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modern

CONNECTING HOME & SCHOOL

parents

modernparentsmagazine.com

Volume II, Issue II

Volume II, Issue III


your resource for

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“I think it is so important for parents to read to their children and spend time with them.” -Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education

28 Hidden Costs of Parenting

14 Dr. Deborah Jewell-Sherman Harvard University Graduate School of Education

P R E G N A N C Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Exercise and Pregnancy

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I N FA N T / T O D D L E R Literacy Skills

Modern Parents MagazineUnited States Department of Education PARENT POWER Forum

HO M E - S C H O O L R E L AT I O N S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Successful Family-School Relations

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PRESCHOOL ..................................8 Preparing Your Child for Reading

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Musical Icon, Yolanda Adams

26 Word Tic-Tac-Toe

E L E M E N TA RY S C H O O L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Reading Runway MIDDLE SCHOOL

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Preparing for Teen Years

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H I G H S C H O O L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Preparing for College

The Hidden Costs of Parenting C O L L E G E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Finding Employment Options 8 Reading Preparation

SPECIAL NEEDS ADHD

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

M O D E R N E D U C AT O R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Dr. Debra Jewell-Sherman PA R E N T T O O L K I T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Quality Time E N E S PA Ñ O L

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La Importancia’ de Lectura del Verano E D U C AT O R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 0 Kagan M O D E R N PA R E N T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4 Ms. Yolanda Adams modern parents magazine

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PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Carol Alexander-Lewis ADVISORY BOARD

Florence Townsend, Ph.D Belinda Alexander, MD Myrna Nickens, MD Tammie Causey-Konate, Ph.D Adele London, JD Anthony White EDITOR

CONNECTING HOME & SCHOOL

modern parents

modernparentsmagazine.com

About Us

Temia Griffin ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER

Jennifer Davis

The mission of MODERN PARENTS Magazine is to connect home & school and to build parent capacity and efficacy.

VICE-PRESIDENT, MARKETING

Julian Stafford, Ed.D CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Rhodesia Douglas CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Kristin Armstrong Rachel Paxton

Karen Plumley Maria Zain

CONTRIBUTING MEDIA CONSULTANT

Dennis Joseph TRADUCTORA DE ESPAÑOL

Victoria Bastani

NEW ORLEANS OFFICE 2536 Delta Pointe Drive Marrero, LA 70072 504.339.5310

HOUSTON OFFICE 10710 Desert Springs Houston, TX 77095 1.866.994.4242

CHICAGO OFFICE 8515 Constance Avenue Chicago, IL 60617 1.866.994.4242 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Please include your full name, title and contact information. Letters are limited to 200 words and may be edited for space and clarity. Send to info@modernparentsmagazine.com.

SPECIAL THANKS TO: God United States Department of Education Harvard University, Graduate School of Education Southern University at New Orleans David Lewis

MODERN PARENTS welcomes letters, articles, artwork and photographs from our readers and the community. MODERN PARENTS is not responsible for the return of unsolicited materials. MODERN PARENTS Magazine is published quarterly by the National Family Development Institute. 2536 Delta Pointe’ Drive, Marrero, LA 70072. Copyright 2010. Due to audit regulations, any requests for a change of address must be submitted in writing. Other subscription-related inquiries may use the same address, or telephone 504.339.5310/1.866.994.4242. Subscription rates: $24.95 for one year; single copies $6.95. Pre-payment required for single copy orders. Address all single-copy requests and sample inquiries to the above address. Manuscripts must be accompanied by a self addressed envelope and return postage. Publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts of art. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

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MODERN PARENTS provides a fresh, relevant connection between the academic world and the parenting world by providing innovative, research-based parenting strategies and techniques. In addition, we serve as a valuable resource for educators by showcasing Best Practices and the most effective instructional strategies and techniques. Exposing parents to effective instructional strategies not only broadens parenting strategies, but also provides the tools needed to ensure their children are receiving quality educational experiences. MODERN PARENTS Magazine is dedicated to increasing global literacy and enhancing the quality of life for families in our society. Readers gain access to information from expert practitioners and associations. From school to home and all that lies between, MODERN PARENTS is your source for the most innovative parenting and instructional strategies and techniques. MODERN PARENTS Magazine voices the most pertinent issues and concerns of today’s parents. By providing trusted information to our audience, and featuring content that is driven by our readers, MODERN PARENTS is the premier resource and choice for today’s parent. We help parents make better decisions about their most valuable investment ...

their children.


Yolanda Adams and Carol

It is great to discover that those who are an inspiration on grand scales are an equal inspiration on smaller scales. This holds true for Grammy, Dove and Stellar-Award winning singer and radio host, Yolanda Adams. We met with Ms. Adams shortly after one of her altruistic, community endeavors; a toy drive. It was delightful to witness her infectious spirit as she interacted with the audience and contributors. Equally delightful was the opportunity to hear the passion she has for her daughter, Taylor, and parenting in general. Please enjoy.

Bountiful Blessings and Happy Parenting! Carol Alexander-Lewis Publisher clewis@modernparentsmagazine.com

modern parents magazine

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inFants

& toddler s

How Can I Teach Literacy to My Infant or Toddler?

Caregivers play a major role in advancing the language skills of infants and toddlers. Research shows that the more adults talk with infants and toddlers and respond to their vocalizations and babbling, the richer and more powerful the language repertoire of children will be when they become preschoolers. There are many activities caregivers can do with infants and toddlers to promote literacy skills, such as sharing picture books, naming body parts, singing action songs and rhymes, using sign language, playing instruments, playing calling and response games and simply talking to infants and toddlers during daily routines.

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Louisiana Department of Education www.doe.state.la.us


home-sChool relations

Developing a Successful Family-School Relationship Let's consider specific guidelines to help you communicate effectively with your child's teacher. Practice these guidelines, and your child will reap the benefits.

Guideline 2: Communicate the purpose for the conference. If you are requesting the conference, immediately tell the teacher the purpose. This helps to alleviate any preconceived ideas the teacher may have about your request to hold a conference. Guideline 3: Arrange the conference at the teacher's convenience. The teacher now has sufficient time to plan and to have the necessary information at the conference. An unplanned conference can turn out to be a waste of time for both teacher and parent and cause feelings of frustration.

Guideline 1: Identify the purpose for the conference. Is it to become acquainted? Is it to alleviate your concerns about your child's attitude towards reading and school? Is it to receive a report card or test scores? Each of these situations is vastly different and requires different preparation.

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Guideline 4: Plan for the conference. Write out the areas and questions you want the conference to cover. Combine, delete, and clarify these questions; and finally, prioritize them. By using this process, your most important questions will be answered in a clear, succinct manner. Moreover, the teacher's responses will likely be Guideline 5: Restate the purpose of the conference at the onset. Try to stay on the predetermined topic(s) since your time together is limited.

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presChool

Checklist for Parents of Preschoolers

Here are some ways you can help your child “get ready to read” during the ages of 4 and 5.

c I help my child hear and say the first sound in words (like “b” in boat), and notice when different words start with the same sound (like “boat” and “book”). c I help my child hear words that rhyme (like moose, goose, and caboose).

c I point out signs and labels that have letters, like street signs and foods in the grocery store. c I encourage my child to find the joy and fun in reading. Usually, I let my child choose the books we read. c I let my child pretend to read parts of the book when we read together. c I talk with my child about stories and make connections to things that happen in our own lives.

c I introduce new words to my child, like “bow” c I ask “what,” “where,” and “how” questions and “stern,” which mean the front of a boat and when I read with my child to help her follow along and understand the stories. the back of a boat. c I talk with my child about the letters of the al- c I help my child write notes or make books phabet and notice them in books, like “c” for (like an alphabet book), even if his writing only looks like scribbles or marks. canoe.

National Institute for Literacy www.nifl.gov/nifl/publications.html

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elementary sChool

Reading Runway Building a strong foundation is essential for future success in reading and math. Reading Runway offers Pre-K through 3rd grade students new ways to learn the basic skills they need to build upon the lessons learned in school.

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Reading Runway provides reading tutorials for students in grades PreK-3. This resource is designed to help young students develop the skills to become lifelong readers. Through this resource, students go to virtual destinations as they practice their reading skills, and the program encourages the development of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary/oral language, and comprehension. Reading Runway’s Key Features:

J Students can choose a tutorial that best meets their individual reading needs J New reading content is provided in each virtual destination J Colorful, printable reports are provided after each activity

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Activity reports are saved in The Reading Runway program so students can follow their progress.

If your child does not have a user name and password, he or she may sign in as a guest.

Reading Runway is located at http://www.louisianapass.org.

“I think it is so important for parents to read to their children and spend time with them.” -Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education

Louisiana Department of Education www.doe.state.la.us/testing/help/prek_3.html

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middle sChool

Preparing for the Teen Years

Consider using some of these ideas with your adolescent or teenage children who are going through the difficult stages of becoming young adults. Share your values with your teens. Let them know what’s really important to you and help them clarify their own values.

✬Don’t fight the small stuff. Minimize the number of household rules, but stick to the ones you do set. Save major power plays for issues that compromise health and safety or important values, like drinking, drugs and sex. ✬Keep communications honest and open, listening to what’s really going on before jumping to conclusions. Be ready for those unexpected in-between times when your teen wants to talk in the car, doing the dishes or at bedtime. That’s when real closeness develops. ✬Avoid the “20-questions” approach to conversation, which teens find intrusive. At this stage, privacy is very important to them. Instead, engage in open-ended conversations.

✬As teens try to separate from their childish selves, they sometimes feel that your existence is an embarrassment. Don’t take it personally... and do drop them off a block from school or the mall and save your hugs and kisses for private times. ✬Teens sometimes try on behaviors and roles the way we try on clothes. Although it can be scary to watch, these new personas usually don’t last long. ✬Even though it’s tempting to be your teen’s friend, it’s much more important to be the parent, setting reasonable limits and being a force of stability in their lives. ✬Tell teens they can use you as the “bad-guy” excuse for

declining to participate in activities that make them feel uncomfortable. That way, they know you’re cool, but they can pretend you’re not.

✬When offering advice, don’t expect a positive response; you’re more likely to see irritation or disgust. It’s important to know, however, that much of what you say is absorbed anyway, waiting to come out. ✬Encourage teens to exercise and develop their problemsolving and decision making skills by helping them evaluate potential choices and responses to situations. ✬Maintain perspective, being careful not to over-parent and over-manage on the one hand, or to under-parent and under-support on the other.

New Mexico Public Education Department www.ped.state.nm.us www.cesdp.nmhu.edu

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high sChool

Preparing Your Child for College Preparing your child for college begins much earlier than the Junior or Senior years of high school. The courses your child takes now have a big impact on preparation and likelihood for success. Following a few good tips early on will prove invaluable in the near future. Please make sure your child understands the importance of math in elementary school, and encourage your child to take more math, science and critical language courses in high school. In the increasingly competitive global economy, it is crucial for American students to be well-trained in math, science and critical foreign languages. U.S. students are currently performing below their international peers in math and science. The landmark education report, A Nation at Risk, recommended that high school students take a minimum of three years of math and three years of science. Yet today, only 22 states and the District of Columbia require at least this amount. Only 44 percent of American high school students are enrolled in a foreign language class. Less than 50 percent of American high school students study critical foreign languages (such as Arabic, Chinese, Korean, and Russian). G Encourage your elementary school child in his or her math homework. Remind him or her of the importance of learning math for success in high school, college, and beyond. Learn your state's math and science requirements for high school graduation. G Encourage your child to take four years of math and four years of science in high school, even if it is not required. Find out what kind of critical language courses your child's school offers. G Encourage your child's school to offer them and encourage your child to take them. G Encourage your child to take more Advanced Placement (AP) courses in high school.

Advanced Placement courses are classes that high school students take to prepare them for college, or post-secondary education. Students receive actual college credit while still in high school. This opportunity can also help parents financially. The AP courses that students take in high school reduces the number of credit hours they are required to take during the freshman year of college. As a result, students can likely take classes ahead of schedule. This could result in an earlier graduation date, thus saving parents college costs. How does the curriculum of an AP course differ from the "normal" high school course? AP courses provide the equivalent of first-year college introductory courses. Students are given the responsibility to reason, analyze, and understand for themselves. Completing a solid academic core in high school, including the opportunity for AP coursework, was more strongly correlated with a student's attainment of a bachelor's degree than high school test scores, grade point average, or class rank. Current research also indicates a direct positive correlation between AP classes taken in high school and the likelihood of earning a college degree. Only 12 percent of high school students have completed a significant college-prep curriculum. Research shows that students who take rigorous ed.gov courses in high school stand a far greater chance of succeeding in college. AP students are much more likely than their peers to graduate from college in four years or less. The four-year college graduation rate for students who take two or more AP courses is 32 percentage points higher than for those who do not take any AP courses. The rate for students who take just one AP course is 16 percentage points higher than for those who don't take any. Find out what Advanced Placement courses your child's high school offers. Make sure they meet the true definition of Advanced Placement and are not simply "honors" courses. Encourage your child to take Advanced Placement courses. If your child’s school does not offer any, encourage it to do so. U.S.Department of Education www.ed.gov

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College

How to Help Your Child Find Student-Focused Employment Options Is Your Child Working His or Her Way Through College?

headquartered in Tampa, Florida, is a local moving company committed to strong minds. They offer an intensive training and leadership program for their 100% student mover staff as well as a mentorship program with the CEO to further guide and assist students. Local moving companies can work around your child’s schedule while training them in all areas of business management and customer service, maintaining fitness and promoting higher education. They also provide work placement assistance for those who are about to graduate.

The go-to jobs for students looking for part-time and flexible work are usually retail and restaurant. Even so, there are other options available that not only give them a little extra cash during the college years, but also guide them in the right direction after graduation. Consider alternatives that include on-the-job training for students, offer mentorship programs to develop leadership skills, and a great place to network and obtain a promising full-time position upon graduation. Aside from non-paid internships, there are other options if your child must have a paid part-time job or would like to get some work experience on his/her resume. Here are some job opportunities you and your child may not have considered:

Tip: Find a company that cares about education or even donates a portion of their profits to a scholarship fund or community program that may ben efit your child in the future. Strong College Students donates a portion of every move to the Strong Scholars Scholarship Fund which goes toward books and educational expenses.

Try a temp agency. The work varies providing an opportunity to test the waters in many different companies and to meet new people. Depending on one’s school schedule, the hours are flexible and best of all, the pay is generally better. Many temp agencies will also offer assistance with resume and interview tips. After graduation, they can assist with job placement or introduce your child to temp-to-hire positions.

Seek companies committed to future generations. There are companies that provide an education-first working environment for their employees. For instance, Strong College Students,







  

 

 



 

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12 m o d e r n p a r e n t s m a g a z i n e . c o m

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speCial needs

Caring f o r children with ADHD may be challenging, but it is important to remember that these children can learn successfully. It is critical that parents remember that some of their child’s disruptive behavior is a manifestation of the disability and that the challenge is finding ways to help their child change the inappropriate behavior. Key to this is remembering to focus on the need for structure and routine for your child’s daily schedule and thereby reinforcing the importance of learning self-control and selfregulation. The following are suggestions for parents: Focus on discrete rewards and consequences for appropriate and inappropriate behavior: C Tangible rewards and treats; C Movie night for a good week at school; C Removal of privileges; C Time-out from reinforcing activities: the child is essentially removed from situations that foster inappropriate behavior.

Set a daily routine and stick to it. Bedtime and preparation for school are much easier if there is a structure already in place. Have tangible reminders: C A big clock in the bedroom; C Charts for chores; C Assignment pad to record homework and a specific folder to put work in upon completion; C Gain the child’s attention before speaking to him or her. Have the child repeat back directions for things that are really important. Avoid the following: CRepeating patterns of inappropriate behavior followed by ineffective punishment; C Administering consequences without prior warning or without the child understanding why he or she is receiving them; C Responding inconsistently to inappropriate behaviors. ed.gov

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modern eduCator

Dr. Deborah Jewell-Sherman Harvard University, Graduate School of Education

We sat down with Dr. Deborah Jewell-Sherman of the Harvard University, Graduate School of Education to discuss 21st century parental involvement and using parental involvement as a means of improving student achievement. Modern Parents: Do you think technology can be used to improve parental involvement and student achievement? Deborah Jewell-Sherman: I think we all understand that our children come from the womb plugged-in, able to access technology and understand its uses and ramifications in ways that many mature adults grapple with; but, for our young parents and our schoolaged parents, they are connected all too well. They are using technology more and more. For so many parents working one job, sometimes two jobs and working long hours, technology provides a way for them to stay connected with what is going in their child’s school and what’s going on in their child’s life in ways that would not have been an option in the past.

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Websites provide a glimpse of not only the school’s district, but more importantly your child’s school and even your child’s classroom so that without having to make frequent visits you can have a sense of who your child’s teacher is, what services are provided in the school, so that you are apart of your child’s school life. You can do that from your desk during a break at work and know that something exciting is coming up or something really interesting is going on. Technology in general is allowing parents to be better partners because you can be the most effective partner when there is equal information on both sides; or at least when each side is coming up with information. Parents know their children better than anyone. We as educators know their children’s learning styles or modality and how they are behaving with other students. Through technology, we are able to bring the community and resources in so that we all have access to the same information. I think it works very very well with parental involvement, and I’m very excited about it. It’s a tool that will enhance it. Join us as we continue our conversation with Dr. Sherman in the next issue.

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parent toolkit

Quality time can happen at any time or any place. The quality of the time you already spend together can be made even better, by talking with and listening to your child. Driving in the car or riding the bus, walking through the neighborhood or going for an ice cream after dinner are all good times to talk together and stay connected. Children of all ages enjoy having your full attention at bedtime to read or talk together. Reading together provides the opportunity to discuss a variety of issues with your child. Think of ways you can spend quality time with your child/children. What are some ways you can turn chore time into quality time? What are some ways to turn drive time into quality time?

1.______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 2.______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 3.______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 4.______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 5.______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Being a good parent is not about saving time––it is about investing time. Our children need daily encouragement and quality time with us so that they will be strong individuals and successful adults. New Mexico Public Education Department www.ped.state.nm.us www.cesdp.nmhu.edu

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pregnanCy

Exercise During Pregnancy: What You Can Do for a Healthy Pregnancy Is it safe for me to exercise during pregnancy? Check with your doctor to make sure that it's safe for you to exercise during your pregnancy. You may have a medical condition that would make exercise harmful to you or your baby. Exercise might help you feel better and maintain your weight. Exercise can help ease or prevent discomfort during pregnancy. It can also give you extra energy and prepares your body for labor by increasing your stamina and muscle strength. If you have no serious medical problems and you have an uncomplicated pregnancy, it's probably safe for you to do some exercising. How should I start an exercise program? It's best to check with your doctor before starting any exercise program. If your doctor approves, you can start exercising at a level that does not cause pain, shortness of breath or excessive tiredness. You may then slowly increase your activity. If you feel uncomfortable, short of breath or very tired, you should reduce your exercise level. If you have already been exercising, it's easier to keep exercising during pregnancy. If you haven't exercised before, you need to start very slowly. Many women find that they need to slow down their level of exercise during pregnancy. What types of exercise are best when I'm pregnant? The most comfortable exercises are those that don't require your body to bear extra weight. Swimming and stationary cycling are good options. Walking and low-impact aerobics are usually well tolerated. You and your doctor will need to decide what's best for you and your baby. stickler for tracking every fat gram and calorie per day or someone who just wants a rough estimate of her daily nutrient intake, the nutrition facts label is a handy tool. Learn how to use it for foods you eat frequently and anything new that 16 m o d e r n p a r e n t s m a g a z i n e . c o m

you are tempted to incorporate into your regular meal plan. What should I be careful about? Avoid activities that increase your risk of falls or injury, such as contact sports or vigorous sports. Even mild injuries to the stomach area can be serious when you're pregnant. After the first 3 months of pregnancy, it's best to avoid exercising while lying on your back, since the weight of the baby may interfere with blood circulation. Also avoid long periods of standing. When the weather is hot, exercise in the early morning or late evening to help prevent you from getting overheated. If you're exercising indoors, make sure the room has enough ventilation. Consider using a fan to help keep you cool. Drink plenty of fluids, even if you don't feel thirsty. Make sure that you're eating a well balanced diet. Normally, pregnancy increases your food requirements by 300 calories a day, even without exercise. What problems should I tell my doctor about? Listen to your body. Talk to your doctor if you have any of the following symptoms: Blood or fluid coming from your vagina Sudden or severe abdominal or vaginal pain Contractions that go on for 30 minutes after you stop exercising Chest pain Shortness of breath Headache that is severe or won't go away Dizziness and nausea Dim or blurry vision familydoctor.org Thomas W. Wang, M.D. & Barbara S. Apgar, M.D., www.aafp.org/afp/980415ap/wang.html Join us on Facebook.com/modern.parents


Modern Parents Magazine and

The U.S. Department of Education present:

The 2012 PARENT POWER Forum

What is the PARENT POWER Forum?

interact with people who are excited about parent involvement and looking for ways to transform The PARENT POWER Forum schools into parent-friendly is a day of workshops professional learning commupresented by national speaknities. WHEN: ers and experts, as well as March 3, 2012 state and local experts. How will schools benefit Workshops will address edfrom sending a parent? WHERE: ucational, financial and Southern University health issues as they reParents, parent advisors or liat New Orleans late to students and paraisons, and educators who at6400 Press Drive, ents. tend the workshops will learn New Orleans, LA strategies that they can use to What are the benefits of increase parental involvement TIME: attending? at their schools, engage other 9:00 a.m. parents in attending school Attendees will get to see real meetings and activities, and professionals in action, train parents to lead schoollearn how to present their own parent workshops, based capacity building parental involvement activbecome familiar with current issues and best prac- ities. The skills acquired at the conference will help tices in parent involvement, become aware of avail- to form a strong foundation for attendees’ knowlable resources to assist parents in becoming parent edge base and get them fired up to return to schools leaders, get ideas to share with other parents, net- and the community to become an informed catalyst work with individuals who share a like-minded pas- for helping to improve parental involvement and sion for parent involvement, and get a chance to family engagement. modernparentsmagazine

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Dear Parents and Students, On behalf of the Questa Independent School District, Welcome to a new school year. First, I would like to formally introduce myself. I recently served as an administrator in the Chama Valley Schools and Los Lunas School District. Prior to becoming an administrator I was an elementary school teacher for 10 years. I believe I have had success in education. I place a high value on personal integrity and represent both my employer and myself in an ethical and respectable manner. Added to my diligence in paying close attention to detail, as a Superintendent of Schools I will bring focus not only to the value of community, but also quality leadership to the position. Furthermore, I am a hard, smart-working, selfstarter who works equally well in a team environment or individually. It is an honor to serve the Questa, Cerro, Costilla, Amalia, El Rito, Lama, and Red River communities. Mr. Albert Martinez Superintendent Questa Schools

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en español

La Importancia de Lectura del Verano

La importancia de Lectura del verano Aunque el verano pueda significar vacaciones de la sala de clase, debe nunca haber una rotura del desarrollo intelectual. Afortunadamente, muchos niños tienen oportunidades abundant para el verano que aprenden en sus hogares y comunidades, y consecuentemente la mayoría de los cabritos ganan puntos en pruebas estandardizadas a partir de junio a septiembre, incluso si no han entrado en una escuela ni han abierto un libro de textos durante los meses mientras tanto. Este aprendizaje del verano viene de los libros de lectura, canciones del canto, jugando a juegos, escuchando las historias, tomando viajes, y todas las clases de otras actividades de la diversión que los cabritos realicen raramente son realmente buenas para ellas. Preparación por el año escolar próximo Sentir bien a un buenos lector y escritor implica habilidades y práctica. Los estudiantes aprenden y practican estas destrezas durante el año escolar. La práctica debe continuar en junio, julio y agosto. Extremidades Bibliotecas públicas de la visita Librerías de la visita Periódicos de la parte con su niños Sea modelos de la lectura para sus niños.

Source: Infoplease Homework modern parents magazine

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eduCators

Kagan Cooperative Learning Hundreds of research studies show how cooperative learning leads to increased achievement, reduction of the gap between low and high achievers, improved social skills and social relations, improved ethnic relations, increased self-esteem, and greater liking for teacher, school and academic content. Cooperative Learning is a teaching arrangement that refers to small, heterogeneous groups of students working together to achieve a common goal. Students work together to learn and are responsible for their teammates' learning as well as their own. According to the theory of multiple intelligences as set forth by Howard Gardner, each student has his or her own unique pattern of intelligences. These intelligences all can be developed, and students learn best when at least part of the time they have access to the curriculum through their preferred intelligence or intelligences. The Kagan structures realize the highest visions of the multiple intelligences (MI) theory. Kagan and Kagan identify three visions which spring from MI theory: • Matching, • Stretching, • Celebrating. They also identify three different types of learning: 1) Learning the academic content (which is promoted by matching the way we teach with the way students are smart), 2) Learning to develop or stretch the intelligences (which is promoted by engaging all intelligences); and 3) Learning about oneself and others (which is promoted by providing opportunities for students to view, reflect on, and celebrate their own unique pattern of intelligences and that of others).

TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM In the traditional classroom, the teacher asks students to complete a worksheet, either in class or for homework. The teacher then collects the worksheets, grades them, & passes them back to the students.

COOPERATIVE CLASSROOM In the cooperative classroom, the teacher has students work in pairs using RallyCoach, Sage-N-Scribe, or Pairs Check. In RallyCoach, one student does a problem & the partner watches, coaches, and praises. Then the students switch roles.

From Traditional Learning to Cooperative Learning FROM “A good class is a quiet class”

TO “Learning involves healthy noise”

“Keep your eyes on your paper”

“Help your partner solve it”

“Sit quietly”

“Get up and look what others did”

“Talking is cheating”

“Verbalize to learn”

Kagan, S & Kagan, M. Kagan Cooperative Learning. San Clemente, CA: Kagan Publishing, 2009.

20 modern parents magazine

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HOME IMPLEMENTATION Correspondence Sheet

Dear Parent, Please take a few minutes of your valuable time to complete the following correspondence sheet and return to your child’s school or to Modern Parents Magazine (info@modernparentsmagazine.com). This form will document the innovative changes you are making regarding parenting strategies and techniques. We all need, and deserve, a pat on the back for our efforts (just like our kids, right.) This document will allow schools to highlight innovative strategies employed by parents. In addition, feel free to submit this correspondence to MODERN PARENTS Magazine for possible publication in future issues. It is our goal to showcase positive parental involvement. Article(s): Issue

Date

What practices have you implemented at home after reading the above article(s):

What can your child’s school do to increase your personal level of parental involvement?

OPTIONAL: Please provide your suggestions on ways in which schools can support your efforts in implementing the strategies (practices) you listed above or any other areas.

Name

Phone/Email

Child’s School

School Address/Phone

Use additional sheets, if necessary.

modern parents magazine

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The Parental Involvement Exchange is a resourceful website and a great find for educators, administrators and parents. This web-site was established to provide parents, students, parent advocates, school parent organizations, school district personnel, school board members, business and/or community partners with useful resources that serve as a catalyst to ensure that children who attend America’s schools receive quality education, supported by well-informed decisions based on scientifically-based research and meaningful parental involvement. Parental Involvement Exchange www.parentalie.com adwhitesr@gmail.com (866) 567-6343 The mission of the Parental Involvement Exchange (PIE) is to assist school district personnel, school board members, parents, parent advocates, school parent organizations, business and community partners in understanding and meeting the parental involvement provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act; namely Title 1, Part A Non-Regulatory Guidance, April 23, 2004, as well as any future education acts reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 (ESEA). To make available to our clients and those actively engaged in working with parents, vital information and resources to assist them in closing the achievement gap and improving the teaching/learning process.

J Student-Focused Employment Options Turn a hobby into a job. Think about all the things your child likes to do and make a list of places for possible employment. Getting a job in something s/he loves to do or is already spending personal time doing, will allow your child to take on work with school and still keep his/her interests going. It can also save you money on the normal costs to maintain that hobby. For example, working at a local gym or YMCA could earn a free gym membership or discounts on sporting goods and events. Considering what you’d save on those monthly or annual membership costs, your child can now put that amount toward their college education.

A paid internship. Though this may be more difficult to find, look for companies that are involved with the college your child is attending and also have visible involvement in the

22 modernparentsmagazine.com

community. Often times, the part-time positions offered there will not only be an excellent corporate office learning experience, but also offer an understanding of the student’s schedule. Look at large privately-owned and corporate companies, law firms and real estate offices. There are paid job opportunities that will help your young adult acquire hands-on work experience while excelling in college and also lend a hand toward the career search after graduation. Be sure to utilize the university tools, too! Speak to a guidance counselor, encourage your son or daughter to seek out the career center on campus for resume building skills and advice on where to look for work and/or how to apply for jobs locally. A great part time job can help your child experience a brighter future. Whitebook Agency Team www.whitebookagency.com


J J J J J

United States Department of Education and Modern Parents Magazine

J J J J

J J J J J

J J

“I’m just overwhelmed with how well it went. The parents felt so special. I also appreciate Carol for doing all this! I mean she has bent over backwards for the U.S. Department of Education, and I thank her so much.” “The parents were nodding their heads like, yes, we have to do this, yes, we have to do this. It was wonderful! And the University just opening its arms to us made a big difference.”

J

J J

“The parents were very receptive to the information they received. They said they were going to go back and use it right away; and they are not only looking at it in terms of their child, but how they can help their neighbors child.”

J

“I think the Forum was an excellent way to bring parents together to discuss issues that they have in common. I think it was a good opportunity for their voices to be heard at the state level and at the national level.” Join us on Facebook.com/modern.parents

JJ J J

Maggie Brolin, LA Department of Education (IDEA and NCLB Parent Rights and Involvement) conducts session

Special Thanks to Mr. Ira Thomas for conducting interviews during the inaugural Forum.

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modern parent

Yolanda Adams Gospel icon, Yolanda Adams, provides inspiration and shares her views on the importance of parenting. Modern Parents Magazine: Thank you so much for speaking to our readers on today. We did a bit of research and discovered that you have background as an educator, and were a teacher for some time. In that our passion is connecting home and school, that was a delightful discovery and just wanted to share that piece of information with our readers. But what we would like to hear a little bit about today is your role as a parent. You speak of your daughter Taylor quite often, and we consider you a very concerned and modern mom. So, we’d like to hear from you about the joy and significance of parenting. Yolanda Adams: Well, first of all, parenting is one of the most rewarding jobs that a mom or dad would have simply because it is one of those things where you don’t see immediate rewards. It takes pretty much a lifetime to see what you have put into your child. You know, we always talk about giving and helping people who are less fortunate than ourselves, and Taylor has been brought up like that. And, that’s one of the biggest keys I can share with parents. 24 modernparentsmagazine.com

Whatever you’re passionate about, your child is also passionate about. My child loves God with all her heart because her mom loves God with all her heart. She has seen me in her life. She has seen me pray over my food; so, she does the same thing. She’s seen me pray in good times and in bad times; so she does the same. And then, she’s seen me worshiping in church, and she understands the dynamic of worship. And we have a great communication line between ourselves because she’ll ask me, “Mom, why are tears falling down your eyes, “ and I’ll tell her, “because God has been so good to us.” We live in a beautiful house; we drive beautiful cars, we’re able to take vacations when we need to.” I said, “God is so good to us.” So, in turn, she knows these things too. And one of the things I have learned as a parent, even before actually having to parent Taylor, by having to help with my nieces and nephews- a great line of communication between the child, parent, and the educational system is one of the keys to making sure kids understand the importance of education. You know, a lot of times that’s not stressed, and we’ve got to make sure that we stress how important education is. Join us as we continue our conversation with Ms. Adams in the next issue.


D STE E GG SES U S U

MODERN PARENTS Magazine

•Focus on one article at a time. Create a parent

your suggestions to MPM for possible publicainteraction system that allows parents to re- tion. Imagine having your school featured in a spond to the most helpful components of the national publication. magazine. •Use MPM to nurture, develop or support par•Designate one article as the topic of discussion ent writers; include teachers and students, as at your parent meetings. well. Submit for possible publication. Be sure to indicate your school. •Create a parent quiz based on articles. •Log the topics/articles that garner the greatest •Have students share how MPM strategies are response. Document the greatest area of growth used, and/or the differences they are making, at in your parents. home. •Use MPM content during Family Night activi•Name one parent an “Expert” in a designated ties. The use of MPM in your school sends the topic after she/he reads and creates a parent ac- message that your school supports its parents tivity revolving around an MPM strategy or tech- and is dedicated to developing well-informed nique. parents. •MPM is a must for all parent rooms and PTO/PTA’s.

•Use MPM to highlight exceptional parents and special events or achievements.

•Designate a section in your school to reflect how •Display a Parent Enlightenment or Parent MPM strategies are used at home, thus show- Growth Chart in your school to showcase areas casing active home-school interaction. of parental growth or enlightenment. •Place a copy of MPM on your office counter and

•List MPM in your School Improvement Plan. It

teacher’s lounge.

meets parent/family involvement requirements.

•Cite MPM data in school newsletters and correspondences.

Contact us for additional uses for MODERN PARENTS Magazine

•Have a Parent Quiz Bowl or MPM-related ac-

tivity at your next PTO meeting for a refreshing change of pace. •Compile parent and/or teacher suggestions on

innovative ways to use the publication. Submit

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25


Word Tic-Tac-Toe Try this new twist on the popular children’s game.

What You Will Need:

cat

dog

pig

pup

ant

bird

cow

fish

bug

paper, pen/markers, 2 colors of sticky notes or 2 different types of coins or creative game pieces

Make two tic-tac-toe boards, one for each player, by drawing three rows of three squares on a piece of paper. The squares should be relatively large, at least 1 ½ X 1 ½ inches. Next, the players should decide on nine words, perhaps theme-related words (such as foods, animals, favorite story characters) or recently learned vocabulary words, and write them in random order in the squares on each of the tic-tac-toe boards. The game is played as in regular tic-tac-toe, except that each player must say the word and use it in a sentence before it can be covered with a sticky note or game piece. The first player to cover three words in a row- either across, down, or diagonally- wins the game. Be creative. You can use numbers, letters, math problems, spellings words, emotion words, sports related words, interest related words, etc. Objective: To Have Fun! Remember, children learn through play.

Related Source: Barchers, S., Burton, M., & Wise, B. (2006). 101 Reading Activities. Lincolnwood, Illinois: Publications International, Ltd.

26

modernparentsmagazine.com


DILLARD UNIVERSITY’S UPWARD BOUND DIRECTOR PROMOTES BOOK & WORKBOOK ON HOW TEACHERS & STUDENTS PREPARE FOR NATURAL DISASTERS Dr. Camacia Smith-Ross, Upward Bound Director at Dillard University and author of Teachers, Students & Natural Disasters: Perspectives Supporting Professional Development promotes natural disaster preparedness and awareness throughout the gulf coast region for teachers and students. The book comes with a workbook called A Natural Disaster Resource Guide and Workbook on Hurricanes. Both are academic resources that touch on the importance of hurricane and natural disaster preparedness for students and teachers. The books are to be used as tools to help teachers and educators understand the urgency of educational preparedness and how to deal with students during emergencies and tragic events. “In the aftermath of disaster comes a guide for restoring hope for students in an organized and carefully constructed resource for educators. Simply put, all educators working with students can benefit from this information, and training resource.” -Pam L. Warrick, Ph.D., University of Arkansas at Little Rock You may contact Smith-Ross at drcamacia@yahoo.com or 504.884.2288 and co-author Dr. Ashraf Esmail at ashesmail@aol.com or 504.914.2818.

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27


The Hidden Co$t of Parenting As parents, we always seem to be forking over money for one thing or another. But it’s the smallunexpected expenses that catch us off-guard. Often times, we budget enough money for the essentials, like gas, food, bills and a mortgage. However, we seem to get side swiped by the extra money that we need for school field trips, Friday pizza, school fundraisers and other minor expenses. Items like these are what I call the Hidden Cost of Parenting. For instance, you send your child to a great school. The only catch is that the school asks for quarterly fundraiser donations, where a mountain of candy is sent home for you to sell but never seems to sell out. This is a great way to cut costs for the parents, right? Well, guess who ends up buying that candy? You, of course, because we MUST support our kids! What about the field trips where the destination just happens to be 100 miles away? This one trip can blow your week’s gasoline budget out of the water (if you have a budget). Being a good parent calls for a lot of work and handling unanticipated expenses; but it is these hid-

However, there are three crucial rules for Glove Compartment Cash (GCC). 1. GCC should never be used for things like fast food. Once you form a habit of using this money for fast food purchases, it will be gone within days! Children have a hard time passing McDonalds or Wendy’s without pouring on how hungry they are. If your

den costs that we do not prepare for or even notice. Well, there is a solution to this problem that will help stop the hemorrhaging of money. It’s called “Glove Compartment Cash (GCC).” This is similar to the petty cash that a business keeps for minor expenses, except these monies are for expenses associated with your children’s school affairs. GCC is a small amount of paper money that you set aside each week only for unexpected occasions. You can seal it in an envelope or have it placed on a prepaid debit card, and keep it in the glove compartment of your car. For safety precautions, simply use a Visa/MC prepaid debt card, which you can get from most stores. GCC should be no more than $100 a month, keeping in mind that some months you won’t have a need for this money at all. Parenting is full of responsibility; let’s embrace it! By preparing for the unforeseen costs associated with being a parent, we empower and liberate ourselves from day-to-day stress, adding years to our lives. Years that we can spend with our children and grandchildren.

child needs a snack after school, add that expense into you grocery budget and keep a few snacks in the trunk.

2. GCC should only be used for gasoline when associated with school activities. A school activity is not defined as a typical drop-off and pickup of your children to and from school. Reserve GCC for those trips where you are a chaperone and must drive to meet the children on site.

3. Resist, Resist, Resist. There will come a day when you have accumulated a few hundred dollars in GCC. On these days, tell yourself, “This money can be used in some other way.” This is when you should resist the most. Remember, as a parent the last thing you would ever want to tell your child is, “I can’t afford for you to go on a field trip.” Think of how that would make you and your child feel, or in some cases, how it has already made you feel.

Shelby White: whit102@gmail.com James Williams: jwill808@hotmail.com 28 m o d e r n p a r e n t s m a g a z i n e . c o m


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ACTIVE BOOKSTORE CHECKLIST COLLEGE COST C R E AT I V E E L E M E N TA R Y EXCEL GAMES H A R VA R D HIGHSCHOOL I N FA N T LIBRARY LISTS LOVE M AT H

MIDDLE MODELING MODERN PA R E N T I N G PUZZLES READ READING REGRESS S T R AT E G I E S SUMMER TEEN TIPS TODDLER TOOLKIT ACTIVITIES CONCEPTS ENGAGEMENT

ENGLISH HISTORY HOMEWORK MATH PARENTS SCIENCE STUDY UNDERSTANDING WRITING

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The next star of MODERN PARENTS Magazine is. . . your child! Hi Readers, Modern Parents Magazine invites you to send in the most interesting photos or stories of your children. Has your child made noteworthy progress at school? Have you captured a snapshot of him or her during a particularly funny moment? If so, MPM would love to feature your photographs or anecdotes in an upcoming issue. Please send all photographs as a jpeg attachment. Stories may be sent in the body of the e-mail to: info@modernparentsmagazine.com

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