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MMWC Mathers Museum of World Cultures Fall 2017 No. 11

“A Giving Heritage� opens Fall Exhibits Explore Global Cultures State, National, and International Research Work


From the Director: Museum as Research Center While enjoying an exhibition such as “Show and Tell: Making Craft at the John C. Campbell Folk School,” listening to a bluegrass band, or participating in a family craft day, it is perhaps understandable that Mathers Museum of World Cultures visitors’ minds do not all immediately register the fact that the museum is an Indiana University research center. Yet, like the Kinsey Institute, the Ostrom Workshop, and the Indiana Geological and Water Survey, the museum has long been a vital part of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research. Like the campus’ other research centers, the museum pursues basic research, turns research into programs that positively impact individuals and communities, trains students through their participation in research work, and works to disseminate scholarship as broadly as possible through accessible publications, public presentations, and museum exhibitions. As an accredited museum, the MMWC also builds, stewards, and fosters study of, a priceless collection of objects documenting the world’s peoples. Whenever you encounter a MMWC program, you are engaging with the museum’s research. Returning to my examples, “Show and Tell” is based on Visiting Curator of Ethnology Kelley Totten’s doctoral research. The musical artists whom we present are most often those whom we have engaged through Traditional Arts Indiana’s research. Even our activities for children draw both on culturally-sensitive scholarship and on research on (continued on page 3)

MMWC Staff and Affiliates Staff Geoffrey Conrad, Director Emeritus Zach Evans, Fiscal Officer Theresa Harley-Wilson, Registrar Sarah Hatcher, Head of Programs and Education Jason Baird Jackson, Director Jon Kay, Director of Traditional Arts Indiana and Curator of Folklife and Cultural Heritage Judith A. Kirk, Assistant Director Mark Price, Preparator Ellen Sieber, Chief Curator Matthew Sieber, Manager of Exhibitions Kelly Wherley, Facilities Manager Visiting Curator Kelley Totten (Folklore and Ethnomusicology) Consulting Curators Jennifer Goodlander (Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance) Pravina Shukla (Folklore and Ethnomusicology) Graduate Assistants Emily Bryant (Indiana University Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology) Joanna Burke (Indiana University Program in Arts Administration) Payton Frawley (Indiana University Program in Arts Administration) Amanda Hutchins (Indiana University Program in Arts Administration) Micah Ling (Indiana University Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology) Evangeline Mee (Indiana University Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology) Katlin Suiter (Indiana University Program in Arts Administration) Bret Syrek (Indiana University Program in Arts Administration) Page 2—Fall 2017

Graduate Assistants (cont) Dominick Tartaglia (Indiana University Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology) Amy Tompkins (Indiana University Program in Arts Administration)

Rowland Ricketts (Indiana University Department of Textiles) Dan Suslak (Indiana University Department of Anthropology) Michael Wilkerson (Indiana University Program in Arts Administration)

Research Associates Sara Clark (Educational Leadership and Policy) Gloria Colom (Folklore and Ethnomusicology) Elizabeth Faier (Mathers Museum of World Cultures) Janice Frisch (Indiana University Press) Matthew Hale (Folklore and Ethnomusicology, Communication and Culture) Carrie Hertz (Museum of International Folk Art) Teri Klassen (Mathers Museum of World Cultures) Kristin Otto (Anthropology) Jodine Perkins (The University of British Columbia) Hannah Rawcliffe (Informatics) Emily Buhrow Rogers (Anthropology) Daniel Swan (Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History) Lijun Zhang (Anthropology Museum of Guangxi )

Ex officio Ed Comentale (Office of the Vice Provost for Research) Theresa Harley-Wilson (Mathers Museum of World Cultures) Jason Baird Jackson (Mathers Museum of World Cultures)

Policy Committee Eric Sandweiss, Chair (Indiana University Department of History) G abrielle A. Berlinger (University of North Carolina) Deb Christiansen (Indiana University School of Art, Architecture, and Design) Vivian Halloran (Indiana University Departments of English and American Studies) Marion Frank-Wilson (Indiana University Libraries) Michael Paul Jordan (Texas Tech University)

A research center of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at Indiana University Bloomington, the Mathers Museum of World Cultures is an American Alliance of Museums-accredited institution offering research and training opportunities for IU students, educational support and services for IU faculty and elementary/secondary school teachers, and family-friendly exhibits and programs.

On the cover Wedding Jacket Osage Osage County Oklahoma


“A Giving Heritage” Opens at MMWC A Giving Heritage: Wedding Clothes and the Osage Community,” now on exhibit at the Mathers Museum, explores the history of bridal attire among the Osage, a Native American people. The exhibition features beautiful jackets, based on early 19th century military uniforms that have a special place among the Osage. Once used as gifts from U.S. military personnel to Osage le aders, these coats can be seen as a symbol of the interplay between two cultures, and have also come to symbolize the joining of families through marriage. Curated by Dan Swan, curator at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma,, the exhibit was organized by the Sam Noble Museum and the Osage Nation. The exhibition and programs are sponsored by IU’s American Indian Studies Research Institute; Committee on Native American and Indigenous Studies; Department of Apparel Merchandising and Design; and Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology.

Osage bridesmaids. (L–R) Maggie Morrell and Marian Coshehe, ca. 1930. (Photograph courtesy George Weston.)

“A Giving Heritage: Wedding Clothes and the Osage Community” Curator’s Talk and Reception Friday, September 15; 4:30 to 6 p.m. Dan Swan, Curator of Ethnology, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, and curator of “A Giving Heritage: Wedding Clothes and the Osage Community” will discuss his work with the Osage Community in developing the exhibit, as well as the history, importance, and meaning of wedding coats in Osage culture. A reception will follow the talk. The program is sponsored by IU’s American Indian Studies Research Institute; Committee on Native American and Indigenous Studies; Department of Apparel Merchandising and Design; and Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology. The event will be free and open to the public. Dressing the Bride Demonstration/Discussion Saturday, September 16; 2 to 3 p.m. Renee Harris and Leah Big Horse, of the Osage Nation, will demonstrate dressing the bride and discuss the meaning behind each of the items in her regalia. The program is sponsored by IU’s American Indian Studies Research Institute; Committee on Native American and Indigenous Studies; Department of Apparel Merchandising and Design; and Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology. The program will be free and open to the public.

MMWC Research (cont.) Research by IU faculty, museum staff, students, and museum collaborators underpins the diverse slate of programs and exhibitions described in this issue of MMWC. Our spotlight exhibition for fall, “A Giving Heritage: Wedding Clothes and the Osage Community” arises from more than three decades of collaborative research with Osage people by MMWC Research Associate and Sam Noble Museum curator Daniel Swan. Connecting the museum’s exhibition and publishing work, the museum and IU Press published Swan’s chapter (with Jim Cooley) on Osage ceremonial clothing in its book series Material Vernaculars. Director of Traditional Arts Indiana Jon Kay’s book Folk Art and Aging also appeared last year in this new series. Like our research journal Museum Anthropology Review, these books are published in free digital editions online, helping maximize the reach of museum scholarship. As fall begins, the museum is overflowing with students—both graduate and undergraduate. Many of these are helping facilitate museum research projects and the more senior among them are leading their own museum-based research. After several years of service as Editorial Assistant working on Museum Anthropology Review, Emily Rogers has begun a year of field research on basketry among the Choctaw in Mississippi. As discussed elsewhere in this issue, doctoral student Kristin Otto has just returned to the museum after summer research in Sierra Leone (on Sowei masks) and Ghana (on so-called “fantasy coffins”). Looking ahead, our research work in Southwest China will continue in December, when a team from the museum will join colleagues from the Michigan State University Museum, the Museum of International Folk Art, and the Anthropological Museum of Guangxi to study cultural policy and textile arts in northern Guangxi Province. Closer to home, Jon Kay is beginning a new phase of research on art making and quality of life in the eleven counties of Southwest Central Indiana. Head of Programs and Education Sarah Hatcher is guiding a research project on learning experiences with objects and exhibitions for elementary age students. These are just some of the research activities underway at the museum and in the communities where we partner. For supporting our research mission, I am thankful for the investments made in the MMWC by diverse individuals and organizations from around our community and around the world. Special thanks go to the Office of the Vice Provost for Research for helping our museum thrive. Jason Baird Jackson, Director Page 3—Fall 2017


Jennifer Miller creates performances that explore gender fluidity

Spotlight events explore arts, cultures, and the “other” “Dark Water” Artist’s Talk and Reception Tuesday, October 17; 4:30 to 6 p.m. Jakkai Siributr, an internationally-recognized artist and IU alumnus, will discuss his work and his exploration of the lives of migrant workers from Myanmar working in Thailand. The talk will be free and open to the public, and will be sponsored by IU’s School of Education. Jennifer Miller Performs Her Signature Sideshow Acts! Friday, October 20; 8 p.m. Those stigmatized as “other” have a range of options for managing their stigma, and have historically been expected to try to cover and minimize their otherness. However, these demands--and categorization itself--can be resisted by choosing to present and perform publicly. Performing artist Jennifer Miller has used circus and sideshow platforms, and her own gender-bending bearded-ness, to challenge norms of self-presentation in society. As a bearded woman, Miller confronts gender confusion on a daily basis. As a skilled circus director and performer, she has used her personal experience of being “othered” to create performances that help audiences see into an experience of gender fluidity that can be liberating and joyous. This free public event will be co-sponsored by Themester: Diversity, Difference, Otherness. Otherness and Identity: Connectedness in Diversity Thursday, October 26; 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. In considering notions of ‘diversity, difference, and otherness” visual identity is key, says Deb Christiansen, Senior Lecturer in Fashion Design and Director of Undergraduate Studies in IU’s School of Art and Design. She notes we Page 4—Fall 2017

have much in common cross-culturally in both identity development and self-concept formation. Self-conception is influenced by our actions and interactions in the world, and appearance is one important outward manifestation and form of communication. This presentation by Christiansen will tie together thoughts about appearance and identity with visual details from the varied cultures being explored by the Mathers Museum of World Cultures this year. From Osage wedding traditions to the material culture of Syria, and from an urban arts colony in China to everyday objects from Pakistan, the elements that define us also connect us, and they tell us what is important, where we come from, and how we are more alike than different. The lecture will be free and open to the public. From Infrapolitical Expression to Gentrified Beautification: Graffiti in the Hip Hop Tradition Thursday, November 16; 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Graffiti is an unauthorized inscription or drawing on a public surface, and it is meant to be confronted by a viewing public and elicit a reaction or perhaps a response, notes Fernando Orejuela. He also notes that graffiti born from the hip hop subculture of the 1970s can be understood as resistance through adornment. This talk, by Orejuela, aims to address a cultural phenomenon when the act of vandalism is transforms into a highly-stylized art form recognized and adopted all over the globe. A Senior Lecturer and the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology at IU, Orejuela teaches courses on hip hop culture, subcultures, and youth music scenes; critical race theory and music; children’s folklore and service learning; and play, gaming, and sports. The lecture will be free and open to the public.


Fall family programs: crafts, dance, and celebrations A variety of community and family programs will be presented this fall at the MMWC--from language classes, to craft qactivitiers, to dance. All programs will be free and open to the public. Bridges: Children, Languages, World Saturdays, September 16 to December 2 1:30 to 2:15 p.m., Introductory Japanese 2:30 to 3:15 p.m., Introductory Chinese 3:30 to 4:15 p.m., Introductory Arabic This award-winning language program for children provides free instruction in languages for Pre-K through 8th grade students. The program is supported by IU’s School of Global and International Studies, the Center for the Study of the Middle East, the Center for the Study of Global Change, the East Asian Studies Center, the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center, and the Russian and East European Institute. No registration is required. For more information, email sabas@umail.iu.edu or visit http://bit.ly/bridgesIU. Tango Before Dark: An Afternoon Milonga with live music from Tamango Sunday, September 17; 3 to 6:30 p.m. Introductory Talk by Prof. Jennie Gubner: “Argentine Tango and Folklore as Social Life” (3 to 3:30 p.m.) Mini Chacarera (Argentine Folklore) Dance Class (3:30 to 4 p.m.) Open Milonga for dancing Tango and Folklore with live music by Tamango (4 to 6:30 p.m.) Come dancing on a Sunday afternoon! Learn what a milonga is and take a folk dance lesson--the event is free and open to all ages and all levels of experience. Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead Community Altar Tuesday, October 3 to Wednesday, November 1 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Tuesdays through Fridays 1 to 4:30 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays You’re invited to add gifts to a community altar in honor of those who’ve passed, as it’s customary to leave small offerings of items they would have enjoyed. The altar nurtures the memory of their lives, and each year it’s built upon the foundation of the previous years’ offerings. The event will be free and open to the public. Celebration of New African Collections Thursday, October 12; 4:30 to 6 p.m. Join Mathers Museum staff and students as we explore new collections of African artifacts (the Kane Collection and the El-Shamy Collection) recently acquired by the museum. The event is free and open to the public. Family Craft Day: Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead Sunday, October 29; 2 to 3:30 p.m. Come learn more about Día de los Muertos as we make sugar skulls, paper flowers, and more. The Latin American Music Center is sponsoring a musical performance as part of our free and fun celebration. Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead Altar Lighting and Reception Wednesday, November 1; 5 to 8 p.m. Join us to light the Día de los Muertos Community Altar during a closing ceremony and reception to celebrate and honor the memories of deceased loved ones. The event will be free and open to the public.

Tamango performs at “Tango Before Dark: An Afternoon Milonga.”

Chinese Calligraphy Club presents the Silk Road Friday, November 3; 4 to 6 p.m. IU’s Chinese Calligraphy Club will present activities and crafts for exploring the Silk Road-- an ancient network of trade routes that were for centuries central to cultural interaction originally connecting the East and West. Try your hand at calligraphy, printmaking, or cross-stitching, or attend a Pipa or Chinese Traditional Dance performance. There’s more to learn and more fun to have! The event will be free and open to the public. Folk Art Residency: Katrina Mitten (Bead work) Thursday, November 16 Demonstrations (10:30 to 11:30 a.m.); Talk Stage (11:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.); Demonstrations (2:30 to 4 p.m.) A member of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, Katrina Mitten was born and raised in Indiana. Although most of the Miami were removed from their ancestral lands, Katrina’s family remained in Huntington County. She learned traditional beadwork by studying family heirlooms and museum artifacts. Her work combines the geometric designs found in Miami ribbon work with the floral patterns of Great Lakes tribes’ beadwork, as she incorporates personal experiences and family stories into her art. Taking inspiration from family and community narratives, Katrina’s artwork continues a storytelling tradition that predates statehood. Through her work, Katrina demonstrates that Miami history and culture is “not something from the past, it is still going on today in the present.” The events will be free and open to the public. Community Jam Session Sunday, November 12; 3 to 5 p.m. Bring your fiddle, banjo, flute, tabla, or other instrument out of the closet and play with other musicians in this informal setting. Participants will take turns picking songs and perhaps even teaching a few traditional melodies. The event will be free and open to the public. La Gran Milonga: A Winter Tango Ball with live music by Tamango Friday, December 1; 7 to 10 p.m. Celebrate the season with dance and music! The event is free and open to all ages and all levels of experience. Winterfest: Storytelling Sunday, December 3; 2 to 3:30 p.m. Winter is the perfect time to tell some stories or hear some stories. Come make puppets, storybooks, and other crafts that tell a story. Storytelling by Bloomington Storytelling Guild. Winterfest will be free and open to the public. Page 5—Fall 2017


Mathers Museum Fall 2017 exhibits “Beijing’s 798 Art Zone” After the turn of the 21st century, artists and cultural entrepreneurs began colonizing a former military factory complex in northeast Beijing. Taking its name from that numbered factory, the 798 Art Zone is an urban arts colony that now attracts visitors from around China and the world. Through a photo esssay, the exhibition offers a glimpse of a compelling place that is both visually saturated and reflective of the state of contemporary arts and society in present-day China. he exhibit will be open through 12/17/2017.

“Creative Aging” This exhibition explores the making and use of memory art in the lives of older adults in the U.S. Some elders use their creations to assist in recalling and sharing important life stories. Others use these works to elicit interest, facilitate personal narratives, and share beliefs and values. Whether painting pictures of past events, piecing a quilt with material from family clothing, or woodburning important names onto a walking stick, life-story objects often anticipate social interactions and storytelling events, which is just one aspect of their creative utility and complex role in the lives of elders. The exhibit will be open 11/07/2017 to 7/27/2018. “Dark Water” This exhibit features a series of works, including large scale embroideries and photographs, created by Jakkai Siributr, an IU alumnus and artist. Siributr explores the lives of migrant workers from Myanmar working in Thailand. Many of them escape religious or ethnic persecution in their own country hoping for a better life in Thailand but often find themselves victims of human trafficking as well as discrimination. The exhibit is sponsored by IU’s School of Education. The exhibit will be on display through 10/22/2017.

“A Different Look at Syria” Drawing upon the Dee Birnbaum Collection, this exhibit offers a glimpse into the richness and diversity of material culture and deep history of an ancient nation. Syria has served as a crossroads of strategic trade routes and cultural exchange since 10,000 BC. While acknowledging the tragedy of Syria’s present, the exhibit invites visitors to connect or reconnect with Syrian culture by learning about its jewelry and textiles to honor and preserve the work of its craftsmen, its women, and their stories. The exhibit will be open through 1/21/2018.

“A Giving Heritage: Wedding Clothes and the Osage Community” “A Giving Heritage” explores the history of bridal attire among the Osage, a Native American people. The exhibition features beautiful jackets, based on early 19th century military uniforms that have a special place among the Osage. The exhibition and programs are sponsored by IU’s American Indian Studies Research Institute; Committee on Native American and Indigenous Studies; Department of Apparel Merchandising and Design; and Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology. The exhibit will be open through 12/17/2017.

“The High Stakes of Macedonia’s ‘Colorful Revolution’” Several years ago the government of the Republic of Macedonia embarked on an “urban renewal” of the capital city, Skopje. In 2016, these monuments and buildings came under attack by various groups of citizens. Using paint as ammunition, they defaced the edifices in an expression of revolt against the buildings and the perceived government corruption. This exhibit brings together the visual testimonies of three photographers: Robert Atanasovski, Vanco Dzambaski, and Kire Galevski. The exhibit is sponsored by IU’s Russian and East European Institute; School of Global and International Studies; and the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, and it will be on display through 12/17/2017. Page 6—Fall 2017


Mathers Museum Fall 2017 exhibits (cont.) “A Snapshot of Pakistan, 1965: The Madge Minton Collection” On her 1965 trip to Pakistan, WASP pilot and herpetologist Madge Minton arrived with funding from the IU Museum (today the Mathers Museum of World Cultures) and a mission to collect objects used in everyday life. “A Snapshot of Pakistan, 1965: The Madge Minton Collection” uses the items she collected and the information she recorded about them, to explore the common needs all people share. The exhibit will be on display through 12/16/2018.

“Show and Tell--Making Craft at the John C. Campbell Folk School” Curated by Kelley D. Totten, a recent Ph.D. graduate in Folklore at Indiana University, this exhibit looks at contemporary craft through the lens of the John C. Campbell Folk School, located in Brasstown, North Carolina. “Show and Tell” highlights the school’s approach to craft and individual creativity by featuring a spectrum of makers (from hobbyists to professionals) and demonstrating a diversity of materials, techniques, and interpretations. The exhibit will be on display through 7/27/2018.

“Thoughts, Things, and Theories...What Is Culture?” “Thoughts, Things, and Theories...What Is Culture?” explores the nature of culture. The exhibit is ongoing.

“Tools of Travel” This exhibit features objects that people in different times and places have used to transport themselves and their belongings, exploring the technology of travel (wagon, saddle, sled, and canoe) and how it is powered (horse, camel, dog, and human). The exhibit will be on display through 12/17/2017.

Traditional Arts Indiana State Banner Exhibitions Attica Public Library, Attica, IN Katrina Mitten (Bead Artist)

Huntington City Public Library, Huntington City, IN Tom Wintczak (Potter)

Salem Public Library, Salem, IN Tom Wintczak (Potter)

Batesville Memorial Library, Batesville, IN Bob Taylor (Wood Carver)

Hussey-Mayfield Memorial Public Library, Zionsville, IN Tom Wintczak (Potter)

South Haven Public Library, South Haven, IN Portia Sperry (Abigail Doll Inventor)

Bedford Public Library, Bedford, IN Greg Adams (Willow Furniture Maker) Brown County Public Library, Nashville, IN Weberding Family (Wood Carvers) Brownstown Public Library, Brownstown, IN Weberding Family (Wood Carvers) Evansville-Vanderburgh Public Library, Evansville, IN Katrina Mitten (Bead Artist) Franklin County Public Library, Brookville, IN Portia Sperry (Abigail Doll Inventor) Franklin County Public Library--Laurel Branch, Laurel, IN Bill Day, Keith Ruble, and Glen Summers (Bowl Hewing) Greensburg Public Library, Greensburg, IN Weberding Family (Wood Carvers) Hebron Public Library, Hebron, IN Bruce Hovis (Basket Maker)

Jasper-Dubois County Public Library--Dubois Branch, Dubois, IN John Bundy (Duck Decoy Carver) Jefferson Township Public Library, Jeffersonville, IN Marie Webster (Quilter and Pattern Maker) Kouts Public Library, Kouts, IN Marie Webster (Quilter and Pattern Maker) Lawrenceburg Public Library, Lawrenceburg, IN Bruce Hovis (Basket Maker) Middletown Fall Creek Library, Middletown, IN Greg Adams (Willow Furniture Maker) Mitchell Community Public Library, Mitchell, IN Bob Taylor (Wood Carver) Plainfield-Guilford Township Public Library, Plainfield, IN Bob Taylor (Woodcarver) Portage Public Library, Portage, IN Bill Day, Keith Ruble, Glen Summers (Bowl Hewing)

St. Joseph County Public Library--Francis Branch, Franklin, IN Bruce Hovis (Basket Maker) Sullivan County Public Library, Sullivan, IN John Bundy (Duck Decoy Carver) Tell City-Perry County Public Library, Tell City, IN John Bundy (Duck Decoy Carver) University Library of Columbus, Columbus, IN Katrina Mitten (Bead Artist) Valparaiso Public Library, Valparaiso, IN Greg Adams (Willow Furniture Maker) Warsaw Community Public Library, Warsaw, IN Marie Webster (Quilter and Pattern Maker) West Lafayette Public Library, West Lafayette, IN Portia Sperry (Abigail Doll Inventor) Winchester Community Library, Winchester, IN Bill Day, Keith Ruble, and Glen Summers (Bowl

Hewing)

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Krisitin Otto raises the IU flag at the studio of Paa Joe, the renowned fantasy coffin artist whose work will be featured in an upcoming exhibition at the MMWC.

MMWC State, National, and International Research Summer and the start of Fall semester has seen a number of research projects at the MMWC that will result in new exhibits, programs, and publications over the next several years. Kristin Otto, a Research Associate at the MMWC and doctoral student in anthropology at IU, spent the summer researching in Siera Leone and Ghana. Otto is a recent recipient of a three-year graduate research fellowship from the National Science Foundation to pursue her project “The Sowei Diaspora: Producing Knowledge about and for Sierra Leone,” an examination of the distinctive sowei masks worn by the women of West Africa’s Sande society. Additionally, she worked in Ghana, documenting the work of Paa Joe, a fantasy coffin artist whose work is featured in museum collections worldwide. Otto’s research will serve as the foundation of a new exhibit at the MMWC opening next year. Jon Kay, director of MMWC’s Traditional Arts Indiana, is piloting a new initiative that aims to employ folk arts to support and improve the quality of life of older adults in local communities. While the program will eventually roll out to 11 counties in south central Indiana, the first installation will begin in Brown County. “Traditional Arts and Creative Aging” will work to address the health and wellness of older adults in the state. Kay and TAI staff will interview older adults and document their creative practices. The project will also produce a Traditional Arts and Aging Activity Guide formatted specifically for elders, providing information and strategies for improving their lives through creative practice. A public meeting about the project will be held at Brown County Public Library in Rooms B and C on Thursday, September 28, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Parking is available in the larger parking lot. And, in the most recent publication in the MMWC/IU Press Material Vernaculars series, Gabrielle Berlinger, examines contemporary Sukkot observance in Framing Sukkot. Berlinger, an MMWC Policy Committee member and Assistant Professor of American Studies and Folklore at the University of North Carolina, examines the role of ritual and vernacular architecture in the formation of self and society in three Jewish communities: Bloomington, Indiana; South Tel Aviv, Israel; and Brooklyn, New York. Through an exploration of the intersections between the rituals of Sukkot and contemporary issues, such as the global Occupy movement, Berlinger finds that the sukkah becomes a tangible expression of the need for housing and economic justice, as well as a symbol of the longing for home. Page 8—Fall 2017


Giving to the MMWC

Caring for an outstanding collection of objects and images from around the world, the Mathers Museum of World Cultures fosters research and training in the social sciences and humanities.

Donors to the Mathers Museum of World Cultures Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation, Inc. Debby Allmayer and James Williams Joelle Bahloul and Marshall Leaffer Richard Bauman Edward and Wendy Bernstein Catherine Pauline Bishop Julianne and Keith Bobay Paddy Bowman Bruce Bradtmiller and Carol Cottom Robert Braunlin Dorothy Bybee Lorraine Cashman Jessica Cattelino Geoffrey and Karen Conrad Brandon Cordes Dayton Foundation Depository Emilee Dehmer Page 9—Fall 2017

Darlynn Dietrich Mimi and Marc Dollinger Hasam and Susan El-Shamy Kirstin Ellsworth Kelly Eskew Zachary Evans Elizabeth Faier Peter Harle Theresa Harley-Wilson Sarah Hatcher Carrie Hertz and Thomas Richardson Lisa Higgins Cynthia Hogan Svend E. Holsoe Lynn Hooker and David Reingold Aiko Hori Suzanne and Nathaniel Ingalsbe

Amy and Jason Jackson Kendall and Barbara Jackson Michael Owen Jones B. David Kane Robert N. Johnson Jon and Mandy Kay Judith Kirk Teri Klassen Linda and Bret Libeno David Lottes Earl Luetzelschwab Mary Magoulick Michael McAfee Crispina McDonald Beth McMartin Ruth Meserve Sidney and Sharon Mishkin Travis Paulin

Mark Plew and Sarah Saras Patricia Sawin Robert and Alice Schloss Amy Schmeltz Adam and Karen Sisson William B Simmons Theresa Vaughan Wahl Family Charitable Trust Michael Wilkerson Abigail M. Wodock Robert Woodley Amy and Stanley Zent Martha and Charles Zuppann


Visiting the Mathers Museum The Mathers Museum of World Cultures is located at 416 N. Indiana Avenue, Bloomington, Indiana. Admission to the museum is free. During the fall semester the MMWC exhibition hall and Mathers Museum Store will be closed Saturday, November 18 through Monday, November 27 and Monday, December 18 through Monday, January 8, 2018. Durng normal hours of operations the exhibition hall and Museum Store are open Tuesdays through Fridays, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays, from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Free visitor parking is available by the Indiana Avenue lobby entrance. Metered parking is available at the McCalla School parking lot on the corner of Ninth Street and Indiana Avenue. The parking lot also has spaces designated for Indiana University EM-P, EM-S, and ST permits. During the weekends free parking is available on the surrounding streets. An access ramp is available at the southwest corner of North Fess Avenue and Ninth Street, at the entrance to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology. Parking is available at the northwest corner of Fess Avenue and 9th Street, across from the ramp. If you have a dsiability and need assistance, arrangements can be made to accommodate most needs. Please call 812-855-6873 for directions and assistance. For more information, please call 812-855-6873, email mathers@ indiana.edu, or visit our website at www.mathers.indiana.edu.

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MMWC11  

This is the Fall 2017 issue of MMWC, the newsletter of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures

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