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Study Area Information

Mims Property Master Plan for Holly Springs

Prepared For: Town of Holly Springs, North Carolina

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Acknowledgements Town Of Holly Springs Staff

Len Bradley, Director of Parks and Recreation (Project Manager)

Steering Committee Members Len Bradley (Project Manager)

Don Mizelle, Local Developer (Chair) David Chapman, 919 Marketing Jimmy Cobb, Town Council Member Willie Green-Aldridge, Local Artist Wanda Holloway, Parks and Recreation Board Member Timothy Howard, Chamber Member Tom Hughes, Planning Board Chair Glen Myrto, Planning Board Member Stephanie Sudano, Direct of Engineering Jeff Westmoreland, Local Landscape Architect Mark Zawadski, Planning Staff

Planning & Design Consultants

Matt Hayes, AICP, Alta/Greenways Associate/Group Leader Melissa Miklus, ASLA, Alta/Greenways Designer Britt Storck, ASLA, Alta/Greenways Senior Designer Anne Eshleman, EIT, Alta/Greenways GIS Specialist Larry Zucchino, ASLA, LEED速 AP, JDavis Architecture Managing Principal James Cooper, LSS, ASLA, JDavis Architecture Intern Landscape Architect I

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Table of Contents Introduction & Planning & Design Process 1.0 Overview 1.1 Planning & Design Process 1.1A Visioning Process 1.1B Steering Committee 1.1C Stakeholder Meetings 1.1D Website & Social Media 1.1E Visioning Sessions 1.1F Public Workshops

Existing Conditions Analysis

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 4 6

Overview Project Location History 2.2A The Role Of History 2.2B Early History 2.2C The Birth Of A Colonial Town 2.2D The Influence Of A Landmark Town Of Holly Springs Plans Site Conditions

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 12 12 14

3.0 Overview 3.0A Approach To Site Design 3.0B Adhering To Existing Guidelines 3.1 Three Alternatives

17 17 17 17 17

4.0 Overview 4.1 Final Concept 4.1A Technical Considerations

25 25 25 30

2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

Design Alternatives

Master Plan Design

Implementation

5.0 Overview 5.1 Master Plan Adoption 5.2 Next Steps 5.2A Organize Implementation Committee 5.2B Programming Opportunities 5.2C Continue Building Partnerships 5.2D Consider Multiple Funding Sources & Facility Development Options 5.2E Identify Scope for Future Tasks

35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35

Appendix A: Public Input

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Introduction Chapter 1: Introduction & Planningand Process Planning Process

1.0 OVERVIEW

In 2011, the Town of Holly Springs acquired a 17acre, forested and historic property in the core of its Downtown. This property was once part of the historic, 180-acre Mims Estate and is adjacent to the existing Mims House (nationally registered as the Leslie-Alford-Mims House). The families that dwelled in this house and farmed on this estate helped shape the Town’s history. Today, the site is mostly wooded, featuring streams, natural springs, and interesting topography along with historic remnants such as a small cemetery and brick cisterns. It is surrounded by Downtown Holly Springs, residential neighborhoods, and the Holly Springs Library and Cultural Center. Upon acquisition, the Town of Holly Springs began a conceptual master planning process to uncap the property’s potential. The visioning and concept design process was driven by resident input. The goal was to craft a master plan that would enhance the social, ecologic, and economic opportunities for the site and the Downtown Village District. This Master Plan document includes a summary of the planning process, site analysis, design concept, and next steps.

1.1 planning and design process

The planning and design process took place over a 10-month period from August 2011 to June 2012 (See the project timeline, page 2). Integral to this effort was a comprehensive community involvement process. The process empowered

citizens of Holly Springs to help shape the programming and design of the site. The planning and design approach was holistic, incorporating history, previous plans and documentation review, site analysis, fieldwork, community involvement, and a flexible process. The goal of the process was to arrive upon a solution well-suited for the time, place, culture, economy, and ecological factors on the site, within the surrounding community, and in the context of the region. Before concept generation, the Town formed a Steering Committee to guide the public involvement and design process. These community members and stakeholders convened at each milestone in the process to evaluate current progress and direct future initiatives.

1.1A VISIONING PROCESS

process. The group convened at each milestone in the process to evaluate current progress and direct future stages of planning and design. Early in the process, the Committee helped refine visions and goals for the Master Plan. The first Steering Committee meeting was a Muddy Boots Tour of the Mims Property to experience the site firsthand and gain an appreciation for the landscape. The Design Team and Committee walked along existing soft surface trails through the site noting features about the property including significant vegetation, topography, the spring, brick cisterns, views, sounds, temperature, shade, and adjacent uses. A map depicting the Muddy Boots Tour Site Analysis was created to present to the public at future participatory events. Later, the Committee reviewed existing conditions analyses and helped to craft the three concept

Two meetings were held at the beginning of the process to establish visions and goals for the Master Plan. The first meeting was with the Town’s “Creative Economy” group; the second meeting with Town of Holly Springs staff. Visions and goals were established for the project that guided the entire process. A thorough description of the visioning meetings can be found later in this chapter.

1.1B Steering Committee

The Town formed a Steering Committee composed of Town staff, stakeholders, and residents. The Steering Committee helped guide the existing conditions analysis, public involvement, and design

alternatives presented in this Plan through interactive discussion. The Committee worked to refine the final concept. Committee members also provided assistance at public workshops.

1.1C Stakeholder Meetings

Collaborative thinking and consensus building with adjacent landowners was a necessary part of this process and will need to continue with future implementation of the final site design. Important stakeholders involved in the process were the Holly Springs United Methodist Church, the owner of the Mims House, and the owner of 919 Marketing. Because of the historic and physical connections to the property, and proximity to the Downtown, the lane surrounding the Mims House will be a key entrance to the site. The above stakeholders were involved in a private meeting to gain an understanding of the Town’s planning process and participate in a small collaborative workshop. At this meeting, the three entities work together with the Town to discuss potential programing and design for the site - particularly the access and design of the lane looping around the Mims House. Before the 2nd Open House, private meetings were held to meet with each of the stakeholders separately. The three site designs were revealed and discussed to determine how the concept would affect each stakeholder, and how the stakeholders and Town can partner in the creation of a successful public open space for residents and visitors of Holly Springs.

Figure 1-1: Steering Committee on Muddy Boots Tour. 1


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Introduction & Planning Process

Planning Process The diagram below illustrates the planning timeline that took place from August 2011 to June 2012.

Educational Boards

Project Website Comment Forms, Newsletters, Flyers

Town Staff/ Committee Mtgs

Public Involvement/ Input

Plans, Zoning, Ordinance, & History Review

Kickoff Meeting/ Committee Meetings

Base Maps; Visions & Goals

2

Fieldwork

Site Mapping

Site Assessment

Existing Plan and Site History Summary

Public Workshop #1

Proposal Alternatives

1st Public Workshop Input

Detailed Site Maps

Public Workshop #2

Digital Report/ Maps

Draft Master Plan

2nd Public Workshop Input

Full Report, Map, and Design

Client Review

Revised Plan and Design

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Aug

Oct

Nov

Jan

Fe b

Apr

May

Final Plan & Development Costs

Final Presentation

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Figure 1-3: Project Facebook page.

1.1d Website and Social Media

Figure 1-2: Project website.

A project website (www.hollyspringsmims.com) and separate Facebook page were established for the Mims Property Master Plan as a means to keep people informed and as a means of receiving input. Utilizing these online and social media tools allowed for an extended reach to citizens beyond traditional methods. These websites created a public forum via the Internet where people were free to engage in the community involvement process at their convenience. Announcements for workshops and public open houses were published on the project website with an interactive RSVP function. The traditional meeting details, location, and time were also posted as

an event on the Mims Facebook page. The two tools worked simultaneously to expand the reach of participation and enhance the breadth of knowledge presented to the public.

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Introduction & Planning Process

1.1E Visioning Sessions “Creative Economy” Visioning Meeting On August 26, 2011, the consultant Alta/Greenways led a “Creative Conversation” to craft a visioning statement for the 17-acre Mims Property. A presentation on the site’s history and features was given to the group along with a description of the upcoming planning process. Method for Crafting a Visioning Statement To initiate this discovery, the Creative Conversation began with segmented categories of brainstorming culminating with small groups crafting potential vision statements. The following categories were vetted by the group: 1. Wants and needs (using a voting system to prioritize a top 5) 2. What kind of place is the Mims property? How does it feel? What do people do here? 3. Who will use this place? 4. What are the unique benefits (social, ecological, economic)? How does the Mims Property fit into Holly Springs (context)? All category lists were posted around the room for small groups to craft a statement based on the following framework: The Mims Estate Property is a [what kind of place] for [user group] where they can [do what] because [unique benefits of the site]. STEP ONE: The following list of wants and needs was established by the group: • Preserving springs (identity/ landmark) • Amphitheater/ music venue • Green space preservation • Collaborative incubator • Public square ( retail shops, mixed use) • Holistic approach • Legacy for children 4

• Revenue generation/ Self-sustaining economically • Gathering space • Playground/ skateboarding • Education • Bike parking • Festivals • Art space/ lofts • Public art • Mini gardens/ nature walk • Springs/ spray park for kids • Community gardens • Historical site • Small museum • Mims soda shop/ ice cream/ eatery • Carousel • Military ties/ patriotic • Exercise/ active use • Summer camps (tied in with all themes) • Teen activities • Space for “creative econ” uses • Rentable space • Permanent farmers’ market • Seasonal space After listing myriad wants and needs for the site, each person in the group voted on their top three wants and needs for the site. This voting process revealed the top wants and needs as: 1. Preserving springs (identity/ landmark) 2. Amphitheater/ music venue 3. Green space preservation 4. Collaborative incubator 5. Public square ( retail shops, mixed use) Considering the above priorities, the group continued the visioning process through an imaginative process of discovering site potential. Ideas were shared and further expanded through experiential, programmatic, and contextual testing.

STEP TWO: The group listed the following statements as potential kinds of place, how it feels and what people do: • Sight/ sound of water • Activity with quiet places • Interactive • Festive • Educational • Combine “green space” with urban edge • Quiet/ peaceful/ beautiful • Soft music • Kids playing • SHADY • Interactive use • Stay/ return • Historical architecture + modern amenities • Buildings: ± 2 story, “Front porch” / covered • Retail STEP THREE: The following potential user groups were recorded: • Seniors: active & quiet spaces • Visitors for specific events • Active adults & kids • Local craftsmen/ artisans STEP FOUR: The large group brainstorming culminated in a discussion of the following unique benefits of the site: • Historic • Centrally located • Will bring people downtown time & time again (Who is target audience?) • 17 wooded acres • Community space for ALL AGES STEP FIVE: Visioning Statements Each of the four groups assembled a vision statement for the Mims Property by combining and fine-tuning elements from each of the categories. The following represent four statements that carried

through the entire discovery process to enhance community workshops. They were incorporated into a final vision statement for the Mims property to carry the master planning process from an idea into a reality. The Mims Estate Property is a seasonal gathering place for Holly Springs citizens where they can enjoy a traditional downtown experience because that’s where the action is and the town needs a heart. The Mims Estate Property is a historic gathering hub for every generation of the whole community where they can relax, play and create because we have the opportunity of working with a clean slate. The Mims Estate Property is a center for public activity for the greater holly springs community where they can enjoy leisure activities, interact with nature, cultural opportunities and each other while connecting to the town’s character because of the unique setting and opportunities available on the site. The Mims Estate Property is a gathering place for active holly springs citizens of all ages where they can relax, commune, laugh and enjoy a drink while experiencing nature and our history because it’s convenient, inviting, and affordable.


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Introduction & Planning Process Town Staff Visioning Session With staff members from administration, parks and recreation, public safety, planning, and other departments of the Holly Springs local government, the Consultant led a visioning session to learn the wants and needs of those who will be involved in the development and operations of the 17acre Mims Property. This meeting was the second visioning session conducted and was intended to gather a different perspective than the initial session with the Creative Economy group. After a brief presentation on the planning process, the staff embarked on a brainstorming activity to illustrate their vision for the site. Method for Crafting a Visioning Statement

• Place for teenagers to recreate (skate park?) • Attractive views/ sequence into site • Residential areas on periphery (not necessarily in site) • Riparian buffers along streams • Recognition of site’s historic character • Flexible water feature (ice skating in winter) The top wants and needs were: 1. Preserve the springs 2. Carousel 3. Features to help define downtown character 4. Holly Springs central park 5. Signature building at northeast edge

The same method was used in the staff meeting as was implemented with the Creative Economy group. STEP ONE: The following list of wants and needs was established by the group: • Preserve the springs • Permanent home police department • Tennis courts • Carousel • Rentable space • Food services • Balanced space: preservation & development • Add adjacent parcels (south) • Signature building at NE Edge • “The Green” benches art fountain (1.5 Ac) • Connection to cemetery • Permanent home for farmer’s market • Walking trails • Picnic amenities • Multi-purpose meeting/ congregation area • Features to help define downtown character • Natural preservation (trees) • Holly Springs central park • Artist studio space on eastern perimeter

• Cool • Vibrant • Festive • Inviting • Historic • “music in the rocks” • Waiting for table @ restaurant • Fusion of natural features/ shops (a la Greenville, SC) • Places to congregate • Groves of trees • Plazas • Trails • Central green space within downtown • Active uses to observe • Public art installations • Accentuated natural features • Farmer’s market • Mountain bike trails • Teen activities: dancing • Wine tastings STEP THREE: The following potential user groups were recorded:

Figure 1-4: Visioning Session with Town Staff.

Considering the above priorities, the group continued the visioning process through an imaginative process of discovering site potential. Ideas were shared and further expanded through experiential, programmatic, and contextual testing. STEP TWO: The group listed the following statements as potential kinds of place, how it feels and what people do:

• Library patrons • People eating lunch • People exercising • Ice skaters • Carousel riders STEP FOUR: The large group brainstorming culminated in a discussion of the following unique benefits of the site: • Accessible/ easy to get to • Central • Large in size • Older, unique stands of trees • Rolling topography

STEP FIVE: Visioning Statements Two groups produced vision statements for the Mims Property by combining and fine-tuning elements from each of the categories. The following represent two new statements that will be added to the first four assembled by the Creative Economy group. The Mims Estate Property is an Inviting Historic place for Friends where they can enjoy and appreciate the essence of Holly Springs because there is no other place like this. The Mims Estate Property is a unique, vibrant place for all people where they can congregate and engage in passive and active activities because it’s the place to be. Visioning Process Conclusion There were several parallel objectives and visions between the Creative Economy group and Town staff. A common theme was having a balance between preserving the natural state of the site and programming the site to become a place that draws people for repeat visits. Another common theme was creating a unique space that highlights the area’s history and serves as a community meeting place for people of all ages. Ideas and visions for the site extend into the overall Downtown Village District. The Staff of Holly Springs, who are familiar with land owned by the Town within the Downtown District, shared an overall vision for enhancing the downtown experience with retail, an ice cream shop, restaurants, a wine bar, a beer garden, and other commercial uses on the periphery of the site.

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Introduction & Planning Process While the visioning process resulted in broad thought, it served to inform the remainder of the planning process. As fieldwork, analysis, and discussion ensued, more specific opportunities and constraints were revealed that impacted suitable uses for the property. Adjacent uses, site conditions such as topography and hydrology, overall vision for the Village District, and other factors impacted the study, narrowing the focus of programming and form over time. Taking the drafted vision statements, a final vision statement was crafted for the Plan: The Mims Property is a

signature conservation landscape with sensible integrations of urban form for people who

embrace collaborative energy where they can

Figure 1-6: Existing Conditions Board.

enhance their knowledge of ecologic and social systems, exercise their creative contributions to society, and enjoy active and passive recreation options because the space

fosters a sense of identify and ownership by fusing historic character with a vision of healthy living.

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Figure 1-5: Flyer for Open House #1.

1.1f Public Workshops PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE #1 The first public open house took place at the Holly Springs Cultural Center on November 17, 2011. The open house was advertised through the project website, Facebook page, Town website, HOA listserves, and hard copy flyers.

Approximately 50 Holly Springs residents participated in the event and provided meaningful input toward visioning and the future design of the site. Participants were welcomed and invited to examine a series of boards presenting a brief history of the site, existing plans and standards for the Village District, site photos, site analysis created by the steering committee, and a final visioning statement for the plan. After forming groups of 4-8 people, a presentation was given to help participants understand the planning and design process. A layered site analysis was revealed for those who may not be familiar with the site or had not walk along the existing soft-surface trails. These layers included topography, adjacent uses, historic relics, existing trail systems, hydrology and wetland areas.

Being acquainted with the site via this layered approach prepared the group for the next step: a Visual Preference Survey (VPS). During this segment of the workshop, the site was broken into zones to enlist reactions to photos that may, or may not be, appropriate for the park. By showing materials, uses, and experiential elements, participants start forming their ideal design for the site and indicated their reactions on a worksheet. After reviewing 4-8 photos for each of the five zones, the small groups discussed their individual ideas and came to consensus on the appropriate elements for each zone of the site. Using cut-out photos from the VPS and drawing materials, each table created a site plan. Presentations from each group followed the ideation session and the workshop closed with a discussion of each of the designs.


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Figure 1-10: Vision Board.

Figure 1-7 through 1-9: Photos from Public Workshop.

Figure 1-12: Site Analysis Board.

Figure 1-11: Photo from Public Workshop in November. 7


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Introduction & Planning Process PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE #2 As the second part of a two-step community participation process, a second public open house was held February 22, 2012 at the Holly Springs Cultural Center. Residents participated in a twoway conversation about the overall planning and design process and provided feedback on three potential concepts for the property. Flyers were distributed throughout Holly Springs by the Steering Committee and Town staff via email, HOA listserves, the Town of Holly Springs website, the project website, and the project’s Facebook page (see Public Open House Flyer, figure 1-13).

Figure 1-13: Public Open House #2 Flyer.

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From 5:30pm – 7:30pm, citizens stopped by the Cultural Center to progress through a seven-station experience (see Open House Set Up, figure 1-14). After signing in, attendees progressed through a series of boards depicting the process and site analysis, visited a station displaying maps from the first Public Workshop, and learned about each of the three concepts by viewing a slide show of lifestyle and materials images accompanied by a site plan rendering and design team member. They finished the tour by completing a feedback worksheet (see Public Open House Worksheet, figure 1-15) and capturing a photograph of their ideal site plan by using puzzle pieces from each concept.

Station One: Check In Visitors were greeted by a steering committee member who explained the progression of the stations, answered questions about the feedback worksheet, and provided a brief introduction to the project. After signing in, each attendee began the evening at station two. Station Two: Process and Site Analysis Boards previously presented at the first Public Workshop were displayed to familiarize those new to the process with the activities of the steering committee and design team. Each board communicated details about the project to help the attendee better understand the planning and design evolution, and details specific to the site. The boards illustrated a process diagram; site context and existing plans; desires, needs, and visioning statement; existing site conditions; and a site analysis diagram. Station Three: Public Workshop Maps For a deeper understanding of how the design concepts evolved, Station Three provided an opportunity to review site maps created by the community at the first Public Workshop. Each map was a product of a Visual Preference Survey (VPS), where participants were asked to react to a series of images, which they later cut out and placed on the map where desired. Each map was created by a group of five to eight members of the community, who presented their concept at the close of the workshop. [Station Four: Concept No. 1 – Leslie-Alford-Mims Ecologic Learning Center Station Five: Concept No. 2 – Mims Forest Activity Station Six: Concept No. 3 – Holly Springs Village Green] The three concepts are described in detail in Chapter 3.

Steering Committee members represented each station to describe each concept to the public. A large-format concept sketch was provided for each concept along with a running slideshow beside the sketch. The slideshow consisted of example photos that represent the overall themes of the concept. Station Seven: Comment Form and Puzzle Mapping The final station allowed attendees to collect their thoughts and respond to a few questions about each conceptual design (see Public Open House Comments, Appendix A). After providing written feedback, each participant was invited to use a series of ‘puzzle pieces’ with elements from each design to arrange their ideal park. Photographs recorded each design (see Puzzle Maps, figures 1-23 through 1-24). Following the Second Open House, site concept plans and narratives were posted to the project website. Citizens were encouraged - through links on the Town website, email, listserves, and Facebook - to participate in an online questionnaire to gather input from those who were not able to attend the second public open house. Comments were recorded for a period of four weeks to capture additional feedback.


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Introduction & Planning Process Mims Master Plan Open House: Holly A & B TV

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5 3 1

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Figure 1-14: Open House Set Up. 1 Check In Table Stephanie / Jimmy Describe flow of room and comment sheet.

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Concept 1 Matt

Describe concept one/answer questions/help with Materials:Mims Property Alternative worksheet/convey Concepts final may be 1. Sign In Sheet (AG) Comment Sheeta hybrid. 2. Comment Sheets/Pens (AG) 3. Name tags (AG)

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1. 2. 3.

Describe planning and design process/history/site analysis.

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the back if you need Melissa 5 LIKEConcept 2Use extra space.

1.

1.

2.

2.

3. Describe the workshop process and results.

Materials: DO NOT LIKE 1. Maps and Boards (AG) 2. Two Easels (HS) 1.

Describe concept two/answer questions.

Materials: 1. Site Plan and Board (AG) 2. Easel (AG) 3. Computer with slide show M2(AG) 4. Projector (AG) DO NOT 5.LIKE Screen (HS)

3.

DO NOT LIKE 1.

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2.

2.

3.

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RANK: Name:

RANK: Address:

Figure 1-15: Public Open House Worksheet.

Describe concept three/answer questions.

Supplies Needed from Holly Springs

Figure 1-17: Process Board.

Seven easels TV with computer hook-up Two projector screens

the three alternatives and provide any additional comments you wish to share.

LIKE

Public Workshop Maps Mark

Concept 3 Larry

Materials: 1. Site Plan and Board (AG) 2. Easel (AG) 3. Computer with slide show PC(AG) 4. Projector (AG) 5. Screen (HS)

Materials: 1. Site Plan and (AG)the final WhatBoard do you think 2. Easel (AG)plan should look like? a description 3. ComputerPlease with provide slide show M1(AG) below of your vision for the 4. Projector/TV (HS) park. Use elements from

Process Boards Jeff Materials: 1. LIKE Five Boards (AG) 2. Five Easels(HS)

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Check Out Table Don

Help attendees finish filling in comment sheet. Answer questions: final plan ready in May.

Three rectangle tables Three round tables

Materials: 1. COLLECT: Comment Sheet

RANK: Email:

Please return this sheet to the check-out table. Thank you!

Figure 1-16: Public providing input for one of the alternatives.

Figure 1-18: Context Board.

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Figure 1-19 through 1-21: Holly Springs residents review and provide comment on the three alternatives for the park site.

Figure 1-22 through 1-24: Participants were asked to take “puzzle pieces� of each component to create their preference for the Mims property. Two examples are shown above.

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Introduction Chapter 2: Existing & Planning Conditions Process Analysis

2.0 Plan Context

Holly Springs is juxtaposed as a community adjacent to the Greater Triangle Area of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. Its proximity to these towns and their suburbs provides a wide variety of cultural and economic opportunities for residents. Because of this, it is essential to consider varying scales of impact. This 17-acre site is not an isolated island, but an important piece of the region, Town of Holly Springs, and Village District Area. During the planning process, both the existing conditions and planning efforts locally and regionally were taken into account and adhered to when determining appropriate concepts for the site. Regionally, major destinations, parks, centers of activity, conservation areas, and regional greenways were considered. Townwide, existing parks and greenways, places of interest, and bicycle and pedestrian connections were analyzed. Within the Village District, complementary uses, sense of place, livability, and accessibility have a significant Impact on the Mims Property.

2.1 Project Location

The future park site is located in the core of downtown Holly Springs in the Village District Area. It is bordered by Earp Street to the north, Avent Ferry Road to the east, Ballentine Street to the south and Utley Creek to the west. A single-family home development flanks the Mims Property to the south and west, with approximately 12 families directly adjacent to the study site. Holly Springs

Library and Cultural Center are located directly across Ballentine Street to the south of the property. The Holly Springs Village District is located to the east, with various commercial and institutional uses including the Holly Springs United Methodist Church, Historic Mims Home, and 919 Marketing directly adjacent to the southeast corner of the property. The historic Holly Springs Cemetery is located just across Utley Creek on the northwest side of the property. Single-family and multi-family housing is present along Earp Street across from the property.

2.2 History 2.2A The Role of History

2.2C The Birth of a Colonial Town

The natural spring on the Mims property provided inspiration for settling the Town of Holly Springs. Adjacent to the site of the spring, colonial settlers erected homes, churches, shops, and avenues for trade. Scottish settler, Archibald Leslie, opened a tailoring business and constructed a 180-acre estate. The home on this property now serves as a landmark signifying the strength of the Town - having survived the Civil War and occupation by the Union Army. The history of the families dwelling in this lasting specimen of architecture contributed to the shaping of Holly Springs as a town. Figure 2-1: Historic Architecture in Holly Springs.

History plays a key role in the development of any site. Since Holly Springs is a town rich in historic ties previous land uses, significant period architecture, and natural land formations will contribute to the character of this site. Within this property lies the site of a natural spring and the property is adjacent to the historic Mims House (Nationally registered as the Leslie-Alford-Mims House). The home was surrounded by a saw mill, cotton gin, stores, and church that created roots for the Town of Holly Springs.

2.2B Early History

Like many areas of North Carolina, Holly Springs served as hunting grounds for the Tuscarora Indian Tribe. This 1773 map depicts a record of the open land and waterways of North Carolina that supported a relationship between hunting tribes and the land.

Figure 2-2: North Carolina shown as home to the Tuscarora Indian Tribe.

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Existing Conditions Analysis Introduction & Planning Process

Visions, maps, extracted from:

and

recommendations

were

• “Vision Holly Springs: Town of Holly Springs Comprehensive Plan,” November 2009 • “Beyond the Green, A Parks and Recreation Master Plan for the Town of Holly Springs, NC,” August 2007 • “Village District Area Plan,” December 2005 The following goals (sourced from the above plans) were important to the development of this Master Plan. • Create a “Village-like” atmosphere and sense of place through design and planning initiatives • Celebrate and protect historical assets • Provide an identity or branding for the Village Core and the Mims Property • Provide a mixture of uses to attract people to the downtown core • Create a family-oriented downtown • Provide bicycle and pedestrian connections • Visually link and brand the area with humanscale streetscapes, architecture and public art • Create a linked system of parks and open space • Use a regional model for future development

Figure 2-3: Historic Mims Home.

As recorded in the home’s formal name, the LeslieAlford-Mims House, Colonel George Benton Alford owned the home and influenced the town of Holly Springs by helping to establish rail connections, improve the economy, and aid in the incorporation of the Town of Holly Springs in 1877.

2.2D The Influence of a Landmark

The Mims House and the spring have become part of the identity of the Town. Other historic landmarks in the core of Downtown include

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homes, the building housing Dewar’s Antiques, the Seagraves Drugstore building (now police station), and churches.

2.3 Town of Holly Springs Plans Previous Town planning efforts provided a baseline of information as they include vision, planning, design, and supporting recommendations for the Village District Area.

via greenway and public transportation are at the forefront of overall town planning. Therefore, the study area should accommodate and enhance such connections. According to “Beyond the Green,” the Mims property area may also contain a park (or park-like) area in the future. This green space would serve as one component of Holly Springs’ entire park system concept. Connections, complementary uses, and access were explored during community involvement and design concepting to enhance the overall greenprint for Holly Springs. (Map from “Beyond the Green”). A new park classification system was also established as part of this plan and includes the following types: • Community Central • Town-Wide Entertainment • Conservation Education • Neighborhood Greenway • Neighborhood Subdivision • Road Linkage • Trail Linkage

“Beyond the Green” Parks and Recreation Plan As seen in the Greenway System Concept map from “Beyond the Green,” the Town intends to create/enhance a system of connected areas throughout Holly Springs. The Mims Property is part of the Downtown “Historic” Center which is a hub for these connections. As the Downtown core becomes a bikable, walkable village, the importance of connections

Figure 2-4: Bass Lake Park.


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Existing Conditions Analysis Process Introduction & Planning

Village District Area Plan The 2005 “Village District Area Plan” promotes a sense of place for the Downtown core with recommendations for streetscapes, increased density, reduced setbacks, and other design details and implementation strategies contributing to the “village” character. The accompanying market analysis provides a picture of the intended additions to the District including office space, mixed use, and retail. A survey revealed community desires including: • Upscale townhouses and condos • Mixed use with residential on the second floor • Shopping • Restaurants • Brewery • Cinema • Coffee Shop • Art Galleries • Salon/Spa • Hardware Store The 2009 “Vision Holly Springs” Comprehensive Plan reinforces the Village District Area Plan’s land use recommendations. Suggested land use for the Mims property is residential, mixed use, and open space bordered by additional park, civic, and institutional uses. Planned Circulation and Connections The recently completed Holly Springs Pedestrian Plan, Bicycle Plan, and Parks & Recreation Plan indicate a variety of on-road and off-road bicycle and pedestrian connections. This includes a recommended “spine” greenway along Utley Creek along with bicycle lanes and sharrows on adjacent and nearby roadways. These existing and recommended features were analyzed as part of site access considerations. These elements were also incorporated into the public input and design process.

Figure 2-5: Village District Area Plan land use map.

Figure 5: Proposed Core Area Schematic Plan

Figure 2-6: Village District Area Plan concept map.

Village District Area Plan Town of Holly Springs

NOVEMBER 2005

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Existing Conditions Analysis Introduction & Planning Process

2.4 Site Conditions

A thorough site analysis was conducted through the examination of GIS mapping and onsite fieldwork. The analysis was conducted to better understand landscape features such as topography, vegetation, and water features. These landscape characteristics were a defining factor in site planning and design. Natural Features The 17-acre site is densely forested with a mixture of mostly hardwood with some pine trees present. Large oaks, beech, and tulip poplars are scattered throughout the site with magnolias, holly trees, and ferns in the understory. A large patch of the invasive privet can be found on the northeastern side of the property near and along a small tributary creek. A variety of wildlife is present on the site including deer, rabbits, fox, squirrels, amphibians, and many bird species. Site elevations range from approximately 372 feet to 438 feet with steep slopes present especially on the southern half of the property where the spring and Utley Creek tributary form a valley.

Figure 2-7: Recommended bicycle and greenway network from the Holly Springs Bicycle Plan.

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Water features include Utley Creek, which runs northeast to southwest along the western border of the property. Utley Creek ranges from 5-15 feet wide and is channeled with five to ten foot banks in places. A Town-owned sewer easement can also be found paralleling Utley Creek. The natural spring is found on the southeastern portion of the property. This spring feeds a tributary that joins Utley Creek on the southwestern portion of the property. A second tributary (where the dense privet is located) runs east to west on the northern side of the property connecting to Utley Creek at the northwest corner of the site. Mapped wetlands were confirmed during fieldwork and can be found in narrow swaths along both creek tributaries.


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Existing Conditions Analysis Process Introduction & Planning Figure 2-8: The Existing Conditions Board was displayed at the first public open house workshop. Photos are labeled on the map to give an overall feel of the unique characteristics of the landscape.

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Existing Conditions Analysis Introduction & Planning Process Figure 2-9: The Site Analysis Board is a result of the Steering Committee Muddy Boots Tour. This board was displayed at the first public open house workshop. General site characteristics are revealed along with potential opportunities at specific sites.

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Chapter 3: Design Alternatives

3.0 OVERVIEW

One of the most effective methods for understanding what a community wants and needs is to present them with something to react to and provide opinions. Three distinct alternatives with variations in programming, form, architectural style, theme, and placement of focal points were created and presented to the public in Public Open House Workshop #2. Each concept reflected ideas generated throughout the public, Committee, and Town staff participation process. In addition to community input, the following were considered: • How to balance creating a sense of place for people with ecologic preservation and conservation • How to deliver a concept that can grow with the changing culture, development, and uses adjacent to the site and within Holly Springs • How to create a place that will be regionally and locally treasured and attended through all four seasons • How to provide access and multiple uses for a variety of age groups • How to achieve the creation of elements and spaces that would be appropriately programmed and maintained by the Town

3.0A Approach to Site Design

Appropriate design solutions incorporate history, previous plans and documentation review, site analysis, fieldwork, community involvement, and a flexible process. The goal of this planning process

was to help the community arrive upon a solution well-suited for the time, place, culture, economy, and ecological factors on the site, within the surrounding community, and in the context of the region. The Town and Steering Committee helped guide the process and provided important feedback along the way.

3.0B Adhering to Existing Guidelines

Final design elements within the study area incorporate standards already established by existing design guidelines (where appropriate) including the Holly Springs Bicycle Plan, Holly Springs Pedestrian Plan, streetscape design guidelines, and other existing appropriate aesthetic standards. To preserve the historic integrity, enhance the overall image of the town, or improve upon existing standards, new guidelines were established within the plan for the Mims Property.

3.1 Three Alternatives Concept No. 1 – Leslie-Alford-Mims Ecologic Learning Center

The Leslie-Alford-Mims Ecologic Learning Center focuses on education and ecologic awareness. Sensitivity to natural systems and the balance between human access and preservation will be present throughout a series of experiences on the site. With daily use as a goal, hard- and soft-surface trails will be gently integrated into the natural topography. To acknowledge the rich history of Holly Springs and this site, small treatments will be made to both the location of the spring as well as the cemetery. Brick and patterned concrete will provide accents in paths, walls, and small plazas. A signature building, located across from the Cultural Center, is fronted with a large hardscape plaza with organic-shaped planting beds and shade trees. Native grasses, ground covers, and shrubs will provide seasonal color and interest to the space, which will function as a venue for the Holly Springs Farmers Market, concerts, art fairs, and any other public gatherings programmed by the Town. The architecture of the Learning Center will be carefully designed to fit into the forest surroundings. With conservation in mind, materials, methods, and maintenance will fold into a LEED® Certified structure, harnessing the power of wind, solar, and other renewable energy sources. A loop driveway approaches the building from Ballentine Street. Shaded by the building’s overhang, this driveway provides a drop-off area for elderly and physically challenged visitors, and protection from the weather for service vehicles. The building will be integrated into a natural ridge, appearing to be two stories from the south and three stories on the north facing side with a large wrap-around porch

serving as a viewing platform to the wooded site and stream below. Programming for the building will mainly revolve around the importance of the natural systems found within forested areas, stream banks, wetlands, and the aquatic environment within the flow way of the stream. Habitat, water quality, soil composition, plant species, animal species, and their interactions will provide a foundation for visitors to the site and Learning Center. Potential audiences include families, school groups, and students–with integrated programming for local schools (elementary through higher education). One exciting feature of the building is an overnight facility where students of all ages, from towns near and far, could spend multiple days enhancing their knowledge of the forest and stream systems. An overnight trip would include guided tours and experiments within the site, as well as access to the sleeping quarters, bathroom facilities, full kitchen, and dining room. Structured programs with varying themes could be created to produce a portfolio of overnight adventures. These programs could be operated in conjunction with other Holly Springs Parks and Recreation amenities, including Bass Lake. Other rentable space, a café or restaurant, and gift shop could also be included within this signature LEED® Certified structure. The rear porch of the building allows visitors to view the natural landscape of the property - overlooking the streams, trails, ridges, valleys, and a series of organically arranged, terraced planting beds and trails. The beds will serve as a study area for native planting and botanical education, creating a picturesque setting for a quiet stroll. A more 17


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Concept Number One: Leslie-Alford-Mims Ecologic Learning Center Design Alternatives On the west side of the property, tucked in between the confluence of two streams, a Stream Laboratory will house supplies for collecting water samples, small aquatic life, soil, and other materials from the site. Here, classes will run tests on samples and explore materials using microscopes. The patio and seating will serve as an outdoor classroom or public space for picnicking, pausing, and meeting. The northeast corner of the site is treated as a welcome center and entrance to the site, capturing visitors who park along Earp Street. Bicycle parking, a site map, an information kiosk, and carefully selected plantings will welcome visitors to the site and hint at the educational experience beyond the densely forested path ahead. To collect, convey, and filter stormwater from the downtown area, a biofiltration system, similar to the large system adjacent to the Learning Center, will be constructed along Avent Ferry Road where the culvert passes underneath the road. This system will clean stormwater before it reaches the natural flow of the stream that flows east to west, located on the northern end of the site.

Figure 3-1: Leslie-Alford-Mims Ecologic Learning Center Site Plan.

formally structured trail segment will navigate the steep slope from the planting bed area, west toward the main greenway alignment within the sewer easement located just west of the stream. Small pedestrian bridges will cross the stream at carefully selected locations to create a system of trails that residents can use daily to enhance their health routines. Water quality and conservation will be a main focus of the building’s interior and exterior - with 18

collection and filtering methods accompanied by interpretive and educational signage. A cistern will collect rainwater from the roof with an overflow valve distributing excess water volume through a series of naturally-planted terraces peppered with boulders and rocks. This area will provide seating, visual interest, and an educational avenue for the importance of stormwater cleansing – especially around stream and wetland areas.

As the Mims House is an important historic connection to the site, entrance signs will be placed near the driveway leading to Holly Springs United Methodist Church and 919 Marketing. A delicate treatment of one-way vehicular circulation, coupled with a raised, brick plaza, will alert motorists to this pedestriandominated area. The plaza can be blocked off for special events hosted by the Town, Church, 919 Marketing, or Mims House. This brick path will meander through the forest to reveal a small brick plaza surrounding the existing grave sites. Benches, wrought iron fencing, large shade trees, and a formal layout contribute to the quiet, reflective properties of this plaza.

Figure 1-14: Compilation of slides shown at Public Open House for concept one.


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Design Alternatives Concept Number One: Leslie-Alford-Mims Ecologic Learning Center Concept No. 2 – Mims Forest Activity Park

Mims Forest Activity Park is a highly-programmed, revenue-generating hub of community connections. The main center of activity is focused near the Cultural Center. A large turf area hosts a variety of events, including the Farmers Market. This structural turf can withstand the weight of trucks, staging materials, and other elements required for community gatherings. Situated on the highest point of the site, the turf lawn becomes an overlook, with forested vistas and glimpses into other activity within the site. Built out over the natural ridge, the turf overlook transitions into a rock climbing wall with areas suited for varying levels of experience including young children, beginners, intermediate climbers, and those advanced climbers seeking a challenge. To minimize the impact to the forest and streams, a raised boardwalk transfers users from the atgrade turf to a series of tree houses constructed within the forest canopy. The nucleus of adventure is located inside the forest, starting with the tree houses. Manned by the Holly Springs Parks and Recreation Staff, this main tree house will be the storage center for all ropes, carabineers, harnesses, and personal guides of adventure. A Figure 1-14: Compilation of slides shown at Public Open House for concept one.

starting platform for a series of zip lines is located just outside the main tree house flanked by two smaller houses for those who wish to observe or enjoy dining in these two tree-top cafes. Via soft surface trail, paved greenway, or zip line, visitors will arrive at another station. Here, a rubberized surface will host a children’s play area with naturalized structures for climbing, swinging, and fostering imaginative play. A second set of tree houses provide restrooms and the second ‘base camp’ for those wishing to partake in body and mind challenges. Tucked in the forest, a ropes course and physical obstacle course are the perfect settings for a weekend adventure or corporate retreat. From low structures perfect for youth to more challenging heights, individuals and groups can test their strength and agility in the natural, forested setting. A main greenway along the sewer easement to the west of the property will connect to the Activity Park in key locations. In addition to a system of trails throughout the site, daily users can extend their cardio conditioning on the cemetery loop trail. A challenging, steep slope will work the lower body, rewarding runners, walkers, and cyclists with a view of large, established trees sheltering historic gravestones. Entering from the Mims House/Church/919 Marketing area, a densely wooded path leads visitors into the forest, revealing a large historic green. Interpretive signage encircles the green, telling the story of Holly Springs and highlighting the founding families who walked the woods in the past. Continuing with the theme of low impact, an amphitheater and event space is integrated into the natural slope. Stone surfaces give way to terraces of low plantings, creating seating for concert goers, families watching school plays, and proud parents at graduation ceremonies. A short walk toward the stream on the south end of the forest leads to an outdoor class room at the site of the spring. Here, interpretive signage

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Concept Number Two: Mims Forest Activity Park Design Alternatives

Figure 3-2: Mims Forest Adventure Park Site Plan.

and seating areas will allow users of all abilities to enjoy a moment of pause in this hub of activity. Stormwater throughout the site will be artfully conveyed to concrete pools interspersed with vegetation. Each vegetated layer will slow and cleanse rainwater and runoff before entering the sensitive stream environment.

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The rather flat, northeast corner of the site features a loop trail perfect for seniors and young families seeking a short distance trail. Vegetated beds will identify plants by botanical name and serve as a learning opportunity as well as a beautiful setting to stroll, meet friends, or read a book while enjoying the peaceful forest.

Figure 1-16: Compilation of slides shown at Public Open House for concept two.


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Design Alternatives Concept Number Two: Mims Forest Activity Park Concept No. 3 – Holly Springs Village Green

Holly Springs Village Green focuses on connecting with downtown, promoting a sense of community, and establishing the feeling of a quaint, historic village. Moving throughout the site, visitors will feel as if they are enveloped in an old town – with a modern twist. Using the Civil War Monument as a focal point, a brick plaza, an allée of large trees, a grass plaza, and a brick horseshoe promenade create a pedestrianonly space. By blocking vehicular access to this space with planted bollards, families will feel safe on the Village Green. By aligning a Clubhouse adjacent to the 919 Marketing building, the grass plaza feels like a public square or front yard. As neighbors, 919 Marketing and the Clubhouse provide an old town feel with wrought iron fences, pergolas, and dense vegetation. A small monument on the brick horseshoe promenade creates an axis from the existing Civil War Monument. Stepping stones embedded in the lawn provide access to a quiet, contemplative area surrounding the grave sites. Interpretive signage along the horseshoe promenade and within the cemetery will tell the story of the Town and the families who lived on this estate.

The Town Clubhouse will mimic the architectural style of the Mims House with large, grand wraparound porches and white columns, welcoming visitors into a multipurpose space. A café will be placed in the clubhouse with a residential feel. Diners will enjoy comfortable seating inside or on the porch, where they can partake in a business lunch or enjoy sipping wine with a group of friends. The Town will also rent space within the Clubhouse, or the entire Clubhouse for events of varying sizes Visitors can rent items for use on the grass plaza or Great Lawn, including bocce, croquet, and a variety of other supplies for enjoying open green space. Within the Clubhouse, small rental spaces will be available for shops and local artists to display and sell their wares. The grass plaza can also house the Holly Springs Farmers Market. Bollards blocking vehicles from the brick plaza can be removed for loading and unloading trucks, tents, and supplies. A structural turf will support the weight of vehicles and event materials. A key architectural structure pulls the space together, responding geometrically to the 919 Marketing building, the Mims House, and the existing Methodist Church structure. This angled building unites all existing buildings within the space, establishing a sense that the area was sensitively designed with all parties in mind. This structure can serve several purposes. The first option is for the town to own the building, creating an architectural structure similar to the Mims House - enhanced with small, modern details. This town-owned building could house restaurants, art studios, small shops, and small offices for local community members. The second option for this angled building is to become a modification to the Church’s expansion. With this option, the architecture would reflect the classic lines and materials of the existing Church building. This concept also involves a small modification to the Church’s sanctuary expansion plan providing a porte-cochère to drop off elderly parishioners, 21


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Concept Number Three: Holly Springs Village Green Design Alternatives large lawn will change with the seasons, acting as a splash pad in the heat of the summer and an ice rink during the holiday season. Central to this space is a kiosk for purchasing snacks and accommodating seasonal rentals. Two grand, stone stairs will descend from the high overlook of the park, leading visitors down soft surface trails or to the site of the springs, where they will find brick and stone walls, interpretive signage, and comfortable benches. Stormwater treatment throughout the site will masquerade as beautiful, densely planted beds. These stone-rimmed areas will collect and filter stormwater from the downtown area, roof tops, and hard surface areas throughout the site. Tasteful, historic themed educational signs will provide details about the modern methods for protecting our precious water sources for years to come.

Figure 3-3: Holly Springs Village Green Site Plan.

small children, and those avoiding unpleasant weather. This building is slightly offset from the original building, creating a public plaza and integrating the Church into the village feel of the Town. Breezeways and covered passages could extend from each building to create seamless transitions. A grand promenade bridge passes over the creek connecting this historic village space 22

to the cultural center and a grand park. Wide paths edged with formal plantings are reminiscent of a time when ladies would stroll with their escorts, protected from the sun by parasols. The formalized planting beds will be strategically integrated with modern amenities. A soft-surface playground area will complement children’s programs at the Cultural Center and provide a haven of safe activity for all ages. A


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Design Alternatives Concept Number Three: Holly Springs Village Green

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Introduction & Planning Process

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Master Plan4:Design Introduction Chapter Master & Planning Plan Design Process

4.0 OVERVIEW

The final concept for Holly Springs Park evolved from a thorough public involvement process. Consulting with the community throughout the journey of planning and design revealed gaps in Town and parks and recreation programming. Combining desires and visions with site constraints and opportunities resulted in a conceptual plan and site programming that will serve the population of Holly Springs.

4.1 Final Concept Holly Springs Park

Overall, Holly Springs Park is a series of experiences juxtaposed within the Village District maintaining nine acres of undisturbed forest on the seventeen acre site. The layout is woven into the surrounding land uses, serving as transition areas from single family housing, to recreational space, to community gathering places, and into the village core. A series of paths and nodes create a sense of mystery and discovery as users navigate through multiple elevations and experiences. The regional greenway, boardwalk, and hard-surface trails of stamped concrete and gravel pave provide ADA accessibility throughout the site. Circulation, via a system of about one-half mile of soft-surface trails, allows visitors to appreciate natural features and challenging topography. Three large, distinct places are located within the park to serve an array of social needs. The Village Green area provides a large public gathering space and permanent home for the Holly Springs Farmers Market. A Parks and Recreation Program

Building serves as home base for the Parks and Recreation Department, while providing facilities for programming related to the park, and indoor space for youth, adults, and seniors. The third node, an adventure playground, will be integrated into the natural terrain and vegetation to provide several ages with physical challenges and social interactions. With multiple entrances, access to the wooded site is easy whether traveling by foot, bike, or car. Cyclists and pedestrians gain entry via a regionally connected greenway and the surrounding sidewalks connecting the entire Village District area. Movement within the site is notably aimed toward pedestrian and bicycle priority, with safety signage posted for drivers and zero curb environments in parking areas and arrival lanes. Bicycle parking will be available at all major nodes within the site including the trailhead, village green, parks and recreation center, and adventure play area. Stitching together these nodes are travel-ways and places of exploration and discovery. Marked with wayfinding signage throughout the property, small “found places” become destinations. Four of these quiet, special places are denoted with flagstone paving and vegetation surrounding the site of historic springs and brick cisterns – used in the past to collect drinking water. These discovered places are marked with interpretive signage delicately integrated into the natural surroundings. A quarter-mile, raised “wetland-walk,” beginning at the Parks and Recreation Building, becomes more than a path. As a main attraction to the park it reveals a story of the site’s natural

habitat, stream facts, conservation information, and species descriptions through interpretive signage. The journey begins on the highest ridge, traveling through the treetops until crossing a

stream. With outlooks and benches punctuating the path, the boardwalk begins to descend through the foliage toward lower elevations of the forest, following a course along streams and 25


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wetlands. The arrival point is the intersection of hard-surface trail, soft-surface trail, and the entrance to the adventure playground.

Figure 4-1: Final Conceptual Site Plan.

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The adventure play area will be tailored to a wide-range of ages. By integrating play into the natural environment, negative impacts to the site will be minimized. In between trees, rope systems will provide a variety of imagination and physical challenges for preschoolers through middle-school aged youth. Seating and shade for observing parents and guardians will abound in this grove of activity.


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Master Plan Design Introduction & Planning Process Moving along the stamped concrete trail, visitors will follow tracks of animal prints and leaf shapes. Meandering through the wooded slope, this twotenths of a mile trail will be dotted with observation points and interpretive signage. As the trail approaches the Village Green area, users will pass through the edge of the Village Orchard. Surrounding the Village Green to the west and south, the Village Orchard will be gently integrated into the natural slope. This feature folds into the

agricultural history of the site, framing the entrance to the village green from the west, and providing seasonal interest and activities for families and visitors. The Village Green area plays host to a variety of special events and gathering opportunities for the community. In addition to becoming a permanent home for the Holly Springs Farmers Market, small and large events can be accommodated on the over one half acre green. Edging the green

are trees providing dappled light to the raised, reclaimed wood planter boxes doubling as benches. The surrounding open-air pavilions shade food vendors, local retailers, and artists during concerts and community festivals. In the main building, the center open air space for seating or staging is capped on either end by a cafĂŠ and restroom facilities. The promenade surrounding the green, along with the areas behind the buildings and the parking lot, will be a structural

gravel material - providing a casual back-yard feel coupled with engineered support for vehicles and ADA accessibility as well as permeability for environmental consciousness. Minimal grading will be employed to align this area on the top of the ridge. Where needed, stone retaining walls topped with wrought iron railings will frame the village green. The cemetery site will feature a grass lawn with flagstone paths surrounded by a wrought iron fence. Shade trees,

Figure 4-2: Conceptual rendering of Village Green during a community event. 27


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benches, and interpretive signage finish this area as a quiet, reflective place when large events are not occurring.

Figure 4-3 through 4-4: Conceptual renderings of buildings around Village Green.

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As a feature to draw people into the site, the area between the Village Green and Avent Ferry Road will be completely cleared and transformed into an open meadow with a beautiful biofiltration facility. This facility will be densely planted with native grasses and flowering perennials, perfectly suited as structural components for the soil. Acting as a giant sponge, this area will filter stormwater


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and scientific names. Large pergolas with “frontporch” swings welcome visitors to enjoy the gardens, read a book, or visit with friends. The Parks and Recreation building will be integrated into the steep ridge complete with a viewing deck large enough to support outdoor café seating or private and public events. This node is connected to the Village Green area via a boardwalk suspended over the stream. Access to the site of the springs and soft-surface trails are provided via a staircase.

before it enters the groundwater source and creeks located on the property. Hard channels will direct water through a series of terraces and weirs punctuated with boulders and stepping-stones. A soft-surface path will lead explorers from the Village Green area, through the meadow and biofiltration facility, to the trailhead at the northeast corner of the park. A boardwalk spanning the creek also connects the Village Green area with the trailhead. Here, twelve parking spaces are provided to gain

access to the park. An additional minimum of twenty-four parking spaces will line Earp Street for those traveling via car to the site. At the trailhead, visitors will find a complete map of the park, bicycle parking, pergolas with shaded seating, wayfinding signage at trail intersections, and an entry monument feature. Also a zero-curb area, pedestrian and cyclist safety is a top priority in this environmentally sensitive, pervious parking lot. Passing along the north of the parking lot, the regional greenway connects cyclists and

pedestrians to areas throughout Holly Springs. This greenway is connected to the site via the trailhead and an entrance on the west side of the park. At the west entrance, visitors will enter the site along the “wetland walk.” Returning to the south end of the property, across from the Cultural Center and Library, the Parks and Recreation building is fronted by a half-acre botanical garden. Meandering paths are framed with native plants, wildflowers, and ornamental species – all tagged with appropriate common

This concept provides the town with a series of trails, public gathering spaces, and conservation areas. Interpretive signage will educate visitors about the history of Holly Springs, as well as the importance of water quality and habitat preservation. A balance of human access and conservation areas, coupled with educational components, will create a sense of appreciation in visitors for the protection of lands near water sources. As the Town continues to grow, this park will remain a hub of social and ecologic connections for generations to come.

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regional greenway along the west side of the site is 1/4 mile, the wetland walk is also 1/4 mile, and there are over 1/2 mile of soft surfaces trails with varying degrees of difficulty. Parcels and Ownership To create a successful place for the Town of Holly Springs, adjacent landowners will need to work together. Essential to the Village Green operating as part of the core Village District will be a relationship between the owners of 919 Marketing, the owner of the Mims House, and the Holly Springs United Methodist Church. Access, circulation, safety, program scheduling, and other logistics will need to be reviewed by all parties. Working in a cooperative fashion will benefit all parties. In this site design, the Town has expanded a proposed parking area planned by the church. Safety enhancements will be made around the existing monument to create a pedestrian environment and determine when bollards should be in place to block vehicles from accessing the lane circulating through all four properties. Working with Topography This trail systems and buildings throughout the site are intended to work with the topography. All efforts will be made to preserve the natural slopes, ridges, and valleys. New hard- and soft-surface trail alignments will gradually climb and descend slopes with switchbacks and retaining walls. This system will allow slopes to not exceed standard ADA accessible limits.

Figure 4-5: Conceptual rendering of botanical garden area and boardwalk leading to Village Green.

4.1A Technical Considerations Undisturbed Acreage From the beginning of the planning and design process the community recognized how unique it is to have seventeen acres of wooded land near a downtown core. Conservation and preservation remained high on the list of priorities for the site. With streams and sensitive edge habitats coupled with the existing residential neighborhood, 30

conservation areas and buffers were main components of the design. Roughly nine acres will remain undeveloped with minimal disturbance to insert trail systems in conservation areas. Educational signage throughout the property will also help visitors understand the importance of keeping the park free from debris, not interfering with plant and animal species, and remaining on marked paths and outlooks.

Trail Systems The number one requested element for the park was trails. This request consistently appeared during visioning, workshops, and was submitted via online surveys. With topographical challenges, and opportunities to include boardwalks, trail mileage throughout the site was maximized to include as much hard- and soft-surface trails as possible without completely developing the parcel. The

Parking Access Several discussions throughout the process have focused on parking and vehicular access to the site. A major component of the vision statement is to promote healthy living and preserve the natural landscape. Those two components can be achieved by limiting vehicular access and pollutants to the site. By encouraging visitors to park within the downtown area, they will not only improve their health by walking, but also will


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Figure 4-6: Acreage estimates for areas throughout the site.

Figure 4-7: Trail mileage estimates.

stimulate the economy. Visitors to the site passing by local shops and restaurants are more likely to patronize these locations traveling to or from the park. Also, there currently are 432 parking spaces throughout the Village District. With additional onstreet parking, a trailhead, a small lot at the Village Green, and an access lane, the proposed site will add at least an additional 67 spaces. All of which are within a five minute walk of the Village Green area. 31


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Figure 4-8: Approximate parcel lines.

Figure 4-10: Topography overlaid on site plan. Figure 4-9: Village parking estimates - all within a five-mile walk of the Village Green. 32


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Master Plan Design Option B: Amphitheater After presenting the Holly Springs Park Master Plan concept to Town Council on May 1st, 2012, the design team was requested to explore the possibility of inserting an amphitheater on the site. This facility should be designed to seat approximately 1,000 people. The purpose of inserting this programming into the site would be to draw people to the downtown area and stimulate the economy for both the park and surrounding businesses. Option B is presented to illustrate how an amphitheater would fit across from the Cultural Center -in lieu of the Parks and Recreation Program building and botanic gardens.

Placing the stage near the stream buffer provides just enough room to have 1.3 acres for the facility. A spacial study shows how the seating area will need to fan out away from the stage, while remaining outside the sensitive stream buffer (See figure 4-13). Intensive site work will be required to reshape the top of the ridge. Twenty to thirty feet of elevation change will need to be gradually sloped to allow for ADA accessibility throughout the amphitheater area as well as to provide a

connection to the wetland walk and boardwalk leading to the Village Green. In addition to creating a more gradual slope, the contour pattern will also have to be reversed to follow the arc of the seating layout. This amount of disturbance will physically reshape the land and require massive retaining walls to expand the buildable area. These retaining walls will also need to be engineered to withstand the force of vehicles delivering items to the staging area (see figure 4-14).

Crowd control areas will be required during events to ensure all ticketed patrons are admitted to the seating area and those without tickets can not circulate throughout the amphitheater space. These barriers should be removed when events are not in progress (see figure 4-15).

Figure 4-12: Stream buffers and topography.

Figure 4-14: Retaining walls.

Figure 4-16: Queue area.

Figure 4-13: Seating area and stage placement.

Figure 4-15: Crowd control barriers.

Figure 4-15: Kiosks and contextual fitting.

The sidewalk will also need to transform into a queue area for those waiting to gain entrance to the event space. Protective barriers from vehicles

Option B: Spacial Study Currently, the area housing the Parks and Recreation Program building and botanic gardens is only one-half acre. In order to accommodate 1,000 seats, the amphitheater will need to use 1.3 - 1.5 acres of land. Placement of the amphitheater will require altering the existing topography and must remain outside of the 35 foot buffer from the stream (see figure 4-12).

Figure 4-11: Existing conceptual site plan showing the halfacre site with a program building and botanic garden.

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- in the form of bollards or vegetation - may need to be installed to ensure safety of pedestrians lining up to enter the event space (see figure 4-16). Within the event space, it is required that patrons have access to restroom facilities and food and beverage vendors. Kiosks will need to be added to the space to provide these services (see figure 4-17). DESIGN STANDARDS: To create a facility with the capacity to seat 1,000 people, typically 1.3-1.5 acres are required. 1,000 Seat Venues: River Front Park/Mankato, Minnesota

1.3 Acres

Oak Point Park/Plano, Texas

1.4 Acres

Hugh Morton/Wilmington, NC

1.4 Acres

NOTE: Forest Theater in Chapel Hill holds 300 people and is approximately .8 acres.

The staging area will need to support electrical features including lighting and sound systems and the seating area should include lighting for safety. Vehicular access will need to be provided to the staging area for equipment set up. Speakers should be integrated throughout the seating area and the stage will need to be designed to project sound toward the audience with sides and ceiling areas. In addition to the performance and seating area, restrooms, concessions, and a box office are required. ADA accessibility will need to be integrated into seating, concessions, box office and restroom facilities. What does this mean for Holly Springs Park?

The proposed location for the amphitheater – across from the Cultural Center – is only one-half acre. This size space will not be able to accommodate 1,000 people. This ridge will likely support less people than the Village Green area – which is currently design to operate as a flex space for events, the Farmers Market, and serve as an open green for

34

park activities including bocce, chess, Frisbee, etc. Within the site, determining the appropriate 1.4-1.5 acres will alter the existing design as access roads, utilities, ADA accessibility, and other design feature will need to be integrated into the landscape. As a community-directed planning and design project – one of the main visions for the site was for it to not have service roads or vehicular traffic within the interior of the site. COSTS: Two comparisons reveal the implementation cost of 1,000 seat amphitheaters to be around $2-3 million. • River Front Park/Mankato, Minnesota $2,000,000 • Sunbury Riverfront/Sunbury, Pennsylvania $2,700,000 Operation and management costs vary for each facility depending on the number of paid events, free events, rental fees collected, event labor, event cleaning, weekly maintenance, etc. The pro forma within the Sunbury Report shows a fiveyear summary indicating cash flow for a 1,000-seat facility. Net Cash Flow •  Year 1: $60 •  Year 2: $2,230 •  Year 3: $3,590 •  Year 4: $8,843 •  Year 5: $7,779 See Sunbury Pennsylvania Feasibility Report (link located at the end of this report) for itemized Planning Level Implementation Costs and Income and Expense Pro Forma.

MARKET AREA: For amphitheaters serving 1,000-2,000 patrons, market areas extend 30-75 miles. The facility will need to be managed by the city (for marketing and

booking) or by an entertainment management company. Within the 30 mile radius, competition (at varying scales) includes: • Holly Springs • Parrish Womble Park • The Cultural Center • Raleigh • Raleigh Amphitheater • Time Warner Cable Pavilion at Walnut Creek (Rock Quarry Road) • Durham • American Tobacco Campus • Angle Amphitheater (Duke Gardens) • Cary • Koka Booth Theater • Chapel Hill • Forest Theater OPERATION: Town or City managed amphitheaters typically require two or more full time employees to manage marketing and booking. Beyond attracting patrons, securing talent, and coordinating rentals, other daily and weekly operations include (but are not limited to): • Security, Parking, Crowd Control (during events) • Emergency Services (during events) • Upkeep and cleaning (daily/weekly) • Food vendors • Ticket Management TRENDS IN EVENT SPACE: With such high implementation costs for amphitheater spaces, which are seen as single-use areas, many towns and cities are programming public space to be multi-use. By creating multi-use spaces, municipalities can accommodate large events with portable staging, lighting, and sound

systems that integrate into their public spaces. Examples: • Carrboro features entertainers on the Weaver Street lawn. • Chapel Hill often holds concerts and festivals on Franklin Street with portable staging for entertainers. • Downtown Raleigh transforms City Plaza and Fayetteville Street into concert and event venues. • Columbia, South Carolina, holds events, festivals, and concerts in the streets of their five-points area downtown. • Buffalo, New York, transforms their large green space along the water front for concerts and events. AMPHITHEATER ADDITIONS TO TOWNS AND CITIES: For venues seating 1,000 or more patrons, towns and cities often conduct a feasibility study before embarking on the design and implementation of the facility. As a model, refer to the Feasibility Report for Sunbury, Pennsylvania, completed by consultants from Simone Jaffe Collins. Report Includes: Executive Summary, Background, Site Analysis, Design Process, Master Site Plan, Market Assessment, Operating Costs, Economic Impacts, and Implementation: http://www.cityofsunbury.com/Documents/ Forms/All%20Items.aspx?RootFolder=%2fDocum ents%2fRiver%20Front%20Project%2fFinal%20MS P&FolderCTID=0x0120009B53131E7709A543B642 BCCE732DB084


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Master Plan5:Design Implementation Introduction Chapter Implementation & Planning Process

5.0 OVERVIEW

The implementation of the Mims Property Master Plan will require a comprehensive approach that includes multiple sources of funding, partnerships, design, construction, and management. It will also take the dedication of Town staff and a commitment to the visions and goals established in this Master Plan.

5.1 Master Plan Adoption

The Town’s adoption of the Mims Property Master Plan should be the first step in the implementation process. Adoption confirms the Town’s position on the success of the planning process and the desire to move forward. Most importantly, having an adopted plan is critical in securing funding from federal, state, and private agencies. This plan can be adopted with both options A and B for the final master plan. It is recommended that the Town continue with a phased approach for adoption and implementation as follows: Action 1: Approve concept plan with optional site feature of (A)botanic garden with parks and recreation program building or (B) amphitheater. Action 2A: Move into implementation process with phased approach – begin with design development and construction of the Village Green area, follow with trail and trailhead design development and construction.

Action 2B: Execute an RFP for a feasibility study including more in-depth planning and design, market analysis, and pro forma development for an amphitheater with a capacity of 1,000 seats Action 3: Select a final design solution for the space across from the Cultural Center after the completion of a feasibility study. Action 4: Initiate design development for site across from Cultural Center.

5.2 Next Steps 5.2A Organize Implementation Committee

This Committee could be a subset of the existing Steering Committee. Their role would be to prioritize short-term and long-term implementation/phasing strategies and to determine funding mechanisms.

5.2B Programming opportunities

Establishing a list of potential short- and longterm programming opportunities will support the concept for the park, transitioning it into a reality for the citizens of Holly Springs. Some programing can be aimed toward funding implementation; others can be established now and continue to run throughout the life of the park. • Reprogramming Farmers Market • Educational partnerships with local schools • Local garden clubs/organizations volunteer group

• Establish a “Friends of the Mims Park” group • Programming of site and responsibilities • Promotional brochure for the Park’s mission and goals/master plan.

5.2C Continue building Partnerships

Build strategic partnerships between Town Departments and between the Town and public –private partnerships for Park issues related to funding, implementation and management. Issues to work through in collaboration include: • Park access road • Zoning issues/regulations • Town initiated stormwater projects for Downtown District

5.2D Consider Multiple Funding Sources and Facility Development Options

Multiple approaches should be taken to support the Mims Property development and programming. Because of significant capital costs and future potential function of the park, partnerships with other public and private agencies are essential. Partnership opportunities can be useful when a combination of funding sources is needed. Potential partners can include downtown businesses, business and civic organizations, local major employers, corporate sponsors, and nonprofit groups. It is likely a combination of funding

sources would be used to reduce the reliance on one financing technique. Potential funding avenues include: • Parks & Recreation Bond funding • Local CIP • PARTF funding • Other sources (including private monies) – grants/gifts • Public-Private Partnerships

5.2E Identify Scope for Future Tasks

The following list of action items will set the implementation process in motion. As the Town moves toward a funding strategy, the conceptual design and programming will need to be vetted against Town needs, current uses, future uses, zoning, design guidelines, and Parks and Recreation standards. The following list should be included as future tasks. • Pre-Design of park program elements • Phasing Plan • Budget Estimates for site and facility program elements • Construction Documentation following park program funding • Operations and maintenance

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Appendix A: Public Input Introduction & Planning Process

A.0 OVERVIEW

Public involvement was central to the planning process. The methods for engaging the public are largely described in Chapter 1. The following comment tables were transcribed from the second open house workshop where participants were asked to describe their likes and dislikes for each of the three alternatives. Participants were also asked to detail the most important or desired features for the final plan.

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Public Open House Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

walking trails

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

3

zip line/ rope course; climbing wall; treehouse; amphitheater

1

bocce/ croquet; ice rink

2

2

ice rink/ snack kiosk/ playground area; historic feel; shopping and clubhouse

1

historic feel; elements like at Pullen Park, ex. train, carousel. Downtown/ walking part similar to downtown Apex

2

very active for multigens; buildings for use; brick plaza & green w/ trail

1

SEE the "Gina" Plan‌ would like to see a more permanent home for the Farmers Market. Look @ Hillsborough as an example- it is FM Sat. morning & rental facility & large picnic shelter at other times. Having public bathrooms & running water & storage room for equipment would allow us the opportunity to expand the offerings and programming. Also right now we are @ the mercy of pvt. land owners allowing us to use their pkg lots to operate. Also feel that this needs to be a "central park" that is a true gathering place where people can go and meet friends. Needs to be more "urban" in design. Have some "active" areas as well as quiet spaces. Although zip lines & ropes courses are "active" they are limited in the # of people that can use. Families will go to a great gathering place each weekend, but might do zip & ropes only a couple times a year. Having multi-use facilities such as the clubhouse are needed to offer community orgs places to meet and spaces for residents to entertain. So many possibilities... and so many opinions- Good luck! Still would like to see opportunities for fountains, lights, carousel, etc. like the plazas & bldgs @ Pullen Parks- build it & they will come :)

2

Concept #2. Ampitheater is the most important feature in my opinion.

plaza/ farmer's market; nature trails

not enough activites/ shopping

3

amphitheater; outdoor activities (tree house, zip line, climbing wall)

FM Plaza; Nature Ed. Center

Not much activities for such large central park; FM still uncovered

3

Activities- zip & ropes course; def unique destination; historic green; cemetery loop trail

conservation

not enough to do

3

*ampitheater; activities n/a

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RANKS

Comments on final plan

united use; amp- already have outdoor stage @ cultural center

1

retail


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Public Open House Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

trails; outdoor classroom; brick plaza; nature center

farmers market; his2 toric plaza; stream lab

getting church, Mims, & center together

no boardwalk trail; mosquito issue in summer

Farmers mkt plaza; nature trails; brick plaza

stream laboratory

nature museum, trails

too focused on nature/ ecology; no <illegible> structure

naturalness

the church driveway becoming the main entrance to the park

RANKS LIKE nothing

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

everything

3

plazas; trails

bocci/croquet; rentals; 1 office space; ice rink idea

3

could attract business walking path needs to be meeting for team bild- elevated or well drained ing conferences. Could generate revenue.

1

3

strolling paths, gets people & kids outside; ampitheather

not pulling together church, Mims, & 919; not having a winter ice rink

1

amphitheater; zip line; ropes course

open green

trails, amphitheater

no museum; no <illegible> structure; need to be concerned about <illegible> and <illegible>; to focused on youth activities

1

tree house; all the natural activities

that the entrance would affect church safety

1

3

Comments on final plan RANKS plazas, soft surface trails, and an outdoor classroom/ edu. Ctr are doable, affordable, and appropriate for the area. The office space shown is on church property. Farmers mkt and ice rink are not a good idea. Some of the concepts shown in #3 have been tried in the area and generally end up unused. This whole concept would be an abuse of the property. The springs need to be a focal point in any decision. The town is on the right track with some combination of concepts #1 & #3. This acreage and Bass Lake together make nice water-based and forest-based venues for walking, learning, and some degree of active recreation.

2

the historic village feel; idea of winter ice rink; appeals to all ages

not having a solid trail 2

snack kiosk; clubhouse rentals; cafĂŠ/ grass

spring/suummer/fall lawn

trails, water park feature, Rental building, buffer for neighbors, access <illegible> public/neighbors

to spread out, no <illegible> struch

shops; that it doesn't take into consideration the church's expansion plans; that you've made plans for the church

2

1) would like small retail area in area; 2) combo of village green & activity center; 3) some hard surface walking area

a combination of the best features of each. Needs to be inviting to a larger group of <illegible> and be family oriented.

Draw up plans that include the church's expansion plans so that we can see how it really all fits together. Be respectful of the church & remove "church with loud bells" from the map.

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Public Open House Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

LIKE

learning opportunities; keeping the land as natural as possible

stream lab; having 3 tree houses, "resting spots", or buildings so close to homes provides places for people to hang out or loiter after dark. That area is very hidden and could be very unsafe if people are hanging out. We have children so this is a concern.

tree house; playground/ zipline; ampitheater

having tree houses, "resting spots", or buildings so close to homes provides places for people to hang out or loiter after dark. That area is very hidden and could be very unsafe if people are hanging out. We have children so this is a concern.

2

historic village feel; manicured gardens; clubhouse; farmers mkt.; brick pathway

learning center near cultural center

steam lab, it would 3 turn into a <illegible> place for kids to hide and do stuff. Too close to residence.

LOVE the rope section. Like ampitheatre

keep buildings further away from resident area

1

really like the part that merges downtown together with the park like open green area. Add ampitheatre to end of green area- Pull Park feel

1

great for kids; has the most activities; unique to the triangle

least disruptive to existing site; multiple path types; space for farmers market Nature trails; concerned about natural spring area- must be preserved and not Disney-World-ed

Question- classroom area at springs area

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3

1

NO!

Comments on final plan DO NOT LIKE

RANKS 1

would like a combination of all three. Keep the hill and forest near the homes as natural as possible, but provide playgrounds and family areas along with a beautiful historic downtown w/ retail and entertainment opportunities in a park like setting.

2

Downtown area of plan 3. Open field also of plan 3. Put ampitheatre at end of open field. Please put in the rope/ zip line of plan 2. It is fun & keeps a lot of the trees keep a lot of trees around resident. Love Pullen Park feel.

2

too much open space; 3 don't need commercial space

I would love to see as much of the site preserved as possible. I love the idea of walking trails over development.

2

No shops; No- spring classroom

not much fun for the kids

3

Need to see plan for church on scope Nature Center

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not leaving opportunities for commercial development along Earp St.; not utilizing site potential!

3

play area; love ampitheater; love creating connectivity to cemetery

not sure citizens are active enough for ziplines, etc. would create a lot of needed town staff to manage programs

1

improving Mims need to move mixed round-about; know use building to road folks w/ use green on frontage! nights & weekends in spring/ summer.

2

Incorporate: walking trails throughout & to cemetery; have ampitheater; have playground & village green area; leave opportunities for commercial development on Earp- missing the boat w/o it!!; need to dress up Springs area


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Public Open House Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS LIKE

little

a lot; welcome center; 3 is is a waste

zip line; active use

Concept 3

Comments on final plan

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

that it doesn't have a baseball complex.

1

bocce & some other active use

too much wasted space

2

Do not like "outdoor classroom" (go to Yates Mill Pond instead). I really think we can use this property for a very active space, like a ball park w/ grandstands, perhaps baseball where H.S., college, or semi-pro could play. It needs to be considered. Trying really hard to make some environmental use which is a waste at this location. Expand Bass Lake if you want passive recreation. Passive recreations has no place in downtown Holly Springs. Cannot support any of these 3. Neither until UM Church campus plan- which the city & designer has- is incorporated into plans!

<illegible>; keep natural; trails- quiet nature

parking separated from focal points

rope/ team bldg course; amphitheatre & green; fireworks watching!; tree housetype climbing areas!

Farmers Market; walking trails

gateway on Ballentine & Elm; no parking

open/ enviromental focus; access @ cult. Ctr.

traffic @ Church Circle; needs amphitheater

1

activity oriented; great for kids; amphitheater

not much to do unless it's a school class studying the environment. I prefer the Farmers Market where it is now.

3

great activities for youth. Doesn't crowd the church like the other plans

could be utilized more

3

exercise; education; amphitheater

little parking; emphasis on children's playgrounds

<illegible> near cultural center; boccee, croquet

formality of plaza behind Mims; do not like axis-based on Mims House; consider axis w/ cultural center; consider reversing area on bldgs w/ entry; too "built" invasive

natural. People magnet pockets. Ropes course. Amphitheatre w/ green area. Need entry "portal". Need parking. Limited impact on nature. Restrict retail to concessions. Nature center. Keep fresh- new activies.

great lawn; trails; forest area limited security for after hours loitering

2

blending to village A lot of traffic parking 3 dist.; mixture of open around church. Does & dense develop. not provide for church expansion.

1

location of Farmers 2 Market; crowds the church next door; don't put shops in the park

no ice rink (should be on great 1 lawn)

ice rink; grass plaza; cafes

not much land used.

2

Include HSUMC expansion plans 1st. Include Amph. and other light active facilities into #1 from #2. Main Entrance @ Cultural Center.

combine options 2 & 3; ice rink(s), amphitheater, activity park, vegetation, historic feel, cafĂŠ's/ kiosks.

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Public Open House Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

Comments on final plan

RANKS

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

too passive; waste of 3 good land & money; relies on a stream that has no water flow.

ampitheatre; tree the lawn near library should house; exercise & edu- have a winter ice rink cation features; great concept; uses whole property

1

grass plaza; cafĂŠ & shops; ice rink

only uses 1/2 property 2

options 2 & 3 need to be combined; must include grass plaza, cafĂŠ & shops, ice rink for all the northerners in town. Ampitheatre, tree house, zip line & exercise features. Great concept. Use the whole property.

monument could be part of a trail

increase vehicle traffic 3 around monument

would like to see pedestrian walk around monument. Like the Learning and Activity centers.

1

walking area around monument- safety

building Disconnect

2

The concept of plan 2 with the Village Green around the monument.

simple; keep area natural

may not be best use of land

2

older kids activities would be unique asset to town

no bldg or restrooms; parking seems remote to activity location

3

Grass area for assem- parking seems far bly events festivals away from Green Ara

1

Grass area from #3; Older kids activities; trails in wood w/ teaching stations; Spring special place; maybe mountain bike trails in woods.

2

Nothing

to much going on

3

shops; natural setting need more shops in plaza

1

1) Brick Plaze with shops/ Farmers market. 2) enhanced springs area; 3) walking trails; 4) nature center at overlook

Nature Center; Bio Filtration; Spring <enhanced area> uniting church, 919 bldg, & house

no paved trails or boardwalks

uniqueness; amphithe- doesn't pull together the atre; strolling paths house, church & 919 house

the old vilage feel w/ lots of pedestrian traffic; pulling together of buildings; clubhouse & ice rink; quaintness fits w/ Holly Springs image; appeals to all ages

Ed Center; Outdoor Classroom; Brick plaza; Nature Center

Spring Classroom; Snack Kiosk Playground; Biofiltration

Amphitheater; Strolling Trail; Biofiltration pools

Educational centre

strolling trail

tree house; amphitheater

Ideally, the plan would be a combination of the 2nd (Activity Park) and 3rd (Village Green) plans. Walking trails made of asphalt or stone or raised boardwalks would be great! An amphitheatre is a wonderful ideea, as well as bridges, fountains, stone walls, etc. It should reflect the quaintness & history of Holly Springs, but should also look good and be inviting for all ages, not just kids! Boutique-type retail & quaint cafes would add to the appeal. Climbing wall

Farmer Market; Educational Center Nothing till Church Designs All iincluded on all Proposals!!!

3

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this would bring activities to everyone in H.S. area; great for families; many uses

1

different uses of space; "highend" look; many uses

*incorporating the 2 Church's property, like the town owns it. (the town does not own it!)


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Public Open House Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2

Concept 3

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

no provision for parking

1

most practical

no provision for parking

2

uses property not purchased and not for sale (Church). No provision for parking

1

cool; ampitheater; stays back away from church property

2

seems to overtake church property. (in rank, wrote "not at all this close to church property")

keeping the most natural; trails

LIKE

Comments on final plan DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Respectful space from church property. Nature trails. Area around springs & cemetary. Some park equipment nice.

Plaza Farmers Market; Outdoor Classroom

biofiltration

2

ampitheater; tree house; strolling trail

not enough hardscape access 1 for wheelchairs/ strollers etcâ&#x20AC;Ś No farmers market space

shops/ cafes/ office space

3

walking trails; welcome center

stream lab

3

historic green; amphitheater; zipline

rope course

Grass Plaza; clubhouse; <illegible> playground

1

2

education center bldg; too much undevelbrick plaza; nature trails oped space = as is now

ropes & ziplining- aclack of commercial bldgs; lack tivity that will attract of plaza linking church, 919, millenials & youth; etc. treehouse architecture; amphitheatre & green

all season lawn/ winter feature; new buildings

too historic & static; too much undeveloped

less intrusive; walking paths; educational aspect

doesn't have playground

activities for kids; walking paths; ampitheatre

possible liability

maybe too much focus/ dependence on church

plaza/ farmers

lack of physical 2 activity component (suggest a walk out trail/ stations)

amphitheater

zipline/ wall (liability issues)

activities for kids; walking paths; possible place to hold events novel ice ring idea; playground shops/ cafĂŠ

1

ice ring idea

Nice to have an outdoor area that combines activities & more leisurely pursuits. A combination of Village Green & Activity Park would bring residents out on a regular basis. need to incorporate a home for the farmers market in final plan; biofiltration system is great; need to design attractionis & venues that are unique & a draw to the "talent" work force we are recruiting; use edges for vertical space; would love to seee buildings for artist space, incubators, entrepreneur workspace

3

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Public Open House Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

Greenway along <illegible> Creek; nature trails; welcome center; parking to be developed along Earp St. Brick Plaza and Historic Plaza

Farmer's Market needs to be at Main St.

44

RANKS LIKE Amphitheater is good but it needs to go wehre the "climbing wall" & "tree adventure" are, since it will require a lot of parking

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Comments on final plan

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

All plans provide for lots of natural area & trails

mostly, this concept does not work well for me. No retail & no housing- they can go elsewhere in town

RANKS


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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

The opportunities for hands-on environmental learning.Treatment of the original spring. LEED certification of buildings

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Comments on final plan

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

There are already places like this in the Triangle. Children over 6 years old find them boring. Don't waste the area with this plan.Boring...... Will go unused except for school field trips which the kids will find boring.

Extremely innovative and designs and potential activities.The 'Outward Bound' type of activities provide fun and confidence builders for all.There is something for everyone with this plan. You can build the best of the other two plans into this plan, but you can not build this plan into the other two.

Looks like a nice place for adults to relax.

Looks like a boring place for children with little to attract them.

Although I love this idea, I'm not positive it is the best use of space within the town.

interpretive signs throughout the park to explain the historyclever use of biofiltration pools.potential to generate revenue for the town.

Beautiful historic downtown park feeling.stormwater treatment flower beds"seasonal" lawn

Nothing. This is my favorite plan.

RANKS

!9 above did not allow me to enter my ranking. My first choice is Holly Springs Village Green; second choice is Ecologic Learning Center; third choice is the forest activity park.

2 2

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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

Beautiful addition and great learning center

I feel like this is what Bass Lake is. And it is also similar to Hemlock Bluffs. Both a great and pretty close by. Don't think this would be a big draw for families multiple times a season.I don't think this would get a lot of repeat visitors. I think families would go to see it and maybe school children, but it will not really add to the value of having the feature in the middle of town. I don't think it will be a boon for the local businesses by driving traffic that might stop and get a bite or also take advantage of the library and cultural center.

ok idea will get boring and will not be used enough... waste of space time and money...

46

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

LIKE

Great for all agesPreserves natureI think families would return again and again. It seem unique to the area and would be a draw. I also think that people would be interested in making an afternoon out of it and stopping at some of the shops and restaurants in HS.

Cater's only to kids, come on there is a large adult community in HS

This is what I vote for has activities for all ages and is a great idea. please do this one.....

Comments on final plan DO NOT LIKE

RANKS 2

I think that having activity area is great. We all need to be more active in our lives. I really think it should work to embrace the library and cultural center as well.

3

walking trails, water, wildlife, bike paths, dog park, restrooms, food/water, rentals, frisbee golf, somewhere to spend a sat afternoon.. scenery, breezy,


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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Comments on final plan

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

This is my favorite of the three plans. I like the idea of a community center building with restaurant and local kiosks.shops.The Green provides a passive gathering place where you can just sit and enjoy nature and the historic architecture.The idea of seasonal recreation like the splash pad and ice rink. i think think this is very inviting and will be used widely!

I'm not really sure what it has to do with the Mims property. What do we use that beautiful house for now?

3

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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

The priority given to learning and caring for our environment

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Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS LIKE

I really like your 2nd or 3rd plan better. This center seems to be closely related to what we already have in the vicinity - Bass Lake & the center off Kildaire in Cary. I definitely would like to have something completely different.

This is awesome! Unique and something that will bring families from Holly Springs and surrounding towns together. Love this idea!

I'm not sure that this takes into account the planned expansion of the United Methodist Church.Seeking and obtaining LEED certification will require additional resources (financial and otherwise) than if it was not part or the design.

The opportunity for an amphitheater.Rubber surface play area for childrenOpen spaces

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

I'm not confident that this takes into account planned expansion of the United Methodist Church.I'm unsure of where the farmer's market would be located in this design

RANKS

LIKE

Comments on final plan DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Love this idea! Very unique and a great place for everyone of all demographics to enjoy!

2

I am thrilled by Holly Springs Vilthe the proposed lage Green is my similarities to the favorite proposal! gorgeous renovations at Pullen Park!The mix of historic and innovative spacesIt appears to take into account the proposed United Methodist Church expansion

3

I like the historic old town feel in plan Village Green. I'd love to have clothing boutiques, a bookstore, coffee shop and nonchain restaurants. Ultimately I'd love a place that would keep me spending money in HSP as opposed to taking it out to Cary & Apex as I do now on an almost daily basis. My reasoning is the same for Plan 2. I think the Activity park is a fantastic idea to bring families together. I love the splash park idea over the ice rink however either would be great! Thank you for the survey. As a member of my HOA board (Windcrest), I will share this link with the board and will email to our 400 plus homeowners and encourage them to give their feedback. Please keep this survey open for at least 2 weeks.


2012

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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

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DO NOT LIKE

I like that it is educational.I really like the nature trails and minimally invasive nature of it.I like the Farmers Market being shown in the site plan. Great place for it.

I can't tell from the site plan but I would hope the trails would be bike friendly.

LEED certificationA place for ecological education"gentle" integration into the landscape

there doesn't seem much there unless there are education classes actively going onlittle to draw adults

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Comments on final plan

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Seems like it would My biggest concern is be a lot of fun that it's a little too kids friendly. All sort of people live in Holly Spring so it's important for me that everyone be able to use the park and have fun.

This is my favorite of the three. I really like the idea of expanding on the idea of the village district over all and I think this does that very well.The shops and cafes. The laid brick area.

This should definitely have the Farmers Market integrated into it somewhere.

3

Activities for every- traffic flow seems likely one- children and to create bottle necks adultsGreen space though the park and grass amphitheaterwalking trails and opportunities for ecological education

open spaceformal aside from seagardensseasonal sonal activities, activities seems very simliar to function/ features of Bass Lakelayout is not creative or excitingdo we really need more brick in Holly Springs?

2

From the plans provided I think a great start is the Village Green. The great thing about it is that it's concentrated to one side of the land area. This will allow for integration of elements from the Activity Park and the Learning Center in the future. This would ultimately provide a useful place for everyone in Holly Springs to gather. I would really like the town to stay away from an exclusively Activity Park. This is great for young kids but doesn't leave much for the rest of us and it's the rest of us that have to pay for it. I love the idea of the natural playgroundthat is an absolute must! I like the green space offered by the forest activitiy park I like the idea of programs/ activities/ equipment for adults as well as kids. Gives me something I can do with my other mom friends. The ampitheater is a great idea- I like the grass I like the attempts to minimize the ecological impact- it's important! Ecological education opportunities as well as walking trails are important to my family. What about adding space for a community garden? It would be a great community draw as well as educational opportunity for children. Great work you all!

49


2012

Hol ly Sp r i ng s M i m s P rop ert y M aster Pl an

Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Overall plan has the right key objectives relative to ecology etc...Good job.Well laid out and good flow.

50

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

Does there need to be an increase in benches, seats along the paths etc. for general use and resting?I assume that the pathway is very receptive to wheel chairs and other aids for the physically challenged.

RANKS LIKE

The zip line.The tree house adventure center.The climbing wall. good cross section of activities.

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

LIKE The village feelingCloseness to the towns history. The bringing in of nature & the availability for public participation. Splash pad/ice rink.The trails. Shops/cafe/rental space.

Comments on final plan DO NOT LIKE

RANKS 3

I like everything about the village green.

2

Historic tours of the site. Plenty of hiking trails. A wonderful playground area.

1

I may have missed it within the documents, but you need to ensure it covers key elements relative to hnadicap accessibility, security and parking.


2012

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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

LIKE

Comments on final plan DO NOT LIKE

RANKS 3

springarchitecturecommunity usage, not commercial

seems to not show all phases of UMC expansionLEED cert not necessarytraffic pattern

Fun and different activities for all ages!!!Interactive for children and adults, not just another flat field to play on.Keep nature close at hand, able to explore and discover with in a natural setting NothingNothingNothing

What would the cost of maintaining the park?the amphitheater seems a bit out of placenothing, great concept!

Too much liability and maintenance required by townNothingNothing

As a frequent visitor to Holly Springs (my daughter and her family, the Henry's, live there) and a soon to be resident of the area, I have long admired the property and had from the first time I viewed it hoped it would be saved from destruction. However, every time it looked like something was to be done to save the building the progress being made seemed to quickly grind to a halt. Any of the plans presented would be better than to lose such a valuable part of the history of Holly Springs. Good luck!

1 2

Ice rinkclassroom- safety on path1 playground waysfull church expansion not shown!!!Where is parking? Needed on all sides of park

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2012

Hol ly Sp r i ng s M i m s P rop ert y M aster Pl an

Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

keeping the area naturallearning about the landinteracting with nature but in a very unobtrusive way brick courtyards and plazas and overlooksoutdoor classroom areabiofiltration and other natural components

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

this will bring a destination to Holly Springs

we do not need to have any enclosed buildings which need to be manned.....this includes a lab and any classroom buildings.....this will require maintenance and staff is stretched thin now

I like the learning at I do not necesarthe stream labI like rily think it offers the arcitecture style enough for families to do.

The town already has something similar to this at Bass Lake.Doesn't offer as much interest for older kids.

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RANKS

Comments on final plan

love the rope courses for adults and kidslove the ampitheatherbotantial gardens are lovely Offers activities that would attract older kids as well as younger ones. More family activities availableNothing like it locally! :)

these amusements will likley be off limits most of the time, therefore what use would the park be? This idea needs to be pulled off the table. This is a maintenance money pit, also I imagine that the zipline and other amusements will not be avaialble to most anyone who wants to use them just for recreational purposes not a fan of the tree houses

RANKS 1

nice plazas and trails

we do not need any enclosed buildings which require maintenance.

splash pad and ice skating great ideagrand park idea

not in love with the bocci ball lawn the upkeep will be terrible

2 3

2

plazas and greens with trails and other passive activty facilities. No enclosed buildings. They will likely require an employee to man them, and they will probably be closed more often than open. We can build roofed pavilions for festivals, but keep all the sides open. Maintenance would be less.


2012

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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

Preservation and education programsAestheticsAccessibility

Any type of new park in HS

the architecture

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

Large green areas Zipline activity interest for farmers market, will fade over time and events etc we will be left with having to reconfigure the park in the future.

Please make sure that there is a HUGE playground for kids of all ages and that it is shaded in the summer so that kids can actually play on it. pretty much everything. what is the common thread to drawn the community in on a regular basis? Ecological Learning... that's nice, but it wouldn't draw me down there on a daily or weekly basis.

I like this much better. More activities and it's diferen than just a natual area.

Lots of variety. Many different things to drawn in all kinds of people on a regular basis

Add a water sprayground for in the summer

RANKS

LIKE

Comments on final plan DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Minimalist effect 3 on green space. Ice rink or open area for activitiesMore manicured landscaping for areas developed. Snack bar Too open and am- 2 bigiuos...it won't be utilized

The layout and the trailsdesign materials

that office building being built right up next to our church. It seems like there could be a better place for this.Not alot of variety

Huge play ground. Nature trail, splash area or. Sprayground.

Well first of all, it would be nice if the "radio" buttons allowing you to rank the designs actually work, but they don't :) Here is my order of preference: Activity Park Village Green Ecological Learning Center

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2012

Hol ly Sp r i ng s M i m s P rop ert y M aster Pl an

Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

I love everything. Very good conceptI like the architectural design of the buildingI like the natural look of this center It is something that nothingnothingreally adds to the nothing HOLLY SPRINGS brand. It places us as a thoughtful city that knows the value of greenspace, outdoor educational settings, and adds to the overall attractiveness of our city. Having green spaces, a system of walking and bike paths, and mature trees would definitely increase the quality of life for all our residents. see 1see1 Use of natural materials.Opportunities for learning for children and adults. The site for a Farmers Market.

54

RANKS LIKE I do like the idea of an amphiteather, but nothing else.

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

LIKE

I do not like the idea of a tree house. I prefer to keep the natural setting of this park

The tree houses. Needs a tree identificaPlant identification tion site.Safety issues on sites.Including the the zip lines. Farmers' Market.

Historical sites. Open green. Places for gatherings.

Comments on final plan DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

I do not like this concept at all. The town already has Womble park with many playgrounds.

1

Not as many kid 2 activities.Not as much environmental education.

The first concept with nature in mind is the best for Holly Springs.


2012

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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1 LIKE

Concept 2 DO NOT LIKE

The learning center Seems like the building.The ofspace would not ferning of classes. be utilized much when events or classes are not occuring.Is very specific and doesn't appeal to a broad number of residents. There is already something similar at Bass Lake, and it doesn't seem to be utilized much. Greenway Stream LaboratoryNaturalized BiofiltrationOvernight Accommodations for Learning Programs The opportunity to enjoy the outdoors in a natural settingGreat learning opportunity potential

RANKS LIKE That it's activity based.Appeals to a broad section of residents.The variety of things to do.

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE I could see this becomming overcrowded and having to wait in long lines to do activities.It seems like some of the activities would need to be fee based to cover expenses (I'd think the zip line would need to be supervised), and I'd hope the fees would be reasonable.

Ropes Courses, Zip Lines, Team BuildingRock Climbing WallAmphitheater

Active opportunities for all ages

It would seem a number of these areas would need to be staffed for safety and therefore would not be open on holidays etc when there could be a high demand.

RANKS

Comments on final plan

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

The ice rinkA place for artistsThe clubhouse

Not enough free activities

2

A combination of the activity park with the village green. Maybe utilize the small classroom to offer some ecologic classes also so all 3 concepts are uitilized.

Historic Village Places for artists District FeelGrand ParkSeasonal Activities: Splash Pad/Ice Rink Seems to fit more with the idea of a Town gathering spaceA variety of potential activities in each areaFormal and informal areas

2

Either Mims Forest Activity Park or Holly Springs Village Green or a combination of the 2 would be the best.

3

I love the Village Green concept. Perhaps a few more paths could be added as the plans continue.

2

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2012

Hol ly Sp r i ng s M i m s P rop ert y M aster Pl an

Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

The opportunity to allow students to spend time including overnight in the center and use it as a base for exploring the outdoors.The ability of the center to host programs on streams and other natural systems that would be open to all.The ability to highlight the way that the building is constructed to save energy and water, and to cleanse stormwater.

That the center will result in the addition of hard surfaces and the cutting of trees.

56

RANKS LIKE The range of activities that can be accommodated within the parkThe way the structures will fit within the environment of the parkThe creation of an amphitheater within the park that will be available for outdoor concerts, etc.

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE An unsupervised climbing wallThe creation of additional hardened surfaces, including the structural turf.

RANKS

Comments on final plan

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

The creation of lawn areas for playThe creation of sites for cafes and gathering placesThe network of trails

The creation of 1 hardened surfaces, including the structural turfThe distance that the Farmers' market would be from available parkingThe creation of large areas of hardened surfaces that will create additional storm water runoff and cause stream bank erosion.

I like the idea of a site that focuses on the natural environment, with a learning center that is suited to our area and its streams and forests. I also like the idea of having some area that is open for activities, such as the ropes course and climbing wall. The inclusion of some type of food service would also be good, with some picnic tables for folks who want to eat outside.


2012

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Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

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Sounds like it will be a pretty place to get in touch with nature

Sounds similar to Bass Lake In a lot of waysI think it would be under utilized

RANKS LIKE

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE

Sounds really cool Not sure of the age and differentI think range to use it it would attract a lot of interest from residents and surrounding areas

RANKS

Comments on final plan

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Like that there is a playground.... we don't have big enough ones In our town so I am hoping this one would be extensive because we normally go to FV, Apex, Cary and Raleigh to go to the parkThe splash ground... we def need some cool activities in the heat of the summer. Not everyone here has a neighborhood pool.

Other than the playground and splash pad... sounds like the rest is boring and wouldn't be utilized much

2

A grand play ground with walking trails, zip lines, climbing walls, splash pad.

Too little space for projectWill not appeal to all 3

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2012

Hol ly Sp r i ng s M i m s P rop ert y M aster Pl an

Survey Monkey Comments Chart Concept 1

Concept 2

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

It building design in nice. It blends with natureReally hands on with nature. Great for early childhood learningIts a learning Center!

Could have more things involved with downtown possibly shops?Would like to see some park activities.Something to do in the winter?

58

RANKS LIKE The strolling pathWater poolswalking trail

Concept 3 DO NOT LIKE I don't love this plan. It seems to much like a camp.Levels of adventure. Too many ropesThe rope hammocks do not look comfortable. I bet they would look bad after a while.

RANKS

Comments on final plan

LIKE

DO NOT LIKE

RANKS

Love how it connects with downtown Holly Springs. Bring more people downtown including businesses. Clubhouse for the town with rental space! Love how it will be similar to pullen parkLove the idea of seasonal activities. Ice skating, water play!!

The croquet plan is okCould have bands come plan in the spring like at North Hills shopsStone outdoor classroom

3

I really like the Holly Springs Village Green. I feel it will be used by the most people and include downtown Holly Springs. I like the seasonal activities and feel of the plan.

Mims Master Plan  

Mims Park Master Plan for Holly Springs