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CITY LIFE & FINE LIVING

RIVERSIDE m ag a z i n e

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serve Chef Brad Martin at Riverside’s sparkling new convention center

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contents

RIVERSIDE M

f e b r u a ry- m a rc h 2 014   •   VO L UME 7, I S S UE 1

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FEATURES 12 BACK IN BUSINESS After a nearly $44 million effort, the Riverside Convention Center is about to make its gala return as a grand downtown meeting place — one with “The Wow Factor.” Before it’s officially unveiled on Feb. 26, discover what went into the facility’s extensive makeover and its potential payoff for Riverside. 20 A WORLD OF FLAVORS Chef Brad Martin has a passion for exploring the world’s cuisines and he delights in preparing his favorite discoveries, whether at home, on the set of ABC’s reality cooking competition “The Taste,” or at the new Riverside Convention Center, where he leads the culinary team. 23 TOOLS OF THE TRADE Gene Sherman has built many things, including an off-road vehicle. Now he wants to show others how build their dream projects at Vocademy, a hands-on workspace. Even novices who never took machine or wood shop classes in high school are welcome. 26 DINING HOTSPOT How do you find a great restaurant? One way is to follow the crowd. Simple Simon’s Bakery & Bistro has lots of devoted fans who fill the pedestrian mall restaurant — especially during lunchtime.

Ron Hasse PUBLISHER & CEO

Don Sproul MANAGING EDITOR

Jerry Rice EDITOR

Jim Maurer V.P. SALES & MARKETING

DEPARTMENTS From the editor 6 Calendar 8 Hot List 8 Finance 25 Health 30 Seen 31 Save the date 32 Music 34

On the cover Chef Brad Mar tin, with a plate of fennel-dusted sea bass with red and yellow pepper coulis, served with roasted red-skinned potatoes and grilled shrimp, at the Riverside Convention Center. Photo by Eric Reed Conn e c t wit h u s !

Follow us on Twitter @riversidemag and Facebook facebook.com/riversidemagazine to be among the first to know what we’re planning for future issues. Have a question or story suggestion? Tweet us!

Lynda E. Bailey SALES DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

Shawna Federoff RESEARCH DIRECTOR C O N T R I BU T I N G W R I T ER S & E D I TO R S

Amy Bentley, David Cohen, George A. Paul e dito r i a l g r a p h i c D E S I G N

Steve Ohnersorgen

Rick Sforza PHOTO EDITOR PH OTO G RAPHER S

LaFonzo Carter, Frank Perez, Eric Reed

Tom Paradis, Melissa Six Jack Storrusten SALES MANAGERS A DV ERT I S I N G S A L E S E X ECU T I V E S

Carla Ford-Brunner, Jack Galloway Andre McAdory, Willie Merriam, Adil Zaher S A L E S A S S I S TA N T s

Flo Gomez, Dixie Mohrhauser Maria Rodriguez, Victoria Vidana g r a p h i c a rtist/a d c oo r din ato r

Rose Anderson m a r k e ting

Veronica Nair, Ginnie Stevens

LANG Custom Publishing Frank Pine EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Joe Robidoux V.P. OF CIRCULATION CONTACT US Editorial: 909-386-3015; fax 909-885-8741 or jerry.rice@langnews.com Advertising: 909-386-3006; or lynda.bailey@langnews.com Riverside Magazine is produced by LANG Custom Publishing of The Sun and Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. Single copy price: $3.95. Subscriptions $14.95 per year. Postmaster: Send address changes to 2041 E. Fourth St., Ontario, CA 91764. Copyright ©2014 Riverside Magazine. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. Riverside Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos or artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope.

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from the editor

Transforming downtown, one project at a time

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hat do the recent overhauls at the Fox and the Muni and the opening of the new downtown fire station have in common? Carl Carey, for one. As the city of Riverside’s capital improvements manager, he’s been the go-to guy for many high-profile projects. “Our team is responsible for managing the design and construction phases of vertical construction — basically, everything that goes up,” as he puts it, and there has always been plenty to keep Carey busy during his eight-plus years with the city. At the time he started, the extensive Riverside Renaissance public works initiative, and the nearly $1.6 billion in projects that came with it, was in full swing. We first met Carey working on one of those Renaissance jobs at the Fox Performing Arts Center, where he was leading the effort to restore the historic

in this issue — are changing the downtown landscape for the better. For Carey, it seems to be part of a natural progression. As a teen, he shared with his dad a passion for building things and tinkering with cars. Later, he earned degrees in business and industrial engineering. “I’ve always loved the construction field; it’s a great PHOTO BY GABRIEL LUIS ACOSTA process,” Carey says. “I really like Carl Carey highlights some of the changes to the working with people, and when you convention center during a tour in July. start something there’s an end date venue to its former glory. when you know it has to get done. Since then, his work has included Then once it’s done, hopefully you’ve met modernizing the old Municipal everyone’s expectations and you’ve Auditorium on Mission Inn Avenue and got some wonderful projects.” building a modern fire station a block away. Most recently, his focus has been remaking the Riverside Convention Center into a facility that can meet the convention needs of today. All of those jerry.rice@langnews.com projects — some of which are highlighted 909-386-3015 @JerryRice_IE

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O LE N. ET I T E HO OL YOU’RE IN. LOVE THE W HE VE EI V L E H E E S R U U O W ’ TH HO V O S L ’R U E H W E LE E YOU’RE IN. U LO IN. HO YO TH YO HO OL E HOUSE L L O E H O E V YO IN. U E H V U E L W S TH ’R SE O E E ’R EW U LOVE THE W E L . N I E H E H E R . U ’ O T WH U YO T HOL ’R IN E VE E YO EH YO E H O S V E O U LE U’ OU L O E R O HOLE HOUSE YOU .L ’ W L H O E N ’ . S U I RE H E TH H E N IN. OL VE Y YO E I W E RE W H H T O E ’ O L V O H E HO LO L LO US SE U’R YOU E W IN. N. VE U I E E R E E H R L ’ ’ O VE T OU YO T T ’R YO SE HE SE Y OU E U U U Y U O W V HO ’ O YO SE EH E IN. LOVE THE W LO L R E U ’ L U O HO S E YO U HO WH L E E O LE HE H US O O T H H E VE L LO HO W

EW O HE O . L EW L LOVE THE W L . VE E W H H E LE O O L O W TH E HO ’RE IN O VE HO E H LE H HO VE YOU U TH O H S E T O W U E OU OUSE YOU’RE IN. E HE OLE U US YO .L E S LO OLE H S N H S E V U HO H W E E ’R TH E I EW TH YO O H Y E LE OUSE YOU’RE TH E I H N U O O . E ’R L W O U’ SE LE V U HO OVE HO IN. L HOL ET R W L H USE YO EW O O L U H E H ’ . R E E E E V E IN. O TH W IN HOL IN E L E H W U O . E O V L LO ET HE OV THE LE OV OUSE YOU’RE IN. H L LE H ET .L O H E W VE N OU E T HO W OV USE YOU H T H ’ R H H E EW S LE HO .L E I E O N E .L HO W L W TH O Y E H VE E E W E WHOLE HOUSE Y OL HO OU O T U TH H E TH ’RE U E H S VE W I O N O H U . O S L E H

LE HO HO OU IN LOVE THE WHOLE HOUSE YOU’RE IN. LOVE THE WHOLE LE . H N U I E E E SE HOU R HO L R ’ ’ U O E THE WHOLE HOLE HOUSE YO V S O W O U E L . H H Y E T N US I YOU ’RE HOU YO U’ OVE SE YO E W L S . E U U R EY IN ’R O H E OUSE LOVE OU’RE IN. LOV H Y E E E O L SE S T O H U R H E T U ’ IN Y ET EW HE W HO U ’ E U E E R I H L N. L .L EI V HO YO HO HOLE HOUSE OUSE YOU’RE I O W H L L N W E E HO SE H L E T O Y O N. L VE .L E OU’ H HO W U O OV V RE TH EW O E H U E H V W O T O E E H L L H I . T E E T N N W I H H S E OUS E E HOL V E .L LOV E E YOU’R EH OV E Y LO LOV IN. O E . O US R . E HOLE HOUSE YO E THE WHOLE HO IN U’ T IN U’R IN. LOV HE W E U T O SE H YO E Y E E YO OLE HOU H R E YOU’RE IN. L OV W E E S U L H U S U’ SE Y O . OVE U VE T RE ’R EH IN O O L L O U E VE THE WHO ’R E WHOLE HOU I HO ’R IN. LO E SE E TH L W E V E R I Y O ’ E N O U .L H LO USE YOU’RE I YOU’RE IN. LOVE T IN N. E E HO V L S H E LO O U E R H E E R Y O ’ S O I N. LO U’RE VE OU YOU H W VE EH SE I L E N U O TH .L HO E WH

US LE TH IN E H H RE OVE Y OU T EW OU U’ L . S H VE ’ YO E RE OL IN N E LO Y E . . O I E I N ’R US U’ E LOV IN HO .L R ’R HO YOU ’RE O U HO E T VE SE E IN OU U E LE H Y L O S . W E Y E E Y L HO OU OU LO W OV HO HE W US H SE H V T ’ E E O U E HOUS HO TH LE RE OU SE LE VE T TH E E H I H O N E L E L E Y HO LE E . Y .L OU HOU W LO LE O W W HO HO OV O IN H U E S W V ’ O H W H H O R .L E E H E O OU ’RE E RE TH E W YO TH LE IN W HE L IN U’ TH I T E S E N E R H . U E VE E .L H YO TH VE LO O ’R VE ’R TH O U’ E I Y W O E E U O O L N O U O E O E V S H V . U V . Y SE U L V E .L LO O E S ’R YO IN TH IN. U OU LO IN. LO IN L SE T E V Y S E H E E O H L U E E O E E N. I O E H I E N R ’R ’RE U Y W VE HO .L LE HO LE E W ’R OU THE U’ U O H E U O ’R U H U O O L H O H W V ’ U Y O E H R O LE THE S E YO W HO YO LE E HO US W YO OL T SE I W E N H H H E L E SE THE H U .L E E O YO O TH E W O EW HE US H W O U H U H E T H O U V O SE VE E TH E T E ’R US HO HO LE OV LE L OV O . L OVE E LE HO E IN THE OV OUSE YO E H .L IN O L .L . Y H U W . H L IN RE O IN S U O H IN U ’ LE E E ’R E O ’ U RE YO VE ’R ’R LE RE HO T U YO U’ U W I H N ’ E RE E YO HE .L YO O E SE E T IN W VE U . V O T H LO E

LOVE THE WHOLE HOUSE YOU’RE IN Do more for your home to conserve energy and water by using the Whole House Rebate Program!


hot list however there is a charge for some activities including Fezziwig’s Ball and Trial of Jack the Ripper. Weekend starts with Pickwick’s Pub Night on Feb. 21. Main and Ninth streets, downtown Riverside; 951-781-3168; www.dickensfest.com. FESTIVAL OF ONE ACTS MARCH 1-9  –  Eighth annual presentation. Matheson Hall, La Sierra University, 4500 Riverwalk Parkway, Riverside; $10; 951-785-2241; www.lasierra.edu. “Godspell,” May 10-18; Showcase, June 7.

JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL MARCH 9  –  Sixth annual event featuring screenings of “The Zigzag Kid” (The Netherlands), a fast-paced, whimsical comingof-age tale, at 1 p.m.; “Nicky’s Family” (Czech Republic), the winner of 12 U.S. film festival audience awards, at 3:30 p.m.; and “Fill the Void” (Israel), an insightful film about life among the ultraOrthodox Haredim community in Tel Aviv, at 7 p.m. Sponsored by Riverside’s Temple Beth El. Screenings at Regency Theater, 1201 University Ave., Riverside; 951-684-4511; www.tberiv.org.

ADAL RAMONES MARCH 8  –  Stand-up comedian and Mexican TV show host. Fox Performing Arts Center, 3801 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 951-779-9800; www.foxriversidelive.com. Also: The Pink Floyd Experience, March 16; The Sing-Off Live Tour, March 28; Willie Nelson, April 1; Dream Theater, April 18; Cypress Hill, April 19; Wayne Brady, May 16; Trace Adkins, May 18.

“Nicky’s Family”

RIVERSIDE DICKENS FESTIVAL FEB. 22-23  –  21st anniversary celebration of all things Dickens, with costumed characters

calendar LAKE ALICE TRADING CO. THROUGH FEB. 28  –  Factory Tuned Band (classic rock), Feb. 21; All In (rock/alt/funk), Feb. 22; SkunkDub (acoustic/reggae), Feb. 26; The Heymakers (rock/dance), Feb. 28. 3616 University Ave., Riverside; 951-686-7343; www.lakealicetradingco.com. ‘IN THE HEIGHTS’ THROUGH MARCH 1  –  Production of the 2008 Tony Award winner for best musical, score, choreography and orchestrations. Studio Theatre, ARTS 113, UC Riverside, 900 University Ave.; 951-827-3245; http://theatre.ucr.edu. Also: “Blackballin’,” April 10-19; Marylu Clayton Rosenthal New Play Festival, May 22-31; Playworks, June 4-6. ‘THE RIVERSIDE LEGACY’ THROUGH APRIL 17  –  California plein air paintings, past and present, from the RAM’s permanent collection. Riverside Art Museum, 8 | riversidethemag.com | february-march 2014

portraying eminent Victorians and characters from his novels, musical acts and a themed marketplace. General admission is free,

3425 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-684-7111; www.riversideartmuseum.org. Also: “Women Who Ride: Photography by Lanakila MacNaughton,” through March 16; “Rebranding the Russian Avant-garde,” through March 25. BLASPHEMOUS RUMOURS FEB. 22  –  Depeche Mode tribute band, with DJ Richard Blade. Romano’s Concert Lounge, 5225 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside; 951-781-7662; http://theconcertlounge.com. RAINCROSS CHORALE FEB. 22  –  Evensong concert, a music service performed in the tradition of 19th century England during the Riverside Dickens Festival. First Congregational Church, 3504 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 5:30 p.m.; $10; http://raincrosschorale.blogspot.com. Spring concert with orchestra, June 8. ‘MEDORA’ FEB. 28-MARCH 1  –  Screening of the winner of the Grand Jury Award at the Indianapolis Film Festival. Culver Center of the Arts, 3834 Main St., Riverside; 951-827-4787;

RIVERSIDE COUNTY PHILHARMONIC MARCH 15  –  “In the Spotlight,” with selections that include Corelli’s “Trio Sonata in E Major” and Stravinsky’s “Soldier’s Tale.” Culver Center for the Arts, 3834 Main St., Riverside; 7:30 p.m.; 951-787-0251; www.thephilharmonic.org. Also: “From the Heart,” with guest artist, violinist Joseph Swensen, May 3 (at the Fox Performing Arts Center).

http://culvercenter.ucr.edu. Also: “Nebraska,” March 7-8. ‘THE SOUND OF MUSIC’ FEB. 28-MARCH 9  –  Riverside Youth Theatre production of the classic Rodgers & Hammerstein musical. The Box, Fox Entertainment Plaza, 3635 Market St., Riverside; 951-756-4240; www.riversideyouththeatre.org, www.riversideblackbox.com. Also: “Beauty and the Beast Jr.,” July 11-20. ARTS WALK MARCH 6  –  Browse more than 20 art galleries, studios and museums with exhibits in various art mediums. Special performances, poetry, theater, hands-on art activities, refreshments and more. Continues the first Thursday of every month. Downtown Riverside; 6-9 p.m.; 951-682-6737; www.riversidedowntown.org. ‘WEST SIDE STORY’ MARCH 9  –  Classic American stage musical set in New York’s Upper West side in the mid-1950s. Fox Performing Arts Center,


3801 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 7:30 p.m.; 951-779-9800; www.foxriversidelive.com. ‘SHREK THE MUSICAL’ MARCH 21-22, 28-29  –  Presented by the Riverside Children’s Theatre, a production based on the Oscar-winning film. Ramona High School Theater, 7675 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; http://riversidechildrenstheatre.org. ‘SPIDER’S WEB’ MARCH 28-APRIL 13  –  Agatha Christie murdery mystery. Riverside Community Players Theater, 4026 14th St., Riverside; 951-686-4030; www.riversidecommunityplayers.com. Also: “Around the World in 80 Days,” May 16- June 1; “She Loves Me,” July 11-27. ‘LES MISERABLES’ APRIL 4-13  –  Performance Riverside presentation of the classic musical set in 19th-century France. Landis Performing Arts Center, 4800 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; 951-222-8100; www.performanceriverside.org. RIVERSIDE AIR SHOW APRIL 5  –  Aerobatics, antiques, warbirds, flybys, plus static displays of helicopters, military

photo by Doug McCulloh

photo Courtesy Joe Biel

‘SENTRY’ THROUGH MARCH 22  –  Solo exhibition by Joe Biel featuring large-scale, two-dimensional drawings on paper and a monumental drawing installation specifically produced for the Culver Center. Sweeney Art Gallery, 3824 Main St., Riverside; 951-827-4787; http://artsblock.ucr.edu. Also: “Quintessential,” through March 22 (at the Sweeney); “CMP Projects: Claudia Joskowicz,” through April 12 (at the California Museum of Photography); “Barbara Morgan: Body Montage,” through May 17 (at the Museum of Photography); “Trouble with the Index,” through June 21 (at the Museum of Photography)

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restaurant • deli-market • wine bar • bottle shop • private parties february-march 2014 | riversidethemag.com | 9


3 Questions: Riverside Repertory Theater

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here’s a new performing arts company in town, the Riverside Repertory Theater, and its behind-the-scenes ranks features local talent with experience staging productions on Broadway, in Los Angeles and points in between. We recently asked three questions of David St. Pierre, the company’s managing director, and Matt Neves, the artistic director. Here are their answers: A: We chose “Fiddler on the Roof ” because it’s a story of tradition. It’s only fitting that a company that prides itself on changing traditions would present, as our debut production, a musical that is steeped in it. We have a second show booked into The Box opening on May 2. I will only say it’s a Broadway classic from the 1980s that has been remounted twice since then and has won the Tony Award all three times. We also will be announcing our 2014-15, five-show season on May 2.

Question: What has been the biggest hurdle getting to this point? Answer: We haven’t had any large hurdles in forming this new theater company. But it has been very challenging getting all of the components put together to make this new venture possible — from forming our board, nonprofit filings, website design, ticketing system, social media, rehearsal space, marketing and much more. Q: What will Riverside Rep present that theatergoers can’t find elsewhere? A: We will be offering an experience that can’t be found anywhere else. We are in such a unique space, The Box, which lends itself to re-invent classic shows. There are 200 seats, no fly rails, thrust seating, minimal set changes and

calendar vehicles and classic cars highlight the 22nd annual event. Riverside Municipal Airport, Arlington Avenue at Van Buren Boulevard; free admission, $10 parking; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 951-351-6113; www.riversideairshow.com. SPRING PLANT SALE APRIL 5-6  –  Nearly 10,000 plants and more than 600 varieties will be available for purchase. UC Riverside Botanic Gardens, 900 University Ave.; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 5, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 6; 951-784-6962; www.gardens.ucr.edu. Also: Spring Outing, April 19. HISTORY LECTURE APRIL 6  –  Historical overview of Olivewood Cemetery, presented by Glenn Edward Freeman. RSVP by March 30. Dining Commons, La Sierra University, 4500 Riverwalk Parkway, Riverside; 11:45 a.m.; $10; 951-353-0770; www.riversidehistoricalsociety.org. Also: Frank Miller — Building the Past with Words, June 1. 10

| riversidethemag.com | february-march 2014

‘Fiddler on the Roof’

Q: Why go with “Fiddler on the Roof ” for that first show, and what’s next?

What: First production presented by Riverside Reper tory Theater Where: The Box, at the Fox Enter tainment Plaza, 3635 Market St., Riverside When: March 14-30 Information: 951-808-5566, 866-360-0336, www.riversiderep.org

FLOWER SHOW AND GARDEN TOUR APRIL 12-13  –  67th annual Riverside Community Flower Show and Garden Tour, featuring a tour of private gardens. “The World is Your Garden” is the theme. Elks Lodge, 6166 Brockton Ave., Riverside; flower show 1-6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, home garden tours 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days; 951-777-0746; www.riversideflowershow.info.

RAM PRESENTS RAM APRIL 26  –  The Riverside Art Museum presents the Riverside Art Market featuring more than 50 artists selling artwork, an Art Adventure Scavenger Hunt, children’s art/ crafts booths with hands-on projects, food and drinks. In front of the Main Downtown Library, 3581 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 909-938-1328; www.riversideartalliance.org.

JULIETA VENEGAS APRIL 18  –  Concert featuring the singersongwriter known for Spanish-language pop-rock performances. Riverside Auditorium & Events Center, 3485 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-779-9800; www.foxriversidelive.com.

DOWNTOWN FARMERS MARKET ONGOING  –  Fresh fruits, vegetables, flowers and more. Downtown, Main Street between Fifth and Sixth streets, Riverside; 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays; 951-826-2434.

SALUTE TO VETERANS PARADE APRIL 19  –  Ninth annual event honoring veterans of all ages and eras, with marching bands, equestrian units, color guards, bagpipes, antique cars, military vehicles and floats. Pancake breakfast is served for $5 at the Riverside City College staging area. Henry Coil is the grand marshal. Downtown Riverside; 10 a.m. to noon; free; 951-687-1175; www.asalutetoveterans.com.

‘NATURE LAB’ ONGOING  –  Hands-on experiences in natural history, with a collection of living vertebrate and invertebrate species. Metropolitan Museum, 3580 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 951-826-5273; www.riversideca.gov/museum. Also: “John Muir and the Personal Experience of Nature,” through Oct. 26; “Telling Riverside’s Story in 50 Objects,” through Jan. 4; “Force of Arms,” ongoing.

a live orchestra — just imagine how different this experience will be.


Restaurants all over the Inland Empire are serving up special lunch and dinner menus at set prices during Inland Empire Restaurant Week

MARCH

21-30, 2014

LUNCHES $10/$15/$20

DINNER

$20/$30/$40

FEATURING ONTARIO / MOUNTAIN RESORTS / RIVERSIDE / TEMECULA / RANCHO CUCAMONGA

For a List of Participating Restaurants and Reservations

INLANDEMPIRERESTAURANTWEEK.COM

#IERW


cov e r story

center of attention


Written by Jerry Rice

A downtown landmark since the 1970s, the Riverside Convention Center was showing its age. An extensive makeover took the facility back down to its steel frame, before it was expanded, modernized and brought beautifully back to life. Now, the next act is about to begin. After a nearly $44 million reconstruction effort, the Riverside Convention Center is ready to resume hosting meetings and events. Already, more than 80 have been booked in the revitalized venue. Photo by Eric Reed


B

uilt during the disco era and as the nation was about to celebrate its bicentennial, Riverside’s convention center was launched as a grand place to host a range of special events and meetings in the heart of a growing and increasingly vital city. Through the decades, the facility served that mission well. There were rock concerts in the 1970s and ‘80s featuring such popular acts as The Police, Alice Cooper and Billy Idol; sporting events from boxing to UC Riverside men’s and women’s basketball; and community gatherings like awards banquets, high school graduations and State of the City addresses. Many notables stopped by too, including Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin Jr., the second man to step foot on the moon; actress Bo Derek, star of the hit movie “10;” U.S. Senators Dianne Feinstein and John McCain; and, in 2003, President George W. Bush.

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While the facility had been spruced up through the years, including a $2 million facelift in 1997, it became increasingly apparent it was in need of a major overhaul. Groups that were interested in staging events found that the center wasn’t large enough or adaptable enough to meet their needs. Another upgrade was in order, this time a more extensive one. “Every 10, 15 years, you really have a need to refurbish, rehabilitate, renovate,” said Ron Loveridge, who was Riverside mayor when the plans were made, the council votes were taken and the work started on what would become a $43.63 million makeover of the Riverside Convention Center. “The convention business is becoming increasingly competitive,” he added. “Being a successful city is a matter of competing, and if you want to have a successful convention business you need to have an updated, 21st-century convention center.” That’s exactly what the city of Riverside now has, according to several

‘Being a successful city is a matter of competing, and if you want to have a successful convention business you need to have an updated, 21st-century convention center.’ people who led the reconstruction effort and others who have since toured the new facility. Many more will have the opportunity to decide for themselves firsthand during a preview event hosted by the Riverside Convention & Visitors Bureau on Feb. 26. What guests will see that night ­ — and during future meetings and events — is a venue that’s been completely remade. About the only component that remains from the old facility is the steel frame, and even that was enhanced to meet today’s

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| riversidethemag.com | february-march 2014


earthquake codes and expanded to increase the interior space. The convention center now boasts a much larger main exhibit hall, a new downstairs ballroom and more than 20 breakout rooms. Eco-friendly touches include water-efficient bathroom plumbing fixtures with sensor technology, a new flight-type dishwasher in the kitchen that consumes significantly less water and detergent, plus there’s energy-efficient LED lighting throughout. Overall, there is more than 65,000 square feet of indoor event space — which may be used for a single event or split up to accommodate multiple groups — and another nearly 9,500 square feet is available in a landscaped plaza outdoors. “We opened up this facility and made it much more flexible than it was before to attract more and different clients,” said Carl Carey, Riverside’s capital improvements manager. Another goal of the re-do was to include several attention-getting elements — ones with “The Wow

PHOTO BY ERIC REED

The custom chandelier hanging from the ceiling of the convention center tower is more than 13 feet tall, 8 feet across and features 24 colorful glass-pair cylinders.

Factor.” Checking that box is the 66-foot tower, which includes a colorful blown- and sculpted-glass light fixture hanging from the ceiling. When illuminated at night, it shines through the tower’s three large glass arches

like a beacon. “It’s the focal point that the convention center didn’t have in the past,” said Belinda Graham, assistant city manager. “Before, when people would ask for the location of the convention

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Riverside’s changing

D

owntown Riverside is a dynamic place. The heart of the city is being transformed through many projects — some completed, others in the works — and the extensive makeover of the Riverside Convention Center is only the most recent to make its debut. Others include:

• The Box at the Fox Entertainment Plaza. Local performing ar ts groups and touring professionals are taking full advantage of the flexibility of this 3,600-square-foot venue, which accommodates 200 guests in a round, thrust or proscenium seating layout. It opened in May to the sounds of Beatles tribute band Ticket to Ride, and is now home to the city’s newest professional stage company, Riverside Reper tory Theater.

Citrus Tower

• Citrus Tower. The six-story, 133,000square-foot office building adjacent to the 91 Freeway was completed in April 2012. The law firm Best Best & Krieger is a major tenant.

• Centennial Plaza. The cultural square will be the home of the Henry W. Coil and Alice Edna Coil School for the Ar ts, Riverside City College’s Culinary Ar ts Academy and the Riverside Community College District office building. The ar ts school will include a two-story, 450-seat concer t hall. Groundbreaking is set for March 13, with completion planned for spring 2016 — in time for RCC’s 100th anniversary. Also par t of the complex is the district’s Center for Social Justice & Civil Liber ties, which opened nearly two years ago in a more than 85-year-old savings and loan building.

• Downtown Fire Station. Dedicated in October, the nearly $12 million station has engine bays for a ladder truck, brush truck and rescue squad vehicle, individual dorm rooms for firefighters, and even a small

center, you would be pointing to a box that could have been a warehouse. Now, when you point to the convention center, there’s clearly a focal and an entry point.” Fittingly, given the convention center’s multimillion-dollar annual impact on the Riverside economy, key players in the effort to remake the facility had local connections. During the design phase,

members of community organizations were asked to vote on exterior design options; Riverside’s DLR Group had a 15-member team fine-tuning the blueprints for a year before the start of construction in July 2012; and another local company, Architectural Custom, Inc., created the unique light fixture/art piece that was installed in the tower.

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| riversidethemag.com | february-march 2014

• Culver Center of the Arts. From 1895 through the early 1960s, the old Rouse’s depar tment store was the place where Riverside’s fashion-conscious came to shop. In 2010, the same space was re-launched as a venue for ar t exhibitions; dance, music and theatrical performances; and screenings of foreign and independent films.

Courtesy culver center of the arts

Culver Center of the Arts

museum with historic Fire Depar tment memorabilia. It replaced a 1950s-era facility next door that was cramped and didn’t meet current ear thquake safety standards.

The lead contractor, Turner Construction, which has experience building convention centers elsewhere in Southern California, previously had completed projects at Kaiser Permanente Riverside and the Plymouth Tower Care and Living Center. Not waiting for the return of the new and improved convention center,

l


g

landscape Downtown Fire Station

• Fox Performing Arts Center. Built in 1929 at the dawn of Hollywood’s Golden Age, the movie theater hosted the first public screening of “Gone With the Wind” in 1939. In later decades it was unoccupied and fell into disrepair, and then was brought back to its original glory thanks to a $30 million effor t that was a centerpiece of the extensive Riverside Renaissance effor t. Since it was re-christened in January 2010 with two performances by singer Sheryl Crow, the venue has hosted shows featuring Pat Benatar, Natalie Cole, Bill Cosby, the Doobie Brothers, Foreigner, Howie Mandel, Steve Mar tin, Don McLean, Dennis Miller and others.

Fox Performing Arts Center

finest examples of classical Beaux-Ar ts architecture in the United States. It was built in 1903, expanded in 1933, and underwent a three-year, $25 million renovation and seismic upgrade in the mid-1990s. • 91 Freeway. With a goal of improving traffic flow through downtown Riverside, a $232-million project is widening six miles of the freeway by adding a carpool lane in each direction from Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange. Also par t of the effor t are improved on- and off-ramps at 14th Street and Arlington Avenue. Construction star ted in spring 2012 and is scheduled to be finished next year.

• Historic Courthouse. Inspired by grand structures at the 1900 Paris Exposition, the cour thouse is considered to be one of the

• Riverside Aquatics Complex. The $10.8-million facility, which opened January 2011 at Riverside City College, has pools, diving platforms, springboards and other amenities that rank it among the top aquatics facilities on the West Coast. ABC’s celebrity diving show “Splash” was filmed there last year, and in the next few months, the venue is set to host the Orange Blossom Invitational, featuring 13 and under

Riverside’s Raincross Hospitality Corp., the company that manages and books the facility, has been busy filling the calendar for 2014 and beyond. Already scheduled are more than 80 events that are expected bring in a combined 56,000 visitors. And since many of those guests will be staying at nearby hotels, including the Marriott, the Hyatt Place and the

Mission Inn Hotel & Spa, as well as dining at local restaurants, it promises to be a major boon for downtown Riverside, according to Mayor William “Rusty” Bailey. “It’s going to increase the pie in terms of economic development and economic growth and impact to both the city and the region,” he said, adding that the convention center, combined

Courtesy convention & visitors bureau

Riverside Aquatics Complex

synchronized swimmers, March 28-30; USA Diving’s Spring West Junior National Diving Championships, April 23-27; and the CIF Southern Section Swimming & Diving Championships, May 12-17. • Riverside Auditorium & Events Center. The Mission Revival-style landmark — which was completed in 1929 as a memorial to Riverside County’s World War I veterans — was brought up to date with a $10 million overhaul. It now boasts new heating and air conditioning systems, new electrical and plumbing, improved lighting and sound, and a new wooden floor in the main theater.

with the Mission Inn and the Fox Performing Arts Center, give downtown Riverside a trio of beautifully unique landmarks. “The convention center is another jewel in the crown of Riverside as the capital city of inland Southern California,” Bailey said. “It gives us another tool to market Riverside to visitors, tourists and convention-goers.” february-march 2014 | riversidethemag.com | 17


Partners in Business. Partners in the Downtown. Partners in the Community. Partners in the Future of Riverside.

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TODAY’S CONVENTION CENTER

A Gateway for Visitors, a Venue for New Opportunities . . . a Showcase for Riverside.


Passion

from palate to plate Chef Brad Martin exercises his culinary talents at home, on TV and at the Riverside Convention Center Written by Don Sproul

‘T

his is really going to be a big premiere for Riverside in a lot of different ways.” In late December, Chef Brad Martin was already brimming with excitement and anticipation. As he worked to put finishing touches on a new menu for the Riverside Convention Center, he also was focused on hiring staff, collecting small wares, pots and pans and presentation pieces to deck out the revitalized kitchen for top-flight catering. The kitchen keys were due to come into his hands in early January, and the transfer couldn’t come soon enough. Large and complex operations are nothing new for Martin, and he’s a known commodity for Riverside, having most recently served as executive chef at a private university, and has worked at large operations including a high-end restaurant chain and at Renaissance and Marriott hotels locations. He also might be considered something of a TV personality, as a competitor on mentor Anthony Bourdain’s team in ABC’s cooking competition show, “The Taste.” While the month-long filming for the second season of “The Taste”


‘I love to be engaged with my staff and with the clients. ... It’s just something that really drives me.’ had wrapped, Martin contractually couldn’t disclose how well he had fared. The eight episodes began airing Jan. 2. Whether at work, in his home kitchen or on a food set, Martin’s driving professional motivation is simple: a passion. Through the years, he’s expressed that passion in a variety of ways: in the prime-rib sandwiches with caramelized onions that he made for teenage friends, in the Tex/Mex, Italian and classic American dishes he plates at home for his wife and children, and through the explorations of food and culture as he plans meals for clients. It’s no wonder that after working in a restaurant as a teen, he found his way to New York where he graduated from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park.

PHOTOS BY ERIC REED

Chef Brad Martin at home with his family, Abygale, left, Hayden and his wife, Heather

His favorite cuisine? “I just like making everything. I like the styles of the Caribbean and Mediterranean,” Martin said, quickly adding Pacific Rim cuisine is frequently his “go-to” style. That’s not to say he hasn’t explored all kinds of

food from Asian to Indonesian and Ethiopian. “I really try to open my mind to all different genres of food and experience it and taste it. … It’s really fun to use a new ingredient and find out how to utilize it at its best stage.”

The convention center’s kitchen, where Martin and his team will be working, shines with new appliances and a stainless steel food prep area. february-march 2014 | riversidethemag.com | 21


terested in

azing e Vera and ming about bookstore l,” Nadia neither sleep. We e Paula the d her we he store. om’s y, we had nt of money yment. ely destined

s, the okstore has entele that residents, urists. While nce took nment, them on ering $1 in rback and und copy. e books

Two spacious walk-in coolers and a walk-in freezer will give the convention center chefs more options for food preparation.

Customizing menus for clients is something the chef both savors and strives for, “I love to be engaged with my staff and with the clients. ... It’s just something that really drives me.” With the re-opening of the Riverside Convention Center, Martin’s new palette will be a taste opportunity painted large. On any single day, if all the conference rooms and spaces are booked, the kitchen could turn out as many as 6,000 to 8,000 meals: breakfast, lunch and dinner with a core staff of six to eight people and another 30 to 40 people in part-time help. It’s not the same as preparing a meal for friends at home — working large scale, requires a different orientation. “As an executive chef, especially at an operation of this nature, you are more of

conducive

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| riversidethemag.comoctober-november | february-march 2014 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 21

the orchestrator, the director. You are not always touching all of the food. You are gathering everybody together and using your knowledge of the industry — how to manipulate every-body’s time — into getting them to the final goal. “Timing is everything,” the chef says, quickly adding, “Timing and taste are everything.” Teaching is important; being on the floor is important, getting the freshest ingredients — locally grown and produced when possible, it’s all part of the orchestra that is the big kitchen, Martin says. “As much as you have a love for food... you are the orchestrator. So you’re holding the wand up, OK sauté over here, OK grill over there, everybody come together.” He’s ready. Tables for 600?


E D UC ATIO N

Building blocks

Photos by Fr ank Perez

Vocademy owner Gene Sherman

At Vocademy, members have the tools and receive the training to make all sorts of things Written by Amy Bentley

F

or most of his life, Gene Sherman has loved to work with his hands. His father owned a machine shop in Thousand Oaks, where as a child Sherman learned to how build models and other things. After high school, he went into manufacturing and industry, working at various companies and teaching others to use tools and equipment. “I’ve seen how movie cameras are made, satellites are made, chain saws and lawn mowers and everything in

between. I’ve stood next to the space shuttle in Palmdale,” said Sherman, 43, of Jurupa Valley. “Other people want these experiences, and I want to give the experiences to them.” Sherman is realizing his dream as the founder and CEO of Vocademy, a 15,000-square-foot facility on Spruce Street in Riverside. Sherman left his last job of five years at UC Riverside, where he managed the machine shop for the Engineering Department, to open Vocademy in October.

Pieces made with a 3D printer february-march 2014 | riversidethemag.com | 23


• Most popular: 3D printing, machine shop, wood shop and welding classes • In the works for 2014: Gene Sherman plans to add classes in “cosplay,” or costume and prop making. Vocademy will be the first facility of its kind to offer this curriculum, he says.

Sherman teaches a raw materials class.

Vocademy is not a trade school but offers paid memberships, much like a gym. “It’s not just a rental garage, it’s a place to learn,” Sherman said. He calls Vocademy a “makerspace,” a hands-on shop for people who want

to make something or learn a skill and don’t have a personal workshop. Sherman spent about $200,000 in start-up costs — raising funds through industry partners, investors, an online fundraising campaign — and borrowed from his own savings.

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‘It just opened up a whole new world for me. I can now weld and use milling machines. Literally, I feel like I can make anything.’ Sherman teaches many of the classes himself and also uses part-time instructors. Classes include wood shop, 3D printing, sewing, welding and “Safety Training & User Basics” (mandatory for all members). Anyone 16 years and older can use the tools and machines to work on projects or take a class. Vocademy has about 70-80 members, and Sherman hopes to grow the membership to more than 300. John Sheehan, a computer programmer who lives in Hemet, is one of those who signed up. “I’m really a maker at heart,” said Sheehan, adding that Sherman has taught him many practical skills that have helped him become a better handyman and also how to make a metal gate for his house. “He took my skills up to a whole new level.”

Sheehan is looking forward to working with electronics and metal at Vocademy. “It just opened up a whole new world for me. I can now weld and use milling machines,” he said. “Literally, I feel like I can make anything.” Sherman is passionate about his mission. During the past two decades, several business owners have told him that they’re having a difficult time finding qualified people who know how to use tools and machines to build things, and also how to incorporate technology, such as computer programming, into their work. “At the same time, schools are killing off their shop classes because everyone’s funneled into college now,” he said. “We are the second-largest manufacturer in the world. How can you make a mechanical engineer who has never built anything mechanical? “I’m doing this for a higher purpose,” he added. “If you build it, they will come.” Vocademy 1635 Spruce St., Riverside 951-266-6630, www.vocademy.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/ vocademyUSA Twitter: @Vocademy


f i n a nc e

Tips for tax time T

ax day will be here before you know it. So, to get a jump on the last-minute filing rush and (hopefully) to avoid sitting in a car in line at the post office to drop off forms or in front of a computer screen trying to e-file on April 15 at 11:45 p.m., we turned to some local tax pros for advice. Lucia & Co. (http://luciacpa.com), which was established » Organize early to ensure no deductions are missed and to avoid penalties for late filing or payment. » All tax forms (1099s, etc.) must be repor ted (even if not taxable). Be sure to provide all forms to your tax preparer to avoid an IRS notice later. » Don’t put 100 percent trust in taxpreparation software. You still must possess the skill to know what the end result should look like.

in 1984, prepares business and individual income tax forms for clients in Riverside and throughout the Inland Empire. Donald Lucia Jr., the company’s chairman, and Lauri K. Pitcher, CEO, offered 10 tax-season tips. (Note that the Internal Revenue Service and other agencies, such as the AARP, also can help taxpayers file their forms and answer basic tax questions.)

itemizing may provide a higher deduction.

special allowance for star t-up expenses.

» Obtain receipts for all contributions. Be aware that undocumented “cash” in the offering plate at church or other similar donations will not be allowed.

» Note the new simplified home office deduction. The IRS offers a safe harbor of $5 a square foot for up to 300 square feet or a total of $1,500.

» If itemizing, include the taxes paid on cars and boats, state tax payments made, and real estate taxes paid on vacant lots or timeshares, in addition to your primary home.

» If deducting mileage, keep a detailed log or calendar and have the auto serviced at the beginning of each year to document the odometer reading.

» Star t-up business expenses may not be fully deductible, but may qualify for 15-year amor tization, or even better, the

» Optimize your itemized vs. standard deduction. Especially if filing single,

» As a result of the Affordable Care Act, there are many new and complicated tax pitfalls. You should consider using a CPA to file your tax returns for 2013.

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ta ste

m i S ply d

cious eli The Hot Focaccia at Simple Simon’s Photos by LaFonzo Carter


Shortbread Heart, above, and The Grump Lunch

Bakery and bistro has been a pedestrian mall lunchtime institution for decades

L

Written by David Cohen

unch places come and go, so it’s not surprising that it’s difficult to find a restaurant that not only has creative fare, but offers diners the opportunity to eat farm-fresh ingredients served on freshly baked artisan breads. For those reasons and more, Simple Simon’s Bakery & Bistro has been a popular place for breakfast and especially lunch since 1983. The lines stretching out the door around noon are a visual testimonial to the quality of the fare. Co-owner Mark Rubin can usually be found running the cash register, and if you’re an East Coaster who enjoys an Andy Rooneyesque sense of humor interspersed with the personality of a waitress at a New York Jewish deli, you’ll feel right at home. Rubin is the consummate perfectionist, and while his wife and co-owner, Suzie Thiel, quells his intensity level, the reason everything tastes as good as it does is because of Rubin’s hands-on approach and laser-like attention to detail, ensuring that every item looks and tastes exactly as intended.


One of the big pluses is that all sandwiches are prepared using artisan breads, including ciabatta, walnut and currant, a focaccia round, and sourdough walnut. After a half-sandwich with soup, you will feel pleasantly sated. Each sandwich comes with a choice of very cold potato salad, fresh fruit or raw vegetables. My first choice would be the roast lamb — one of the most delicious creations I’ve encountered in the Inland Empire. It’s a thinly sliced mound of meat with grilled eggplant, roasted peppers, feta and provolone cheeses, and onions (ask for them grilled). The contents are topped with a tomato fennel sauce and served on ciabatta bread. My only complaint during a recent visit was that the meat wasn’t spread evenly over the bread, so one half of my sandwich had a relatively sparse amount of meat. The Grump’s Lunch, presumably Rubin’s daily meal, combines pastrami and rye with coleslaw, grilled onions and a Russian dressing containing distinct overtones of smoked paprika. The pastrami was nicely crisped, allowing much of its fattiness to melt away. Vegetarians will find much from which to choose. For one, the Hot Focaccia is outstanding: eggplant and roasted red peppers sauteed with balsamic then topped with romaine, beautifully juicy tomato slices, kalamata olives, provolone, parmesan, garlic and a ricotta pesto spread containing ground walnuts. Carnivores won’t miss the lack of meat at all. The smoky grilled cheese is served on olive oil brushed grilled sourdough and incorporates four cheeses (gruyere, 28

| riversidethemag.com | february-march 2014

After the lunch rush, Simple Simon’s becomes a quieter place to dine.

smoky mozzarella, feta and fontina) with tomato slices and sweet onions. You also can get this as a “loaded smoky” by adding avocado, bacon and arugula. Before moving onto a brief discussion of breakfast and pastry items, don’t miss the deluxe vegetarian black bean chili — which is created using a veritable cornucopia of ingredients: tomato, avocado, onion, cheddar, croutons, sour cream and cilantro, served with moist, luscious cornbread — or the curried turkey salad plate with fresh fruit and vegetables. For those with a huge sweet tooth who always worry about being too full for dessert, the bakery display case contains such treats as Princess Cake (an eight-layer white cake interspersed with raspberry preserves, pastry cream, whipped cream covered with marzipan and whipped cream icing), lemon and blueberry scones, strawberry chocolate mousse layer cake, and the sinfully delicious chocolate croissants — which are best when they come out of the oven around 11 a.m. Have any one of these treats with a vanilla latte up front. You can always take part of your sandwich or salad home. Finally, a few words about ordering. If you don’t want to stand in line during lunchtime for 30-45 minutes to place

an order, I’d suggest coming in to eat at 11 a.m. or after 1:30 p.m. Simple Simon’s is open until 5 p.m. and you can always get something to go if the doors are about to close, then eat on the outside patio along the pedestrian mall. You get your own drinks after paying at the register and pick up plastic utensils and napkins at a station against the wall. Also, if you have room, snap up a rhubarb mini pie to go. You can always have it for breakfast the next day!

Simple Simon’s Bakery & Bistro Where: 3639 Main St., Riverside Prices: Salads and salad plates, $6.75-$10.50; sandwiches, $7.95-$11.95 Hours: 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. MondayFriday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; closed Sunday Call: 951-369-6030

Princess Cake


A short walk, then let’s eat Written by Jerry Rice

T

here are lots of dining options near the Riverside Convention Center. To see how long of a trek it will take to get lunch, we launched a pedometer app, put one foot in front of the other, then discovered… Walking south from the convention center’s tower, it takes 86 steps to reach the Southern smoked barbecue dishes served up at Gram’s Mission Bar-B-Que (http://gramsmissionbbq.com). July marks the 26th anniversary of the restaurant in downtown Riverside, including 16 at its current location. It takes another 60 steps to reach The Upper Crust (http://tucdeli.com), which is known for its grinders, subs and sandwiches. Next door is Proabition Whiskey Lounge & Kitchen (www.proabition.com) with its Roaring ‘20s speakeasy vibe, which has helped make it a local hotspot since opening a year ago. For ty-four more steps will get you to Bella Trattoria (www.missioninn.com), an Italian style sidewalk cafe. It’s one of four dining options at the historic Mission Inn Hotel & Spa. Continuing the same direction, another 61 steps away is Simple Simon’s (read David Cohen’s story on Page 26). Take 35 more to reach The Tamale Factory (www.tamalefactory.net), where owner and chef Naomi Avila uses time-tested recipes handed down from her mother. Walk another 90 or so paces to reach The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. Take a few steps in one direction to Elephant Thai Cuisine or the other direction to Antonious Pizza & Cafe (www.antoniouspizzariverside.com) and Pacific Stiks. Go east on Mission Inn Avenue to reach The Hideaway Café & Lounge (www.facebook.com/TheHideaway3700), an appropriately named place because getting there requires going down a stairway with 24 steps. Before 5:30 p.m., another entrance is available through the Mission Galleria antiques mall. The Hideaway’s fare includes sandwiches and salads. White-tablecloth dining is available a few more steps away at Mario’s Place (http://mariosplace.com), where Chef Leone Palagi’s take on Nor thern Italian cuisine has been praised far and wide. To return to the convention center from here will take 370 steps, more or less.

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h e a lth Q& A

How to reduce

high blood pressure

H

igh blood pressure, or hypertension, is often referred to as a “silent killer” because it usually exhibits no symptoms. It is a serious health issue that can lead to stroke, heart failure, heart disease and kidney failure. The American Heart Association estimates that one third of all Americans have hypertension, and many of those don’t even realize they have it. To get a better view of high blood pressure and for suggestions on how to control it without using medications, we talked with Dr. Graham Scott, the chief of Family Medicine at Kaiser Permanente Riverside. Question: What is a normal blood pressure reading, and how often should it be checked? Answer: Blood pressure is normal when it is less than 120 mm Hg systolic and less than 80 mm Hg diastolic. It should be checked at least once a year. Q: We’ve heard that herbal teas, certain foods (such as dried apricots) and even vinegar can help lower blood

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| riversidethemag.com | february-march 2014

pressure. What do you recommend I put into the cart on my next trip to the grocery store? A: There are many lifestyle changes that will reduce blood pressure including dietary changes. Read the labels on your food purchases and pay close attention to the sodium content; try to keep to less than 1.5g daily. The Joint National Committee on Hypertension recommends a DASH diet (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension), which is rich in fresh fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy products with reduced saturated and total fat. Q: Exercise certainly benefits every body, but what if there’s no time during the week for an exhaustive gym workout? What are the best things I can do at home that would help lower blood pressure? A: Exercising is a great way to bring down your blood pressure. At least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise on most days of the week is recommended. For those who are pressed for time, the 30 minutes can be divided up into 10-minute episodes at different times throughout the day. Walking is a great way to exercise — it can be done almost anywhere, it’s fun and it does not cost anything. A good way to fit a quick walk into a busy schedule is to always take the stairs instead of the elevator and park as far from your destination as possible. The walk across the parking lot will do you good. Q: Meditation and other

relaxation techniques seem like they would be good. What are your suggestions? A: Meditation and relaxation techniques Dr. Graham Scott have not been graduated from the proven to University of Cape Town in South Africa contribute to and performed his the overall family medicine long-term residency at Kaiser reduction Permanente Riverside, where he of blood is the chief of Family pressure, but Medicine. Scott is they are board cer tified in family medicine and is certainly very specialist in clinical effective ways hyper tension through of reducing the the American Society of Hyper tension. He stress in our has been practicing lives. as a family physician Q: Stressful at Kaiser Permanente situations — for 15 years. which may lead to elevated blood pressure — sometimes can’t be avoided. What are the most effective actions that can be taken to reduce the anxiety that comes with these situations? A: Stressful situations often cannot be avoided and can cause a temporary elevation in blood pressure that will usually come back down to normal once the stressful situation has passed. Understand that this elevation in blood pressure is harmless and is part of your body’s normal mechanism for coping with stress. Anticipating possible stressful situations can help to avoid the anxiety that comes at these times.


seen 1

Fox Riverside Theater Foundation Benefit Concert Singer Melissa Manchester came to The Box at the Fox Entertainment Plaza recently to perform a benefit concert for the Fox Riverside Theater Foundation. Proceeds from the event, which included a VIP reception with the artist, supported the foundation’s theater education programs. Information: www.riversidefoxfoundation.org

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(1) Melissa Manchester (2) John and Trish Field, left, Steve and Liz Cunnison, and Sarah Suverkrup Mundy (3) Kathy Wright and Dwight Tate (4) Richard and Melissa Rouhe, left, and Jim and Debbi Guthrie (5) Marcia and Frank Campbell (6) John and Cynthia Wright, left, Ida and Steve Craft (7) John and Connie Jackson (8) Theryl Buan and Anne Marie Acosta (9) Brian Pearcy, left, Tera Harden, Kevin and Maryann Manning

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seen The Junior League of Riverside’s annual Sapphire Ball, held recently at the Riverside Auditorium & Events Center, was a fundraiser to celebrate the organization’s projects including fitRiverside, which combats childhood obesity through physical fitness and nutrition education.

sav e th e date Junior League Sapphire Ball

March 1 – Soroptimist International Saturday of Service and the seventh annual Live Your Dream Conference. California Baptist University, 8432 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; http://soroptimistriverside.org.

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March 29 – American Lung Association’s Respiratory Rally. Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, 400 N. Pepper Ave., Colton; 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 909-321-3290; http://action.lung.org/coltonrally. 3

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charitable events

April 5 – Fashion show and luncheon, with a silent auction and $1,000 oppor tunity drawing, hosted by the Assistance League of Riverside. Proceeds suppor t the philanthropic programs of Assistance League. Riverside Convention Center, 3637 Fifth St.; doors open at 10:30 a.m., luncheon at noon; $65; 951-682-3445.

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May 3 – Rape Crisis Center’s annual banquet auction gala. Dr. G. Richard Olds, founding dean of the UC Riverside School of Medicine, will be the master of ceremonies. 951-686-7273, www.rarcc.org.

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music

Switchfoot performs at 7:30 p.m. April 11 at The Wiltern in Los Angeles. Information: www.switchfoot.com Switchfoot Photo by Chris Burk ard

Tim Foreman

Jerome Fontamillas

Drew Shirley

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or Switchfoot, life is all about the journey. With that in mind, the San Diego-based alternative rock band embarked on the most ambitious adventure of its nearly two-decade career. Seeking fresh inspiration, the five musicians routed a 2012 concert trek around some of the world’s best surf breaks in Australia, South Africa and Bali. They gave the big waves a spin, visited locals and caught it on camera. The results are documented in absorbing new film, “Fading West,” and the accompanying album. During some scenes, lead singer/guitarist Jon Foreman lays everything on the line emotionally. “The fans feel they know us more now because we’ve revealed the inner workings of our lives,” said Drew Shirley, 39, guitarist and former Riverside resident. “They really listen with their hearts to our songs, so it’s cool to be able to share that.”

Switchfoot was started by Foreman, bassist brother Tim and drummer Chad Butler in 1996. The guys (who competed in national surfing contests) released three indie albums, made major inroads at Christian rock radio and added keyboardist Jerome Fontamillas in 2000. Major label breakthrough “The Beautiful Letdown” arrived three years later and went double platinum. Since then, the quintet has amassed another gold record, eight top 20 alternative radio hits, a Grammy and 11 Dove Awards. Shirley joined Switchfoot in 2005. Before that, he played in All Together Separate. The Dove-nominated Christian funk/rock group was comprised of fellow California Baptist University students during the late ‘90s/early ‘00s. The Puerto Rico-born guitarist studied fine arts and music at the university. “I was sort of a drama nerd,” recalled Shirley. “Had a great experience there, just learning to find my identity.” Some of his fondest Riverside memories include going to Mt. Rubidoux, the Old Spaghetti Factory downtown, and hanging out and performing live with ATS at the Jon Foreman

Written by George A. Paul

Chad Butler

Surfin’ safari, rooted in Riverside

Coffee Depot (which closed in 2000). “I lived in a rented early-1900s house in the orange groves off Victoria Avenue for a little while,” he said. “I just loved driving down Victoria and smelling the oranges. So awesome.” Following graduation, Shirley worked with local high school students as a Campus Life director. On the pop-oriented album “Fading West,” Switchfoot utilizes vintage and unusual instruments (an African tin gas can guitar is heard on “Love Alone is Worth the Fight”), which led the musicians to change their usual creative approach. “We stepped pretty far out of our comfort zone,” Shirley said. “Jon and I decided to put guitars on last, only if they were needed. That was one of our rules and it dictated the sound would change quite a bit for a guitar-driven rock band.” One memorable “Fading West” film segment finds Switchfoot reunited with teens in Africa they had first met several years before. Everyone performs together during the new tune, “The World You Want.” “They were just so ecstatic to see us again,” said Shirley. “A lot of them had grown up quite a bit. It was a fun, beautiful moment and something that’s definitely burned into my memory.”


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Riverside Magazine  
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After decades of hosting events of all types, the Riverside Convention Center recently underwent an extreme makeover and is now ready for it...

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