News Notes - Summer 2022 - Vol 2 Issue 1

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VOL 2

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ISSUE 1

SUMMER 2022

NOTES

A PUBLICATION FOR THE TURFGRASS PROFESSIONAL


WHERE THE GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER…

Spartan Turf. CANR.MSU.EDU/TURFGRASS

Learn from our world-class turfgrass pros

2016 Michigan Golf Hall of Fame inductee Joe Vargas, PhD, has worked to improve turf quality on every global continent except Antarctica. An MSU Distinguished Faculty member, Vargas has advised master’s and doctoral students and served as faculty coordinator of the MSU Turfgrass Research Center while working with industry for more than 50 years.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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President’s Message 2022 LaFontaine Graduate Student Assistantship Golf Outing Research News — x

WinterTurf Research Update

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Sod on Plastic Establishment Practices for Kentucky Bluegrass and Perennial Ryegrass

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Five professors are currently funded by the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation Industry News — x

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Members in the Field

MTF Foundation Awards 2022 Michigan Turfgrass Conference Recap A Sneak Peek at the new #HydroponicGreen project at Michigan State University Turfgrass Pathology Michigan Turfgrass Membership Application 2022 MTF-TT4Turf Auction Recap 2022 MSU Turfgrass Field Day MSU Turf Team Recognized at GAM Awards Luncheon Executive Director’s Report Industry Job Board

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MTF Executive Committee PRESIDENT Mr. Curt Boak

SECRETARY Mr. Scott Rettmann

VICE PRESIDENT Mr. Dan Mausolf

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Mr. Carey Mitchelson

TREASURER Mr. Brad Lazroff

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY Ms. Britney VanderKodde

MTF Board of Directors

Upcoming Events

TERMS TO EXPIRE ANNUAL MEETING 2022

Mr. Eric Davey

Mr. Paul Kuhna

Prestwick Village Golf Club REPRESENTING: Greater Detroit District

Lansing Lugnuts REPRESENTING: Sports or Institutional Turf

Elected: 2016, 2019

Appt/Rensel - May 2021

2022 LaFontaine Graduate Student Assistantship

GOLF OUTING June 22, 2022

Mr. Curt Boak Lawn Tech REPRESENTING: Turfgrass Services Representative

Coyote Preserve Golf Club

Elected: 2016, 2019

2022 Michigan State Turfgrass

TERMS TO EXPIRE ANNUAL MEETING 2023

Adam Palmatier

Mr. Brad Lazroff

Helena REPRESENTING: Commercial Turfgrass Supplier

Huron Meadows Golf Course REPRESENTING: Cemetery, Park, or Sod Representative

Appointed: 2022 (Replaced

Doug Johanningsmeier President Emeritus Term Expired)

FIELD DAY August 10, 2022

Hancock Turfgrass Research Center

Elected: 2017, 2020 Mr. Dan Mausolf LIC, CSP, ASM

Mr. Matt Gaver

Stine Turf & Snow REPRESENTING: Lawn & Maintenance

REPRESENTING: Western Michigan District

Elected: 2017, 2020

2023 Michigan Turfgrass

CONFERENCE

Elected: 2017, 2020

January 10, 11, and 12, 2023 Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort

TERMS TO EXPIRE ANNUAL MEETING 2024

Mr. Craig Moore

Mr. Jeff Holmes CGCS

Marquette Golf Club REPRESENTING: At Large

Egypt Valley Country Club REPRESENTING: At Large

Elected: 2018, 2021

Elected: 2018, 2021

Mr. Dan Lucas

Mr. Scott Rettmann

Kingsley Club REPRESENTING: Northern Michigan District

Walnut Creek Country Club REPRESENTING: At Large

Elected: 2015, 2018, 2021

Elected: 2018, 2021

TERMS TO EXPIRE ANNUAL MEETING 2025

Mr. Christian Koval Lakelands Golf and Country Club REPRESENTING: Mid-Michigan District

Elected: 2022

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Michigan Turfgrass Foundation P.O. Box 27156 Lansing, MI 48909

Phone: +1-517-392-5003 miturfgrass@gmail.com

Mission Statement The mission of the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation is to work in partnership with Michigan State University, supporting ongoing programs in research, education, and extension in the area of professional turfgrass management that will benefit all individuals who manage turfgrasses or derive pleasure from the results of such management.

www.michiganturfgrass.org


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

The Summer season is in full swing, and it feels good to have our event dates locked in! With that said, we have The Annual Lafontaine Golf Outing right around the corner on June 22, Field Day in August, and The Conference in January. We have more information on these events in the magazine. With the struggles we all faced last year, we were lucky enough to host all our events in person. We had a last-minute venue change for The Conference and moved it to The Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort in Mt Pleasant, Michigan—and it turned out to be an outstanding success, so much that we will be back there again in January! If you were not able to attend the last Conference, you are not going to want to miss the 2023 Conference! Staffing struggles, unfortunately, are the new norm these days for employers. The million-dollar question is, where will we find qualified and experienced employees or employees wanting to learn? There are a couple Apprentice Programs that are in the initial stages of development; this will be a useful resource in the future. We will keep you posted with information when available. However, if you are currently looking to expand your team and staff members, the MTF is offering something new, a job classified section. MTF members will be able to post job positions here for free; we will also have the job classified postings on our Social Media pages and in the Summer and Fall editions of NewsNotes. With this new section, we can help you find qualified employees! To learn more about this new feature, look at page 35. The MSU Turf Team has been working on several interesting projects and we have highlighted two of these in this issue. Check out our Annual Field Day event scheduled for August 10th, hosted at the Hancock Center located on the beautiful campus of Michigan State University. If you are interested in learning more about the current, and even past research projects, you will want to sign up for this event. We have more information on Field Day in this issue, so be sure to check it out and mark your calendars—it’s always a great time! It’s an exciting time to be involved in the turf industry, and the MTF Board is working hard at raising funds for turfgrass research in support of the turf team. Stay up to date on the latest information and events with Facebook, Twitter, the MTF website and through our email. Curt Boak MTF President

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2022 LAFONTAINE GRADUATE STUDENT ASSISTANTSHIP

GOLF OUTING WHEN: LOCATION:

June 22, 2022 • 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM Coyote Preserve Golf Club

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Individual Golfer – $150.00

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Foursome – $600.00

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Reception only – $25.00

4 Corporate Sponsorship – $1,000.00 Includes one foursome of golf and your name or company name acknowledged on a placard on a tee location.

5 Lunch Sponsor – $1,270.00 Includes one foursome of golf, lunch signage and acknowledgement at lunch.

6 Tee Sponsorship – $170.00 Your name or company name will be acknowledged on tee sponsorship placard at a tee location.

7 Breakfast Sponsorship – $270.00 8 Reception Sponsorship – $270.00 Reception Sponsorship includes 2 signs acknowledging recognition of company that provided funding used to help supplement cost of food and beverage at conclusion of golf event.

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www.michiganturfgrass.org

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Registration

Registration 8:00 am Shotgun 9:00 am

The Gordon LaFontaine Golf Outing is a fundraising event to support the MSU Turf Team with Graduate Assistants on a yearly basis. Funds generated by the Golf Outing are invested in the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation Graduate Student Fund. This fund combines with the Rieke Endowment at MSU to create and establish a solid source of funding for Graduate Assistantships for the Turf Team at MSU. These Graduate Assistants are essential for fundamental research projects to help solve tomorrow’s problems today. The LaFontaine Golf Outing is an annual event held to generate funding for these Graduate Assistants. *Payment may be made online with registration or during check in at the golf outing. Choose “Invoice Me” option and a printable invoice will be emailed to you.


Winterkill sensor package on an ice covered green.

RESEARCH NEWS

WinterTurf Research Update By Kevin W. Frank

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he classic saying of ‘third time’s the charm’ held true for our WinterTurf grant that was funded in 2021 after our third submission. The WinterTurf research project was funded by the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) SCRI (Specialty Crop Research Initiative) grant program. The research team represents seven universities (Iowa State, Univ. Massachusetts, MSU, Univ. Minnesota, Rutgers, Oregon State, and Univ. Wisconsin) and one country, Norway (Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research). The full title of our grant is “WinterTurf: A holistic approach to understanding the mechanisms and mitigating the effects of winter stress on turfgrasses in northern climates.” The $8 million grant was funded for 2021-2025. There are many different aspects of winterkill that will be researched. MSU turf team faculty Dr. Vargas, Dr. MerewitzHolm, and myself will be working on different aspects of the grant. I will be focused on researching reestablishment, preventative practices such as cover systems, nitrogen and potassium rate and timing effects on snow mold incidence, leaf mulching effects on snow mold incidence, and of course outreach efforts. There are many exciting aspects of receiving and working with a large group of scientists focused on one issue such as winterkill but probably one of the greatest benefits to our program is enrolling new graduate students. Payton Perkinson started a Masters’

program under my direction officially in May, but even before she graduated from our 4-year turf program she’s already seeded a reestablishment study this spring. Payton is an excellent study who recently won the top award from the GCSAA Scholars Competition, the Mendenhall Award.

Sensors to Monitor Winter Conditions on Greens In the autumn of 2020, the MTF Founders Society funded the purchase of six sensor packages to monitor winter conditions on golf course putting greens in Michigan. The sensor package was developed by scientists at the University of Minnesota that we’ve been working with as part of the WinterTurf research project. The winterkill sensors we installed at 6 golf courses in Michigan last winter was part of the process of collecting preliminary data to support this grant. The sensor package included: soil temperature and moisture sensors at 3 depths, and oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors. Data collection from the sensors was powered by a solar panel and data was transmitted via real time via a cell signal.

The objectives of this research are: 1) Determine if the sensors reliably record and transmit data throughout the winter 2) Develop a model that could notify superintendents when conditions are likely to

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RESEARCH NEWS cause winterkill. This could be from soil gas, temperature, moisture data or perhaps a combination of all. Ultimately to develop a model we will need to monitor conditions on putting greens when winterkill occurs. 3) Make the sensor package commercially available to superintendents. At least one of our locations in Michigan had ice form on the putting green that was being monitored and the sensors reflected the ice cover as we observed a drop in soil oxygen levels and a concurrent rise in soil carbon dioxide levels. Although we ultimately did not observe any winterkill on that green as the ice only remained in place for about 2-3 weeks, it was interesting to see the sensors recording this data. This is the perfect example of what we’re hoping can be developed, sensors that can record data in real time that the superintendent can use to make decisions such as when to remove ice to minimize the risk of winterkill. The sensor team at Minnesota is still working through all the data from last year, analyzing trends, determining sensor functionality, and correlating data with any observed damage. I would like to thank the following superintendents for hosting sensor packages this past winter.

Payton Perkinson verticutting plots for a winterkill reestablishment trial.

Eric Davey, Prestwick Village Golf Club Drew Paxton, Spring Lake CC Doug Hoeh, Treetops Resort Scott Pulaski, Walloon Lake CC Jim Bluck, Arcadia Bluffs Ryan Moore, Forest Lake CC

Reestablishment Seeding Research This spring reestablishment seeding research was conducted at MSU, University of Minnesota, University of Wisconsin, and Iowa State University. On three consecutive weeks in the spring of 2022 four creeping bentgrass cultivars and Two-Putt annual bluegrass were seeded into an existing putting green that was killed with glyphosate the previous fall. The bentgrass cultivars were Penncross, Declaration, Pure Distinction and A4. Previous seed germination research at the University of Minnesota found that some bentgrasses displayed high germination rates at low temperatures while others performed poorly. As a first step in our research we designed a study to compare bentgrass cultivars and Two-Putt annual bluegrass over three seeding dates in the spring in the field. We will answer the questions:

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Winterkill establishment trial area.

www.michiganturfgrass.org


1) Do cultivars differ in establishment rate, especially in a cold spring 2) Should I seed early or wait until it warms up? This research is the first step in the first year of the WinterTurf grant. In the spring of 2023 we will repeat this trial and expand with additional research that evaluates the effect of covers on reestablishment and other management practices such as nutrient source and rate, and possibly even using pigments to enhance surface warming and germination rates.

Management Practices and Snow Mold In the fall of 2022, we will conduct research projects in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin to determine the effects of different nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) rates and timings on snow mold incidence on a creeping bentgrass fairway. Plots will start receiving nitrogen and potassium applications starting in May and continuing through August. Different rates of N and K will be applied in September, October, and November. A different study will study the effects of leach mulching in Kentucky bluegrass on snow mold incidence.

Sod on Plastic Establishment Practices for Kentucky Bluegrass and Perennial Ryegrass John N. Rogers, III, Jackie Guevara, Ryan Bearss Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences Michigan State University

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ometimes, when we watch a football or soccer game, we notice tufts of grass flying off the field or sticking on the athlete’s gear. These athletes (bigger, stronger, and faster than ever before) plow through the grass and soil, leaving a beaten-up field at the end of the game. To continue providing an excellent playing environment, field managers are now shifting to building fields that could sustain highperformance demands known as performance turf.

There are two main factors in a performance turf: • United States Golf Association (USGA) specification rootzone – a sand-based rootzone promotes healthy turfgrass because it is less prone to soil compaction and allows proper drainage. • A traffic-tolerant and high-recovery turfgrass species – species with vegetative stems (i.e., rhizomes and stolons) repairs itself quickly and provides stability to the playing surface. To maximize the playing time on a performance turf, the rootzone of the installed sod should be the same as the existing rootzone. Soil layering – putting a fine-textured soil on top of a sand-based rootzone – leads

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RESEARCH NEWS to poor drainage, increasing soil compaction and reducing turfgrass growth. As a result, we see an increasing demand for compatible sod to repair, renovate and build performance turf fields. However, it is hard to obtain and produce a sod with a compatible rootzone. The sod from traditional production depends on the soil type of the farm. The other factor is the production time of some turfgrass species. For example, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis; KBG) – a popular turfgrass species used in sports fields – is harvested every 18 months. A way to meet the increasing demand for compatible sod is to grow sod on plastic. Sod grown on plastic, commonly called Sod on Plastic (SOP), is a method of growing turfgrass on a thin layer of growing medium on top of a plastic sheet. We have full control over the growing medium, preventing soil layering issues. Its structure lets roots interweave, increasing tear resistance while reducing production time. Our preliminary data showed that we can harvest sod as early as 4 months. We can put the plastic sheeting down on any surface, allowing us to produce sod anywhere (e.g., non-arable lands, concrete). Other benefits of SOP are preventing transplant shock and providing an instant smooth playing surface during sod installation.

Washouts – erosion of the sand due to heavy rainfall/irrigation – have a high chance to take place during the germination period of KBG. KBG usually germinates around 7 to 21 days. During this period, no rooting system will hold the sand particles together. Thus, the main objective of our research project is to identify SOP establishment practices that will stabilize the sand during the initial stages of production while producing durable sod and reducing production time.

Species Composition and Initial Mowing Study This study will focus on seeding a faster-growing species like perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne; PRG) with Kentucky bluegrass. PRG germinates around 5 to 7 days, providing stability to the sand mix during the initial stages of production. However, the drawback of this approach is that PRG could dominate the sod. To avoid that, we need to identify the lowest required seeding rate of PRG that will provide stability while producing a KBG-dominated sod. Aside from the seeding rate, the initial mowing schedule also influences the ratio of KBG and PRG in a sod. Thus, we will identify the combination of seeding ratio and initial mowing schedule that will provide the highest stability, strongest

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sod, and least production time. This study will consist of five KBG: PRG seeding ratios [100:0, 99:1, 97:3, 95:5, 93:7, 0:100] subjected to three initial mowing schedules [1, 2, 3 weeks after seeding]. We will determine the best combination by measuring species composition, percent turfgrass cover, root mass, root density, and sod strength.

Soil Amendments and Phosphorus Fertilization at Establishment Study This study will focus on increasing the root growth of KBG by applying phosphorus (P) at the establishment and increasing stability to the sand mix by incorporating soil amendments. We will evaluate a combination of soil amendments and P fertilization rates at establishment that will provide the highest stability, strongest sod, and least production time. The study will consist of KBG established on four 1-inch depth sand mixes [USGA specification sand, 80% USGA specification sand: 20% Peat, Crumb Rubber over USGA specification sand] subjected to five P fertilization rates at establishment [0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 lbs 1000 ft-2]. We will determine the best combination by measuring soil P levels, percent turfgrass cover, shear strength, root mass and density, and sod strength.

Benefit Group These studies will benefit sod producers as our data could significantly increase their annual sales from reduced production time and increased production using non-arable lands. Our data will also benefit collegiate and professional sports associations by gaining access to reliable sources of compatible and durable sod for midseason repairs and renovation.)

www.michiganturfgrass.org


Five professors are currently funded by the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation. Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences John N. Trey Rogers III, Ph.D. rogersj@msu.edu

Brian Horgan, Ph.D. horgan@msu.edu

Professor, Turfgrass Research - Golf Course Renovations - Sports Turf and Golf Turf Management Programs; Turfgrass Research Telephone: 517-353-0136

Professor and Chairperson Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences

Joseph Vargas, Ph.D. vargas@msu.edu Professor - Fungicide resistance; disease management; biological control; chemical control and breeding; epidemiology. Telephone: 517-353-9082

Thomas Nikolai, Ph.D. nikolait@msu.edu Senior Turfgrass Academic Specialist - Golf Course Putting Green mechanical and cultural practices, turfgrass health. Telephone: 517-353-0133

Kevin Frank, Ph.D. frankk@msu.edu Professor and Turf Extension Specialist Telephone: 517-353-0147

Emily Merewitz-Holm, Ph.D. merewitz@msu.edu Assistant Professor - Plant physiologist; abiotic & biotic stresses of turfgrass and crop species; whole-plant, biochemical, & molecular techniques. Telephone: 517-353-0203

Dr. David Gilstrap, Ph.D. gilstrap@msu.edu Senior Academic Specialist Sports and Commercial Turf Management Education Telephone: 517-353-0140

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Members

in The Field

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ou may remember the torrential downpours during the Players Championship this year, downpours that suspended play on Thursday and Friday with 60 mile an hour wind gusts on Saturday. The flooding and severe weather eventually forced a Monday finish for one of the PGA Tour’s finest events. You may also remember, that once play was able to be resumed, the course was in impeccable condition. The Michigan State Turf Club was a part of that effort.

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During an internship at Sawgrass Country Club in 2021, MSU Turf student Matt Haist worked under TPC Superintendent and MSU Turfgrass Alumni, Patrick Reinhardt. It was there that the idea was discussed of sending an email to all the MSU Turf Club members, to see who might be interested in volunteering at the Players Championship the following year. The club eventually sent several members and they had the opportunity to work alongside students from Penn State, Mississippi State, University of Connecticut, Horry Georgetown and others.

www.michiganturfgrass.org


The week started out with an orientation on Saturday. Volunteers would learn their assignments for the week and be paired up with crew members. Days started at 4:30 am with course work done by 9:00 am. Assignments were on one side or the other, front nine or back nine. Jobs ranged from mowing tees, taking care of bunkers to watering hot spots on the fairways. “I’ve never had to worry about walk mowing rough or moving a microphone off a tee before!”

massive group, it doesn’t seem like it once you start to get to know the core of the industry. I think that you learn a lot. You see new ideas, you learn things that maybe you didn’t know, this is how it’s done or how it could be done. I worked the US Open last summer and I think one of the differences I noticed right off the bat, between the two experiences, is that the media really kind of honed in on how difficult a job the maintenance crew has. People think, oh, you’re going to learn how to cut the fastest way, there’s more that goes into it than that. I don’t think they see the long hours that go into it. There’s a lot of work that goes into it and they did a good job at highlighting it. They had a whole day, three hours where they spent with some of the guys on the crew with a drone coming to show every single task there is. And even that didn’t show, you know, the level of difficulty that this job really does have.”

Once their assignments were finished, crew members would gather and wait for further instructions on what else needed to be done. There was also the opportunity to volunteer during the championship tournament play. Club members would be positioned at a hole, being ready if an official needed the green to be blown off or if rain forced the need for squeegeeing. They were available for anything that might need to be done. Days typically would last somewhere between 12-18 hours. MSU student Anthony Kiser noted that he had tracked his steps during the nine days at Sawgrass. 261,000 steps; 145 miles walked, approximately 24 miles per day. The rains eventually forced a Monday finish and most of the MSU Turf Club members stayed to help out. The guys got to stick around and see the finish, with Cameron Smith holding on for a one shot victory. They shared their thoughts on the week:

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Seth Jenkins: “I really appreciated all the TPC Sawgrass agronomy, and their whole team, for inviting us down there. For them to trust without having met us, especially me with mowing tees, you know, you don’t want any scalps or anything out there. You want perfect lines. I was just really appreciative that Jeff and his team let us help us out for the week.”

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Anthony Kiser: “I was definitely grateful to be part of such an experience. I think the words of advice I would give to anybody coming into the program or thinking about doing it, volunteering is one of the best ways to network in our industry. This is kind of a tight group. Even though it’s such a

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Matt Haist: “I found one of the cool things to see is just how many people they had out there working on just the ground staff. I think they were saying, including volunteers and crew, there were 180 of us working. That and just all the different things that people are all doing, all the organization that goes into it, it’s just something you really don’t get a chance to see anywhere else. It’s pretty spectacular when it all comes together and works out the way that it does to set up the course.”

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INDUSTRY NEWS

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Patrick Reinhardt - Golf Course Superintendent TPC Sawgrass, MSU Graduate “We were excited to have the Michigan State Turf students as a part of our team for The 2022 PLAYERS Championship. College students have become an integral part of our team and help us build long lasting relationships. I am very proud of their commitment to the Championship and the contributions that they made during an extremely challenging week. Go Green!”

Related: 2021-2022 SCHOLARSHIP AWARD WINNERS Photos via MSU Turf Club on Twitter - @TurfState

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www.michiganturfgrass.org


Michigan

Turfgrass Foundation

Norman W. Kramer Outstanding Student

MTF Merit Scholars

AWARD

Spencer Cole

Dennis Sullivan

Kenyon T. Payne Outstanding Student

AWARD

David Parker

Adam Nadeau

Robert Hancock

AWARD

Payton Perkinson

Ryan Wiggins

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2022 MICHIGAN TURFGRASS

Conference Recap 2022 Michigan Turfgrass Conference January 4th - 6th, Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort There was a new venue this year as the Michigan Turfgrass Conference, hosted by the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation, was held at the Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort Conference Center. Over 350 registrants gathered in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan for an educational and networking event dedicated to the turfgrass industry.

Day One

Winter Turf Research Update - Dr. Kevin Frank, MSU

Day one started with a half day session of presentations. Classes were structured in three different sessions; Golf Sessions, Lawns, Athletic Fields and Grounds Sessions and an Equipment Technicians Session.

Annual Meeting Highlights: • Treasurers Report, Presidents Report, Executive Directors Report • MTF Funded Research - Craig Moore, Research Chairman • Pete Cookingham retired after decades of service to the turf industry worldwide. • Dr. David Smitley has announced his retirement. • Finance items of interest n Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology, notable donations, membership, nominating scholarships, events

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Golf Course Architecture and the Golf Course Superintendent Andy Johnson, The Fried Egg

www.michiganturfgrass.org


• MTF Board of Directors Election Results n Curt Boak (Lawn Tech) - Representing Turfgrass Services n Eric Davey (Prestwick Village Country Club) Representing - Greater Detroit District of MiGCSA n Christian Koval (Lakelands Golf and Country Club) Representing - MidMichigan District of MiGCSA n Paul Kuhna (Lansing Lugnuts) Representing Sport or Institutional Turf • Events - 2021 Virtual Conference, Tee Times 4 Turf, LaFontaine Golf Outing, Field Day • MTF Founders Society - Brad Lazroff - Chair Founders Society n Founders Society purchases front load tractor for Hancock Turfgrass Research Center n Tissue Homogenizer for Dr. Emily Merewitz-Holm

The MTF Board presents $1 million check to endow the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology.

Founders Society Reception The Founders Society is an endowment established by charter members with the goal of using funds donated to purchase specialized research and support equipment for the turf program at MSU. At this year’s reception, the announcement was made that the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation would be pledging $1 million to launch a $5 million campaign to endow the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology. Follow the link to read more about the MTF’s commitment to funding the future of turfgrass research at Michigan State University: The Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology

The Spartan Family accepts MTF Meritorious Award at the 2022 Founders Reception

Day 2 Day two was a full day of education. Four sessions were offered and included Golf, Equipment Technicians, Lawns and Grounds and Athletic Fields.

Meritorious Award Winner During the reception, the MTF was proud to present Dawn & Bruce Johnson / Kris Early and the Spartan Family with the Meritorious Award. This award is presented annually by the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation to an individual or company for their dedication and support of the turfgrass industry. Spartan Distributors were instrumental in the formation of the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation in the 1950’s and have remained strong supporters of the golf and sports field industry for their entire history.

Keeping your Cutting Edge - Mike Rollins, SIP Grinders

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2022 Michigan Turfgrass Conference Recap

Non-Chemical Water Conditioners - Dr. Bernd Leinauer

­— Continued

The 2021-2022 Scholarship Winners

Halftime Show

Scholarship Awards The 2021-2022 Turfgrass Science Scholarship Awards were held after the day’s sessions had finished. Dr. Trey Rogers hosted the awards and described the opportunity each year as “his favorite day of the year.”

Day two wrapped up with the halftime show, where vendors from across the industry shared their products and knowledge with the conference attendees. This year’s show was well attended and provided a terrific opportunity to network with fellow industry colleagues. The show also included the Dr. Paul Rieke Graduate Assistantship Silent Auction, benefiting graduate assistantship for ongoing graduate student positions at MSU.

Board Member and MTF Scholarship Chair Dan Lucas with MTF Award Winners

Vendor Halftime Show

Dr. Rogers with Samuel I. Russell Foundation Award Winners Anthony Kiser and Seth Jenkins

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Dr. Paul Rieke Graduate Assistantship Silent Auction

www.michiganturfgrass.org


Day 3

The final day wrapped up with a half day of Golf Sessions and Lawns and Grounds presentations. The Michigan Turfgrass Foundation would like to thank everyone for attending the Conference and your continued support of turfgrass research at Michigan State University. We hope you enjoyed the event, the new location and the chance

to be back in person again. The Planning committee is already gearing up for next years event and we look forward to your feedback and suggestions for the future. Thank you for attending the 2022 Michigan Turfgrass Conference! Webpage for reference: https://michiganturfgrassfoundation.wildapricot.org/ Michigan-Turfgrass-Conference

Thank you to our 2022 Michigan Turfgrass Sponsors!

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A SNEAK PEEK AT THE NEW

#HydroponicGreen

project at Michigan State University

Michael Rabe, Operations Coordinator at MSU’s Hancock Turfgrass Research Center discusses the new Capillary Hydroponic greens system with MTF Executive Director Carey Mitchelson and Thomas A Nikola PhD, Senior Turfgrass Academic Specialist and the Doctor of Green Speed.

Comparing the 2 Systems

The project includes three Capillary hydroponic greens and three Variable-Depth Root Zones USGA greens, each 36x36. “What we’re going to do is compare the two systems for economic and environmental impacts. Obviously, we anticipate the hydroponic greens will save a lot of water and energy inputs, but there are also many questions about pests, playability, and management factors. While the hydroponic greens are the focus it’s also exciting that we are constructing the first triple replicated alternative depth root zones greens, so we’re really getting two projects in one”.

3 Capillary Hydroponic Greens (Sub-surface irrigation)

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The green’s cavity is divided into 2 equal parts. There is a 55 gallon basin on the outside with pipes that feed into the middle of each cavity. The water moves back and forth between each cavity at a fully adjustable rate. “You can control the level of the water table. It’s an ebb and flow system.”

www.michiganturfgrass.org

3 Variable-Depth Root Zones USGA greens

The latest USGA technolgy. The peak of each green has 8 inches of root zone and the low areas will have 16 inches of root zone. This keeps the moisture higher at the peak so it doesn’t dry out as quickly and areas that are lower, that typically get wetter, holding the water further away from the surface. “So you have an ideal water holding situation for keeping the surface dry, essentially.”

Dr. Nikolai: “I’m gonna guess that these are the most perfect research greens built in the history of turfgrass. We have a professional construction crew out here (Frontier Golf) building them and since drainage is of utmost concern to the research, it’s the only site built I know of that is perfectly level. The site was designed by architect Chris Wilczynski ASGCS and he made each green with a 1.5%, 3% and 5% slope”. Chris wrote, “The slopes are typical of a real putting green. The 1.5% slopes support the cupping areas (where the pin is located) and the 3-5% slopes support the transition zones between the cupping areas. Each plot will be constructed exactly the same”.


THE JOE VARGAS CHAIR IN

T U R FG R AS S PAT H O LO GY

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A PIONEERING TURFGRASS PROGRAM over 70 years, Michigan State University’s turfgrass management program has provided significant, cutting-edge research that AFor PIONEERING TURFGRASS PROGRAM positively impacts practitioners and end-users, from our back yards to world-class golf courses. We have played an integral role

in building and evolving every type of turf used in sports such as golf, soccer, football, baseball and racetracks to name a few. The For over 70 years, Michigan State University’s turfgrass management program has provided significant, cutting-edge research that program is rich in history, tradition, and accolades. For over seven decades, the Michigan State turfgrass program has provided a positively impacts practitioners and end-users, from our back yards to world-class golf courses. We have played an integral role world-class education to our students and produced valuable research to benefit the entire industry. in building and evolving every type of turf used in sports such as golf, soccer, football, baseball and racetracks to name a few. The The research place within our program notseven only decades, serves to the positively affect ourturfgrass campus program community the state program is rich taking in history, tradition, andturfgrass accolades. For over Michigan State hasand provided a of Michigan’s economy, but also the U.S. and the world. Greenspace and turf are valuable for communities, as these spaces provide world-class education to our students and produced valuable research to benefit the entire industry. positive ecosystem services including stormwater management, pollinator friendly habitats, urban cooling and environmental The research taking place within our turfgrass program not only serves to positively affect our campus community and the state protection and preservation. of Michigan’s economy, but also the U.S. and the world. Greenspace and turf are valuable for communities, as these spaces provide Michigan State University a two-year certificate program,pollinator a four-year undergraduate degree, and graduate degrees positive ecosystem services offers including stormwater management, friendly habitats, urban cooling and environmental in turfgrass science and management. The programs bring together faculty, specialists, and educators who work with both protection and preservation. professional turfgrass managers and homeowners in managing turfgrass in an environmentally responsible manner. They are Michigan State University offers a two-year certificate program, a four-year undergraduate degree, and graduate degrees practical and immersive, and extend the program’s reach and impact globally. in turfgrass science and management. The programs bring together faculty, specialists, and educators who work with both professional turfgrass managers and homeowners in managing turfgrass in an environmentally responsible manner. They are

THE IMPORTANCE OF ENDOWED FACULTY At the forefront of our turfgrass program are our faculty members who are leaders in their areas of expertise. They create new THE IMPORTANCE OFtheENDOWED FACULTY knowledge through research, while educating and inspiring students who will become the next generation of leaders in the practical and immersive, and extend the program’s reach and impact globally.

field. These talented individuals are the heartbeat of the program, and we must continue to attract the most forward-thinking At the forefront of our turfgrass program are our faculty members who are leaders in their areas of expertise. They create new researchers and educators to Michigan State. knowledge through research, while educating and inspiring the students who will become the next generation of leaders in the What holds true forindividuals successfulare businesses holds of true forprogram, universities: a competitive world. academia, we compete for field. These talented the heartbeat the and we we live mustincontinue to attract theInmost forward-thinking the best students, for funds to fuel ourState. research programs, and for the best faculty. Endowed positions offer a huge competitive researchers and educators to Michigan advantage when recruiting faculty, as they are one of the most pivotal factors that candidates consider when weighing their What holds true for successful businesses holds true for universities: we live in a competitive world. In academia, we compete for options between multiple universities. For that reason, we are seeking a $5 million endowment to fully endow the Joe Vargas the best students, for funds to fuel our research programs, and for the best faculty. Endowed positions offer a huge competitive Chair in Turfgrass Pathology at Michigan State University. advantage when recruiting faculty, as they are one of the most pivotal factors that candidates consider when weighing their The Joe Vargas multiple Chair in Turfgrass Pathology ensure a strongaand robust endowment program is possible in perpetuity, that MSU’s options between universities. For thatwill reason, wethat are seeking $5 million to fully endow the Joeand Vargas land-grant tradition of linking research to our region’s needs continues to advance the economic development, environmental Chair in Turfgrass Pathology at Michigan State University. stewardship, and improved quality of life in Michigan and around the world. The Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology will ensure that a strong and robust program is possible in perpetuity, and that MSU’s We seek faculty members who will offer unique viewpoints and expertise to educate and inspiredevelopment, our students,environmental and who will land-grant tradition of linking research to our region’s needs continues to advance the economic conduct collaborative research with colleagues in other colleges and industries. The Vargas Chair will enable MSU to effectively stewardship, and improved quality of life in Michigan and around the world. compete for top faculty members who are leaders in the field of turfgrass pathology. We seek faculty members who will offer unique viewpoints and expertise to educate and inspire our students, and who will conduct collaborative research with colleagues in other colleges and industries. The Vargas Chair will enable MSU to effectively compete for top faculty members who are leaders in the field of turfgrass pathology.

GOLF’S ECONOMIC IMPACT $4.2 GOLF’S 60,000 $1.4 ECONOMIC IMPACT127,500

BILLION

$4.2

Economic BILLION impact in Economic Michigan from in theimpact golf industry Michigan from the golf industry 22

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PEOPLE

BILLION

Employed PEOPLE by Michigan Employed golf courses by Michigan golf courses

Wages paid BILLION annually by Wages paid Michigan golf annually by courses Michigan golf courses

60,000

$1.4

www.michiganturfgrass.org

ACRES

127,500

Professionally ACRES managed Professionally greenspace that managed provide wildlife greenspace habitatsthat provide wildlife habitats


THE JOE VARGAS CHAIR IN TURFGRASS PATHOLOGY THE JOE VARGAS CHAIR $5 MILLION ENDOWMENT IN TURFGRASS PATHOLOGY The individual who holds the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology will be driven, creative and utilize cutting-edge techniques

MILLION ENDOWMENT to$5 tackle pressing challenges for solutions that positively impact the field of turfgrass science around the world. Funds from the Vargas Chair endowment will allow us to do research in the area of greatest promise rather than being constrained by a specific The individual who holds the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology will be driven, creative and utilize cutting-edge techniques grant opportunity. At the same time, the research they conduct with resources from the endowment, along with the benefits of to tackle pressing challenges for solutions that positively impact the field of turfgrass science around the world. Funds from the being a part of a large research institution, will provide the catalyst for additional grant and research support. The Vargas Chair Vargas Chair endowment will allow us to do research in the area of greatest promise rather than being constrained by a specific will conduct innovative research that will forever link the MSU brand with a meaningful and positive impact on the industry. grant opportunity. At the same time, the research they conduct with resources from the endowment, along with the benefits of being a part of a large research institution, will provide the catalyst for additional grant and research support. The Vargas Chair will conduct innovative research that will forever link the MSU brand with a meaningful and positive impact on the industry.

YOUR IMPACT

YOUR IMPACT

As the nation’s pioneer land-grant university, it is our responsibility to recruit and support faculty who are ready to tackle the world’s most challenging issues. We value research that enhances our ability to deliver advanced solutions and educational initiatives for the turfgrass industry. As the nation’s pioneer land-grant university, it is our responsibility to recruit and support faculty who are ready to tackle the Byworld’s helpingmost to create the Joeissues. Vargas Chair in research Turfgrassthat Pathology at Michigan University, you are investing the industry, our challenging We value enhances our abilityState to deliver advanced solutions andineducational students, faculty, research. With your partnership, we will ensure that Michigan State University continues to lead the field as initiatives for theand turfgrass industry. the premier school for turfgrass science and management. Together, we can make a difference in ways that improve the lives of By helping to create the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology at Michigan State University, you are investing in the industry, our our communities, strengthen the economy, and change our world. students, faculty, and research. With your partnership, we will ensure that Michigan State University continues to lead the field as the premier school for turfgrass science and management. Together, we can make a difference in ways that improve the lives of our communities, strengthen the economy, and change our world.

Dr. Joe Vargas has dedicated his 51 year career to improving Dr. Joe Vargas has the quality of turf dedicated his 51 year on every continent career to improving except Antartica. His the quality of turf knowledge has been on every continent shared in over 200 except Antartica. His articles and over 1,000 knowledge has been presentations. As an shared in over 200 international articles and expert over 1,000 on turfgrass diseases, presentations. As an he is a member of the international expert Michigan Golf Hall of on turfgrass diseases, Fame. he is a member of the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame. MTF NEWS NOTES

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he Michigan Turfgrass Foundation would like to thank all the contributing clubs who helped make our 2022 Edition of Tee Times 4 Turf online auction for Turf Research a tremendous success this year. The event is in its 10th year to gain support of the MSU Turf Team and Turf Program as well as Scholarships for the Turf Students at MSU. With over 200 Golf Courses and some Industry Partners participating in this year’s event we anticipated some exceptional bidding and activity – but our expectations were exceeded. The 2-week auction that began April 24th and ended on May 8th - Mother’s Day never had a slow day and courses were continuing to sign up as the auction began. Total income from the event was $49,484 and would not have been possible without the participation from all the host courses who supported Michigan Golf and MSU Turf. This amount exceeded last years event and is the largest amount raised since the event began. TT4Turf Chairpersons – Scott Rettman and Eric Davey have been the key component in organizing all the items and details required to make this event a success, however, the true accomplishment would not have been possible without so many willing golf courses participating. We are especially grateful to the golf course superintendents who are our first line of contact when requests are made. Golf is a generous industry, and many charities and groups are constantly seeking donations to help various causes. We are fortunate our industry is willing to follow up with our requests and so many of you took the time to respond to this effort. Every course participating is listed in this writing and each course will be receiving an acknowledgement thank you and report of the auction activity as well as description of how the funding is used and its impact on the MSU Turf Program. The TT4Turf Committee would also like to thank the MiGCSA Board of Directors for their support and assistance with this year’s auction. Many of the course contacts were directly attributed to their efforts and it was greatly appreciated.

Total income from the event

$49,484

Next years auction is already being organized and there will be updates early this fall for those who would like to participate again and hopefully continue its success. For those who have not had the chance to be a participant and would like to be a part of next year’s event please feel free to reach out to us at MiTurfgrass@gmail.com and we will provide you with any items you may need to be course host.

Again – the MTF thanks all our golf course and industry sponsors for helping with this year’s record breaking event.

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2022 Tee Times 4 Turf Golf Courses

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Item Title

Item Title

A-Ga-Ming .. Sundance Course A-Ga-Ming .. Torch Course Alpena Golf Club American Dunes Golf Club - Grand Haven, Michigan Ann Arbor Golf & Outing Apple Mountain Golf Course Arbor Hills Golf Club Arcadia Bluffs Arcadia Bluffs - South Course Arrowhead Golf Club Atlas Valley Country Club Avon Oaks Country Club Barton Hills Country Club Battle Creek Country Club Bay County Golf Course Bay Pointe Golf Club Beacon Hill Golf Course Bedford Valley Golf Club Bellaire Centenial Golf Club Belvedere Golf Club Birchwood Farms Golf & Country Club Bird Creek Golf Club Blythefield Country Club Boulder Creek Golf Club Boulder Pointe Boyne Resorts - Bay Harbor Boyne Resorts - Highlands Brentwood Golf Club & Banquet Center Brookshire Inn & Golf Course Bucks Run Golf Club Cadillac Country Club Calderone Golf Club Canadian Lakes Royal Golf Course Cascade Hills Country Club Cattails Golf Course Chandler Park Golf Course Cherry Creek Golf Course City Of Livonia Golf Division, Fox Creek, Idyl Wyld or Whispering Willows College Fields Golf Club Coyote Golf Club Coyote Preserve Golf Club Cracklewood Golf Club Davison Country Club Dearborn Country Club Detroit Golf Club Dunham Hills Country Club Dunmaglas Golf Course Eagle Eye Golf Course

Eagle Glen Golf Course Eco Green Edgewood Country Club Egypt Valley Country Club - Ridge Course Egypt Valley Country Club - Valley Course Eldorado Golf Course Elk Rapids Golf Club (9 Hole Course) Farmington Hills Golf Club Farmington Hills Golf Club Faulkwood Shores Golf Club Fellows Creek Fieldstone Golf Club Flint Elks Country Club Forest Akers East Golf Course Forest Akers West Golf Course Forest Lake Country Club Fountains Golf and Banquet Gaylord Golf Club Golden Passbook to Michigan Golf - NORTH Golden Passbook to Michigan Golf - WEST Goodrich Country Club Grande Golf Club Great Oaks Country Club Green Hills Golf Course Greystone Golf Club & Banquet Center Grosse Ile Golf & Country Club Gull Lake Country Club Gull Lake View - EAST Gull Lake View - WEST Hankerd Hills Golf Course Hawk Hollow Golf Course Hemlock Golf Club Highland Meadows Golf Club - Sylvania, Ohio Hilltop Golf Course Huntmore Golf Club Huron Hills Golf Course Indian Run Golf Club Indian Trails Golf Course Inkster Valley Inverness Club Island Hills Golf Club Kalamazoo Country Club Kent Country Club Kingsley Club Knollwood Country Club Knollwood Country Club - Lake County, ILLINOIS Lakelands Golf and Country Club Lakes of Taylor - Golf Simulator Lakes of Taylor Golf Course

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Lenawee Country Club Leslie Park Golf Course Lincoln Golf Club Links at Crystal Lake Links of Novi Lochmoor Club Macatawa Legends Manistee National Golf & Resort Marquette Golf Club - Greywalls Marquette Golf Club - Heritage Meadowbrook Country Club Metamora Golf and CC Midland Country Club Milham Park Mystic Creek Naperville Country Club Northville Hills Golf Club Oak Pointe Country Club - Championship Course Oak Pointe Country Club - Honors Course Oak Ridge Golf Club Oakhurst Golf & Country Club Oakland University Sharf Golf Course Paint Creek Country Club Petoskey-Bay View Country Club Pheasant Run Country Club Pilgrim’s Run Golf Club Pilgrim’s Run Golf Club Pine Knob Golf Course Pineview Highlands Plum Hollow PohlCat Golf Course Polo Fields Country Club - Ann Arbor Prestwick Village Golf Club Rackham Golf Course Radrick Farms Golf Course Railside Golf Club Red Hawk Golf Club Rivers Edge Golf Club Riverview Highlands Rouge Park Golf Course Royal Scot Golf Course Saginaw Country Club Salem Hills Golf Club Scott Lake Country Club Shanty Creek Shenandoah Country Club Spring Lake Country Club Spring Meadows Country Club St. Clair Golf Club

St. Ives Golf Club at Tullymore Golf Resort Stoatin Brae Golf Club Stonehedge - North Stonehedge - South Stonycroft Hills Club Sugar Loaf “The Old Course” Sunnybrook Country Club Sweetgrass Golf Club - Island Resort and Casino Tam O’Shanter C.C. Tanglewood Golf Club Taylor Meadows Golf Club The Chief Golf Course The Classic Fox The Dream The Dunes Club The Emerald Golf Course The Emerald Golf Course The Falls at Barber Creek The Fortress The Gailes Golf Course The Golden Fox The Heathers Club The Majestic at Lake Walden The Meadows Golf Club The Medalist The Mines Golf Course The Moors Golf Club The Nightmare The Orchards Golf Club The Strategic Fox The Tamaracks Golf Course & Estates The Wyndgate Country Club Timber Ridge Timber Wolf Golf Club TPC of Michigan Traverse City Golf & CC Travis Pointe Country Club Treetops Resort Tullymore Golf Resort Twin Lakes Golf & Swim Club TWO - 25LB Bags of GRASS SEED, by EGS Green Grounds with XALT Walnut Creek Country Club Wawashkamo Golf Club Western Golf Club Westshore Golf & Country Club Westwynd Golf Course White Deer Country Club Whitmore Lake Golf Links Wuskowhan Players Club

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8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Location: Hancock Turfgrass Research Center Cost: $60 Morning Session/ $50 MTF Members $40 Afternoon Session/ $30 MTF Members Pre-Registration Online thru August 8, 2022

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS: Bottled Water Sponsorship – $500.00 Coffee and Donuts Sponsorship – $500.00 Corporate Lunch Sponsorship – $500.00 Support turf research at MSU by becoming a lunch sponsor at Field Day. Only 4 sponsorships will be sold, sponsors will be acknowledged during opening comments and with signage. Lanyard Sponsorship – $1,000.00 MDARD CREDITS AVAILABLE

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LEARN MORE ONLINE:


MSU

Turf Team Recognized at GAM Awards Luncheon

It had been threes years since the Golf Association of Michigan was able to hold an in person Annual Meeting. This year’s event was held on Wednesday at Eagle Eye Golf Club in Bath, Michigan. Members of the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation and the Michigan State University Turf Team were in attendance as the association recognized the team’s contribution to golf in the state of Michigan.

Dr. David Smitley accepts MSU Turf Team recognition.

MSU Professor Dr. Thom Nikolai, MSU Golfer James Piot, MTF Executive Director Carey Mitchelson

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MTF Executive Director, Carey Mitchelson, presents the latest Michigan Turfgrass Foundation initiatives, including the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology.

GAM Awards

Dr. Kevin Frank presents the latest Turf Research projects ongoing at MSU and the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation’s Tee Times 4 Turf auction.

Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences Professor and Chairperson, Dr. Brian Horgan, discusses the program and introduces members of the Turf Team.

“If you keep inviting me, I will keep coming!”

Dr. Joe Vargas thanks the GAM for their impact on the game of golf in Michigan.

MTF NEWS NOTES

Mia Melendez 15 & Under Girls Player of the Year Max VanderMolen 15 & Under Boys Player of the Year Sophie Stevens Girls Player of the Year PJ Maybank Boys Player of the Year Terry Delcamp Senior Women’s Player of the Year Rick Herpich Super Senior Player of the Year Jerry Gunthorpe Senior Player of the Year Kimberly Dinh Women’s Player of the Year James Piot Men’s Player of the Year Ron Dahlin, The Meadows at GVSU - GAM Superintendent of Merit Award Phil Holmblade Course Rater of the Year Erik Haneberg James D. Standish Jr. Award - U of M Christian Jackson James D. Standish Jr. Award - MSU LPGA USGA Girls Golf MWGA - Champion of DE&I Award Glenn Pulice, Royal Oak Golf Center - Club Services Award Lee Juett, GAM President Emeritus - GAM Distinguished Service Award

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT CAREY MITCHELSON

Welcome to year two of the newly revised MTF NewsNotes! Each year the MTF sets its sights on new goals and ways to improve itself to and improve for our members. Those thoughts and meetings are sometimes very successful. Sometimes not as successful. However, this year marks our second year of the New – NewsNotes and the Foundation considers this a successful endeavor. Congratulations to our President Curt Boak for taking it on and making our Foundation a bit stronger in doing so. It isn’t easy to prepare a publication. There are always items of interest and lots of subject matter to present. With those subjects come deadlines and time-consuming attention to detail that can make or break any writing. But with it comes deadlines and a great deal of attention to detail in order that is time PRESIDENT’S consuming. To produce a professional publication even if it is only 2 times a year is a task that isn’t easy. It takes a certain persona to take on a mission like this because once started it is an “To swear off making expectation that comes repeatedly and beyond.

MESSAGE

mistakes is very easy. All you have to do In your normal, chaotic workday it would be very simple and is swear off having easy to not make mistakes – but if giving up on ideas is a ideas.” way to avoid mistakes, what would the world be like? Ideas t is with great pleasure that the Michigan Turfgrass make us fresh and energized. It offers a chance to explore Leo Burnett – Foundation once again is able to present our Annual Turfgrass what everyone else may have given up on …or never thought Advertising Executive.

I

Conference. The years of. We will continue to improve and decision learn how tofour produce a ago to return to East publication that has interesting items, and hope you share Lansing and make theweemphasis on education has proven your thoughts with us. to be the correct choice. Our speaker line-up is once again well-

rounded and the topics for your consideration have been planned forHighlights months. A great deal of debate regarding what our attendees Spring may be interested in always takes place and the goal is to anticipate GAM the Annual Meeting priorities of the attendees. Your input on topics during the The MTF is proud to be and a closethroughout partner with thethe Golfyear Association of Michigan. The GAM Conference is always welcome anditself wesupports the MTF with an annual donation from the proceeds of its annual Golf Auction. It shares the revenues look forward to any thoughts you may have. We hope you find it receives from that event with both the MTF and the Evans Scholars Program and is an indication of how the GAM the Conference suited to your expectations and trust you will let respects both organizations and joins in their success. Many of our host courses for the TT4Turf auction are ustheknow your opinions onclubs where wecore may improve and we spring havejust prior to a part of GAM organization and these are the of our fundraising effortifeach effectively planned your time as that well. Mother’s Day. In addition there are several courses contribute annually to the MTF and we are grateful for their contributions annually.

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Many people are involved with the planning process of the At this year’s GAM Annual Meeting there the were day manyafter individuals ties toends. the MTF. Conference and it starts the who lasthave session TheJ. Lee Juett of Oakland Hills Country Club, a longtime GAM volunteer and rules official, was the recipient of the catalyst of the event is our current Vice-President Amy Fouty. She has set the tone the last three years and always strives to enhance and improve each day of the sessions. Fellow Board members Mark Wildeman and Curt Boak have been under her wing this past and1 they will be chairing the Conference for the upcoming VOL 2 year | ISSUE www.michiganturfgrass.org years. Many thanks to all of them as they continue to provide a conference that we all enjoy and learn from.


Distinguished Service Award. Mr. Juett is well known for his commitment to the GAM, golf and Oakland Hills and his selection is well deserved. Juett, a member at Oakland Hills since 1976, first got involved with the GAM in the early 1990s through Peter Jackson, a fellow Oakland Hills member and GAM Governor. “Peter got me involved with the (GAM) green committee working with the superintendents and the Michigan Turfgrass (Foundation),” he said. “I was a member of that committee for a long time, an Honorary Governor and then became a Governor in 1999. That kind of morphed into an interest in the rules and working as a rules official, being part of the championship committee. I was president of the GAM (2010-11), and I still enjoy being a rules official.” Also recognized was David Baughman – another member of Oakland Hills and the GAM Green Committee Chairperson responsible for the creation of the Superintendent of Merit Award given annually by the GAM. This award recognizes individuals who have served their industry and their respective clubs in a manner that is appreciated by not only the club but also by their peers. This year’s awardee was Ron Dahlin of The Meadows Golf Club of Grand Valley State University. Mr. Baughman was recognized at the annual meeting for his efforts with the GAM and was recognized as an Honorary Governor of the GAM by the Board of Directors for his service to the GAM and the Golf Industry. Mr. Baughman has supported the MTF since his introduction to the MTF and we congratulate his selection. Along with David, Linda Lester of Gowanie Golf Club and Lynn Saunders of Lakelands Golf and Country Club were also presented as Honorary Governors. Each of their clubs have also supported the MTF and the MSU Turf Program. With 3 years since the last in person meeting there was also an opportunity to acknowledge three of the MSU Professors for their roles at MSU with the Turf Program

and interaction with the GAM over the years. Dr. James Crum who was unable to attend was acknowledged for retirement and years of service to the students and research at MSU. Dr. David Smitley who would be giving his final exam to students after the GAM meeting was thanked by the GAM for his years of passing along his knowledge from the Entomology Department and finally Dr. Joe Vargas was present to accept kind words and thank you for all his 52 years of professional service as the patriarch of the Turf Team. Plant, Soils and Microbial Sciences Chairperson, Dr. Brian Horgan, was on hand to present the awards and spoke on behalf of MSU and its effort to fund the Dr. Joseph Vargas Endowed Chair in Plant Pathology.

TT4Turf This year’s TeeTimes4Turf auction was the most successful ever and we would like to thank all the participating courses and industry partners who help make the event something all golf courses in the state of Michigan can be proud of. This year’s event raised a record $49,484 for the Turf Program at MSU and is an example of how strong our golf alliances are in Michigan.

Club Donations Each year there are several individual clubs that donate annually to the MTF and it is there continued support the we would like to acknowledge. The 2020-21 Clubs include: Oakland Hills Country Club, Detroit Golf Club, Red Run Golf Club, Warwick Hills Golf and Country Club, Meadowbrook Country Club, Forest Lake Country Club, Bucks Run Golf Club, Crystal Downs Country Club, Edgewood Country Club and Egypt Valley Country Club. We also received contributions from the Golf Association of Michigan, The Northern Great Lakes Golf Course

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Superintendents Association, and the Dul Foundation on behalf of Fox Hills.

Like the surgeon said – “It’s fifty dollars for cuttin’ and a full hundred for knowin’ where.”

These individual clubs and organizations have supported the MTF for many years and we thank them for their longtime consideration. All clubs know the importance the turf program can be in everyday use. Those that can do the little extra are appreciated.

Membership Dan Mausolf, Vice President, and Membership Chair has taken on the enormous duties of updating our files and correcting the vast data base of our Membership. The Board of Directors determined a couple of changes to clarify our Honorary Membership and wanted to thank those who have served to better the MTF by allowing a new category on our Membership roster to include Honorary Service Membership. This classification will provide a membership to those individuals and clubs who have supported the MTF financially or with their time to benefit the MTF. Many of you received notification on this change and we thank all of those who voted to approve this category in our membership roster.

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He has also been updating our Founders Society list to include all those who may have been omitted or not recognized in previous years for their contributions. If you have any questions or would like to become a Founders Member please feel free to contact the MTF with your inquiry.

Summer thoughts As we approach summer and the many decisions that will be made. The MTF hopes you approach all those choices knowing that for every good choice made their will be some not so good choices as well. Always remember: The best way to be right or wrong is humbly. And humility is like underwear – essential, but indecent if it shows. Let’s wish for some good weather and the Foundation hopes to see you soon at one of our events.

www.michiganturfgrass.org


INDUSTRY

Job Board Assistant Superintendent or Second Assistant Superintendent Beautifully located among the rolling landscape of midMichigan, the Country Club of Lansing is one of the premier private country clubs in the Midwest. Founded in 1908, the Country Club of Lansing is a firstclass, family oriented private club that offers a full range of amenities, including a championship 18-hole golf course, driving range, tennis courts, fitness facility, swimming pool and the area’s finest dining and social setting. We are looking to add an energetic, dependable and career oriented individual to join our team. The Second assistant will assist in all aspects of private-golf course management. This is a great opportunity for a recent graduate or spray technician looking to sharpen their skills and gain valuable, real world experience. This is a full-time, year-round position with the opportunity for position advancement within our management structure.

Assist with: Course Setup Chemical and Fertilizer Application Cultural practices such as aerification and topdressing Irrigation repairs Moisture reading and hand watering Operation of all golf course related equipment Personnel management Candidate Key Attributes: Driven work ethic Dependable Positive attitude Willingness to learn Asks questions Contribute positive solutions Attention to detail Understand the game of golf Benefits: Uniforms Attend regional industry conferences Medical & dental insurance 401K PTO & sick days Alternate weekends off Holiday bonus Golfing privileges Access to volunteer at in-state tournaments.

Albanese & Lutzke hiring labor and operators for golf course contraction projects; pay rate DOE. email info@golf-designs.com for more information”

Pure Turf & Tree handles Lawn Fertilization and Plant Health Care for residential and commercial properties mainly in Macomb and Oakland Counties. We are looking to hire technicians, and we place a high priority on enlisting team members who can deliver quality results, who possess excellent people skills, and who are oriented to meeting and exceeding goals. Visit our website or reach out to us at info@pureturfandtree.com for more information. www.pureturfandtree.com

Compensation: Very competitive, discussed during interview.

Drew Peddie | Grounds Superintendent Country Club of Lansing 2200 Moores River Drive, Lansing, MI 48911 C: 517.420.5220

For information on submitting an ad please email cmb@lawntechofmi.com. MTF NEWS NOTES

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NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. Postage PAID Lansing, MI Permit No. 689

P.O. Box 27156 Lansing, MI 48909-7156

www.michiganturfgrass.org

Phone: 517-392-5003 miturfgrass@gmail.com

Are you someone who saves every magazine? We could use your help! We are trying to complete the archives of our News Notes Magazine and we have a few gaps to fill. Its important for us to have the complete archive, so we are reaching out to anyone that might hav some of the missing copies, or anyone who might know someone that might have saved the magazines. Thank you in advance for contacting Michigan Turfgrass Foundation President, Curt Boak (cmb@lawntechofmi.com) with any possible leads.

Are you someone who saves every

magazine?

W

e could use your help! We are trying to complete the archives of our News Notes Magazine and we have a few gaps to fill. Its important for us to have the complete archive, so we are reaching out to anyone that might have some of the missing copies, or anyone who might know someone that might have saved the magazines. Thank you in advance for contacting Michigan Turfgrass Foundation President, Curt Boak (cmb@lawntechofmi.com) with any possible leads.


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