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EXCLUSIVE MAGAZINE OF THE MARYLAND-NATIONAL CAPITAL BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

JULY/AUGUST 2010

IN MARYLAND AND WASHINGTON, DC

2010 Custom Builder Awards


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Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association 1738 Elton Road, Suite 200 Silver Spring, MD 20903 Phone (301) 445-5400 Fax (301) 445-5499 E-mail: communications@mncbia.org Website: www.mncbia.org 2010 Executive Committee Edward (Guy) R. Curley, III President

Frank Bossong, IV P.E., Associate Vice President

Jim Kettler Vice President/Calvert Co.

Steve Nardella Treasurer

Doug Meeker Vice President/Charles Co.

Dave Lunden Vice President, State Legislative/ Secretary

Robert J. Spalding Vice President/Montgomery Co.

BUILDING

IN MARYLAND AND WASHINGTON, DC Representing Calvert, Charles, Montgomery, Prince George’s and St. Mary’s counties in Maryland and Washington, DC

FEATURES

Robert A. Jacobs Life Director

Marty Mitchell Vice President/ Prince George’s Co.

Thomas M. Farasy Immediate Past President

John B. Norris, III Vice President/St. Mary’s Co.

Stephen P. Elmendorf Legal Counsel

Brian (A.J.) Jackson Vice President/Washington, DC

Diane K. Swenson CAE, Executive Vice President

2010 Board of Directors Bill Bilo Hillary Colt Cahan Mike Conley Chuck Covell Tony Crane Timothy Dugan Ken Dunn Andrea Leahy-Fucheck Robert Harris Howard Katz Gary Kret David Little Charlene F. Parker-Thayer

Stephen Paul Nanci Porten Karen Radisch Marc Rose Andy Rosenthal Gary Rubino Ronald Rymer Ted Smart Ray Sobrino Clark Wagner Peggy White Bryan Whittington Carter Willson

MNCBIA Staff Executive Vice President - Diane K. Swenson, JD, CAE Communications Manager - Kelly H. Grudziecki Financial Services Manager - Linda Groft Director of Government Affairs - F. Hamer Campbell, Jr. Associate Director/Government Affairs Raquel Montenegro Associate Director/Regulatory Affairs Annette T. Rosenblum Membership Manager - Debi Turpin Member Services Manager - Samantha Ager Program Manager - Builders Development Guaranty Group Debi Turpin Program Manager - Home Builders Care Foundation Patricia B. Kane

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5 2010 Custom Builder Awards Honoring Fine Design and Quality Workmanship 9 Multifamily Revs Its Engines Multifamily is Leading the Real Estate Recovery

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1 4 Tennis Anyone? Members turn out for MNCBIA’s 2nd Annual Tennis Tournament

DEPARTMENTS 4 A Message from the President 11 The Legal Pad

14 Published for: Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association 1738 Elton Road, Suite 200 Silver Spring, Maryland 20903 301 445-5400 Fax: 301 445-5499 E-mail: building@mncbia.org Website: www.mncbia.org

JULY/AUGUST 2010

12 The Engineer’s Angle 13 MNCBIA Membership News

MNCBIA’s Most Wanted List

STARS Club

New Members

14 Events Calendar

Published by:

E&M Consulting, Inc. 80 West 78th Street, Suite #230 Chanhassen, MN 55317 800-572-0011 Fax: 952-294-9944 Website: www.emconsultinginc.com Published April 2010 MNC-S0210/9844

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

Team Work is the Best Answer

W

ow! It’s July 1st and there are only 169 days left in the Curley Presidency. I appreciate all of you who responded to the Nominating Committee’s call for action for 2011. When I spoke to Mr. Tom Farasy, I graciously accepted the position of Past President and am looking forward to writing my memoirs. All kidding aside, the first half of this year went by extremely fast. It seems like the legislative session just got started when the back-to-back snowstorms were upon us. April showers came and went along with Sine Dine. As Maryland’s General Session came to a close we barely had time catch our breath before dissecting the effects of the MDE’s Stormwater Regulations. And before we knew it, new tasks were looming on the horizon. Without the entire MNCBIA team in action, our spring could have remained a soggy one for a long time. As the dog days of summer are upon us and we get sidetracked with summer vacations, ballgames and cookouts, I want to thank each of you for your commitment to the MNCBIA. This remains one of the most resilient, creative and caring teams of folks I have been involved with and I am proud to lead. Moving forward into the second half of 2010, we will be challenged mainly from the lack of new (or being able to expand) current Acquisition, Development & Construction loans. In addition you may be called on by one of your teammates to participate with EPA Effluent Limitation Guidelines (state implementation), EPA Baywide TMDL or the Federal Executive Order Initiatives. The Cardin/ Cummings Bay Chesapeake Bay Clean up and Reauthorization Act could also impact our industry for many years to come. If we continue to work as a team we should be able to finish our year with a winning record. But in order to be successful we need to expand our team roster. This can be accomplished by continuing to partner with other stakeholder groups on common missions and by bringing in new members to the MNCBIA team. We so strongly believe in the value of membership at MNCBIA that we have just approved a “First Year Money Back Guarantee Membership” that begins on July 1st. To receive a refund of first year’s dues, the member must write to our Executive Vice President, Diane Swenson, asking for a membership dues refund and indicating the nine events they have attended during that first year of membership. Our membership co-chairs Marc Rose and Michael Faerber are always happy to help with recruiting efforts, and to answer your questions about this new offer, so feel free to email them at marcr@mtr.com or mfaerber@mcmillanmetro.com.

Edward R. Curley, III

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All teams need trophies now and then to boost morale. Inside this issue, you will find the winners of our 2nd Annual Tennis Tournament. You will also see that some of your teammates have excelled in the area of custom building. I was fortunate to be able to greet and pass out the awards at the event, now in it’s 16th year. All of the entrants and winners did a great job and should be commended for doing extraordinary things in a tough market. Cheers!

Is The Housing Industry Under Siege By Our State And Federal Elected Officials? You Be The Judge! Proposed Maryland Regulations E - Storm Water regulation implementation E - Storm Water redevelopment policy issues P - Erosion and Sediment Control draft regulation/technical standards P - Maryland NPDES re-opener modifications (This would make Maryland the first state with Effluent Limitation Guidelines.) H - Controlled Hazardous Substance draft regulations E - State Highway Administration entranceway draft regulations H - New Home Third Party Warranty draft regulations P - Advanced energy efficiency construction requirements

Federal Regulation E - EPA Effluent Limitation Guidelines (state implementation) P - EPA Baywide TMDL (Expected by July 2010, with implementation by December 2010. This will then trigger local watershed implementation plans as a result of TMDLs) P - Federal Executive Order Initiative

Legend E=Enacted U=Unfavorable NA=No Action

W=Withdrawn P= Pending

A=Amended H=Holding


2010

Custom Builder Awards

C

ustom homebuilders, architects and remodelers throughout the greater Washington region were awarded top honors for their fine design and quality workmanship in the annual MNCBIA Custom Builder Awards on May 20th at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel. Judging was done over a three-day period utilizing the expertise of architects, builders, land planners and marketing consultants. The judges viewed both interior and exterior of the homes in addition to detailed written information, photographs and plans. In this competitive custom housing market, all of these winners are shining examples of the talent and expertise that our area has to offer.

Speculative Home Under 3,500 sq. ft.

- Gold Warren Brothers Construction » Architect: Susan Keeney

- Silver Studio Z Design Concepts, LLC » Builder: Zuckerman Partners

Speculative Home 3,500 to 5,000 sq. ft.

- Gold Chase Builders, Inc. » Architect: Studio Z Design Concepts, LLC

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Speculative Home Over 7,500 sq. ft.

Custom Home 3,500 to 5,000 sq. ft.

- Gold -

- Gold -

Camberley Homes » Architect: Bassenian Lagoni

Sandy Spring Classic Homes, LLC » Architect: Studio Z Design Concepts, LLC

- Silver -

Speculative Traditional Home

- Gold -

Mangan Group Architects » Builder: Turning Point Homes, LLC

Three Brothers Land Company, Inc. » Architect: Claude C. Lapp, AIA

Custom Home 5,000 to 7,500 sq. ft.

- Gold -

Speculative Transitional Home

Alliance Homes » Architect: GTM Architects

- Gold Laurence Cafritz Builders » Architect: Sutton Yantis Associates Architects

Custom Home 7,500 to 12,500 sq. ft.

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- Silver -

- Gold -

Bethesda Bungalows » Architect: Christian Gladu

Sandy Spring Builders, LLC » Architect: Custom Design Concepts

- Bronze -

- Silver -

Crescendo Builders, LLC » Architect: GTM Architects

Studio Z Design Concepts, LLC » Builder: Sandy Spring Builders, LLC

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Custom Home Over 12,500 sq. ft.

New or Remodeled Kitchen

- Gold Warren Brothers Construction, LLC » Architect: Tom Nyein, AIA

Before

- Gold Meridian Homes Inc. » Architect: Custom Design Concepts

Traditional Custom Home

Custom Addition Over 2,000 sq. ft.

- Gold Bell Builders, Inc. » Architect: Scott Spencer

Before

- Gold Washington Metropolitan Homes » Architect: Chris Lapp

- Silver Chrisler Homes, LLC » Architect: Raoul Lissabet Architects, LLC

Partial House Renovation

- Gold Alliance Homes

Transitional Custom Home

Before

- Gold Paramount Construction, Inc.

- Silver Chuck Sullivan Homes, LLC » Architect: Van Franke & Studio Z Design Concepts, LLC

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Whole House Renovation Under 2,000 sq. ft.

- Bronze Gibson Builders, LLC » Architect: GTM Architects

- Gold Before

Before

Douglas Construction Group, LLC » Architect: Michael K. Bell

Whole House Renovation (Adaptive Re-Use) Whole House Renovation Over 2,000 sq. ft.

- Gold Brooks Run Builders

- Gold Before

Before

Mangan Group Architects » Builder: Rosenthal Homes

- Silver Sandy Spring Builders, LLC » Architect: GTM Architects

And finally, a special thank you to Dennis Hockman, publisher of Chesapeake Home Magazine, and our official partner in these awards, as well as our Grande Sponsor, Century Stair Company and our Friend of the Custom Builder Awards, Insurance Associates, Inc. m

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Congratulations to all the winners whose work creates both homes and masterpieces.

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Multifamily Revs Its Engine Multifamily is leading the real estate recovery. Fueled by echo-boomers, it will eventually blast off. But not just yet.

“H

ere’s my favorite statistic,” says Tom Bozzuto. “The class starting college in September of 2009 is the largest class in the history of higher education in the U.S.” As CEO of the Washington, DC-based residential development firm The Bozzuto Group, Bozzuto knows this statistic foretells the coming of a flood of young apartment renters within a couple of years. Called Millennials or Echo Boomers, they are the children of the Baby Boom generation, a massive 80-some-million strong population segment that multifamily developers and operators are looking forward to meeting. “The historical pattern is that when young people move out and form their own households, they move into apartments first,” Bozzuto says. Add to that the federal government and its ability to create jobs and attract young people, and you can see why multifamily real estate in the national capital region is poised to blast off.

First Things First But first, multifamily has to lead other categories of real estate out of the Great Recession. That process seems to have begun as demand for apartments is growing and capitalization rates for multifamily developments are falling across the region. “Occupancy rates are up substantially throughout the area,” observes Bozzuto, whose firm manages 30,000 apartment units between suburban Virginia and Baltimore. “Landlord concessions are lessening significantly, and job creation is getting underway. It is much more of a landlord’s market than it has been.” It is also becoming a sellers market. “We are seeing interest in Class A multifamily properties,” says Tom Farasy, president of Terra Verde Communities, LLC, in Burtonsville, MD. “Brokers tell me that they are receiving 10 to 15 offers on Class A properties.”

Photo Courtesy of: The Bozzuto Group

By Michael Fickes

The credit markets aren’t locked up completely as they were a year ago. Some projects are moving forward. Multifamily capitalization rates are compressing. “About nine months ago, the spigot turned on in metro DC” says Asheel Shah, vice president of investments with Kettler, Inc., in McLean, VA. “Nine months ago, cap rates for Class A-B+ rehab product was probably around 7. Today, those properties are probably averaging sub 6. “Core Class A high-rise buildings were in the mid to high 5s nine months ago. Today, they are in the mid to low-5 range.”

Not That Easy Nothing about the Great Recession has been easy, though. While investors are doing better, developers are not. As more renters come into the market, they drive demand and rents up. Investors will pay more for more income, so cap rates are going down. Generally, rising demand will bring more developers into the market. Not now, though, or at least not yet. “There has been no new product added to the DC metro market for a long time,” says Bozzuto. The reason? Credit availability. “The only commercially acceptable lending source for new construction out there for multifamily today is the HUD 221 D4 program,” says Farasy. “Being the only lender in town means that HUD can be extremely selective. In our area, HUD isn’t interested in garden apartments. Instead,

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it wants to do the newest style of developments such as transit oriented. At the same time, the agency won’t consider financing deals in areas like Rockville where there is transit oriented development but perhaps not enough demand to take on any new supply. “In addition, HUD is right now tightening its underwriting standards to require more equity.” “Commercial lenders say that they are in the market and willing to entertain construction loans for well-thought out projects,” says Bozzuto. “But I suspect they will want developers to hold a 30 percent or higher share of equity.” Credit availability remains sluggish because lending institutions have not yet dealt with their non-performing loans and can’t afford to make new loans. A recent report by the CoStar Group, Inc. in Bethesda, MD, found that the amount of delinquent multifamily loans rose 59 percent to $12.7 billion between the first quarter of 2009 and the first quarter of this year. All told, foreclosed commercial real estate grew by 73 percent from a year ago to $31.3 billion.

Up From Recession Then again, the credit markets aren’t locked up completely as they were a year ago. Some projects are moving forward. Terra Verde is working on two projects. The Bozzuto Group has a number of projects in its pipeline including three in the national capital region. And the massive White Flint development, projected to provide work for developers for 20 years or so, is just getting underway. According to Farasy of Terra Verde: “We are just finishing entitlements for a 300 multifamily unit development abutting the University of Maryland campus. I’m also working on a 200-apartment deal in Darnestown, MD. It will have four stories and an elevator.” One of the Bozzuto developments is a suburban site. Another occupies a site adjoining the subway in downtown DC. The third is in Bethesda. “Most of what we are doing is high-density, transit-oriented and mixed-use,” Bozzuto says. In late March of this year, the Montgomery County Council gave unanimous approval to a plan to transform 430 acres in White Flint along Rockville Pike into self contained villages where residents will live, shop, play and often work. The Washington Post places the project within “a national movement to re-engineer older neighborhoods built around America’s love affair with the car.” The development will eventually include a local circulating bus system, bike paths and walkways that connect communities and commercial centers. Residents will take longer trips on Metro and at some point in the future by way of MARC. The plan calls for 10,000 new housing units in high-rise buildings. By contrast, White Flint now counts about 2,400 homes within its boundaries. Is the White Flint transit oriented development plan the wave of the future in multifamily development? “It certainly is a significant multifamily trend,” says Jorgen Punda, a regional vice president with Atlanta-based Gables Residential, speaking from his offices in McLean. A privately held multifamily real estate investment trust (REIT), Gables owns 3.5 acres in White Flint and plans to build a multifamily project there. Gables is also part of the White Flint Partnership, a group through which half a dozen White Flint developers are coordinating their work. If White Flint does not represent a trend, it does bear watching. The Washington Post reports that the planners believe the project will “persuade at least half of the

estimated 50,000 people who eventually would work in White Flint to stop relying on cars” by living nearby or using the mass transit resources.

The Echo Boom Cometh While White Flint cranks up its 20-year development program, the local economy will continue to recover. Observers expect the commercial real estate market to lag behind the general recovery. On the other hand, the multifamily real estate market is expected to lead the commercial real estate recovery. “It will recover sooner than the other categories,” Farasy says. “Even then it will take until 2012 and 2013 for the multifamily development markets.” Why so long? Remember that 2009 was the year that the nations largest ever class of college freshman matriculated. That class, the peak year for Echo Boomers, will graduate in 2013, find a job in the recovering employment market and start looking for an apartment. Several years after that, the Echo Boomers will marry, have children, and start to rev up the single family and multifamily ownership markets. m

New Storm Water Regs May Hamper Multifamily Development Multifamily developers contend that Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) regulators should oppose their own new stormwater run off rules. The state is pushing for more transit-oriented development — mixed-use developments with restaurants, retail shops, office facilities and residential rental and condominium space. The new stormwater regulations, however, push multifamily developers out into the suburbs. Under the new regulations, development sites must allow stormwater to run off into green space and be absorbed directly into the ground. The old regulations called for underground retention tanks in the city and ponds in the suburbs that would capture run off and route it back to a river or creek and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Today, however, run off has been declared a source of Bay pollution. So instead of routing stormwater run off back to the Bay, the state wants developments to allow stormwater to run off into green areas on site, where the earth will absorb it. “That means we need to build rain gardens, swales and other green space that reduces the density of the development,” says Tom Farasy, president of Terra Verde Communities, LLC, in Burtonsville, MD. “But urban transit oriented developments require density to earn a profit. Green space reduces density. These sites are economically challenged already. A developer can’t sacrifice density and still pencil out a project.” The upshot? Farasy says builders will move multifamily developments to the suburbs where green space is readily available and less expensive — exactly what smart growth principles try to avoid. Since the rules were first issued, says Farasy, developer lobbying has brought about some changes in the regulations that will provide local jurisdictions with discretion in enforcing the new rules for redevelopments such as transit oriented mixed use projects. m

Multifamily Trends Conference The Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association’s (MNCBIA) Multifamily Trends Conference will take place this coming November 17. Tom Marshall, regional partner and vice president with Elm Street Development and chair of the MNCBIA Multifamily Council, has already begun planning the event. “Any topic is on the table,” he says. “We’ll look at trends in the market, pricing, finance, construction, products and demographics.” Ron Terwilliger, Chairman Emeritus, Trammell Crow Residential, will give the keynote speech and discuss his perspective on the multifamily industry. Julie Smith of Bozzuto, Drew Dolben of Dolben, Peter Gartland of Donohoe, Greg Bonifield of Woodfield Investments and Anirban Basu of the Sage Policy Group will be on the program. “I invite all those in the housing industry, even if your primary line of business is not multifamily. It promises to be a great conference,” says Marshall. m

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The Legal Pad Is the Transition of Maryland Condominiums and Community Associations from Developers to Owners Out of Control? By Judyann Lee, Linowes and Blocher LLP

I

n October of 2009 the Maryland Condominium Act and the Maryland Homeowners Association Act were both amended by the Maryland legislature to require developers of residential condominiums and homeowners associations to transition control of the boards of directors of condominium associations and homeowners associations from the developer to the homeowners. Under the Maryland Condominium Act, a meeting of the condominium association to elect a board of directors must be held within 60 days from the date that units representing 50 percent of the votes in the condominium have been conveyed by the developer to members of the public. Similarly, a meeting to elect the board of directors of a homeowners association must be held within 60 days from the date that at least 75 percent of the total number of lots that may be part of the development are sold to members of the public. Under both acts, the term of each member of the board of directors appointed by the developer shall end 10 days after such transition meeting, provided a replacement board member is elected. In addition, within 30 days of such meeting, the developer must deliver to the replacement board, at its own expense, certain items including, copies of all association books and records. The foregoing revisions to the Maryland Condominium Act and the Maryland Homeowners Association Act have arguably made it more difficult for developers to maintain control over the development of their projects. When a condominium or homeowners association is first started, the developer is usually in the midst of developing and completing construction of the project, as well as marketing and selling homes in the project. The developer is investing large amounts of money, time and work in the project. In order to protect its investment, the governing documents for the project usually contain provisions that allow the developer to exercise control over the development and operation of the project until a certain date in the future or when a certain percentage of units or number of lots have been sold. This ‘developer control period’ could last a year or several years depending on the size of the project, the construction schedule, and rate of sales of homes in the project. During this ‘developer control period’ the developer appoints the members of the board of directors for the association. By amending

The developer should consider early on what areas of the project’s development it wants to control and reserve its rights to do so in the governing documents. these statutes the legislature clearly intended to require developers to turn over control of the association to the homeowners, but it’s not clear how much control. Does the developer, who may still own 50 percent of the votes in a condominium or 25 percent of the lots in a homeowners association still have the right to vote for members of the board of directors? Can the developer’s appointees be nominated and run for election? What if the project is a mixed-use project and the association’s board is comprised of residential members and non-residential members – can the developer’s non-residential board appointees remain on the board? While the legislation does not provide clear answers to the foregoing questions, a set of well-drafted governing documents will address any ambiguities. The developer should consider early on what areas of the project’s development it wants to control and reserve its rights to do so in the governing documents. For example, the developer will want to reserve the following rights: to approve the initial construction of any improvements within the project; to add property to or withdraw property from the project; to grant certain easements; and to correct errors in the governing documents or otherwise make certain amendments or modifications to them. However, the developer must also carefully balance its reservation of rights with the legislative intent of passing control of the community to the homeowners. While it’s not clear when the reservation of developer rights crosses the line and runs afoul of this legislative intent, the more reasonable the reserved right, the less likely it will be challenged by a homeowner or held by a court to be prohibited under the statutes. Judyann Lee is an attorney in the Common Interest Practice Group of Linowes and Blocher LLP and represents developers of condominiums and community associations. She may be reached at jlee@linowes-law.com or 301-961-5234. m

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The Engineer’s Angle Proactive Sediment Control Design to Minimize Future Compliance Liabilities By Dusty Rood, AICP, LEED AP & Phil Hughes, PE, Rodgers Consulting, Inc.

A

s this new generation of environmental regulations continues to unfold, the need to remain focused on adapting to change has never been greater. Maryland’s new stormwater regulations requiring Environmental Site Design (ESD) are fundamentally different from the approach our industry has been dealing with for nearly two decades. Fortunately, with the help of the industry association’s leadership, opportunities to minimize the financial losses associated with this regulatory change were created. Looking forward, what other changes are expected and what can we do right now to plan our next project to avoid or minimize adverse future regulatory impacts? Over the next several years three updated or new regulatory programs will begin to take effect that will directly impact our industry. These three programs, the 2010 Erosion/Sediment Control (E/SC) Standards, the Federal Effluent Limitation Guideline (ELG) and the State’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) General Permit for Construction Activities will change the way land development projects are designed, permitted and constructed. The 2010 E/SC Standards, currently in draft form but scheduled to be issued this year, change the way that the construction process occurs by requiring limits to the amount of disturbed land, the use of chemical treatment systems and reducing the timeframe for stabilization to occur. The Federal ELG, which will be implemented through the State of Maryland, establishes a numeric limit of the turbidity of runoff from a construction site, which could require monitoring and enhanced treatment measures to maintain turbidity levels. Third, the NPDES General Permit takes what used to be a simple process to obtain coverage and creates a complex process that facilitates public comment and increases coordination and timeframes. With these recent and pending changes on the horizon there are many factors to consider as you plan your next project. One common thread that exists between these three programs is that the more land your project disturbs, the greater your liabilities, mitigation requirements and risk. Therefore, as soon as you finish reading this article you should evaluate your project’s Erosion & Sediment Control Plan and the area of disturbance relative to critical thresholds. For your reference, provided below is the list of important thresholds that every sediment control designer, site supervisor, and project manager should be mindful of.

1 Acre (43,560 sf) • Obtain NPDES General Permit coverage with a minimum 30 day public review period and coordination of local E/SC Plans 3 Acres (130,680 sf) • Obtain NPDES General Permit coverage with a minimum 45 day public review period and coordination of local E/SC Plans 5 Acres (217,800 sf) • Provide passive chemical treatment 10 Acres (435,600 sf) • Provide active chemical treatment • As early as February 2014, comply with numeric turbidity limit of 280 NTU 20 Acres (871,200 sf) • Maximum area of ‘grading unit’, or allowable area of disturbance • As early as August 2011, comply with numeric turbidity limit of 280 NTU 150 Acres (6,534,000 sf) in certain watersheds • NPDES General Permit coverage is no longer available and an Individual Permit is required

While the benefits of exceeding these thresholds, such as earthwork balancing for example, may outweigh the costs in certain situations, these thresholds should be a part of the design and decision-making process. Hopefully this simple piece of information will be useful as you plan your next project. m Dusty Rood, AICP, LEED AP is a Principal and Environmental Consultant with Rodgers Consulting, Inc. and is Chairperson of the MNCBIA’s Environmental Committee. Phil Hughes, PE is a Senior Associate and Water Resources Engineer with Rodgers Consulting, Inc. and serves on Montgomery County’s New Stormwater Products Committee.

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MNCBIA Membership New Members (as of June 1, 2010) BUILDERS

DTB Improvements Remodeling Dale Bilo 5408 Whitfield Chapel Rd. Lanham MD 20706 Ph: 301-306-5449 DTBImprovements@aol.com Sponsor: Bill Bilo

Homestead Building Systems, Inc, Building Materials Matt Danner 10109 Piper Lane Bristow VA 20136 Ph: 301-748-1382 matt.danner@homesteadbuildingsystems.com Sponsor: Marty Mitchell

ASSOCIATES

JK Moving & Storage Matt Plumer 7561 Lindbergh Dr. Gaithersburg MD 20879 Ph: 240-360-6683 matt.plumer@jkmoving.com Sponsor: Marc Rose

Capital Strategies, LLC Public Relations Robert Johnson 155 Duke of Gloucester Annapolis MD 21401 Ph: 410-268-3099 rjohnson@capitol-strategies.com Sponsor: Tom Farasy

MNCBIA’s Most Wanted List

Rubino Design & Consulting, LLC Architects Gary Rubino 2309 Twin Valley Lane Silver Spring MD 20906 Ph: 301-873-8109 gjrubino@gmail.com Sponsor: Edward Curley

Fastsigns Sign Making Hank Bharmal 7634 Standish Place Rockville MD 20855 Ph: 301-251-0555 bharmal@fastsigns.com Sponsor: Joseph C Smith

Taksey, Neff & Associates, LLC Accountants & CPAs Jeffrey Taksey 2 Research Place Suite 310 Rockville MD 20850 Ph: 301-294-1100 jtaksey@tncpas.com Sponsor: Michael Faerber

Gordon Feinblatt Attorneys Timothy Perry 233 East Redwood Street Baltimore MD 21202 Ph: 410-576-4227 tperry@gfrlaw.com Sponsor: Tom Farasy

TGM Granite & Marble Countertop Suppliers Yasar Ozturk 11905 Bowman Drive Unit 505-506 Fredericksburg VA 22408 Ph: 540-373-7311 info@tgmgranitemarble.com Sponsor: Marc Rose

Listed here are firms whose membership in MNCBIA has lapsed in recent months. WE WANT THEM BACK! Please encourage these companies to reinstate their membership. Bluewing Environmental Solutions & Technologies, LLC Ice Edge Business Solutions Key Bank Premier Lifts, Inc. Elsroad Trim Corp. Quiza Management, LLC Site Maintenance Companies Robert Charles Lesser & Co., LLC Mason Dixon Funding RBC Builder Finance The Washington Post Conteh Builders, Inc. PDC, Inc.

STARS Club GOLD

Acacia Federal Savings Bank BB&T Bank DGG-MC Hanley Wood Market Intelligence Linowes & Blocher, LLP PEPCO Pleasants Development, Inc.

SILVER

Georgetown Insurance Service, Inc. Loiederman Soltesz Associates, Inc. McMillan Metro, P.C. Miles & Stockbridge P.C. Rodgers Consulting Inc.

BRONZE

Ballard Spahr LLP Bank of America Elm Street Development Gutschick Little & Weber, P.A. Holland & Knight, LLP Learch, Early & Brewer, Chtd. Liberty Home Builder, Inc. Reznick Group P.C. Sandy Spring Bank Winchester Homes Inc.

FRIEND

1st Mariner Bank Baker Tilly Bowman Consulting Group, Ltd. Bozzuto Group Burgess & Niple, Inc. Charles P. Johnson & Associates christopher consultants, ltd. Columbia Bank Craftmark Homes Dewberry DICO Furey, Doolan & Abell, LLP GE Appliances Geo-Technology Associates Inc. Greenhorne & O’Mara Inc.

IDI-MD, Inc. K. Hovnanian Homes Kim Engineering M &T Bank Macris, Hendricks & Glascock, P.A. Michael Harris Development Mid-Atlantic Builders, Inc. Miller & Smith Homes Mitchell & Best Homebuilders LLC Shulman Rogers Steuart-Kret Homes, Inc. Terra Verde Communities LLC Ward & Klein Washington Gas

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Tennis Anyone?

Nearly two-dozen members turned out for MNCBIA’s 2nd Annual tennis tournament at Congressional Country Club under sunny blue skies. Decked out in traditional white attire, players were randomly paired for doubles play and sweated through multiple matches. Following the tournament, players traded their racquets for drinks and hors d’oeurves as they anxiously awaited the final scores. In the ends, four players came out on top, Danny Cantwell III, Counselors Title, LLC, Robert Malm and Ken Mergor, Craftmark Homes and Ray Sobrino, Porten Homes. Winners received gift certificates to Congressional’s Tennis Pro Shop, and the three highest scorers received Washington Nationals tickets thanks to MNCBIA president Guy Curley. Special thanks to our sponsors, Counselors Title, LLC, Craftmark Homes, Furey, Doolan & Abell, LLP, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage and Ballard Spahr, LLP, who helped make this event possible. And thank you to BIA member Rick Sullivan, Jr. who was the originator and driving force behind this fun and exciting event. m

Events Calendar JULY 2010

AUGUST 2010

Custom & Small Builders Council meeting

Custom & Small Builders Council meeting - TBD

7

4

Development Review Process Subcommittee [DRPS] Environmental Committee meeting

8

Home Builders Care Foundation board meeting WSSC Liaison Committee meeting

6

6

3

Development Review Process Subcommittee [DRPS] - TBD Development Review Process Subcommittee [DRPS] - summer break Environmental Committee meeting

Prince George’s Liaison Committee meeting

9 Prince George’s Liaison Committee meeting DC Liaison Committee meeting

10

13

11

Codes & Standards Committee meeting

Green Building Committee meeting

14

12

Green Building Committee meeting

EPA Lead Paint Certification Seminar WSSC Liaison Committee meeting Executive Committee meeting

15

Codes & Standards Committee meeting

Executive Committee meeting

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

Appliance Distributors Unlimited, Inc...................Back Cover General Electric...................................................Page 15 Macris, Hendricks & Glascock, P.A.........................Page 11 Shulman Rogers.................................................Page 12 Vintage Security....................................................Page 2

21 Montgomery Liaison Committee meeting St. Mary’s Liaison Committee meeting Charles Liaison Committee meeting

27 Record Plat Committee meeting

28 P&P Ad Hoc Committee meeting

18 St. Mary’s Liaison Committee meeting Charles Liaison Committee meeting

19 General Membership Crab Feast

25 P&P Ad Hoc Committee - summer break

31 Record Plat Committee - summer break

14

JULY/AUGUST 2010

|

BUILDING IN MARYLAND AND WASHINGTON, DC


BUILDING IN MARYLAND AND WASHINGTON, DC

|

JULY/AUGUST 2010

15


1738 Elton Road, Suite 200 Silver Spring, MD 20903

BUILDING in Maryland and Washington, DC  

Exclusive magazine of the Maryland-National Building Industry Association

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