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FRESH FACTS 2013 NEWS

MISSOULA STEPS UP TO STOP SEXUAL ASSAULTS

OPINION

INSIDE: YOUR GUIDE TO BEING A BETTER LOCAL

RETHINKING THE TERM “REDSKINS”

MUSIC

CHUCK PROPHET SAVES THE BEST FOR LAST


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


FRESH FACTS 2013 NEWS

MISSOULA STEPS UP TO STOP SEXUAL ASSAULTS

OPINION

INSIDE: YOUR GUIDE TO BEING A BETTER LOCAL

RETHINKING THE TERM “REDSKINS”

MUSIC

CHUCK PROPHET SAVES THE BEST FOR LAST


[2] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013


cover photo courtesy of NPS

News Voices/Letters Cell tower, organ harvesting and climate change......................................4 The Week in Review Fire, Fringe Festival and politics .....................................................6 Briefs More fire, river cleanup and speed .........................................................................6 Etc. Bears in the crosshairs.................................................................................................7 News Council calls on community to help curb sexual violence ......................................8 News Connecting the conservation dots in the West.........................................................9 Opinion Time has come for demeaning mascot to disappear.........................................10 Feature Missoula firefighters recall the summer Yellowstone burned ............................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts What happens when Missoula musicians revisit Spinal Tap.....................................20 Music Travis Sehorn, Murder by Death and Wooden Indian Burial Ground ..................22 Music Chuck Prophet never needed a revival..................................................................23 Film The Act of Killing turns mass murder on its head ...................................................24 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .........................................................25 Flash in the Pan More than a label..................................................................................26 Hangriest Hour Philly West .............................................................................................28 8 Days a Week Eerie timing.............................................................................................29 Mountain High BozeMonster Challenge.........................................................................37 Agenda Summer of Solidarity Tour ..................................................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters PHOTO INTERN Tommy Martino CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Dameon Pesanti COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [3]


[voices]

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, Aug. 20, at the Eastgate Shopping Center. This week The Indy covers the 25th anniversary of the summer Yellowstone caught on fire. What were you doing in the summer of 1988? Follow-up: What’s your favorite thing about Yellowstone?

Jim Rutstrom: I was working as an airplane mechanic in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Scary bear: I remember Old Faithful was real disappointing, but I liked seeing the bears. They were intimidating.

Melanie Gardner: I was probably riding my horse all summer long. I was in eighth grade! Wild lines: All the animals. The buffalo traffic jams are cool.

Angel Ruiz: I was in New York working on Wall Street as a purchasing agent for Brokerage House. Virtually active: I haven’t been there, but I’ve seen it on Discovery Channel. I like the lodge. It looks like a place where you can just sit back and watch TV. I was active in ’Nam, so now I’m a couch potato.

Feeling connected

I read with interest the article about cellphones and towers in Hot Springs (see “Tower on tap in Hot Springs,” Aug. 8), because I am a part-time resident in that quirky rural Montana town. I was distressed by the cartoon that said, “Integrity is free, but selling out pays cash money.” I do not know Glen Magera, but he certainly has the right and perhaps the duty to cash in on any free money that someone wants to hand him. He is a rancher, and money is not easy to come by in that profession. If he can get a few (or many) extra bucks from renting dry range land to AT&T, the more power to him. Hopefully he “We all have the right will spend the lease money at the few businesses that still survive in the economically blighted town. to complain but can’t Some residents are opposed to the building of an AT&T cell tower on do a damn thing Mr. Magera’s hill because they fear that the towers emit radiation. A quick about it.” Google search of “cell tower radiation” results in many stories about residents opposing cell towers in their neighborhoods. One newspaper in Vancouver, Canada, said, “Radiation caused by cell towers is too insignificant to cause health problems, according to Health Canada.” The Gazette in Maryland said, “According to the National Institutes of Health, some studies have found a faint link rived through connection with the rest of between exposure to electromagnetic fields the world. Now I have to spend five days a and childhood leukemia, but other studies week in Missoula in order to work. I am selfhave found no link between such exposure ish—I would rather spend those five days in and other childhood cancers.” Apparently the quiet of Hot Springs and just two days any links between cell tower radiation and in the hustle and bustle of Missoula. I think ill health have not been firmly established. more visitors will come to Hot Springs if Some town residents complained that they know they can be connected. We can they were left out of the decision loop, as to always turn the cellphone off if we do not whether to have a cell tower or not. Unfor- want the distractions of the interconnected tunately for them, there are very few build- world. Jim Beyer ing codes in Sanders County. The Hot Missoula Springs town council was not included be-

Kyle Hibler: I was in Colorado and I was four, rolling around in my diapers and playing with my G.I. Joes. Double rainbow: All of it. Its all-encompassing beauty and the history that is there.

[4] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

Righteous stance The story, almost too dreadful to believe, was first revealed in 2006 when a woman claimed that as many as 4,000 Falun Gong practitioners had been killed for their organs at the hospital where she worked. Her husband was a surgeon and disclosed to her that he removed corneas from the living bodies of 2,000 Falun Gong practitioners. (Falun Dafa is a traditional Chinese self-improvement practice of mental and physical wellness through meditation and gentle exercises. The core teaching principles are truthfulness, compassion and forbearance). In response, congressional resolution 281 was recently introduced by Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., and Congressman Robert Andrews, D-N.J. The resolution expresses concern over persistent and credible reports of systematic, state-sanctioned organ harvesting from non-consenting prisoners of conscience in China, including from large numbers of Falun Gong practitioners imprisoned for their beliefs, as well as numbers of other religious and ethnic minority groups. Because killing of religious or political prisoners for their organs is an egregious crime, I ask Montana readers to contact our congressman to urge him to co-sponsor this resolution. The resolution is an important step to help put an end to this atrocity. The resolution will also help our country’s doctors, hospitals, pharmaceutical companies and universities make informed decisions and take a righteous stance regarding illicit organ transportation, and stand up and speak for those without a voice. For more information about Falun Gong and the ongoing persecution, please visit faluninfo.net. Katherine Combes Kalispell

[Comments from MissoulaNews.com] Backtalk from “Taking a monkey wrench to climate change,” Aug. 15

One problem for another

Mark William: I was building a house for myself in the Sequoias. Safety dance: That the caldera is far away from here and any plume that might result from its eruption is downwind from us.

cause the tower will be built outside of the city limits, where it has no jurisdiction. It seems that the lease between Mr. Magera and AT&T was a legal private contract that was approved by the state of Montana. We all have the right to complain but can’t do a damn thing about it. Personally, I will use my cellphone in Hot Springs, because most of my work is de-

“Climate change is the focus of all main stream enviros and they are wholesale supporting the obliteration of hundreds of square miles of southwest habitat for solar panels. I hope they know that an-

L

other big environmental problem is replacing habitat with solar panels and killing raptors with wind turbines.” Posted Aug. 15 at 5:06 p.m.

Giving mood “That’s in part the reason why I do-

nated $10,000 to the North Woods Conservancy last year. BTW I [have lived] on a fixed income for the past 5 years but believe we need to save these precious wildlife areas rather than build houses on them.” Posted Aug. 15 at 8:20 p.m.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


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missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Tommy Martino

Wednesday, August 14 Dirk S. Adams, a 62-year-old Democrat from Wilsall, announces his campaign to replace the retiring Sen. Max Baucus. A Harvard Law grad and former professor with no previous political experience, Adams owns and operates a cattle ranch.

Thursday, August 15 The Missoula County Sheriff’s Office asks for help finding a woman with three children, a dog and a cat who went missing five days earlier en route to Gold Creek. The family is found safe near Schwartz Creek the next day.

Friday, August 16 The second day of Missoula’s first Fringe Festival features eclectic performances, including “Impossible Hermaphrodites,” featuring the Interface Project’s Jim Ambrose detailing how modern medicine has botched its dealings with people born with “ambiguous genitalia.”

Saturday, August 17 An evening storm rolls through the area, causing at least seven new fires to ignite. The West Fork Two and Schoolhouse fires outside of Lolo are among the first to be spotted.

Sunday, August 18 Chad Goodman, 23, of Missoula, dies when shot by an acquaintance who is handling Goodman’s semi-automatic gun. Law enforcement reports that the man who shot Goodman says he didn’t know the weapon was loaded.

Monday, August 19 The Missoula City Council schedules a public hearing for Sept. 9 to deliberate whether it should limit where homeless shelters and soup kitchens can set up shop. The move comes in response to the Union Gospel Mission’s planned move to West Broadway.

Tuesday, August 20 Bruce Hall dies at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle after being injured in an explosion at Rick’s Auto Body the day before. Hall was pouring lacquer thinner from a barrel when static electricity ignited the fumes. Another man was also injured but released on Monday.

Dead, from Melbourne, Australia, performed Aug. 17 at The Palace as part of Total Fest XII, a three-day punk and metal music festival.

City council

Taft tries to slow things down Missoula City Councilman Alex Taft understands that local traffic can be a heated issue. That’s why the man who made a career as a transportation planner in Washington, D.C., before moving to Missoula nine years ago expects that some locals will not like his proposal to drop speed limits from 30 miles per hour to 25 across a sizable chunk of urban Missoula, including portions of Higgins Avenue and Orange, Brooks and Russell streets. “People have strong opinions,” Taft acknowledges. In July, the first-term councilman raised some hackles when he sponsored a referral from Riverfront Neighborhood residents proposing to slim down Fifth and Sixth streets to make more room for cyclists and residential parking. While many in the Riverfront Neighborhood support the idea, which is now being studied by Missoula Development Services, some locals opined in emails to council and newspaper op-ed pieces that such changes unfairly favor cyclists over motorists.

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[6] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

Taft sees the Fifth and Sixth streets redesign as a way to improve safety for not just cyclists and pedestrians, but also drivers. Similarly, he says that lowering speed limits would curb accidents across the board. Taft’s new proposal calls for cutting speeds on Orange Street and Stephens Avenue between downtown Missoula and South Avenue; Fifth and Sixth streets from Higgins Avenue to Arthur Avenue; Brooks Street between Higgins and South; and also Higgins from Third Street to South. Council began discussing the proposal this week. While Missoula has created more bike lanes, added new bus lines and promoted sidewalk construction in recent years, Taft says that speed limits have not been adjusted to suit the evolving landscape. Missoula Chief Administrative Officer Bruce Bender served in the city’s Public Works Department for 22 years, 10 of them as director, prior to assuming his current position in 2005. He agrees that Missoula’s thoroughfares look significantly different than they did in the 1980s, when speed limits on many of the city streets that Taft is now targeting were increased from 25 mph to 30.

“We’ve encouraged pedestrian usage and connectivity,” Bender says. “And along with that, bike lanes have been added.” Though the city has long supported expanding safe transportation options for cyclists and pedestrians, Bender notes that in order for Taft’s proposal to take effect, it must be vetted by not only the public and the Missoula City Council, but also the Montana Department of Transportation, which is charged to help oversee city thoroughfares. Jessica Mayrer

Fires

Confusion amid closure Kim Satterlee stood with her family by her side, held her hands to her mouth and stared at the grayish purple cloud rising from behind the mountains. “My cats,” she said. “We didn’t get my cats.” The Satterlee home stood at the 22-mile marker on Highway 12, right between the Schoolhouse and West Fork Two fires that erupted on Monday. Satterlee’s grown


[news] children, Chad and Mandie, drove from Missoula that morning to help their parents evacuate, but when the fires began to draw together the family had just minutes to leave. “You just don’t know what to grab,” Chad Satterlee said. “There’s a house full of stuff, the officers are there yelling for you to hurry … all I could think was, what would my mom want out of here?” Chad grabbed the family photos and says he drove away just as the fire jumped the road behind him. The Satterlees huddled together Monday afternoon in the Lolo Super Stop parking lot while frightened travelers and area residents milled about. Everyone asked for updates. Fire officials answered what they could but few things were certain. The highway was closed. Anyone traveling to southern Idaho needed to turn back and drive west to Coeur d’Alene before heading south. Residents could go through checkpoints, but only so far. Inside the evacuation zone phone lines and cell service were down. At the corner of the Super Stop parking lot, Tyler Burt, 17, held a huge Quizno’s sign to the line of cars stacked along the shoulder of the road waiting to checkin with sheriff ’s deputies. His coworkers sent him outside to drum up business. Burt says he lives up Sleeman Gulch, just east of the fires. His dad, a deputy, told him their house was safe for the moment, but they wouldn’t know more until later that night. “This isn’t the first time this has happened,” Burt said. “I’m not worried—but that could change later on.” Dameon Pesanti

Clark Fork

Local beer cleans up Three rafts and one guide boat bobbed down the Clark Fork Sunday, flanked by snorkelers and hauling mounds of garbage. Passersby kept asking which church group the 20-odd boaters belonged to. Bjorn Nabozney replied they weren’t from any church. Just a couple of local breweries. A mix of staff from Big Sky Brewing and Kettlehouse Brewing—along with local fishing guide Jay Dixon— wound up pulling four boatloads of trash from the water over the course of a day-long trip from Sha-Ron to Silver Park. The whole thing came together last-minute, says Nabozney, one of Big Sky’s co-founders. Someone suggested an impromptu cleanup float via email, and most figured they’d be on the river anyway. The Clark Fork Coalition launched its annual cleanup effort in April, pulling six tons of trash from the waterway. But as with any hot Missoula summer, river users in June and July quickly undid the nonprofit’s hard work. Based on recent buzz about increased float traffic and messier-than-normal riverbanks, Nabozney

expected the grain bags both breweries had brought along to be spilling over. “We had a bunch of people snorkeling for cans and stuff on the river bottom,” he says. “I was pleasantly surprised. I really expected the worst.” Megan Riek, who works at both Big Sky and Kettlehouse, says the initial goal was to clear the “can graveyard” that had formed near Brennan’s Wave. But someone beat them to the punch, she adds, indicating other unofficial cleanup efforts have recently hit the river. Nabozney admits there was some concern that the breweries would wind up finding cans bearing their logos. “We were telling each other, ‘Okay, what’s the penance if we find one of our own?’” But in the end,

snorkelers recovered mostly Bud Light Lime-a-Rita and Coors Light, he says, along with glass bottles of Mike’s Hard Lemonade and Twisted Tea. For the past five years, Big Sky has done similar floats along the river west of town. What they typically find there, Nabozney says, are tires. “Not a couple tires. Like, a couple dozen.” But it wasn’t bottles and cans he found taking up most of the space during last weekend’s trip. “Most of the stuff we found was old industrial-type trash, big metal stuff,” he says. Nabozney says the float was enough of a success that both breweries are considering doing it again in a couple of weeks. “What you find in those situations is stuff that the alcohol industry created,” Nabozney says. “So we’re just going to go out there and help it out.” Alex Sakariassen

Agriculture

The price of PEAS Mayor John Engen and officials at Garden City Harvest say that a change in ownership will ensure the PEAS Farm’s future and its place in the community. That’s why both are pushing hard for the city to purchase the prime Rattlesnake property.

BY THE NUMBERS Rep. Steve Daines’ estimated net

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million

man at 42 this week on its top 50 list of the wealthiest lawmakers in Congress. “We’re talking about the urban ag movement, educating school kids, keeping local food available,” says Engen. “It hits on a lot of cylinders.” The PEAS Farm, which stands for Program in Ecological Agriculture and Society, resides on a 13-acre parcel owned by the Missoula County Public School District and leased to the city. An audit done by the city places the land’s current value at $1.3 million. Missoula Open Space Program Manager Jackie Corday says that figure doesn’t reflect the value of the farm itself, but rather the potential of the land it sits on. Details of the city’s efforts to purchase the PEAS Farm are not entirely clear, in part because MCPS never listed the land for sale. But Engen says if the sides agree to a deal, the city would use some of the remaining funds set aside in a $10 million Open Space Bond approved by city and county voters in 2006. The mayor estimates that there’s around $2 million remaining in the fund, but says the city would not cover the entire purchase. Garden City Harvest and private donors would make up the rest. In a similar deal in April, the city spent $200,000 from the Open Space Bond to assist in the $440,000 purchase of the 3.25-acre River Road Neighborhood Farm and Community Garden. Pat McHugh, MCPS executive director of business and operations, says the district doesn’t currently make any money off the PEAS Farm property; the city pays about $10 a year under its current lease. While MCPS officials value the educational experiences the farm affords its students, and they like the idea of selling the property, McHugh says officials are approaching the proposal cautiously. The farm’s fate will ultimately be decided by a longrange facilities plan the district is currently creating. Due out by January 2014, the plan will examine everything from student demographics to the number of districtowned lawnmowers as it determines what’s best for MCPS’s future. McHugh acknowledges the benefits of the sale for all sides—greater stability for the farm, continued access for students and extra money for MCPS to pay off bonds used to remodel aging buildings—but says there’s more to the equation. “If there’s a possibility that it needs to be replaced with a school, we need to consider that,” he says. “We’ll use the data to help make the decision.” Dameon Pesanti

ETC. August is typically known as fire season around Montana, a fact made abundantly clear when the Lolo Complex fires blew up in recent days. But it’s also bear season, and two bits of recent news could mean trouble for the species. Grizzly attacks left four people wounded in and near Yellowstone National Park last Thursday in two separate incidents. Two hikers needed medical attention after tussling with a sow near Canyon Village. Later the same afternoon, two Bureau of Land Management contract workers stumbled upon a grizzly that was presumably sleeping in a day bed. One worker required stitches for bite wounds on his thigh and buttocks, while the other suffered bite wounds on his hand while trying to use bear spray. The media jumped on the stories, with Gawker sarcastically warning of “mindless killing machines” on the loose. Other national outlets kept the news more in check while adding that grizzlies have killed four people in the Yellowstone region over the past three years. The timing of these headlines wasn’t exactly ideal considering last week’s other bit of bear news. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks announced that it will host a string of open houses later this month to gather public feedback on a comprehensive draft management plan for grizzlies in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The document essentially outlines how the state will handle responsibility for the species if and when the bears are delisted … again. One management approach outlined in the draft plan calls for limited public hunts on grizzlies—a prospect that’s been much discussed in Yellowstone and elsewhere in recent years. Regulated hunting could help remove unwary or human-habituated bears from the population, the plan reads, and reinforce human avoidance behaviors. Ultimately, such hunts could promote “the long-term survival and social tolerance of the grizzly population.” FWP’s plan further highlights that, until 1991, regulated hunts had “a long successful history in Montana.” The document steers the hunting discussion toward male grizzlies, which could “increase cub survival and recruitment,” and stresses that hunting would be “only one tool among many to provide for the long-term recovery and survival of grizzly bears.” The question of future hunting of grizzly bears as a management tool is certainly worthy of further discussion. It’s a topic that will likely dominate FWP’s upcoming open houses. But let’s hope recent headlines don’t skew the conversation.

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missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [7]


[news]

The World Affairs Council of Montana presents:

Conflict in the Middle East: An Update on Current Developments A Distinguished Speakers Program with

Ambassador Mark Johnson (ret.) Join us for a community discussion on Tuesday, August 27th at 7:00pm University Center North Ballroom, UM Campus Open to the public. Free for Council members and students; $5 for non-members Visit www.montanaworldaffairs.org for more information or call 728-3328

Beer Drinkers’ Profile THROWBACK TO THE WAYBACK

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[8] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

Neighborhood watch Council calls on community to help curb sexual violence by Jessica Mayrer

One night last year, Kelly McGuire was there are so many opportunities to inter- riculums have proven effective in reducing hanging out with a few colleagues at a bar vene. But people, I think often they don’t dating violence among teens by as much as in downtown Missoula when they spotted a have the information to be able to identify 5 percent. Of the $54,406 the Missoula City Counyoung woman who was clearly intoxicated. what’s happening, so they don’t notice the “Like, falling-over drunk,” McGuire event. If they do notice the event, they’re cil set aside to boost outreach, roughly $12,000 will go to the YWCA Missoula, ennot really sure how to intervene.” recalls. For nearly a decade, Missoula County abling the nonprofit to grow the Make Your McGuire was worried about the woman. She grew more concerned when has channeled federal dollars to help fund Move Missoula Campaign it launched last the woman’s friends left her alone at the bar. domestic and sexual violence prevention ef- summer with multiple community partners, “These two guys at a table near us start star- forts in rural areas including the Seeley including Missoula County, the city of Mising at her and nudging each other, and grin- Swan Valley and Mineral County. The city soula, Blue Mountain Clinic, the National ning and looking at her,” McGuire says. “And has not invested in such direct outreach ef- Coalition Building Institute and Planned Parenthood. The campaign features promithen one gets up and goes and starts talking forts until now. nent community members such to her and engaging her. And as Sen. Jon Tester, Gov. Steve we’re like, ‘Why does he want Bullock and Missoula Mayor to talk to her? She’s fallingJohn Engen holding signs that down drunk.’” offer their thoughts on ways to McGuire works for Miscurb relationship violence. soula’s Crime Victim Advocate The idea behind the Make Program. Her training provides Your Move Campaign is to bring her with an advanced underthe entire community together, standing of the conditions that says the YWCA’s Elizabeth Harribreed victimization. She saw the son, who will be taking over mens’ behavior as sexually opMake Your Move marketing. Harportunistic. rison recognizes that it’s easier to “Most rapists are serial preach to the choir than reach rapists,” McGuire explains. “And the actual perpetrators of viothis is predatory behavior. It is lence, and she’s up for the chalnot usually just an accident. lenge. “We’re going to have to be This is how we usually think of creative,” she says. “We’re going (sexual assault), right? ‘Oh, he to have to be edgier.” just didn’t know she wasn’t conphoto courtesy of Andy Kemmis Since launching Make Your senting.’ Or, ‘Oh, they were Move last year, the county has reboth drunk.’ The statistics show Missoula City Councilman Jon Wilkins poses for the that that is not usually the case. Make Your Move Missoula Campaign, which launched ceived requests to duplicate it from entities such as the U.S. Ninety percent of rapists are se- last summer to help end sexual violence. Navy and Marines, along with rial rapists. And they’re using McGuire, who already works with the Johns Hopkins University. these tactics and getting women incapaciMissoula City Councilman Jon Wilkins tated and isolating them and purposefully county, will fill the three-quarter-time coordinator position with the city. She’ll also has been an outspoken supporter of boostsetting up the sexual assault.” To help foster a greater understanding continue working 10 hours a week for the ing city efforts to stop relationship violence. of the conditions that breed sexual assault county, helping to oversee prevention ef- He admits that a handful of constituents have questioned him about whether governand to educate community members about forts in rural areas. In her new role with the city, McGuire ment should be involved. In response, ways to intervene in such situations, the Missoula City Council recently approved aims to hold workshops for bartenders so Wilkins says the city’s investment seems spending $54,406 to boost urban outreach they know how to intervene when they see small when considering the social and finanefforts. A primary component of those ef- behavior like she witnessed last year. cial costs of domestic and sexual violence forts is hiring McGuire as the city’s new McGuire will also coordinate with area so- tallied in hospitals, jails and among families. Healthy Relationships Coordinator. Council cial service providers and nonprofits to “I think they just don’t understand,” he says. was still discussing the exact job description more efficiently use existing resources and “Sometimes government needs to be inlast week, but intends for McGuire to draw reach out to faith-based communities and volved. … To me, in the long run, it saves money.” from a groundbreaking intervention model area high schools. McGuire agrees. She sees funding preNearly one in 10 Missoula County high that calls on bystanders to help head off sexual assault and domestic violence before it school students say that they’ve been phys- vention efforts as a moral imperative. While ically forced to have sex, according to the the intoxicated woman McGuire saw last occurs. “Historically, we’ve targeted people Montana Office of Public Instruction’s 2013 year at the bar ended up leaving safely with who are survivors of assaults, or potential Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Of the 769 friends, McGuire knows that’s not always victims, or potential perpetrators, and tried teens polled in that survey, nearly 7 percent the case. “This is a community issue,” she says. to sway them in prevention,” McGuire ex- reported that someone they dated had physplains. “And that doesn’t really work. … In ically hurt them. McGuire notes that women “It affects all of us.” two-thirds of sexual assaults, there are by- who are battered as teens are more likely to standers leading up to the event. And so, be victimized as adults, and educational curjmayrer@missoulanews.com


[news]

Road trippin’ Connecting the conservation dots in the West by Alex Sakariassen

Conservation has taken a road trip of cently released Blueprint for Balance, a docLast Thursday, representatives from a host of local organizations gathered in a sorts this month. From the offices of the Mis- ument outlining five suggestions for continconference room on the Hip Strip to dis- soula-based Clark Fork Coalition to the uing down the path toward energy cuss their individual opinions on the im- Organ Mountains of southern New Mexico, independence without sacrificing the naportance of public lands in Montana. Sarah the newly launched Equal Ground campaign tion’s wild and pristine corners. “If done responsibly, if done right, Cobler of Montana Conservation Voters is cruising the Intermountain West like a conreminisced about her childhood spent servation combine, harvesting the voices of there are places that should be used for dohunting in the backcountry. Jennifer Fer- various community groups and attempting mestic energy production,” Kincaid says. “We need it. But again, they should be done enstein of the Wilderness Society empha- to bundle them into a unified message. responsibly and done in a way sized the importance of that minimizes impact.” holding certain industries acThe point contrasts countable for how they impact sharply with news from the oil the environment and making and gas industry itself in resure there are “clear sidecent years. Groups like the boards on development when Western Energy Alliance have it does occur.” been maligning constant The goal of the meeting, at drops in federal acreage ofleast for Center for Western Prifered for lease since Obama orities Executive Director took office. In Colorado alone, Trevor Kincaid, was to investiwhere Equal Ground made gate what public lands mean to several stops this week, leases Montanans and how those senissued for drilling on federal timents can be used to strike a lands were down nearly 70 better balance between conserpercent last year over 2008. vation and energy developphoto by Cathrine L. Walters Still, the White House has ment. Kincaid likened it to handing each group “a mega- Trevor Kincaid, left, and others with the Equal Ground trumpeted steady drops in the phone,” and the answers he campaign prepare to hit the road in an RV to gather stories country’s dependence on forfrom groups throughout the Intermountain West. Their eign oil. National crude oil heard varied. hope is to find balance between oil and gas development production has reached its “We know that we need and conservation of public lands. highest levels since the late good wildlife habitat,” said “It’s an idea that a lot of people can get 1980s. And the Bakken formation in North Blake Henning of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, who added that many of his behind, because it’s an idea that we used to Dakota and eastern Montana has acorganization’s members are employed in do automatically: Responsibly balancing counted for considerable growth, with prothe oil and gas industry. “We can’t have conservation with energy development,” duction there increasing an additional 1.4 roads and drill pads and things like that says Kincaid, one of the conservationists percent just this June. Meanwhile, legislaeverywhere. We’ve fostered good relation- now riding inside the Equal Ground RV. “We tion aimed at protecting other pockets of ships with the oil and gas industry. Some did it for 30 years. We’ve gotten away from federal land—such as the North Fork Waof those companies have been very good it, and this campaign simply asks that we get tershed Protection Act and the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act, both sponsupporters, very good donors to our pro- back to what succeeded before.” Former Interior Secretary Bruce Bab- sored by Sen. Max Baucus—has failed to grams over the years.” By Friday afternoon, Kincaid sat in front bitt coined the phrase “equal ground” this gain much traction in Congress. “The conservation movement is a fabof a completely different group in Bozeman. spring when he called for President Barack He posed the same question, about what Obama to put conservation on even foot- ric that’s composed of many local efforts,” public lands and conservation meant, to ing with the rampant oil and gas develop- Kincaid says. “When you put all those tolocal business people representing every- ment that’s swept Western states in recent gether, those matchsticks, it makes a very thing from marketing firms to fishing-gear years. Babbitt’s speech inspired five con- bright light. Washington, for whatever reagiant Simms. Brickhouse Creative founder servation organizations—CWP, along with son, hasn’t been able to see that. But hopeDavid Thompson answered with a story the Wilderness Society, the Conservation fully they will.” According to polling conducted by about an employee he’d recently hired who Lands Foundation, the Western Energy desired the quality of life offered by Mon- Project and the Center for American Bozeman-based Headwaters Economics, tana’s wild spaces over the hustle and bustle Progress—to unite under one banner. The Montana enjoyed higher growth in employEqual Ground campaign has since chas- ment, population and personal income than of southern California. “The thread is that everyone is drawn tised Congress and the Obama administra- non-Western states between 2000 and 2011. to Montana’s wilderness,” Kincaid says. tion for setting aside the least amount of Kincaid, and those he’s spoken to so far on “Everyone’s inspired by it. Many, many peo- protected land since the Reagan era, less the Equal Ground tour, attribute that growth directly to the state’s wealth of preple who live here or moved here either than 2.6 million acres since 2008. Compare that to nearly 6 million acres served public land. The tour itself, he says, came here for the quality of life and wilderness or have stayed here because of the of federal land leased for oil and gas devel- is primarily about “gathering the stories that quality of life and wilderness. People have opment, Kincaid says, and the scales are prove those numbers true.” different reasons for embracing it, and dif- more uneven than ever before. That’s the driving message behind the campaign’s referent uses for it.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

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missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Rethinking redskins Time has come for demeaning mascot to disappear by Sue Muncaster

“Stupid political correctness is killing us!” was one longtime local’s response after the school superintendent of Teton County, Idaho, sacked the “Redskins” as the school’s mascot. As a fifth-generation resident and Teton High graduate himself, Superintendent Monte Woolstenhulme said he figured that the move would distress some people. Yet nothing could have prepared him for the community’s fervid response. As the head volleyball coach at Teton High School, I’ve always been bothered that I teach at one of the last remaining schools in the country to use Native American mascots. Over 40 years ago, in 1972, Stanford University, where I was a student, switched from the Indians to the Cardinals. Lois Amsterdam, Stanford’s ombudsperson, noted that the Indians name was never meant to “defile a racial group. Rather, it was a reflection of our society’s retarded understanding, dulled perception and clouded vision.” The public outcry here to the Redskin announcement was loudest on social media, and a petition signed by 410 people within 24 hours circulated to recall the decision. To put that in perspective, just 364 people total voted in last May’s school board election. Even after leaders of the local Shoshone-Bannock Tribe supported discarding the Redskin moniker, over 200 people, dressed in Redskin memorabilia, showed up at a school board meeting to demand its retention. There was some concern about the costs to taxpayers, despite assurances that changes would only happen within existing equipment budgets over the next six years. But most people were outraged by the insinuation that the name had ever been used offensively. “It’s our constitutional right to say whatever we want,” people argued, “and if some-

[10] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

one is offended, then that’s their problem.” At the conclusion of that emotional school board meeting, Woolstenhulme recommended tabling a decision on the mascot name until further notice. The Redskin debate has been one of the hottest in the simmering slew of issues in recent years. It’s what happens when one of the most conservative communities in the West gets discovered by outdoor enthusiasts and retirees, some of them liberal thinkers from different parts of the coun-

“I have the utmost reverence for the past and its cherished symbols, but it’s time to move forward.” try. Some may say that Teton Valley, close to Jackson, Wyo., is like any community with growing pains, but it’s not everywhere that both Glenn Beck and Widespread Panic have performed a few miles apart on the Fourth of July. These are some of the words used in letters to the editor, on social media and at backyard barbecues in recent weeks, to characterize everything from the Redskins debate to our new comprehensive land-use plan: “tyranny,” “hippie biker,” “move-in,” “ignorant,” “arrogant,” “redneck,” “bully,” “intel-

lectually dishonest,” “polarizing,” “corrupt,” “selfish,” “tea bagger,” “unqualified crony,” “fearful,” “right-wing conspiracy,” “Agenda 21,” “village idiot” and (this is harsh) “pretty little potty mouth.” To be fair, most of us here live together in relative harmony. But just when I think it’s not that bad, a truck pulls up next to me while I’m dropping off my 11-year-old daughter at her 4H archery club, and a small freckled boy hops out of a side door, whose window has a bumper sticker that says, “Gorpers Suck.” For those not in the know, a gorper refers to an environmentalist or perhaps a hiker or biker. When does someone’s freedom of speech infringe on another person’s wellbeing? When is it just plain mean and mindless to insult people you don’t know? I just returned from a five-day team camp in Utah with 21 extraordinary, diverse volleyball players who bonded like cement on the court. We want to be champions, but to do it we know we must overlook our personal differences. It’s up to us to develop our strengths and conquer our weaknesses. I have the utmost reverence for the past and its cherished symbols, but it’s time to move forward. Who we are is so much more than what we were; I can only imagine what we might become. I believe Woolstenhulme’s decision was a good-faith attempt to accept and understand another culture and set rules for effective and non-threatening communications. Now it’s up to “us” and “them” and everyone between to decide whether united we’ll stand, or divided we’ll fall. Sue Muncaster is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She is a freelance writer, coach, food activist and adventurous mom.


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missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Sheriff’s deputies hunting robbery suspect Matthew Oliver in Pasco County, Fla., posted his wanted picture on their Facebook page, naming him their “Fugitive of the Day.” Oliver replied, posting daylong comments, along with his photo and personal details, including his address. Insisting he was set up by a “crack head,” Oliver elicited such comments as, “Ur runnin from the popo & post on your picture? Lol.” Deputies arrested Oliver as he was leaving his apartment. (Tampa Bay’s WTSP-TV) Police named West Virginia University football player Korey Harris their armed robbery suspect after the victims recognized Harris, who was wearing WVU-issued football sweatpants with his uniform number, 96. Harris was arrested and dropped from the team. (Charleston’s Metro News)

SNOOP PROOF - Russia’s Federal Protective Service offered to pay $15,000 for 20 typewriters. The agency, a KGB successor assigned to protect President Vladimir Putin and other top officials, explained that it began using typewriters after Edward Snowden’s disclosures about U.S. National Security Agency secret surveillance to print drafts of official documents intended for Putin. (Associated Press)

THANKS FOR NOTHING - To point out to voters how much Canada’s Conservatives are doing to improve life for disabled citizens, the party mass mailed a flyer headlined “Supporting Jobs for All Canadians.” It repeated those words in a series of Braille dots. Only instead of being raised, the dots were printed on the flyer’s flat surface, making them unreadable to blind people. Jim Tokos of the Canadian Council of the Blind called the flyers “baffling.” (Toronto Star) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - Police reported that a man’s ex-girlfriend dropped by his home in San Antonio, Texas, while he was with his current girlfriend. During the ensuing argument, the man aimed a gun at the ex-girlfriend but accidentally shot the current girlfriend in the chest. She was hospitalized in critical condition; the ex-girlfriend wasn’t injured. (San Antonio’s KSAT-TV) Charged with killing a 5-year-old girl with an assault rifle, Jon Andrew Meyer Jr. explained that the rapid-fire weapon fired accidentally while he was using it as a crutch to help him stand up from a couch while visiting a friend in Grants Pass, Ore. The fully automatic weapon fired out of control; one burst blasted through the ceiling, killing the girl and wounding an adult with her. (Grants Pass Daily Courier) When neighbors confronted Rhonney Jacobs, 43, for speeding through a community in Norfolk, Va., he left but returned brandishing a gun. Police official Chris Amos said Jacobs then accidentally shot himself in the leg. (Norfolk’s WAVY-TV)

FIRST IS WORST -First-class airline passengers are nine times more damaging to the environment than coach passengers, according to a study by the World Bank. The report noted that first-class seats are bigger than other ones, meaning planes can hold fewer people, thereby requiring more fuel per passenger to fly and increasing carbon emissions. First-class passengers are also likelier to have more luggage per person, requiring even more fuel. The report calculated that average coach passengers have a 0.76 carbon footprint, business-class passengers 2.30 and first-class passengers 6.89. (Britain’s Daily Mail) CURSIVE’S LAST GASP - Two German entrepreneurs invented an ink pen that recognizes misspelled words and bad handwriting. Its name is Lernstift, German for “learning pen,” according to Daniel Kaesmacher, co-founder of the company that spent 18 months developing the digital pen. It’s a regular pen with real ink, but also contains a tiny motion sensor and a battery-powered Linux computer with a WiFi chip. “The pen will have two functions,” Kaesmacher said, “calligraphy and orthography mode.” In the spelling mode, the computer compares words it writes to its language database; when it doesn’t recognize a word, it vibrates. If it senses bad letter formation or messy handwriting, it also vibrates. The company intends testing the digital pen with a whole school class before selling it, for 130 to 150 euros ($170-$200). The device will work with smart phones and tablets eventually, but its “basic functionality is all in the pen,” Kaesmacher said, pointing out “there’s no app needed” or special paper. (ABC News) HORSELESS-CARRIAGE FOLLIES - An automobile killed a woman and injured three other people when it overturned outside Zion National Park in Utah. The vehicle was a 1915 Ford Model T. “There’s no rollover protection,” said Russ Forstnow, chairman of an international Model T club’s annual outing in which the soft-top vehicle was taking part. Troopers said it went off the pavement, causing the wheel’s wooden spokes to separate, then flipped, ejecting all four occupants. (Associated Press)

YOU BE THE JUDGE - Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Karen Nudell ordered Arman Samsonian to stand trial for manslaughter in the deaths of two women who tried to rescue him after he crashed his sport utility vehicle into a utility pole and a fire hydrant. Irma Zamora and Stacey Schreiber were killed when they stepped into a pool of water that had been electrified by 4,800 volts from the fallen power line. Nudell said Samsonian, 20, “was definitely driving negligently,” but defense attorney Andrew Flier argued that his client couldn’t have foreseen the “intervening acts” once he crashed and that the victims should have known the dangers created by downed power lines and standing water. (Los Angeles Times) Tennessee Child Support Magistrate Lu Ann Ballew was listening to the parents of a 7-month-old baby who couldn’t agree on the child’s last name, but when she heard that the boy’s first name was Messiah, she promptly ordered it changed to Martin. “The word Messiah is a title and it’s a title that has only been earned by one person and that one person is Jesus Christ,” Ballew said, explaining that her decision is best for the child, especially while growing up in a predominantly Christian community. Meanwhile, according to the Social Security Administration, Messiah ranked fourth among the fastest-rising baby names in 2012. (Associated Press)

BEATEN TO THE PUNCH - Tony Gesin, 50, called police in Fairbanks, Alaska, to report that his neighbor had assaulted him. He repeated his story to troopers who responded but then admitted punching himself in the face because he wanted his neighbor arrested. Department of Public Safety official Megan Peters said Gesin and his neighbor are engaged in a civil dispute about property. (Fairbanks News-Miner) DO THE MATH - Several students at Virginia’s George Mason University signed a petition urging the legalization of fourth-trimester abortions “so that women have a choice,” according to Dan Joseph of the conservative Media Research Center, who circulated the petition. (CampusReform.org)

[12] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013


missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [13]


photo courtesy Jeff Henry, National Park Service

T

On June 23, lightning again ignited the forest, Lightning touched down in the Custer National wenty-five years have passed since summer 1988, when wildfire swept through Forest on June 14, just outside the northeast corner this time starting the Shoshone Fire in the southern 36 percent of Yellowstone National of Yellowstone. That strike sparked one of the first portion of the park. Shoshone was joined a week Park’s 2.2 million acres, and Missoula wildfires of the summer, the Storm Creek Fire. Low later by the Red Fire, and a week after that by the local Mike Bader still dreams of fighting snowpack and poor rains in May had left the forest Mist Fire just inside Yellowstone’s eastern border. the blaze. The visions come to him less often now, but they’re always the same: an open field, a crew of firefighters and a towering curtain of flame. The tempo of his voice speeds up in the telling, and his face—once bearded, now covered in graying stubble—wrinkles into an excited smile. It’s as if he’d love nothing more than to be there again, to revisit a time when he was part of a 25,000-person effort to contain the biggest fire season in the Northern Rockies since the Great Burn of 1910. “I was real lucky, I felt, to be there, to be a witness,” Bader says, flipping through one of the many firefighting journals he’s held onto for all these years. “It was like seeing a tornado, or any of nature’s great acts.” Bader was working his fifth summer in Yellowstone as a ranger with the National Park Service, colphoto courtesy Jim Peaco, NPS laborating with grizzly research biologists and managing various resources in the Norris area. He Military fire crews walk to buses near Yellowstone’s northeast entrance on Sept. 4, 1988. knew the district intimately, from the direction of the winds to the concentration and condition of the fuels carpeting the forest floor. He felt a loyalty to Norris the equivalent of a tinder box. Storm Creek sent Forecasts held no hope of rain. On July 11, lighting and a pride in its beauty that kept his enthusiasm billows of smoke into the air, but few hailed it as a started two more fires, one to the east and one just outside the park’s southern border. harbinger of worse things to come. high as the usual host of tourists rolled in.

[14] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

Then, on July 14, three park employees were caught in a firestorm as a 300-acre blaze called the Clover Fire made a surprise 4,000-acre run in just a few hours. The trio deployed two emergency fire shelters, narrowly escaping danger. Park officials issued their first fire maps the following day, marking a transition from letting the fires burn in the backcountry to actively suppressing them. The 1988 firefighting season in Yellowstone had begun. As strong winds fanned the flames of eight established fires, Bader found himself pulled from his district. He spent weeks bouncing from one assignment to the next, working as a radio dispatcher at Mammoth, conducting aerial recon of the Continental Fire, defending the historic Trail Creek Cabin as a crew boss on the Mink Creek Fire. His experience with wildfires in northern California the previous summer—when he and roughly 105 other Yellowstone employees were temporarily loaned out—made him a valued asset in coordinating with overhead crews. But his desire to return to Norris never waned. Between lengthy days of firefighting, he filled his free time monitoring grizzly populations and continuing other projects on behalf of his home district. Bader’s first sense of how big the fires would get came when he was attached to an engine crew defending Grant Village, a development constructed on the western shore of Yellowstone Lake in the 1970s. When Bader arrived on July 23, there were nearly 100 fire engines stacked up along the


roads. There was talk of using bulldozers to create fire breaks. The entire scene was chaos. “That was the first clue that, hey, now we’ve got our hands full,” Bader says. “These aren’t just burning in the backcountry.”

The specter of normalcy

Donald Hodel, then-U.S. Secretary of the Interior, tried to calm the growing national outrage by appearing at the Old Faithful Inn July 27 to declare his support for the park’s “let it burn” policy. Yellowstone Superintendent Robert Barbee—nicknamed “Barbee-que” by the media and one West Yellowstone motel manager—repeatedly defended the initial decision not to fight the flames that summer, telling the Associated Press that “when push comes to shove, nature wins in the national parks.” Bader and other park employees felt a sense of mounting frustration. Anyone familiar with the

dual message,” says Jeff Henry, a seasonal ranger of 11 years who had been reassigned to take photos of the Yellowstone fires for the park’s archives. “They were saying officially that the fires were a good thing, cleaning out old growth in the forest and making room for new life. On the other hand, they were saying they were doing all that they could do to stop these beneficial phenomena. It confused the public, it confused the media and it probably confused the politicians too.” On Aug. 2, the Fan Fire in the northwest corner of Yellowstone threatened to burn across the

was never off it, because you could see the big clouds of smoke from Bozeman,” he says. “I just had an attraction to it. I wanted to be in it. I didn’t want to be away. I didn’t want to miss anything.” In mid-August, Bader finally landed back in his old district at Norris. Just in time for Black Saturday.

In the days leading up to the Shoshone Fire’s July 23 run at Grant Village, 4,000 people were Everything that could burn evacuated from the area. Trees were cut down Bader woke up around 5 a.m. on Aug. 20, around each structure. Buildings were soaked threw on his Nomex and wolfed down a quick with water or flame-retardant foam. Fire burned breakfast. Mornings often meant briefings with toward nearby campgrounds, and the first Unified crew bosses to discuss tactics for the day, and Area Command of the summer—a two-person Bader had a feeling he knew what his priteam made up of experts from the National Park ority for the day would be: Defend the hisService and the U.S. Forest Service—was estabtoric Norris Museum, a stone-and-log lished to oversee command of firefighting efforts. building with a domed, angular roof that Shoshone wound up bypassing Grant Village has inspired park service architecture since and turning north on July 26. But for Bader, the its construction in 1929. The North Fork seriousness of the weeks and months to come Fire had remained fairly active the night besank in. He requested to be sent back to his old fore, and spot fires were already forming in district, the area he knew best. nearby meadows. But before the defense of “It didn’t work,” Bader says. “I got sent off on the Norris Museum could begin, Bader and another fire somewhere else.” others had to evacuate the Norris campBader was sent on missions throughout the ground—a task they’d done the previous park in the first weeks of August. On Dunraven day only to have park officials order them Pass, he found himself relaying reports from spotto reopen the site. ters on the Clover-Mist Fire. He watched new fires “I was a little nervous,” Bader says. “It start, only to see them swallowed up by bigger was like, ‘Man, this is stupid. Why are these - Mike Bader fires before they could even be named. Near people out here? We told headquarters this Tower Village, he witnessed a ground fire sweep fire is going to hit this village flat-on, and across five miles of sagebrush in the middle of the situation knew that Yellowstone officials had held park boundary and onto private land owned by they made us re-open it.’ Then we had to evacuate day. The smoke turned the sky pitch black. He saw off fighting the fires to let nature run its course. the Church Universal and Triumphant. The flames, it under fire, which is the worst thing you can do.” whole mountainsides burn, saw towering crown Critics didn’t understand the role fire was meant fought by some 1,500 firefighters, never made it Bader remembers flocks of people running to to play in the forest’s ecology, Bader says, and no that far. fires 300 feet high. their vehicles as flames grew all around. Bader continued to travel the park, bouncing “A couple of days out fighting fires seems one could have foreseen how quickly the flames Jeff Henry, who was living near Madison Junclike weeks,” he says. “But then after weeks, it would spread. “It was like a category five hurri- from new crew to new crew. His only escape came tion that summer, arrived at the Norris complex seems like years.” around 9 a.m., camera in Despite the evacuation hand. He figured the “hot of Grant Village, much action” for the day would of Yellowstone remained happen at the head of the open to tourists. Select North Fork Fire, an inroads were shut down as stinct informed by his exfire burned over and past perience from previous them. Visitors were cauwork near Yellowstone tioned to avoid certain fires in 1979 and 1981. areas. The smoke grew so Burning conditions in ’88 thick at times that park staff were, by Henry’s account, posted road signs asking “off the charts.” Firefightpeople to use their headers were already removlights during the day. ing trees from around the For the most part, howmuseum, and the wind ever, the country’s first nawas starting to pick up. As tional park continued to crews busied themselves draw outsiders by the clearing fuel in advance thousands. Those working of the fire, Bader recalls in the park that summer one woman turning to felt Yellowstone’s adminishim and saying, “I didn’t tration was trying hard to join the National Park maintain a sense of Service so I could cut down normalcy. trees.” The approaching Tourists were graduflames were double, someally joined by flocks of retimes triple the height of porters from various news the lodgepoles. outlets as the fires grew in Geyser basins are typphoto courtesy Jeff Henry, NPS size. Satellite trucks lined ically devoid of fuel, and parking lots. Cable televi- Fire threatened to destroy buildings near the Old Faithful Inn on Sept. 7, 1988. Crews fought desperately and saved the inn, there was little in Norris sion crews hauled equip- but several other buildings were lost. beyond upturned stumps, ment from fire line to fire clusters of lodgepole and line, decked out in yellow the odd bush. But Henry fire-resistant Nomex shirts. The perception spread cane. You might see a category one coming, but during a single night in Bozeman, when he got felt like the very air itself was on fire. Flames 200 drunk and went to see the movie Full Metal feet or higher danced at the tree line less than a by the media seemed to be one of impending ruin, then boom, it goes up to a category five.” “Part of the controversy in my mind, too, was Jacket—not the best choice when you’re stressed football field away. The fires were so hot that of failed policy and a grave delay in response from that the park service was trying to send out a out from fighting fires, he admits. “But my mind burning pines toppled, or blew down before they the park service.

“A couple of days out

fighting fires seems like weeks. But then after weeks, it seems like years.”

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [15]


even ignited. Sparks and embers flew through the thickening smoke, driven by winds that, as the day progressed, reached as high as 60 miles per hour. “The air was so full of sparks and embers that anything that was burnable out there in the geyser basin was torched,” Henry says. For Bader, the fumes were the worst. The sky would completely black out, and he’d find himself in the middle of a cloud of toxic carbon. Bader always wore a bandana around his neck, which he would pull over his face to keep out the larger chunks of ash. Bader’s crew had an engine parked next to the museum, and firefighters on the roof were continuously soaking the structure with hoses. Bader says it was like being in a movie, and at one point the engine boss shouted through the smog, “Here it comes.” In the midst of a firestorm, Bader noted with photo by Cathrine L. Walters a mixture of awe and dismay, “everything that could burn was on fire.” “Imagine a bunch of logs scattered Missoula retiree and World War II veteran Ron Scharfe was 61 when he traveled to Yellowstone to fight fires in around a parking lot and they’re all on fire,” 1988. He wound up joining the “hottest hot shot crew” in the park, the Wyoming Hot Shots. Bader says. “It was kind of bizarre.” Henry shot several photos of Bader durScharfe watched as crews positioned themselves in Cook ’er from the inside out ing the siege, despite Bader’s protests. Henry told him he’d Twelve miles away at Canyon Village, Missoula retiree front of the lodge, darting out to douse embers as they fell probably want a memento when the summer was finally Ron Scharfe was well into his first few weeks fighting the to the ground. The inferno was bearing down on them fast, over. fires. His wife had answered a phone call at their Grant Scharfe recalls, and the explosions from the burning lodgeBader’s not sure when he got any sleep that night. He Creek home in late July inquiring whether their son Pat, a poles “was like a bunch of freight trains coming together.” probably took “a two-hour nap” at some point, he says be- wildland firefighter, was available for duty in Yellowstone. The lodge was wrapped and covered in foam, but Scharfe fore consulting another keepsake—his old fire notebooks, Pat had taken off for a vacation in Oregon, and Scharfe of- noted that the building’s massive two-story windows still which chronicle his crew’s nearly 45-hour fight to save the fered to take his place. At age 61, Scharfe had performed left it vulnerable to fire. Norris Museum. Wildfire tends to lay down at night, calmed the arduous step test at the Missoula Smokejumper Center “I saw that darn window there, and I thought, ‘Well, by humidity and a drop in temperature. The North Fork was and qualified for his red card. When the woman filing the that sucker’s going to blast right through those windows no different as Bader stayed awake through the end of what, paperwork asked for his age, he says, “I asked her, ‘Would and cook ’er from the inside out,” Scharfe says. “So I told in the coming days, would be dubbed “Black Saturday.” the fire boss there, I said, ‘You have to set up a water curtain you believe 51?’” Even today, Scharfe exudes the energy out in front there.’ He just looked at me.” Scharfe proceeded to explain the theory. By training of a much younger man. He does have a bad hip, he says, but that’ll happen when you two hoses out and in front of the building, the crews could spend 22 years putting out fires and saving create mist that would envelope their position and cool the lives with the Chicago Fire Department. His air. The fire, he said, would blow right past them. “The fire boss looks at me for a second, then he says, living room is a shrine not only to those old‘Go make it happen.’” timey days of firefighting—“we rode on the Scharfe dashed over to the crew and began barking out back of the truck, not in the cab,” he says— directions. Firefighters redirected their hoses, and the water but to his experiences in World War II. curtain quickly surrounded them in mist. The blaze swept Scharfe fudged his age back then too, and at 16 landed on Iwo Jima under intense past without harming the building. “It worked real neat,” Scharfe says. “So the fire boss gunfire, watching men die all around him. The Yellowstone fires are relegated to a asks me, ‘Rondo, what can I do for you?’ I told him to put crowded shelf on a bookcase by the me on the hottest hot shot crew in the park.” Within days, Scharfe says he was “busting my hump” door, where newspaper clippings and a with the Wyoming Hot Shots. His age attracted attention, copy of “The Hot Shot’s Prayer” are tucked not only from the young men and women on other crews into the pages of a photo-heavy 20-year but also from the media. ABC News’ “20/20” did a segment fire retrospective. The flare-ups of Black Saturday saw on Scharfe shortly after Black Saturday, focusing on his staScharfe defending structures in Canyon Vil- tus among much younger firefighters. photo courtesy Jim Peaco, NPS More than 152,900 acres burned throughout Yellowlage, namely the large peak-roofed Canyon Lodge. It was his first time fighting wildfires, stone that Aug. 20, nearly doubling the collective size of the At some point during the fires of 1988, an individual spray-painted this sign near Cooke City. an experience he felt was “easier” than the park’s fires that summer. Grant Village was evacuated a secstructure fires he’d faced with the Chicago ond time, and crews on the Clover-Mist Fire fought to hold Fire Department. “Structure fires are tougher back the flames from a safety zone, their emergency fire “I looked out around the junction, and it’s surrounded fires than forest fires, I think,” Scharfe says. “We’d go into shelters at the ready. Rich Jehle, an interpretive ranger staby forested mountains and big hills,” Bader says. “In every factories, we’d go into buildings, you wouldn’t know where tioned in West Yellowstone, later recorded his Black Saturdirection, a 360-degree arch, it just looked like there were the hell you were at. But out here, you can see where you’re day memories for the National Park Service as well. thousands of little campfires. It was really beautiful.” According to Jehle’s story, it was his one day off in weeks, at.”

[16] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013


largely on his contribution to the defense of Norris and Canyon. “His services and experience in wildland fire management made the difference in our ability to conduct an organized evacuation of the sub-district and not lose one building in both areas,” McCutcheon wrote. Harrowing stories began to circulate from other fires in the park in late August. Firefighters were warned that, at the smokiest times, simply breathing was the equivalent of smoking four Four packs a day As news of Black Saturday spread, pressure to con- packs of cigarettes a day. Bader contain the fires ramped up exponentially. That’s when the fesses that “my left lung hasn’t been finger-pointing and the name-calling really began, Bader the same since.” says. “People demanded that heads roll.” It seemed to “There were things that happened Bader that people didn’t have proper respect for the that I heard over the radio, like fire crews park’s main mission to defend historic structures. The getting trapped down in the woods, reother stuff was tried, he says, and didn’t work. ally worried, scared they weren’t going “Black Saturday just kind of blew the lid off every- to get out,” Bader says. “People were thing,” he says. “After that, it was President Reagan on the yelling at them to keep calm, to get tophone, governors and senators on fact-finding tours. The gether, think it through, get out. It just inquisition was underway before the fires were even out. put a whole new spin on everything that That was a pretty tough way to go about your business.” was going on down there.” From any vantage point, full containment was imposOn Sept. 7, the fires finally sible. The park had 9,000 firefighters working simultane- reached the Old Faithful Inn, one of ously at one point, and still Bader felt there was no Yellowstone’s most fabled buildings. It stopping the flames. You could flank the fire, he says. You was another dry, windy day, and Henry couldn’t stay ahead of it. Strong winds and the heat gen- had an inkling that something big was erated by the fires propelled burning pinecones and other about to go down. He drove the 18 fuel for miles ahead of the fire line. Most of those working miles from his home near Madison the fires knew that only an act of nature—rain or snow— Junction to Old Faithful and found a could finally turn the tide. As officials struggled to meet perch on the inn’s roof. Flames domithe demands of politicians and the public, crews on the nated the horizon, some as tall as 400 ground were asking themselves one question: Where feet, Henry says. Huge balls of gasified photo by Cathrine L. Walters would the fires go next? fuel were shooting out ahead of the Bader ended up defending a cluster of government fire line, creating explosions as big as buildings near Norris Junction, right on the banks of the basketball arenas. Trees were igniting Mike Bader was working his fifth summer as a ranger in Yellowstone’s Norris Geyser Basin when fires erupted in 1988. Today, he still has numerous mementos and looks back on the experience as Gibbons River. The cabins were staff housing—his own in- well before the fire ever reached them. a time when he felt “part of something.” cluded—and everyone struggled to gather their belong- The crowns of the flames would roll ings and park their vehicles in relative safety. Bader forward on the wind, Henry says, only “When I looked down the other side of the building instructed the crews to set up pumps by the river and to be sucked back into the ground draft of the fire. The toward Old Faithful Geyser, there were quite a few tourists stretch hoses around the entire perimeter of the complex. effect was like gigantic ocean breakers. down there snapping pictures of the geyser with their InThey even burned a nearby field in advance of the North The park service had shut down the inn, but the road stamatics, oblivious to what was approaching,” Henry Fork’s growth. “But then the fire moved east and got into and viewing platforms were still open to visitors. says. “Then the firestorm hit. I think the people who were the blowdown and headed at Old Faithful that day are some of the few straight for Canyon Junction,” he people in the world who have seen such a says. firestorm up close and lived to tell about it.” Canyon Village was another Crews had managed to fix a faulty sprinkler developed area west of Norris, system on the inn’s exterior that very morning, and tourists were everywhere as and water was running off the eaves. That didn’t the North Fork blaze bore down. stop the roof from catching. Henry watched as Bader, newly assigned as a princiseveral hotel employees put out a start with a ple fire monitor and resource adfire extinguisher. As hard as the crews were fightvisor to the Class I Overhead ing, however, Henry was convinced that the Team, warned the fire boss there complex was going to be enveloped and “a lot of the chaotic evacuation of the of people were going to die.” Henry looked Norris campground. In advance around the area, trying to figure out his course of the North Fork’s spread, of action if the flames came too close. roughly 360 visitors were evacu“My plan at Old Faithful, specifically, was ated from the Canyon Village to go out into the geyser basins, which are area. Mark McCutcheon, the subbroad, barren plains of silica,” Henry says. district ranger for Canyon at the “There’s a river that flows through the center photo courtesy Jeff Henry, NPS time, would later compose an of the geyser basins—the Firehole River—and end-of-season appraisal of Jeff Henry snapped this photo of Mike Bader on Aug. 21, 1988—almost a full I had visions of going out and literally getting Bader’s performance based day into Bader’s fight to save the historic Norris Museum. in the river.” and he’d risen early to go fly fishing near Mammoth. On the drive back, roads through Norris and Grant Village were closed. “I finally arrived home at midnight—where my boss sent me right back out to patrol the West entrance road,” Jehle wrote. “That night, the hillside south of the road was glowing with a million embers for as far as I could see up or down the river.” Two days later, with Yellowstone’s firefighter reserves depleted and its employees exhausted from continuous 12- to 16-hour days, a U.S. Army battalion arrived to help relieve civilian personnel.

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [17]


Henry still lives just The inn was saved, outside the park, and frebut a number of other quents many of the sites buildings in the complex photo courtesy Jeff Henry, NPS he photographed during burned down. On the the summer fires. The fornorthern edge of the Lodgepole pine saplings sprout near Gibbon River in August 1998, 10 years after the Yellowstone fires. est is coming back, he says. park, officials declared martial law in Cooke City. Montana Gov. Ted of the burn was 793,880 acres. An estimated 300 an- stone was ruined, park officials recorded 2.6 million Even five years after the blaze, lodgepole saplings had sprouted in thick fields across much of the old burn. Schwinden chose Sept. 7 to announce a statewide ban imals perished, including nine bison and two visitors—the highest visitation rate for the 1980s. The political fallout was intense. Agencies began Twenty-five years later, most are more than six feet tall, moose. The price tag for firefighting efforts broke on all nonessential outdoor recreation. Not every post-Black Saturday story was quite nationwide records at $120 million. Despite several reexamining their fire policies, spurred by a fact-find- he says. Newcomers to certain areas of the park might so fraught. Scharfe laughs when he remembers an close calls, only two people died—one pilot and one ing mission launched by President Ronald Reagan in not even recognize that the forest burned that recently. Yellowstone while the fires were still burning. Bader Nature took its course in ’88, he says, and Yellowstone assignment he had driving supplies to the Firehole firefighter from the Bureau of Land Management. says that was part of the “post-fire hangover,” and the is now growing anew. Tracking the regeneration of the Public perception held that the park was irrevarea. Most of the roads were closed, and he found constant arguments that broke out during and after forest inspired Henry to put together a book, The Year ocably damaged, and that no one would want to himself on a dirt track surrounded on all sides the summer of ’88 “dampened my enthusiasm for Yellowstone Burned, which is due out next spring. visit again. But even as early as September 1988, by fire. “The flames are, like, right out the window,” grass was peeking through the ash near the Norris going back.” Despite McCutcheon’s glowing appraisal Henry says he wouldn’t have missed shooting the fires and recommendation that “for all the tea in China.” Scharfe says. “It’s just a little dirt road, and it is Museum. The resin Bader be promoted to a packed inside lodgepole “It makes me wish I could live a lot longer than cranking, man. Really, really rolling. And I see this position as a resource I’m going to live,” he adds, “because I’d love to conpinecones had melted copper coming with his lights toward me. He pulls management supervisor, tinue to watch the progression.” right in front of me, stops and says, ‘Get the hell under extreme heat, as Bader didn’t return to Yelnature intended, releasScharfe has returned several times, too, though out of here! You can’t get through there. I’m just lowstone the following he says he steers clear of discussions on the fire ing the seeds and allowlucky I got through.’ So I turned that thing around. summer. Instead, he took policy controversy. The Yellowstone fires tend to ocI was thinking the paint was blistering on the ing them to spread a job as executive director cupy less of prominent space in his mind. Given his across the forest floor. At truck.” for the newly founded Al- military service and years with the Chicago Fire DeBy Sept. 10, residents and employees in Mam- the time, Bader says, liance for the Wild Rock- partment, he says he’d already lived a pretty full life some wondered if the moth were evacuated. The next day, it snowed nearly ies. Bader turned his by age 61. fires had simply been three inches throughout the park. Bader remembers experience on the Yellowtoo much all at once. “It’s a young man’s game, for sure,” he says of throwing a huge party in one of the maintenance stone fires into a call for fighting wildfires. “But you’d bust your hump with the “I went on a backshacks at Norris, complete with a banner that said widespread governmental Pulaskis, stretch a lot of line, do a lot of back burns. “Snow.” Park officials began demobilizing fire camps country patrol to cut change. Specifically, he’s It was a good experience.” trees off the trail, take inon Sept. 12, making sure to keep some crews around raised the issue of formventory of sites and so Bader doesn’t have the dreams nearly as often anyfor mop-up work. ing a permanent federal more. They’ve faded even as he’s traveled to Yellow“It was real deflating,” Bader says. “It was anti-cli- forth, and I walked Fire Command Corps to stone to watch the regrowth. At the time, he called mactic. The thrill was gone in some ways. There was through one area that more effectively launch Yellowstone “the Cecil B. DeMille of forest fires. You had burned really heava lot left to do. … So much of our district, over united efforts to fight know, the guy that had the cast of thousands?” Now it’s ily,” Bader says. “I was in 100,000 acres of our subdistrict alone, burned. I got wildfires. ash about eight or 10 an experience he finds difficult to share with those who after it right away. No time to lose.” “In some ways it weren’t there, and a defining moment in his own life. inches deep, this fine Bader fought the fires from July 21 to Sept. 29 brought people together,” “You felt like you were a part of something,” Bader with just one day off. His firefighting timecards show powdered ash. There photo courtesy National Park Service Bader says of the ’88 fires. says. “I’ve testified in front of Congress on wilderness he worked a total of 432.5 hours on fire-specific as- was nothing green in signments—not counting shift breaks or his regular sight for a long ways and A helicopter drops water on the Lama Fire He feels the severity of the and a lot of other stuff. I’ve been on national TV, on summer taught govern- CNN. But you can never really explain [the Yellowstone ranger duties like directing traffic and patrolling the I thought, ‘Oh my god, I during the summer of 1988. mental agencies like the fires] to people. I think some people understand it, but can’t believe this.’ But park’s roads. Park Service and the Forest people who weren’t there might have a hard time unI’ve seen pictures from Service that they need to band together in this era of derstanding why it was so important.” the same area, and only three weeks later there was Sprouts in the ash drier summers, longer fire seasons and tighter budgalready grass sprouting all over out of that ash.” A total of 51 fires swept through Yellowstone ets. “Nobody can sail alone,” he says. The following summer, despite fears that Yellowasakariassen@missoulanews.com between June and November, 1988. The final tally

[18] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013


missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [19]


[arts]

None more black What happens when a bunch of Missoula musicians— including one particular drummer—revisit Spinal Tap?

illustrations by Jonathan Marquis

by Bob Wire

et three or more musicians together, and I’ll bet inside of 10 minutes somebody will drop a This is Spinal Tap quote. As Caddyshack is to golfing, The Big Lebowski is to bowling, and GoodFellas is to chopping up a body and burying it in the woods with your crime crew, This Is Spinal Tap is rock’s movie quote motherlode. It provides a bounty of iconic lines and catch phrases, some of which have surpassed the rock idiom to take a place in our everyday lexicon. I wanted to find out what would happen if I gathered a living room full of local rockers to watch this 30-year old mockumentary—or, if you will, “rockumentary.” I wanted to capture the sights, the smells and, yes, the opinions of a bunch of hardworking rockers as we took in the movie together. And just to make sure this event went to 11, I

G

asked the drummer of Spinal Tap, Missoula’s own Ric Parnell, to join us. The results were somewhat surprising. The participants were as follows: Chris La Tray: local author, bass player for American Falcon. Randy Pepprock: song writer and guitarist for Letters To Luci, ex-bandmate of Duff McKagan. Andrea Harsell: mainstay singer/guitarist on Missoula’s rock scene, owner of leather pants. Andy Smetanka: filmmaker, Humpy guitarist, multiple threat. Ann Szalda-Petree: singer/songwriter, co-host of “The Ann and Teresa and Ann Show” on KBGA, demolitions expert. And of course, Parnell: drummer extraordinaire who played Mick Shrimpton in the movie. We gathered at my house a few weeks ago and

[20] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

I loaded the Special Edition DVD into the player. Being that we were mostly—ahem—veteran rockers, and watching the movie in a family household, the most illicit substance being passed around was a giant bowl of hot buttered popcorn. An ice chest of PBR squatted nearby. Harsell was the group’s lone Spinal Tap virgin, having never seen the movie. “I felt like I have. It’s my dad’s favorite,” she says. “I didn’t realize I haven’t actually seen it. It all looks so familiar.” “So you haven’t seen it out of youthful rebellion?” asks Smetanka. “I saw it the day it came out,” says Pepprock, who also played in the Missoula band Shangri-La Speedway in the ’90s. He was at the Spinal Tap concert they filmed after the movie came out. “See that big head?” He points to the giant demon skull prop being carried to the stage in the opening scene.

“After that show in Seattle (the stage crew) said, ‘You can have this skull but you have to take it today.’ We had a Volkswagen bus, and there’s no way we could fit it in. It’s probably in some Hall of Fame somewhere now.” La Tray, a dyed-in-the-wool hard rock purist and volume enthusiast, first saw the movie when it became available on VHS. He hated it. “We didn’t know who these actors were, outside of Rob Reiner (Tap’s director, named Marti DiBergi in the movie). To us, this was a bunch of Hollywood assholes making fun of the music that at that time was the most important thing in the world to us.” Having just moved with a few friends to Seattle to “make it big” as rock stars, La Tray and his buddies were pretty insulted by the movie’s over-thetop caricatures of the metal genre. “So much of what they were lampooning hit


pretty close to the heart of a group of guys who wanted to make it in the more epic varieties of metal,” he says. And the whole “this one goes to 11,” which has become far and away the most popular phrase from the movie, particularly irks La Tray. “This is something that rolls out of the mouths of people who can’t stand the thunder of a 50-watt tube amp turned beyond two, let alone the ass-puckering a 100-watter will deliver,” he says. This was the first time La Tray had seen the movie in decades, and he still is not a fan. “I’ve never liked joke rock or humor in my music.” This Is Spinal Tap is one long joke, of course, and according to Parnell, it was all ad-libbed. “The entire fucking movie,” he claims. “Rob Reiner shot over 90 hours of usable footage. The whole movie was improv except for one scene.” That scene happens to be Ann Szalda-Petree’s favorite. As we watch, Nigel Tufnel (Christopher Guest) plays an intricate composition he’s been “fooling around with” on the piano while a bemused Reiner looks on. Szalda-Petree collapses in a heap of giggles on the couch before the dialogue even starts. Tufnel plays a delicate figure in D minor, “the saddest of all keys.” Reiner asks him if he has a title for the piece, and Tufnel says it’s called “Lick My Love Pump.” Szalda-Petree convulses with laughter and gasps for air. “I can’t stand it!” She’s a quick-witted comedian with excellent timing, and this kind of subtlebut-slapstick humor is her stock in trade. Her own songs are so cockeyed and funny, it’s no surprise to me that she would be enamored of a movie so packed with spontaneous gags. Parnell mentions that, besides the Seattle concert, the entire thing was filmed in LA, and he provides a constant stream of behind-the-scenes anecdotes and unknown details from the film. For example, when an early version of Spinal Tap called the Thamesmen is shown playing “Give Me Some Money,” he casually points out that Danny Kortchmar is playing bass. Say what now? Danny Kortchmar? Don Henley’s wingman? Guitarist for the famed West Coast studio posse The Section? That Danny Kortchmar? Get the hell out of here. “Nice bloke,” says Parnell. The lanky drummer is not the only trivia wellspring in our group. Smetanka pipes up early and often, with observations and knowledge that belie his claim that he hasn’t seen the movie that much. He wonders aloud if the DVD includes “Heavy Metal Memories,” a fake commercial he remembers from

the Special Features of the VHS version. “Expository dialog!” he calls out, as record company flak Bobbi Flekman (Fran Drescher) describes the artwork on the rejected cover of the band’s would-be comeback album Smell The Glove. Smetanka is shocked to learn that the scene where the band members pay homage at Elvis Presley’s grave was shot in LA, not Memphis. “Wait a second,” he says to Parnell. “That’s a mock Elvis Presley grave?” Parnell pauses the DVD and points to the spelling of Presley’s middle name on the black stone. “It’s supposed to be A-R-O-N” he says. “There’s no two A’s in it.” Hell, I’ve been to Graceland. Spent a half hour staring at that grave marker. And I’ve seen the movie countless times. Never caught that. Nigel and Derek St. Hubbins mention a jazz/blues festival Tap played at “the Isle of Lucy.” We all laugh. “If you didn’t know this was a fake documentary,” says Smetanka, “that’s one of the few lines that would give it away. It’s not as subtle as the other jokes.” Parnell chips in with another tidbit: “There is no Saint Hubbins,” referring to the character’s namesake, whom he claims is the patron saint of quality footwear. “He supposedly found out later that his name was really Derek Stubbins. He just never fixed it.” Another cultural nugget, the phrase “none more black,” (as in, how much more black could it be? None. None more black) comes off the screen. It’s my favorite bit in the movie. “I bet there’s a hundred bands called None More Black,” I say. “How many hits on Google?” says Smetanka. “Over a million using that phrase,” I venture. “Two hundred forty thousand,” Smetanka counters. La Tray whips out his iPhone. It takes him less than 10 seconds to find an answer: “368,000.” Smetanka gives me a self-satisfied grin. The man knows his cultural touchstones. Popcorn flies. PBR flows. Parnell weaves tale after tale from his experience while shooting the movie, including the story of how he got his pal Dave Kaff cast in the role of keyboard madman Viv Savage in order to settle a debt between them. That, unfortunately, is a story I am not at liberty to repeat here. Like the best art, This Is Spinal Tap doesn’t appeal to everyone. It doesn’t even appeal to everyone in this room. But even the most jaded cynic could surely find a satisfying glimmer somewhere in this silly-but-spot-on rock ’n’ roll gem. It’s like David St. Hubbins says: “It’s such a fine line between stupid and clever.”

arts@missoulanews.com

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missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [21]


[music]

Natural noise Travis Sehorn gives life to Stoned Womb

Travis Sehorn

Travis Sehorn’s new album reveals a dusty, dreamy soundscape that seems just right for star-gazing in the desert. That Sehorn comes from the Rocky Mountains is no matter. You could also imagine his psych-country-folk tunes filling the air on a Missoula summer’s eve while watching a meteor shower or while curled up beneath the pulsing Northern Lights during a camping trip in the Mission Mountains. It’s not even so strange that Sehorn now lives in New Orleans, since you can pick out a tinge of urban grittiness here and there when he really gets into the guitar noodling. Stoned Womb runs the gamut. Some tracks, like “Back When We Were” and “Stoned From the Womb,” are psychedelic and muddy, with just a hint of Neil

Young; they burn slow, eddying in reverb and chords that bay like wild dogs. You might like these tracks best if you are stoned, or at least feeling introspective. More narrative efforts—like the nostalgic “Old Flames,” which prominently features the high hum of slide guitar, and the harmonica-filled train-hopping anthem “Cause I’m Gone”—ground the album in something less nebulous. These songs are what best showcase Sehorn’s raw talent as a singer-songwriter. A decade ago, he sharpened his craft on the streets of Missoula during farmers markets before rising in the ranks of the independent music scene here. And then he left. (Sigh.) We don’t get to see Sehorn live much anymore, but albums like this make up for his absence. (Erika Fredrickson)

Murder By Death, Bitter Drink, Bitter Moon I first listened to Murder By Death after randomly buying 2006’s In Bocca al Lupo because I liked the album cover. During that introduction, I imagined that lead singer Adam Turla, with his mournful baritone accompanying the band’s dark Americana, must be some grizzled, quirky, monocleand-top-hat-wearing Ichabod-Crane-meets-TomWaits-type figure. Instead, as I found when the band played The Other Side in 2009, Turla’s a lanky young guy with a mop of dark hair and a big wide grin. I remember him flashing that grin when, at 1:30 a.m., The Other Side bouncers were motioning that Murder By Death was supposed to be finished, but they had one last song to play. “They say we have to stop,” Turla said, and then looked around. “Fuck it,” and

they blasted through a rousing rendition of “Brother.” The crowd danced like you’d expect of a crowd that wasn’t sure whether the plug would get pulled any second. (It didn’t.) This Bloomington, Ind., band is no stranger to Missoula by this point. The band’s fifth album, Bitter Drink, Bitter Moon, released last year, hones in on its gorgeous Gothic sweetness, laced with spooky horns and cello, driven by a punk-rock energy. It gives the best kind of shivers. (Kate Whittle) Murder By Death plays the Top Hat Wed., Aug. 28, with Minneapolis’ 4 on the Floor. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $15 in advance at tophatlounge.com, Rockin Rudy’s and the Top Hat.

Wooden Indian Burial Ground We’re in the part of the year that I can best describe as “hazy,” from the smoky sky above to the late summer revelry in dim bars. It’s a good season for fuzzed-out psychedelia, like that of Portland’s Wooden Indian Burial Ground. The band’s eponymous LP, released in October 2012 on Mon Amie records, serves up 35 minutes of reverb-heavy, surfy waves coating a sweet center of fast, bouncy garage rock. The occasional warpy sci-fi vibe jiggles through, too. It’s not groundbreaking, by any means, but gives the impression that

[22] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

the musicians are talented enough to make a prettier sound but choose not to. Vocals sometimes lurk in the mix somewhere, but the guitars do most of the talking. Wooden Indian Burial Ground might be fuzzy, but the message is clear: party. The wild, weird summers always end before you know it, so you might as well revel while you can. (Kate Whittle) Wooden Indian Burial Ground plays the VFW Thu., Aug. 29, at 10 PM with Boys, Bad Naked, Copilot Eyedrops and Thom Cornelius. $4.


[music]

Real animal Chuck Prophet never needed a revival by Jason Cohen

The Paisley Underground revival is upon us. The Dream Syndicate, the Rain Parade and the Three O’Clock have all returned this year. Mazzy Star, led by Rain Parade co-founder David Roback, is back with a new single. And the Bangles have been reunited since 2003. Then there’s Chuck Prophet, an antidote to both nostalgia and such pigeonholes. All the term “Paisley Underground” ever really meant in 1982—if it meant anything at all—was, “look, a bunch of post-punk bands who also still like classic rock and folk and psychedelia and songwriting!” And while the LA/Arizona band that Prophet played in, Green on Red, also reunited briefly in 2006, he’s been making solo records out of San Francisco for two decades plus, a rich and ragged catalog of music you could summarize by saying, “look, a post-punk kid who also still likes classic rock and folk and psychedelia and songwriting!”... and Memphis soul and glam and cosmic

point is like saying “(ex-Nirvana)” of the Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl, or putting “(from the Yardbirds)” on an Eric Clapton poster. It’s true, but incomplete. Prophet’s own website has the right perspective, listing the Green on Red catalog under “side projects” on the discography page. GoR broke up in 1992; Prophet’s second solo album, Balinese Dancer, was released in 1993. At the time, it was actually a little shocking that such a good guitarist was also such an appealing, multi-faceted singer-songwriter and frontman. It’s even more shocking that I’m still listening to him in 2013. Undeniable truth: If 90 percent of all musicians only ever made three records, we’d be missing out on nothing. But Prophet’s last two records, No. 9 and No. 10 respectively, may well be the best of his career, which, after 30 years, including 20 solo, is a rare thing to achieve, and something you can’t even say about Springsteen or Bob Dylan.

Chuck Prophet’s band Green on Red was associated with the Paisley Underground in the 1980s, but it’s his solo albums that have made him a lasting artist.

country and whatever else you might call rock ’n’ roll. An equally magnetic singer, songwriter and lead guitarist, the 50-year-old Prophet has been particularly prolific in the past five years, putting out two records under his own name (2009’s ¡Let Freedom Ring! and last year’s Temple Beautiful), plus one by his bandmate, spouse and acein-the-hole Stephanie Finch (2010’s Cry Tomorrow). There were also two collaborations with Austin’s Alejandro Escovedo—Prophet co-wrote some of last year’s Street Songs of Love, and co-wrote and played guitar on all of 2008’s Real Animal (that record’s quasi-hit, “Always a Friend,” is a staple of both mens’ set, as well as a song Escovedo has played live with Bruce Springsteen a few times). On top of that, Prophet co-fronted a Clash cover band, the Spanish Bombs (taking the Strummer role) and landed his song “You Did (Bomp Shooby Dooby Bomp)” over the closing credits of an episode of “True Blood.” Like a ballplayer who’s not a superstar but makes the lineup every game and still plays on a winter team in Mexico, Prophet never stops working. He does it because the constant action (and variety) make him a better artist and because, well, that’s the only way to make a living playing music in this day and age. When they take the stage on Sunday afternoon at the River City Roots Festival, Chuck Prophet and the Mission Express will have played 22 shows in August, including a Thursday-Friday-Saturday swing from Big Sky to Great Falls and back to Bozeman. You’ll still find “(formerly of Green on Red)” next to Prophet’s name more than occasionally, which at this

And comparing Prophet to Springsteen feels increasingly appropriate. He covered “For You” while touring behind ¡Let Freedom Ring!, which the Village Voice called “a Born in the USA for our time,” and his tastes are similarly ecumenical, if more punk rock (read: better). But what really stands out is the sense of showmanship. Earlier this month in Philadelphia, Prophet sprinkled “Willie Mays Is Up At Bat” with an entertaining mid-song yammer about the inferiority of soccer (and cricket) to baseball. “Ladies and gentlemen, I don’t have to explain to you what’s going on right about now ... We play this song in [the United Kingdom] and they don’t know what’s going on! … In [soccer], it’s a lot like our Giants, there’s a good chance that you can watch an entire game and neither team will score a point!” It’s as kitschy a verbal riff as Bruce’s storytelling, sans the teleprompter, but almost certainly repeated other nights. It then explodes into a Thin Lizzyesque guitar duel (if you don’t mind Internet spoilers, you can listen to it and the whole show, which also features an especially raging “Cortez the Killer”-style “You Did” at archive.org). And this carnival barker persona is nothing new. “Ladies and gentlemen, step right this way,” Prophet sang way back on his debut album, 1990’s Brother Aldo. You still should. Chuck Prophet and the Mission Express play the River City Roots Festival in downtown Missoula Sun., Aug. 25, 3:30 to 5 PM. Free. See our calendar spotlight this week or go to rivercityrootsfestival.com for more info.

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missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [23]


[film]

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Mirror mirror The Act of Killing turns mass murder on its head by Josh Wagner

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[24] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

As the credits roll at the end of Joshua Oppenheimer’s documentary The Act of Killing, one thing you’ll notice is that the production manager is listed as anonymous. So are the line producers and the assistant director. Also, the makeup artists and the entire costume department. It doesn’t stop there. A total of 41 crew members decided they didn’t want their names on this project. “Anonymous” even turns up twice under “special thanks.” This is a dangerous film to be involved in. This is a dangerous film, period. In 1965 a failed coup in Indonesia led to a communist purge in which an estimate of over 500,000 people were tortured and executed. Along with other anti-communist youth militias, one group known as the “Movie Theater Gangsters” got involved with the purges and carried out countless arrests, interrogations and murders. In 2005, Oppenheimer, a Texas filmmaker, and his crew met and collaborated with this gang—now wealthy old men who have never been charged with any crime—in order to recreate their exploits on film. The Act of Killing documents this process, and the result is one of the most powerful and revealing works of cinema I have ever seen. The opening of Oppenheimer’s film introduces us to a crew of old murder squad bosses reminiscing about the 1965 purges. The brutality of their honesty is more striking than the brutalities they describe. They laugh and joke about the people they killed, without a twinge of guilt or shame. The conversations are relaxed. At moments they seem to throw off sparks of pride. The mechanical accounts detail the best techniques for killing someone as casually as a golfer explains his backswing. But over the course of the film there is an unraveling within these men. As they reenact the murders, review their daily footage and, most significantly, play the roles of their victims, something starts to crack in the façade. This is particularly true for the big boss, Anwar Congo, whose inner journey from start to finish is both catalyzed by and revealed through the documentary. In Shakespeare’s Hamlet there’s the pivotal moment where a group of actors do a thinly veiled reenactment of the king’s assassination in front of his

murderer, Hamlet’s uncle. Hamlet’s intention here is to provoke his uncle’s guilt. The scene has become emblematic of the reflective power of art, the kind that forces us to confront aspects of ourselves that we’d rather leave buried and rationalized. If the purpose of some art is analgesic, other art is major surgery. Like Hamlet, The Act of Killing is a chillingly cogent example of the latter. The humorous and surreal aspects of the film provide a welcome break from its general intensity. Anwar’s persistent nightmares inspire him to stage colorful and abstract fantasy settings. “The communists have become ghosts, haunting me,” he admits. But Anwar continues to blame his suffering not on any moral culpability, but on practical mistakes. “Why didn’t I close his eyes?” he bemoans, recalling a victim, and in this way he assigns the source of his torment to flaws in his method. The resulting sequences are bizarre dreamscapes of phantoms taking revenge, girls dancing out of the mouth of a giant fish and a whimsical, eerie music video in which Anwar’s victims award him with a medal and thank him for sending them to heaven. The Act of Killing is not easy to watch. I found myself squirming in my seat most of the time. But its true artistry takes place in its confident pacing and steady layering, as the gradual extrication of Anwar’s psyche to the truth about himself threatens to dawn. The Act of Killing is altogether captivating, entertaining enough that I felt guilty for being entertained, and, okay, I’m just going to say it: This film could spark a revolution in the way we view the function and value of cinema. There’s a trope in science fiction stories in which a superpower or technology delivers justice by making criminals feel the very suffering they inflicted on others. If such a technique ever materializes in the real world, The Act of Killing might be judged in the future less as a film and more as an early and intrepid prototype. The Act of Killing screens at The Roxy Theater Thu., Aug. 22–Sun., Aug. 25, at 7 and 9:30 PM nightly. See theroxytheater.org. arts@missoulanews.com


[film] PARANOIA An ambitious hot young thang is caught in a game of corporate espionage between two of the most powerful and rich tech tycoons in the world. Starring Liam Hemsworth (you know, Thor), Harrison Ford and Gary Oldman. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12.

OPENING THIS WEEK THE ACT OF KILLING This award-winning documentary project asked former Indonesian death squad leaders to reenact their real-life mass killings. The results include Hollywood crime drama-style depictions and song-and-dance sequences. Stars include Haji Anif, Syamsul Arifin and Sakhyan Asmara. Not rated. Showing at the Roxy Theater Aug. 22-25, at 7 and 9:30 PM. See theroxytheater.org. (See Film.)

PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS In this sequel to 2010’s Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief, good ol’ Percy and crew must find the Golden Fleece and, presumably, throw it into Mordor to prevent evil from taking over the world. Starring Logan Lerman, Alexandra Daddario and Brandon T. Jackson. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Showboat, Pharaohplex.

BLUE JASMINE Woody Allen brings us this tale of a narcissistic socialite, played by Cate Blanchett, who undergoes a nervous breakdown and transformation after her life hits rock bottom. Also starring Alec Baldwin and Sally Hawkins. Rated PG-13. Wilma. FROM UP ON POPPY HILL (KOKURIKOZAKA KARA) Umi Matsuzaki, a plucky girl attending high school in 1960s Japan, teams up with friends to try to save the school’s clubhouse in this 2011 Studio Ghibli animation. The English version is voiced by stars including Sarah Bolger, Anton Yelchin and Christina Hendricks. Rated PG. Showing at the Roxy Theater Aug. 22-25, at 7 and 9:30 PM nightly. See theroxytheater.org. THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES New York City teen Mary Sue, I mean, cough, Clary Fray finds a great excuse to get out of school when she learns she is a descendant of the Shadowhunters, and must travel to the alternate city called Downworld to save her mother. Supernatural adventure and make-outs with high-cheekboned dudes are in store. Starring Lily Collins, Jamie Campbell Bower and Lena Headey. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. THE WORLD’S END Five buddies on an epic pub crawl have no idea they’re about to join a really epic battle for humanity’s survival. Brought to you by the Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz dudes, so British witticisms abound. Starring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost and Martin Freeman. Rated R. Village 6. YOU’RE NEXT A family’s annual reunion gets a whole lot more interesting when, wouldn’t you know, a gang of gosh-darned ax murderers invades their secluded getaway. Starring Sharni Vinson, Nicholas Tucci and AJ Bowen. Rated R. Carmike 12.

Don’t make fun of her ax-scent. You’re Next opens this week at Carmike 12.

NOW PLAYING 2 GUNS Don’t you love discovering the things you have in common with buddies, like, say, being undercover agents? I suspect there won’t be many BFF necklaces, though, when a DEA agent and a naval intelligence officer form a shaky alliance after trying to sneak into a drug cartel. Starring Denzel Washington, Mark Wahlberg and Paula Patton. Rated R. Carmike 12. 20 FEET FROM STARDOM Meet the unsung heroes (geddit?) in the world of back-up vocalists. What’s it like to share a stage, but none of the glory, with David Bowie or the Rolling Stones? Interviewees include Merry Clayton, Lisa Fischer and Judith Hill. PG13. Wilma. THE CONJURING You can bet your Milk Duds it’s not the cat knocking stuff over this time. Paranormal investigators arrive to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their home. Starring Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson and Lili Taylor. Rated R. Carmike 12. DESPICABLE ME 2 The somewhat inept but well-meaning Gru is put to work for the Anti-Villain league to fight a new super criminal in the follow-up to the 2010 family friendly animated comedy. Starring the voices of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig and Miranda Cosgrove. Rated PG. Carmike 12.

ELYSIUM It’s the year 2154, and rich people live on a space station while the poors live down on the ruined earth. It’s up to Jason Bourne, er, Matt Damon I mean, to bridge the two worlds. Also starring Jodie Foster and Sharlto Copley. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex. JOBS Ashton Kutcher portrays Steve Jobs’ during his struggles for success in the ‘70s and ‘80s with an obscure company called Apple. Will it be a mission iMpossible to become wealthy based on selling iThingies? Also starring Josh Gad and J.K. Simmons. PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. KICK-ASS 2 The young vigilantes Hit Girl and Kick-Ass are trying to live quietly as Mindy and Dave, but with a baddie on the loose, must return to deliver another dose of unsubtle butt-whooping. Starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Chloë Grace Moretz, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex. LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER See notable American events of the 20th century from an interesting perspective: an AfricanAmerican White House butler. Starring Forest Whitaker, Lenny Kravitz and Oprah Winfrey. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

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WE’RE THE MILLERS A drug dealer asks oddballs to pretend to be his family to avoid suspicion while moving a large amount of weed over the U.S/Canada border. Dude, strippers look like normal women when they put pants on! Lolz! Starring Jennifer Aniston, Jason Sudeikis and Emma Roberts. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Showboat, Pharaohplex.

Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit missoulanews.com’s arts section to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING Joss Whedon uses modern costuming to retell this classic Shakespeare comedy about romantic confusion. Iambic pentameter really gets the ladies going, I hear. Starring Amy Acker, Alexis Denisof and Fran Kranz (and watch for the everadorable Nathan Fillion). Rated PG-13. Wilma.

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PLANES The makers of Cars bring you Planes, in which Dusty, a plucky cropduster, longs to compete in a famous race, but is afraid of heights. Wah-wah. We look forward to the inevitable sequels; Boats, Trains, Amish Buggies and Rickshaws. Starring the voices of Dane Cook, Stacy Keach and Brad Garrett. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6, Entertainer, Pharaohplex.

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missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [25]


[dish]

More than a label by Ari LeVaux

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[26] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

Since the narrow defeat last November of California’s Prop 37, which would have mandated labeling of genetically modified foods, the sentiment behind the proposition has spread—or metastasized, depending on your perspective—into similarly conceived bills in 26 other states. Proponents of such laws mostly argue that we have a right to know what’s in our food. However, it’s probably fair to say that for many supporters, labeling would be a consolation prize in place of an outright ban on GMOs. But we’re not going to stop GMOs. And it’s becoming clear that labels aren’t going to be blocked forever, either. So instead of fighting about whether or not we need them, it makes sense for both sides to sit down and talk about how labels should look. In an April blog post for Discover magazine online, Ramez Naam argued that it makes sense for GMO food supporters to stop opposing labels: “I support GMOs. And we should label them. We should label them because that is the very best thing we can do for public acceptance of agricultural biotech. And we should label them because there’s absolutely nothing to hide.” According to most polls, the percentage of Americans who support labeling is in the low-to-mid 90s. To dismiss such popular sentiment would be to ignore the will of the vast majority, which wouldn’t be very democratic. It would in fact be a bit obnoxious, Naam writes. “At best it’s condescending to consumers, sending a signal that ‘we know better than you what you should eat.’” By fighting GMO labeling, he argues, “We’re persuading those who might otherwise have no opinion on GMOs that there must be something to hide.” One recent ABC poll showed 57 percent of shoppers would be less likely to buy products that are labeled GMO, suggesting a significant chunk of those who support labels aren’t afraid to eat GMO foods. Other common reasons for support of labeling, according to polls, include opposition to GMOs for environmental reasons, the “right to know” and angst over corporate control of the food system. Polls may not ask it, but for many, GM is more symbol than issue, just one part of the industrialized, monoculture-based food system that they don’t wish to participate in. Clearly, that 57 percent of GMO-fearing shoppers would represent a significant cut to the revenue of biotech corporations, and of corporate farmers who use GMO seeds, and it isn’t clear to what extent they will be able to make up the difference by squeezing processors, retailers and consumers. Such financial concerns are part of why Big Biotech shouldn’t be a part of the labeling discussion: It has too much at stake, and wields undue influence—outspending the grassroots support of Prop 37, for example, by five-to-one. Corporate recusal is something that proGMO people should get behind, too. Arguably, much of the grief felt by GMO supporters is inspired less by the technology itself than by the way it’s been rolled out. Many people who support labeling, or who oppose GMOs in their food, do so because they are uncomfortable with this powerful technology being

FLASH IN THE PAN

forged in a corporate crucible, where there is a conflict between pleasing shareholders and proceeding with caution. It’s the same reason many people are skeptical of petroleum company claims that drilling won’t harm the environment. We’re conditioned to expect the narrative that’s best for business, whether it’s true or not. Big Biotech’s history of unpopular moves, including farmer lawsuits, and a one time opposition to voluntary GMO labels, has long posed a problem to GMO-supporters, who often include a little Monsanto-bashing in their pro-GMO arguments as a means of communicating that Monsanto does not equal GMO. Perhaps these pundits would agree that it makes sense to exclude corporations from organizing and funding discussions about how labels should look. (The industry recently its own forum on all things GMO, www.gmoanswers.com). Concerns about corporate behavior and motivation can overshadow the examples of GM crops that don’t exist in order to sell more pesticides, or otherwise generate corporate revenue. The ringspot-resistant Rainbow papaya, created at the University of Hawaii and Cornell University, was a public sector effort that likely saved the state’s papaya industry from being wiped out by the virus. Efforts like these are easier to support, and wholesale anti-GMO ideologues should be clear about what, specifically, they oppose. An honest discussion about labeling could help tease apart distinct issues that are often lumped together. Critics of labeling frequently argue that a general label, along the lines of “contains GMOs,” communicates very little, because there are so many different kinds of GMOs. But given that labeling seems inevitable, perhaps the pro-GMO side could help create a system that tells us something meaningful. Naam told me via email that he thinks GMO labels should be on products’ back labels, not on the front, as might happen if GMO food supporters don’t come to the table. He also suggested labels like, “Contains ingredients engineered to reduce pesticide use,” or “Contains ingredients engineered to increase farm sustainability.” If the public lacks sufficient understanding of the science behind GMO foods, as many GMO supporters lament, maybe even more detail would be productive. Perhaps a GMO ID system is in order, under which the back label lists genetically engineered components by some kind of identification number, which consumers could look up. Then they could decide for themselves if they think a particular ingredient is insufficiently tested, potentially invasive environmentally, made by a big evil corporation or transgenic (made with DNA from a different species). And they could also consider whether a particular product requires less pesticide, or otherwise effects farm sustainability, or contains some desirable added nutrient value. Given the apparent inevitability of labeling, a meaningful system should be the goal for advocates on both sides of the issue. Then, GMO skeptics could have their labels, GMO cheerleaders will have their nuance and the will of the large majority of Americans will prevail. Doesn’t that sound like how democracy should work?


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway • 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Bernice's Bakery has been a Missoula Landmark since 1978. If you haven't been you should! If you come every day you know what we're talkin' about: Huckleberry Danishes, fresh baked breads daily, crazy cheap lunches showcasing delicious flavors, one of the nation's top cupcakes, handmade croissants and so much more. Sit inside in one of Missoula's homiest of atmospheres or scoot out back to enjoy a view of downtown Missoula at one of the picnic tables. And don't forget to try the best cup o'joe around or Bernice's toddy brewed iced coffee. There is a lot of hard rollin' action around this joint. Come and see just what we're talkin' about. $-$$

El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$

Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 84. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... THURSDAY is Trivia Night (7:30-10 pm). FRIDAY: 8/23 David Boone 6-9 pm. SUNDAY: Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY: Erin & The Project 6-9 pm. TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks • 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$

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The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and glutenfree options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 10am-6pm Mon-Thurs/10am-7pm Fri+Sat. Downtown Missoula. $

GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall • 728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am-2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 97:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$

8am - 4pm

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Times Run 8/23/13 - 8/29/13

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater Blue Jasmine (PG-13) Nightly at 7 & 9 Sat at 1 & 3

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD he GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserieroasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$

Sat & Sun

531 S. Higgins

20 Feet from Stardom Nightly at 7 • Sat at 1 NO show Wed 8/28 Much Ado About Nothing Nightly at 9 • Sat at 3 NO show Wed 8/28

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131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

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Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

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missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [27]


[dish]

Philly West HANGRIEST HOUR Why you’re here: Authentic cheesesteaks and East Coast-style thin-crust pizza are the primary reasons. You may also remember that Indy readers named Philly West Best New Restaurant in 2012 or know that the West Broadway eatery recently marked its second anniversary. Why that guy in the Eagles shirt is here: He wants to talk about Charlie Manuel’s recent firing and/or offer his two cents on the football team’s quarterback controversy. The Philly West crew is the real deal and, in addition to serving up a true taste of South Street, will happily talk Phillies, Eagles, Flyers or Will Smith. (Actually, maybe not Will Smith.) How you’re ordering your cheesesteak: Contrary to popular belief, there is no right or wrong way to order a cheesesteak. “That’s a common misperception,” says co-owner Dave Jones. “It’s not like there’s a provolone versus Whiz battle raging in Philly.” Even so, you want to be prepared. Philly West serves shaved rib-eye on a Le Petit hoagie roll with your choice of cheese and toppings (starting at $7.75). Jones goes with grilled onions and provolone. Co-founder Mike Fitzgerald prefers green bell peppers and American. Both of them recommend a side of Disco Fries, which are slathered in gravy and cheese, and baked ($5.50).

Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 36pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

photo by Skylar Browning

What you’re ordering when you’re not ordering a cheesesteak: Don’t sleep on the menu’s other standouts. We recommend the Florentine Stromboli ($10), a turnover-style dish with sliced chicken breast sautéed in white wine with onions, garlic, spinach and mushrooms, and stuffed with provolone and mozzarella. The key is Philly West’s handmade dough. Where you’ll find it: Philly West is located at 134 West Broadway. Keep an eye out for a two-year anniversary event in the coming weeks. —Skylar Browning Hangriest Hour serves up fresh details on western Montana eats. To recommend a restaurant, dish or chef for Hangriest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins • 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West • 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. • 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 • pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins • 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an all-encompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one

$…Under $5

[28] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins • 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 • sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis’s Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula “Best Pizza” Winner’s for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12”crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find WestMex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Walking Moustache 206 W. Main St. 549-3800 www.walkingmoustache.com Our aim is to offer excellent food with five star service. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner, Daily Specials + 2 am Special. Restaurant Hours: 24/6. Tues–Sun 6:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays. Winebar Hours: Tues–Sun 11:00am–11:00pm. Closed Mondays. Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

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THURSDAYAUG22 Don’t go disappearing now when Off in the Woods plays its reggae-infused tunes at the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM. Free. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 dropin class. Visit openway.org.

August 22–August 29, 2013

Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gardeners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montananaturalist.org.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Singer-songwriter Sista Otis brings the love to Philipsburg Brewing Company. 5 PM. Free. Go on, have a cookie and a glass of milk stout when Grandma’s Little Darlings play Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-8 PM. Free. Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com. Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. You’ll be asking for seconds when Mac and Cheeb play the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

I’m a big fan. Miriam Reuter plays Melinda in George Farquhar’s comedy The Recruiting Officer, presented by Montana Shakespeare in the Parks at the UM oval Mon., Aug. 26, at 6 PM.

Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 8 PM, plus specials

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [29]


[calendar] nightlife

on wings, pizza, domestic pitchers and $7 Harvest Moon pitchers.

121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240.

Put some pizzazz into your Thursday evening when Kimberlee Carlson Jazz Trio plays the Top Hat from 7-9 PM. Free.

UM President Royce Engstrom and his venerable beard present the State of the University Address, beginning at 10 AM in the Montana Theatre. Reception to follow afterward at 11 AM.

End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

If you’ve ever felt like dancing outside on a lovely morning,

Enjoy some alley tunes with unusually good beverage catering

Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Gotta hydrate before you gyrate to the hip tunes and underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. $1 well dranks til’ midnight, life-long memories for free, y’all. Hone your performance skills at the Broadway Inn’s open mic night, with Big Sky Pool Party in the Cabana starting at 5 PM, singing and prizes at 9 PM. Includes $3 Big Sky beer special. 1609 W. Broadway St. Free to attend. It’ll be wicked cool when Austinby-way-of-Boston singer-songwriter Greg Mullen plays the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Mark Duboise and Crossroads are here to smooth out the rough edges of your eve when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., from 9:30 PM to close. Show off all that hard work you put in sophomore year when Stage 112 presents the Beer Pong Tourney 4.0. Free to play; winner gets tickets to the upcoming Adventure Club show. 10 PM.

FRIDAYAUG23 Take a break from late-summer heat when Dead Winter Carpenters outta California stop in town to bring a dose of roots-rockAmericana to Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. 9 PM. Free. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective,

drink and music from Headwaters and the Boxcutters, plus the chance to bid on great auction items. 629 Phillips St. 6-11 PM. $20 for non members/$15 for MUD members/$40 for non-member families/$30 for MUD families. Visit mudproject.org or call 721-7513 for more. Can this cockpit hold the vasty fields of France? Find out when

settling in For many a college freshman, the River City Roots Festival is the introductory salvo to living in Missoula. The Missoula Downtown Association bills it as the “signature celebration of the city we live in,” and I can’t really argue with that. There is, of course, much more to Missoula, but here are the basics you’ll want to be familiar with: bluegrass and Americana bands, family friendly activities commingling with grownup carousing, art shows, food and beer. There’s something else about the festival, too, something that, upon my arrival, I realized was a thing I was sorely needing in my life without even knowing it. River City Roots Fest is a good representation of a town with a real heart and center. A soul, if Railroad Earth you will. (And yeah, you can have some wine with that cheese.) The big-box-ification of Amer- in Missoula now, you and I, where we block off streets ica has decimated downtowns across the country. and throw parties at any provocation. Besides watching boisterous performers like The Other places don’t have big free music festivals downtown where people can dance in the streets; I’ve ex- Gourds, Railroad Earth and Chuck Prophet, River City perienced towns where anything that blocked parking Roots Festival is a good place to learn about what spaces would never be allowed by the city council. community really means. People coming together But thank goodness, we’re not in those places. We’re just because they like a place. People volunteering to throw free events because it seems like a cool thing to do. Wandering around and seeing old friends WHAT: River City Roots Festival and new friends and yet-to-be-friends everywhere you go. There’s someWHERE: Main Street and Higgins in downtown Missoula times enemies and exes, of course, WHEN: Sat., Aug. 24 and Sun., Aug. 25 and part of living in a community is figuring out how to gracefully handle HOW MUCH: Free them, too. So come on, everybody dance now. MORE INFO: rivercityrootsfestival.com —Kate Whittle don’t be bashful and join Nia in the Garden at The Women’s Club Health and Fitness Center. 10:30 AM. Call Barbara at 406-728-7130 for more info.

when the Top Hat and Rhino present Blues Alley, with Kevin Van Dort Band and Idle Ranch Hands in the patio between the two bars. 5 PM. Free.

The Women’s Circle Group Acupuncture at Mountain Sage Acupuncture Clinic, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 1, focuses on women’s health issues and sounds comfy and nice. 2–5 PM, last appointment at 4 PM. Sliding scale treatments $20-40 with a first time administration fee of $10. Call (503) 593-7073.

John Floridis plays the folk-rock to sip some malt beverages to at Draught Works, starting at 5 PM. Free.

Teens go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Library’s Teen Writers Group, which meets every Fri. at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

[30] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com. It’ll be a jolly good time, chaps, at MUD’s annual Garden Party and Silent Auction. Includes dinner, a

Montana Shakespeare in the Parks presents Henry V at the Double Arrow Resort, two miles south of Seeley Lake on Double Arrow Road off Highway 83. 6 PM. Free. Refreshments available, leave the pups at home. Now, here’s a class reunion that’s bound to be fun: Fact and Fiction hosts the 406 Poetry Workshop Reunion Reading, with Mark Gibbons, Clark Chatlain, Gillian Kessler, Mal Westcott, Mindy Hammett, Laura Hunt and Annie Connole. 220 N. Higgins Ave. 6-8 PM. Don’t yell out your ex-girlfriend’s name during Hump Day Bingo with Bob at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for winners. Beware:

$5 mini-fishbowls served all day. Bingo starts at 6:30 PM. DalyJazz is back in action and ready to spruce you up. The August edition features Austrian fella Jim Rotondi on trumpet and flugelhorn, David Morgenroth on Piano and Kelly Roberti on bass. Dinner and drinks provided. 240 Daly Ave. 7 PM. $25 requested donation, RSVP to dalyjazz@gmail.com. Russ Nasset classes it up when he plays the terrace at The Keep, 102 Ben Hogan Drive, from 7-10 PM. No cover. The dress code is black (bolo) tie when Wild Coyote Band plays Cowboy Troy’s, on Highway 93 outside Victor. 8 PM. No cover. You just might have to show up to find out what smooth, sensual grooves are in store when Regmachine presents Band in Motion: Blues and Beyond at the Eagles, 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. No cover. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 2734733. Sing a happy tune at the Evaro Bar’s Friday night karaoke and you just might win a prize. Starts at 9 PM, free to sing. 17025 US Highway 93 North. DJ Dubwise spins hot oldschool and new dance party traxxx at Feruqis, 318 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 10 PM. Free. Mark Duboise and Crossroads are here to smooth out the rough edges of your eve when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., from 9:30 PM to close. Shake what your momma gave you, like somebody’s about to pay you when Muzikata plays the Union Club, starting around 9 PM. No cover. The Live and Uncut Hip Hop Saga show promises some realness, yo, when Ambedext, Traff the Wiz, Codependents, Tajh, Siren and DJ Dub Wise perform at Feruqi’s, 318 N. Higgins ave. 9 PM. 21-plus. Cover TBA. Sista Otis keeps spreading the love to P-town, playing the White Front Bar in Philipsburg. 9 PM. Free. Get totally housed at the August edition of I’ll House You, with DJ Vyces, Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Hotpantz. 9 PM. Free. Confidence Man, The Blue Side of Town and Run From the City present rootsy tuneage at Sean Kelly’s. 9 PM. Free. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every


[calendar]

Rock, stock and barrel. Missoula funk and R&B outfit Locksaw Cartel plays the Top Hat Fri., Aug. 23, along with Baby and Bukowski. Top Hat. 9:30 PM. Free.

Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406-721-2416 or just show up. Funk and R&B outfit Locksaw Cartel has the monopoly on partying tonight, along with literary tunesters Baby and Bukowski. Top Hat. 9:30 PM. Free.

SATURDAYAUG24 After dancing in the streets all day, beat the heat and head to Stage 112 for a River City Roots Festival after party, with Sista Otis, Josh Farmer Band, Locksaw Cartel and more. 9 PM. $5/$3 in advance. Tell Uncle Cooter that the woodpile done been piled high enough and slip into your glad rads for Missoula’s biggest downtown party, River City Roots Fest, which features a 4-mile run, art shows, and most importantly, dancing in the streets to the likes of The Gourds and Chuck Prophet. For a full schedule of events visit rivercityrootsfestival.com. (See Spotlight.) Don’t tell the Welshman next door, but the Bitterroot Scottish Irish Festival is back with two days of kiltfilled competition, Gaelic fun, music and food, at the Daly Mansion in Hamilton. For more information visit bitterrootscottishirishfestival.org. See some of Montana’s best golfers make fools of themselves and have a toot doing it at the Big Hole Cow Pasture Golf Tournament. The tournament takes place in a pasture near the town of Wisdom and features hazards of the cow variety along with prizes for first

and last place, as well as Most Original Golf Cart and Most Original Golf Attire. One reminder: Don’t mess with the Cow Pasture Committee. To enter or for more info call 6893260 or 834-3264. Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to farmers’ markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine Street (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com) and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. Veg out with your carrot out during the Hamilton Farmers Market, where folks can purchase all sorts of dee-lish local goodies from area farmers. Third and Bedford Streets. 9 AM to 12:30 PM. Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, this and every Sat. from 9:30–10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 drop-in/$8 students drop-in, with various prices for punch-card holders. Call 581-4093 or visit yogainmissoula.com. Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Find out if art galleries are the hangover cure we’ve all been looking for when The Missoula Art Museum hosts a tour every Saturday at noon. Various exhibiting artists, guides and teachers host. Visit missoulaartmuseum.org to find out schedule details. Free. Stop on by the ZACC booth at the River City Roots Festival to join in creating an artistic representation of your own family roots, starting at noon. Check out zootownarts.org. (See Spotlight.)

nightlife Don a laurel garland and party with the full pantheon during Mount Olympus at Lolo Hot Springs, an evening of camping, fire spinning, dancing and two stages of electronic music, from 3 PM to 8 AM the next day. $15/$10 in advance at Piece of Mind and Lolo Hot Springs. End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com. Sista Otis plays Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 6-8 PM. Free. Brian Ernst is parking the solar-powered biodiesel bus for the evening to play upbeat acoustic roots music for y’all, with over 20 instruments and a looping pedal for his live show. Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [31]


[calendar] Matt Arthur and the Bratlanders just might get a little sassy when they play the Top Hat. 7 PM. Free, all ages. You just might have to show up to find out what smooth, sensual grooves are in store when Regmachine presents Band in Motion: Blues and Beyond at the Eagles, 2420 South Ave. W. 8 PM. No cover. Hey, bub, get your noir on when Missoula Outdoor Cinema presents Naked City, at 8:21 PM on the lawn of Head Start School, 1001 Worden Ave. $5 suggested donation. Call 829-0873 and visit missoulaoutdoorcinema.org. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like Shabba-Doo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. DJ Dubwise spins hot oldschool and new dance party traxxx at Feruqis, 318 N. Higgins Ave., starting at 10 PM. Free. Mark Duboise and Crossroads are here to smooth out the rough edges of your eve when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., from 9:30 PM to close. Zeppo lights it up for your dancing pleasure at the Union Club, starting around 9 PM. No cover. Dry those tears and belly up to the bar when Aran Buzzas presents lonesome songs for the nightlife crowd at the Alcan in Frenchtown. 9 PM. Free. Stuff your ears with tasty wieners when Lil’ Smokies play their fresh, tasty bluegrass at the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM. Free. Don’t let the name fool ya, The Hasslers are really just out to make sure you have a good time when they play a River City Roots Festival after-party at Sean Kelly’s. 10 PM.

SUNDAYAUG25 The Top Hat presents a special screening of All the Labor, the documentary about Missoula’s favorite squashes, The Gourds. 7 PM. Free. Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth

[32] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

Getting beer-dy. Missoula-based author Ryan Newhouse presents a talk and signing for his new book, Montana Beer: A Guide to Breweries in Big Sky Country, Sun., Aug. 24, at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Noon-2 PM.

St., at 10 AM every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. Take a chill pill and ride a pony during the Carousel Sunday Market, every Sunday from 10 AM to 2 PM. Produce, psychic readings, live food, music, kids’ activities and, yes, pony rides, are all going down. Artist Lisa Hofman is set up on the street corner outside the Import Market at Broadway and Ryman to sell prints and cards from original paintings. Proceeds go to the Humane Society of Western Montana. 10 AM-2 PM. Have yourself a brewskie before and/or after beverage aficionado Ryan Newhouse presents a talk and signing for his new book, Montana Beer. Mmm, malty. Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Noon-2 PM. Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing,

cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free. The inimitable and indefatigable Tom Catmull soothes your Sunday when he plays Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 4-7 PM. Free.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Bob Wills is still the king of Western swing, but our very own Western Union is looking to commit some regicide and make some fine old Western swing tunes for you all to dance by at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5. Explore the idea of open intelligence and the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during the Balanced View open meeting, which runs every Sun. from 6-7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini


[calendar] Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free. Soar to new heights when the Crown of the Continent Guitar Workshop and Festival twangs and strums in Bigfork, running Aug. 25Sept. 1, with live performances at 8 PM. Instructors/performers include Pat Metheny, Lee Ritenour and Robben Ford. Flathead Lake Lodge. Register for workshops, or just get tickets to watch the shows. $35 for individual tickets. Check out cocguitarfoundation.org for info. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. $3 Fireball specials. Call 721-1798. Keep rocking the River City at the second Stage 112 River City Roots Festival Afterparty, with Sista Otis, Ted Ness and the Rusty Nails and more. 8:30 PM. Check stageonetwelve.com.

MONDAYAUG26 Shakespeare is cool and all, but there’s plenty of other neato plays out there, and so, Montana Shakespeare in the Parks presents George Farquhar’s The Recruiting Officer, a comedy set in the early 18th century, at the UM Oval. 6 PM. Free. Bring a chair or blanket. You’ll be seeing stars at Bingo on Broadway, with cash prizes, $3 Sam Adams pints and food specials. Broadway Inn, 1609 W. Broadway St. 8 PM. $6 buy-in. Sharpen your pencils, check your shoelaces and don’t be too nervous; you’ll do fine. Today’s the first day of autumn semester classes at the University of Montana.

nightlife Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. Steelworker union activists with the Summer of Solidarity Tour stop in town to host workshops and a potluck to spread the message of fighting corporate power. Union Hall, 208 E. Main St., at 5 PM, with live music to follow at 7 PM. Free. Just ‘cause it’s free, don’t call it cheap when LA-based folk-rock band Rose’s Pawn Shop plays the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 68:30 PM. No cover. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Musical activists with the Summer of Solidarity, Anne Feeney and Michael O’Brien, play folk and hip-hop (respectively) at the Union Hall. 7 PM. Free. Enjoy a rarified evening when Blue Moon plays smoky smooth jazz and blues at Red Bird, 111 N. Higgins Ave., from 7 to 10 PM. Free. Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness meditation group that meets Mondays from 7:30 to 8:45 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit openway.org.

House. Togas optional, but hey, why not? 8 PM. Free, all ages. Open Mic at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Rock the mic when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free.

TUESDAYAUG27

Last Downtown ToNight for 2013!

August 29 The Cold Hard Cash Show Family Activity

Walking Stick Toys

This one’s for the girls. Come hang out at Tamarack for the Community Tap Night, this week benefiting The Girls Way. The brewery donates 75 cents of every pint sold. 6-9 PM. Dance cuz everybody’s watching at the American Cabaret Style bellydance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. This class is great for beginners and experienced dancers alike. 6–7 PM. Visit madronadance.wordpress.com.

Last Out to Lunch for 2013

August 28 Shakewell Family Activity

Walking Stick Toys

Watch your little ones master tree pose in no time during yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25.

Soar to new heights when the Crown of the Continent Guitar Workshop and Festival twangs and strums in Bigfork, running Aug. 25Sept. 1, with live performances at 8 PM. Instructors/performers include Pat Metheny, Lee Ritenour and Robben Ford. Flathead Lake Lodge. Register for workshops, or just get tickets to watch the shows. $35 for individual tickets. Check out cocguitarfoundation.org for info. The Top Hat presents Monday Movie Night, this week with Animal

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [33]


[calendar] Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free.

nightlife If early morning grub grabbing isn’t for you, head to the Tuesday Farmer’s Market at Circle Square on the north end of Higgins Ave. Veggies, flowers and pretty people are bountiful. 5:30–7 PM. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Lo, the time doth approacheth for Montana Shakespeare in the Parks to present Henry V at the UM Oval. 6 PM. Free; bring a chair or blanket. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. The Unity Dance and Drum African Dance Class is sure to teach you some moves you didn’t learn in junior high when it meets Tuesday from 7 to 8:30 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. All ages and skill levels welcome. $10, $35 for four classes. Email tarn.ream@umontana.edu or call 549-7933 for more information.

WEDNESDAYAUG28 The dramatic, inspiring and only slightly creepy Murder By Death plays the Top Hat, with guests 4 On the Floor. Doors at 8 PM, show at 9. $15 in advance at tophatlounge.com, Rockin Rudy’s and the Top Hat. (See Music.) The Ravalli County Fair starts at 10 AM with a parade through downtown Hamilton, and includes livestock shows, pie auction, music and rodeo every night. More info at rc.mt.gov/fair. Food served out of a truck always tastes better, so check out the goods at Out to Lunch in Caras Park, from 11 AM–2 PM. Free to hang out and people-watch, food will cost you. Until the day comes that we can install GPS locators in our kids, do the next best thing and get a free Child ID, at an event hosted by local law enforcement every Wednesday at Caras Park at 11:30 AM. Child IDs record information like fingerprints and contact info, which are needed in case of an abduction and Amber Alert.

Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expression-filled improvisational bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:30-9 PM. $10. Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs.

The Jocko Valley Farmers Market offers treats, produce, tunes and more in The Hangin Art Gallery parking lot, 92555 Highway 93 in Arlee, from 4-7 PM. For more information or to become a vendor, call Kelley at 726-5550.

Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: Bruce Springsteen has said that he sent a demo of his song “Fire” to what musical idol, just before the man’s death? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

nightlife

“So much depends upon a red wheelbarrow...” Learn to mine great lines from that fabulous mind of yours just like William Carlos Williams when you join other seasoned and novice poets for Poetry Club every Tuesday at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First W. The winningest USian will get a $25 bar tab at KBGA’s Tuesday Trivia night, which includes music and picture rounds, plus drank specials. Pro tip: $25 is enough to buy almost everybody in the bar a Natty Light. Free to play. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 8-10 PM. Soar to new heights when the Crown of the Continent Guitar Workshop and Festival twangs and strums in Bigfork, running Aug. 25-Sept. 1, with live performances at 8 PM. Instructors/performers include Pat Metheny, Lee Ritenour and Robben Ford. Flathead Lake Lodge. Register for workshops, or just get tickets to watch the shows. $35 for individual tickets. Check out cocguitarfoundation.org for info. The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Stage 112, inside the Elk’s at 112 Pattee St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus.

[34] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013

You’re in for a slew of botanical fun when Hogan and Moss and Pinegrass play the Top Hat. 8:30 PM. Free.

Hot damn, this is a tasting I can really get behind: The Scotch Gals present a tasting of eight single malt whiskies at the Rhino, 158 Ryman St. $25. 5-8 PM. Hey, Ball’ers and jar heads, MUD presents the Canning With A Crew workshop so you can learn how to preserve all this harvest time goodness. Northside Headstart, 1001 Worden St. 6-8 PM. $20/$10 for MUD members. Email programs@mudproject.org or call 406493-1556. Mid-2000s melodic hard metal is alive and well and coming to the Wilma, as luck would have it, when Three Days Grace plays along with Otherwise. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $35, available at Rockin Rudy’s, 866468-7624 or online at TicketWeb.com. You’ll be shaking dem bones, dem bones when Ryan “Rye Bones” Bundy plays the Top Hat. 7-9 PM. Free. Soar to new heights when the Crown of the Continent Guitar Workshop and Festival twangs and strums in Bigfork, running Aug. 25-Sept. 1, with live performances at 8 PM. Instructors/performers include Pat Metheny, Lee Ritenour and Robben Ford. Flathead Lake Lodge. Register for workshops, or just get tickets to watch the shows. $35 for individual tickets. Check out cocguitarfoundation.org for info. Let me tell you something I learned the hard way: Meatloaf songs are not appropriate for karaoke. Now go forth to


[calendar] Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $6 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30– 8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats.

Fancy up the feast when Catfood and Black Rock Kitties, along with DJs Lecture, Earthlink, Simpleton and Equinox, lap it up for Milkcrate Wednesday at the Palace. 9 PM. No cover, plus $6 Pabst pitchers and free pool. (Trivia answer: Elvis.)

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

THURSDAYAUG29

Sip a cold one and let Russ Nasset do the work at Draught Works Brewery today. 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM.

Head on up the ‘Root this eve to hear Carter Freeman play old-timey acoustic blues and folk at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. Free. The Ravalli County Fair starts at 10 AM with a parade through downtown Hamilton, and includes livestock shows, pie auction, music and rodeo every night. More info at rc.mt.gov/fair. On the prowl for some cash? Check out the Student Employment and Academic Enrichment Fair at the University Center Ballroom. Representatives from on- and offcampus jobs will be hanging out, as well as chances to sign up for volunteering, internship and research gigs. 9 AM-3 PM. Release some stress during t’ai chi classes every Thursday at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org.

“That’s not a knife. Now this is a knife!” Montana Shakespeare in the Parks presents Henry V at the UM Oval Tue., Aug. 27, at 6 PM. Free.

Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gardeners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montananaturalist.org. Americana-type fella Luke WinslowKing plays an early show at Stage 112, 112 Pattee St., at 4:30 PM. $12/$10 in advance; check out stageonetwelve.com.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Get a taste of la dolce vita and a li’l vino when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com.

Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 8 PM, plus specials on wings, pizza, domestic pitchers and $7 Harvest Moon pitchers. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Dance your way to a free mind and an open body at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance. Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 8 PM. $8. Visit turningthewheel.org. Soar to new heights when the Crown of the Continent Guitar Workshop and Festival twangs and strums in Bigfork, running Aug. 25-Sept. 1, with live performances at 8 PM.

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [35]


[calendar] Instructors/performers include Pat Metheny, Lee Ritenour and Robben Ford. Flathead Lake Lodge. Register for workshops, or just get tickets to watch the shows. $35 for individual tickets. Check out cocguitarfoundation.org for info. Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Gotta hydrate before you gyrate to the hip tunes and underground tracks at Dead Hipster Dance Party. 9 PM. Badlander. $1 well dranks til’ midnight, life-long memories for free, y’all. Hone your performance skills at the Broadway Inn’s open mic night, with Big Sky Pool Party in the Cabana starting at 5 PM, singing and prizes at 9 PM. Includes $3 Big Sky beer special. 1609 W. Broadway St. Free to attend. The Western Union Band packages up the country fun and mails it to everybody tonight at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., from 9 PM to close. No cover.

Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons are back in town to rock some butts at Stage 112, 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $10/$8 in advance. Check out stageonetwelve.com. The very groovy Portlanders Wooden Indian Burial Ground, along with Boys, Bad Naked, Copilot Eyedrops and Thom Cornelius, play the VFW at 10 PM. $4. (See Music.)

More events online: missoulanews.com You just might find a pie in the sky summit when Night Circus, three esteemed Missoula DJs, play hot dance tunes at the Top Hat. 10:30 PM. Free.

The roof, the roof, the roof is on fire. Submit events by 5 PM on Friday to calendar@missoulanews.com to ensure publication in print and online. Include the who-what-whenwhere-why and a picture, if you would be so kind. Alternately, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 5434367. You can also submit events online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight event on the right of the front page at missoulanews.com.

Stairway to heaven. Three Days Grace plays the Wilma, along with Otherwise, Wed., Aug. 28. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $35, available at Rockin Rudy’s, 866-468-7624 or online at TicketWeb.com.

[36] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH I’m rather amused that a post on the BozeMonster Challenge site feels it’s necessary to explain the benefits of the run in very typical health-nerd lingo; like that running through 3.1 miles of a mud-andobstacle course helps runners “develop stamina and strength” and people training for a half or full marathon can “improve their pace.” Another post gets more to the heart of the BozeMonster: It’s mega fun to get filthy with friends and later share the glory. “Play Queen ‘We are the Champions’ on blast all the way home, shout about it on Facebook, show everyone your medal and tell everyone at work on Monday that you are ‘the man’—or ‘woman.’” Now we’re talking. Judging by photos, it just looks like a down-and-dirty, madcap, exhilarating good time; in a pre-race photo from last year, one dude dressed as the god Hermes, painted himself gold and added steampunk

goggles. Afterward, he’s covered in rivulets of golden mud from head-to-toe; those goggles were a good idea. Other folks went with easier-to-manage grass skirts and clamshell bras over t-shirts. (Festive for ladies and gents alike!) Running can be a real serious endeavor, certainly, but it’s hard not to appreciate events that throw a little whimsy, humor and adventure into it. Plus, there’s free beer. —Kate Whittle The 3.1-mile BozeMonster Challenge mud run is Sat., Aug. 24, at 11 AM, with the kids’ Jr. BozeMonster at 10:30 AM, starting at the Gallatin County Regional Park, west of 19th Street on Oak and Davis in Bozeman. Registration is 7-9 AM; all proceeds support maintenance of Gallatin County Parks and Trails. $45 for dayof sign-up. Visit bozemonster.com.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY AUGUST 22 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Tuesdays to play polo. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

FRIDAY AUGUST 23 Today kicks off the Girls on the Gorge annual whitewater kayaking clinic, which includes three days of learning techniques with other water-loving ladies on the Alberton Gorge. Beginner to intermediate skill levels welcome. $200 includes lodging, food, instruction, yoga and transportation. Reserve your spot at zootownsurfers.com. Watch out for Smokey and his cousins when the Rattlesnake Creek Watershed Group hosts a self-guided Tour da Bear, starting at Greenough Park and winding its way to Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Bike or walk around presentations on electrified chicken coops, bear-proofed trash cans and learn more about living with bears in the figurative and literal backyard. 5-8 PM. Free. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY AUGUST 24 Triple your fun at the Bitterroot Classic Triathlon. If swimming isn’t your strong suit, this may be your event: It takes place at the Bitterroot Aquatic Center and is only 750 yards. That’ll leave plenty of time to make up ground on a 20K road bike ride and 5K run. Head to bitterrootclassictriathlon.com. You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325

N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. These duckies ain’t rubber. Five Valleys Audobon invites you along on a trip to see migrating waterfowl and shorebirds at the Frenchtown Mill Site. Meet in the middle of the UM Field House parking lot to leave at 8:30 AM, or meet up at the mill site at 9 AM for the all-day trip. (Bring lunch!) Call 2141194 to learn more. Free. Tee up, y’all, it’s the second annual Florence Athletic Department GOLF SCRAMBLE! (And heck yes, we are going to capitalize it that way.) 10 AM shotgun start at the Whitetail Golf Course in Stevensville. 18 teams of four at $40 per person, includes 9 holes of golf and lunch. Call Delaine at 241-1709 or Kelly at 880-2933 for more info.

SUNDAY AUGUST 25 Fancy runners and regular folks are invited to feel the burn at River City Roots Run, a 4-miler that starts on Alder Street near the Higgins XXXXs. Race day registration starts at 7 AM, run begins at 9 AM. Check out runwildmissoula.org to learn more. Cash prizes included. Keep your eyes peeled for Bigfoot, and Smokey the Bear too, during the Missoula Family Leave No Trace Expo, an event with music and activities to help teach folks how to safely and responsible have fun in the great outdoors. Fort Missoula; follow the signs. 4-8 PM. Free.

TUESDAY AUGUST 27 Meet other free-wheeling gals when Montana Dirt Girls meet every Tuesday around 6 PM on Tuesdays for hiking or mountain biking in the Missoula area. For locations and more information, visit mtdirtgirls.tripod.com. Free.

THURSDAY AUGUST 29 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Tuesdays to play polo. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [37]


[community]

Here’s some concepts brought to you by the labor movement’s efforts in the late 19th and early 20th centuries: Eight-hour work days. Restrictions on child labor. Retirement ages. Weekends. Sick pay. Safety regulations. These are not things that, in most cases, companies chose to enforce out of the goodness of their (metaphorical) hearts. In case you believe that the free market alone encourages corporations to treat their employees well, go peruse some recent news articles about more than 1,100 deaths and injuries at Bangladesh garment factories; factories that limited collective bargaining power and were found to have serious safety violations. In a move that’s very telling of the power that unions have to keep workplaces safe, the Bangladeshi government has since announced plans to allow workers to unionize more freely. Looking to our own borders, protections for workers, built by the American labor movement and safeguarded by unions, are in danger these days. Take Wisconsin, where a few years ago, Gov. Scott Walker beat back a voter recall and approved legislation that severely limited the strength of public sector

unions in the state. Private-sector union membership is in decline since the post-WWII era (which unions attribute to employers making it increasingly chancey to join), a decline that’s coincided with a rise in income inequality. That is, the rich keep getting richer and the poor keep getting poorer. But now, Wisconsin has become a “ground zero for the future of the labor movement,” according to an Aug. 2 Salon piece, and the word is spreading. Even fast-food workers are trying to mobilize for better wages. This year, the Steelworkers union is sponsoring the Summer of Solidarity tour, a 17-day trip across the country. The tour stops in Missoula at the Union Hall for a workshop and potluck aimed toward bringing together locals in a bigger struggle against corporate power. As they say, if you’re not angry, you’re not paying attention. —Kate Whittle The Summer of Solidarity Tour stops in Missoula on Mon., Aug. 28 at the Union Hall, 208 E. Main St., with workshops at potluck at 5 PM, and live music to follow at 7 PM. Free to attend. Check out labornotes.org for more info.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] FRIDAY AUGUST 23 Just imagine the treasures you might find at the Missoula Manor Homes annual White Elephant Sale, with jewelry, furniture, books, small electronics and more, plus cinnamon rolls and coffee. 909 W. Central Ave (near Walgreens off Brooks.) Friday from 9 AM to 2 PM, Saturday from 9 AM to noon. It’ll be a doggone good time for all the cool cats at the 11th Last Best Bone Ball, a fundraiser for the Humane Society of Western Montana. The Humane Society is celebrating 50 years of helping critters find good homes, and boasts a whopping 98 percent adoption rate. Caras Park, 5:30 PM. $50. Check out myhswm.org. Peter Sagal can eat his heart out when The Jeannette Rankin Peace Center hosts a series of talks discussing the Constitution. Sample topic: “Are Big Bank Bailouts allowed by the Constitution?” 7 PM. Free. Call 543-3955 to learn more.

SATURDAY AUGUST 24 Just imagine the treasures you might find at the Missoula Manor Homes annual White Elephant Sale, with jewelry, furniture, books, small electronics and more, plus cinnamon rolls and coffee. 909 W. Central Ave (near Walgreens off Brooks.) Friday from 9 AM to 2 PM, Saturday from 9 AM to noon.

MONDAY AUGUST 26 Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from

Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM, except for holidays.

TUESDAY AUGUST 27 Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 28 Get collectively sustained when Transition Missoula hosts a end of summer potluck at 520 Dearborn. 6 PM. Bring a dish, beverages, a plate, chairs and a drum if you got ‘em. Check out transitiontownmissoula.org or call Claudia at gcbrown@bresnan.net for more info.

THURSDAY AUGUST 29 Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Intercultural Dialogue Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, where people from various backgrounds meet on the last Thur. of each month at 5 PM for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info. Eleanor’s Project, a non-profit founded in memory of a Missoula girl born with cerebral palsy, is hosting a fundraiser for Peruvian children with disabilities. The event at A Carousel for Missoula includes expert wheelchair riders, wheelchair mobility skills course, handwoven bracelets and unlimited carousel rides. 5-8:30 PM. VIsit eleanorsproject.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent • August 22–August 29, 2013


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 ROXANNE• Roxanne is a very pretty young lady who is full of spirit and always ready to do something fun. She likes to play, she likes to go for walks, and we're sure she'd also be a great hiking partner. Most of all, she wants to be your best friend.

EMILY•Emily is an older Beagle who acts

like a youngster. She gets along with all different kinds and sizes of dogs, and she thinks people are just great. She's also smart and has very good manners. What's not to like?

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

RUGER•Ruger is a handsome fellow who

really dislikes living in a cage in a room filled with other dogs. He'd like his own space and his own people. Although he isn't at his best 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 inside our kennel, he's very popular with our Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) volunteers who want to take a dog for a long 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 walk. Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri)

BUTTERFLY•Butterfly is a sweet, gentle lady who would love to have a real family again. She hopes that the special bonus that comes with any adoption of a black or a black and white cat during August will help that new family find her sooner rather than later!

ASPEN•Aspen is a big, beautiful cat who wants to be your one and only. She hopes that someone looking for a truly special cat will take advantage of the August "special" on adoptions of black and black and white cats, and just take her home!

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

JARALI•Jarali is sleek, smooth, and shiny

www.dolack.com

-- as well as friendly and loving. Her adoption fee has been sponsored, and anyone adopting her during August will also receive a special treat from the Black Cat Bake Shop. Such a deal!

Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat)

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 SPANKY•Missing the Little Rascals? So is

Spanky, a seven year old boy whose owners moved and left him behind. This tuxedo colored boy is a big sweetheart. He loves his belly rubbed and a comfy lap, and will reward you with affectionate purrs. Good with dogs & cats alike, Spanky would love to be your personal assistant. Come meet him today!

SID•Hi. I’m Sid and just who you’re looking for. Seven years young, you can call me your partner in life. I’ll help in whatever you do – watch TV, work on the computer, or just chill during the day. I prefer a quieter adult home, and as a sweet boy, I’ll reward you with many purrs plus be your forever friend.

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

The Flower Bed

2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

TAFFY• Don’t be surprised if this sweet 4-

year old calico girl sticks with you. Taffy is easygoing, independent, & loves treats, not to mention your affection. Considered a private investigator, she’ll keep an eye on your household & take care of intruders such as mice. Preferring to be the only pet in an adult home, she welcomes catnip and cat toys!

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

DONNIE DARKO•Okay, I’m just d’bom.

I’m Donnie Darko, a 3-year old Chihuahua mix boy who is outgoing, playful and definitely worth meeting. I get along with adults and children alike, and would love a forever home where we could go on daily walks and hikes. Still young, I’d enjoy learning new things. All I ask for is your love. Come meet me!

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

JERSEY BOY•Aptly named, Jersey Boy

has the moves & energy of a star. Just a tad over 1 year old, he’s playful, social and independent. This Chihuahua pup loves to go for a walk on a leash, and is eager to please and learn. While Jersey would prefer an adult environment, he also does well with older kids. Come meet him!

Improving Lives One Pet at a Time Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

DOC•This sweet guy named Doc could be the medicine you need. A kind boy who loves a lap, head rubs, treats and brushing, he is 10 years old and friendly, if not a little shy. Doc’s person passed away and therefore, he, Snow White and Dopey (along with a few other ‘dwarfs’) are looking for their forever home. Come meet them all today!

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4701 TABITHA•Tabitha is a 4-year-old female

orange tabby who has been with AniMeals for two years. She is a very sweet girl; however, she will need a single cat home and a patient owner. She is shy upon first introduction, but once she gets to know you, she is very loving.

ROCKY• Rocky is a large 5-year-old male tabby. He is declawed on the front, extremely loving and prefers to live with other female cats. He is tentative and cautious around men, but instantly cuddles with women.

GALENA•Galena

is a 3-year-old female, long-haired tabby. She is playful and full of energy. She is looking for an indoor/outdoor environment and would do well in a multiple-pet home, as long as she has her own space.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

715 Kensington Ste 8

406-240-1113

J. Willis Photography

Find me on FACEBOOK jessicagoulding.zenfolio.com specializing in weddings, pets, families, babies, senior pictures, fine art, and more!

LEONA•Leona is a 6-year-old female lilac

Rockin Rudy’s World Headquarters 237 Blaine • 542-0077

tortoiseshell who has been at the shelter since January of 2012. She gets along well with children and other cats but is often overlooked because of her quiet, calm disposition.

missoulanews.com • August 22–August 29, 2013 [39]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

August 22 - August 29, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com

donate now at missoulamedicalaid.org!

LOST & FOUND

PRODUCE SALE MILLTOWN GARDEN PATCH. Saturdays 9:00-11:00 by Milltown Water Tower. 274-1518

FOUND: Light blue journal with pen up Rock Creek near Welcome Creek on August 2nd. Call 518-265-8570 to ID

Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com

LOST MALE COCKATIEL Lost Sunday 8/4/13 middle Rattlesnake, Missoula, MT. He is mostly grey and white with orange cheeks — yellow on his head. Male cockatiel responds to Buck. If seen and found, call

Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. Please

FREE

Estimates

406-880-0688

bladesofglorylawncarellc.com

Ken's Barber Shop Children and Walk-in Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard trims-$4 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

Piano Lessons

HYPNOSIS

A clinical approach to negative self-talk • bad habits stress • depression Empower Yourself

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2

728-5693 • Mary Place MSW, CHT, GIS

“I found a brighter world, I found Unity” 546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C6 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7 Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C9 This Modern World . .C12

At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541

P L AC E YOUR AD:

Basic & Advanced Obedience School

Walk it.

Dog obedience classes to begin Sept. 9-13th

317 S. Orange

( :

Missoula Near Stevensville Hamilton

Call Gary Kammerer 406-777-3527

Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com

I BUY

PET OF THE WEEK

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

Carmel How big is your heart? Carmel is a young girl at the Humane Society of Western Montana who’s really hoping to find her forever home. Approximately 1-year old, she’s a shepherd cross pup with beautiful tan & black coloring. A bit shy, she desires an adult home where someone would take the time to teach her how wonderful being a dog is, & to show her the ropes. Might that be you? Expect your heart to melt. 4 0 6 . 5 4 9 . 3 9 3 4 . www.myHSWM.org

Honda • Subaru • VW Toyota • Nissan Japanese/German Cars Trucks SUVs

327-0300 ANY TIME

“This will be our reply to violence: to make music more intensely, more beautifully, more devotedly than ever before.” – Leonard Bernstein


COMMUNITY BULLETIN

ADVICE GODDESS

Marlene 4067212425.

By Amy Alkon IT'S SCOLD IN HERE Online dating isn't going so well. I'm a 34-year-old professor seeking a relationship. I listed an age range of 18 to 35 on my profile, not because I particularly like 18-year-olds but simply to avoid limiting my options. I messaged a 24-year-old woman, noting that I loved that she "enjoys supporting people who have a purpose and a passion." She wrote back: "You seem really cool, but the fact that you're considering dating women as young as 18 is a dealbreaker. 18-year-olds aren't people yet. You're a professor. You know that." She then scolded me for failing to admire that she clearly has purpose and passion—she doesn't just support those things—but considering my interest in 18-year-olds, purpose and passion probably don't matter much to me anyway. Huh?! Should I really be faulted for being open-minded? —Reprimanded Online dating can be so efficient. It used to be that you'd have to wait to say hello to have your first argument. This woman probably couldn't go out with you anyway, as busy as she must be getting the ignition lock replaced on her broom. However, she may have done you a favor. Although most women won't turn online dating into online berating, many probably share her anger and suspicion at the lower end of your listed age range. But, but … you protest, you're just trying to be open instead of assuming that every single 18-year-old will be the dating equivalent of going out with a steak in a short skirt. Your open-mindedness seems to be a rational approach. The problem is, we aren't the rational animals we smugly insist we are. Research by evolutionary psychologists Martie Haselton and David Buss suggests that we evolved to make protective errors in judgment—erring on the side of perceiving whatever would have been least costly for our survival and mating interests back in the ancestral environment. This makes us prone to believe there's a snake behind every rustle of a pile of leaves because the embarrassment from shrieking like an idiot would have been less costly than dying from a snakebite. In the mating sphere, women evolved to be "commitment skeptics," prone to overperceive men as hookup-seeking cads until they prove otherwise. For men, it would have been costly to miss any mating opportunity … leading to a 34-year-old man being "open" to a wide range of women, including a woman only slightly older than some of his socks. You can turn this into a positive experience in two ways: by thanking your lucky

stars that you won't be the boyfriend she's ripping into at the supermarket for eyeing the wrong potato and by listing an age range that's less ire-producing. This actually shouldn't limit you in the slightest, since you can write to any woman you find attractive—including those who'll think you're "like, so much more amazing" than the other "men" they're dating, because you don't live with your parents or have a job that requires a paper hat.

DON'T JUST MALL A WOMAN I've saved some money to get my girlfriend something special for her birthday. I know what she likes at REI, Pottery Barn, and Williams-Sonoma, but nothing feels special enough. Perhaps I'm an idiot for asking you, a stranger, what to get the woman I know and love, but maybe you can point me in the right direction. —Stumped Too bad the two of you aren't cats, or you could just come by with a dead cricket between your teeth. But you are wise to think outside the cardboard box. Researchers Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton write in "Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending" that the purchases that ultimately make us the happiest are not material things but experiences. They cite research showing that new "stuff" soon stops giving us the same zing, while experiential purchases not only contribute to our sense of self and our connection with others but get more meaningful over time through the stories we tell about them. Also, they never need dusting. So, instead of deciding between the espresso machine that'll guess her weight and the one that gets basic cable, think about an experience she'd really love. It could be a Champagne balloon ride or driving a racecar around a track (nascarracingexperience.com). But fret not if these are too pricey. The research suggests that even when people spend just a few dollars, they get more lasting pleasure from an experience than a thing. And even when experiences go wrong, like a romantic picnic that ends in horrible poison oak, they tend to be viewed fondly in hindsight. Your girlfriend may not have asked for a series of hydrocortisone injections for her birthday, but years later, she'll be laughing with you and friends about that and not the story of how you once got her a bowl from Pottery Barn.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • August 22 – August 29, 2013

LOST MALE COCKATiEL. Lost Sunday 8/4/13 middle Rattlesnake, Missoula, MT. He is mostly grey and white with orange cheeks — yellow on his head. Male cockatiel responds to Buck. If seen and found, call Marlene 406-721-2425. WHERE’S JERRY? Lost male neutered tabby cat. Seen 7/27. Kiwanis Park. 5yo, split ear. No collar. Very friendly. Call 240-5382.

tion to great bargains on jewelry, furniture, books, small appliances and electronics, we will also have our popular cinnamon rolls and coffee available for purchase. Located at 909 West Central Avenue (kitty corner from Walgreen’s). WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744

VOLUNTEERS

TO GIVE AWAY Free For All First Fridays. Free haircuts for everyone. Mighty Aphrodite Salon. 406-546-3846. 736A S. 1st W. Missoula. Find us on Facebook Pass It On Missoula is now located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

Watershed Education Network WEN needs volunteers who are passionate about rivers and education. Contact us: 541-9287 or www.montanawatershed.org

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

MEDICAL MARIJUANA CARD Please call 830-6890 to renew or get a new Medical Marijuana Card for Montana. Fletch Law, PLLC Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Accidents & Personal Injury

100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744

Over 20 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

The Missoula Manor Homes Annual White Elephant Sale is Friday August 23 from 9 AM to 2 PM and Saturday August 24 from 9 AM to 12 Noon. In addi-

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL BARTENDING

$300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 FRONT DESK ASSOCIATES part time/full time. Must have excellent customer service skills, be dependable and self-motivated. Must have computer knowledge and good phone skills. Hotel experience preferred. Work directly with customers at the front desk, make reservations, some light cleaning in lobby and front desk area, morning shift will include light cleaning in breakfast room. Work can be parttime OR full-time depending on employer need, between 24 and 40 hours per week. Shifts are from 7AM-3PM or 3PM-11PM. WAGE: $7.80 per hour. Job#2985108. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 GENERAL LABORERS are needed for a growing aluminum trailer manufacturing company. Hands-on experience with a variety of power tools is required. Previous experience in manufacturing, construction or related field is highly

preferred. Mon-Fri, 7 am to 5:30 pm, 45-50+ hours per week. $35,000+ annually. Benefits available. Job#2985105. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take your career to the next level. Benefits: à$50,000 Loan Repayment Program. àMontgomery GI Bill. àUp to 100% tuition assistance for college. àMedical & dental benefits. àStarting at $13.00/hr. àPaid job skill training. àCall 1800-G0-GUARD. National Guard. Part-time job...Full-time benefits. NEED A JOB NOW? Our company currently operates over 200 websites and a call center located in Missoula Must have phone, email, computer and internet skills. We offer paid training at $320 per week and commissions based pay to our trained sales people. Average wage is $18/HR +plus benefits and bonuses. For interviews call 406.329.7662

Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266 Protective Security Off. Missoula, MT for the Federal Protective Service and The Department of Homeland Security to control access/egress according to post orders, to inspect packages entering the facilities, and assist in evacuations of building in the event of a fire or other situation. Must be able to write reports, maintain a duty log, and be willing to travel if needed. A State of Montana Private Security Guard License will need to be obtained at time of hiring; as well as a Federal background check will be obtained. Job# 9980057. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 RETAIL ASSOCIATE POSITIONS Cashier, Donation Door Attendant, Sales Floor/Rack Roller, Processor/Pricer. Able to perform repetitive tasks independently; Knowledge of current trends helpful; Must be able to work flexible hours, days, evenings, and weekends; Available to work all shifts (weekends and nights a must) $8.36/hr. Job#2985107. Missoula Job Service 728-7060


EMPLOYMENT RETAIL TECHNICIAN Computer skills required; Knowledge of collectibles antiques and web trend desired; Photography experience is helpful; Good communication skills a must; Ability to work with people with disabilities and other special needs desirable. Full time, regular position. WAGE: $8.91/hr. Job#9645474. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES MANAGER $19.7547/hr, regular, full time, nonunion. The Missoula Parking Commission is seeking an individual to plan, organize and oversee administrative support, parking enforcement and collection functions; perform a variety of financial accounting and budgeting duties, and perform complex administrative support functions for the department. Requires bachelor’s degree in business administration, accounting, public administration or related field and three years of increasingly responsible administrative assistant or management related experience including two years of supervisory experience, OR high school diploma or equivalent plus two years of course work in business management or accounting and five years of increasingly responsible administrative assistant or management related experience with two years of supervisory experience. Complete job description and required City application available at City of Missoula Human Resources Dept., 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802-4297, (406) 552-6130 or apply on-line at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/jobs. Closing Date: 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, Au-

gust 27, 2013. EEO/AA/ADA Employer. Qualified women, veterans, minority and handicapped individuals are strongly encouraged to apply. After-School Program Assistant Kids-Niche, a placebased after-school program for 1st - 5th graders, is looking for an energetic, part-time assistant. Bachelor’s degree in education or related field or two years teaching experience. $9.00 - $10.50 Hourly. Job#9980076. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical Coding. Minimum 5 years experience adult inpatient medical surgical or critical care nursing; or minimum 5 years inpatient coding. Full time; M-F; day shift. Missoula Job Service 7287060 LEGAL ASSISTANT for Business and civil litigation law firm in Missoula, MT. Proficiency with recent versions of WordPerfect, Outlook & Adobe. Typing speed of at least 55 wpm. Must have own car and valid driver’s license for use in running errands (mileage reimbursed). Must work a full time schedule; 8am to 5pm, Monday Friday with occasional over-time. WAGE: Depending on Experience. Benefit package available upon eligibility; health, retirement and paid vacation. Job#2985112. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 PHONATHON CALL CENTER MANAGER The University of Montana Foundation, part-time (30 hrs/week) Bachelor’s Degree or relevant work experience. 1-2 years

of supervisory experience. Proven experience with office software applications such as Word, Outlook & Excel. Work week is Sunday thru Thursday, 3:30pm-9:30pm. The UM Foundation offers a competitive salary ($14.00/hr) and an excellent benefit package. Job#2985109. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR BUILDING OPERATOR Missoula County is seeking a regular, full-time BUILDING OPERATOR (2 positions). Requires training or education demonstrating achievement of one of the following: 1) Completion of a 1 year Building Operator’s Program; 2) Completion of a 2 year Building Engineers Program; 3) Current journey level license in Plumbing; 4) Current journey level license in Electrical; 5) A current fire prevention license; 6) Certificate or other evidence of completing HVAC training. Requires two years of experience as a building operator and technician. Must possess a valid Montana Driver’s License and pass an extensive background check. Work is full-time and pay is $15.16/hr. Benefits available. CLOSE DATE: 08/27/13. Job#2985106. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Equipment Operator Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disability to perform the essential functions. Previous heavy equipment operation experience or training is preferred. Valid driver’s license is preferred. Operate equipment safely and efficiently. Responsible for safe slopes on excavations and proper barricading. Job

#9980035. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Hiring Service Technicians Looking to join a winning team? University Motors Honda is expanding and we are searching for 2 Technicians that enjoy a fast paced environment, and the opportunity to be on a team that provides exceptional customer service. Must have required tools and the ability to work Monday - Friday with the occasional Saturday. University Motors Honda offers Holiday Pay, Vacation, Health, Vision and Dental Insurance. 401K, short term disability and Life Insurance. Family owned business since 1992. DMS system is Reynolds and Reynolds. Stop in today to complete an application at 3600 S Reserve Street. Pay DOE NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Class” training. New Academy classes weekly. No money down or credit check. Certified Mentors ready and available. Paid (while training with mentor). Regional and Dedicated opportunities. Great career path. Excellent Benefits Package. Please Call: (520)375-9632 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546 TRUCK DRIVER-GLASGOW, MT We are looking for a truck driver to safely transport farm equipment as assigned. Selected applicant will effectively and professionally commu-

nicate with sales, service and customers to keep them informed of scheduling and other relevant changes. Must have a CDL, clean MVR, keep timely and accurate records/logs of pickup and delivery to customers as appropriate and maintain all required certifications and necessary paperwork for compliance with DOT, OSHA and company policies and regulations. We offer competitive wages, 401k retirement plan, health insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance, short-term & long-term disability insurance, life insurance, paid vacation, eight paid holidays and job training. If you are ready to work in a great environment with great people, email your resume to Glasgow Implement giservicedept@gmail.com or call

Pete or Joe and set up an interview today. Glasgow Implement Glasgow, MT 1-800-345-6042. 1-406228-9341

SALES INTERACTIVE / ONLINE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE /

#2984085 A minimum of 3 years successful sales experience, preferably in media sales. Thoroughly familiar with Microsoft Office Suite. Excellent communication, presentation and interpersonal skills. New or non-traditional media sales experience a plus. Solution based selling background. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

GIVE BACK. GET MORE. Donate life-saving plasma.

RECEIVE RECEI EC IV VE U UP TO $ $320 32 YOUR 1st MONTH! ª'REATª.ORTHERNª!VEªsª-ISSOULA ª-4ª 406.721.2584 SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT AT BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM

FLATBED DRIVERS NEEDED FROM THE MISSOULA AREA • Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years exp. required • Clean driving record

406-493-7876 Call 9am-5pm M-F only

$220

NEW DONORS OR DONORS WHO HAVEN’T DONATED IN SIX MONTHS OR MORE, PRESENT THIS COUPON AND RECEIVE $220 IN JUST FOUR DONATIONS.

Must present this coupon prior to the initial donation to receive a total of $40 on your first, a total of $50 on your second, a total of $60 on your third, and a total of $70 on your fourth successful donation. Initial donation must be completed by 8.31.13 and subsequent donations within 30 days. Coupon redeemable only upon completing successful donations. May not be combined with any other offer. Only at participating locations.

MARKETPLACE ELECTRONICS REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! 4Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $24.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers. CALL 1-866-755-3285

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 5490013. www.montanamusic.com

Outlaw Music

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop! Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.org 406-207-0765

Thift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

CATS: #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; LONGEST RESIDENT #3142 Orange, DSH, SF, 12yrs; #3187 Torbie, ASH, SF, 7yrs; #3226 Grey/white, Persian X, SF, 4yrs; #3238 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 3yrs; #3240 Calico, DSH, SF, 8yrs; #3248 Black, DMH, NM, 2yrs; # 3313 Flame Point, Siamese, SF, 6yrs; #3340 Blk/tan, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3429 White/grey, Siamese/DSH, 12yrs; #3454 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #3468 Black, DSH, SF, 2yrs; #3477 Black, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3505 White/grey, ASH, SF, 8yrs; #3527 Blk/white, ASH, SF, 6yrs; #3540 Black Torti, Persian X, SF, 6yrs; #3720 Blk/white, ASH, NM, 3yrs; #3723 Orange Tabby, ASH, NM, 10yrs; #3729 Blk/Gold Torti, DMH, SF, 7yrs; #3759 Black, DLM,

NM, 5yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #3291 Brindle, Pit Bull, NM, 3yrs; #3432 Blk/white, Pit, NM, 3yrs; #3488 B&W, Pointer, NM, 2yrs; #3489

Summertime Sale! 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

Blk/tan, Shepherd X, NM, 2yrs; #3490 Golden, Pit X, NM, 3yrs; #3503 Black/tan, Rott/Shep X, NM, 9 mo; #3575 Blk/white, BC/Heeler, SF, 8yrs; #3623 Bluetick Hound, NM, 4yrs; #3743 White, Poodle, SF, 3yrs; #3757 Tri, Heeler X, NM, 9yrs; #3793 Black/brown, Lab X, SF, 2yrs. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in

Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

Contact Deb, Cloud Dancer Alpacas, Lewistown, for more information: (406)538-3177

Pekingese puppies AKC PEKINGESE male puppies. Excellant pedigrees. Show potenial. $950.00 406-490-3306 or 406560-1145

OUTDOOR GEAR

PET ALPACAS FOR SALE, $200 each. To approved homes only. Non-breeding, various colors.

The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-7216056

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

IT'S TIME TO

PLAY

OUTSIDE! SWINGS! BIKES! TOYS!

WATERMELON COOLER 2 oz. Silver Tequila 1 oz. Pineapple Juice 1/2 oz. Lemon Juice 3 Chunks Watermelon Lemon Slice Garnish

829 S. Higgins On the Hip Strip

406.543.1179 Mon-Sat 10:30-6 • Sun 12-4

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 22 – August 29, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

By Rob Brezsny

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): "The artist is by necessity a collector," said graphic designer Paul Rand. "He accumulates things with the same ardor and curiosity with which a boy stuffs his pockets. He borrows from the sea and from the scrap heap; he takes snapshots, makes mental notes, and records impressions on tablecloths and newspapers. He has a taste for children's wall scrawling as appreciative as that for prehistoric cave painting." Whether or not you're an artist, Gemini, this would be an excellent approach for you in the coming days. You're in a phase when you can thrive by being a gatherer of everything that attracts and fascinates you. You don't need to know yet why you're assembling all these clues. That will be revealed in good time.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Can you remember the last time you bumped up against a limitation caused by your lack of knowledge? What did it feel like? I expect that sometime soon you will have that experience again. You may shiver with worry as you contemplate the potential consequences of your continued ignorance. But you may also feel the thrill of hungry curiosity rising up in you. If all goes well, the fear and curiosity will motivate you to get further educated. You will set to work on a practical plan to make it happen.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): "My story isn’t sweet and harmonious like invented stories," wrote novelist Herman Hesse. "It tastes of folly and bewilderment, of madness and dream, like the life of all people who no longer want to lie to themselves." As interesting as Hesse's declaration is, let's not take it as gospel. Let's instead envision the possibility that when people reduce the number of lies they tell themselves, their lives may become sweeter and more harmonious as a result. I propose that exact scenario for you right now, Leo. There might be a rough adjustment period as you cut back on your self-deceptions, but eventually your folly and bewilderment will diminish as the sweet harmony grows.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Novelist James Joyce once articulated an extreme wish that other writers have probably felt but never actually said. "The demand that I make of my reader," said Joyce, "is that he should devote his whole life to reading my works." Was he being mischievous? Maybe. But he never apologized or issued a retraction. Your assignment, Virgo, is to conjure up your own version of that wild desire: a clear statement of exactly what you really, really want in all of its extravagant glory. I think it'll be healthy for you to identify this pure and naked longing. (P.S. I'm not implying that you should immediately try to get it fulfilled, though. For now, the important thing is knowing what it is.)

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Now and then a British Libra named Lloyd Scott dresses up in funny costumes while competing in long-distance races. He does it to raise money for charity. In the 2011 London Marathon, he wore a nine-foot snail outfit for the duration of the course. It took him 27 days to finish. I suggest you draw inspiration from his heroic effort. From a cosmic perspective, it would make sense for you to take your time as you engage in amusing activities that benefit your fellow humans.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What will you do now that you have acquired more clout and visibility? Will you mostly just pump up your self-love and bask in the increased attention? There's nothing wrong with that, of course. But if those are the only ways you cash in on your added power, the power won't last. I suggest you take advantage of your enhanced influence by engaging in radical acts of magnanimity. Perform good deeds and spread big ideas. The more blessings you bestow on your fellow humans, the more enduring your new perks will be.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You've been pretty wild and uncontained lately, and that's OK. I've loved seeing how much permission you've given yourself to ramble free, experiment with the improbable, and risk being a fool. I suspect that history will judge a majority of your recent explorations as tonic. But now, Sagittarius, the tenor of the time is shifting. To continue being in alignment with your highest good, I believe you will have to rein in your wanderlust and start attending to the care and cultivation of your power spot. Can you find a way to enjoy taking on more responsibility?

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "The person who can't visualize a horse galloping on a tomato is an idiot," said the founder of Surrealism, writer André Breton. I wouldn't go so far as to call such an imagination-deprived soul an "idiot," but I do agree with the gist of his declaration. One of the essential facets of intelligence is the ability to conjure up vivid and creative images in one's mind. When daily life has grown a bit staid or stuck or overly serious, this skill becomes even more crucial. Now is one of those times for you, Capricorn. If you have any trouble visualizing a horse galloping on a tomato, take measures to boost the fertility of your imagination.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you google the statement "I can change overnight," most of the results that come up are negative, like "It's not something I can change overnight" or "I don't think I can change overnight." But there's one google link to "I can change overnight." It's a declaration made by Taurus painter Willem de Kooning. He was referring to how unattached he was to defining his work and how easy it was for him to mutate his artistic style. I wouldn't normally advise you Tauruses to use "I can change overnight" as your battle cry. But for the foreseeable future you do have the power to make some rather rapid and thorough transformations.

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BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

ARIES (March 21-April 19): An Indian student named Sankalp Sinha has invented the "Good Morning Sing N Shock." It's an alarm clock that plays you a song and gives you a small electrical jolt when you hit the snooze button. The voltage applied is far less intense than, say, a taser, and is designed to energize you rather than disable you. I encourage you to seek out wake-up calls like the kind this device administers, Aries: fairly gentle, yet sufficiently dramatic to get your attention. The alternative would be to wait around for blind fate to provide the wake-up calls. They might be a bit more strenuous.

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h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): "I want to be with those who know the secret things, or else alone," wrote the eccentric ecstatic poet Rainer Maria Rilke. That wouldn't be a good rule for you Aquarians to live by all the time. To thrive, you need a variety of cohorts and allies, including those who know and care little about secret things. But I suspect that for the next few weeks, an affinity for those who know secret things might suit you well. More than that, they may be exactly the accomplices who will help you attend to your number one assignment: exploratory holy work in the depths.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): To launch your horoscope, I'll steal a line from a Thomas Pynchon novel: A revelation trembles just beyond the threshold of your understanding. To continue your oracle, I'll borrow a message I heard in my dream last night: A breakthrough shivers just beyond the edge of your courage. Next, I'll use words I think I heard while eavesdropping on a conversation at Whole Foods: If you want to cook up the ultimate love feast, you're still missing one ingredient. And to finish this oracle, Pisces, I'll say that if you want to precipitate the trembling revelation, activate the shivering breakthrough, and acquire the missing ingredient, imitate what I've done in creating this horoscope. Assume the whole world is offering you useful clues, and listen closely. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • August 22 – August 29, 2013

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 22 – August 29, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on September 9, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution levying and assessing the lots and parcels within the City of Missoula Road District Number 1 in the amount of $704,498 for the costs associated with providing certain maintenance, purchasing and improvement services in fiscal year 2014 for city-owned facilities, land and equipment under the responsibility and care of the City of Missoula Public Works Department’s Street and Vehicle Maintenance Divisions and Development Service’s Engineering Division providing for a method of assessments; and providing for other matters properly relating thereto. Copies of the resolution are available at the City Clerk Office, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. For further information, contact Marty Rehbein, City Clerk, at 552-6078. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein CMC, City Clerk

CITY OF MISSOULA PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on September 9, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution levying and assessing the lots and parcels within the city of Missoula Park District Number 1 in the amount of $628,297 for the costs associated with providing certain maintenance, purchasing and improvement services in fiscal year 2014 for city-owned facilities, land and equipment under the responsibility and care of the City of Missoula Parks and Recreation Department; providing for a method of assessments; and providing for other matters properly relating thereto. Copies of the resolution are available at the City Clerk Office, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. For further information, contact Marty Rehbein, City Clerk, at 552-6078. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein Cassie R. Dellwo MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM 38 Second Ave E Dickinson ND 58601 Phone: 701-227-1841 Fax: 701-

225-6878 Attorney for the Plaintiff CDellwo@mackoff.com MT Bar #11880 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV-13-460 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, Plaintiff, -vs- Jerry R. Allen; Donna M. Allen; Eric Shawn Allen; Robin Lin Allen, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, JERRY R. ALLEN AND DONNA M. ALLEN: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an action for legal reformation of real property and foreclosure of a Deed of Trust upon the following described real property in the County of Missoula, State of Montana: Commencing at the Northwest 1/16 corner of said Section 24, the true point of beginning; thence South 89 degrees 57 minutes 54 seconds East along the Northerly boundary of the Southeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 24, a distance of 665.95 feet; thence North 87 de-

grees 22 minutes 24 seconds East 665.62 feet to a point on the North-South Mid-section line of said Section 24; thence South 00 degrees 13 minutes 11 seconds West along said Mid-section line, a distance of 593.18 feet to the Northeast corner of Tract A of Certificate of Survey 1124; thence the following six (6) courses along the Northerly boundary of said Tract A; South 89 degrees 57 minutes 22 seconds West 216.96 feet; South 46 minutes 29 minutes 49 seconds West 105.55 feet; South 76 degrees 31 minutes 09 seconds West 158.55 feet; thence South 47 degrees 53 minutes 37 seconds West 109.18 feet; North 81 degrees 48 minutes 32 seconds West 584.60 feet; and North 89 degrees 57 minutes 50 seconds West 221.76 feet; thence North 00 degrees 02 minutes 38 seconds East 662.64 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 10250 Miller Creek Road, Missoula, MT 59803 That there was an error in the legal description of the property intended to secure this loan and in order to include all improvements to be part of the lien, the legal description should have been shown as follows: Commencing at the Northwest 1/16 corner of said Section 24, the true point of beginning; thence South 89 degrees 57 minutes 54 seconds East along the Northerly boundary of the Southeast l/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 24, a distance of 665.95 feet; thence North 87 degrees 22 minutes 24 seconds East 665.62 feet to a point on the North-South Mid-section line of said Section 24; thence South 00 degrees 13 minutes 11 seconds West along said Mid-

section line, a distance of 593.18 feet to the Northeast corner of Tract A of Certificate of Survey 1124; thence the following six (6) courses along the Northerly boundary of said Tract A; South 89 degrees 57 minutes 22 seconds West 216.96 feet; South 46 degrees 29 minutes 49 seconds West 105.55 feet; South 76 degrees 31 minutes 09 seconds West 158.55 feet; thence South 47 degrees 53 minutes 37 seconds West 109.18 feet; North 81 degrees 48 minutes 32 seconds West 584.60 feet; and North 89 degrees 57 minutes 50 seconds West 221.76 feet; thence North 00 degrees 02 minutes 38 seconds East 662.64 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 10250 Miller Creek Road, Missoula, MT 59803 and the legal description should be reformed to show the property that was intended to be described on the Deed of Trust. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, this 6th day of August, 2013. (SEAL OF THE COURT) Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By; /s/ Laura M. Driscoll, Deputy Clerk of the District Court Dated this 24th day of July, 2013. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for Plaintiff 38 Second Ave E Dickinson ND 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 By: /s/ Cassie R. Dellwo, Attorney #11880 Attorney for the Plaintiff THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION RECEIVED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. NOTICE Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that un-

ADVERTISMENTS FOR BIDS MacArthur, Means & Wells, Architects, PC Poverello Center, Inc. 1110 W. Broadway Project #: 13.011 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that separate sealed BIDS for the Poverello Center, 1110 W. Broadway Property, will be received by the Poverello Center, Inc., c/o MMW Architects, located at 125 West Alder Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 PM on August 29, 2013, at which time bids will be publicly opened and read aloud for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for the construction of the following. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications prepared by MMW Architects. The project consists of construction of a new soup kitchen and homeless shelter. The contract is being funded with federal funds through the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program and administered by the Montana Department of Commerce and the County and City of Missoula, and is subject to all federal laws and regulations as specified under the Federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974. Bids shall be submitted on the form provided with the Contract Documents. Copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained at the office of MMW Architects, located at 125 West Alder Street, Missoula, MT 59802 upon payment of $200.00 refundable deposit for each set and a nonrefundable shipping and handling fee of $45/set. The documents will be available @ MMW on Monday, August 5, 2013 after 1:00 PM. In addition, Contract Document will also be available at several plans rooms within the State of Montana, including the Missoula Plans Exchange, 201 N. Russell, Missoula, MT (406) 549-5002. Any BIDDER, upon returning the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS promptly and in good condition, will be refunded their payment, and any NON-BIDDER upon so returning the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS will be refunded $200.00. Any shipping and handling fee will not be refunded. Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968. The contractor will ensure that to the greatest extent feasible opportunities for training and employment arising in connection with this CDBG-assisted project will be extended to lower income project area residents. Further, the contractor will, to the greatest extent feasible, utilize business concerns located in or substantially owned by residents of the project area, in the award of contracts and purchase of services and supplies. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Requirements: Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) requirements of federal Executive Order 11246 are applicable to CDBG-funded construction contracts and procedures for compliance should be followed and documented. The current Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Directory may be used to locate qualified DBE firms in your area. The DBE/WBE Directory can be accessed via the MDT’s internet website: http://www.mdt.mt.gov/business/contracting/civil/dbe.shtml -- or by contacting MDT’s DBE Program Bureau at (800) 883-5811 or 406.444.6337 TTY: 800.335.7592 | Fax: 406.444.7685 The site is currently vacant; no pre-bid walk-through is scheduled. Each Bid or Proposal must be accompanied by a cashiers check, certified check, or Bid Bond payable Poverello Center, Inc., issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana, in the amount of not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid and must be in the form specified in MCA 18-1-201 through 206. The bid bond or other security shall protect and indemnify Poverello Center, Inc. against the failure or refusal of the bidder to enter into the contract within 90 days of bid acceptance. Bid security will be returned to the unsuccessful bidders as soon as practicable after the opening of the bids. The bid bond of the successful bidder will be retained until the payment bond and the performance bond have been executed and approved, after which it will be returned. Bids must be signed by an authorized representative of the bidder. Bidders must satisfy themselves of the accuracy of the estimated quantities in the bid schedule by examination of the site and a review of the drawings and specifications, including Addenda. After bids have been submitted, the bidder shall not assert that there was a misunderstanding concerning the quantities of work or of the nature of the work to be done. Each bidder is responsible for inspecting the site and for reading and being thoroughly familiar with the Contract Documents. The failure or omission of any bidder to do any of the foregoing shall in no way relieve any bidder from any obligation to his or her bid. The Contract Documents contain the provisions required for the construction of the project. Information obtained from an officer, agent, or employee of the Poverello Center, or any other person, shall not affect the risks or obligations assumed by the Contractor or relieve him or her from fulfilling any of the conditions of the contract. No oral interpretations will be made to any bidder as to the meaning of the Contract Documents or any part thereof. Every request for such an interpretation shall be made in writing to the Architect. Any inquiry received seven (7) or more calendar days prior to the date fixed for opening of bids will be given consideration. Every interpretation made to a bidder will be in the form of an Addendum to the Contract Documents, and, when issued, will be on file in the office of the Architect and emailed to each person holding Contract Documents at least five (5) calendar days before bids are opened but it is the bidder’s responsibility to make inquiry as to the Addenda issued and to obtain such Addenda prior to submitting his or her proposal. All Addenda shall become part of the Contract and all bidders shall be bound by such Addenda. Successful bidders shall furnish an approved performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful bidder(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. Attorneys-in-fact who sign bid bonds or payment bonds must file with each bond a certified and effective dated copy of their power of attorney. Bonds, insurance certificates, and a signed contract shall be delivered to the Poverello Center, Inc. within ten (10) calendar days from the date when Notice of Award and contract is delivered to the bidder. In the case of failure of the bidder to execute the contract, the Poverello Center may at his or her option consider the bidder in default, in which case the bid bond accompanying the proposal shall become the property of the Poverello Center. The Notice to Proceed shall be issued within ten (10) calendar days of the execution of the contract by the Poverello Center. Should there be reasons why the Notice to Proceed cannot be issued within such period, the time may be extended by mutual agreement of all parties. If the Notice to Proceed has not been issued within the ten (10) day period or within the period mutually agreed upon, the Contractor may terminate the contract without further liability on the part of either party. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race or color, national origin, religion, sex or gender, familial status, physical or mental handicap, creed, marital status, or age. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. Contractors must make positive efforts to use disadvantaged businesses, including small businesses, minority-owned firms, women’s business enterprises, and firms in labor surplus areas, whenever possible. Contractor shall abide by all applicable laws, ordinances, and the rules and regulations of all authorities having jurisdiction over construction of the project throughout the term of the contract. The Poverello Center may make such investigations as deemed necessary to determine the ability of the bidder to perform the work, and the bidder shall furnish to the Poverello Center all such information and data for this purpose. The Poverello Center reserves the right to waive informalities, to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid, which is in the best interest of the owner, to reject any and all proposals received, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award, as in the judgment of its officials, best meets the County’s and City’s and owner’s requirements. Federal Davis-Bacon Act Prevailing Wage Rates for Building Construction 2013 apply to this project. Modifications to applicable wage rate determinations for the project that are posted by HUD at the Davis-Bacon website ten days before bid opening need to be utilized. Contracts shall not be made to any person debarred or suspended or otherwise excluded from or ineligible for participation in Federal assistance programs. The cost plus a percentage of cost and percentage of construction cost method of contracting shall not be used. The responsible low bidder shall supply the names and addresses of major material suppliers and subcontractors when requested to do so by the Missoula County or City or the Poverello Center. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is indicated above. Late bids will not be accepted and will automatically be disqualified from further consideration. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and plainly marked "Proposals for Poverello Center – 1110 W. Broadway Property, c/o MMW Architects” and addressed to: Poverello Center, Inc. c/o MMW Architects 125 West Alder Street Missoula, MT 59802 The envelopes shall also be marked on the outside with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor's Registration Number. No bids shall be considered that do not carry the bidder's Montana Contractor's Registration number on the bid and on the envelope containing the bid. If forwarded by mail, the sealed envelope containing the bid must be enclosed in another envelope addressed to MMW. The County and City of Missoula and Poverello Center, Inc. are equal opportunity employers. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. The County and City of Missoula and Poverello Center, Inc. make reasonable accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with an applicant’s ability to compete in the recruitment and selection process or the Contractor’s ability to perform the essential duties of the job. In order for Missoula County and City and Poverello Center, Inc. to make such accommodations, the applicant must make known any needed accommodation. Persons using a TDD may call the Montana Relay Service: (800) 253-4091. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form by August 9, 2013, with MMW Architects prior to the bid opening.

[C6] Missoula Independent • August 22 – August 29, 2013

less you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. DECLARATION OF LAND PATENT Notice is hereby given to interested parties that the following property: S11, T13N, 19W, Lot one (1) and ten (10) of Block 2 of Amended Plat of MARTINWOOD ADDITION NO. THREE (3) is being brought up under United States patent #924. No claim is made herein that claimant has been assigned the entire tract described in the original patent. The filing of this Declaration of Land Patent shall not deny or infringe on any right, privilege or immunity of any other assignee to any portion of land covered in the described patent #924. Submit any questions to the Claimant: Lovella V. Torp, 3116 Old Pond Rd., Missoula, Montana 59802 Jason J. Henderson, Esq. Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Phone: 701-227-1841 Fax: 701-2256878 jhenderson@mackoff.com MT Bar #11414 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY BANK OF America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. F/K/A Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, Plaintiff, v. LARAMIE D. LOEWEN, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWHEQ INC., CWHEQ REVOLVING HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-D, AND COLLECTION BUREAU SERVICES, INC., Defendants. Cause No. DV-13-28 Dept. 1 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT, GREETINGS: LARAMIE D. LOEWEN YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an action to rescind the Trustee’s Sale and Trustee’s Deed and to reinstate a Note and Deed of Trust covering property situated in Missoula County, in the State of Montana and described as follows: LOT 21A OF SOUTH MISSOULA, BLOCK 77, LOTS 21A & 22A, AN AMENDED SUBDIVISION PLAT IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court this 30th day of July 2013. Clerk of District Court, Shirley E. Faust BY: /s/ Laura M Driscoll (SEAL) Deputy Clerk Dated this 19th day of July, 2013. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for the Plaintiff 38 Second Avenue East Dickinson, North Dakota 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 By: /s/ Jason J. Henderson, Attorney #11414 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION RECEIVED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. NOTICE Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that unless you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-137 Dept. 3 No. Hon. John W. Larson NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of PETER STUCKEY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this

notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Sharon K. Steinert, 2110 27th Avenue, Missoula, MT 59804, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 11th day of July, 2013. /s/ Patrick G. Sandefur, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-694 Dept. No. 4 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION STAN D. RATLIFF, Individually and as Trustee of the RATLIFF TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. GLORIA M. SCHLEINZ, SALLIE DRUCILLA ACORD, RICARDA JOHNSON and all other persons, unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien or encumbrance upon the real property described in the Complaint or any part thereof adverse to Plaintiffs MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY, Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-13-155 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE B. EVERINGHAM, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Bishop Skillman Everingham, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Ryan Law Offices, PLLC, PO Box 9453, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. DATED this 2nd day of August, 2013. /s/ Bishop Skillman Everingham, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/08/99, recorded as Instrument No. 199900837 Bk 568 Pg 2221, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Richard A. Sandefur and Wendy L. Sandefur, husband and wife was Grantor, North American Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and First Montana Title & Escrow, Inc was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First Montana Title & Escrow, Inc as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 7 of Huson Heights, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200704460, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 18, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $98,461.53. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $90,081.56, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 28, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Fore-


PUBLIC NOTICES closure.com. (TS# 1002.252209-File No.

7023.106495)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/15/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200917604, Bk 843, Pg 1246, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jhawn D. Thompson and Misty J. Thompson, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Western Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 1 of Plats at Page 57, together with the Northerly half of vacated Bedard Street adjoining said Lots 12, 13, 14 and 15 in Block 14 of the Townsite of Frenchtown as vacated by Resolution recorded April 7, 1966 in Book 2 of Micro Records at Page 533. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201119250, Bk 885, Pg 877, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of June 18, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $190,304.99. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $159,856.94, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on October 28, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.97589) 1002.207163-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 7, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT C-50 OF WINDSOR PARK PHASE IV, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. A.P.N.: 4278683 Jamie L Kirschenheiter, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank- Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 28, 2008 and recorded December 1, 2008 in Book 830, Page 48 under Document No. 200826460. The beneficial interest is currently held by DLJ Mortgage Capital, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly pay-

ments due in the amount of $977.36, beginning July 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the properly or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 1, 2013 is $159,960.54 principal, interest at the rate of 6.000% now totaling $27,434.57, late charges in the amount of $1,401.29, escrow advances of $8,135.79, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,576.12, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.29 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 29, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 29th day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Sps V Kirschenheiter 41477.284 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on September 30, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 47 OF MALONEY RANCH PHASE VI, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Chad M. Bauer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank - Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 15, 2007 and recorded October 15, 2007 in Book 807, on Page 612, under Document No. 200727252. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage, LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,388.38, beginning January 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 12, 2013 is $302,691.07 principal, interest at the rate of 4.625% now totaling $6,255.00, late charges in the

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s amount of $277.68, escrow advances of $3,010.61, and other fees and expenses advanced of $18.30, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.35 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: May 22, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 22nd day of May, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 NationstarVs. Bauer 41706.508 Notice That A Tax Deed May Be Issued To: Occupant 19370 Clarkson Drive Clinton, MT 59825 Mary E. Harper Elizabeth A. Harper 5151 US Highway 93 N. Florence, MT 59833 Beneficial Montana Inc. d/b/a Beneficial Mortgage Co. 3075 N. Reserve St. Missoula, MT 59808 Mary E. Harper Elizabeth A. Harper 19370 Clarkson Drive Clinton, MT 59825 Missoula County Treasurer 200 W. Broadway Missoula, MT 59802 Internal Revenue Service Center Ogden, UT 84201-0010 Pursuant to section 15-18212, Montana Code Annotated, notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a property tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: LEWIS AND CLARK ADD, LEWIS&CLRK LOT 3 OF LEWIS & CLARK ADDITION 27-12-17. The real property is also described in the records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder as: Lot 3 of Lewis & Clark Addition, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof, entered on file and of record in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. Parcel No. 5852507. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on November 30, 2009. 3. The property tax lien was attached as the result of a tax sale held on July 16, 2010. 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on July 16, 2010, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to Jaci Investments, LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 6655, Helena, MT 59604, and a tax deed will be issued to it unless the property tax lien is redeemed prior to the expiration date of the redemption period. 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and costs, is: Taxes $2206.70 Penalty/Interest $606.83 Costs $452.06 Total $3,265.59 7. The date that the redemption period expires October 21, 2013. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue

from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to Jaci Investments, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing the tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847. Further notice for those persons listed above whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested party’s rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this 17th day of August, 2013. Jaci Investments, LLC Notice That A Tax Deed May Be Issued To: Occupant 19450 Clarkson Drive Clinton, MT 59825 Charles L. Deibert 201 NE Salzman Road Corbett, OR 97019 Dex Media, Inc. c/o Legal Department R.H. Donnelley Corporation 1001 Winstead Drive Cary, NC 27513 Charles L. Deibert 19450 Clarkson Drive Clinton, MT 59825 Missoula County Treasurer 200 W. Broadway Missoula, MT 59802 John Peterson Shelly Peterson P.O. Box 103 Milltown, MT 59851 Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana Code Annotated, notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a property tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: LEWIS & CLARK ADDITION LOTS 9, 10 & 11, LEWIS&CLRK LOT 11A OF LEWIS & CLARK ADDITION OF LOTS 9, 10 & 11 27-12-17.The real property is also described in the records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder as: Lot 11A of Lewis & Clark Addition Lots 9, 10 & 11, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof, entered on file and of record in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. Parcel No. 5852581. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on November 30, 2009. 3. The property tax lien was attached as the result of a tax sale held on July 16, 2010. 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on July 16, 2010, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to Jaci Investments, LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 6655, Helena, MT 59604, and a tax deed will be issued to it unless the property tax lien is redeemed prior to the expiration date of the redemption period. 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and costs, is: Taxes $3295.56 Penalty/Interest $729.70 Costs $449.02 Total $4,474.28 7. The date that the redemption period expires October 21, 2013 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the re-

CLARK FORK STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 228, 261, 248, 199, 262. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 9/16/2013 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 9/19/2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

demption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to Jaci Investments, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing the tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847. Further notice for those persons listed above whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested party’s rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this 17th day of August, 2013. Jaci Investments, LLC Notice That A Tax Deed May Be Issued To: Occupant 2340 Craftsman Place Missoula, MT 59801 Missoula County Treasurer 200 W. Broadway Missoula, MT 59802 Internal Revenue Service Center Ogden, UT 84201-0010 Mark Doty 2340 Craftsman Place Missoula, MT 59801 Bank One, NA National Direct Equity (NDE) 100 East Broad Street Columbus, OH 43271 Department of Labor and Industry Unemployment Insurance Contribution Bureau P.O. Box 6339 Helena, MT 59604-6339 Mark Doty P.O. Box 5425 Missoula, MT 59806 First Security Bank 1704 Dearborn Ave P.O. Box 4506 Missoula, MT 59806 Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana Code Annotated, notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a property tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: CRAFTSMAN PLACE, LOT 2 OF CRAFTSMAN PLACE. The real property is also described in the records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder as: Lot 2 of Craftsman Place, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, as recorded in Book 26 of Plats at page 34. Parcel No. 654903. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on May 31, 2010. 3. The property tax lien was attached as the result of a tax sale held on July 16, 2010. 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on July 16, 2010, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to Jaci Investments, LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 6655, Helena, MT 59604, and a tax deed will be issued to it unless the property tax lien is redeemed prior to the expiration date of the redemption period. 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 239, 384, 400, 470, 568, 602. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, August 26, 2013. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

"Networking"–let's channel your inner TV junkie. by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Let out ___ (be shocked) 6 Rescue shelter resident 11 Heavenly sphere 14 John Coltrane ballad named after his wife (anagram of MANIA) 15 "Star Trek" crew member 16 Six, in Sicily 17 Alec Baldwin line in "Glengarry Glen Ross" 20 Stylist's spot 21 "Citizen Kane" studio 22 Middle Easterner, often 23 Grassy plain, in Latin America 25 Bush Supreme Court appointee 26 Team nickname during a 1919 scandal 31 Condition soap opera characters often fall into 32 Get through to 33 Swindle 36 Tried the TV scene again 41 Illegal contribution 43 Worse than bad 44 Tagline from a Montel Williams "Money Mutual" ad 50 For all to see 51 Orange or lemon 52 Bland 53 Hong Kong pan 55 Alleviates 58 Compound based on the formula XeF (hey, cut me some slack; this was a tough one to find) 62 Capp/Pacino blend? 63 "Dingbat," to Archie Bunker 64 "Fur ___" (Beethoven piece) 65 Bread that's also a kind of booze 66 Tells stories about one's coworkers, maybe 67 Max von ___ of "The Exorcist"

DOWN

1 California's Santa ___ winds 2 Young ladies 3 Bygone Japanese audio brand 4 Compact category 5 Money in old radio 6 Footlong, e.g. 7 1953 biblical movie with Richard Burton 8 Alan who played Cameron Frye in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" 9 "Alice's Restaurant" singer Guthrie 10 Towering Ming 11 Brother and husband (!) of Isis 12 Lead role in "La Cage aux Folles" 13 Megastore descriptor 18 Fishing line problem 19 Polio immunologist Jonas 24 Like Swedes and Danes 25 Berliner's eight 26 Included, as on an e-mail 27 Garden cultivator 28 Oft-protested financial org. 29 Texas city 30 High card, in many games 34 Be next door to 35 Big brewer 37 With reluctance 38 Instagram shot 39 Yellowstone sighting 40 Moines or Plaines opener 42 "Waiting for Godot" playwright 44 Within walking distance 45 In a roundish way 46 Discombobulate 47 Pie crust flavor 48 Bass or treble 49 Elaborate jokes 53 Part of WWW 54 Valhalla figure 56 Kiddie lit author Blyton 57 Just OK 59 Give it some gas 60 Raised eyebrow remarks 61 Cutting-edge

Last week’s solution

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 22 – August 29, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES costs, is: Tax $4933.91 Penalty/Interest $591.35 Costs $464.48 Total $5,989.74 7. The date that the redemption period expires is October 21, 2013. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to Jaci Investments, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing the tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847. Further notice for those persons listed above whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested party’s rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this 15th day of August, 2013. Jaci Investments, LLC Notice to Creditors If you believe you have a claim against the estate of Margaret A. Leto, formerly of Missoula, MT, you must file a written claim within four months of the original date of this notice (8.22.13) with Charles Leto, Executor, 65 Drinkwater Road, Hampton Falls, NH 03844 or be forever barred from doing so. The Regular Board Meeting of the Missoula Housing Authority will be held at 5:30 on Wednesday, Aug 28th, 2013 at Missoula Housing Authority Headquarters: 1235 34th Street, Missoula Montana 59801.

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 721-7744

SERVICES Complete residential inspection and renovation design services. Insured • Licensed Experienced 203(k) Approved Consultant

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[C8] Missoula Independent • August 22 – August 29, 2013


SERVICES CHILDCARE Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Able Garden Design & Services LLC Summer is winding down and it is time to think about scheduling your fall clean ups and irrigation winterizations. Residential and Commercial services available. Call Rik 406-549-3667

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient SOLAR ACTIVE HOME • Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels. 369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642 SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

SUSTAINAFIEDS Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Energy efficient, small homes, additions/remodels, higher-comfort

crafted buildings, solar heating. 369-0940 or 642-6863. www.naturalhousebuilder.net

INSPECTION Missoula Home Inspections Complete residential inspection and renovation design services. Insured • Licensed • Experienced. 203(k) Approved Consultant. Visit www.missosulahomeinspections.co m or call 406-531-6693

located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131 to schedule an appointment. zoocitymassage.com.

dential. 406-880-6211 ImprovingYourOutlook.com

WINDOWS

PERSONAL

Abbott’s Glass Vinyl Windows • Wood Windows • Small Commercial Jobs • “The Meticulous Glass Professionals” Since 1992 728-6499

$45/hour Deep Tissue Massage. Zoo City Massage

Alpine Window Cleaning Commercial and Resi-

Commercial or Residential

880-6211

Specializing In Post Frame and Portable Buildings

Natural Housebuilders, Inc.

(855)MQS-BARN (677-2276)

SOLAR ACTIVE HOME

www.mqsbarn.com

Building the energy-efficient

• Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels

FREE ESTIMATES

369-0940 or 642-6863

$21,400 Installed

www.naturalhousebuilder.net

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40’x60’x12’ x Garage/Hobby Shop x 2-10x10 Garage Doors x 1-3’ Entry Door Soffit and Wainscot Optional

PRICED FOR A 40 LB. SNOW LOAD – Delivery Fees May Apply

30’x60’x12’ x x x x

$14,500 Installed

Storage Building 1-60’ Sidewall Open 5-12’ Bays 3’ Overhang On Front

406-241-2432

RENTALS

before

See pictures online • Cleaning products available

allgonellc.com 406-363-3775 or 406-212-7040

$1025.Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1324 S. 2nd St. W. “B”. 3 bed/2 bath, central location, shared yard, W/D hookups, DW.

1885 Mount #1. 1 bed/1 bath, centrally located, off-street parking, shared yard. $550. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

after

Licensed & Insured • Commercial • Residential • Lifetime log home staining • Log home cleaning • All types of siding cleaning & paint prep • Concrete sealing lifetime • Concrete cleaning gum removal • Sign cleaning & UV protective coating • Graffiti removal • To much to list, just ask!

APARTMENTS

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2 bedroom, 1 bath $650 W/S/G paid, across from Public Library, carport, coin-op laundry, off-street parking. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bath W/S/G paid, DW,

$675 W/D

hookups, off-street parking. free standing gas stove. Cat upon approval. No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 430 Washington 1bed/1bath, downtown, coin-ops on site. $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 720 Turner St. “D”. 3 bed/1.5 bath. Northside location, offstreet parking, HEAT PAID, pet? $900 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula. All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

825 SW Higgins Ave. B7. 2 bed/1 bath, single garage, DW, W/D hookups, near Pattee Creek Market $800. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 921 Helen: 1 bedroom, By the University, 2nd floor, laundry, free cable, $725. $100 Costco Gift Card! GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 5496106; Equinox Apartments. 1 bedroom $517. 2 bedroom $479 w/s/g paid. Contact Colin Woodrow at

406-549-4113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org Garden District. 2 bedroom $711 w/s/g paid. Washer/dryer included. Contact Jordan Lyons at 406-549-4113, ext. 127., jlyons@missoulahousing.org Gold Dust Apartments. Gold Dust Apartments. 3 bedroom $798 all utilities paid. Contact Jordan Lyons at 406-549-4113, ext. 127 or jlyons@missoulahousing.org

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • August 22 – August 29, 2013 [C9]


RENTALS Palace Apartments. (2) 1 bedrooms $438-$556. (1) 2 bedrooms $575-$668. h/w/s/g paid. Contact Matty Reed at 406-549-4113, ext. 130. mreed@missoulahousing.org Quiet, private 1 bedroom 8 miles from town with Bitterroot River access. NS/NP. $600 + deposit includes utilities, satellite TV & Internet. 273-2382 Solstice Apartments. Solstice Apartments. 1 bedroom $517. (2) 2 bedrooms $620-$751 w/s/g paid. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org Studio, $450 ALL Utilities paid, true one room format, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, storage. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

DUPLEXES 205 1/2 W. Kent. Studio/1 bath, lower level, shared yard, all utilities included. $600. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 722 1/2 Bulwer. Studio/1 bath, lower level, shared fenced yard, pet? $525. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES 107 E. Kent. 2 bed/1.5 bath, single garage, fenced back yard, extra storage. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 119 Cotter Court: 5 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Family room, Double

garage, Deck, Small pet, $1495. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 120 South Ave East. 3 bed/2 bath, close to University, fenced back yard. $1450. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1944 S. 8th W. 2 bed, 1 bath on two lots. Wood floors, garden & front deck. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

2017 W. Sussex: 3 Bedroom house, 1 1/2 Baths, 2-story, Porch, By the mall, Storage shed, Dishwasher, $1095. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 4 bedroom, 3 bath house $1,400. Garage, DW, W/D in unit, fenced backyard, S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 4972A Potter Park Loop. 3 bed/1.5 bath condo, newer unit, close to shopping. Double

garage, yard, pet? $1200. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 Two bedroom unfurnished basement. W/D hookups, fenced yard, small dog friendly. University area. 204 Livingston. $950/12 month lease. Available 9/1. 880-5261

OUT OF TOWN 20230 Ninemile: 2 Bedroom house, Full unfinished basement,

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Garage stall, Hook-ups, Pet OK, $795. $100 Costo Gift Card! GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

Rent Incentive

SMALL COMPANY, BIG ON SERVICE LOOKING FOR RESIDENTIAL RENTALS IN MISSOULA, LOLO, FLORENCE

544-1274

GardenCity

Property Management

1&2

549-7711 Check our website!

1020 Kemp Large 1 Bed With Storage $575/Month 113 N. Johnson 1 Bed Apt. $485/month Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month Visit our website at fidelityproperty.com

Lolo RV ParkSpaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric included. $425/month 406-273-6034

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707

MOBILE HOMES

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

FIDELITY

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

Did you know? No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

www.alpharealestate.com

Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE!

www.missoulanews.com

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1010 Vine. 2 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM & downtown. Many upgrades. $169,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240—7653. pat@properties2000.com 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1716 Schilling. Adorable 2 bed, 1 bath in central Missoula. Patio & double garage. $190,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355 milyardhomes@yahoo.com 1807 Missoula Avenue. Lovely Bavarian-style 3 bed, 2 bath in Lower Rattlesnake. Mount Jumbo views & 2 car garage. $319,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 1926 S 6th W $169,000 Centrally located 2BD/1BA private home with large front yard. Call Nora 880-7508 MLS 20134144 2 Bdr, 1 Bath North Missoula home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 216 Tower. Cute 2 bed, 1 bath on 1/2 acre close to Clark Fork River. 750 sq.ft garage/shop.

$185,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 2316 Craftsman. 3 bed, 1.5 bath 2 story on quiet cul-de-sac near Milwaukee Trail. $229,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 2550 Pattee Canyon. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 8 acres. Gourmet kitchen, deck, patio, 2 car garage. $495,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 2607 Deer Canyon Court. 6 bed, 3 bath on Prospect Meadows cul-desac. Fenced yard, deck, hot tub and sweeping views. $449,000. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $239,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2808 Rustler Drive. 5 bed, 3 bath Edgell home on Ranch Club Golf Course. $539,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Windor Park home. $195,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Big Flat home on 5.3 acres. $451,250. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696,

or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Real Estate, 532-9229 tory@montana.com

3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on 5 acres in Target Range. Borders DNRC land. $499,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

4834 Scott Allen Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath 4-level on approximately 1/3 beautifully landscaped acre. $372,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

309 Benton. 3 bed, 1.5 bath home upgraded throughout. Large fenced yard, patio, deck, fruit trees & 2 car garage. $259,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Central Missoula home. $247,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath, Miller Creek home on 1 acre. $250,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 425 King Street. 5 bed, 2.5 bath ranch with 2 fireplaces, patio, fruit trees & 2 car garage. $299,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531/2605. vickiehonzel@aol.com 4449 Johnsrud Park Road. Incredible 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.52 acres along the Blackfoot River. $675,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605 4475 Quaking Aspen. 4 bed, 2.5 bath Prairie-style home on almost one Rattlesnake acre. Built by professional woodworker with lots of natural light and beautiful details. $639,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros

[C10] Missoula Independent • August 22 – August 29, 2013

509 Simons. 6 bed, 3 bath Farviews home with 2 car garage. Backs Mountain Water owned park, City Park & open space. $385,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 524 Spanish Peaks Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath Mansion Heights home with 3 car garage near park & common area. $585,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 5606 Hillview. 2 bed, 2 bath with fireplace and deck & 2 car garage. $219,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres overlooking Clark Fork River. Missoula Valley and Mission Mountain views. $420,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Central Business District Home! 426 W Alder. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Great location, blocks to downtown and easy access to interstate. Detached garage with built-in workbench and storage. $244,900. MLS# 20134457 KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Cute Westside Home 1312 Phillips. $189,900. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Established garden and fruit trees. Close to downtown, parks, bike trails. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Grant Creek Frontage. 4 bed, 3 bath with open floor plan, fireplace, deck & 2 car garage. $655,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7365 milyardhomes@yahoo.com Location Location Location! 1289 River Street: 4 bed, 2 bath newer home near the river, bike trails, Good Food Store, Home Resource and more! This location rocks! $208,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Lot 42 Jeff Drive. To be built 2 bed, 2 bath Hoyt home in Linda Vista with 3 car garage. $369,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com LOWERED $15,000 MUST SEE STEVENSVILLE; 3 BEDROOMS AND 2 BATHS ON ONE LEVEL. CUSTOM HIGH-END RE-MODEL AND UPDATING

DONE IN 2012 ON THIS 12 YEAR OLD HOME. Call: 310-889-4448. PRICE JUST LOWERED $15,000 TO $199,999.

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES

Missoula Home Inspections Complete residential inspection and renovation design services. Insured • Licensed • Experienced. 203(k) Approved Consultant. Visit www.missosulahomeinspections.com or call 406531-6693

1845 B West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. Large, open kitchen, patio & garage. No HOA dues! $158,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 7288270 glasgow@montana.com

Rose Park Home FSBO 629 North Ave West $269,900 Mid-century modern; 3 bdrm, 2 bath. Hardwood floors on upper floor; tile floor and Corian counter tops in kitchen. New windows, paint and appliances throughout. The basement level, with daylight windows, has a family room and bedroom with a roughed-in bath. Lots of potential for further finishing. Newly landscaped yard with productive raised garden beds. Underground sprinkler system. Fully fenced back yard is completely deer-proof! Alley access to two-car garage and car port. Email or call for appt: 208-818-7875 Wanted FSBO owner contract. Missoula area. Have down collateral and guaranteed income. Non-traditional housing considered. 406821-1016 WESTBROOK Property Management WANTED! Residential Rentals in Missoula, Lolo and Florence. 544-1274 www.westbrookpm.com

2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $159,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 8804749. montpref@bigsky.net 2121B West Kent. Immaculate, energy-efficient 3 bed, 1.5 bath with covered front porch, fenced backyard & single garage. $167,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 3811 Stephens Ave #23. 2 bed 11/2 bath with fireplace, single garage and 1 parking space. $117,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546.5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $120,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 5510 Creekstone #3. Cottonwood Condo 2 bed, 1.5 bath in Grant Creek. $139,500. Vickie Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com


REAL ESTATE 6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

Uptown Flats #103. 1 bed, 1 bath with W/D, patio and handicap accessible features. $155,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com

6632 MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath with gas fireplace, Jacuzzi and wonderful views. $273,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net

Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com

Burns Street Commons 1400 Burns St. #15. $159,9000. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Coveted 3 bedroom home in the Burns St. Commons, next to the Burns St. Bistro and the Missoula Community Coop. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Condo With Views 1545 Cooley, Apt C. 2 bed, 1 bath Westside condo close to downtown, Burns Street Bistro & Missoula Community Co-op. $128,500 MLS# 20134747 KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

Uptown Flats. From $155,000. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

LAND FOR SALE 531 Minnesota. Building Lot 9. $55,000. Robin Rice Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

Rita Gray Lambros Real Estate ERA 406-544-4226 www.ritagray.com

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Florence Acres 944 Pathfinder. 330 gorgeous acres with 1 bed cabin and double garage. This little slice of perfection can be yours! Build your dream home here. $650,000 MLS# 20134863, 20134864 KD: 2405227 porticorealestate.com Frenchtown area, 14.9 Acres, existing well, adjacent to Forest Service land. $225,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Georgetown Lot Liquidation Make offer - motivated seller, best prices for great lots at Georgetown Lake, ready to build, easy access, half mile to lake, 6 miles to Discovery, may consider trade or seller financing. Email info@cabinmt.com 546-4797 Georgetown Lot Liquidation Make offer - motivated seller, best prices for great lots at Georgetown Lake, ready to build, easy access, half mile to lake, 6 miles to Discovery, may consider trade or seller financing. Email info@cabinmt.com 5464797 Near Riverfront Park. 1265 Dakota #B. To-be-built, 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Lot: $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

NHN Edgewood, East Missoula. 3.5 acres bare land. $89,900. Vickie Honzel, LambrosERA Real Estate 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com NHN Mormon Creek Road. 12 acres with Sapphire Mountain views. $150,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties.2000.com NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 40+ acre parcel with Mission Mountain views. $199,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

COMMERCIAL

Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 7289270. glasgow@montana.com

Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the award-winning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

OUT OF TOWN 11082 Cherokee Lane, Lolo. 3 bed, 3 bath with basement, deck, 2 car garage & fantastic views. $237,900. Robin Rice, Montana

Preferred Properties 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net 11901 Lewis & Clark Drive, Lolo. Cute 2 bed, 2 bath farmhouse on nearly 1 acre. $230,000. Rita Gray, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 532-9283 ritagray@lambrosera.com

HISTORIC STENSRUD BUILDING. Renovated 1890’s building with 95% original hardware. Residential or commercial zoning. Lovely opportunity. $868,000. Rochelle

NHN Old Freight Road. Approximately 11 acres with Mission Mountain Views. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpet-realty.com RECREATIONAL ACREAGE on Bozeman Pass. 406-932-5215. Details: https://sites.google. com/site/oberlyridgeforsale/

Rochelle Glasgow

RICE TEAM

Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Robin Rice • 240-6503

Missoula Properties 728-8270

Ronan, Montana 406 Main Street SE

$249,900 PRICED BELOW MARKET VALUE

Beautiful large family custom built home.

This home features 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, wrap around covered porch, triple car garage, large fenced yard with lots of trees. There is separate living quarters with its own bath and kitchenette. Judy Coulter, GRI • Wright Real Estate Co. • 406.249.4101

1716 Schilling $190,000 Adorable 2 bed, 1 bath on huge lot. Fir & tiles floors, granite countertops. Patio & double garage 4834 Scott Allen Dr. $372,500 4 bed, 3 bath multilevel on almost 1/3 acre landscaped, fenced. Light & bright 3500 sq.ft. floor plan 2 car garage & 3 storage sheds

Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos Large secure units with affordable HOA dues Starting at $144,900

missoulanews.com • August 22 – August 29, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE 13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves & 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Florence area home on 12.6 irrigated acres. $500,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $430,000. Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

3416 Lupine, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath log-sided home with wraparound deck & Bitterroot views. $269,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com

19655 Mullan Road, Frenchtown. 3 bed, 2 bath log/timber home on 15 acres with pond, fenced pasture, 2 car garage & 1 bed rental. $319,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 210 Red Fox Road, Lolo. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.59 acres along Bitterroot River. $495,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula, 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

439 Hidden Valley, Florence. 3 bed, 2 bath remodeled ranch home with green house, chicken coop, 2 car garage & room for horses. $229,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home home. $130,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

575 Killdeer, Stevensville. 5 bed, 3 bath on 7.5 fenced acres. Mountain views, hay barn & 2 car garage. $339,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

5905 Ocean View, Clinton. 4 bed, 3 bath on 1.63 acres with 3 fireplaces, 2 car garage and many new improvements. $300,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred

Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

20135333 $139,500 KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com

Corner Lot in East Missoula! 450 Speedway. 1 bed, 1 bath, garage with attached workspace. Mature trees, easy access to downtown and the UofM. MLS#

LotB MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

Potomac Log Cabin 1961 Blaine, Potomac. $195,000. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 8.77 acres. Light-filled log cabin with an open floor plan with high ceilings and large windows. Hiking in the summer with a great little sled hill in the winter! KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

439 Hidden Valley Road N

$229,500

425 King Street $299,000

Lewis & Clark Area • 5 bed, 2.5 bath • Granite counters, Wood-look & Tile flooring • 2 fireplaces, shaded patio & lots of fruit trees • 1 Year ERA Home Warranty

$259,900 309 Benton • Upgraded 3 bed, 1.5 bath in Lewis & Clark neighborhood • Newer furnace, water heater, windows & roof • Great fenced backyard with deck, patio & fruit trees • 2 car garage

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • August 22 – August 29, 2013

3bed/2bath home on 2.68 acres w/area for horses. 2 car garage. Granite counters & stainless appliances in kitchen.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance &

Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com We are experts in the home lending process. Call Astrid Oliver, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Office: 406-2587522 or Cell: 406-550-3587



Missoula Independent