News Notes - Fall 2021 - Vol 1 Issue 2

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ISSUE 2 FALL 2021

NOTES

2022

A PUBLICATION FOR THE TURFGRASS PROFESSIONAL

Michigan Turfgrass Conference Education Program - Golf - Lawn, Athletic Fields, Grounds - MDARD, GCSAA Credits - Vendor Halftime Show - Silent Auction - Networking

January 4-6, 2022

SOARING EAGLE | MOUNT PLEASANT, MICHIGAN


WHERE THE GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER…

Spartan Turf. CANR.MSU.EDU/TURFGRASS

Learn from our world-class turfgrass pros 2

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2016 Michigan Golf Hall of Fame inductee Joe Vargas, PhD, has worked to improve turf quality on every global continent except Antarctica. An MSU Distinguished Faculty member, Vargas has advised master’s and doctoral students and served as faculty coordinator of the MSU Turfgrass Research Center while working with industry for more than 50 years.

www.michiganturfgrass.org


TABLE OF CONTENTS

5 7

President’s Message Research News — x

Fungus that causes dollar spot

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Industry News —

x

14 17 18 19 22 23 24 27

Members in the Field, Kennedy Ellis

MSU Turfgrass Field Day Recap Michigan Turfgrass Membership Application Meritorious Service Award Turfgrass Pathology Executive Director’s Report Vargas Endowed Chair Update Michigan Turfgrass Conference Guide 2022 Candidates for Election

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MTF Executive Committee PRESIDENT Mr. Curt Boak

PRESIDENT EMERITUS Mr. Doug Johanningmeier

VICE PRESIDENT Mr. Dan Mausolf

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Mr. Carey Mitchelson

TREASURER Mr. Dan Mausolf

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY Ms. Britney VanderKodde

Upcoming Events

SECRETARY Mr. Scott Rettmann

MTF Board of Directors TERMS TO EXPIRE ANNUAL MEETING 2022

Mr. Eric Davey

Mr. Paul Kuhna

Prestwick Village Golf Club REPRESENTING: Greater Detroit District

Lansing Lugnuts REPRESENTING: Sports or Institutional Turf

Elected: 2016, 2019

Appt/Rensel - May 2021

Mr. Curt Boak

Mr. Robert Steger CGCS

Lawn Tech REPRESENTING: Turfgrass Services Representative

Red Run Golf Club REPRESENTING: Mid Michigan District

Michigan State University

TURF SCHOOL December 13-16, 2021

Appt/Wildeman - July 2020

Elected: 2016, 2019

Michigan Turfgrass

TERMS TO EXPIRE ANNUAL MEETING 2023

Mr. Doug Johanningsmeier

Mr. Brad Lazroff

Harrell’s LLC REPRESENTING: Commercial Turfgrass Supplier

Huron Meadows Golf Course REPRESENTING: At Large

Elected: 2014, 2017, 2020

Elected: 2017, 2020

Mr. Matt Gaver

Mr. Dan Mausolf LIC, CSP, ASM

REPRESENTING: Western Michigan District

Stine Turf & Snow REPRESENTING: Lawn & Maintenance

Elected: 2017, 2020

CONFERENCE January 4, 5, & 6, 2022 See conference information on page 24.

Elected: 2017, 2020 TERMS TO EXPIRE ANNUAL MEETING 2024

Mr. Craig Moore

Mr. Jeff Holmes CGCS

Marquette Golf Club REPRESENTING: At Large

Egypt Valley Country Club REPRESENTING: At Large

Elected: 2018, 2021

Elected: 2018, 2021

Mr. Dan Lucas

Mr. Scott Rettmann

Kingsley Club REPRESENTING: Northern Michigan District

Walnut Creek Country Club REPRESENTING: At Large

Elected: 2015, 2018, 2021

Elected: 2018, 2021

Michigan Turfgrass Foundation P.O. Box 27156 Lansing, MI 48909

Phone: +1-517-392-5003 miturfgrass@gmail.com

Mission Statement The mission of the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation is to work in partnership with Michigan State University, supporting ongoing programs in research, education, and extension in the area of professional turfgrass management that will benefit all individuals who manage turfgrasses or derive pleasure from the results of such management.

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www.michiganturfgrass.org


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Where did the year go? This year felt like one of the busiest years I have ever had. Winter is always classified as the off season in our industry. People always ask me what you do in the winter because the grass isn’t growing. They assume we are sitting around all winter waiting for the grass to start growing again. Not exactly what happens. My winter months or offseason seems to get busier every year. Always trying to get those projects done that will make the spring, summer, and fall season be more efficient and productive. With the growing staffing issues everyone is facing I would imagine that will be a hot topic at the trade shows and conferences this winter. How do we do more with less? That has been a slogan in the lawn care industry that I have used time and time again. With increasing technology in fertilizer, equipment, and computers is what I have used in my experience to do more with less. It has been a very busy year with the MTF also. My busiest year compared to the last 6 I have been on the board. Coming off a year with dealing with covid we have increased attendance with Tees Times 4 Turf, Lafontaine golf outing and Field Day was amazing. Seeing everyone get back together is a great thing and is what our industry wants right now. We made a last-minute change to move the conference to the Soaring Eagle Conference Center & Casino in late summer to give us some better accommodations and it has been all positive feedback. We are looking forward to a great conference to bring everyone back together. Conference will be January 4,5, and 6, 2022. We look forward to seeing you there and look for more details in this issue of Newsnotes. Another new communication tool we have brought back this year is the Newnotes Magazine. We will be publishing 2 issues a year with information on research from the turf team, current events coming, and past event recaps. It has been a great experience and I have enjoyed bringing it back to life. The Joe Vargas Endowed Chair Position fundraiser is off and moving forward. If you want more information on this unique position, see the enclosed article in this issue. This is a very important piece to keeping our Turf program the best and will be a positive snowball from here. Watch for some big news coming soon on this from the MTF. It has been a busy and great year here at the MTF and I want to thank everyone for this opportunity and look forward to continuing in the coming year. Curt Boak MTF President

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Six professors are currently funded by the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation. Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences John N. Trey Rogers III, Ph.D. rogersj@msu.edu

Brian Horgan, Ph.D. horgan@msu.edu

Professor, Turfgrass Research - Golf Course Renovations - Sports Turf and Golf Turf Management Programs; Turfgrass Research Telephone: 517-353-0136

Professor and Chairperson Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences

Joseph Vargas, Ph.D. vargas@msu.edu Professor - Fungicide resistance; disease management; biological control; chemical control and breeding; epidemiology. Telephone: 517-353-9082

Thomas Nikolai, Ph.D. nikolait@msu.edu Senior Turfgrass Academic Specialist - Golf Course Putting Green mechanical and cultural practices, turfgrass health. Telephone: 517-353-0133

Dr. David Gilstrap, Ph.D. gilstrap@msu.edu Senior Academic Specialist Sports and Commercial Turf Management Education Telephone: 517-353-0140

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www.michiganturfgrass.org

Kevin Frank, Ph.D. frankk@msu.edu Professor and Turf Extension Specialist Telephone: 517-353-0147

Emily Merewitz-Holm, Ph.D. merewitz@msu.edu Assistant Professor - Plant physiologist; abiotic & biotic stresses of turfgrass and crop species; whole-plant, biochemical, & molecular techniques. Telephone: 517-353-0203

David Smitley smitley@msu.edu Professor Telephone: 517-355-3385


RESEARCH NEWS

Fungus that causes dollar spot By J.M. Vargas Jr. Professor, Dept. of Plant, Soil, and Microbial sciences Michigan State University

Introduction

T

he name of the fungus that causes dollar spot has been changed to Clarireedia jacksonii from Sclerotinia homoeocarpa. There are three other species that are responsible for dollar spot throughout the world: Clarireedia monteithiana, Clarireedia homoeocarpa, and Clarireedia bennettii. However, Clarireedia jacksonii is responsible for most of the dollar spot on cool season grasses throughout the world including Michigan.

Folk Lore I like to say turfgrass science has a lot of what I call “folk lore” still in it. This describes beliefs we have about turfgrass management that are based on observations, greenhouse experiments, and things that seem to make sense but do not have replicated research under field conditions to back up these claims. Some of this is because turfgrass science is relatively new compared to research done on field or fruit crops which has been going on for over a hundred years so they have eliminated most if not all of the folk lore. Most of the critical turfgrass research began in the 1960’s but it didn’t really become wide spread at many university until the 1980’s. Maybe the all-time classic folk lore was that Poa annua died in the heat. Of course we now know based on

field research that it dies in the warm weather from disease and insect problems.

Dollar Spot Irrigation Dollar spot has some folk lore associated with it some of which I am personally guilty of. In the three additions of my text book “Management of Turfgrass Diseases” I tell you the worst time to water the turf is in the early evening because the turf will remain wet for a longer period of time thus resulting in more disease. So at Michigan State University we set up an experiment where one set of plots received a .10 inch daily irrigation at either 10 pm or at 5 am for a total of .7 inch a week. A third set of plots received the same amount of irrigation .7 inches a week applied twice a week which represented a deep infrequent irrigation program. The results showed a pm daily irrigation had the least dollar spot followed by the daily 5 am daily treatment with the deep infrequent program having the most dollar spot. We believe the reason the daily irrigation programs had the least dollar spot was because of the moist soils supporting higher levels of bacteria which were antagonistic to the dollar spot fungus. We know moist soils can support high populations of bacteria and that bacterial populations are lower in drier soils. Also included in the study were 3 creeping bentgrass cultivars: L-93 a susceptible cultivar, Declaration a moderately

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RESEARCH NEWS

resistant cultivar and Flagstick a highly resistant cultivar to dollar spot. Whereas Declaration and Flagstick had the least disease and L-93 had the most dollar spot regardless of irrigation regime all the cultivars had less disease in the daily irrigation plots compared to the twice a week irrigation regime. This is why you need to do the experiment under field conditions and not base recommendation on what sounds good or seems to make sense.

Rolling Greens There was great concern that rolling greens would cause compaction resulting in poor quality turf. This may have been true if we still had soil greens. Research at Michigan State University showed there was not enough compaction to injure the turf. A surprising result of the study was that there was less dollar spot in the rolled plots. In an attempt to explain the reduction in dollar spot in the rolled plots we examined the soil moisture in the upper 1.5 inches of the greens. The research did show there was more moisture in the upper 1.5 inches of the rolled green suggesting the rolling had reduced the macrospore space and produced more microspore space resulting in greater moisture holding capacity in the rolled plots. Further research showed there were high levels of bacteria in the rolled plots compared to the non-rolled plots.

the severity of dollar spot by having the plant growing so infections can be mowed off before they develop into a lesion and new leaves can be produced to replace those infected by the fungus.

Conclusions In conclusion night time irrigation does not increase dollar spot and if done on a daily basis will result in a decrease in dollar spot. Rolling greens will also result in a decrease in dollar spot by supporting higher levels of bacterial populations. This is related to the increase in microspore space in the sand which causes an increase in moisture levels in the top 3.8 cm of the green. Removing the guttation water as soon as possible in the morning and having adequate levels of nitrogen to increase the growth of the plant will also reduce the amount of dollar spot. Finally there are now creeping bentgrass cultivars like Declaration and Flagstick with resistance to dollar spot which will also help reduce dollar spot especially when combined with the above mentioned cultural practices.

Other well-known cultural practices Other cultural practices that we have known about for a long time are also important in managing dollar spot. Removing the dew from the greens as soon as possible in the morning stops the fungus from continuing to spread. Of course what we are really doing is removing the guttation water that was produced by the plant which contains nutrients that help support the growth of the fungus. Adequate nitrogen fertility will also reduce

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Dollar spot lesions brown banding.

www.michiganturfgrass.org


Block R53, A1-4 Light, Daily 5 am

Block R50: Light, Daily, 10 am

Block R54: Deep, Infrequent 10 pm

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Members

in The Field Kennedy Ellis

Olivet College - Custom Major of Environmental Chemistry, Biology Penn State World Campus - Turfgrass Management Michigan State University - Turfgrass Soil Fertility

Follow Kennedy on Twitter: @KennedyAnneTurf 10

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www.michiganturfgrass.org


K

Kennedy Ellis is a freshman at Olivet College and inspiring turfgrass professor who keeps busy by playing on the golf team, taking online courses from Penn State World Campus and taking Turfgrass Soil Fertility classes at Michigan State University. We caught up with her at the MSU Turfgrass Field Day and discussed some of her many goals in the Turfgrass Industry.

What got you interested in a career in turf? I used to be really shy and quiet, which is hilarious because I am the exact opposite now. My agro-science teacher (Mr. Werth), wanted me to join FFA because he wanted to get me out of my shell and wanted me to explore that industry more. It wasn’t until my sophomore year that I was required to be in it, because I took his class that required it, and you were required to compete. So he wanted me to do public speaking and to do my topic on turfgrass management. I did that out of respect for him, I was scared to death, but I fell in love with the research side of turfgrass. For me, being a golfer, I can understand and respect the maintenance that goes into it, so I wanted to know more about it. I just fell in love with it from then on and that high school teacher was really good at pushing me. He is not in the turfgrass management industry but he was always very inspirational at helping me through. Some of the professors in the industry have been really great with encouraging me, getting me involved in opportunities. Many others, but my high school agro-science teacher was the biggest one.

You were your high school’s greenhouse manager?

classes. We also had an annual flower, vegetable sale every spring. I was in charge of keeping up to date with those experiments, making sure things were going smoothly and then putting the sales orders for the products we were going to put out. Raising them and growing them so when it came time, we could start selling them. It was100% of the operations that go within the greenhouse, so I was fortunate to be able to do it as a student.

You were also the Student Ambassador for the agro-science program? Our school was unique because our career tech classes, automotive, construction, were all in our actual building so instead of students going off campus, it was right there. Our career tech department had student ambassadors for their programs. So I was a student ambassador for the agro-science program. When we had school school board meetings, we would give presentations. When we had kids from other district area schools, incoming freshmen or others, we would them tour our specific department facilities. It was another way to promote the classes and opportunities we offered but from a perspective of a student, rather than a teacher.

For an independent study I did as an elective in high school, my time was spent in a greenhouse where we did experiments for our

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Is it unusual for agro-science to be offered in high school? My hometown high school, Alpena High School, is the furthest town from any four year university in Michigan. The closest one is almost three hours away. So for them a big thing is, how are we going to promote, if these kids don’t want to go to college because of the distance, how are we going to help them get into the workforce right away. How can we help them become qualified employees, how are we going to get them to get college credits through our programs. That’s why our school had that opportunity. So students had access to them without having a university next door. It’s something that definitely helped start me down this path.

We understand you’ve worked at some big golf tournaments? I volunteered for the ANWA (Augusta national women’s Amateur) tournament when it was at champions retreat. That was a treat, in and of itself! Also the US Women’s

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Open when they had the big Women in Turf Group, where over half of them were women, I was the youngest one there by quite a few years. I loved every minute of it! I’m planning on doing the Men’s Open next year at the Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts. Maybe another tournament…..

What are you most looking forward to about playing golf for Olivet? There are goals I have athletically, but the biggest thing for me wanting to go to the smaller school, and especially Olivet, is that my coach is focused on how you are in the classroom rather than how you are on the golf course. For example, today is the move-in day for incoming golfers, but he let me move in the day before so that I could be here (MSU Turf Day), little things like that. He’s really into your academics, you can shoot 120 and he doesn’t care as long as you have great grades and you’ve got yourself set towards a really great career. It’s the same for my teammates, academics is a huge component of their life, so yes we’re on the golf team but it’s not the only thing. Golf is definitely one of the perks of going to college.

www.michiganturfgrass.org


What is some of the best advice you’ve got so far? The advice I got was think of your dream job and then work backwards. I did that exactly. If I want to be a professor, where do I need to go backwards, how do I need to get into grad school, how do I need to do an undergraduate degree to be there, what connections do I need to make, who do I need to talk to, that’s how I’m working backwards.

What makes you want to be a turf professor? II really love the idea of working with students and that mentorship opportunity, undergraduate advising or graduate advising. One of my favorite things, at least in high school, was being a junior golf coach. Watching them, helping them succeed, being that person they can fall back on if they need help. Being that person to give them an extra contact or two and then send them out on their way and see how successful they are. That’s something I really love. I also love lecturing and talking about what I love and what I’ve found and learned. I ve had the opportunity to be a student assistant for my agroscience teacher. One day there was an accident, so he was away and I picked up the classroom. We were doing soil triangles and I gave them examples, things like that I really love to do. Then of course, the research component is a major part and I love to be a part of that.To be the first person to answer those questions, questions that we didn’t even know existed. It’s a little bit of everything that all fall into one umbrella of academia. That makes me really passionate about it and want to pursue it as my future goal.

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Recap August 11, 2021

F

or the MSU Turf Team and the more than 400 participants who came out to learn, network and participate in the study of turfgrass, it turned out to be a great day. One day later, and it would have been a completely different story, as MSU along with many other Michigan areas, received 4 inches of rain overnight.

Golf 6. Turfgrass Weed Research Dr. Thom Nikolai, Dr. T.O Green, Eric Galbraith, Dr. Eric Patterson, and Ben Pritchard Attendees were encouraged to take ratings at two different studies.

Highlights from the day included Dr. Vargas’s turf dust - IRS comparison, Dr. Frank’s barefoot test and learning that Poa Annua ranks only behind cockroaches on the toughness scale.

Lawn & Athletic Fields 9. The Long-Term Effect of Irrigation and Fertilizer Programs on Different Turfgrass Species — Dr. Kevin Frank and Jesse Sholl The objective of the study is to demonstrate the interaction and performance of fertilization and irrigation on different turfgrass species and mixtures.

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Lawn & Athletic Fields 8. Disease Management in Lawns and Athletic Fields Nancy Dykema and Dr. J.M. Vargas Jr. Leaf Spot, Dollar Spot, Red Thread, Necrotic Ring Spot

www.michiganturfgrass.org

Congratulations to Peter Cookingham, Head of the Turfgrass Information Center, on his upcoming retirement.


Thank you to Jesse Sholl and the staff at the Hancock Turfgrass Research Center for all they did to make this one of the most successful Field Days to date.

Golf 4. Racecourse Athletic Field Systems, and Golf Ball Reaction and Soil Strength Studies; Dr. J.N. Rogers, III, Dr. J.R. Crum, and Dr. T.O. Green The the golf ball reaction and soil strength study (2021-2022) will give insight to improving golf shots by allowing golfers the option of bouncing shots to gain distance while placing them nearer target putting green.

Lawn & Athletic Fields 10, Golf 5. Outbreaks of Japanese Beetle Decline in Southern Michigan Due to Biological Control While Populations Increase in Northern Michigan — Dr. David Smitley In 1999, with Japanese Beetle populations exploding in Michigan, a survey by Cappaert and Smitley (2002) revealed that the most promising biocontrol organisms were either absent or nearly absent in Southern Michigan.

Golf 3. Abiotic Stress Physiology of Putting Green Species — Megan Gendjar and Dr. Emily Merewitz, Kailey Miller, Dr. Kevin Frank Soil water content and plant growth regulator effects on Poa Annua acclimation to and survival of winter. Mowing height effects on winterkill of Poa Annua putting greens.

Golf 2. The Effects of Soil Test Philosophy Recommendations on Creeping — Jackie Guevara and Dr. Kevin W. Frank The study evaluated two soil testing philosophies and fertilizer recommendations, namely Sufficiency Level of Available Nutrients (SLAN) and Minimum Levels for Sustainable Nutrition (MLSN).

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MSU Turfgrass FIELD DAY Recap

Lawn & Athletic Fields 7. Turfgrass Weed Research Dr. Thom Nikolai, Dr. T.O. Green, Eric Galbraith, Dr. Eric Patterson, and Ben Pritchard Discussing results of a 3-year lawn HOC study and a walk over to a GDD crabgrass application study.

The 2021 Turfgrass Field Day was presented with the support of the following sponsors:

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Golf 1. Disease Management for Golf Courses Nancy Dykema and Dr. J. M. Vargas, Jr. Anthracnose; Dollar Spot Management Summer Stress in Turfgrass

Lanyard sponsor: MeritHall Inc., Rep. Travis Goeski Corporate Lunch Sponsors: NuFarm, FMC Professional Solutions, MTESP

www.michiganturfgrass.org

Bottled Water Sponsor: Green Point Consulting Breakfast Sponsor: Harrell's LLC


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MERITORIOUS

Award Winner: The Spartan Family

S

partan Distributors began representing the Toro product line in 1947 in Michigan and has continued doing so for 75 years. They were also instrumental in the formation of the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation in the 1950’s and have remained strong supporters of the golf and sports field industry for their entire history. Originally based in Sparta MI only, Spartan Distributors, led by Warren Schut, Dawn’s father, covered the Western and Northern part of the state. In the early 90’s they purchased Wilkie Turf in Eastern Michigan and Warren, one of the original founders and president of 45 years, retired. Dawn and her husband Bruce then purchased majority ownership and they have been leading the company ever since. Playing a key role in Spartan’s long history of involvement and support for the turf industry is also Kris Early, a graduate of MSU’s Turf Program, and longtime vice president and board member. In prior years John Read and Jack Rogers, key managers within the company, continued to build on past relationships and support the MTF. Along with Toro, Spartan Distributors over the years has provided millions of dollars of both turf equipment and irrigation product to MSU’s Turfgrass program in addition to many other contributions. Dawn, Bruce, and Kris are

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Bruce Johnson, Dawn Johnson, and Kris Early

thankful for the long term partnership and believe the future is bright for those now benefitting from past and current investments.

www.michiganturfgrass.org


TTHHEE JOE JOE VARGAS VARGAS CHAIR CHAIR IN IN

TTUURRFG FGRRAS ASSS PAT PATHHO OLO LOGY GY

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A PIONEERING TURFGRASS PROGRAM For 70 years, Michigan State University’sTURFGRASS turfgrass management program hasPROGRAM provided significant, cutting-edge research that AoverPIONEERING

positively impacts practitioners and end-users, from our back yards to world-class golf courses. We have played an integral role For over 70and years, Michigan State University’s turfgrass has provided significant, cutting-edge research that in building evolving every type of turf used in sportsmanagement such as golf,program soccer, football, baseball and racetracks to name a few. The positivelyisimpacts practitioners andand end-users, fromFor ourover back yards to world-class golf courses. We haveprogram played an integral rolea program rich in history, tradition, accolades. seven decades, the Michigan State turfgrass has provided in building and evolving every type of turf used in sports such as golf, soccer, football, baseball and racetracks to name a few. The world-class education to our students and produced valuable research to benefit the entire industry. program is rich in history, tradition, and accolades. For over seven decades, the Michigan State turfgrass program has provided a The research taking place within our turfgrass program not only serves to positively affect our campus community and the state world-class education to our students and produced valuable research to benefit the entire industry. of Michigan’s economy, but also the U.S. and the world. Greenspace and turf are valuable for communities, as these spaces provide The research takingservices place within our turfgrass program not only serves to positively affect our campus community and the state positive ecosystem including stormwater management, pollinator friendly habitats, urban cooling and environmental of Michigan’s economy, but also the U.S. and the world. Greenspace and turf are valuable for communities, as these spaces provide protection and preservation. positive ecosystem services including stormwater management, pollinator friendly habitats, urban cooling and environmental Michigan State University offers a two-year certificate program, a four-year undergraduate degree, and graduate degrees protection and preservation. in turfgrass science and management. The programs bring together faculty, specialists, and educators who work with both Michigan State University offers aand two-year certificate program, turfgrass a four-year undergraduate degree, and graduate degrees professional turfgrass managers homeowners in managing in an environmentally responsible manner. They are in turfgrass science and management. The programs bring together faculty, specialists, and educators who work with both practical and immersive, and extend the program’s reach and impact globally. professional turfgrass managers and homeowners in managing turfgrass in an environmentally responsible manner. They are practical and immersive, and extend the program’s reach and impact globally.

THE IMPORTANCE OF ENDOWED FACULTY At the forefront of our turfgrass program are our faculty members who are leaders in their areas of expertise. They create new THE IMPORTANCE OF ENDOWED FACULTY

knowledge through research, while educating and inspiring the students who will become the next generation of leaders in the At theThese forefront of our turfgrass are program are our faculty members and whowe aremust leaders in theirtoareas of the expertise. They create new field. talented individuals the heartbeat of the program, continue attract most forward-thinking knowledge through research, while educating researchers and educators to Michigan State. and inspiring the students who will become the next generation of leaders in the field. These talented individuals are the heartbeat of the program, and we must continue to attract the most forward-thinking What holds true for successful businesses holds true for universities: we live in a competitive world. In academia, we compete for researchers and educators to Michigan State. the best students, for funds to fuel our research programs, and for the best faculty. Endowed positions offer a huge competitive What holdswhen true for successful businesses true wefactors live inthat a competitive In academia, we compete advantage recruiting faculty, as theyholds are one offor theuniversities: most pivotal candidatesworld. consider when weighing their for the best students, for funds to fuel our research programs, and for the best faculty. Endowed positions offer a huge competitive options between multiple universities. For that reason, we are seeking a $5 million endowment to fully endow the Joe Vargas advantage when recruiting as they are one of the most pivotal factors that candidates consider when weighing their Chair in Turfgrass Pathologyfaculty, at Michigan State University. options between multiple universities. For that reason, we are seeking a $5 million endowment to fully endow the Joe Vargas The Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology will ensure that a strong and robust program is possible in perpetuity, and that MSU’s Chair in Turfgrass Pathology at Michigan State University. land-grant tradition of linking research to our region’s needs continues to advance the economic development, environmental The Joe Vargas in Turfgrass will ensure a strong and robust program is possible in perpetuity, and that MSU’s stewardship, andChair improved qualityPathology of life in Michigan andthat around the world. land-grant tradition of linking research to our region’s needs continues to advance the economic development, environmental We seek faculty members who will offer unique viewpoints and expertise to educate and inspire our students, and who will stewardship, and improved quality of life in Michigan and around the world. conduct collaborative research with colleagues in other colleges and industries. The Vargas Chair will enable MSU to effectively We seek faculty who willwho offerare unique viewpoints and educate and inspire our students, and who will compete for top members faculty members leaders in the field ofexpertise turfgrass to pathology. conduct collaborative research with colleagues in other colleges and industries. The Vargas Chair will enable MSU to effectively compete for top faculty members who are leaders in the field of turfgrass pathology.

GOLF’S ECONOMIC IMPACT GOLF’S ECONOMIC IMPACT $4.2 60,000 $1.4 127,500

BILLION $4.2 BILLION Economic

impact in Economic Michigan impact from in the golf industry Michigan from the golf industry 20

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PEOPLE 60,000

PEOPLE Employed by Michigan Employed golf courses by Michigan golf courses

BILLION $1.4 BILLION Wages paid

annuallypaid by Wages Michigan annually golf by courses Michigan golf courses

www.michiganturfgrass.org

ACRES 127,500

ACRES Professionally managed Professionally greenspace managedthat provide wildlife greenspace that habitats provide wildlife habitats


THE JOE VARGAS CHAIR THE JOE VARGAS CHAIR IN TURFGRASS PATHOLOGY $5 MILLION ENDOWMENT PATHOLOGY IN TURFGRASS

$5 MILLION The individual who ENDOWMENT holds the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology will be driven, creative and utilize cutting-edge techniques to tackle pressing challenges for solutions that positively impact the field of turfgrass science around the world. Funds from the The individual who holds the Vargas in Turfgrass will bepromise driven, creative andbeing utilizeconstrained cutting-edge Vargas Chair endowment will Joe allow us to Chair do research in thePathology area of greatest rather than bytechniques a specific to tackle pressing challenges for solutions that positively impact the field of turfgrass science around the world. Funds from the grant opportunity. At the same time, the research they conduct with resources from the endowment, along with the benefits of Vargas Chair endowment will allow us to do research in the area of greatest promise rather than being constrained by a being a part of a large research institution, will provide the catalyst for additional grant and research support. The Vargasspecific Chair grant opportunity. At the same time, they conduct with with resources from theand endowment, along on with the benefits of will conduct innovative research that the will research forever link the MSU brand a meaningful positive impact the industry. being a part of a large research institution, will provide the catalyst for additional grant and research support. The Vargas Chair will conduct innovative research that will forever link the MSU brand with a meaningful and positive impact on the industry.

YOUR IMPACT YOUR IMPACT As the nation’s pioneer land-grant university, it is our responsibility to recruit and support faculty who are ready to tackle the

world’s most challenging issues. We value research that enhances our ability to deliver advanced solutions and educational As the nation’s pioneer land-grant initiatives for the turfgrass industry.university, it is our responsibility to recruit and support faculty who are ready to tackle the world’s most challenging issues. We value research that enhances our ability to deliver advanced solutions and educational By helping to create the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology at Michigan State University, you are investing in the industry, our initiatives for the turfgrass industry. students, faculty, and research. With your partnership, we will ensure that Michigan State University continues to lead the field as By createfor the Joe Vargas Chair in Turfgrass Pathology at Michigan State aUniversity, are investing in thethe industry, thehelping premiertoschool turfgrass science and management. Together, we can make differenceyou in ways that improve lives ofour students, faculty, and research. With your partnership, ensure that Michigan State University continues to lead the field as our communities, strengthen the economy, and changewe ourwill world. the premier school for turfgrass science and management. Together, we can make a difference in ways that improve the lives of our communities, strengthen the economy, and change our world.

Dr. Joe Vargas has dedicated his 51 year Dr. Joeto Vargas has career improving dedicated 51 year the qualityhis of turf career to improving on every continent the quality of turf His except Antartica. on every continent knowledge has been except Antartica. shared in over 200His knowledge articles andhas overbeen 1,000 shared in over 200 presentations. As an articles and over 1,000 international expert presentations. As an on turfgrass diseases, international expert he is a member of the on turfgrass diseases, Michigan Golf Hall of he is a member of the Fame. Michigan Golf Hall of Fame. MTF NEWS NOTES

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT CAREY MITCHELSON

Welcome to the second issue of the renewed News Notes Magazine. This release will focus on the upcoming MTF Turf Conference with its new location and schedule of events. This year’s conference will be the 92st time the MTF has hosted this event making it one of the country’s oldest and longest running conferences focusing on turf research and educational sessions. This winter we are pleased to have Soaring Eagle Casino in Mt. Pleasant as our conference location (January 4 – January 6) and believe it will offer attendees many educational options and plentiful possibilities for gatherings and conversations. Considerable effort was put into making the move to a site that would provide the best conference experience possible for our membership. MTF President and PRESIDENT’S Conference Chairperson Curt Boak researched many possibilities and worked tirelessly to ensure we could provide the best possible in-person experience and deserves accolades for his effort. While at the conference please take a moment to thank him for his time on the board and all he has done to make the MTF Conference an experience that I am sure each of you will enjoy.

MESSAGE

The majority of our annual events will be taking place during the 3 days of the conference, and we encourage all attendees to take advantage of the many social and meeting options available. Items such as The Vendor Halftime Show, Student Scholarship presentation, Annual Meeting and other details are important parts the conference and we hope canMichigan take time to Turfgrass attend as many as possible. t isofwith great pleasure thatyouthe

I

Foundation once again is able to present our Annual Turfgrass Conference. The decision four years ago to return to East To many, the highlight of the Conference is awarding scholarships to the students at MSU. This year the Lansing andthemake emphasis haspresent proven awards will be presented during Vendorthe Halftime Show. Ifon youeducation have not been for these in the toabe theopportunity correct choice. speakerourline-up is onceofagain past it will be great for you toOur see firsthand new generation turfgrasswellstudents and experience their pride and accomplishments that they share with their families. rounded and the topics for your consideration have been planned for months. A great deal of debate regarding what our attendees Vendor Halftime Show/ Sponsorships be interested always takes place isand thetiedgoal to anticipate Speaking ofmay the Halftime show …thein success of the conference closely to soismany of our allied the priorities oftothe Your input on offering topics Sponsorships. during the The Board partners and individuals willing be attendees. a part of the Halftime Show and of DirectorsConference and the MTF membership all thank you your is presence support ofand the Conference. and throughout theforyear alwaysandwelcome we Please take look a moment to thank them for their input to the conference. At this writing there are still forward to any thoughts you may have. We hope you find options available for anyone interested in signing up for a sponsorship or a table at the halftime show the Conference suited to your expectations and trust you will let please visit our website to register. us know your opinions on where we may improve and if we have effectively planned your time as well. MTF Items of interest Student Awards

Election of Board of Directors

Many people are of involved with the planning processand ofupdated the its By-Laws Last year thanks to the hard work Doug Johanningsmeier, the MTF reviewed to reflect current communication as well as outdated verbiage. Thanks Conference and itmethods startsand thesystems day after the last session ends. Theto those changes wecatalyst are now able to offer our election of Board of Directors to the active membership on-line. of the event is our current Vice-President Amy Fouty. She Voting will be taking place late in December and notices will be sent via electronic messages and email.

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has set the tone the last three years and always strives to enhance and improve each day of the sessions. Fellow Board members Mark Wildeman and Curt Boak have been under her wing this past year and they will be chairing the Conference for the upcoming | ISSUE 2 www.michiganturfgrass.org years. Many thanks to all of them as they continue to provide a conference that we all enjoy and learn from.


Vargas Endowed Chair

UPDATE

O

ne of the largest undertakings ever taken on by the MTF is currently underway as we begin the process of building the Endowed Chair Position in the name of Dr. Joe Vargas. The importance of the position cannot be understated, and the Board of Directors are fully committed to working with MSU to provide enough funding to make this goal a reality. An Endowed Chair would provide the Turf Program a position within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources that would be in perpetuity. This privately funded position will provide and guarantee future turf students and endeavors a place at Michigan State University for generations. Funding by the MTF will represent seed money and indicates our commitment to the Turf Program at MSU. The Foundation has been extremely fortunate over the years to have far sighted individuals who sought to improve our industry, educate our peers, and provide a respectable definition of someone who makes a living in the turfgrass industry. The Endowments that have been constructed for those purposes were started by a generation past. Funding the Turf Program has always been the goal and as the MTF plans its next step to that goal, the Endowments will play a crucial role. Some concern may be had to the vast amount of financial support that will be sent to MSU that is currently held by the MTF. The plain truth may be …that there is no certainty that the program will always be there. As priorities change, the University will always be reviewing which programs are most meaningful to their bottom lines. With that in mind, the Foundation will do everything to ensure the Turf Program at MSU continues to be an important part of the industry. As for the Endowments, we believe that there are currently some individuals in our industry that understand the need to reinvigorate and perhaps reinvent what was done previously – and pay it forward like those that have done so already. In the upcoming months the MTF will be working with Dr. Brian Horgan (Department Chair of Plant and Soil Sciences) to provide information and begin the process of engaging with individuals or organizations who may be willing to be a part of this initiative. MTF Members interested in this endeavor or with questions… may contact us at miturfgrass@gmail.com

MTF NEWS NOTES

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Michigan Turfgrass Conference

GUIDE January 4-6, 2022

SOARING EAGLE RESORT & CONFERENCE CENTER 6800 Soaring Eagle Boulevard, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858 SoaringEagleCasino.com 1-877-232-4532 Hotel Room Block Code: MTF010422 Cost is $139.00 per night plus taxes

On-Site Registration Hours:

Register online at www.michiganturfgrass.org

SPEAKER SPOTLIGHT:

January 4, 2022 (Tuesday) 11am-4pm

January 5, 2022 (Wednesday) 7am-4pm January 6, 2022 (Thursday) 7am-9am)

Pam Sherratt Turfgrass specialist and lecturer in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at The Ohio State University Pam Sherratt is a turfgrass specialist and lecturer in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science at The Ohio State University. Pam received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Lancashire in England and her master’s degree from The Ohio State University. Pam devises and implements the Buckeye Sports Turf Program and disseminates sports turf research to the industry. She is currently writing an online class for groundskeepers & athletic field managers and manages a website with 2800 subscribers. Pam makes 25-30 in-state visits to athletic fields each year, manages the annual sports turf short course, produces an annual sports turf calendar, speaks at several instate workshops and seminars, serves on several industry boards (in and out of state), and writes Extension/Outreach grants. Her research focuses on athletic field stability and reinforcement, sand selection for athletic fields, cool season grass traits; wear tolerance, establishment speed, overseeding options, rhizomatous tall fescues & other newer grass varieties.

Presentations: Athletic Field Diagnostics Playing Surface Management Tips and Tricks

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Dr. Fred Whitford Clinical Engagement Professor, Botany and Plant Pathology and Director of Purdue Pesticide Programs Frederick “Fred” Whitford, Clinical Engagement Professor, Botany and Plant Pathology and Director of Purdue Pesticide Programs. Fred received his bachelor’s degree in wildlife management from Louisiana Tech. He received his master’s and doctorate degrees in entomology from lowa State University. He has served as the Coordinator of the Purdue Pesticide Program since 1991. He has authored more than 300 publications and become a popular speaker with more than 5,000 presentations given throughout Indiana and the United States.

Presentations: Truck Hitches and Spray Equipment: Understanding the System What We Can Learn From Truck Accidents

Dr. Bernd Leinauer Professor and Extension Turfgrass Specialist at New Mexico State University Dr. Bernd Leinauer is a Professor and Extension Turfgrass Specialist at New Mexico State University and holds the special professor position in turfgrass ecology at Wageningen University and Research. His research program focuses on developing sustainable management strategies aimed at reducing resources and inputs used for maintaining turfgrass areas. Research efforts include the investigation of biotic and abiotic stressors on turfgrasses and developing and adopting modified management strategies to maintain aesthetics and functionality of the turf areas. Dr. Leinauer has authored and co-authored a book, a book chapter, over 80 scientific peer reviewed research papers, and almost 200 reports and abstracts.

Presentations: Non-Chemical Water Conditioners Irrigation Water Quality and Understanding a Water Quality Test Report

Jim Brosnan, Ph.D. Professor, The University of Tennessee Dr. Brosnan is a Professor in the Plant Sciences Department at the University of Tennessee (UT) and Director of the UT Weed Diagnostics Center. His research focuses on controlling unique and problematic turfgrass weeds, particularly those with resistance to herbicides. His extension programs aim to provide education and diagnostic support to Tennessee’s $5.8 billion turfgrass industry. Dr. Brosnan serves as an advisor to the Tennessee Turfgrass Association Board of Directors, and he is actively involved in the Weed Science Society of America, Southern Weed Science Society, Golf Course Superintendents Association of America, and Sports Turf Managers Association. He has consulted at multiple venues on the PGA Tour (including several major championship host sites) in addition to National Football League franchises. Dr. Brosnan received a B.S. in turfgrass science from Penn State University, an M.S. in plant, soil and insect sciences (turfgrass) from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and a Ph.D. in agronomy (turfgrass) from Penn State University.

Presentations: Poa365: A Deep Dive on the Most Interesting Weed in Turf New Herbicides for Cool-Season Turfgrass

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Silent Auction and Sponsorship Opportunities for the 2022 Michigan Turfgrass Conference Support from our Turfgrass Industry Partners is the key to the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation’s continued success in its mission to fund Turfgrass research and programs at Michigan State University. With your help, we can continue our combined efforts to advance study in the Turfgrass industry.

Dr. Paul Rieke Graduate Assistantship Silent Auction Michigan Turfgrass Conference - January 4-6, 2022 Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort, Mt. Pleasant MI 48858 Exhibit Function: January 5, 2022 / 4:00 - 6:30pm

The Silent Auction is always one of the highlights of the Michigan Turfgrass Conference. Held during the Halftime Show, the Silent Auction helps raise funds for the Graduate Assistantship for ongoing graduate student positions at MSU. These students provide critical turfgrass research, and participate in extension and teaching programs, which garner additional grant funding through research publications and further examination of turfgrass subjects. For more information please contact Curt Boak at cmb@lawntechofmi. com or by phone at 517-490-5191.

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2022 Candidates for

Election

Curt Boak — Turfgrass Services Representative I have enjoyed being in the greens industry for the past 25 years and look forward to many more. My career started in the landscape construction field and then it took me to the residential/commercial lawn care industry where I have been the last 20 years. Serving on the board has been a great experience and has allowed me to meet others who share the same passion for turf as I do. I am honored to be a part of an organization that supports the turfgrass program at Michigan State University, continuing education, research, and extension.

Eric Davey — Greater Detroit District I have worked within the golf industry for the last 25 years. This work experience has brought me great opportunities to work with great people and see amazing things. As a current Michigan Turfgrass Foundation board member, I feel it is important for me to give back some of the great experiences I have had in this industry. To help ensure we, as members of the Michigan Turfgrass Foundation, continue to support Michigan State University and its turfgrass program. GO GREEN!!

Paul Kuhna — Sports or Institutional Turf Graduated from Michigan State University with a four year turfgrass management degree in 2017. This year was my sixth working in sports turf, the last two for the Lansing Lugnuts. As a recent graduate and someone just beginning their career in sports turf, I believe I can connect with what is an important part of MTF, the students. Keeping the numbers of students involved and interested in a career in turfgrass management is something that is important to me, and MTF helps provide for the greatest turfgrass degree available.

Christian Koval — Mid-Michigan District I graduated from the MSU Turfgrass Program in 2004 and started as an intern then 2nd assistant at Crystal Downs CC for 5 years. Next I was assistant at Prestwick Village GC for 5 seasons and now Superintendent for 10 seasons, 9 of which have been at Lakelands G&CC in Brighton. I’m married with 2 children and I reside in Grand Blanc.

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NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. Postage PAID Lansing, MI Permit No. 689

P.O. Box 27156 Lansing, MI 48909-7156

www.michiganturfgrass.org

Phone: 517-392-5003 miturfgrass@gmail.com

Are you someone who saves every magazine? We could use your help! We are trying to complete the archives of our News Notes Magazine and we have a few gaps to fill. Its important for us to have the complete archive, so we are reaching out to anyone that might hav some of the missing copies, or anyone who might know someone that might have saved the magazines. Thank you in advance for contacting Michigan Turfgrass Foundation President, Curt Boak (cmb@lawntechofmi.com) with any possible leads.

Are you someone who saves every

magazine?

W

e could use your help! We are trying to complete the archives of our News Notes Magazine and we have a few gaps to fill. Its important for us to have the complete archive, so we are reaching out to anyone that might have some of the missing copies, or anyone who might know someone that might have saved the magazines. Thank you in advance for contacting Michigan Turfgrass Foundation President, Curt Boak (cmb@lawntechofmi.com) with any possible leads.


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