No Substitutes.

Dynatronics 800-874-6251 www.dynatronics.com

The Generation II Aqualift* the original Hydration System from Sports Innovations

Let Dynatronics furnish your athletic facility with individual taping stations, cabinets built to your specifications, and units with your team logo debossed in the Naugahyde color of your choice. Dynatronics manufactures tables in beautiful, durable hardwoods to fit every need. With 28 years of experience, Dynatronics offers outstanding craftsmanship and design, with sturdy construction, reinforced stress points, and great long-term performance. Go online to learn more. Circle No. 584

• New quick disconnect drinking hoses and cooler connections

• Stop valves on manifold • 10 gallon insulated beverage container

• More durable electrical • Multi-unit stacking feature enclosure • All terrain maneuverability • 500 lb capacity • Dual power supply • All aluminum frame • Easy filling & cleaning • 4 fully adjustable PVC labcock drinking valves

General Tools & Instruments 800-697-8665 www.generaltools.com The WBGT Handheld Heat Stress Monitor is designed to monitor environmental thermal conditions. It represents an industry breakthrough for outdoor sports, because it uses four measurement parameters: WBGT (wet bulb globe temperature), TG (globe temperature), TA (air temperature), and % (relative humidity). By taking all these factors into account, it accurately measures true heat stress risk in any outdoor setting. The WBGT is invaluable for coaches, athletic trainers, athletic directors, and sports medicine practitioners. Circle No. 585

1-800-288-3954 www.sportsltd.com PROUD TO BE MADE IN THE USA *The Aqualift Portable Drinking System is proprietary property of Sports Innovations, Ltd. and is protected by U.S. and Foreign Patents issued and pending. U.S. Patent No.: 5,154,317

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Products on Display HQ, Inc. 941-723-4197 www.hqinc.net Early intervention to rapidly and accurately assess core body temperature on the field is necessary for the proper prevention, evaluation, treatment, and management of exertional heat stroke. Research indicates that external methods of monitoring core temperature have not been proven valid under conditions of intense exercise in the heat. The CorTemp™ system, featuring the CorTemp ingestible temperature pill, provides an easy, affordable approach to monitoring core temperature on the field and gauging the effectiveness of cooling methods on the sidelines. This FDA-cleared product is used by professional and collegiate teams nationwide. Circle No. 586 Hydrate, LLC 407-694-1034 www.hydrate1.com The Hydrate Cart by Hydrate, LLC, is a 50-gallon hydration system that allows up to eight players to quickly and easily replenish vital fluids lost during practice and competition. The cart has a builtin hitch for easy transportation and is protected by a lifetime warranty. With newly improved drinking nozzles, a quick-drain tank, and no assembly required, it saves athletic trainers and coaches valuable time, so they can be on the field with their athletes. Circle No. 587 Hygenic Performance Health Products 800-246-3733 www.biofreeze.com Applied generously, Biofreeze® pain-relieving gel and roll-on effectively relieve

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pain from heel injuries, sore arches, muscle spasms, strains, sprains, and tendonitis, and will help minimize nextday aches and pains. Use it up to four times a day. It’s available in a 16-ounce spray bottle and 16-ounce, 32-ounce, and gallon gel pump bottles. Also available is a gravity dispenser box with 100 five-gram single-use application packets for clinical settings. Circle No. 588 Keiser 800-888-7009 www.keiser.com The Air300 Runner is a unique and innovative product designed for the athletic performance market. It allows athletes to train the lower body for power by using the components of speed and resistance. Developed specifically for sports teams to improve acceleration and explosive power, this unit will improve the power and performance of any individual looking for a competitive edge. Circle No. 589 Kneebourne Therapeutic 866-756-3706 www.eliteseat.com The Elite Seat is a portable kneeextension device designed for the non-operative treatment of degenerative knee conditions. By evenly distributing force across the leg, the Elite Seat provides effective fullknee hyperextension and reduces pain in bent knees caused by any of these conditions: acute ACL injury; inadequate post-operative rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction; total-knee arthroplasty; arthrofibrosis; deconditioned knee with a flexion contracture; and arthritis. Circle No. 590

Magister Corp. 800-396-3130 www.magistercorp.com Thanks to a new surface-modification process, Eggsercizer® hand exercisers are smooth and entirely tack-free. They feature a translucent color scheme that corresponds to Magister’s well-known REP Band® color scheme, with each color representing a different level of resistance. Circle No. 591 Virtually identical to latex bands, REP Bands® resistive exercise bands from Magister Corp. offer greater elastic response, higher resiliency, and faster recovery. Patented REP Bands are the only resistive exercise bands manufactured exclusively in the United States. Circle No. 592 Medical Specialties, Inc. 800-582-4040 www.medspec.com The Patellavator Knee Orthosis has a unique design that applies variable pressure to the patellar tendon without creating a tourniquet around the leg or irritating the popliteal. This is achieved by having an interlocking base strap made of Coolflex material, which is very comfortable and flexes with the knee. The Patellavator’s low-profile design eliminates irritation to the opposite leg. Circle No. 593 Hibiclens® 800-843-8497 www.hibigeebies.com Hibiclens® antimicrobial antiseptic skin cleanser can be an effective defense against the spread of MRSA and other staph infections. Its active ingredient, fourpercent chlorhexidine gluconate, works in a unique way.

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Products on Display It kills germs on contact, bonds with the skin, and keeps killing microorganisms for up to six hours. Hibiclens is used for skin wounds, general skin cleansing, and as a hand wash. Hibiclens is a product of Molnlycke Health Care. Circle No. 594

proven to be one of the most effective rehab protocols for lowering core body temperature. Circle No. 595

Morning Pride 800-688-6148 www.korekoolerrehabchair.com

The InterX Professional Sport is dedicated to your success. Handheld and battery-operated, it is one of the most convenient products on the market today. It’s an effective and user-friendly way to deliver pain relief and increased range of motion to keep your athletes out of the athletic training room and in the game. The InterX is easy to incorporate into all your usual treatment programs, and is used by the athletic trainers for several professional and collegiate teams. Go online for more details. Circle No. 596

Morning Pride’s unique Kore Kooler rehab chair is an efficient way to prevent heat stress. The Kore Kooler is affordable and portable, allowing athletic trainers to more effectively address the health and safety needs of their athletes. Athletes immerse their hands and forearms in ambient water and take advantage of limb-immersion technology. Kore Kooler is scientifically

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NSCA 800-815-6826 www.nsca-lift.org Plyometrics for the Strength-Power Athlete is a DVD that presents an overview of how to incorporate plyometric training into a basic strength and conditioning program. It discusses why plyometric exercises are not meant to be conditioning drills—rather they are designed to improve the powerperformance level of athletes. Topics covered include the scientific basis for plyometric training, preparation for plyometric training, plyometric exercise prescription, and plyometric exercise demonstrations for various levels of intensity (low, low-moderate, moderate, moderate-high, high). Visit the NSCA online store to order. Circle No. 597

Neuro Resource Group 877-314-6500 www.nrg-unlimited.com

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Products on Display NSCA Certification Commission 888-746-2378 www.nsca-cc.org Developed by the NSCA Certification Commission, the Exercise Technique Manual for Resistance Training, second edition, provides clear descriptions for those performing resistance training exercises and those who instruct others. The manual gives detailed explanations on proper technique for each free weight and machine exercise, and the accompanying DVDs show the movements for each exercise in action. Features include checklists for 57 resistance training exercises and demonstrations of accurate exercise technique as well as the most common incorrect techniques. Circle No. 598 Power Systems 800-321-6975 www.power-systems.com Develop the core, proprioception, and kinesthetic awareness with the Functional Training Board from Power Systems. This multi-planar instability training board offers several settings to allow users of different abilities to perform standing, seated, or lying exercises. To further enhance sport-specific workouts, incorporate tubing using the notches around the base or add in medicine balls, weighted bars, and dumbbells. For multiple push-up positions, use the raised handholds on each side. Circle No. 599 PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. 800-523-5611 www.proorthopedic.com The PRO 130 Standard and 130A Altered Diamondback Knee Sleeves have an exclusive design that was unique enough to receive a patent, making this one of the most comfortable sleeves yet developed. Geometrically opposed seams provide

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a bent-knee configuration while eliminating bothersome popliteal irritation. The use of 1/8-inch neoprene for a comfortable, controlled-tension fit makes this product ideal for all-day wear. It is available in N1 or N2 material. Circle No. 600 Pro-Tec Athletics 800-779-3372 www.injurybegone.com Experience the benefits of direct, active ice massage with the Ice Up portable ice massager. It offers effective treatment in just five to seven minutes, and quick deep-tissue relief for ligament, tendon, and muscular injuries. Ice massage increases treatment effectiveness and speeds recovery. The Ice Up has a leak-proof design to keep your sports bag dry. A portable carry cooler keeps the Ice Up stick frozen for up to 12 hours, so it can be taken anywhere for pre- or post-activity ice massage. Circle No. 601 ProMera Health, LLC 888-878-9058 www.con-cret.com AminoActiv all-natural pain relief and anti-inflammatory actively repairs strained muscles, joints, and tissue. Composed of unique amino acids, AminoActiv targets the two main sources of pain: inflammation and lactic acid. Pain impacts active lifestyles and most people use ibuprofen, naproxen, aspirin, and analgesic creams that mask pain and are toxic to the kidneys, liver, and stomach. Studies prove AminoActiv is an effective alternative without side effects. Circle No. 602 Con-Cret from ProMera Health is a pure and concentrated creatine supplement that has no other ingredi-

ents—no sugars, additives, or stimulants. Con-Cret’s unique Micro-Dosing formula saturates the muscles, creating dramatic endurance and recovery that leads to strength building. One capsule or 1/4 tsp. per 100 pounds of body weight eliminates any need to preload or cycle off. There are no side effects from taking Con-Cret, and it’s designed for people who are serious about performance. Circle No. 603 Stromgren Supports 800-527-1988 www.stromgren.com Looking for affordable protection for ankle sprains? Stromgren’s model 329 Ankle Support offers heel-lock ankle protection without tape. Permanently attached heellock straps help control severe eversion and inversion of the ankle complex. The Spandex™ sock applies comfortable compression to the entire foot complex. It’s easy to put on, not bulky, and fits comfortably inside the shoe. This support stays cool and dry because of its moisturewicking material. For a free sample, call Stromgren or e-mail barb@ stromgren.com. Circle No. 604 Need affordable MCL injury prevention for your linemen? For more than 20 years, the 190SP Knee Protector from Stromgren Supports has been helping college and professional football teams reduce injuries to the MCL ligament. It absorbs and dissipates blows to the lateral side of the knee complex, helping to reduce lateral pressure on the MCL. The slotted pivot points allow a full range of motion for lateral movements, and the Lycra® straps secure the brace so there is no downward migration. The

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Products on Display knee protector weighs seven ounces and fits either the left or right leg. Call Stromgren for more information, or visit the company online. Circle No. 605 StaphAseptic by Tec Laboratories 800-482-4464 www.staphaseptic.com StaphAseptic First Aid Antiseptic is providing free MRSA education materials to athletic trainers. Stop by booth 2010 at the NATA convention to receive “MRSA... The Ticking Time Bomb,” an educational DVD with a quiz, facts about MRSA, pamphlets, and a skin infection identification card. If you are unable to stop by the booth, call StaphAseptic to request that the educational materials be shipped directly to you. Circle No. 606

absorption of nutritional supplements, reduces soreness, inflammation, and cramping, and supports overall recovery by restoring cellular balance after post-workout depletion. This 100-percent natural product doesn’t interact with other supplements or medicines and is safe for all ages. Circle No. 608 Whitehall Mfg., Inc. 800-782-7706 www.whitehallmfg.com The Slant Back whirlpool meets the requirements of professional athletes. It is manufactured with a 304-grade stainless steel gravity drain and includes a 1/2 horsepower turbine. The whirlpool is available in both mobile and stationary configurations to fit your needs. Circle No. 609

Townsend Design 800-432-3466 www.townsenddesign.com Townsend Design’s number one custom knee brace, the Premier, features ultra lightweight, rigid carbon graphite shells. Premier braces are fabricated with patented Townsend Motion Hinges that replicate the roll-andglide movement of the knee, and Townsend’s patented Synergistic Suspension Strap, backed by a no-migration guarantee. This is the ideal brace for ligament injuries, contact sports, and prophylactic protection. Call or go online to learn more. Circle No. 607 Hyland’s/Treatment Options 800-456-7818 www.txoptions.com

WissTech Enterprises 800-809-8184 www.wisstechenterprises.com WissTech Enterprises offers a complete line of indoor and outdoor portable drinking fountains. The company’s Hydration Station is manufactured for durability and features an all-welded cart with industrial casters and wheels to ensure years of worry-free service. Durable chrome-plated brass drinking valves are easy to use and warranted against breakage. The Hydration Station is produced in 20-, 25-, and 50-gallon capacities. The new drinking cart is intended for indoor use. Circle No. 610

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2008 National Conference and Exhibition July 9-12, 2008 • Paris Hotel & Casino • Las Vegas

Working to provide its members with the most compelling and diverse fitness content, the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) invites all fitness professionals to the association’s largest annual gathering, the 31st National Strength and Conditioning Association National Conference in Las Vegas, July 9-12, 2008. This year’s conference features more than 50 educational sessions and research presentations, more than 140 exhibiting companies, and two keynote speakers: former Olympic wrestling champion Rulon Gardner and the “Grid Iron Grandpa,” Mike Flynt. Back by request, attendees will be able to attend a pre-conference symposium on Wednesday, July 9, which will discuss 10 industry trends. (Registration is required.) It will include these in-depth sessions: • High Numbers, Low Budget Youth Training • Sport Nutrition: “Functional Foods” • Transfer of Training: Selecting Exercises for Athletic Performance • Functional Movement Screens: Defining the Problem • Practical Application of Sports Supplement and Nutritional Strategies • Introduction to Kettlebells for Fitness and Athletic Development • Movement Solutions: Advanced Manual Technique (two sessions)

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• Methods of Developing Maximal and Explosive Strength • Kettlebell Programming for Fitness and Athletic Development • Using the Functional Movement Screen in Team Sports

Full conference sessions begin Thursday, July 10, and are set in a two-track format that will update attendees on the most relevant and current information in the field. Look for enlightening, researchbased presentations by well-respected sport and exercise scientists and practitioners, including Mike Boyle’s Using the Functional Movement Screen in Team Sports and Gray Cook’s Secrets of the Shoulder and Functional Movement Screens: Defining the Problem (both sponsored by Perform Better.) Preceding the national conference, the NSCA will host USA Weightlifting’s Sports Performance Coach Certification Course, the International NSCA Index Invitational, and NSCA certification exams. Starting on July 8, the Sports Performance Coach Certification Course will introduce athletes, students, and clients to the techniques of weightlifting, plyometrics, and other explosive training methods as a means of improving athletic performance. On July 9, the NSCA’s inaugural invitational will feature

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participants competing for points based on their performance in the vertical jump, pro-agility run, 10-yard dash, and hang clean in a decathlon-style scoring system. Also on July 9, non-certified attendees will have the opportunity to join the 36,000 professionals who have obtained their CSCS® or NSCA-CPT® certification during the NSCA Certification Commission’s examination session. Visitors can also explore the exhibit hall, interact with equipment providers, and preview the latest products to hit the industry. Exhibit hall hours are: Thursday, July 10 7 a.m. – 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Exhibitor Reception—5 p.m. Friday, July 11 7 a.m. – 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturday, July 12 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. And finally, the NSCA Career Services Center will be available throughout the conference. Those interested should come prepared with a resume, as employers will be conducting interviews on-site. For more information on the NSCA National Conference and related events, call 800-815-6826 or visit: www.nsca-lift.org/NatCon2008.

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2008 Exhibitor Spotlight The following advertisers in this issue are exhibiting at the NSCA convention: CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Booth 100, 201 888-298-6629 www.cytosport.com CytoSport offers athletes the Muscle Milk protein powder and Cytomax sport drink. See ad on back cover

Hammer Strength®/ Life Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . .Booth 101, 103 800-634-8637 www.lifefitness.com Life Fitness is a premier manufacturer of cardiovascular, strength, and fitness equipment for consumers and commercial facilities. See ad on page 58

SPRI® Products, Inc. . . . . .Booth 516, 517 800) 222-7774 www.spriproducts.com SPRI® has been a leader in rubber resistance for more than 20 years, offering high-quality fitness products, education, and accessories. See ad on page 79

Training & Conditioning . . . . . . .Booth 325 607-257-6970 www.athleticbid.com www.training-conditioning.com Training & Conditioning is a national trade magazine for strength/conditioning and rehab professionals who work with competitive athletes.

VersaClimber/VersaPulley . . Booth 426, 527 800-237-2271 www.versaclimber.com VersaClimber is a total-body vertical trainer that provides a superior cardio and strength energy workout in the least amount of floor space. See ad on page 28

WerkSan Barbells . . . . . . .Booth 310, 312 877-937-5726 www.werksanusa.com WerkSan Barbells offers outstanding weightlifting equipment certified by the IWF. The company is a national sponsor of USA Weightlifting. See ad on page 32 (list current as of April 25, 2008)

NSCA Certification Commission . . Booth 127 888-746-2378 www.nsca-cc.org The NSCA Certification Commission offers two nationally accredited certifications: the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist® (CSCS®) and the NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer® (NSCA-CPT®). See ad on page 111

Perform Better . .Booth 630, 632, 634, 636 800-556-7464 www.performbetter.com Stop by Perform Better’s booth to pick up your copy of The Guide to Functional Training. See ads on pages 114 & 189

Power Lift® . . . Booth 200, 202, 204, 206, 301, 303, 305, 307 800-872-1543 www.power-lift.com Power Lift® rack systems and lifting platforms utilize advanced design technologies to meet the demands of premier strength facilities. See ad on page 63

Power Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Booth 316, 318, 417, 419 800-321-6975 www.power-systems.com With more than 1,000 innovative products and programs available, Power Systems is committed to providing quality products and service you expect—guaranteed. See ad on page 36-37

ProMera Health/Con-Cret . . . . .Booth 413 781-878-8798 www.con-cret.com www.aminoactiv.com ProMera develops safe and effective supplements like Con-Cret and AminoActiv. See ads on pages 45 & 66

Rogers Athletic Co. . . . . . .Booth 322, 324, 326, 423, 425, 427 800-457-5337 www.rogersathletic.com Rogers offers innovative Brute Rack Systems with Monster Arms, Monster Machines, and the revolutionary Pendulum plate-loaded equipment. See ads on pages 47 & 61

Samson Equipment, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Booth 302, 304, 306, 308 800-472-6766 www.samsonequipment.com Since 1976, Samson Equipment has designed, manufactured, and sold heavy-duty, industrialstrength weightlifting equipment to top high school, college, and professional teams worldwide. See ad on page 113

Shuttle Systems. . . . . . . . .Booth 517, 519 800-334-5633 www.shuttlesystems.com The Shuttle® MVP develops explosive speed, agility, and vertical jump. It is also an effective tool for injury prevention and rehabilitation. See ad on page 53 Circle No. 183 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

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2008 Conference Workshop Schedule July 9-12, 2008 • Paris Hotel & Casino • Las Vegas

Thursday, July 10, 2008

2:00pm-2:50pm

7:00am-8:00am

Calcium and Weight Loss: Recent Research Findings Joan Eckerson

Morning Yoga brought to you by: The Balanced Athlete John Gillespie, CSCS, NSCA-CPT, & Cara Bradley, CSCS

9:00am-10:00am More Power in Less Time Gary Lavin, CSCS, NSCA-CPT Fitness for Police, Fire and EMS Personnel Thomas Collins, DC, CSCS

10:00am-11:00am Quadrennial Planning for the High School Athlete Ian Jeffreys, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT,*D Special Ops Fitness—Motivate your Clients Using Proven Training Methods of Special Operators to Help Achieve Fitness/Health Goals Stewart Smith, CSCS

1:00pm-2:00pm 30 Minute Time Efficient Workouts Annette Lang, NSCA-CPT

1:00pm-3:00pm Nutritional Supplementation Before, During & After, Resistance Training: Science & Recommendations (Sponsored by GNC) Jeffery Stout, PhD, CSCS,*D, FNSCA & Joel Cramer, PhD, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT,*D, FNSCA & Joseph Weir, PhD

2:00pm-3:00pm Exercising the Role of Fitness in the Treatment of Eating Disorders Irv Rubenstein, PhD, CSCS

3:00pm-3:50pm Resistance Training and Arterial Compliance Anette Fjeldstad

3:00pm-4:00pm Separating Dead Lifts from Weightlifting Pulls Through a Technical Practical Perspective Michael Waller, MA, CSCS,*D, NSCACPT,*D The Influence of Dexterity Training on Injury Prevention and Performance Tony Moreno, PhD, CSCS

4:00pm-4:50pm Multiple Sclerosis: Postural Balance & Resistance Training Cecilie Fjeldstad

4:00pm-5:00pm Common Musculoskeletal Compensation Patterns for Basic Movement Mechanics Keith Shimon, CSCS, USAW

Sports Nutrition for the High School Athlete: Do’s and Don’ts to Increase Performance Paul Moore, MS, RD, LDN, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT,*D

Friday, July 11, 2008 7:00am-8:00am Morning Yoga brought to you by: The Balanced Athlete John Gillespie, CSCS, NSCA-CPT, & Cara Bradley, CSCS

9:00am-10:30am The Aging Neuromuscular System in Men and Women Still Responds to Strength Training Keijo Häkkinen, PhD

10:30am-12:00pm Secrets of the Shoulder Sponsored by Perform Better Gray Cook, CSCS Assessment and Monitoring of Athlete Strength and Power Robert Newton, PhD, CSCS,*D

1:00pm-2:00pm Performance Training for the Aging Athlete Peter Twist, MSc, CSCS Applied Power Training Research & its Implications for Training: Lessons from Australian Professional Rugby League Daniel Baker, PhD

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2008 Conference Workshop Schedule July 9-12, 2008 • Paris Hotel & Casino • Las Vegas

2:00pm-2:50pm

Saturday, July 12, 2008

Youth Fitness Testing: Effectiveness and New Developments Jill Bush

7:00am-8:00am

2:00pm-3:00pm Factors Affecting the Length of the Rest Interval Between Resistance Training Exercise Sets Jeffrey Willardson, PhD, CSCS

3:00pm-3:50pm Resistance Training for Hypertrophy: Why Do Some Respond Better? Marcas Bamman, PhD, CSCS

3:00pm-4:00pm The Power of Nutrition for all Levels: 10 Ways to Implement Sports Nutrition Techniques for the Competitive Edge Dawn Weatherwax-Fall, RD, CSSD, LD, ATC, CSCS Cleveland Browns 2007 Game Plan Thomas Myslinski Jr, MS, CSCS

4:00pm-4:50pm Resistance or Aerobic Exercises for Weight Loss and Weight Management John McCarthy

4:00pm-5:00pm Functional Training: Beyond the Hype Sean Flanagan, PhD, ATC, CSCS Neuromuscular Control Training Programs to Reduce Lower Extremity Injury Risk Terry Grindstaff, DPT, ATC, CSCS*D

Morning Yoga brought to you by: The Balanced Athlete John Gillespie, CSCS, NSCA-CPT, & Cara Bradley, CSCS

9:00am-10:30am Non-Linear Periodization: From its Physiological Basis to its Implementation William Kraemer, PhD, CSCS, FNSCA Maximizing the Various Aspects of Strength for All Levels of Athletes— Absolute, Speed, Reversal, Stabilizing Pete Bommarito, MS, CSCS, USAW

10:30am-12:00pm Real World Fat Loss—Destroying the Dogma (Sponsored by Perform Better) Alwyn Cosgrove, CSCS,*D Theory and Practice of Vibration Training Michael Barnes, MEd, CSCS,*D, NSCACPT,*D

1:00pm-2:00pm The Use of Meta-Analysis in Strength Training Research Moh Malek, PhD, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D Plyometric Training Integration in Athletic Development James Radcliffe, MS

A Simplified Progression for Teaching the Olympic Movement Sean Waxman, CSCS

2:00pm-3:00pm In-Season Detraining in College Athletes Todd Miller, PhD, CSCS, *D Improving the Physical Capacities of 12—16 Year Olds Clive Brewer, MS, CSCS & Ian Jeffreys, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D

2:00pm-3:00pm “Practical Teaching of Acceleration and Top Speed Running” (Sponsored by Velocity Sports Performance) Loren Seagrave

3:00pm-4:00pm Benefits/Risk Analysis of the Weightlifting Movements Allen Hedrick, MA, CSCS*D, Coach Pract, FNSCA Building a Strong Foundation: How to Train the Endurance Athlete in the Gym Carmen Bott, MS, CSCS

4:00pm-5:00pm Theory and Applications of Recovery Techniques David Sandler, MS, CSCS,*D Back to Basics: A Practical Framework for Coaching and Training Back Health Tracy Fober, MSPT, CSCS

Do you have ENOUGH BANDS for your team? WVU does! Shown here is just one of three rubber-band rooms at West Virginia University.

For information on setting up a band room in your facility, call us at 1-800-344-3539. Stay ahead of your competition with Flex Bands...the best-kept secret in pro sports! Used by the Giants, Jaguars, Raiders, Ravens, Angels, Padres, Red Sox, and many more, Flex Bands have been improving athletic performance since 1980!

Jump Stretch, Inc. 1230 N. Meridian Rd. Youngstown, OH 44509 www.jumpstretch.com 1-800-344-3539 Fax: 1-330-793-8719 Circle No. 185 TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM JumpStretchAdForTC1505v3.indd 1

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CHEST & BACK Creative Health Products, Inc. 800-742-4478 www.chponline.com Creative Health Products is a leading discount supplier of rehabilitation, fitness, exercise, and athletic testing and measuring products. The company offers a unique testing device that measures leg strength and is ideal for measuring the strength of the thighs, chest, back, and upper torso as well. It’s an innovative, easy way to measure an athlete’s improving strength and assess his or her overall fitness level. The device is now available with either a standard (pounds) or metric (kilograms) gauge. Circle No. 611 Fitnessrubber.com 888-894-0204 www.fitnessrubber.com Fitness Rubber is a new Web fitness resource that offers “manufacturer direct pricing” for all your fitness rubber equipment needs. The company’s products include Kraiburg Solid Rubber Weight Plates, KraiburgSportec Rolled Rubber Flooring, Kraiburg-Sportec Interlocking Fitness Tiles, and FLEXGARD Rubber Coated Cast Iron Weight Plates, to name just a few. Make it a point to visit Fitnessrubber.com and receive immediate savings of up to 45 percent. Act now and receive a $20 discount on your initial Web site order over $100. Circle No. 612 Gilman Gear 800-243-0398 www.gilmangear.com The Mobility Arch by Gilman Gear helps develop dynamic mobility by improving athletes’ flexibility and range of motion in the groin, glutes, hamstrings, and lower back while bending, stepping, squatting, 116

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and lunging. It is an excellent tool for off-season conditioning and in-season flexibility training and is ideal for obstacle courses and agility stations. The Mobility Arch can be used indoors or out. It is made entirely of aluminum, so it’s guaranteed not to rust. Circle No. 613 Jump Stretch, Inc. 800-344-3539 www.jumpstretch.com The Jump Stretch Door Harness makes it easier than ever to train with FlexBands® when you travel. This sturdy harness conveniently attaches over any door that can be closed to hold it in place. Position it on the top or side of the door and attach your bands (sold separately) to perform back extensions, standing benches, leg curls, and a host of other exercises. It’s also great for home use. The Door Harness adjusts easily, and an instructional video is available. Circle No. 614 Keiser Corp. 800-888-7009 www.keiser.com Due to overwhelming demand from pro teams and universities, the Power Rack Platform was created. This unique lowprofile platform is trimmed in steel tubing with cast rounded corners to reduce athletic injury. It is constructed of quality materials with 1.5-inch thickness and topped with first-grade maple (sanded, sealed, and triple-varnished) with space for team or club logos. The platform also features impact-absorbing rubber to significantly reduce noise. Circle No. 615 Lebert Fitness, Inc. 905-785-0626 www.lebertequalizer.com The Lebert Equalizer trains athletes for strength, agility, plyometrics, and

so much more. Originally developed for portable body weight compound strength training exercises, this product has many outstanding functions. For instance, when used in cardiovascular training, the Equalizer works great for circuits and interval training. In a circuit, the participants can move from one of 75 different strength training and cardio exercises to another to get their heart rate way up. In an interval setting, a coach can have athletes break in two groups, with one doing Equalizer pullups and the other doing jumping jacks or Equalizer agility drills. Circle No. 616 When it comes to athletic conditioning, most coaches agree that athletes should master body weight training before external loading. The Lebert Equalizer is the perfect tool for compound body weight exercises like chinups, push-ups, and dips. Using their own body weight, athletes can adjust the level of difficulty (usually by a simple change in foot placement) to suit their needs. The Equalizer is perfect for everyone from beginners to pro athletes. Made of long-lasting steel, the Equalizer is portable, versatile, and easy to store. It is a leading tool for sports teams, boot camps, and athletes everywhere. Circle No. 617 Hammer Strength 800-634-8637 www.hammerstrength.com The rugged new Hammer Strength® Heavy Duty line features racks, platforms, and accessories built to optimize team training. Developed with the help of coaches and athletes, Hammer Strength Heavy Duty racks offer the variety, efficiency, and simplicity to train large groups of athletes with the most advanced TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM


CHEST & BACK performance training techniques. Call or go online today to find out more. Circle No. 618 MAXX Football 800-294-4654 www.maxxfootball.com This off-season, while your opponents are lifting, you will be putting the intensity of football into your workouts. MAXX provides a lifelike dummy and a durable weight machine with state-of-the-art computer technology. The LED board gives your players instant feedback on their speed off the ball and the power of their punch while they work to increase strength and perfect football technique. Circle No. 619 NCCPT 800-778-6060 www.NCCPT.com The National Council for Certified Personal Trainers is a company that certifies personal trainers both nationally and internationally. The NCCPT curriculum focuses on preparing students to succeed and excel in the commercial environment. The council offers homestudy courses as well as two-day seminars to prepare students to sit for the exam. The NCCPT is currently looking for qualified individuals to instruct those two-day courses. Call, go online, or email info@nccpt.com for details. Circle No. 620 NZ Mfg. 800-886-6621 www.nzmfg.com TurfCordz® resistance products are engineered for high-level athletic agility and strength training. Leading professional sports teams and international Olympians train with TurfCordz for explosive TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

start drills, power-building footwork, and simulated play action to enhance performance through resistance. TurfCordz offers both safety and reliability, enabling athletes to overcome physical and mental barriers. For more information on NZ Mfg.’s extensive product line, call today or go online. Circle No. 621 Power Lift 800-872-1543 www.power-lift.com Power Lift’s Dual Stack Functional Trainer is an ideal piece of equipment for every strength and fitness facility. Two 200-pound weight stacks feature a 2:1 resistance level that is ideal for both strength training and rehabilitation movements. Standard features include Power Lift’s patented Rotating Chin-Up Handles, weight stack guards, accessory storage handles, and two D-ring handles. The wide opening is ideal for users working on a physio ball. Circle No. 622 Power Lift’s 4 Way Neck is an ideal piece of equipment for every strength and fitness facility. Standard features include two-peg weight storage on the work arm side and three-peg weight storage on the non-work arm side, nonmarking rubber floor bumpers, an oversized adjustable seat pad that allows users to position themselves correctly in the machine, contoured face pads that naturally rotate with the user’s body through the exercise, an adjustable chest pad, and a cam and belt design that reduces the fly-away effect. Circle No. 623 Power Systems 800-321-6975 www.power-systems.com At 73 inches, the extra-long Folding VersaBalance Beam is one of the longest soft balance beams on the

market. Designed for portability, it easily folds to half its length and features a convenient carrying strap. It provides uniform stability from the corners to the center, measuring seven inches wide and two inches high. The Folding VersaBalance Beam is made of high-quality EVA foam for extra durability and protection against odor-causing moisture. Circle No. 624 Rogers Athletic Co. 800-457-5337 www.rogersathletic.com The Pendulum Power Squat Pro by Rogers Athletic builds incredible leg mass and strength. Users feel no sheering at the knee. Load the top to concentrate on the hips and glutes, load the bottom to concentrate on the quads, and then load both ends equally to match a bar squat. It’s no wonder that the most serious athletes, from pro football players to America’s elite military forces, train with the Pendulum. Circle No. 625 Rogers Athletic’s Monster Glute Ham has a user-friendly design that minimizes fatigue so athletes can work more on isolated muscle groups. The walk-through design allows athletes to enter or exit the machine from either side. All adjustments can be made from the workout position, allowing users of all sizes to quickly cycle through the machine. Attachment points are available to perform perfect reverse hypers. Rogers weight training equipment gives your athletes a better workout for better results. Circle No. 626

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CHEST & BACK Samson Equipment 800-472-6766 www.samsonequipment.com

chain with three different size belts. Go online to learn more. Circle No. 627

SPRI Products 800-222-7774 www.spriproducts.com

The new Samson Belt Squat is yet another way Samson Equipment is leading the way in custom, heavy-duty weight training equipment. The brand new design limits the amount of floor space needed for this unique piece while still making it easy for athletes of all different sizes to use. It features adjustable handles, a unique load release that brings the athlete’s hands closer together while performing the exercise, an adjustable yoke that allows each athlete’s hips to stay in their natural range of motion, and an adjustable

The Samson Combo/Decline Bench is one of the newest and most comprehensive utility benches on the market today. This revolutionary new addition to Samson’s bench line gives your athletes the ability to perform a decline press by making a few simple adjustments. Perform the bench press, incline, military, decline, and even sit-ups all from the same bench. The unit is constructed of 2 1/2” x 2 1/2” steel square tubing, and all flat surface welds are ground and polished to a smooth finish. Outfit your weightroom with the best in quality and design from Samson Equipment. Circle No. 628

The 10-pound Blue Dead Weight Ball is soft, squeezable, and filled with sand. Easy to catch and throw, it’s ideal for exercises in which rebounding and bouncing are not desired. Weights can be combined for a quantity discount. Circle No. 629

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WerkSan Barbells 877-937-5726 www.werksanusa.com New Custom Training Plates from WerkSan feature your organization’s name and logo on both sides. Available in black, red, blue, yellow, and green, they are identical in construction to the company’s high-quality training plates, which are certified by the IWF for use in international competition training and warmup rooms. They even cost the same. Order today to get personalized, high-quality training plates at a great price. Circle No. 630 WerkSan training sets are identical to the highly regarded IWF-certified WerkSan Competition Sets. They feature the same materials, the same manufacturing methods, and the same guarantees. They even come with IWF stickers, certifying them for use in warmup and training rooms at IWF events. But there is one difference: They cost considerably less. All WerkSan equipment comes with the company’s ironclad guarantee. For safety, durability, and exceptional value, choose WerkSan USA: Engineered to LastSM. Circle No. 631

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NEW Product Launch Stadion™ Plus All-natural Electrolyte Boost Unique features: • Contains 12 electrolytes • No carbs, sugar, or anything artificial • Replacement levels of sodium Benefits for the user: • Environmentally friendly • Available in lemon-lime and non-flavored (16¢ per drink) • Quantity discounts available

Outdoor Boss www.stadionsportsdrink.com 888-463-5699 Circle No. 632

Braided Tubing Unique features: • Available in four versions of braided tubing: StrengthCord, StrengthCord Plus, TD SpeedCord Plus, and TrainingCords (three-pack)

Rotational Platform Unique features: • Design is great for post-op/post-injury rehab • Ideal for hip/tibial rotation and foot/ankle exercises • Provides smooth gliding and a non-skid surface Benefits for the user: • Improves range of motion and flexibility to aid the recovery process • Can be used seated or standing

OPTP www.optp.com 800-367-7393 Circle No. 633

Customized WerkSan Training Plates Unique features: • Your organization’s name and logo are displayed on the sides of each plate • Identical in construction to WerkSan plates, which are certified for use in international competition training and warmup rooms

Benefits for the user: • Versatility: take anywhere, do anything, even on all-terrains with confidence • Great for speed (dynamic) and full-body exercises • Ideal for wrap-around type exercises

Benefits for the user: • Personalized, high-quality training plates are available at a great price with the same guarantees as all WerkSan training plates

SPRI Products www.spriproducts.com 800-222-7774

WerkSan Barbells www.werksanusa.com 877-WERKSAN

Circle No. 634

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COMPANY NEWS

The History of Cramer Products, Inc. Cramer Products—a name that’s The Cramers were known as honest, synonymous with athletic training—is hard-working men who built a comcelebrating its 90th anniversary in pany on a solid foundation of integrity, 2008. Ninety years ago, a young innovation, and unsurpassed quality pharmacist named Charles “Chuck” and service. Athletes and coaches Cramer recalled a across the country knew soothing liniment he the brothers, and in 1932 had first concocted six they were selected as the years earlier to treat his first athletic trainers for the sprained ankle while U.S. Olympic Track and attending the University Field Team. of Kansas. He thought local athletic teams Five years later, in 1937, might buy it, so he Frank Cramer became one cooked up a batch in of the founding fathers Frank and Chuck Cramer his mother’s kitchen in of the NAIA, along with Gardner, Kan. Coaches James Naismith and Emil and athletes did buy it—and they liked Liston. Cramer’s strong connection it. Chuck and his brother Frank decidwith the NAIA continues today with its ed to go into business, manufacturing status as the Official Sports Medicine and selling the liniment. With that, Supplier and through the sponsorship Cramer Chemical Co. was born, along of awards and scholarships that recogwith the profession of athletic training nize outstanding athletic trainers. and the field of sports medicine. As their company and product line For 10 years, Cramer Chemical Co. grew, Chuck and Frank established (the name was changed to Cramer an unwavering commitment to the Products, Inc., in 1969) was a onegrowth of athletic training and to product company. the people choosing this very new Then in 1928, Notre career path. This commitment lives on Dame’s Knute through Cramer’s annual sponsorship Rockne gave of a student athletic trainer workshop Cramer Athletic at the College of William and Mary Liniment an imporand the funding of scholarships for tant boost by student athletic trainers. Chuck and endorsing the prodFrank Cramer also believed they had uct in a print advera responsibility to be an important tisement. Sales source of sports medicine information. took off with that In 1933 they started a newsletter, The stamp of approval, First Aider, and more than 85,000 copand the brothers began creating more ies were printed and mailed to athletproducts to help injured athletes. As ics professionals and athletic trainers the company grew, Chuck and Frank nationwide four times each school Cramer created the standards for the year. Today, the newsletter is published profession of athletic training—stanonline six times a year. dards that are still followed today. In 1950, Frank and Chuck funded and helped organize a meeting considered to be the birth of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. Chuck was the first Executive Secretary of the NATA, serving from 1950 to Cramer Products, Inc. 1954. Today, the NATA P.O. Box 1001 has more than 30,000 Gardner, KS 66030 members, and both Frank 800-345-2231 and Chuck are members Fax: 913-884-5626 of the NATA Hall of Fame. www.cramersportsmed.com 120

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Cramer was the first company to mass-produce the rosin bag for baseball, one of the first to sell moldable mouthpieces for football, and the first to patent an ankle brace with straps to duplicate a first-class tape job. Athletes, athletic trainers, and coaches throughout the world rely on Cramer’s high-quality tape and wraps, braces and supports, analgesics, field and training room supplies, mouthpieces, and much more. To stay current, Cramer listens to athletic trainers. “We test our products across the country at the high school, college, and professional levels,” says company President Tom Rogge. “We constantly seek ways to better meet the needs of athletic trainers, and I’m proud to say that many of our new Tom Rogge products and product improvements are suggested by our customers.” Today, Cramer Products is an international company with 53 employees, selling more than 500 products. Cramer is still based in Gardner, Kan., on the same land where the company’s first building was constructed 90 years ago. It’s a company steeped in history, and the legacy of its founders is deeply ingrained in the company’s culture. “Every one of our employees knows that the company was started by Frank and Chuck Cramer,” says Rogge. “Every day, all of us at Cramer strive to live up to the standards that began in 1918.”

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MORE PRODUCTS EightBall Nutrition 888-331-6601 www.8-ballnutrition.com

C.H.E.K. Institute 800-552-8789 www.chekinstitute.com

EightBall Recovery Mix features a collegiate-compliant formula that includes 15 grams of high-quality protein and 35 grams of carbohydrates. It is certified free of banned substances and available in three delicious flavors: chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Recovery Mix is available in a fivepound tub and in single-serve ready-to-mix bottles. Quantity discounts are available. Circle No. 636

How to Eat, Move and Be Healthy is written for the general public interested in living a healthy, balanced lifestyle while also dropping pounds and reaching peak vitality. Author Paul Chek reveals techniques previously available only to his select clients. Using a four-step approach, the book shows the reader how to reach optimal health from the inside out, by identifying individual needs and addressing key issues that prevent them from looking and feeling their best. Circle No. 639

Gator Whey from 8-Ball Nutrition replenishes fluids and electrolytes while encouraging an anabolic response. It delivers six grams of whey protein and is available in three refreshing flavors: lemonade, orange, and strawberry. Gator Whey is made with a collegiatecompliant formula and is certified free of banned substances. Visit 8-Ball Nutrition online to learn more. Circle No. 637 Austin Plastics & Supply 800-290-1025 www.athleticrecordboards.com Athletic record boards are effective tools for motivating your athletes to do their best. Visit Austin’s Web site to view examples of boards for various sports, off-season strength and conditioning record boards, player-ofthe-week boards, goal boards, and all types of recognition boards. Engraved record nameplates are available, or you can print your own using perforated card stock supplied by the company. Custom boards are also available. Circle No. 638

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Cho-Pat 800-221-1601 www.cho-pat.com Cho-Pat’s newest product, the Bicep/ Triceps Cuff, affords protection from overuse injuries for individuals performing repetitive lifting in activities such as weight training. This patent-pending device applies dynamic circumference pressure to the upper and lower portions of the biceps and triceps muscles, particularly at the tendon attachments. This action spreads out the stress and direct pull on the muscle attachments, which helps reduce the likelihood of developing bicipital and tricipital tendonitis or tendonosis. Circle No. 640 Egg Whites International 877-EGG-WHITES www.eggwhitesint.com Healthy, 100-percent pure Liquid Egg Whites are pasteurized and tested for salmonella, making them liquid but not “raw.” They’re double-filtered to achieve the smooth consistency of milk and are completely tasteless and odorless, so they can be used to make the perfect protein drink. Eight ounces supply 26 grams of protein with no fat, no choles-

terol, two grams of carbs, 120 calories, and all the essential amino acids. Call or go online to learn more. Circle No. 641 G&W Heel Lift, Inc. 800-235-4387 www.gwheellift.com If your patients are suffering from lowerextremity misalignment, Varus/Valgus wedges are just what you need to reduce pronation and supination. G&W’s V/V wedges come in comfortable six- and nine-degree angles and are recommended for athletes with the following syndromes: hyperpronation of the foot, shin splints, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, chronic ankle instability, tibialis posterior tears, adult flat foot, chronic lateral compartment knee syndromes, plantar fasciitis, and subtalar instability. Circle No. 642 Gebauer Co. 800-321-9348 www.gebauer.com Gebauer’s Instant Ice® non-prescription skin refrigerant can be used like ice for minor pain and swelling from sprains, strains, bruising, contusions, and minor sports injuries. Gebauer’s Instant Ice is ideal for facilities that restrict the use of flammable components. It is available in a mist spray or stream spray aerosol can, and can be purchased directly from Gebauer by calling the company or visiting its Web site. Circle No. 643 Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch® topical anesthetic skin refrigerant replaces Gebauer’s Fluori-Methane, which has been discontinued. Use Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch fine stream spray in conjunction with the spray and stretch technique to effectively manage myofascial pain, restricted motion, trigger points, muscle spasms, and minor sports injuries. The product is non-flammable and available only by prescription. It can be purchased through your medical supplier or wholesaler, or directly from Gebauer. Circle No. 644 T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY CIRCLE#

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Accelerated Care Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Active Ankle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 American Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Antibody (The BodyGuard) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Aqualift/Sports Innovations. . . . . . . . . . 107 AthletiClean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Austin Plastics & Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Avazzia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 BioMedical Life Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Boiron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 BSN Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 BushwalkerBags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 C.H.E.K. Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer (DM Systems). . 57 California University of Pennsylvania . . 44 Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Cramer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Creative Health Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Dynatron X5 Turbo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IBC efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym. . . . . . . . . 5 Egg Whites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 EightBall Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 evoSHIELD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 FitBALL USA (Ball Dynamics) . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Fitnessrubber.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Fitter International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Flexall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 G&W Heel Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Gebauer Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 General Tools & Instruments. . . . . . . . . . 76 Gilman Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

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661 . . . 638 . . . 639 . . . 640 . . . 611 . . . 641 . . . 637 . . . 636 . . . 612 . . . 642 . . . 643 . . . 644 . . . 645 . . . 613 . . . 618 . . . 614 . . . 615 . . .

Aqualift/Sports Innovations. . . . . . . . . . 125 Austin Plastics & Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 C.H.E.K. Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Cho-Pat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Creative Health Products . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Egg Whites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 EightBall Nutrition (Gator Whey) . . . . . . . 121 EightBall Nutrition (Recovery Mix) . . . . . . 121 Fitnessrubber.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 G&W Heel Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Gebauer (Instant Ice) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Gebauer (Spray and Stretch) . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Gilman Gear (King Crab Sled) . . . . . . . . . . 123 Gilman Gear (Mobility Arch). . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Keiser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

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Accelerated Care (Neuroprobe 500 Pro). . 104 Accelerated Care (Omnistim FX2 Pro) . . . 100 Accelerated Care Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Active Ankle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Active Ankle (Volt ankle brace) . . . . . . . . . . 100 American Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 American Red Cross (CPR/AED) . . . . . . 104 Antibody (double shoulder sleeve) . . . . . . . . 104 Antibody (knee brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Ari-Med (Flexall) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Ari-Med (Bushwalker Bags) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Ari-Med (Flexall 454) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 AthletiClean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 AthletiClean (Pro Tex Sport) . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Avazzia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Avazzia (BEST-RSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Avazzia (Med-Sport) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Ball Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Biofreeze®/Hygenic Performance Health . . 108 BioMedical Life (BioStim NMS+) . . . . . . . . 106 BioMedical Life Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Boiron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Boiron (Sportenine). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 BSN Medical (Coverlet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 BSN Medical (Lightplast Pro) . . . . . . . . . . 106 Bushwalker Bags (Diversa Products) . . . . . 87 California University of Pennsylvania . . 86 Cramer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Cramer (Power Lacer ankle brace) . . . . . . . . 100 CytoSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 CytoSport (Collegiate Performance Drink). . 106 CytoSport (Muscle Milk RTD) . . . . . . . . . . . 106 DM Systems (AnkleTough) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 DM Systems (Cadlow) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Dynatronics (Dynatron X5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Dynatronics (taping stations) . . . . . . . . . . . 107 efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym . . . . . . . . . . 97

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142 . . . 145 . . . 191 . . . 133 . . . 176 . . . 109 . . . 173 . . . 185 . . . 108 . . . 136 . . . 160 . . . 120 . . . 116 . . . 182 . . . 101 . . . 162 . . . 124 . . . 105 . . . 190 . . . 184 . . . 129 . . . 107 . . . 122 . . . 106 . . . 178 . . . 111 . . . 127 . . . 151 . . . 161 . . . 114 . . . 188 . . .

Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Hibiclens (Molnlycke Health Care). . . . . . . . . 71 Hibistat (Molnlycke Health Care) . . . . . . . . . . 70 HQ, Inc. (CorTemp system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Hydrate, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 HydroWorx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15 Hyland’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Jump Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Keiser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Kneebourne Therapeutic . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Kore Kooler (Morning Pride). . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Lebert Equalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Magister Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 MAXX Football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 McDavid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Medical Specialties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 MET-Rx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Mueller Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Muscle Milk (CytoSport) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BC NASM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 NCCPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Neuro Resource Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 NormaTec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 NSCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . 105 Oakworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 ONS Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Outdoor Boss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Perform Better (seminars) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

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PHI Pilates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Power Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Premier Software (Simtrak) . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 PRO Orthopedic Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 ProMera Health (Con-Cret) . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 ProMera Health (AminoActiv) . . . . . . . . . . . 66 PROTEAM by Hausmann. . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Redwood Toxicology Laboratory . . . . . . 43 Rogers Athletic (Pendulum) . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Rogers Athletic (Brute Rack). . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Samson Weight Equipment . . . . . . . . . . 113 Save-A-Tooth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Shuttle Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 SPRI Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 StaphAseptic by Tec Labs . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Stromgren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Swede-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 SwimEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Thera-Band®/Hygenic Performance Health® . 7 Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 TurfCordz/NZ Mfg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 VersaClimber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Waterboy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Watkins, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IFC WerkSan Barbells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Whitehall Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Wilson Case. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

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646 . . . 616 . . . 617 . . . 619 . . . 648 . . . 647 . . . 650 . . . 649 . . . 620 . . . 652 . . . 651 . . . 633 . . . 653 . . . 632 . . . 623 . . . 622 . . . 624 . . .

Lane Gainer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Lebert Equalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Lebert Equalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 MAXX Football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 MET-Rx (Metamyosyn XXL Blend) . . . . . . . . 123 MET-Rx (RTD Nutrition Shake). . . . . . . . . . . 123 NASM (Corrective Exercise Specialist) . . . . . 123 NASM (Performance Enhancement) . . . . . . . 123 NCCPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Oakworks (Portable Taping Table) . . . . . . . . 123 Oakworks (PowerLine treatment tables) . . . . 123 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Outdoor Boss (Coil Boss) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Outdoor Boss (product launch) . . . . . . . . . 119 Power Lift (4 Way Neck) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Power Lift (Dual Stack Functional Trainer) . . 117 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

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654 . . . 655 . . . 626 . . . 625 . . . 627 . . . 628 . . . 656 . . . 629 . . . 634 . . . 621 . . . 657 . . . 658 . . . 659 . . . 660 . . . 630 . . . 635 . . . 631 . . .

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PROTEAM by Hausmann. . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Redwood Toxicology Laboratory . . . . . 124 Rogers Athletic (Monster Glute Ham) . . . . . . . 117 Rogers Athletic (Pendulum Power Squat Pro) . . 117 Samson (Belt Squat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Samson (Combo/Decline Bench). . . . . . . . . 118 Save-A-Tooth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 SPRI Products (Blue Dead Weight Ball). . . 118 SPRI Products (product launch) . . . . . . . . 119 TurfCordz/NZ Mfg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 UCS (Elite Plyo-Safe boxes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 UCS (Plyo-Safe G2 boxes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 VersaClimber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Watkins, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 WerkSan Barbells (Custom Training Plates) . .118 WerkSan Barbells (product launch) . . . . . 119 WerkSan Barbells (training sets) . . . . . . . 118

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565 . . . 512 . . . 551 . . . 513 . . . 585 . . . 514 . . . 515 . . . 594 . . . 516 . . . 586 . . . 587 . . . 517 . . . 552 . . . 518 . . . 519 . . . 608 . . . 520 . . . 589 . . . 590 . . . 521 . . . 595 . . . 591 . . . 592 . . . 522 . . . 555 . . . 556 . . . 593 . . . 557 . . . 523 . . . 558 . . . 596 . . . 524 . . . 597 . . . 598 . . . 559 . . . 525 . . . 526 . . .

efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym (Scrunch) . . 103 evoSHIELD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Fitter International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 General Tools & Instruments. . . . . . . . . . 88 General Tools & Instruments (WBGT) . . 107 Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Hibiclens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Hibiclens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 HQ, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 HQ, Inc. (CorTemp system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Hydrate, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 HydroWorx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 HydroWorx (5000 Series) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Hygenic Performance Health . . . . . . . . . 90 Hyland’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Hyland’s (Bioplasma) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Keiser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Keiser (Air300 Runner) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Kneebourne (Elite Seat). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Kneebourne Therapeutic . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 KoreKooler (Morning Pride) . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Magister (Eggsercizer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Magister (REP Bands) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 McDavid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 McDavid (Dual Density HexPad) . . . . . . . . . 102 Medical Specialties (ASO EVO). . . . . . . . 102 Medical Specialties (Patellavator) . . . . . . 108 Mueller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Neuro Resource Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Neuro Resource Group (Dual Flex Array). 102 Neuro Resource Group (InterX) . . . . . . . 109 NormaTec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 NSCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 NSCA Certification (Resistance Training) . . . . 110 NSCA Certification (Strength/Conditioning) . . 103 ONS Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Perform Better (Plyo-Safe G2 Boxes) . . . . 102 PHI Pilates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Power Systems (Functional Training Board) . 110 Premier Software (Simtrak) . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 PRO Orthopedic (130/130A Knee Sleeves) . 110 PRO Orthopedic (611 Ankle Anchor) . . . . . . 103 PRO Orthopedic Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Pro-Tec (Ice Up) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 ProMera Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 ProMera Health (AminoActiv) . . . . . . . . . . 110 ProMera Health (Con-Cret) . . . . . . . . . . . 110 PROTEAM by Hausmann. . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Shuttle Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Shuttle Systems (2000-1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 SPRI Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 StaphAseptic by Tec Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 StaphAseptic by Tec Labs (free materials) . . 111 Stromgren (190SP Knee Protector) . . . . . . . 110 Stromgren (329 Ankle Support) . . . . . . . . . 110 Swede-O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Swede-O (X8 ankle brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 SwimEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 SwimEx (900T model) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Thera-Band®/Hygenic Performance Health 102 Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Townsend Design (Premier) . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Waterboy Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Whitehall Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Whitehall Manufacturing (Slant Back) . . . 111 Wilson Case. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Wilson Case (TablePro) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 WissTech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111


MORE PRODUCTS Gilman Gear 800-243-0398 www.gilmangear.com The King Crab Sled develops power at the height of a player coming out of a stance. The special elevated handlebar allows a player to drive the sled in a posture that simulates game conditions. An athlete can generate force more efficiently when operating from a power position. Develop strength and power in the three most important joints: the knees, ankles, and hips. Use it to increase work capacity and pillar strength. It’s also excellent for general physical preparation. Circle No. 645 Lane Gainer 800-443-8946 www.lanegainer.com Lane Gainer offers Gorilla™ agility hurdles. Convenience is the primary feature of these highly visible orange hurdles. They can be stacked and carried “briefcase style,” and they’re easy to store. The hurdles have a synthetic edge, making them ideal for indoor or outdoor use, and the collapsible design makes them safe for any athlete. Gorilla hurdles are very affordable, and are available in three sizes: three inches, six inches, and 12 inches. A carrying tote bag is also available. The three-inch hurdles cost just $8. Circle No. 646

Check out

www.AthleticBid.com to contact these companies. TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

MET-Rx 800-996-3879 www.metrx.com MET-Rx’s RTD Nutrition Shake is pre-mixed and ready to drink. It provides 18 grams of protein and supports recovery and energy balance. This shake comes in two flavors (vanilla and chocolate), and team discounts are available. Circle No. 647 MET-Rx Metamyosyn XXL Blend drink mix can be combined with water or milk to create a delicious beverage that offers excellent protein/fat and carb/protein ratios. MET-Rx products are made according to guidelines established by the most recognized governing body of collegiate athletics. Each serving contains 770 calories and 57 grams of protein. Circle No. 648 NASM 800-460-6276 www.nasm.org/pes Outperform the competition with the updated Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES) advanced specialization. Learn cutting-edge performance assessment techniques and sport-specific program design. The course content is now delivered 100percent online, with a brand new NASM look and feel. Course materials and the exam can be purchased separately, and an optional Print On-Demand manual and Burn On-Demand CD-ROM are now available at additional costs with the course purchase. Circle No. 649 NASM’s Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES) advanced specialization provides you with evidence-based knowledge, skills, and abilities to achieve superior results with clients

suffering from musculoskeletal impairments, imbalances, and post-rehabilitation concerns. Comprising nine modules that cover advanced corrective topics such as movement assessment, inhibitory techniques, muscle activation techniques, and common musculoskeletal impairments, the CES integrates innovative science and solutions for optimal success. Go online to find out more. Circle No. 650 Oakworks 800-916-4603 www.oakworks.com Strong, stable, and remarkably durable, PowerLine treatment tables are in a league of their own, with a massive 500-pound weight capacity. The solid hardwood construction with heavyduty hardware ships partially assembled, resists humidity, and will continue to promote your professional image year after year. Choose a 27-inch or 30-inch wide Hbrace, and a flat rectangular or manual back rest top with an optional storage shelf and 20 upholstery colors. Circle No. 651 With a 500-pound weight capacity, the Oakworks Portable Taping Table is one of the strongest and most durable taping tables on the market. Fully portable, this table provides an ideal sideline evaluation and taping station both at home and on the road. Plus, with independently adjustable legs and unique field feet, the Portable Taping Table can handle any uneven surface or rugged terrain without a problem. Circle No. 652

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MORE PRODUCTS Outdoor Boss 888-463-5699 www.outdoorboss.com

PROTEAM® by Hausmann 888-428-7626 www.proteamtables.com

Redwood Toxicology Laboratory 866-577-8886 www.redwoodtoxicology.com

It’s no wonder why Outdoor Boss is a leader in water drinking systems for sports teams. Look what the company has designed now. The new Coil Boss drinking system has all the great features at an unbelievable price. The specially designed coil is like no other. The Coil Boss lid will fit almost any cooler. Check it out online. Circle No. 653

PROTEAM® by Hausmann offers athletic trainers a complete line of laminate treatment furniture designed to enhance the functional capacity and appearance of the athletic training room. PROTEAM Modular Taping Stations are available in a wide variety of sizes and with many options. The individual taping units are finished on all sides and can be easily repositioned to fit your needs now and in the future. Go online to see the company’s wide selection of quality products. Circle No. 654

Redwood Toxicology Laboratory (RTL) offers comprehensive, low-cost drug and alcohol testing options. The laboratory’s services include urine drug testing, steroid testing, EtG/EtS alcohol testing, oral fluid drug testing, and more. RTL also sells Reditest® instant on-site drug testing products, which are some of the highest quality and most cost-effective devices in the industry. For home use, RTL offers the Reditest® home drug test and Reditest® alcohol breath test. Circle No. 655 Save-A-Tooth® 888-788-6684 www.save-a-tooth.com Without proper care, a knocked-out tooth begins to die in 15 minutes. The Save-A-Tooth emergency tooth pre-

STAY CONNECTED, STAY CURRENT...DAILY DAILY Training & Conditioning has developed an innovative Web site to keep you in touch with issues facing sports medicine and fitness professionals

News items on injury treatment and strength/conditioning, updated daily Bonus editorial not found in the pages of Training & Conditioning Downloadable MRSA educational posters Help with researching products and vendors

Archives of articles from past issues Search function to find articles and research published on other related sports medicine and conditioning Web sites

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MORE PRODUCTS serving system utilizes Hank’s Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) to not only preserve, but also reconstitute many of the degenerated cells. The patented basket and net container are designed to protect tooth root cells. This is the only system that keeps tooth cells alive for up to 24 hours. Circle No. 656 UCS, Inc. 800-526-4856 www.ucsspirit.com UCS Strength and Speed’s fully padded Elite Plyo-Safe boxes offer the ultimate combination of durability, stability, and safety, providing protection from common plyo box injuries. The understructure is made of 3/4-inch oak covered in a dense foam and upholstered in tough 38-ounce vinyl. A raised lip on all the boxes allows for stacking and locking of the lids. The 24-inch box is bottomed with 3/4-inch high-density rubber for stability. Circle No. 657 UCS Strength and Speed’s Plyo-Safe G2 boxes provide a lightweight, safe, and sturdy option for your plyometric routines. An extralarge landing surface (30” x 36”) is covered in durable 21-ounce vinyl. The 100-percent foam core will not break down, delaminate, or soften over time. Handles allow for quick repositioning. Each box has three two-inch strips of Velcro™ to enable stacking and prevent slipping during use. Circle No. 658 VersaClimber 800-237-2271 www.versaclimber.com Exervibe is a whole-body vibration stepper that provides athletic enhancement when used in either the static (standing) or dynamic (pedaling) TR AINING-CONDITIONING.COM

position. Vibration is applied to the feet, hands, arms, and core simultaneously. The Exervibe is a cardio stepper and a vibration trainer in one. It has a step range from one to 18 inches, an adjustable seat, and a control module with four different settings. It is an extremely versatile device that efficiently and effectively implements the benefits of vibration. Circle No. 659

COMPANY NEWS

Get All Your Fitness Rubber Products in One Place Fitnessrubber.com is a unique new fitness Web site offering an opportunity for training and conditioning professionals to purchase all their fitness rubber needs at “Manufacturer Direct Pricing” with no middle man.

Watkins, Inc. 800-243-9423 www.JRWatkins.com For 140 years, Watkins has been America’s pioneer in natural living, utilizing the finest natural ingredients in its products. To this day, Watkins adheres strictly to the same quality standards set forth by company founder J.R. Watkins. Through its topical analgesics, first aid, and natural personal care offerings, Watkins continues to provide products that are good for the earth, good for others, and good for you. Circle No. 660 Sports Innovations 800-288-3954 www.sportsltd.com Every athlete needs water, and the Aqualift portable drinking system delivers—for children on the playing field and professionals in the NFL alike. Aqualift is one of the finest hydration systems on the market, and is made with only top-quality materials. It continues to be the hydration unit of choice for many pro, college, and high school athletic teams worldwide. Each 10-gallon Aqualift includes four drinking hoses (with stacking capabilities), plus a battery with a charger. Circle No. 661

The site offers one of the largest everexpanding product selections in the industry, with everything from rubber flooring to free weights. Some of the major-brand products available include Kraiburg Solid Rubber Olympic Bumper Plates, Kraiburg-Sportec Rolled Rubber Flooring, FLEXGARD Interlocking Fitness Tiles, FLEXGARD EVA Dojo Interlocking Mats, and FLEXGARD Rubber Coated Cast Iron Olympic Weight Plates, to name a few. If you are looking for a one-stop shop to purchase rubber flooring, free weights, racks, barbells, and bars, Fitnessrubber.com has exactly what you need. In addition to excellent savings, log on now to receive a $20 discount on your initial Web site order over $100.

Fitnessrubber.com 8525 Dunwoody Pl. Atlanta, GA 30335 888-894-0204 Fax: 866-747-0150 www.Fitnessrubber.com T&C MAY/JUNE 2008

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COMPANY Q&A

Kinesio Tape: A Better Alternative for Many Applications Kelly May is a Marketing Assistant at OPTP with a background in sports medicine. As a member of the company’s New Product Review Board, she takes part in evaluating new products and resources to ensure that they meet OPTP’s quality standards.

Can we start with a little background on OPTP? OPTP has been around for more than 30 years, providing affordable rehab and fitness tools and the knowledge to achieve healthy living. We have established relationships with some of the most renowned names in fitness and healthcare, many of whom trust only OPTP to offer their products and publications. Since you work so closely with industry experts, you must know: What is an area that’s increasing in popularity? Taping, especially Kinesio taping, is becoming more popular. There are new resources available and it is becoming more widely used than before. What exactly does Kinesio tape do? Kinesio tape is a specific type of tape used with the Kinesio Taping Method. This method works with the body and does not restrict movement like a lot of other taping techniques. It gives support but also rehabilitates the affected area in the patient or athlete. The Kinesio method involves specific taping procedures to correct muscle function and improve blood and lymph circulation. The tape is made of 100-percent cotton and is latexfree, which makes it safe for sensitive skin and for populations ranging from pediatric to geriatric. It has the approximate weight and thickness of skin, and after wearing it for 10 minutes the athlete won’t even perceive it is there. It’s comfortable to wear for three to five days at a time and the water-resistant fabric allows the athlete to bathe or swim as usual. What kinds of injuries can Kinesio taping help?

OPTP 3800 Annapolis Ln. #165 Minneapolis, MN 55447 800-367-7393 customerservice@optp.com www.optp.com 126

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Kinesio taping is a great modality for a number of clinical conditions, including carpal tunnel syndrome, plantar fasciitis, and even chronic swelling and lymphoedema. Because of how the adhesive is applied to the back of the tape, it can help with

swelling by microscopically lifting the skin so the excess fluid can be removed from the area. How is it different from traditional athletic taping? Conventional athletic taping is designed to restrict the movement of the affected muscles and joints. Kinesio tape was designed with the movement of the fascia in mind and so it facilitates, rather than restricts, normal biomechanics. As a result, it won’t interfere with activities. Kinesio tape can be used to assist in the positioning of muscle tissue, fascia tissue, or joints to add functional support without losing range of motion. Are there different types of Kinesio tape? OPTP carries four different colors of Kinesio Tex tape: beige, black, blue, and red. There is no physical or chemical difference between the colors. How can our readers learn more about the Kinesio Taping Method? In the OPTP catalog, you will find a variety of Kinesio taping books. We have recently added three new books on Kinesio taping: Kinesio Taping for Lymphoedema and Chronic Swelling, Acupressure Taping and Kinesio Taping in Pediatrics, and Fundamentals and Whole Body Taping. Do you carry other kinds of tape as well? Yes. We carry Endura Sports Tape, Endura Fix Tape, Leukotape-P, CoverRoll Stretch, and Kendall Wet-Pruf waterproof tape.

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WEB NEWS Accept No Imitations: The Adams USA Site Has It All The Adams USA Web site has information on products, equipment fitting, field layouts, and base installation. Pictures, descriptions, and product measurements are available for many products, including Trace Pads, Neumann Gloves, Bucks Belts, Bolco Bases, and Bac-Shield™. The News section has current information on topics like MRSA, Adams sponsorships, and awards. Adams USA does not sell to the general public, but offers an online dealer search for product purchases. You can download current catalogs and brochures from the site, and also send questions, requests for information, and suggestions through the Contact Us link. Adams USA strives to meet the needs of athletes from youth to the pro ranks, and works to make its site as user-friendly as possible.

www.adamsusa.com Discover the World of FitBALL® Online The brand that’s synonymous with exercise balls is now making a further impact in the fitness and rehab markets with new products for balance training, strength training, Pilates, functional training, massage therapy, and education. Go online to see the entire FitBALL® line of professional-quality products, including the new FitBALL Roller, FitBALL SoftMeds, FitBALL Sport, and FitBALL Tubing. The company’s user-friendly site has information for prospective wholesale customers as well as links for consumers who want to visit online FitBALL dealers. Sign up for the monthly eNewsletter, the Health Bounce, which is filled with health and fitness articles as well as new product announcements.

www.fitball.com Personal Training Products and Resources Available Online The National Council for Certified Personal Trainers offers a variety of educational courses, fitness products, and services to help train people effectively and efficiently. Job postings and listings are available on the council’s Web site. While online, you can also sign up for a free newsletter and receive fitness tips.

www.nccpt.com See Outstanding Strength Equipment at Life Fitness’s Site For more than 30 years, Life Fitness has been a global leader in designing and manufacturing a full line of reliable, high-quality fitness equipment. The Life Fitness Web site is a one-stop destination geared toward the needs of fitness facilities. It provides in-depth product information, key performance features, and specifications on Life Fitness cardio, strength, and Hammer Strength products to guide you in your purchasing decisions. Detailed information on the company, including articles, press releases, facility showcases, printable brochures, career opportunities, and more are all available online.

www.lifefitness.com Check Out Elite Resistance Products on NZ’s Site TurfCordz resistance products by NZ Mfg. meet the demands of high-level athletic training. Leading professional sports teams and international Olympians train with TurfCordz for explosive start drills and power-building footwork to enhance performance through resistance. Visit the company’s Web site to view NZ’s extensive line of TurfCordz, StrechCordz, and MediCordz resistance products. You can purchase products, request a catalog, access usage guide brochures, receive overstock item discounts, and get free UPS Ground shipping to the contiguous U.S. on any order placed through the site (certain restrictions may apply).

www.nzmfg.com ONS Performance Is Your Source for Sports Nutrition Products and Info ONS Performance’s new Web site offers not only great-tasting, top-quality sports nutrition products, but also valuable information for today’s athletes. Check out the Articles page to learn about adolescent strength and conditioning, metabolic training for soccer athletes, and more. Don’t miss the amazing before and after photos of professional MMA boxer Thor Skancke— learn how ONS Performance products helped him optimize his performance and improve his fighting endurance. Finally, don’t worry about the safety of your nutrition products again: Go to the Certification page, enter your batch number, and see the certification letter.

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T&C May/June 2008 Volume XVIII, No. 4

Training & Conditioning is pleased to provide NATA and NSCA members with the opportunity to earn continuing education units through reading issues of the magazine. The following quiz is based on articles that appear in this issue of Training & Conditioning. By satisfactorily completing the quiz and mailing it to MAG, Inc., readers can earn 2.0 BOC Athletic Training and 0.2 NSCA (two hours) continuing education units.

Instructions: Fill in the circle on the answer form (on page 130) that represents the best answer for each of the questions below. Complete the form at the bottom of page 130, include a $25 payment to MAG, Inc., and mail it by July 30, 2008 to the following address: MAG, Inc., ATTN: T&C 18.4 Quiz, 31 Dutch Mill Road, Ithaca, NY 14850. Readers who correctly answer 70 percent of the questions will be notified of their earned credit by mail within 30 days. Showing What You’re Worth (page 6) Objective: Learn how an end-of-season report summarizing services completed by your athletic training department can prove beneficial.

Objective: Learn how the right balance of low impact training in athletes’ off-seasons can benefit them much more than too much rest or too much high impact training.

1. This article says a crucial decision-making time for athletic departments is: a) When problems occur. b) The end of the fiscal year. c) The beginning of the season. d) The end of the season.

6. This article suggests beginning the off-season: a) With high intensity strength training. b) With some type of active rest. c) After two months of complete rest. d) Two weeks before the next season.

2. A season breakdown should include: a) How many athletes were treated, how many referrals were made, and the number of injuries requiring surgery. b) Cost averages per treatment. c) The number of injuries prevented and number of injuries sustained. d) Next year’s budget request.

7. Metzgar-Deacon indicates it is important to _____ when dealing with female athletes. a) Design muscle mass building programs. b) Emphasize strength training. c) Emphasize weight bearing cardiovascular workouts such as treadmill running. d) Realize the importance females place on body image.

3. One purpose of including a finance section in an end-ofseason report is to: a) Highlight just how cost-effective and valuable your services are. b) Show how underpaid your department is. c) Gain a budget increase for your department. d) Show how many hours of service your department provided.

8. What is one activity Metzgar-Deacon suggests to cut down on unnecessary pounding? a) Jogging. b) Jumping rope. c) Hydrotherapy. d) Tennis.

A Different Route (pages 16-26) Objective: See how three athletic trainers have blazed new trails in taking different paths to their current positions. 4. Changes in the 90’s that put new demands on collegiate sports medicine staffs include: a) Growth of men’s contact sports and insurance issues. b) Changes in student supervision requirements. c) Growth of women’s sports and insurance issues. d) Fewer athletic trainers entering the profession. 5. The athletic training staff is the athletic department’s first: a) Line of defense, preventing many litigation issues. b) To arrive at an event and first to leave. c) To combine teaching and medicine. d) Mediator between coaches and parents.

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9. Livingston indicates the purpose of his physical screening and assessment process is to: a) Create a baseline so progress can be measured. b) Look for imbalances that may have led to chronic injuries or performance limitations. c) Gather data for research on NHL players. d) Provide the coaching staff with specific measurements and numbers on each player.

Safe From Steroids? (pages 39-49) Objective: Get the latest on steroid testing programs being implemented at the high school and college level. 10. According to an ongoing anonymous self-report study, steroid use among NCAA Division I college athletes was the highest in what year? a) 1979. b) 1989. c) 2001. d) 2005.

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11. In a study called “Monitoring the Future,” what percentage of 12th grade males reported having tried steroids in 2007? a) 1.1. b) 1.7. c) 2.3. d) 4.1.

20. Studies have reported that what percent of maximal oxygen consumption is sufficient to induce EIH? a) 50. b) 60. c) 70. d) 85.

12. One criticism of the NCAA drug testing program is that: a) Just four percent of participants are tested each year. b) Many participants know someone who has been tested, therefore they do not fear they will be tested. c) The drug testing budget required exceeds $170,000. d) Only championship teams are tested.

21. Studies have found that _____ have a higher tolerance for pain than _____. a) People with chronic untreated hypertension; people with normal blood pressure. b) People doing low back exercises; people doing leg exercises. c) People with less than five percent body fat; people with greater than give percent body fat. d) People over the age of 40; people under the age of 40.

Unmasking Pain (pages 51-57) Objective: Take a deeper look at the physical and mental sides of pain, as well as the concept of exercise-induced hypoalgesia. 13. Type III pain fibers are also known as: a) A-Delta fibers. b) B-Delta fibers. c) C-Delta fibers. d) D-Delta fibers. 14. Type III fibers primarily respond to what? a) Structural deformation and mechanical pressure. b) Hot and cold sensation. c) Sharp and dull sensation. d) Muscle contractions and proprioception. 15. Type IV fibers are: a) Responsive to structural deformation. b) Associated with a sharp, piercing pain. c) Thick and myelinated. d) Thin and un-myelinated. 16. The release of histamine and other substances can: a) Shut down nearby nociceptors. b) Stimulate the release of seratonin. c) Activate nearby nociceptors. d) Stimulate the healing process and healing speed. 17. One drawback of using analgesic drugs is that: a) They inhibit the healing process. b) They prolong the recovery time. c) They can mask functional pain. d) Subjective pain reports are altered. 18. Athletes may be better able to deal with pain due to: a) A minor injury and therefore minimal perceived pain. b) Extreme motivation. c) Exercise-induced hypoalgesia. d) Excitability-induced hypoalgesia. 19. What is one contributing factor to the occurrence of EIH? a) An increase in catecholamines. b) A decrease in blood pressure. c) A decrease in endorphins. d) Mental imagery.

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22. Pain can be diminished when rubbing an area due to unmyelinated _____. a) A-fibers. b) B-fibers. c) C-fibers. d) E-fibers. 23. What theory holds that the actual number of painful impulses reaching the brain is reduced when multiple sources of sensory input are introduced simultaneously? a) Speed Control Theory. b) Inhibition Theory. c) Gate Control Theory. d) Thunder Theory.

No Stopping ’Em (pages 59-64) Objective: See how a top-ranked women’s college soccer team makes the most of its players’ aerobic workouts and movement drills. 24. During a typical 90-minute soccer game, elite-level players run approximately how many miles? a) Two. b) Four. c) Six. d) Eight. 25. In a recent study from Norway, aerobically trained athletes average: a) Less distance coverage but more contact with the ball. b) Three times more sprints per game but less contact with the ball. c) Fewer sprints per game, greater distances, but less contact with the ball. d) Twice as many sprints per game, greater distances, and more contact with the ball.

Answer sheet is on page 130

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CEU QUIZ

ANSWER FORM

Instructions: Fill in the circle on the answer form below that represents your selection of the best answer for each of the previous questions. Complete the form at the bottom of this page, include a $25 payment to MAG, Inc., and mail it to the following address: MAG, Inc., ATTN: T&C 18.4 Quiz, 31 Dutch Mill Road, Ithaca, NY 14850, no later than July 30, 2008. Readers who correctly answer 70 percent of the questions will receive 2.0 BOC Athletic Training and 0.2 NSCA (two hours) CEU’s, and will be notified of their earned credit by mail within 30 days.

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No Stopping ’Em

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Last Name ____________________________________ First Name _______________________________ MI______ Title ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________________________ State _________ Zip Code _____________________ Daytime Telephone ( _________ ) ________________________________________ E-Mail Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ Payment Information

❏ $25 check or money order (U.S. Funds only) payable to: MAG, Inc. (please note “T&C 18.4 Quiz” on check) ❏ Visa

❏ Mastercard

❏ Discover

❏ American Express

Account Number _______________________________________________ Expiration Date ____________________ Name on Card _____________________________________ Signature ______________________________________

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OVERTIME

Next Stop: Web Site Our editorial continues on www.Training-Conditioning.com Here is a sampling of what’s posted right now:

WEEKLY BLOGS Serving Up Support

MONTHLY FEATURES Q&A with Jenny Moshak

When the Brigham Young University volleyball team donned pink bracelets this year, it was not just to raise awareness for breast cancer research. It was to support their athletic trainer, Gaye Merrill, MS, ATC, who is battling the disease.

It isn’t everyday a college athletic trainer is heralded in a front-page story in USA Today. But Jenny Moshak, MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS, Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Medicine at the University of Tennessee, recently found herself in the media spotlight as she helped to rehab All-American forward Candace Parker in the midst of the Lady Volunteers’ run to their eighth national championship.

World Wide Workouts If you liked what Ryan Johnson, CSCS, Strength and Conditioning Coach at Wayzata High School in Plymouth, Minn., had to say in “Take a Load Off,” (on page 29 of this issue), check out his blog on how to develop a Web site for strength and conditioning programs.

Lacrosse Injury Breakdown Regular contributor Dawn Comstock, PhD, gives T&C readers an inside look at her recent studies on injury rates and trends for high school lacrosse players.

While the concept of a “runner’s high” has been debated for years, a recent study indicates that running and other aerobic activities can indeed elicit a flood of endorphins in the brain. In this feature, we examine the influence exercise can have on human emotions.

www.training-conditioning.com/features.html AP PHOTO| DANNY JOHNSTON

www.training-conditioning.com/blogs.html

Runner’s High Theory Gains Traction

In our current monthly feature, we talk to Jenny Moshak, Athletic Trainer at the University of Tennessee (far right).

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Training & Conditioning 18.4  

2008 NATA CONVENTION ISSUE

Training & Conditioning 18.4  

2008 NATA CONVENTION ISSUE

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