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NEWS BOOKS

GREEN INVESTMENT GROUP TRIES TO FEND OFF SUPERFUND DESIGNATION IN FRENCHTOWN

MACLEAN RAISES HEATED QUESTIONS

OPINION

DOUBTING THE MERITS OF DOMESTIC SURVEILLANCE

FOOD

MONTANA STYLE FEEDS NEW SEATTLE EATERIES


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS BOOKS

GREEN INVESTMENT GROUP TRIES TO FEND OFF SUPERFUND DESIGNATION IN FRENCHTOWN

MACLEAN RAISES HEATED QUESTIONS

OPINION

DOUBTING THE MERITS OF DOMESTIC SURVEILLANCE

FOOD

MONTANA STYLE FEEDS NEW SEATTLE EATERIES


[2] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013


cover illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart

News Voices/Letters Pride Month, greed and Taylor Swift .........................................................4 The Week in Review Roller derby, Haz-Mat crews and a dreamer...................................6 Briefs Water rights, arson and Legacy Ranch .....................................................................6 Etc. With Schweitzer, the waiting is the hardest part.........................................................7 News Emerald City eateries feed off Montana style ...........................................................8 News Green Investment Group aims to stop Superfund listing........................................9 Opinion Doubting the merits of domestic surveillance ..................................................10 Opinion Stop clinging to coal on the reservation ...........................................................11 Feature The two David Burgerts ......................................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts James McMurtry on art and politics..........................................................................20 Music He Whose Ox is Gored, Paper Birds, The Cave Singers and Vampire Weekend....................................................................21 Books John Maclean raises heated questions in Esperanza Fire ....................................22 Film Linklater’s Before Midnight captures post-romance ...............................................23 Film Frances explores the subtleties of ladymance .........................................................24 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..........................................................25 Flash in the Pan Bugging out..........................................................................................26 Happiest Hour The Journalist.........................................................................................28 8 Days a Week Two sides to every story..........................................................................29 Mountain High Bull Trout Campfire Program ................................................................37 Agenda Veterans for Peace ...............................................................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12 PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters PHOTO INTERN Tommy Martino CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle EDITORIAL INTERN Eben Wragge-Keller ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [3]


[voices]

Prideful senator

STREET TALK Asked Tuesday, June 18, on the University of Montana campus. by Tommy Martino

This week the Indy writes about a slew of Seattle restaurants and bars with Montana themes. If there was one thing you wished Montana could share with big cities what would it be? Follow-up: What’s one thing you wish a big city could share with us?

Meagan McKay: A sense of community. I’m from LA and the lack of diversity here creates a sense of belonging and togetherness that LA can’t because of so many people. More range on the home: I think that some more diversity would help certain aspects in the state of Montana.

Steve Amish: Less traffic. It would make everyone happier. Ironic answer: I would say restaurants. It’s not that there aren’t a lot of great restaurants in town but you can’t get the same quality that you would get in a big city.

Mark Grimes: Well, you can’t. Montana is Montana. But access to the outdoors and fewer people. Chow towns: The variety of restaurants. You can’t really get that if you don’t have a big population.

I believe each one of us has the moral obligation to leave this place in as good or better shape than we found it for our kids and grandkids. That responsibility also means making sure everyone has the opportunity to succeed regardless of whom he or she loves. We’re at a decisive moment in our history as Americans because we have the opportunity to achieve that equality. For many, LGBT Pride Month is a time to reflect on the values of equality and independence. Especially the values we hold dear from the Declaration of Independence: “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” These principles are the cornerstone of our great nation, and are what make it the envy of the world. During Pride Month, it’s appropriate to consider the ways we’re working to make Montana and our nation a more just society where all can pursue happiness as they see fit, regardless of whom they choose as a partner. While it seems that not many folks are working together in Congress, I’m proud that we passed a strong Violence Against Women Act this year. The Violence Against Women Act provides $4 million to support 50 Montana programs. And, for the first time ever, it provides protections for our LGBT community. It’s time we recognize that LGBT survivors deserve equal access to these important resources. In Montana, we believe in personal freedom. We believe the government shouldn’t interfere in the people’s private business. That’s why I agreed to co-sponsor efforts to repeal the Defense of Mar-

riage Act. There are more than 1,000 rights and obligations the federal government grants to married couples that samesex couples are denied. It’s time to end marriage discrimination, which is why I supported overturning the Defense of Marriage Act. Simply put: The federal government should not be interfering in the personal decision of who an adult chooses as a partner. When it comes to the workplace, it is unacceptable for anyone to be fired simply because of their sexual orientation. The Employment Non-Discrimination Act

“We all have a role in making sure that Pride Month is not just something we check off on the calendar.” (ENDA) will help protect workers from this type of discrimination and I look forward to moving forward on this legislation in the Senate as soon as possible. Members of the LGBT community are our neighbors, brothers, sisters and friends. They are community leaders who bring the kind of diversity to our nation that makes it strong. We all have a role in making sure that Pride Month is not just something we

check off on the calendar. “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness” for all Americans is what we are called to strive for every day of the year. U.S. Sen. Max Baucus Washington, D.C.

A few words on greed In modern America, cancer is the plague. But a far worse plague is greed. Insidiously, greed is engendering malignancy in politics and government while, simultaneously, denaturing the Natural World. It’s corrupting this republic of ours and, similarly, it’s corrupting the wellbeing and viability of Planet Earth’s eonsold but rather fragile “sufficiencies” (which are increasingly rendered insufficient by greed’s idiocies and ruinousness). Obviously, we must begin to identify and repudiate greed’s most egregious and sociopathic exponents, and insist that human intelligence replace human greed as the determinant of what “rules us” as a species. If we fail in that undertaking, do we not risk becoming heirs to a catastrophic outcome that absurdly contradicts our notable achievements and our higher human promise? Who are the greedy? And should their idiocy and incorrigibility be allowed to condemn all of us to despotism, environmental collapse and existential despair? Human greed is implicitly at odds with a fundamental, intrinsic generosity in the universe, and should not be obeyed when it presumes to assert its preposterous, misbegotten “authority.” Tom Azzara Missoula

[Comments from MissoulaNews.com] Backtalk from “The road to Taylor Swift,” June 13 Natasha Boote: Appreciation of outdoor recreation—hiking and backpacking in particular. My friends from home won’t go hiking with me. More medley: Theater and art and there could also be more diversity, including food.

Adam Hoge: Local breweries and beer. We have so many great breweries in the state. Buffalo steaks, too. Country boy: I’m more of the outdoorsy person. The city ain’t got much to offer for me.

[4] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

No folk fan “Personally, I don’t trust anyone who looks down on pop music. ‘A guy and his guitar’ gets on my nerves after about 10 minutes.” Posted June 13 at 5:36 a.m.

be a glamorous older sister and Pied Piper that helps bring young women safely through the dark and dangerous woods that our culture has become. Long, long live Taylor Swift, Princess of Nashville!” Posted June 13 at 6:28 a.m.

Swift praise

Ungrateful snob

“You are a Mother Who Gets It, in a way that lets adults allow for Swift’s personal, professional and character excellence. Ms. Swift is an extraordinary person in her own right, but has also chosen to

“Let me get this straight. You win a prize for FREE tickets to a concert that sold out in under three minutes. You get FREE hotel stay. You get a FREE ride from Montana to Utah. And all you can do is say

L

how much of a torturous experience it was with the exception of the three hours of the concert? What an ungrateful snob. Wow!” Posted June 14 at 6:43 a.m.

The full story “If anything, I think the writer did a great job of expressing her gratitude for T-Swift, the gift of music, her daughter, and the entire experience. Are you sure you read the entire story?” Posted June 14 at 8:52 p.m.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


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missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, June 12 Haz-Mat crews descend on Spectrum Products west of Missoula to clean an acid spill. Spectrum manufactures pool products and emergency responders say that the spill resulted from a valve that was unintentionally left open.

Thursday, June 13 A fire at a Missoula Housing Authority’s Vantage Villa displaces all 45 low-income tenants. Plumes of smoke are seen across Missoula as firefighters work to extinguish the blaze. No one is hurt, but the building sustains significant damage.

Friday, June 14 Attorney General Tim Fox addresses the Montana Newspaper Association’s annual convention in Missoula, stressing the importance of improved communication between reservations and state authorities. He notes that skeptics call the initiative impossible, but maintains, “I’m a dreamer.”

Saturday, June 15 Portland’s Breakneck Betties slam the Hellgate Rollergirls at the Missoula County Fairgrounds, 238-118. Hellgate holds its own during the first half, but, despite the efforts of Prefondame and Knuckle Slambitch, the home team loses steam as the bout goes on.

Sunday, June 16 A man dies after running his pickup truck off the side of Highway 200 near Clearwater Junction and rolling the truck. Law enforcement officials say they received reports of the truck swerving prior to the crash.

Monday, June 17 The Missoula City Council votes 8-1 to strengthen enforcement of a ban on fireworks within city limits. The “zero-tolerance” policy calls for a maximum $100 fine plus court fees to first-time offenders.

Tuesday, June 18 Alt folk favorite Iron & Wine announces a return engagement to Missoula’s Wilma Theatre in November. Sam Beam and his group last played to a sold-out crowd in the same venue in 2011. Tickets go on sale June 21.

California Street neighbors came together Friday to reinstall a homemade airplane that blew down in April during a windstorm. The 150pound craft was originally erected in the 1990s and lifted back into place with the help of Bitterroot Welding.

Health

Blue Mountain’s phoenix act The early hours of March 29, 1993, were disastrous for Missoula’s Blue Mountain Clinic. Flames engulfed the Kensington Avenue facility after a firebombing destroyed Blue Mountain and outraged the community. Richard T. Andrews, an anti-choice activist from Washington state, pleaded guilty years later to having set the fire during an arson spree involving eight women’s health clinics across the western United States. The fire became a turning point for Blue Mountain, which spent two and a half years building enough public support to construct a new facility on California Avenue. Blue Mountain has made strides in the intervening years, says spokesperson Lynsey Bourke, and will mark the 20th anniversary of the fire with a commemoration June 21 of “the clinic’s resilience in the face of so much adversity.” Much has changed at Blue Mountain since that night just over 20 years ago. But it’s not just bullet-proof glass and security systems that characterize how the clinic and the community have responded. Rebuilding gave Blue Mountain an opportunity to expand both its space and

POLISH YOUR LOOK PEDICURES & MANICURES

its practice. Bourke explains that the clinic now has a burgeoning transgender health program and is getting more involved in new ways of teaching sexual education. The family practice side itself was only just taking root before the fire, she says. Afterwards, it “bloomed.” “The initial feminist vision that brought Blue Mountain Clinic to Missoula has evolved into an understanding that in order to take care of the woman, we have to take care of her whole family,” Bourke says. The anti-choice protests outside Blue Mountain have undergone a similar shift over the years. Bourke notes that “in the last years, the anti-choice protest has been peaceful and respectful for the most part. There haven’t really been any threats to any of our clinicians or our staff.” Marking the anniversary of the fire has also allowed Blue Mountain to build up an archive of sorts. The clinic intends to display recently collected photos and a number of items—including a melted phone and pen holder—during the commemoration, alongside a video featuring interviews with those who were working at Blue Mountain at the time. “It just feels good that we’re still here in the community, and that we have been able to expand our serv-

ices so much,” Bourke says. “Looking at where we were before the fire and now, it’s amazing.” Alex Sakariassen

Education

Rate hike hits UM students On Monday, 20-year-old Gillian Ellison of Missoula visited with University of Montana financial aid specialists to hash out how best to finance her college education. “It’s really daunting,” said the incoming freshman, who hopes to earn a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies. Incoming freshmen are facing more significant hurdles financing a college education than at any other time in recent history. Statistics show Montana University System students borrow more money now than their predecessors five years ago; 2013’s graduating class had an average education debt of $25,000, or $4,000 more than in 2008. Similarly, a June 18 congressional report shows that student loan debt has nearly doubled nationally during the past five years, increasing from $550 billion in 2007 to just under $1 trillion this year. Ellison is especially frustrated because if Congress

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[6] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

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[news] doesn’t act soon, she’ll be forced to pay even more. On July 1, the interest rate for subsidized Stafford loans, which are designed to serve students with financial need, is slated to double, from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. This week’s congressional report shows that the interest rate hike will stick students who borrow the maximum amount allowed under federal subsidized Stafford loan guidelines with an additional $4,500 tab. To head off the impending interest rate hike, lawmakers are debating several alternatives, including a complete overhaul of student loan interest rates, potentially making them variable, rather than fixed. One such plan would set rates at 4.7 percent this year, with future increases on the horizon. President Obama, meanwhile, supports tying rates to those attached to the 10-year U.S. Treasury bond and tacking on an additional .93 percent, meaning that the rate attached to a loan taken out now would actually fall by roughly .27 percent. In Missoula, UM Financial Aid Director Kent McGowan says that 6,700 UM students have signed up to receive an unsubsidized Stafford loan in 2013. “To the tune of about $25 million,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

Irrigators fear that if the FJBC falls apart it will trigger a clause in the cooperative management agreement that stipulates in an emergency the BIA can reassume control. “That scares a lot of people,” Laskody says. The rift is rooted in a conflict over the CSKT’s ongoing efforts to quantify their water rights based on promises included in the 1855 Treaty of Hellgate. For more than a decade, tribal, state and federal negotiators have worked to craft the agreement, spelling out how much water would be allocated for irrigators and commercial and residential use, while ensuring protections for the reservation’s prized fish hatcheries.

Water

Irrigators sling mud A feud among Flathead Indian Reservation farmers and ranchers that’s mired in allegations of racism and illegalities is jeopardizing a groundbreaking collaboration between the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and non-native irrigators. “It is really ugly,” says Flathead Reservation cattle rancher Jerome “Jerry” Laskody. The Flathead Joint Board of Control helps manage the reservation’s sprawling irrigation project on behalf of roughly 2,500 farmers and ranchers. On June 14, two of three FJBC districts, the Jocko and the Mission, voted to withdraw from the board, leaving only the Flathead District in their wake. Because the FJBC can’t exist as a standalone entity, farmers and ranchers fear that the dissolution threatens local irrigation system oversight. In the early 1980s, reservation residents formed the FJBC as part of a long-term effort to gain control of the irrigation project, rather than leaving it to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Laskody notes the BIA has a spotty track record managing such endeavors. The effort to assume local control was lauded when, in 2010, Flathead Reservation irrigators and the tribes crafted an unprecedented supervisory body called a “Cooperative Management Entity.” Composed of four tribal representatives and four FJBC members, it enabled locals to assume control of the irrigation project and has been touted as a collaboration unlike any other in the nation.

The agreement stalled this past year, largely as a result of fears expressed by some Flathead irrigators, including Laskody, who worry that the plan, also called a compact, won’t guarantee them enough water to sustain their operations. Others, however, including FJBC representative Kerry Doney, who voted on behalf of the Jocko Irrigation District to sever his district’s affiliation with the body last week, see the agreement as the best possible compromise. He says he voted to break away in part because he doesn’t want the people he represents to get bogged down in the expensive litigation that will likely arise in the absence of a compact. “The water-use agreement, in my opinion, is for everybody,” he says. The vote to dissolve the FJBC is slated to take effect 90 days after the June 14 vote. Jessica Mayrer

Bitterroot

Final days for Legacy Ranch? The deadline for a decision from the Ravalli County Commission on the Bitterroot’s controversial

2012

BY THE NUMBERS Votes Republican Sandy Welch lost by in her 2012 race against Denise Juneau for Montana Superintendent of Public Instruction. According to state records, Welch has already declared her candidacy for 2016.

2,231

Legacy Ranch subdivision has shifted repeatedly in recent months. What was supposed to be a done deal by May 30 has now stretched to the end of June, and could bleed into the first weeks of July if any new hang-ups plague final deliberations on the proposal. The county’s planning board recommended approval of the 368-acre, roughly 639-unit subdivision on April 18, after nearly nine hours of public comment that Ravalli County planner Kevin Waller summed up as “100-percent” opposed. The commission’s own public comment period spanned two days and prompted feedback from roughly 80 residents. Several individuals supported the proposal alongside Alexandra Morton, who, with her husband, Donald Morton, is the landowner and developer behind Legacy Ranch. Those voices were drowned out, however, by opponents repeating past arguments that Legacy Ranch would increase traffic hazards on the Eastside Highway, burden the Lone Rock School District and threaten the integrity of the adjacent Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge. But some speakers, including Jim Rokosch with the nonprofit Bitterrooters for Planning, put a new spin on the debate by requesting that commissioners Suzy Foss and Ron Stoltz recuse themselves from any action. Foss and Stoltz each received $320 in combined campaign contributions from the Mortons during the 2010 election, as well as smaller donations from various individuals with Missoula-based Territorial Landworks, the engineering firm contracted by the Mortons. So far Foss and Stoltz have remained active in the commission’s review of the proposal. The commission convened for nearly six hours June 10 to review public comment, and after some question whether new information had been raised, continued its discussion the following day. The hearing is scheduled to continue June 27, potentially culminating in a June 28 vote. Jason Rice with Territorial Landworks has already agreed to a second extension, which would allow deliberations to continue into July. But Wiles says the commission is under a time crunch of its own now: The first week of July marks the beginning of budget hearings for the county. Alex Sakariassen

ETC. Sen. Jon Tester made a bold wager on MSNBC last week: He bet the family farm—all 1,700 dry, dusty acres of it—that former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer will run for the U.S. Senate in 2014. And while Tester admitted that his “crystal ball is still a little cloudy,” there aren’t many in the state right now who’d take him up on the bet. Everyone’s speculating that Schweitzer will vie for Max Baucus’ open seat, from anonymous Democratic insiders to a growing Draft Schweitzer movement headed by political operatives in Washington, D.C. The question seems more when he’ll declare than if. Meanwhile, those with Senate aspirations of their own are left waiting for the final official nod from the man who polls show could win in a landslide. The 2014 lineup on both sides of the aisle is starting to resemble the line outside a gas station bathroom. It’s hard not to view Schweitzer’s prolonged deliberation as a bit coy, a trademark Schweitzerian act of political theatrics. News broke earlier this month that he’d traveled to the Beltway to meet with interest groups that typically back Democratic candidates. In May, Schweitzer stood before a group of state union leaders in Billings and told them that, should he indeed decide to run, he’d need their help. He joked with The Hill recently that he should change his ringtone to Carly Rae Jepsen’s “Call Me Maybe,” a nod to how often he’s getting calls about 2014. The whole scene feels vaguely reminiscent of last year’s widespread suggestion that Schweitzer would launch a White House run for 2016, except this time the pieces actually appear to be falling into place. The Progressive Change Campaign Committee has hosted Draft Schweitzer rallies all across the state in the past few weeks, gathering thousands of grassroots supporters. The group has raised roughly $30,000 for Schweitzer’s Senate campaign and intends to keep going until it hits $50,000. Schweitzer himself has admitted he has “a timetable” for making his final decision, though he told The Hill that, as a soil scientist, he tends to “think of time geologically.” Montanans understand Schweitzer’s hesitation. This is a tough state to leave behind for a dysfunctional Congress, especially when you’ve been fishing at a cabin on Georgetown Lake for six months. But to employ what sounds a lot like a Schweitzerism: It’s about time for him to fish or cut bait.

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missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [7]


[news]

Montana feeds Seattle A healthy portion of Emerald City eateries serve up the Big Sky by Daniel Person

On the phone with Grant Carter, owner of Bitterroot BBQ in Seattle’s maritime-chic Ballard neighborhood, I’m just getting done explaining my call when he interrupts me. “Do you know about RockCreek?” he asks. I tell him I do not. “Well, that’s another one.” Noted. What I’m calling about is Montana’s curious tendency to crop up throughout Seattle’s culinary scene. At Carter’s stripped-down barbecue joint, located on one of Seattle’s hippest strips, patrons can sit on an always crowded communal bench to peruse

Carters decided to take a leap and open their own place. When they did, Grant says, they wanted to name it something dear to their hearts, if not evocative of a valley known for its brisket. Indeed, with no strong barbecue tradition in Montana, the fare is a more generalized “Northwest barbecue” than anything firmly rooted in Big Sky Country. The beef is sourced from an Oregon coop and smoked with applewood from eastern Washington. But it’s enough to make any Grizzly homesick that you can wash it down with a cold Bayern Pilsner. Montana beer is a big deal for the Seattle establishments, especially if you name a place after the state.

which is a huge carved wood sign that reads “MONTANA DEMOCRATS.” When a Montanan comes in, Opatz says, “the best is when they end up there by accident and slowly realize what’s going on from the décor.” The easy explanation for this spreading spate of Montana-philia is that, when one decides it’s his or her time to get the hell out of the state, the Interstate Highway System provides a straight shot at Seattle. In some iteration or another, that’s what happened when Mark McConnell’s mother left the Blackfeet Indian Reservation and moved to Seattle. But she took her family back to Browning for Indian

photo courtesy of Off the Rez

Mark McConnell’s Off the Rez food truck is inspired by Browning’s Indian Days, which he attended every summer while growing up.

sauce-splotched menus made of Bitterroot Mountain topo maps (Montana Manhattans: $5). On Capitol Hill, a bar simply named “Montana” is like a Bob Marshall Forest Service cabin marooned in urbanity and a magnet for the impossibly hip locals, including pixie-cut girls with Macklemore knock-off boyfriends (Mon-fucking-tana bumper stickers: $2). Rumbling around various locations is a food truck from which a Blackfeet Indian slings frybread he swears is better than anything he ate at the Browning Indian Days growing up. And now in Fremont—the self-proclaimed “Center of the Universe,” there’s RockCreek, a soon-to-open seafood joint named for the chef ’s favorite trout fishing river. Which, coincidentally, is how Bitterroot BBQ got its name as well. Carter and his wife, Hannah, spent seven years in Missoula, much of that time casting lines into the ’Root. The two met at the University of Montana and struck up a relationship when Grant lied and said he was doing well in the statistics class they had together, which landed him a study session with the girl. After moving to Seattle and working for other restaurants for a few years, the

[8] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

“If there’s one complaint it’s that we don’t have their favorite Montana beer,” says Kate Opatz of the generally responsive ex-pats who come into her bar, called simply Montana. The bar typically has Big Sky and Bayern on tap, but she blames Montana liquor laws for bottling up many of the state’s microbrews. A Whitefish native, Opatz says the idea for the bar came when she was visiting home and realized what Seattle’s drinking scene was missing. Montana bars are “dark and comfortable, totally unpretentious, the bartender knows your name,” she says. “There were enough common threads between just about all the old bars you see there— creaky wood floors, lots of beers on tap, snapshots of regulars stuck around—that I felt pretty sure we could replicate that vibe in Seattle and people would love it.” A year and a half in, she appears to have been correct. During working hours on a sunny weekday afternoon, Montana is full with patrons who may or may not work and wouldn’t look out of place at the Badlander. Along with a brown-and-yellow color scheme, the walls are lined with a mishmash of memorabilia, the coolest of

Days every summer, where McConnell developed a taste for frybread. McConnell’s Off the Rez food truck has been a sensation since it first began rolling in February 2012, and proven what Montanans have known all along: Indian tacos are delicious. “I’d say 80 percent [of customers] have never heard of it,” he says. McConnell, 29, admits that as a boy he had little interest in learning the tricks of his grandmother’s trade. But when he decided he wanted to get in on Seattle’s still burgeoning food truck scene, his mind kept going back to the reservation. So, working with a chef and pumping his mom with questions, he produced what he likes to think would hold its own back in Montana. “I like to think it’s better” than what’s offered in Browning, he says with some embarrassment. As for the latest establishment, RockCreek owner Eric Donnelly tells curious food blogs around town that his focus will be sustainable seafood, suggesting fare like crab, mussels, striped sea bass and Kona kampachi. The lack of trout is duly noted. editor@missoulanews.com


[news]

Paper tiger Green Investment Group tries to fend off the feds by Matthew Frank

In late April, Ray Stillwell, president of Green Investment Group, Inc., which in 2011 acquired the former SmurfitStone pulp mill near Frenchtown, penned a letter to Montana Gov. Steve Bullock imploring him to reconsider his administration’s support for the proposed federal Superfund designation. Stillwell said he “very strongly” prefers state oversight, citing the “uncertainty associated with lengthy processes” required by the Environmental Protection Agency, and noted his company’s “proven track record of completing successful voluntary remediation of other sites.” Attached to the letter was a packet of materials intended to support Stillwell’s case. One of the items was a letter from Missoula attorney Thad Huse, who wrote that he’s helped GIGI lure potential new businesses to the property, and attested to a “multi-dollar transaction, which would involve economic development and benefit, that is on hold and in jeopardy, because of the potential Superfund listing of the site by the EPA.” But as state and federal officials determine how to clean up the 3,200 acres of contaminated land along the Clark Fork northwest of Missoula, which is expected to cost tens of millions of dollars, GIGI’s environmental track record isn’t inspiring confidence, and promises of economic development are becoming harder to believe. The company’s cleanups at two of the shuttered mills it owns in the United States and Canada—neither of which were near the scale of what’s required at the Frenchtown mill—are outweighed by a pattern of unmet expectations, litigiousness and doubts over the company’s solvency. The latest evidence is the Chapter 11 bankruptcy filed by one of the company’s subsidiaries, SWI Energy, on May 28. The largest claim is for $1 million. In 2006, GIGI purchased a 235-acre former Smurfit-Stone mill in Alton, Ill., where GIGI is based, with plans to transform it into an ethanol plant. The company, through SWI, scrapped the mill, sold off anything of value and later nixed the ethanol plant idea. Stillwell says the decision to file for bankruptcy protection was influenced by the recession and a declining ethanol market. SWI is also in court over a contract breach alleged by South Dakota-based Integro Services Group. ••• Questions about GIGI’s financial wherewithal first arose in April 2012,

when VanTek, a Washington-based supplier of used paper mill equipment, dropped its breach of contract suit against GIGI after reviewing the company’s confidential financial disclosures. VanTek, which had sued because GIGI allegedly disregarded an agreement to buy the Frenchtown mill in partnership with VanTek, concluded from the disclosures that GIGI wouldn’t be able to pay back any judgment. VanTek’s statement to that ef-

GIGI has until the end of July to post the $6.8 million. Stillwell declined to comment on the transaction. In Bathurst, New Brunswick, where GIGI owns another former Smurfit-Stone mill, the Department of Environment and Local Government sent a warning letter to GIGI subsidiary SSPM Bathurst earlier this year because the company was out of compliance with decommission and cleanup plans. Stillwell declined to com-

the former Smurfit-Stone mill in New Richmond, Quebec, and the imminent announcement of a recycling center at the former Smurfit-Stone mill in Portage-duFort, Quebec. In Portage-du-Fort, Stillwell says, GIGI’s redevelopment work has created hundreds of jobs. But nothing GIGI has done convinces Peter Nielsen of the Missoula City-County Health Department that the company has the capacity to conduct a voluntary

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Green Investment Group, or GIGI, purchased the former Smurfit-Stone pulp mill near Frenchtown in 2011. Now the site has been proposed for federal Superfund designation, much to the company’s dismay.

fect was published by the Independent. GIGI subsequently filed a claim of civil contempt, which prompted VanTek to run a full-page retraction. The Ministry of the Environment in Ontario, Canada, recently reviewed GIGI’s environmental cleanups at its seven former paper mills as the company attempts to acquire an eighth property in the town of Marathon. The mill is currently owned by Tembec, a forest products company, which MOE has ordered to pay $4.8 million in financial assurance for extensive cleanup work. For GIGI to take over the site and assume environmental liability it must pay an additional $2 million, an amount MOE attorneys insisted on after reviewing GIGI’s confidential financial documents, according to Lisa Brygidyr, an MOE project coordinator. “There was a little bit of uncertainty— not a whole lot of confidence—in the financial ability of the owners,” she says.

ment because he says there’s a pending transaction involving the Bathurst mill. ••• The company’s “proven track record of completing successful voluntary remediation” is largely based on a 26-acre portion of the roughly 300-acre former SmurfitStone mill in Circleville, Ohio. That cleanup was funded by $750,000 in public brownfield revitalization funds. Stillwell says 280 acres of the property has been sold to a cattle rancher, and that another transaction will be announced in a couple of weeks. But even in Circleville the local subsidiary, CircleGreen, hasn’t avoided trouble. In 2009, the Ohio EPA issued several violation notices related to the mill’s demolition. Stillwell, in an emailed response to questions about GIGI’s properties, refers to several “exciting development activities,” including a pending transaction at

cleanup of the toxins left behind by a halfcentury of papermaking in Frenchtown. “We are very concerned about the Green Investment Group’s ability to complete the cleanup at Frenchtown,” he says. “It will be very expensive, requiring much more work than at any of the other mill sites they own. The federal Superfund process is the only way to bring the former mill owners back to the table to clean up the messes they left behind when it closed.” Stillwell counters by saying that a Superfund listing would impact “the timing of economic development, job creation and even environmental cleanup at that location for many years.” ••• A recent EPA investigation of the Frenchtown mill’s soil and sludge ponds found concentrations of multiple dioxins and furans, among other contaminants, ex-

ceeding federal benchmarks for cancer risk. Before the mill shut down in 2010, every year it produced, on average, about 5.7 billion gallons of wastewater, much of which was discharged into the Clark Fork, with some 20,000 tons of sludge sent to the ponds in the river’s floodplain. GIGI has yet to perform an environmental assessment in the two years it’s owned the site. When Smurfit-Stone sold the mill to GIGI it passed on all environmental liability. Soon after the transaction, and about a year after emerging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, Smurfit-Stone was acquired by RockTenn, one of the largest paper and packaging manufacturers in North America. A Superfund designation would allow the federal government to force RockTenn and all other former mill owners or their corporate heirs to pay for the cleanup. GIGI doesn’t want that. Protecting former mill operators from environmental liability is central to its business model— although it wasn’t apparent amid the fanfare of GIGI’s acquisition of the Frenchtown mill two years ago, when former Gov. Brian Schweitzer stood at the mill’s gates and spoke of GIGI’s “proven track record.” “[GIGI] sold a bill of goods to the state of Montana, particularly the community of Missoula,” says attorney Milt Datsopoulos, whose firm represents local real estate agent Tom Dauenhauer in yet another breach of contract suit against GIGI. “I think they acquired property and misrepresented what they actually intended to do, and also what they were capable of doing financially.” Datsopoulos believes the company’s acquisition and scrapping of so many mills furthers another, larger goal among industry heavyweights such as RockTenn: “to reduce the papermaking capacity and create more demand than supply,” he says. “Everybody that remains in business wins. The community became a victim of that approach.” As the Associated Press reported last month, “a wave of consolidation” has concentrated 75 percent of the packaging market with a few companies, allowing RockTenn to “aggressively increase prices twice in the past year, driving earnings.” Last week, RockTenn’s stock hit a new 52week high, with shares up nearly 50 percent in that time. The EPA’s comment period on the Frenchtown mill’s proposed Superfund designation ends July 23. mfrank@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [9]


[opinion]

For our own good? Doubting the merits of domestic surveillance by Dan Brooks

Imagine that I knock on your door and offer to sell you something marvelous. Thanks to my inquisitive mind, I have invented a machine that tells you when something bad is about to happen. You wear the machine around your wrist, and it makes a beeping sound when you are in danger. When you are about to say “Where’s Katie?” at a party, and Katie has just succumbed to malignant carcinoma, my incredible machine beeps quietly to save you from the faux pas. When you stand too close to the kooky old valve Katie brought home from Chernobyl, my fantastical device beeps loudly to warn you away. In today’s world of socially competitive cocktail parties and radioactive keepsakes, my amazing danger-sensing machine is indispensable—and darn near perfect. The only catch is, due to quantum entanglement, it also beeps every time your spouse thinks someone else is attractive. Rugged checkout boy? It makes kind of a hum. But you quickly learn to ignore those sounds, since they’re not what you want to know about anyway. So what do you think of my fabulous contraption? If I rapped smartly on your storm window one morning and pitched it to you, would you buy it? If your spouse were standing there with you, would you be more or less likely to say yes? Last question: What if I came to your door and told you that not only had I invented this wonderful machine, but I was so confident you’d like it that I installed one in your basement three weeks ago? The non-Amish among us experienced a similar sensation last week when we learned that the National Security Agency has been secretly collecting phone, Internet and credit card data from millions of Americans. Almost immediately after whistleblower and not currently locatable person Edward Snowden revealed the top-secret program to the British press, our elected officials assured us that it was not a big deal. Yes, the NSA has been conducting broad domestic surveillance, but it’s for

+20(5(6285&(25*&251(52)5866(//$1':<20,1*

[10] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

our own good. What’s more, it’s perfectly legal. A secret court looked at the Patriot Act and ruled that the secret surveillance program is okay, in an airtight work of legal reasoning that is itself a secret. And they’re only collecting metadata anyway. Metadata—that mystic strain of information that tells the people who watch the screens so little about your private life that it’s only useful for catching terrorists. Speaking to Jane Mayer of the New Yorker, former Sun Microsystems engineer Susan Landau

“The idea that the government could collect a kind of information that reveals terrorists yet tells it nothing about our private lives is a pleasing fantasy.” described metadata as “much more intrusive than content.” The same metadata that tell us who’s a terrorists can also tell us who’s having an affair or going to political meetings or planning a corporate buyout. The idea that the government could collect a kind of information that reveals terrorists yet tells it nothing about our private lives is a pleasing fantasy, a pitch from a salesman who has installed the machine already. And that may be the eeriest part— the sense that our elected officials are not trying very hard to sell us on domestic surveillance from the NSA, since they are already doing it regardless. In Washington, the response to Snowden’s revelation has ranged from pique to

condolence. President Obama and most of Congress seem annoyed that we even expect an explanation. Seeing as how a government that both knows what we think and does not care is exactly the thing we’re trying to avoid, their monolithic apathy is kind of unsettling. The senators from Montana have been exceptions, and to their credit. Max Baucus sharply criticized the NSA program and voted last year to end the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Jon Tester is a co-sponsor of legislation that would require the FISA court make public its opinions pertaining to the Patriot Act. “Time and time again, Congress extends the Patriot Act without properly considering the law’s impact on Americans’ civil liberties.” Tester told the Great Falls Tribune. “While we must keep our families safe, I have many questions about the scope of this program and how it affects law-abiding citizens.” Unfortunately, the senators’ skepticism toward domestic surveillance puts them in the minority. Most of Washington seems to either trust the executive branch not to abuse the unprecedented power it secretly gave itself, or trust us not to care. In this context, it’s hard to say which is more alarming: that the federal government has built such an elaborate apparatus to surveil the American people, or that it has bet so heavily on our inertia now that we know about it. It’s easier to beg forgiveness than to ask permission, my father used to say. Maybe the NSA’s wonderful danger-sensing machine had to be a secret in order to work properly. Or maybe we learned about it from a disappearing whistleblower because it is not actually so great, and we would never have signed up for it if government had asked. “It’s for your own good” is not what you say when you do someone a favor. Dan Brooks writes about politics, consumer culture and lying at combatblog.net.


[opinion]

Something for everyone at Fort Missoula’s

Retreat to the past Stop clinging to coal on the reservation by Sarah Jane White

“Courageous,” “an opportunity,” “a venture into a new era,” “a vision for the future.” To hear glowing words like these from some leaders of the Navajo Nation, you might think the tribe had decided to head boldly into renewable energy or some other modern economic model. But no, the officials were describing the tribe’s desire to buy and prolong the life of a 50-year-old coal mine on the Navajo Reservation. At the least, this is an odd plan, as the mine’s current corporate owner doesn’t even see the mine as profitable and just wants to get rid of it as quickly as possible. I was a teenager when the Four Corners Power Plant and the Navajo Mine that supplies it with coal started up in the early 1960s. Relatives and friends have worked at the mine, which is just 20 miles from my home; some have retired from it. My late husband worked at the coal plant as a truck driver, hauling coal ash waste to the mine pits. It was a dirty job in many ways: Coal ash contains heavy metal toxins, and my husband came home each day with his face and clothes coated black. About 10 years ago, I began thinking about other ways of generating electricity than coal-fired power plants. That’s when I first got a computer and got on the Internet. I wanted to learn what was in the smoke I saw coming from the Four Corners Power Plant and San Juan Generating Station. As I learned about the pollution from coal-generated electricity and what it does to human health, water and fish, I started going from house to house to talk about it with other residents in my area. Until then, I hadn’t realized how many of my neighbors were grappling with lung problems, either from asthma, which I also suffer from, or other respiratory issues. Many have lived with coal dust blowing into their homes for decades.

I also heard many residents express frustration that, after 50 years, the coal industry on the Navajo Nation has not really benefited our people. Power lines crisscross our land, but many Navajo homes still have no electricity or running water—even some that are close to the power plants. In recent years, the coal ash waste at the Four Corners plant hasn’t been dumped back into the mine because mine owner BHP Billiton apparently got nerv-

“A wiser, more far-sighted vision is to create clean renewable energy development on our land to benefit the Navajo economy.” ous about its liability for toxins from ash waste seeping out. Instead, it’s being dumped in huge surface pits near the Chaco Wash, which funnels rain and snow melt into the San Juan River. From the surface pits, high winds pick up the ash and blow it around. While it might be a new thing for the Navajo Nation to own its own mine, all across America coal is becoming a part of the past as coal mines close. It is a polluting fuel that’s very costly to try to clean up. Major portions of both the San Juan Generating Station and Four Corners Power Plant are due to be closed soon. At the Navajo Generating Station coal plant

near the Grand Canyon, two owners have announced that they’re leaving; meanwhile, the plant has fallen behind on controlling its pollution. Nationwide, and especially in the Southwest, polls this year reveal that most of the people asked want more power to come from renewable sources like solar and wind, rather than from coal. So should we keep tearing into our land to fuel far-off places like China? In the Pacific Northwest, residents are concerned about export terminals that will take coal from Montana and ship it overseas, and plans for three of them have been scrapped. Deciding to hold on more tightly to a declining coal industry is not a courageous vision for the Navajo people; it’s a retreat to the past as well as a reckless idea. It could leave us dealing with the decades of coal waste dumped on our land while a multinational mining corporation washes its hands of all responsibility. A wiser, more far-sighted vision is to create clean renewable energy development on our land to benefit the Navajo economy. If we don’t do it soon, others will, and the door will one day be slammed on our coal workers, leaving them—and us—with no other alternatives in sight. When I was little, my father used to tell us that the land, our Mother Earth, is sacred, that we are its keepers. We care for it, he said, but we don’t own it. I wish my father were here now to advise our shortsighted leaders who are so eager to own a 50-year-old coal mine. I think he’d advise us to find a new and better model, one that doesn’t come at the cost of our health, our water and our Mother Earth.

4th of July Celebration & PANCAKE BREAKFAST Huge pancake breakfast put on by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (for the benefit of the Friends) from 8:00 until 11:00, on Jul y 4th with entertainment and special events from 10:00 until 4:00 including homestead fun & games, historical demonstrations, antique engines, live music, silent auction, crafts, food, and more! Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for seniors, $2 for students, $15 for a family. Children under 6 and members of the Friends of the Museum are free. The Pancake Breakfast is a separate price.

Sponsors: Pepsi-Cola and Community Medical Center Southgate Mall, Black Knight Security and Investigations, Pink Grizzly Greenhouse and Fireworks, Good Food Store, Bayern Brewing, Denny's Copy Stop and SignPro For more information, call 728-3476. for tmissoulamuseum.or g

Sarah Jane White is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). She lives on the Navajo Nation near the Chaco Wash in northwestern New Mexico.

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – A police officer stopped a car for a traffic violation in Clayton, Mo., and asked driver Joseph Meacham, 39, to step out. Meacham obliged but then shoved the officer and fled on foot. He ducked into a building, which turned out to be St. Louis County police headquarters. After Meacham was arrested at gunpoint, Officer Korey Golcynski noted, “It appears the subject had no idea where he was going.” (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) Fugitive Dennis Gholston, 45, attracted the attention of New Jersey State Police by driving alone on the New Jersey Turnpike’s high-occupancy-vehicle lane, which requires vehicles to have three occupants. Sgt. Adam Grossman said troopers searched the car after smelling marijuana and found 410 decks of heroin. A records check uncovered fugitive and traffic warrants. (Newark’s The Star-Ledger) MORE WOES – The United Nations is considering a ban on killer robots. Calling them “lethal autonomous robotics,” or LARs, a draft report for the U.N.’s Human Rights Commission by Christof Heyns, a South African professor of human rights law, urges a worldwide moratorium on “testing, production, assembly, transfer, acquisition, deployment and use” of robots that can attack targets without human input, until an international conference can develop rules for their use. The report says the United States, Britain, Israel, South Korea and Japan have developed various fully or partially autonomous weapons. (The Canadian Press) AN END TO DOUGHNUT BREAKS – Police in Lowell, Mass. agreed to allow global-positioning systems in patrol cars to track officers. The Lowell Patrolmen’s Union had expressed concerns about the GPS devices being used to discipline officers found to not be where they’re supposed to, but the union agreed to their implementation in exchange for a retroactive 0.25 percent hike in base pay. The city pays for the GPS units with money seized during drug arrests. (Lowell Sun) THINGS THAT GO BOOM—AND DON’T – A 19-year-old man carrying what Houston police called a “combustible mixture” intending to “blow up turtles” suffered severe injuries to his hand, lower extremities and face after he accidentally detonated the materials. Investigators said the teenager lit a cigar, whose ashes fell near the pocket carrying the explosive cartridges and ignited them. (Houston Chronicle) Authorities said Leonard Burdek, 50, walked into the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission offices in Salem, Ore., carrying a pressure cooker with wires sticking out and claimed it was a bomb. He told Executive Director Vickie Chamberlain and the receptionist that he tried to blow up the agency’s outside sign because of a misspelling (a “d” was missing from “and” in the agency’s name), but the bomb didn’t work. After discussing the bomb’s failure to detonate, Burdek complained that the instructions he downloaded to make it also had misspellings. He left after an employee called police, who found him nearby. Noting the pressure cooker wasn’t a bomb, police Lt. Dave Okada said, “It looks like he was just trying to get attention.” (Salem’s Statesman Journal) WHY THEY CALL IT DOPE – Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez, 22, drove more than 2,000 miles from Idaho Falls to Washington, D.C., and fired as many as eight shots at the White House, according to prosecutors, who said after his arrest that Ortega-Hernandez “expressed anger towards the government regarding the continued criminalization of marijuana,” which he acknowledged smoking and claimed makes people more intelligent. (Associated Press) ADDING INSULT TO INJURY – Police said a man who found an intruder in his garage in Boonville, Ind., chased the man off with a shovel, then addressed the thief on Craigslist: “How does it feel to get whacked with a long handle shovel by an old man, not once, but twice? If you want to try again, come on back.” (Evansville’s WFIE-TV) DOUBLE JEOPARDY – Scott Ferguson resigned as mayor of Oakland, Tenn., following reports that he has two wives. “I decided to resign because I have not been true to my wife, and I have neglected my family,” Ferguson, a Church of Christ preacher, said, although it was unclear whether he was referring to his first wife, Laurie, and their four children or to Miguelina Mora, whom he married on Valentine’s Day. Mora asked for a divorce or annulment, plus alimony, claiming Ferguson married her fraudulently because he’s still married to Laurie Ferguson. (Memphis’ WMC-TV) ECO-FALLOUT – One in five Seattle business owners surveyed blamed a ban on plastic bags for an increase in shoplifting. Typically, shoplifters enter stores with reusable bags containing some merchandise, then add a few items and walk out. “Across the United States, we have seen these bag bans, and the shoplifting has always had a substantial leap,” Jan Gee, president of the Washington Food Industry Association, said, “and so it was not a surprise to us.” (Seattle Weekly) IT HAPPENS – The town of Brunete, Spain, reported a 70-percent drop in unscooped poop since it enlisted volunteers to track down dog owners who fail to pick up after their pets. The 20 volunteers patrol the town, and when they observe owners who fail to pick up after their pets, they approach them under the guise of casual conversation to learn the dog’s name. They check the name against a pet database to find names and address of the owners and mail the excrement to them in an official box marked “Lost Property.” (Britain’s The Telegraph) City officials in Abbotsford, British Columbia, apologized for spraying chicken manure on a makeshift camp to drive away homeless people. After homeless advocate James Breckenridge complained about “the dumbness of using chicken manure in light of bird flu” and the fact that the homeless people wind up tracking the manure “all over the place in the city,” city manager George Murray said the city would remove the manure from the site. (Canada’s QMI Agency) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION – Authorities accused Orlando Llorente, 41, of attacking his girlfriend over what he considered false allegations posted on Facebook. According to Miami police official Kenia Reyes, Llorente, a plastic surgeon, waterboarded the 36-year-old woman continuously until she lost consciousness and banged her head on the floor. (The Miami Herald) Authorities accused barber Timothy Evans, 31, of fatally punching co-worker Michael Alao, 22, after the two argued over a set of broken clippers. Jon Bramble, owner of the barbershop on New York’s Staten Island, said the argument was more about respect than it was about the clippers. (Staten Island Advance)

[12] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013


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Features include energy-efficient features, LED site lighting and many other water and energy saving measures. Exterior features include an extraordinary clubhouse, private gardens, open spaces and a pool and fitness center. Residences include oversized storage and balconies, bike hangers, shaker cabinetry, plank-style floors and custom finishes.

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mullanreserveapartments.com

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [13]


[14] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013


What would later happen spurred a massive manhunt by local and federal law enforcement agencies and drew the attention of media outlets across the country. On Oct., 29, 2011, the 25th season of “America’s Most Wanted” premiered with an episode that reenacted the chase and the brief shootout that followed. By way of illustrating the stakes the deputies faced that day, the show’s host, John Walsh, recalled Burgert’s Project 7 plot from a decade before, which sought to assassinate Flathead County public officials and draw the federal government into war. “The goal was nothing short of anarchy,” Walsh said, before making a plea to viewers. “Let’s take this dangerous guy off the streets.” Today, Burgert is wanted for the attempted murder of Newsom and Schwindt as well as violating his federal probation. The saga of his crimes, both alleged and proven, has been told and retold, producing the same questions and dead-end speculations. But just more than two years after he disappeared into the woods, law enforcement is no closer to finding the fugitive. The story of the man behind the crimes has been less considered. Even if it doesn’t provide any answers, it’s a narrative that at least offers a better understanding of the man described on federal “Wanted” posters as “armed” and “extremely dangerous.”

Prom Photos courtesy of Phyllis Richards

G

raves Creek Road appears to go nowhere. After you take the right turn from Highway 12 onto its washboarded dirt and pass the beehives, the pastured horses, the through-the-pines glimpse of an enormous log cabin and the recently shuttered Lumberjack Saloon, the road becomes rutted and rocky as it negotiates the steep terrain of the Lolo National Forest. If you commit yourself (and your vehicle), eventually you’ll end up on Petty Creek Road, where the dirt is graded and leads to Interstate 90 near Alberton. Otherwise, the only way out is by way of a left turn at Wagon Mountain Road, which has no sign and loops back to Highway 12 after it winds and ascends to wildfire-charred ridgetops. Once used by loggers, Graves Creek and Wagon Mountain roads are now mostly traveled by hunters, hikers and others looking to escape into the backcountry. They are an ends, rarely a means. This was the thought Missoula County Sheriff ’s Deputy Will Newsom had on June 12, 2011, when the light blue Jeep Cherokee he and deputy-in-training Larry Schwindt were following turned right on Graves Creek Road. They had just heard over the radio that the Jeep belonged to an ex-militia leader named David Burgert who was on probation for federal gun charges. “We were told that he hated the government,” Newsom says. “He had threatened to kill law enforcement.” Moments before, as the chase continued west, Newsom thought one of two things would transpire: “Either he’s heading to the border thinking we’re not going to follow him to Idaho. Or he’s taking us into the woods away from our backup for something bad to happen,” he remembers. When Burgert turned onto Graves Creek, Newsom feared the worst.

e 14

Camping, ag

Burgert at 18 months

n June 13, 2011, the day after Burgert disappeared, Phyllis Richards was at her to home in Rogersville, Ala., when six men in “SWAT gear” and carrying guns came son. her of thought the front door of her trailer. She immediately “I was thinking they done something to him,” she says. he The men informed her that David was a fugitive. They asked her if she knew where might be. She said she didn’t. Richards was worried, but her shock was tempered by her son’s sordid past. and Burgert was born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1964, to Richards, a now-retired Army nurse, his After work. after a father who had a job as an insurance adjuster and drank too much evenmother his and Ky., n, parents divorced when he was 4, his father moved to Lexingto tually moved Burgert and his younger brother to Victor, Colo. , Richards remembers her son thrived in the mountains. She says he loved camping Cub a was He home. their around forests the g explorin hunting and fishing and spent days out Scout, a Boy Scout and he played baseball. His troubles didn’t begin until he dropped ered rememb she what and service military mother’s his by d influence of high school and, as his tireless desire “to help people,” joined the military. by Burgert, though, had trouble adjusting to military life. Richards says he was abused her When beating. s merciles a his drill sergeant and once was shuttled into the desert for boy.” son complained of his injuries, she says, the military doctors called him a “mama’s . Colorado to returned After less than two years, he went AWOL and was Through an appeal with then-U.S. Congresswoman Patricia Schroeder, Burgert school. high in ed re-enroll He 1981. honorably discharged in But Richards says Burgert came home a changed person. She says he started drinking and developed an affinity for bar brawling. you “He would iron his blue jeans, put on a cowboy hat, and I would ask him, ‘Where

O

“He was crying like a baby. He said, ‘Mom, I could have found that boy, I knew where he was.’ That’s when David lost it.” — Phyllis Richards, David Burgert’s mother

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [15]


going?’ And he would say, ‘Someone’s been bragging their butt’s never been kicked,’” she remembers. “He was different when he came back.” Not long after returning to school, Burgert’s teacher told him to stop chewing gum in class. Richards says he came home livid. “I’m old enough to serve but I can’t chew gum,” he told her. He dropped out of high school and left Colorado. He headed farther west before landing outside Kalispell in Flathead County. The subsequent 15 years of Burgert’s life followed the trajectory of a man who was often too drunk to make the right decision. In Flathead County, he got the attention of local law enforcement after stealing a horse. He then went to Alabama, where his mother had moved, to try his hand making money in commercial fishing. That plan floundered in 1985, when Burgert drunkenly broke into a trailer carrying a loaded handgun and ate a sandwich at the kitchen table. He fled when he heard a car park outside, and woke up the next morning without his gun. Burgert called the sheriff ’s office to see if they had found it. For breaking and entering and weapons charges, Burgert went to prison. After being released in 1989, he returned to Montana, met a woman in a bar and got married.

By the mid-1990s, Burgert gave his mother reason to believe that he was headed down a new path. His life had stabilized. He owned a home with his wife, Yvonne, and had started a business that rented snowmobiles to tourists. He had also stopped drinking and founded an Alcoholics Anonymous group in Kalispell. “He was doing well for himself,” remembers Richards. “He was happy.” And perhaps because he was sober for the first time since leaving the Marines, Burgert again felt he wanted to help people. He began emergency medical technician training, and in 1996 applied to become a member of the North Valley Search and Rescue team. He was denied. Then-Sheriff Jim Dupont told team leaders that regulations prohibited the team from having members who had criminal backgrounds. Burgert’s friend Kandi Matthew-Jenkins, a Missoula resident and a nowand-then Constitution Party candidate for local public office, says Burgert was devastated by the rejection. He believed the sheriff ’s department was “out to get him.” “Dave felt like because of petty arguments or dislike or whatever it was on the part of [Dupont],” she says, “they were trying to keep him from making a difference.” According to then-Undersheriff Chuck Curry, who in 2011 replaced Dupont as sheriff, Burgert began pop-

ping up on law enforcement’s radar after he was denied a spot on search and rescue. He owned a police scanner and a radio and would call the police and sheriff ’s offices to complain about bad drivers, unsafe intersections and general objections with the way Dupont and Police Chief Frank Garner ran their departments. “He took issue with everything,” Curry remembers. “He became very confrontational with law enforcement.” For the next five years, Burgert galvanized his reputation as a thorn in the heel of local government, albeit peacefully. It wasn’t until the beginning of 2001 that his life began to teeter off the rails.

Exactly when Project 7 formed and to what extent the group was a militant, anti-government militia is difficult to pin down. Larry Chezem met Burgert at his rental shop in January 2001. Chezem, who had previously worked as a high school teacher and guidance counselor in Ronan, was then making a living installing and repairing satellite dishes in Flathead Valley homes. He had heard Burgert call in to a local talk radio show and found a common ground in Burgert’s suspicion of government. “We’d had a whole string of things—Waco, Oklahoma City, Ruby Ridge, the assault weapons ban,” he says. “If you had a viewpoint considered in opposition to the mainstream politic, you were harassed.” Chezem found a like-mind in Burgert, and shortly after meeting, Burgert invited him to participate in a group he was organizing. “[Burgert] told me he had hired a CPR instructor who would be giving weekend training sessions over the course of about six weeks,” Chezem remembers, and adds that the group had no name. The “Project 7” moniker, which alluded to the “7” on Flathead County license plates, was “fed to the media by Dupont,” he says. Over time, the group’s ambitions evolved. “We had all felt that things were moving in such a direction that there was a disaster coming down the road— man-made or natural,” Chezem recalls. “Our agreement was that we would train ourselves in survival skills as best we could and to get a knowledge base so that we could also train other people.” Chezem says the stockpiling of food, clothing, medical supplies, “and yes,” ammunition and weapons, was not to orchestrate a government takeover, but to help “everyone in the community” in the event of catastrophe. “It was no different from what the fire department was doing,” he says. But as Project 7 took shape, Burgert’s problems with law enforcement grew more serious. On Jan. 5, 2001, Bob Cesnick, a member of his AA group, was signaled to

pull over by a Highway Patrol vehicle. Like Burgert, Cesnick was paranoid about law enforcement. He panicked and drove straight to Burgert’s house without stopping. A dashboard camera recording from that night depicts a chaotic scene. The Highway Patrol officers had been joined by Sheriff ’s Deputy Tom Snyder, their vehicles parked behind Cesnick’s pickup truck. Though the beginning of the recording’s audio is muddled, charging documents would later allege that upon arriving, Burgert told Cesnick to go inside the house. When Snyder attempted to follow across the threshold of Burgert’s front door, Burgert attempted to forcibly stop him. Though neither of the two other officers would testify to witnessing it and though he sustained no injuries, Snyder claimed that Burgert punched him. In the recording, after all of the men are outside again, Cesnick spits obscenities at the officers while Burgert urges him to calm down and just “talk to them.” Burgert tries to diffuse the situation. “This man is afraid of police,” he says to the officers. Finally, the officers leave and say they will recommend charges be pressed. As they get back in their vehicles, one officer says to another, “That other guy is Dave Burgert.” The officer responds, “Oh, Burgert. Okay.”

During summer 2001, Burgert fought the assault charge in court and avoided prison. Meanwhile, Project 7 continued to stockpile provisions and train one another in wilderness first aid, edible plant identification and the handling of firearms. Then, over the course a few days in November, the situation changed. On Thanksgiving Day, 2001, a 12-year-old boy named Kodi Quinn went hunting with his father, Kelly, on Stryker Ridge north of Whitefish. The day was cold and the pair became disoriented in a snowstorm. Newspaper accounts of the incident say Kodi turned “lethargic” and his father found a tree well, protected from the elements, for him to wait in while he found help. After making it back to the road, Kelly called search and rescue. Burgert heard the call come in over the radio and contacted Sheriff Dupont saying he’d led snowmobiling trips in the Stryker Ridge area and that he could help. Dupont refused. The search lasted through the night, but to no avail. Kodi’s frozen body was recovered the next afternoon. Burgert’s mother, Phyllis Richards, received a call from her son the day Kodi was found. “He was crying like a baby. He said, ‘Mom, I could have found that boy, I knew where he was,’” she remembers. “That’s when David lost it. “

Two days later, on Nov. 27, Burgert was asked by a Missoula attorney to help serve process papers to a Kalispell woman. Burgert had helped the attorney before, serving papers in the Flathead Valley. According to the attorney, who wishes to remain anonymous because of how his connection to Burgert affected his personal and professional life, he and another process server had searched for the woman all day, but couldn’t find her. They left the documents with Burgert before heading back to Missoula, but on their way out of Kalispell spotted the woman’s husband, a local doctor. They began following him and the man called 911, claiming he was being stalked. The attorney was pulled over by Kalispell police. The attorney says he called Burgert and asked him to bring the papers to the scene, proof that he wasn’t stalking. When Burgert arrived, however, an officer immediately asked him to leave. When Burgert refused, a video recording of the incident shows one officer ordering another officer to “get [Burgert] to leave or arrest him.” The officer then douses Burgert in the face with pepper spray and puts him in handcuffs. The Missoula attorney was let go, and a police department security camera recording shows Burgert getting booked. His face is puffy and his eyes are swollen shut. He continually tries to rub his head on his shoulders. He spits on the floor and complains about the burning in his eyes, throat and nose. He is agitated and confrontational with the officers as they process him, but Burgert complies as they pat-search his body. One of the officers then leaves the room and turns on a shower, presumably to decontaminate the prisoner. Burgert spits again just as Police Chief Frank Garner enters the room and walks past Burgert, directly to the shower. He turns it off and orders a canvas bag be put over Burgert’s head. Burgert writhes and seems to panic. “I cannot breathe,” he says. “And I’m sick to my stomach.” Garner responds coolly, as if talking to a child. “Well you sound like you’re breathing to me, David.” Burgert was released early the next morning.

People close to Burgert say he was broken after the November 2001 episode. His paranoia became overwhelming. “He always thought they were watching him,” Chezem recalls. “And sometimes I’m sure they were.” “They didn’t even treat him like a human,” adds Richards. Then Burgert disappeared. On Jan. 9, 2002, Burgert went fishing and never returned. His wife, who by then was estranged from Burgert (Richards calls them “room-

Security camera footage from 2001 shows Burgert handcuffed and with a canvas bag over his face after being pepper-sprayed by Kalispell police.

[16] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013


mates”), reported him missing, and his pickup truck was found at a Flathead River fishing access. His fishing pole and tackle box were strewn on the bank. It was clear to members of the sheriff ’s department what conclusion Burgert wanted them to draw, but they were unconvinced. “He made a poor attempt at faking his own death,” Curry says. “We didn’t believe he was dead for a minute.” For nearly a month, Burgert remained missing. Newspaper accounts at the time reported his wife believed he had drowned. Then she accused law enforcement of killing her husband. Curry was confident he would turn up. “Dave Burgert just wasn’t the sort of guy that would just go hide in the woods for the rest of his life,” he says. “It just wasn’t his personality to disappear.” Since disappearing, Burgert had also failed to show up for a court hearing for his January 2001 assault charge. He was now a fugitive. Before the end of January, a Project 7 defector named Jason Larson called in a tip. He told the sheriff ’s department that Burgert was hiding in the area and was being supported by a fellow group member named Tracy Brockway with whom he had become romantically involved. He also said that Burgert and Project 7 were conspiring to assassinate judges, county prosecutors and other government officials with the aim of drawing the National Guard into a war in Flathead Valley. On Feb. 7, deputies staked out Brockway’s home, and after spotting Burgert leave, gave chase. It was snowing and Burgert’s car slipped off the road. He took off into the woods. All night SWAT team members hunted Burgert through the forest. At times, they were close enough to hear him trudging through the snow, but the darkness kept him out of their reach. Finally, after dawn, Burgert took off across a field and posted underneath a tree clutching a rifle. As officers yelled at him to drop his weapon, he sat down on the ground, put the gun to his head and said he would kill himself. After several tense hours, he just gave up.

In 2002, Burgert pleaded guilty in Missoula federal court to owning an illegal firearm and being a felon in possession of a firearm. After his capture, investigators discovered Project 7’s cache, which reportedly included body armor, pipe bombs, several automatic rifles, more than 30,000 rounds of ammunition and military rations. Though Burgert was not charged with anything related to the assassination plots, investigators also claimed to have found the names and addresses of 26 county offi-

cials, including several judges, law enforcement officers, Flathead County prosecutors and a dog catcher who worked for the Whitefish Police Department. An FBI investigation ensued, and in 2004, this time with five other Project 7 members, Burgert was again charged with federal weapons violations. Burgert told reporters in 2002 that there was no “hit list” and that he had compiled information because he was one of the few people willing to serve legal process papers on public officials. Larry Chezem, who in 2003 moved to Indiana unaware of the FBI investigation, says he wasn’t surprised no one was charged with conspiracy to commit murder. He says whether Burgert kept the files for process serving or because he was attempting to document “the corruption of government,” there was never a Project 7 plot. “The [newspapers] … came up with this fabulous story that the group was going to create a situation where the locals would have to ask the governor to help. The governor would ask for the National Guard, and the six of us being such highly trained super human people, we were going to take them on one by one,” he says. “After we nailed the National Guard to the wall, then we’d do a number on the regular military. Really? Try to imagine that.” Today, Chezem lives on a farm in West Virginia. A year after moving to Indiana, he says he was arrested in his driveway by federal agents and charged with conspiracy to possess illegal firearms, stemming from his involvement with Project 7. He was ultimately found guilty and sentenced to 15 months in prison. In 2011, Chezem finished federal probation, but he says the repercussions of becoming a felon have haunted him. For years he was unable to find work and in 2010 he lost his house, prompting him to accept an offer to take care of the old farm where he lives today. “This whole thing,” he says, “it ruined my life.” Burgert spent the next seven years in Missoula County jail and federal prisons around the country. During his initial court proceedings, Burgert’s public defender, Melissa Harrison, argued that her client was diagnosed with paranoid personality disorder, delusional disorder and PTSD, and said it was unreasonable to portray him as a “dangerous, anti-government person who might possibly have been trying to assassinate people.” She added that Burgert was not the “monster he has been depicted [as] in the press.” Assistant U.S. Attorney Kris McLean countered that despite his mental illness, Burgert was clearly a menace. “This defendant is simply a conniving, manipulative criminal and has been since he left the Marines in 1981,” McLean said.

John Rhodes, a federal defender who represented Burgert during a successful appeal regarding the length of his sentence and the fact that he had been charged twice for the same crime, says that Burgert’s mental health issues were too often overlooked. “I respected Dave, and I think he respected me. He was somebody that was paranoid of government, and he was mentally ill. No doubt about that,” Rhodes says. “And like a lot of mentally ill people, if they’re taking their accurately prescribed medications, they’re fine. And if they’re not, they’re spiraling downward.” Rhodes adds that during the time he worked with Burgert, he was in custody and taking his prescriptions. “To me, there were two David Burgerts,” Rhodes says. “Mainly, I saw the stable David.”

Burgert was released from prison in March 2010. His mother had been to all the court hearings, had driven to spend Christmas with him at the federal medical prison in Rochester, Minn., and made once-a-month trips to the penitentiary he was later moved to in Talladega, Ala. Upon his release, she says she bought him some new clothes and drove with him to Missoula, where his probation officer was based and where he would try to begin his life again. Richards remembers Burgert was happy for a time. She says he volunteered at the Missoula Food Bank and that he got an apartment on the Westside. Kandi Matthew-Jenkins was relieved to see her friend out of prison. “He showed up one day, and I just said, ‘Is that you?’” she recalls. “It was so good to see him safe.” Eventually, Burgert got permission from his probation officer to go to work on a ranch in eastern Montana, killing gophers and mending fences. Richards says her son called her every day and once complained about the fact that the rancher he was working for wouldn’t allow him to dispose of a cow carcass laying in pasture. The sight upset him but the rancher thought it a waste of time to dispose of the remains. The men fought, and the rancher would later tell Missoula County deputies that Burgert had punched him, and that he didn’t press charges because he assumed Burgert would just come back to work. Richards says the rancher gave her son guns as payment. Law enforcement says Burgert stole them. In late spring 2011, Burgert was back in Missoula County. Richards says he couldn’t afford his medication. John Rhodes saw his former client at the Ole’s gas station on Orange Street and could sense there was something wrong. “We talked briefly, and it was apparent to me he was-

n’t doing well,” Rhodes remembers. “I was concerned about his stability.” By early June, Burgert was living in a camp near the Fort Fizzle recreation area on the banks of Lolo Creek. He stayed there for a few weeks, intermittently driving into town for groceries. On the morning of June 12, someone called 911 and reported a suspicious-looking man camping in the dayuse only area. Deputies Newsom and Schwindt were in Lolo responding to reports of vandalism when they got the call. They finished with the broken windows before heading to Fort Fizzle. At around 11:30 a.m., as the deputies pulled into the Fort Fizzle parking lot, a man got into a blue Jeep Cherokee and took off in the opposite direction. “He’s running from you,” Newsom told the in-training Schwindt, who was driving at the time. Burgert left the pavement and took off down a muddy two-track that followed a string of power lines through the woods. The deputies got stuck and Newsom told Schwindt to get out so he could drive. Then Burgert got back on Highway 12 and headed west. By the time the Cherokee turned right on Graves Creek Road, the officers knew who they were dealing with. How much of that day Burgert had planned in advance is open to speculation. Most likely, he had no idea sheriff ’s deputies would show up at Fort Fizzle, even though he seemed ready when they did. Newsom recalls Burgert driving fast, but not erratically, as if he knew where he was going. (He also says journalists’ description of the chase as “slow-speed” was part of a media “template” in retelling the story.) Then-Undersheriff Mike Dominick received reports of someone fitting Burgert’s description getting in an argument with a county roads employee on Wagon Mountain Road a few weeks before. As Burgert led the deputies down Graves Creek and then up Wagon Mountain, Newsom relayed their location over the radio. Backup was coming from Missoula, some 30 miles away. “I had never been up that road,” Newsom says. “There isn’t even a road sign.” At one point, where the road breaks from the trees, Burgert stopped and began to reverse. Newsom told Scwhindt to get ready to fire. Schwindt hopped out of the car, hoping to shoot out Burgert’s tires, but Burgert immediately proceeded forward again. Less than a quarter mile later, Burgert turned off the road and began driving over sapling evergreens up a steep slope to a ridge that ran parallel to the road. The deputies continued down Wagon Mountain, scanning the ridgeline for any sign of Burgert. After 100 yards or so, Schwindt spotted him.

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [17]


Newsom remembers Burgert looked calm as he strapped a fanny pack around his waste. He was holding a handgun. As Newsom started up the hill toward Burgert he yelled at him to drop the gun. Newsom says Burgert—almost “calmly”—rested his arms on the Jeep’s hood and took aim. All Newsom could see was the top of Burgert’s head and the open barrel of his gun. Investigators later recovered five shells from Newsom’s assault rifle. The distance between the deputy and Burgert’s Jeep was about 14 yards. Newsom can’t remember exactly how many shots Burgert fired—none of his shells were ever recovered—but he knows it was more than once and he knows Burgert shot first. He doesn’t know how he survived. “I couldn’t get it out of mind that I could see inside his barrel,” he says. “And I didn’t get shot. I’m still alive.” After Newsom fired his shots, Burgert disappeared. He and Schwindt, who had also fired several rounds, approached the Jeep slowly, thinking an injured or dead Burgert would be lying on the other side. But he was gone. From where Burgert stood as he fired at Newsom, the view is quintessential Montana. To the north and west, dense pine forests carpet the hills before giving way to the charred landscape of an old wildfire. To the south, the craggy spine of the Bitterroot

The late Flathead County Sheriff Jim Dupont is seen in a 2002 photo displaying a cache of weapons that were associated with David Burgert and Project 7.

[18] Missoula Independent • April 13–April 20, 2012

Mountains snakes its way down the Montana-Idaho border. But to the east, from that spot, a thick wall of new-growth spruce obscures everything. It was the only place Burgert could have gone, and when later that day dozens of Missoula law enforcement officers showed up on the scene, it was to the east that they began their search. For the next five days, officers from the Missoula County Sheriff ’s Office and Missoula Police Department, supported by the FBI and U.S. Marshals, combed the Graves Creek area. Road blocks were set up and a spot plane flew low over the mountains. The search recovered three caches containing food, ammunition and weapons, several of which belonged to the rancher in eastern Montana. They also discovered a makeshift cabin in the woods that turned out to be the home of a transient squatter. Burgert was nowhere. In June 2012, officers from the U.S. Marshals, Missoula County Sheriff ’s Office and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and several other agencies re-intensified a search effort in the area, combing swaths of thick brush in 40-man lines. They brought a cadaver dog. Again, they found nothing. Dominick says they received a number of tips after the “America’s Most Wanted” episode aired in October 2011, but since then the open investigation has been quiet.

Photo courtesy of Daily Inter Lake


“A handyman in Florida, a transient spotted back east …,” Dominick says. “We got a tip a couple of months ago. They’ve mostly turned out to be cold leads.” Today, there is no longer a trail to follow. The ridge where Burgert disappeared has seen two years of rain, snow, wind and fire and offers as much evidence of two hunting seasons as it does the disappearance of a fugitive. Assuming he’s alive, finding Burgert today is predicated on him making a mistake or an accomplice turning on him. But there is no consensus on whether or not Burgert made it out of the woods that summer or even that day. Dominick and Newsom will presume he’s alive until a body is recovered. Larry Chezem believes his friend survived for different reasons— because “he trained to survive.” “I know him too well. He’s alive and well somewhere,” he says. “I just don’t know where.” Chuck Curry disagrees. He feels it’s unlikely Burgert would be able to stay out of trouble for so long. He believes if he were alive, he’d be captured by now. “I could be wrong,” he says, “but Dave Burgert is not the kind of guy that just fades into obscurity.” There’s also this: On the afternoon Burgert disappeared, as the search mounted up Wagon Mountain Road, numerous

officers reported hearing a single gun shot in the distance. Dominick describes it as “suspicious,” but doesn’t believe Burgert took his own life. He says it’s common for people to go up into the woods to shoot guns.

For most of his life, Burgert battled himself. He was a criminal, a drunk, a gadfly and a maker of astoundingly poor decisions. He was the diagnosable sort of paranoid, delusional and depressed. But there is enough to know about Burgert to suggest his story is not so reducible, that he at least wanted to be more than those things. In 2003, with nearly a decade of prison ahead of him, Burgert wrote a series of letters to Kandi Matthew-Jenkins. One reflects a man struggling to cope. “My system is in shock still, and I really do not know how to respond. I am having a very tough time communicating and talking properly. I am [illegible] of another attack on myself or what they could do to my family. I am not over what has been done to me. I don’t know if I ever will be.” Another letter sent in November 2003 is more hopeful. “I went to a Bible study today … Very pleasant and uplifting.” That letter was written on the back of a printout of the

Robert Service poem, “The Call of the Wild,” which his mother had sent to him. (“I gotta spread the good stuff around,” he wrote.) The penultimate verse reads, “They have cradled you in custom,/ They have primed you with their preaching,/ They have soaked you in convention through and through;/ They have put you in a showcase;/ You’re a credit to their teaching./ But can’t you hear the Wild?—it’s calling you.” No one knows what Burgert thought as he turned off the pavement in June 2011. It seems, though, that he understood where he was going—that the man who as a boy wandered the wilderness around his mountain home knew that Graves Creek Road went nowhere. In fact, as he approached the Lumberjack Saloon that day, the patrons sipping drinks on the deck could hear the low rumbling of vehicles and shrill swoon of a siren before they could see the pursuers and the pursued. Several of them would later say that as Burgert passed, he took one hand off the steering wheel, stuck it out the window and waved. editor@missoulanews.com

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missoulanews.com • January 6–January 13, 2011 [19]


[arts]

Wasted on the way James McMurtry on Lou Reed, gun control and why Leonard Cohen must die by Bill Forman

J

ames McMurtry doesn’t necessarily think of himself as a political songwriter, but he’s gotten pretty used to other people thinking that. Especially in the aftermath of “We Can’t Make It Here,” an unforgiving state-of-the-union indictment that the acerbic singer-songwriter distributed as a free download during the 2004 presidential campaign. While McMurtry hasn’t released a studio album since 2008’s excellent Just Us Kids, the Texas native has kept busy. He tours extensively, plays weekly Wednesday night gigs at the Continental Club whenever he’s back home in Austin, and re-recorded “We Can’t Make It Here,” with Steve Earle and Joan Baez contributing vocals, as his standout contribution to last year’s fourdisc Occupy This Album collection. “That was the brainchild of my ex-manager Mark Spector, who also manages Joan Baez,” says McMurtry of the remake. “He quit my business a long time ago, because back then 20 percent of nothing was nothing. He threw up his hands and ran screaming back to Connecticut. But he still manages Joan, and she is buddies with Steve, so that’s how that happened.” It’s easy to see why such socially conscious artists would be attracted to a song with lines like: “Should I hate a people for the shade of their skin / Or the shape of their eyes or the shape I’m in / Should I hate ’em for having our jobs today / No I hate the men sent the jobs away.” Other McMurtry tracks like “Cheney’s Toy” contain some of the most caustic political commentary since Phil Ochs’ heyday. But like Warren Zevon and Randy Newman before him, he offers an equal-opportunity iconoclasm on signature songs like “Choctaw Bingo”: “We’re gonna strap them kids in / Give ’em a little bit o’ Benadryl and a Cherry Coke.” Just how dark can McMurtry’s sense of humor get? Consider a couple of Just Us Kids song titles: “You’d a’ Thought (Leonard Cohen Must Die)” is a sly reference

to Cohen’s “A Singer Must Die,” while “God Bless America (Pat Macdonald Must Die)” targets the former Timbuk3 singer who ended up playing harp on the track. “Actually, there were a couple of ‘Must Dies’ that I recorded that didn’t get on the record. And one of them [Stephen Bruton] did die,” recalls McMurtry. “‘Leonard Cohen Must Die’ happened because the lyrics kind of reminded me of Cohen’s stuff. I was writing it while the band was in the studio waiting for me to show up with the lyrics. So I came in and said, ‘Well, if it wasn’t for Leonard Cohen, you wouldn’t have been waiting all day. Leonard Cohen must die.’ And then that became kind of the buzzword joke for the whole session.” For McMurtry—who’ll be playing with a full band at Stage 112 on Wednesday—being typecast as a political songwriter does have its upside. He spends less time these days answering questions about his father, author Larry McMurtry, whose storytelling mastery is also evident in his own work. The musician’s John Mellencamp-produced debut album, Too Long in the Wasteland, came out in 1989, the same year his father’s Lonesome Dove was adapted into a TV mini-series that made him a household name. While the musician’s deep voice and deeper lyrics are unmistakable, his earliest work suggests a number of influences, including Lou Reed. “Yeah, sure, I was a Lou Reed fan,” says McMurtry, “and a lot of people thought my voice and production were like that. It’s actually kind of scary, because my favorite record of his is New York, which came much later than the stuff that a lot of people liked. I heard one of those songs in the outro of a movie right as I was finishing up making Too Long in the Wasteland, and I remember coming out of there thinking, ‘This is scary.’ Because the production sounded so much like that. I remember when Mellencamp got the New York

[20] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

album; he said, ‘Yeah, it sounds like it was produced by an eighth-grader, but I like it.’” McMurtry is currently working on a new album with C.C. Adcock at the production helm. Given the Grammy-nominated producer’s Louisiana heritage, it’ll likely be more swampy-sounding than its predecessor. McMurtry says the album will feature his touring band “and whoever else C.C. drags into it. He works in New Orleans, so he can find horn players and accordion players and people we don’t know.” Adcock also recently produced a re-recorded “Choctaw Bingo” as a promotion for Lagunitas Brewing Co., which sponsors a lot of his tours. “I put an extra verse in it that I just wrote for that project.” A verse about beer? “No, the verse is about an aunt with a painkiller addiction,” says McMurtry with a rare laugh, “which I failed to cover in the original.” No interview with McMurtry would be complete without some discussion of current affairs, especially at a point where gun control has once again become the focal point of national debate. “I was riding around with a cousin of mine this past weekend, and he asked if I was gonna write about Obama. I said, ‘Well, you know, “We Can’t Make It Here” works pretty well with Obama, just as it did with Bush.’ And he said, ‘At least Bush didn’t come after our guns.’ I said, ‘Obama’s not either. And you don’t have to worry about whether Obama wants our guns or not. The problem for you is: How many millions of your fellow American voters want somebody to come get your guns?’” Of course, that distinction isn’t all that reassuring for the National Rifle Association’s “pry it from my cold, dead fingers” crowd. I ask McMurtry if he really thinks there are that many people set on confiscating guns, versus, say, closing loopholes. “There may be, I don’t know. I haven’t met very

many. But there are a lot of people that believe somebody wants to come and take their guns. And if you have a conversation about any kind of limits on magazine capacity or whatever else, then you’re a traitor to the cause and get excommunicated from the church, basically. Because it is a church. It’s a cult.” That said, McMurtry’s own views have shifted in the wake of Newtown. While still skeptical of the selective ban on semi-automatic weapons found in the Clinton Crime Bill (which expired in 2004), he now agrees with the provision that restricted magazine capacity to 10 rounds. The reason, he says, is that deputy sheriffs and patrolmen are no longer being instructed to hold off until more highly trained SWAT teams arrive on the scene to confront the assailant. “If a shooter has to change mags, they’ll have a second-and-a-half or two with no return fire. And that might help, you know?” It was in the aftermath of an earlier school shooting that McMurtry got fed up with the NRA. “I was an NRA member until I saw that footage of Charlton Heston waving that damn Pennsylvania rifle over his head in Columbine two weeks after the shooting. That’s just subhuman behavior. That was a community that needed to mourn their children. They needed to be left alone. And they went in there and did that. You know, a dog knows better than to do that. “It’s made out now that Democrats have a monopoly on gun legislation, which is not the case,” McMurtry points out. “I mean, Reagan signed the Brady Bill into law. But of course, Reagan got shot. That can change your attitude, you know?” James McMurtry and his band play Stage 112 Wed., June 26, at 8:30 PM. $18/$15 in advance plus fees at stageonetwelve.com. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Big heavy He Whose Ox is Gored lures with Nightshade The sound of He Whose Ox is Gored is neither doom-metal nor is it masturbatory math rock—the kind that wallows in complex, self-congratulatory riffage only a guitar nerd could love. Instead it borrows from both styles, with hints of The Sword and Mastodon and a dash of Ronnie James Dio, too. On “Charming the Snake” from the Nightshade EP, a spooked-out wind blows and chiming bells bring on the heavy. The band crashes forth with guitar stomp and a short burst of bellowing vocals that fans of Big Business or the Melvins are certain to enjoy, before the track lulls the listener with an expansive Mastodonian riff and morose soundscape. Just when you’ve given yourself over to the spaced-out groove, the bombastic vocals return and the rhythm section adroitly shifts into some solid ass-kickery, asserting more inertia on the repetitive figure and causing one to kick over nearby garbage cans. If there’s something sweeter than a false ending I haven’t heard it; the band drops a dope one here replete with

He Whose Ox is Gored

the perfect riff for headbanging hair farmers. Crush, groove, repeat. (Jason McMackin) He Whose Ox Is Gored plays the VFW Thu., June 27, at 9 PM with Into the Storm, Breag Naofa and Shramana. $4.

Paper Bird, Rooms Have you ever wondered what a female-fronted Avett Brothers would sound like? After searching for too long, I’ve settled on Paper Bird as the closest it gets. It’s not the bluegrass/newgrass similarities alone that make the comparison apt. The band’s latest, Rooms, is a soulful string album that is, like the Avett Brothers, a down-to-earth endeavor. Though the seven-member Denver band dabbles in some convention, it uses a constant vocal harmony to guide the songs more than any single instrument. Rooms swaps electric for acoustic, and occasionally a capella for instrumental, in the same way an adept swing dancer changes spins and directions. Still,

it would be nice to hear one voice take the lead more often. The gospel sound has its place, and some lines—or entire tracks for that matter—would be better left to one singer. The break between “Hold it Down” and “Through These Days” provides a demarcation in the album from faster pop-style songs to the down-low ballads of the second half. While either style could fit two separate EPs (or two separate bands), the combination works to suit the larger cross-section of folk-minded ears. (Brooks Johnson) Paper Bird plays Stage 112 Sat., June 22, at 9 PM. $8/$5 advance. $5 surcharge for ages 18-20.

The Cave Singers, Naomi Campers in Chacos and swim gear are finally beginning to fill dusty campgrounds across Montana. It’s a welcome change after a long, rainy spring—until about mid-August when we start sweating through the sheets. But now, during these bluebird days and warm nights we yearn for campfire music. The Cave Singers quenches that thirst. Six years and four albums later, the Seattle band, who recently added bassist Morgan Henderson of Fleet Foxes fame, has yet to stray from its simple, folk-rock sound, which at least makes it consistent. The band’s newest album, Naomi, hits its stride with the song “Evergreen,” which makes no effort to be anything more than a simple guitar melody. Frontman

Pete Quirk’s vocals, strangely enough, resemble what a male Stevie Nicks might sound like. The song’s single, short, delicate riff matches perfectly in tone with lyrics about idealistic love and displacement from home. But when the band treads on some more electrified, heavier sounds in “It’s A Crime,” it sounds forced, falling short of bands who do it better, such as the Willowz. Naomi is an album featuring easy-to-hum choruses and steering-wheel tapping rhythms. But if you’re expecting anything more substantial than a light-hearted sing-along with friends, look elsewhere. (Eben Wragge-Keller) The Cave Singers plays the Badlander Mon., June 24, at 9 PM. $12.

Monday through Sunday

Open am

79:30 to

Every day of the week this summer

pm

Vampire Weekend, Modern Vampires of the City I’m making a list of what Vampire Weekend sounds like: the Police if Sting could read, Sandinista! if the Clash were from the Hamptons, reverse-chronology Paul Simon. That last one is more about me: I hated Vampire Weekend at first, just as I initially liked Paul Simon, and now I am sorry to report that Graceland is cheesy and I like Modern Vampires of the City. They still sound mannered and twee, but now they sound mannered and twee over a bassy pop rhythm section. That has made all the difference. The frantic midrange plunking of Contra and their self-titled debut made Vampire Weekend stand in relation

to world music as Wheat Thins are to Fritos: equally bad plus kind of pretentious. With more low end and fewer toms, however, Ezra Koenig’s tenor pops and, suddenly, Modern Vampires of the City is like Chili Cheese Fritos: still guilt-inducing, but undeniably pleasurable. It is not an unadulterated joy. MVotC contains some genuinely bad tracks, and your friends will still mock you for listening to it. That’s a small price to pay for a pop album that walks the narrow line between self-conscious and brainless, though. I will miss hating Vampire Weekend, but “Ya Hey” is worth it. (Dan Brooks)

S i n c e

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222 West Main, Missoula 406.549-9903

see our complete menu at www.theshackcafe.com seasonal sidewalk dining ◆ fine wine & beer selection

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [21]


[books]

1st Annual

Summer Scorched Solstice Sidewalk Sale

Maclean raises heated questions in Esperanza Fire by Kate Whittle

Summer Solstice Events at Caras Park The Last Best Solstice Friday 4-10pm Garden City Localfest Saturday 11am-5pm Blues Alley On Friday Live Music 5:30-9pm Between Top Hat/Rhino

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[22] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

During a wildfire, it takes a particular combination of low humidity, wind and dry vegetation to create what’s called an “area ignition.” It’s a mild-sounding term that means, in effect, an explosion. In October 2006, the driest, windiest time of the year in Southern California, fire engines from the San Jacinto district responded to the Esperanza Fire above the Banning Pass, southeast of Los Angeles. The fire was started around 1 a.m by a simple device of matches wrapped around a lit cigarette. By 7 a.m., it had grown to 2,200 acres. Engine 57 was stationed around a home dubbed the Octagon House when winds hit the creek drainage below and torched off an area ignition. The five firefighters were hit by the blast of heat where they stood. The inferno destroyed the house, the fire engine and melted most of the clothing off their backs. Three of them were dead by the time responders made it to the scene. Two men, found alive, died later in a hospital. The death of those men is at the heart of John Maclean’s The Esperanza Fire: Arson, Murder and the Agony of Engine 57. But where the book begins is in a courtroom three years after the fire, where auto mechanic Raymond Oyler was found guilty of murder for setting the fire. Prosecutors successfully argued that Oyler, tied by DNA evidence to a string of arson fires in the area, was also responsible for placing the ignition device that started the Esperanza blaze. Oyler is the first person in history to be convicted of murder for arson. A jury sentenced him to execution. Maclean (the son of Norman Maclean, by the way) worked as a Chicago Tribune reporter for 30 years, mostly stationed in Washington., D.C., and spent 15 years covering wildfires. He’s already written three books about fires, and one, Fire on the Mountain, was featured in History Channel and “Dateline” documentaries. That expertise makes Esperanza an engrossing and haunting read. The book is written in a straightforward news style, which lets the inherent drama of the story really shine. Scott Michaels, a Riverside County homicide detective at the time, was largely responsible for fingering Oyler as the suspect, risking his career on the hunch. “Investigations don’t happen like this,” Michaels says in the book. “They don’t go this fast; you don’t have arguments with police commanders and do cliché stuff like that. It was like being in a movie.” Indeed, much of Esperanza reads like a movie treatment, in part because of Maclean’s vivid writing. Most of Esperanza is a play-by-play of the fire itself, and how circumstances led the men of Engine 57 to their death. Maclean carefully goes over the different accounts given by other firefighters. Battalion Chief Bob Toups told Maclean that he had suggested to the captain of Engine 57 that they needed to leave the Octagon House, and that an area ignition was likely. Others say he never made that prediction, and

that if he had, the crew of Engine 57 would have left. No one will ever really know what happened, but it’s heartbreaking to think that a simple course of action could have saved five people. Maclean suspends tension through the story by veering off into tangents and back history to illustrate what was happening in Esperanza. The history of firefighting is chock full of harrowing events, like the 1971 Mack II fire, in the same area as the Esperanza Fire, where an out-of-shape, hungover firefighter died when he was too slow to outrun an approaching blast of flames. The real main character of Esperanza is fire itself. We aim to control it, but fire does what it wants to: It can be a powerful force for good, for restoring the health of forests, and an incredible force of destruction. This is what excites Maclean’s imagination. He quotes one firefighter who describes a wall of flames as crashing and curling like an ocean, and later Maclean describes a photo of the Esperanza Fire where “churning flames like sinews of raw muscle broke through the smoke.” As the fire season approaches here in Montana, it’s difficult to read Esperanza without considering the questions that wildfire raises. Government agencies spent years of the early 20th century quashing any fire, which allowed forests to amass tons of fuels. Developers built communities out into the sticks, creating the “wildland-urban interface.” Climate change, too, is spurring droughts, that in turn mean fire seasons are only going to worsen. The point of case studies like Esperanza is, as Maclean makes clear himself, to learn from our mistakes. Firefighting is becoming an ever more complex science to keep up. Most of the book presents the viewpoint of the firefighters, and the last few chapters detail the trial. We don’t get to know too much about Oyler, the convicted arsonist, though it’s not Maclean’s fault. Oyler never took the stand at his own trial and has maintained his innocence in the Esperanza Fire. He’s currently on death row and appealing his sentence. He’s communicated with Maclean, but mostly to complain about prison. Maclean expresses some of his own opinion about fire management, but when it comes to Oyler, he only presents the facts, leaving the reader to wonder about yet more questions. What spurs a man to cause such destruction? California law says arsonists can be charged with homicide, but does that make it right to do so? Did Oyler intend to kill people? Does he deserve execution? These questions, and more, remain long after the book ends. John Maclean signs copies of The Esperanza Fire at Fact & Fiction Sat., June 22, 11 AM to 12:30 PM. kwhittle@missoulanews.com


[film]

Handmade with love.

Ever after

Did you know we carry more than 50 vendors of letterpress and screen printed goods? Stop in and see these handmade goodies today!

Linklaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Before Midnight captures post-romance by Molly Laich

101 higgins

541-6683

near the wilma

noteworthystore.com

An Evening With Bill Bowers! TELLING STORIES WITH AND WITHOUT WORDS

JUNE 28 FRIDAY @ 7:30 PM

PROCEEDS GO TO THE

Check please!

In 1995, writer and director Richard Linklater made a simple independent film called Before Sunrise about an American traveling in Europe named Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and the Parisian student Celine (Julie Delpy) who he picks up on a train one afternoon in Vienna. Over the course of one night, we witness the unfolding of their love and then watch helpless as they leave each other the next morning. They make vague plans to meet again in six months, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it. Nine years later, the characters reunited to make Before Sunset. They missed each other in Vienna, but Jesse wrote a novel about their experience, and when he goes to Paris to promote the book, Celine shows up and the conversation continues. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe it had been another nine years since the last film, but here we are with the next installment, Before Midnight. The last time we saw the couple, Jesse had married someone else in New York City and they had a child together, but the marriage was on the rocks and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clear by the ending of Before Sunset that this time theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to stay together or at the very least exchange phone numbers. At the start of Before Midnight, we learn that Celine and Jesse have gotten married (I think, although it might just be a common-law thing), have 7-year-old twin girls and are living together in Paris. They look plump and happy at the start. Jesseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career as a novelist has been fruitful (convenient, I know, suspend your disbelief ) and Celine is as content as sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ever be doing humanitarian work, but their lives arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t perfect. Jesse misses his son in America and puts forward the idea of moving back there to be nearer to him. Celine doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to go back to America, and, voilĂĄ. This is the central conflict of the film, but with lovers like this itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never so simple. Before Midnight takes place on the last night of their summer vacation in Greece. Linklaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scripts (the last two are also co-written by Delpy and Hawke) are known for letting moments meander uninterrupted for longer than is sometimes comfortable. The

SCHOLARSHIP FUND

effect is a rarely achieved intimacy between both the characters onscreen and our relationship to them. As a teenager in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s, Linklaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s films were among the central preoccupations of my life, and his influence persists. In Celine I saw the beautiful, sensitive, fiercely smart and independent woman I wanted to grow up to be, and in Jesse the brooding intellectual I hoped to marry. Linklaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s characters talked about relationships, death, art, reincarnationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all the best things. That tradition continued with Before Sunset, but with added urgency. Before Midnight is unique in the series because the enemy is no longer circumstance; now they have nothing but time, and with so much real life to look forward to, they turn on each other. The latest installment belongs to Celine and her claustrophobic fit at the idea of domesticity forever. The script is expert, as always, in the way it captures the cadence of bickering couples. At one point Celine says that Jesse is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Always [doing this bad, annoying thing.]â&#x20AC;? And Jesse calmly replies, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not always doing anything.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true of the film as well. They oscillate between affection and anger on a dime. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m surprised and a little disappointed by whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s become of Celine since the first film. She seems shrill, ungrateful, manipulativeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost a caricature of the belligerent feminist. I no longer want to be her, which is unsettling. What does that say about marriage and motherhood? Jesse is measured and reasonable; he comes off as damn near saintly in comparison. At times heartbreaking and frustrating, Before Midnight is a good film in its own right. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to have seen the first two to get something out of this one, but it helps. And if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen the others, you have no choice. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just abandon them now. Before Midnight continues at the Wilma Theatre.

TICKETS ON SALE

MONDAY

JUNE 17

There will be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet and Greetâ&#x20AC;? after the performance. /PSUI"EBNT4USFFU .JTTPVMB .5ttwww.MCTinc.org

arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com â&#x20AC;˘ June 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 27 , 2013 [23]


[film]

A-Ha moments Frances explores the subtleties of ladymance by Josh Wagner

Public displays of emotion.

The world needs more BFF stories that are also love stories. In Frances Ha, Frances is a post-grad dance studio apprentice who doesn’t really want to grow up. She’s too comfortable might be her problem. The film, directed by Noah Baumbach (The Squid and the Whale and Greenberg) starts out in bliss, with two besties living together, nearly inseparable until they separate. Frances spends the rest of her story coming to grips with the reality of her awkwardness and her inability to fit into the social world, a reality she never had to face while nestled within the safety bubble of her “ladymance.” Her story plays out at a literary, ambling pace, but you couldn’t exactly call it slow. Frances Ha will no doubt get branded as a hipster flick on account of all the vintage references and quirky dialogue. The main character is a 20-something struggling artist who undertakes a series of seemingly aimless decisions, punctuated by intimate conversations alternately clever and awkward. She lives in a Brooklyn that’s been script-referenced down to its streets and subway lines. Plus, the movie’s in black and white, despite being shot on digital cameras. Let the stereotyping begin. But none of this is really a matter of style. The movie doesn’t set out to be hip and edgy. Rather, it uses the superficially convoluted exterior of hipsterdom as an environment against which to develop its most salient themes. It feels like it really wants to grapple with something as meaningful as love in a genuine way, and for a couple brief moments of lucidity, Frances Ha manages to get there. It all starts with a scene where Frances is trying to decide whether or not to read Proust while she’s in Paris. She says, “Sometimes it’s good to do what you’re supposed to do when you’re supposed to do it,” and her clumsy assertion unravels a contemporary social anxiety with the rules of cool. It’s a mouthful, but it comes off almost triumphant against the backdrop of a culture predisposed to rabid and often unexamined criticism against enjoying anything sentimental, cliché, or trendy. Later Frances describes her ideal relationship. It’s two people locking eyes across a crowded room in a love so confident you might think it’s been taken for

[24] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

granted—a “secret world that exists right there in public, unnoticed.” This is one of the film’s most beautifully honest moments, and yet when we try to talk about that sort of thing the way Frances does, we so often feel like we have to apologize for not being cynical enough. Like we’re obligated to keep a swaggering distance from feelings most of us share. So we end up embarrassed by the supposed triteness and naïvety of our thoughts and find ourselves couching them with disclaimers like “sorry, that was cheesy,” or, as Frances backpedals, “…I sound stoned.” The way that Frances Ha so radiantly frames and overcomes this tension also highlights my biggest disappointment. Upon the theme’s inevitable boomerang at the dénouement, Baumbach decides he better hit his audience over the head with it. This isn’t simply a question of good storytelling. By assuming the audience is too stupid or ADD or whatever to get it, Baumbach contradicts his own core message, and it’s hard to forgive him for losing faith right there at the finish line. Frances Ha’s potential lies in its power to embolden viewers to trust in those simple, shared and unspoken truths. To put it out there and not second-guess yourself. We’re watching, we’re listening, we can feel it. Take it easy. All of this maybe doesn’t go very far in helping you decide whether or not to trade in an hour and a half of your time. The film isn’t Hollywood, but it isn’t exactly ‘indie’ either. There’s a professional polish from start to finish. It’s not guerilla filmmaking and it isn’t spontaneous. This is well-crafted cinema overlapping the farthest, softest edges of Woody Allen and Wes Anderson. Frances Ha isn’t a movie you have to see. It has a lot of things to say that won’t outlive their short-term cultural significance. But its treatment of the fine and complicated line between romance and friendship tips the scales. For all its meandering, Frances Ha manages to capture that pervasive kind of love whose proclivity for defying expectations rebrands the trite as subtle and the cliché as profound. Frances Ha opens at the Wilma Theatre Fri., June 21. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK FRANCES HA Noah Baumach brings us this tale of women’s friendship and 20-something soul-searching, featuring pretty people in New York City. Starring Greta Gerwig, Mickey Sumner and Adam Driver. Rated R. Wilma. (See Film.) MONSTERS UNIVERSITY This prequel to 2001’s Monsters, Inc., visits Sulley and Mike during their college days. I bet they threw some beastly frat parties. Starring the voices of Billy Crystal, John Goodman and Steve Buscemi. Rated G. Carmike 12, Village 6, Entertainer, Pharaohplex. MY LITTLE PONY: EQUESTRIA GIRLS Travel through a magic mirror with Twilight Sparkle to visit an alternate universe. Keep your eyes peeled for Derpy Hooves! Starring the voices of Tara Strong, Ashleigh Ball and Andrea Libman. Not rated. Carmike 12. WORLD WAR Z Brad Pitt tries to save his cute white family from a world ravaged by CGI (or, ahem, zombies) in this thriller. Also starring Mireille Enos and Danielle Kertesz. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex.

NOW PLAYING BEFORE MIDNIGHT Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy return in this third installment of the Before Sunrise trilogy, “film’s longest love story.” Incidentally, “before midnight” is way past the bedtime of most long-term couples. Also starring Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick. Rated R. Wilma. THE INTERNSHIP Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn play two salesmen competing with younger techies for an internship for Google. Will hilarious coffee-fetching scenes ensue? Will we spend two hours watching a long Google commercial? So many questions. Also starring Rose Byrne. PG-13. Village 6.

show up, too. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex, Showboat.

ring Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto. Rated PG13. Carmike 12.

MAN OF STEEL I’m not saying all mild-mannered journalists are secretly powerful alien beings (winky wink) but watch the most famous one in this latest blockbuster edition of Superman. Starring Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon. PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex, Showboat.

THE PURGE It’s the year 2022, and a family is held hostage during an annual nationwide event called “The Purge,” in which all crimes are temporarily legal, including murder. Creepy masks are involved. Starring Ethan Hawke, Lena Headey, Max Burkholder. Rated R. Village 6, Pharaohplex.

THIS IS THE END “Drug and penis humor” earned This Is The End its rating, which is probably all some of you need to know. James Franco, Jonah Hill and Seth Rogen star in this comedy about the end of the world. Rated R. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex.

NOW YOU SEE ME It’s the FBI versus four of the world’s greatest illusionists during this heist caper. This will go way beyond pulling rabbits out of hats. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo and Woody Harrelson. Oh, and Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS In the next Trek prequel from director J.J. Abrams, Captain Kirk and crew must save Starfleet by chasing down a one-man weapon of mass destruction. Cumberbitches, start your engines: Benedict Cumberbatch is the baddie. Also star-

“Honey, put this child back. She’s not on sale.” World War Z shows at theaters including Carmike 12, Village 6 and the Pharaohplex.

numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com or contact the theaters in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [25]


[dish]

photo by Ari LeVaux

Bugging out by Ari LeVaux

Times Run 6/21/13 - 6/27/13

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

Frances Ha (R) Nightly at 7 and 9 7 ONLY on Sun (6/23), Tue (6/25) and Thur (6/27) Sat matinee at 1 and 3

Before Midnight (R) Nightly at 7 and 9 9 on Sun (6/23), Tue (6/25) and Thur (6/27) Sat matinee at 1 and 3

www.thewilma.com

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

[26] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

Moth mousse whipped with hazelnut milk. Cricket broth with a side of grasshopper garum sauce. Licoriceglazed ant stick. Bee bread. These dishes are part of a menu put together by the Nordic Food Lab, a kitchen/laboratory/think tank in Copenhagen. The idea behind its “Pestival” menu is to “explore the 1,400 untapped wholesome crawling creatures that are edible to man.” That goal is in line with a recommendation contained in a recent United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization report: The food industry should help in “raising the status of insects” by including them in new recipes and adding them to restaurant menus. Pound-for-pound, insects have as much as 10 times the protein as beef. Such comparisons, coupled with growing numbers of hungry and malnourished people, have led in recent years to increasing calls for more entomophagy, also known as bug eating. The U.N. report, titled “Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security,” argues that increasing our insect intake is good for both humans and the environment. The biggest obstacle to widespread acceptance of entomophagy is a phenomenon the report identifies as the “disgust factor.” I know this factor well, and I suspect you do too. But before you get too buggedout by the prospect of entomophagy, consider this: You probably already consume a lot of bugs, even if you fancy yourself a vegetarian. It’s nearly impossible to avoid the stray bits of insect protein that are commonly found in salad, or to spit out every mosquito that flies in your mouth as you ride your bike down a hill. Current FDA regulations allow an average of 60 insect fragments per hundred grams of chocolate— and even more for peanut butter. But given the sugar, preservatives and other unsavory elements of the average peanut butter cup, bug parts might be its healthiest component. Insects not only offer more protein than mammals, fish or fowl, but in many cases provide higher levels of unsaturated fat, minerals like zinc and calcium and other nutrients. In addition to the nourishing aspects of entomophagy, according to the report, raising and gathering insects can provide opportunities for economic improvement as well. “Insect harvesting/rearing is a low-tech, low-capital investment option that offers entry even to the poorest sections of society, such as women and the landless.” Beyond human well-being, there are environmental advantages to entomophagy as well. Insects emit almost no methane, a potent greenhouse gas that’s produced excessively by cattle. Insect ranching does not require the clearing of land, as is necessary to create space to raise livestock and feed. Insects are incredibly efficient at converting feed into protein—crickets need 12 times less feed than cattle, four times less than sheep and half as much as pigs and broiler chickens

FLASH IN THE PAN

to produce the same amount of protein, according to the report. And farmed insects can be fed things that would otherwise be considered waste products, like grain stalks after the seeds have been harvested. While convincing the average soccer mom to sprinkle a handful of flies into the soup pot might seem like a lot to ask, the report suggests a hybrid tactic that might have legs: using insects as animal feed, primarily for chicken and fish. This seems like a more palatable way to put insects on the menu than trying to get people to eat insects directly, and would free up land and fertilizer for agricultural pursuits that feed people, not animals. Dutch scientists, meanwhile, are exploring another way around the disgust factor. They’re culturing high-protein ovary cells from worms and larva that they hope to slip into burgers, breads and other processed foods. After all, if modern consumers have demonstrated anything, it’s their willingness to eat foods that are processed into oblivion and sold in pretty packages. Mystery meat products like hot dogs are infamous for their inclusion of unmentionable body parts, so what’s a little bug powder among the ground-up noses, feet and rectums we so willingly toss on the grill? Nobody seems bothered by so-called pink slime in hamburger meat, so worm ovary powder could probably fly under the radar as well. In some countries, insects are already regularly featured on menus, such as maguey worms in Mexico and the aquatic larvae known as zazamushi in Japan, which are popular sautéed with soy sauce and sugar. But these are exceptions, not the rule, and it’s hard to imagine the U.N.’s recommendation to add insects to restaurant menus gaining traction among bug-averse Americans, at least without some sort of catalyst. But one night in Bangkok a few years back, I became acquainted with a time-honored strategy that might help. On a street crowded with young revelers, a vendor’s cart contained several stainless steel bins filled with deep-fried insects, and I ordered a serving. They’re deep-fried, I repeated to myself. Thus, it would run contrary to the laws of physics for these bugs not to be good. And indeed they were good, tasting like potato chips, or crispy fried chicken skin, or any other type of fried crispy thing. And as with most other crispy-fried salty things, the fried bugs were a good pairing with beer. Perhaps the U.N. should focus its insect-promoting efforts in bars and pubs. It’s easier to envision a basket of fried crickets alongside a jar of pickled pig trotters and a bottle of mezcal with a worm in it. In a culinary context, fried bugs with beer may not hold a candle to moth mousse, but it’s a lot simpler to prepare, and an easier sell than hiding powdered worm ovaries in a hot dog.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area’s most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Bernice’s Bakery is a Missoula Landmark. 34 years of baking goodness. Open 6a8p Bernice’s offers an incredible selection of breakfast pastries, treats, cakes, breads and a fine, fresh lunch daily. If you’ve never been in you are missin’ out. And if you haven’t been in lately you really should make it a point to stop by. June & July are great months for slow walks along the Clark Fork while you sip Bernice’s iced coffee or Mountain Huckleberry iced tea and nibble on a coconut macaroon. Picnic? Bernice’s is your stop. We can load you up with all you need and off you go! Bernice’s: made from scratch for your pleasure. See you soon. xoxo bernice. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns: THURSDAY is Trivia Night (7:30-10 pm). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). Yappy Days! Wednesdays starting at 4 pm, and all day Sundays. In the park. Dog Treats + Drink Specials! Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

$…Under $5

Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 10am-6pm Mon-Thurs/10am-7pm Fri+Sat. Downtown Missoula. $ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall 406-728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula’s Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We’re located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula’s #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [27]


[dish]

The Journalist HAPPIEST HOUR Background: Reputation would lead you to believe that journalists only drink cheap whiskey from the bottle and the blood of corrupt politicians, but those are unfair stereotypes. We much prefer to sip the tears of fallen stars willing to spill their story in an exclusive. Just kidding. In fact, journalists generally drink whatever they can get their hands on or whatever fits the occasion. During last weekend’s Montana Newspaper Association annual convention, hosted in Missoula, we decided to try an appropriate cocktail for the festivities: The Journalist.

Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$

The scoop: The Journalist calls for 1.5 teaspoons of sweet vermouth, 1.5 teaspoons dry vermouth, 1/2 teaspoon of triple sec, 1.5 ounces of gin, 1/2 teaspoon of lemon juice and 1 dash of bitters. Shake the ingredients with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Inside source: We scored ours at Brooks and Browns, inside the convention’s host hotel, The Holiday Inn Downtown. The Journalist had been described to us as essentially a “perfect” martini, meaning it includes equal parts dry and sweet vermouth, but bartender Bridget Stokes disagrees. “It’s not a martini if it includes more than gin,” she says. “This is just a mixed drink in an up glass.”

photo by Joe Weston

ald points out, it’s the type of drink “where you only have one, maybe.” This journalist downed his and promptly switched back to cheap whiskey. —Skylar Browning

Editorial comment: The Journalist is crisp and dry, but as Stokes’ colleague Aime Macdon-

Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

JUNE

COOL

COFFEE SPECIAL

COFFEE

Organic Peru

ICE CREAMS

$10.95/lb. IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY

BUTTERFLY

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. • 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org.

FAIR TRADE

SATURDAYS

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[28] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and

$…Under $5

CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$ Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis’s Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula “Best Pizza” Winner’s for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12”crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


June 20 – June 27 , 2013

“Check out my invisible basketball!” Minneapolis garage-rawkers The Blind Shake and Chicago’s Outer Minds, along with Missoula's own Magpies, play the VFW, 245 W. Main St., Thu., June 20, at 9 PM. $5/$8 for ages 18-20.

THURSDAYJUNE20 Find out whether Jed Nussbaum is a vodka or a gin martini man when he and Eric Bostrom of the Dodgy Mountain Men play mandolin and guitar at Montgomery Distillery, starting at 6 PM. Free.

Release some stress during T’ai Chi classes every Thu at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org.

pus, are hosted by professional writers. Sessions are July 8-12 and July 15-19. For costs and registration, email info@missoulawritingcollaborative.org.

Mamas, take it from me: Don’t let your babies grow up to be writers. But if they insist, and they likely will, let ‘em be good writers. Enrollment is now open for Words With Wings 2013, a summer writing program for ages 8-14. Workshops, at the University of Montana cam-

Smurfit Stone in Frenchtown is a proposed Superfund site. The Clark Fork Coalition hosts a walk-and-talk for folks to learn about just what that means, exactly, starting at noon at the CFC office, 140 S. Fourth St. Learn more at clarkfork.org.

Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gardeners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montananaturalist.org.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [29]


[calendar] grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Saunter on up the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Root this evening to hear Chase McBride bring up some San Luis Obispo cheer at Bitter Root Brewery, from about 6 to 8 PM. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when the Rattlesnakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake

Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com. Chanting â&#x20AC;&#x153;KVD! KVD!â&#x20AC;? is optional but sure to be hilarious when Kevin Van Dort plays Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Get your grub on, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats.

After the revolution, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where its Sewing Lounge goes from 6 to 8 PM. $9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10/hour. Call 541-7171. The rock will be unstoppable when The Blind Shake and Outer Minds, along with Missoulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Magpies, play the VFW, 245 W. Main St., starting at 9 PM. $5/$8 for ages 18-20. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7 PM. Free. Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 PM. Free.

SPONSORS

DAY CAMP June 24 24â&#x20AC;&#x201C;28 28

Grades 1-12 Langel & Associates, PC Register by June 21 Dr. Troy Shaw Orthodontics Missoula Federal Credit Union OZ Architects & Intaglio at Oz Missoula Pediatric Dentistry, PC

PERFORMANCES

June 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;30 3:00 3 00 & 5 5:00 00 PM Tickets on sale June 24 at 9:00 AM

 Â&#x2021;ZZZ0&7LQFRUJ ĎŽĎŹĎŹEĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ?^Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;DĹ?Ć?Ć?ŽƾůÄ&#x201A;Í&#x2022;DdϹϾϴϏώ͝ůůĆ?Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĨŽĆ&#x152;ĹľÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Í&#x2DC; DdÄ&#x201A;Ä?Ä?ŽžžŽÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć?Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x2021;ĆľĆ&#x2030;ŽŜĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2039;ĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;͡Ć?ŽžÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ä?ŽžžŽÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ĺ?ŽŜĆ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2039;ĆľĹ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x161;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;ŜŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC;

Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Plus, all-youcan-eat wings, $10 two-topping pizzas, $6 domestic pitchers and $7 Blue Moon pitchers. You just might see a UFO (unidentified food object, that is) when Captain Wilson Conspiracy

plays the Top Hat from 7-9 PM today. Free. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM. Show â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Santeriaâ&#x20AC;? is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Hand me my glowsticks, Mama wants to jiggle. Dead Hipster Dance Party is tonight at the Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Orgone isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a unit of measurement for â&#x20AC;&#x153;universal life force,â&#x20AC;? itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an LA-based nine-piece funk band thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sure to get personal life forces moving and grooving. It plays Stage 112, inside the Elkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lodge, starting at 9 PM with openers. $12/$10 in advance at Ear Candy and stonefly-productions.com. Boots will be scootinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; when Quenby and the West of Wayland Band play the Sunrise Saloon, 1100 Strand St., starting at 9 PM. Free. Cure For the Common offers up a dose of musical therapy when it plays the Top Hat, starting around 10 PM. Free.

[30] Missoula Independent â&#x20AC;˘ June 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 27 , 2013

FRIDAYJUNE21 Honor the sun in one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest holidays at the Summer Solstice Festival, hosted by the ZACC and Missoula Cultural Council, at Caras Park from 4-10 PM. Includes adult and youth art activities, 21 artists creating pieces, plus food, beer and wine and music from Kung Fu Kongress. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. The Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Circle Group Acupuncture at Mountain Sage Acupuncture Clinic, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 1, focuses on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health issues and sounds comfy and nice. 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 PM, last appointment at 4 PM. Sliding scale treatments $20-40 with a first time administration fee of $10. Call (503) 593-7073. Teens go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teen Writers Group, which meets every Fri. at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com.


[calendar]

brewin’, eh?

In Barbara Holland’s short, lively book, The Joy of Drinking, she lauds the ability of alcohol to bring people together in a spirit of fraternity. It’s been going on about as long as we’ve been domesticating plants and animals. As humans spent less time hunting and gathering, she writes we, “clustered together into tribes to grow and ferment crops. Having discovered conviviality, we moved our living quarters closer together and quit trying to kill each other on sight. Visited the neighbors. Shared a few drinks.”

WHEN: Tue., June 25, doors at 6:30, movie at 7:45 PM HOW MUCH: $5

So perhaps Big Medicine Brewery’s mission to become the country’s first “combination of microbrewery and center for positive change” isn’t so odd after all. I certainly feel more positive about humankind after I’ve had a pint or two. Helena native

Two words: risotto bar. The Bespeak Summer Solstice Launch Party, a “fairy tale adventure” of an evening, includes music, the Cigarette GIrls, silent auction and food catered by the Silk Road and Tom Dooley’s. At the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier, from 6 PM to midnight. $50 for the 6-9 PM events including Silk Road, $10 from 9 PM to midnight. Dressing up as a literary character is encouraged. Money goes toward supplies for local schools. Let the Frederico Brothers show how siblings really can get along at the Top Hat’s Family Friendly Friday, from 6 to 8 PM. Free.

July 4

Miller Creek

Kung Fu Kongress

Family Activity

Family Activity

Missoula Public Library

YMCA

June 26

July 3

Ed Norton Big Band

Kevin Van Dort Band

Family Activity

Family Activity

Historical Museum of Fort Missoula

Children’s Museum

Robert Rivers and his partner, Fernanda Menna Berreto Krum (originally from Brazil), have worked in international conflict zones. Rivers has a master’s from the European Centre for Peace Studies, and Menna Barreto Krum has traveled with Doctors without Borders, working as a trauma psychologist. They also have about five years of brewing experience on their resumes, and plan for Big Medicine to combine the mindfulness of Belgian monastic brewing, joy and celebration of Irish beer, and the variety of beer styles in American pubs.

WHAT: Strange Brew screening and Big Medicine Brewery fundraiser WHERE: Wilma Theatre

June 27

At the fundraiser, $5 gets you in to a 30th anniversary screening of the classic film Strange Brew, and the proceeds go toward funding Big Medicine’s start-up costs. Enjoying some beers and some laughs with others in the community seems like a good first step for Big Medicine’s mission. The brewery aims to raise about $100,000 this summer—yes, all wannabe brewers take note—before finding a space and firing up some brew kettles.

To paraphrase William Faulkner, “Civilization begins with fermentation.”

Don’t yell out your ex-girlfriend’s name during Hump Day Bingo with Bob at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for winners. Beware: $5 minifishbowls served all day. Bingo starts at 6:30 PM. You’re a cheap date, not a cheapskate. The Missoula Public Library hosts another installment of its cheap date movie night, which starts at 7 PM sharp at the library, 301 E. Main St. Enter from the parking lot side of the building. Free. Call 721-BOOK and visit missoulapubliclibrary.org. The third annual Summer Guitar Celebration in Bigfork will surely settle the Gibson versus

—Kate Whittle

Fender debate once and for all. Musicians include Adam Stroud Trio, Dan Dubuque and Barnyard Riot. Kicks off at 7 PM at the Saddlehorn Trapper Cabins, 150 Ranch Road off Highway 209. Show moves to Bethany Lutheran Church in case of rain. $10 suggested donation, with food and beverages available for purchase. Put on some sunscreen and celebrate the longest day of the year at the Solstice festival in Philipsburg, which includes music, flamenco dancers and Seattle funk band Gravity Kings. Runs at 7:30 PM until sundown throughout downtown.

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [31]


[calendar] Celebrate the “cycles of the sun” at Freecycles (geddit??) with snacks, libations and tunes from Leo J and Wind Before Wolf, from 7:30 to 10:30 PM. 732 S. First St. W. Donations accepted.

rides to Marshall Mountain are available. 4-9 PM. Visit bigskybbq.com.

It won’t be champagne, cocaine or flying in a plane giving you a kick, but classic Broadway musical performance during Anything Goes, with showings at the Hamilton Playhouse at 8 PM. $15/$8 for children 12 and under.

End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 8303296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

nightlife

The Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., will surely deliver an equal share of party to everyone when The Justice Band hits the stage, starting around 8 PM. Free.

Chillax with some calamagrostis rubescens, AKA Pinegrass, when it plays Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton from about 6 to 8 PM. Free.

Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733.

Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave., hosts the Mike Bader Bear Jam for you all to tap your toes to from 5 to 8 PM. Free. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com.

Run the game, umpire, always chase the game, young squire, when Traff the Wiz, Enzymes and Codependents rhyme their way through an evening at Stage 112, inside the Elk’s Lodge, starting around 9 PM. $5. Break out the glowsticks because London’s own Frankmusik will be gracing the Badlander with Ride the Universe, DJs Kris Moon, and Hot Pantz, likely resulting in a rump-shake earthquake. 9 PM, $10/$7 advance.

Captain Wilson Conspiracy won’t tell you if Lee Harvey Oswald really did it, but they will play chill tunes while you hang out at Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, from 6 to 8 PM. Free.

Lay down some cardboard and prepare to spin some windmills, MCs Luck & Lana are kicking off the Turn the Bass Up Tour at the Palace, with LuckyIAM and Bozeman’s David Dalla G. 9 PM. $5/$10 for ages 18-20.

Dance up on the bar in a spangly outfit when Wild Coyote Band plays the American Legion Hall, 825 Ronan St., starting at 7 PM.

John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406-721-2416 or just show up. Do-si-do and twirl that doe-eyed receptionist from the dentist’s office when Cash For Junkers play the Union Club, starting around 9:30 PM. Free. Trot around the dance floor with other free creatures when Wild Coyote Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1100 Strand St., starting at 9:30 PM. Free. We’ll just see who can draw the fastest when Showdown plays the Top Hat, starting around 10 PM. Free.

SATURDAYJUNE22 Learn how 19th century artist Thomas Cole helped shape our concept of American identity at the Thomas Cole: Wild Land and the Birth of the American Landscape, at Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St., in Hamilton, with a presentation at 6 PM and exhibit on display through Aug. 11.

Pretty people, fresh num-nums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded— it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area Farmers’ Markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com) and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary

The Heart to Heart Duo plays the Missoula Senior Center’s Saturday Night Dance, so slide into those glad rags and show the youngsters how it’s done. 705 S. Higgins. 7–10 PM. $5.

Eyes of the tiger. “Exile Lifestyle” blogger Colin Wright reads his latest book, Act Accordingly, a “philosophical framework written to help people become the best possible version of themselves.” Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W., Wed., June 26, at 7 PM.

slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. Veg out with your carrot out during the Hamilton Farmers Market, where folks can purchase all sorts of dee-lish local goodies from area farmers. Third and Bedford Streets. 9 AM to 12:30 PM. Suit up for fierce competition at the Third Annual City Life Paintball Tournament, where you can sign up for three-person groups or arrive solo and join a team. Includes youth and open divisions, and prizes. It all goes down at Bob Ward’s, 3015 Paxson St, from 9 AM to about 4 PM. Learn more and register at citylifemt.com/pball. Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, this and every Sat. from 9:30–10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 dropin/$8 students drop-in, with various prices for punch-card holders. Call 581-4093 or visit yogainmissoula.com. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like sto-

[32] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

rytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721BOOK. The Esperanza Fire: Arson, Murder, and the Agony of Engine 57 is the story of how a man was convicted for setting a fire that led to the deaths of five firefighters in 2006. Author John Maclean signs today at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave, from 11 to 12:30 PM. Free. (See Books.) Celebrate all things Zoo City at Garden City Localfest V, with food, family activities, chef challenge, music and, importantly, beer, all local. It all goes down in Caras Park from 11 AM to 5 PM. Free to wander about. Find out if art galleries are the hangover cure we’ve all been looking for when The Missoula Art Museum hosts a tour every Saturday at noon. Various exhibiting artists, guides and teachers host. Visit missoulaartmuseum.org to find out schedule details. Free. Cue up for some meat eatin’ at the Big Sky BBQ Festival, which takes place at Marshall Mountain during the Hammer Nutrition XC bike race. Lots of local chefs cook up mouthwatering BBQ, and there’s beer, of course. Stay until the end and enjoy a live performance by The Hasslers. All proceeds from the festival go to the Montana Food Bank Network. Free bus shuttle

The Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., will surely deliver an equal share of party to everyone when The Justice Band hits the stage, starting around 8 PM. Free.

It won’t be champagne, cocaine or flying in a plane giving you a kick, but classic Broadway musical performance during Anything Goes, with showings at the Hamilton Playhouse at 8 PM. $15/$8 for children 12 and under. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like Shabba-Doo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. Baroque-pop-folk band Paper Bird will flit and flutter its way into your hearts along with Patrick Dethlefs at Stage 112, inside the Elk’s Lodge, starting at 9 PM. $5/$8 for ages 1820. (See Music.) Meditative folk/electronic act Pressed And might give you questions to ponder when it plays Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., along with It Is Rain In My Face, starting around 9 PM. Free. The Imperial Sovereign Court of the State of Montana hosts a drag show at the Palace, under the theme Turnabout, (encouraging male-female role reversal) with DJ Tygerlily. Platform heels sold separately. $5/$10 for ages 18-20.


[calendar] The Roadhouse Band pours on the redeye gravy at the Sunrise Saloon, 1100 Strand St., starting at 9:30 PM. Free.

SUNDAYJUNE23 Detroit “odd pop” duo Jamaican Queens combines rap beats a la Three 6 Mafia and experimentation like Brian Eno when it plays the VFW, 245 W. Main St., along with our own Shahs. 9 PM. $5.

Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. Take a chill pill and ride a pony during the Carousel Sunday Market, every Sunday from 10 AM to 2 PM. Produce, psychic readings, live food, music, kids’ activities and, yes, pony rides, are all going down.

It won’t be champagne, cocaine or flying in a plane giving you a kick, but classic Broadway musical performance during Anything Goes, with showings at the Hamilton Playhouse at 8 PM. $15/$8 for children 12 and under. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. $3 Fireball specials. Call 721-1798.

MONDAYJUNE24 Progressive Sanskrit-chant music band Blue Spirit Wheel is “pioneering a new level of chanting experience to create a soundtrack for the inevitable liberation of all beings!” Join the liberation at the Stensrud building, 314 N. First St. W., starting around 7 PM. $20/$15 in advance at bluespiritwheel.com/events.

Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721BOOK.

The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/ rough-cut-series for the schedule.

Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free.

Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Find out if Tom Catmull waxes or shaves when he plays Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave., from 4 to 7 PM. Free. Bob Wills is still the king of Western swing, but our very own Western Union is looking to commit some regicide and make some fine old Western swing tunes for you all to dance by at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5. Explore the idea of open intelligence and the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during the Balanced View open meeting, which runs every Sun. from 6-7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. Put a li’l centrifugal motion into your Sunday when Pay Dirt swing band plays the Top Hat from 7 to 9 PM. Free, all ages. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free.

nightlife

Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Spit out that gum before joining the Missoula City Band rehearsal, every Monday from 7-9 PM in the Sentinel High School band room. All players welcome. Learn more at missoulacityband.org. Pretend like you know how to pronounce montepulciano d’abruzzo whie you enjoy the live tunes at Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., from 7 to 10 PM. This week with Folkswagon Bug, a folk-rock country band outta Racine, Wisc. Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness meditation group that meets Mondays from 7:30 to 8:45 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit openway.org. This time, I’m going to root for the gopher. The Top Hat shows Caddyshack as part of its Monday Movie Night series, starting at 8 PM. Free. Why not experiment when Philadelphia’s own mewithoutYou is bringing its experimental indie rock to the Palace, along with Rocky Votolato and Auctioneer. Music at 8 PM. $15 in advance at tickets300.com. Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488. Rock the mic when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark

missoulanews.com • January 6–January 13, 2011 [33]


[calendar] Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. Intro to folk music 101 band The Cave Singers have returned to Missoula and brought their indie cred with them. Local americana pop group, The Hasslers, will warm the Badlander stage starting at 9PM. $12 in advance. (See Music.)

TUESDAYJUNE25 Tommy “Z” Zurhellen rolls into town to melt some faces with his book reading of Apostle Islands, along with fiction writer Baker Lawley. Starts at Shakespeare, 103 S. Third St. W., at 7 PM. Dance cuz everybody’s watching at the American Cabaret Style bellydance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. This class is great for beginners and experienced dancers alike. 6–7 PM. Visit madronadance.wordpress.com. Give those Terrible Twos an outlet at Toddler Taekwondo, at the Children’s Museum, 225 W. Front St., from 11 to 11:30 AM. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. If “good enough” isn’t cutting it, why not try to Be The Best Parent You Can Be, a

four-week long class at the Children’s Museum, 225 W. Front St., which kicks off today from 121:30 PM, and continues July 2, July 9 and July 16. $40/$60 with childcare. Freecycles will host visiting adventurers, cyclists participating in the American Lung Association’s Big Ride Across America, with a bikebuilding party. Bike-delivered Le Petit and Black Coffee refreshments available, starting at 2 PM.

nightlife It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. Just tell the man named Fox Mulder everything you know when Captain Wilson Conspiracy plays the Holiday Inn, 200 S. Pattee St., from 6-9 PM. Free. Head over to the Wilma, eh, for a screening of Strange Brew, which will benefit the upand-coming Big Medicine Brewing Company. Starts at 7 PM. $5. (See Spotlight.) The Unity Dance and Drum African Dance Class is sure to teach you some moves you didn’t learn in junior high when it meets Tuesday from 7 to 8:30 PM at the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. All ages and skill levels welcome. $10, $35 for four classes. Email tarn.ream@umontana.edu or call 549-7933 for more information. Drink from the cup of knowledge during the Socrates Café at the Bitterroot Public Library

[34] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

West Meeting room in Hamilton. Questions are chosen, terms discussed and thoughts given. 7– 9 PM. Free. Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expression-filled improvisational bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:309 PM. $10. Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: Tiregan, Ivan Kupala Day, St. Jonas’ Festival, Wianki and Jani are all names for what annual event? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) “So much depends upon a red wheelbarrow...” Learn to mine great lines from that fabulous mind of yours just like William Carlos Williams when you join other seasoned and novice poets for Poetry Club every Tuesday at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First W. The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Stage 112, inside the Elk’s at 112 Pattee St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus. The Mike Dillon Band (interests: “toothpaste and being your dog”, according to Facebook) brings its New Orleans vibes to Stage 112, inside the Elk’s Lodge, starting around 9 PM. $10/$8 in advance. Nuno Business will mind its own beeswax when it plays the Top Hat starting at 9 PM. Free.

Practice safe partying during your humpday-eve at the Badlander’s Live and Local Night, this week with Traffic Jam and guest Denver reggae act David Baty, starting around 10 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAYJUNE26 The muscular-calved folks of Free Cycles invite you to “watch horrible and/or obscure films in the company of strangers and ridicule them” at the first ever Good-to-be-Bad Movie Night. Starts about 8 PM at 732 S. First St. W. $1 suggested donation. Food served out of a truck always tastes better, so check out the goods at Out to Lunch in Caras Park, from 11–2 PM. Free to hang out and people-watch, food will cost you. Until the day comes that we can install GPS locators in our kids, do the next best thing and get a free Child ID, at an event hosted by local law enforcement every Wednesday at Caras Park at 11:30 AM. Child IDs record information like fingerprints and contact info, which are needed in case of an abduction and Amber Alert. The Jocko Valley Farmers Market offers treats, produce, tunes and more in The Hangin Art Gallery parking lot, 92555 Highway 93 in Arlee, from 4-7 PM. For more information or to become a vendor, call Kelley at 726-5550.


[calendar] nightlife Get a sweet treat when you preview the Whitefish Theatre Company’s upcoming season during The Cake Off, which includes season tickets on sale at discounts and a cake competition. From 4:30-6:30 PM at the O’Shaughnessy Center in Whitefish. Enjoy all the fun of drinking in an alley, but with much better beverage service when the Top Hat and the Rhino team up to bring you Rally in the Alley, with tunes from Skin Flowers, Shakewell and Cody Beebe and the Crooks. Runs 5:30 to 9:30 in the alley behind the Top Hat. Free, all ages. Hey, spring is here and TV ain’t exactly pumping out the good stuff these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. “Exile Lifestyle” blogger Colin Wright quit a high-paying design career to live simply and travel around the world. He reads his latest book, Act Accordingly, a “philosophical framework written to help people become the best possible version of themselves.” Starts at 7 PM at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. Feel the grass under your toes, let the breeze ruffle your hair and kick back to the sonic stylings of the Missoula City Band, which presents its annual summer concerts every Wednesday evening at 8 PM in Bonner Park, on the corner of Ronald and Hastings Streets. Free. Check missoulacityband.org for artist info. “America’s fiercest songwriter” Larry McMurtry ventures outside Austin city limits to play Stage 112, inside the Elk’s Lodge, starting around 9 PM. $18/$15 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s, Ear Candy and stageonetwelve.com. (Trivia answer: Summer solstice.) Let me tell you something I learned the hard way: Meatloaf songs are not appropriate for karaoke. Now go forth to Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $6 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Clean the wax out of your ears. Locals MR Wizard, Justin Slayer, Geeter Tron, and Digerati, will be filling the Palace with electronic music and dance grooves for all to hear. 9 PM. Free. $6 pitchers of PBR.

THURSDAYJUNE27 It’ll be the most fun you’ve had at the mall since junior high at the 11th Annual Boys & Girls Club Playhouse Auction, which includes live and silent auctions, Mayor Engen officiating, music by Andrea Harsell and Leia Sky and free food. Starts at 5 PM at Southgate Mall. Release some stress during T’ai Chi classes every Thu at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks St. $10 drop-in class. Visit openway.org. Let me know when this thing can print a sandwich. Learn the basics of 3D printing with the Makerspace Intro to 3D Printing class, from 1 to 3 PM at Missoula Public Library. Visit missoulapubliclibrary.org or call 258-3851 for more.

Hipster CPR class. Detroit “odd pop” duo Jamaican Queens plays the VFW, 245 W. Main St., Sun., June 23, starting around 9 PM. $5.

Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gardeners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montananaturalist.org.

Get your grub on, but don’t pig out, and give a girl a call who you wanna take out to Downtown ToNight, where local food and beer vendors as well as local musicians have a good day down at Caras Park. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free to hang and bang, but the grub and beer will cost you a couple ducats.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.-Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

Beavers have been a hot commodity for a long time. Learn this and more at E.B. Eiselein’s presentation, “Montana Indian Fur Trades,” about the history of the trade in the Northwest and rivalry that led to the first fur-trading post in the Flathead. Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St. in Hamilton.

John Floridis winds down your Thursday real smooth-like when he plays Draught Works from 5-8 PM. Free.

Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., hosts the Captain Wilson Conspiracy from 6 to 8 PM. Free.

Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Visit tenspoon.com.

Bitter Root Brewery up in Hamilton hosts singer-songwriter fella David Boone, who is sure to please with his tunes. About 6-8 PM. Free. Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia

questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Plus, all-you-can-eat wings, $10 two-topping pizzas, $6 domestic pitchers and $7 Blue Moon pitchers. The six masketeers known as the Hollywood Undead do the dirty modern rock and roll without the Hawaii’n noises at the Wilma Theatre, with openers Pop Evil, 3 Pill Morning and my uncle Gravy’s band All Hail The Yeti. 7 PM. $26. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketweb.com. You know of Fort Missoula, but do you really know it? Learn about the post, which dates from 1877, during author Tate Jones’ illustrated talk and signing of his new book, Fort Missoula. Starts at 7 PM in the main museum building. Free. This could be a band or a short story about a science fair gone wrong, but Erin and the Project appears at the Top Hat dinner show from 7-9 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [35]


[calendar] Everybody puts their pants on one leg at a time, turns out. Find out more about How the Other Half Loves when this farce involving tangled love affairs opens at the Opera House Theatre, 140 S. Sansome St. in Philipsburg, with showings at 7 PM. Schedule and tickets available at operahousetheatre.com, or call 406859-0013. Dance your way to a free mind and an open body at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance. Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 8 PM. $8. Visit turningthewheel.org. Fight for your right to belt out tunes at the Dark Horse’s Combat Karaoke, hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. He Whose Ox Is Gored fearlessly brings the metallic thunder when it plays the VFW, 245 W. Main St., along with Into the Storm!, Breag Naofa and local self-dubbed “shitcore” Shramana. 9 PM. $4. (See Music.) Don’t be fooled, the B-Side Players offer up nothin’ but A-side material of Latin funk when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Free.

Some folks start getting ready for Halloween real early. Hollywood Undead plays the Wilma Theatre, with openers Pop Evil, 3 Pill Morning and All Hail The Yeti, Thu., June 27, at 7 PM. $26. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s or ticketweb.com.

TWO-NIGHT HOMESTAY EXPERIENCE

THREE WEEK HOMESTAY OPPORTUNITY

• Invite a Japanese high school student into your home for two nights (Friday and Saturday, Aug. 2-3)

• Host a Japanese student in your home from Aug. 21 - Sept. 13 while they attend classes at ELI

• Pick up student Friday evening, spend Saturday with them, return them to campus Sunday morning

• Share your culture with your student and make a lasting friendship

• Students will come with $20 to go toward meals during their stay

• Receive $500 to help cover the costs of hosting

[36] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

Official summer goal: Crashing a different barbecue every weekend. Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Friday to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit events online. Just head to the arts section of our website, scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link on the left that says “submit an event.”

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING IN EITHER OF THESE OPPORTUNITIES, CONTACT: Ariel Barrett Administrative Associate, English Language Institute email: Ariel1.barrett@umontana.edu • phone: 243-6289


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

I

In the 1920s, Montana Fish and Game authorities considered the bull trout the “cannibal of the river.” The bull trout’s crime was eating non-native brown, brooke and rainbow species that were brought into the state and stocked as game fish. The times, they have changed, according to Dan Shook, an AmeriCorps member with Montana State Parks. Today, the bull trout is an endangered species and its presence serves as a marker of watershed health. At the Bull Trout Campfire Program at Beavertail Hill State Park, Shook will give a fireside chat about the history of the bull trout, how it strongly features in Salish myths and culture, and give basic information on how to identify it, plus the best practices for catch-andrelease. The bull trout weaves into thousands of years

of Salish history, environmental catastrophes in the state and the current restoration of the Clark Fork river. Shook’s talk is part of Montana State Parks’ “Montana’s Multitude of Myths, Misconceptions and Little Known Facts” series. Shook says he’s seen turnouts ranging from two to 30 people at these events, depending on the weather. Everyone is welcome to come on up and find a spot by the fire. –Kate Whittle The Bull Trout Campfire Program is hosted by Dan Shook at Beavertail Hill State Park, off the Beavertail Road exit on I-90, Fri., June 21, from 8–9 PM. Free. Visit stateparks.mt.gov/camping or call 1-855922-6768 for camping information.

HOP ON BOARD THE CELEBRATION. AND WIN. Help celebrate the many ways public transit benefits us all — reduced traffic, cleaner air, improved mobility — and you could win cool prizes!

8 one-year Bus Passes

$500 Kona Dew Commuter Bike from Missoula Bicycle Works

Big Dipper Coneboy Truck for 1 hour for 40 people provided by M+R Strategic Services

5 Monte Dolack “Going to the Sun” posters ($100) provided by Adventure Cycling

$100 Gift Card from The Good Food Store

$100 Gift Card from Biga Pizza (6) $20 Gift Cards from Domino’s Pizza

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY JUNE 20 The Shoot Out golf tournament at Canyon River Golf Club, 1268 Bandmann Trail, is a fundraiser for Missoula kids in need. Starts at 9 AM and includes breakfast, lunch and prizes. Call Carol at 728-0560 or Judy at 370-4580 to sign up. The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Tuesdays to play polo. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations.

FRIDAY JUNE 21 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free.

SATURDAY JUNE 22 All you Ned Overend wannabes take note: The Hammer Nutrition Missoula XC mountain bike race is a grueling up-and-down affair full of technical riding and breathless climbs. The event takes place at Marshall Mountain Ski Area just outside of Missoula. This year’s event features championship and UCI Elite races today, as well as the Hair of the Dog Super D on Sunday for those who can still pedal. For a full list of costs, events and trail maps visit missoulaxc.org. You’ll be coming around the mountain when you take part in the inaugural Trail Rail Run, which follows the old Milwaukee and Northern Pacific railroad grades from Mullan, Idaho, over Lookout Pass and all the way to St. Regis, Mont. Race lengths include 50 miles, 50K, 30K and 10K. Head to trailrailrun.com. Maybe you’ll finally be able to get a butterfly to perch on your finger, Disney princess-style, after the Native Plant hike up the Blackfoot-Clearwater area to learn about native butterflies and their plants with local enthusiast Bud Jewett. Meet at 12:45 at the Clearwater Junction rest area, and carpool from there to locations with about three hours of easy hiking. Find out more info by emailing Clare at clare.beelman@gmail.com or calling 728-0189. You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

Naturalists take note: Throughout this summer, the Wilderness Institute is taking small groups of volunteers to monitor weeds and recreation impacts in the gorgeous Anaconda Pintler and Welcome Creek Wildernesses. Learn about natural history and invasive species. Backcountry experience is a good idea, but not necessary. Transportation is available from Missoula and a few other towns, dinners are provided. Call 406243-5361 or email citizenscience@cfc.umt.edu with questions or to register.

$476 Health Panel for Men from Community Medical Center

(2) $50 Gift Cards from Shakespeare & Co. Booksellers

Bag of Books from Fact & Fiction ($120)

(2) $75 Gift Cards from The Trail Head

(5) $20 Gift Cards from Worden’s

$408 Health Panel for Women from Community Medical Center

(2) $50 Gift Cards from Scotty’s Table

(2) $269 Mammograms from Advanced Imaging

Bag and Necklace ($100) from Betty’s Divine

$50 Life Flight Membership from Providence St. Patrick Hospital

A loaf of bread a month for a year from Great Harvest Bread Company $25 Gift Card from Bernice’s Bakery

$25 Gift Certificate from Runner’s Edge 2 Pairs of Women’s SmartWool Socks from Hide & Sole

SUNDAY JUNE 23 This weekend, Five Valleys Audobon hosts a trip to observe all the feathered, flighty creatures in the Dillon area, including Melrose, Bannack and Clark Canyon Reservoir. The group is staying at Best Western Paradise Inn, in Dillon. $10, lunch and hotel not included. Group departs from East Broadway Park and Ride at 7:30 AM Saturday. Find out more by emailing Cynthia are bobcyn@live.com or emailing 406-830-5424. If you’re the type of athlete who’ll try anything, then try the Bozeman Tritons Triathlon. This annual Gallatin Valley fun fest features both a sprint distance race and a long course race, with options for all abilities. The long course is the only halfIron triathlon in Montana, and consists of a 1.2-mile swim, a 56-mile out-and-back bike up Bridger Canyon Drive and over Battle Ridge Pass, and a 13.1-mile run in the Bridger foothills on mostly paved surfaces. The sprint race is a 750-meter swim followed by a 20K out-and-back bike and a 5K outand-back run. For costs and more info visit bozemantritons.org.

TUESDAY JUNE 25 Meet other free-wheeling gals when Montana Dirt Girls meet every Tuesday around 6 PM on Tuesdays for hiking or mountain biking in the Missoula area. For locations and more information, visit mtdirtgirls.tripod.com. Free.

THURSDAY JUNE 25 The Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group meets on Tuesdays to play polo. Kidding, kidding, they meet on Thursdays at 6 PM to ride trails in the Missoula area. Check thursdaynightmtbr.org to find out locations. calendar@missoulanews.com

Enter to win on f or at www.mountainline.com. missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [37]


[community]

OUR SPECIAL NONPROFIT GUESTS: Thurs., June 20 vs. Brewers Missoula Butterfly House & Insectarium

Sat. June 29 vs. Brewers Mission Mountain Enterprises (HCP)

Fri., June 21 vs. Brewers Hamilton After School Program

Sun., June 30 vs. Brewers Mountain Home Montana

Mon. June 24 vs. Mustangs Western Montana AHEC MedStart Program

Sun., July 1 vs. Brewers Available

Tues., June 25 vs. Mustangs Parenting Place Sponsored by

To get your organization signed up, for Community Corner, send a written request on your organization's letterhead to: Missoula Osprey c/o Community Corner MSO Hub 140 N. Higgins, Missoula 59802 or call 543-3300

Patrick Vaughan served in the Navy in Vietnam, but it wasn’t until more recent years, when he saw the civilians affected by the war in Iraq, that he started to question the United States’ participation in international conflicts. “I just don’t see the sense of it,” he says. “I always thought that maybe we learned some lessons from Vietnam, that we weren’t going to get ourselves into that situation again.” But looking at the volatility in Iraq and Afghanistan, Vaughan sees needless tragedy. “You always want to trust your country,” Vaughan says. “It took me a lot to get to the point of saying, ‘Well, wait a minute, this doesn’t make sense.’” Vaughan, a Hamilton resident, and a few others are banding together in hopes of relaunching the Montana chapter of Veterans For Peace, a national nonprofit aiming to “build a culture of peace by using our experiences and lifting our voices.” (Vaughan says there was a chapter in Helena, but it went dor-

THURSDAY JUNE 20 Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins, enter through back alley door. 7 PM. Free will offering. (The group will be taking the month of July off.)

FRIDAY JUNE 21 Support young mothers at Mountain Home Montana’s annual yard sale, which includes furniture, toys, baby clothes and more. 2606 South Ave., across from Community Hospital, starting at 10 AM. It’s been 20 years since an anti-choice arsonist tried to destroy Blue Mountain Clinic. The clinic is marking the event with a barbecue fundraiser at outside the office, 610 N. California St., from 4 to 7 PM. $60 suggested donation.

SATURDAY JUNE 22 Support young mothers at Mountain Home Montana’s annual yard sale, which includes furniture, toys, baby clothes and more. 2606 South Ave., across from Community Hospital, starting at 10 AM. Learn how even the most stick-figure-inept folks can still find healing in art during the “So You Think You Can’t Draw?” class by Odette Grassi at Living Art, 725 W. Alder St., Ste. 17. Free, materials provided. Open to anyone facing illness or loss. Visit livingartofmontana.org to learn more.

MONDAY JUNE 24 Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM.

There’s more to our care than you might think

Informational meetings to start a Missoula chapter of Veterans for Peace run from 3 to about 5 PM at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 102 McLeod Ave, on Mon., June 24 and Mon, July 8. Call Dave at 541-2556 to learn more. All veterans welcome.

[AGENDA LISTINGS]

Join friends and family of gays and lesbians in the Bitterroot at the PFLAG group that meets every third Thursday at 7 PM at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 600 S. Third St. in Hamilton. This month, the group will discuss how tobacco companies market to the LGBT community.

Blue Mountain Clinic would like to honor the support of the Missoula community during this 20-year anniversary of the clinic arson.

mant a few years ago because its members were too scattered across the state.) Veterans for Peace lists chapters in nearly every state, including Wyoming, Washington and Oregon. Its national projects include advocating for Agent Orange victims, the Iraq Water Project install water Photo byto Steele Williams filtration devices and printing the War Crimes Times, a publication that works to expose war crimes. Vaughan isn’t sure yet what the Montana Veterans for Peace chapter’s goals would be until it has properly formed, but the first step is to bring people together to start talking. —Kate Whittle

The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

Find out how the Garden City grows at the weekly Missoula City Council meeting, where you can no doubt expect ranting public commenters, PowerPoint presentations and subtle wit from Mayor Engen. Missoula council chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Meetings are the first four Mondays of every month at 7 PM.

TUESDAY JUNE 25 Maybe you’ll learn how to weave a bandana out of purslane when Jessica Thomas, “Outlaw Herbalist,” presents a workshop on native plants and herbs from noon to 1 PM in the Bitterroot Public Library in Hamilton. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Start ‘em young and they’ll always remember how to ride. Freecycles, 732 S. First St. W., hosts a youth bike building event and promotes a proposed cleaner gasoline, in conjunction with the American Lung Association. Starts at 2 PM. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 26 Join a bevy of local progressive organizations in celebrating the quotable former Congressman Pat Williams, with music by Tom Catmull, local brews and more, all at Caras Park starting at 6 PM. Free. Support folks in your community who don’t have a stocked pantry at the Evening About Hunger fundraiser for Missoula Food Bank, at Ten Spoon Winery from 6 to 8 PM. Local music, food and speakers will be on tap, and diners will take away their handcrafted ceramic bowls. $25, RSVPs must be paid in advance. Call 549-0543 to reserve a table.

THURSDAY JUNE 27 Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Intercultural Dialogue Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, where people meet at 5 PM for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013


2012 Transportation Best Practice Award Winners and 2013 Commuter Challenge Winners Employees at the following businesses were crowned

Commuter Champions! • Adventure Cycling • Adventure Life • Bernice’s Bakery • Biga Pizza • City of Missoula • CTA Architects • Garlington Lohn & Robinson • Good Food Store • Hide & Sole • Home Resource • MSLA County Clerk of Court & Human Resources • Missoula Public Library • Montana Legal Services • Mountain Press Publishing Company • REI • University of Montana: Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Biological Sciences, & Spatial Analysis Lab • Wallmart 2147 • Wildlands CPR

These businesses are champions at encouraging the use of sustainable transportation.

Bronze Level: • Adventure Life • Ecology Project International • Home Resource • Homeword

Silver Level: • REI – Missoula

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013 [39]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

June 20 - June 27, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www.altweeklies.com/ads Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com

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The ARTISTS’ SHOP, LOCAL ART & CRAFT, 127 N. Higgins, downtown Missoula: ceramics, painting, jewelry & more. FOR THE BIRDS: ceramic BIRDS, BIRDBATHS & FEEDERS. Time for Spring Cleaning. Call for an estimate. RC Services 241-0101 www.rcservices.info Why has acupuncture been around for about 5000 years? Because it works. Gentle Acupuncture by Karen Hayberg L.AC. (406) 396-0815

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"The planet does not need more 'successful' people. But it does desperately need more peacemakers, healers, restorers, storytellers and lovers of every shape and form.– David Orr


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon ENNUI GO! My girlfriend and I love each other, but we feel we're becoming numb to hearing it from each other. We've been together three years, so I assume that time is what's put a damper on the "three little words." I suggested that when we are about to say "I love you," we come up with something more personal and meaningful. This, sadly, was difficult and lasted about a day. Now we're back to expressing affection the rote way. Yes, we could have a bigger problem, but beneath this is a bigger worry—that the relationship will get old, too. —Same-Old, Same-Old The pressure to be original in love can be pretty trying. Imagine Shakespeare tentatively mumbling to a woman "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" and hearing back, "Ugh, Will...for the third time this week?" Likewise, the first time you heard "I love you" from your girlfriend, you probably thought, "Wow, she loves me! Hot damn!" But once a relationship gets going, sometimes "I love you!" wells up from the bottom of the heart and sometimes from the need to say something a little more feelgood than "Gotta get you off the phone so I can clean up this cat vomit." Sometimes, one partner is needy and says it constantly so they can hear it back constantly. (If not for somebody being there in their life to respond, they'd be standing for days on end yelling it into the Grand Canyon.) So, yes, it's probably time for a little rationing of "I love you" if it's become shorthand for everything short of "pass the salt." But there's actually research by Dr. Sara Algoe and others showing that expressions of appreciation seem to keep a relationship alive, keeping partners from taking each other for granted and feeling taken for granted. This doesn't necessarily require blithering on in detail about your partner's great qualities, especially not when you both know what you're really saying with a laughing "I love you!" is "You are simply the greatest for coming over and resting your boobs on my head while I'm stuck writing these boring reports." Of course, one of the best ways to make "I love you" more meaningful is by showing it—ideally, at least once a day—just by thinking about what would make each other happier and less stressed and doing it. This could involve small kindnesses like getting up to refill your girlfriend's drink when you're eating dinner or somewhat

bigger (and ickier) kindnesses like telling her to stay put while you clean up after her puking cat. Any guy can go through the romantic motions—say "I love you" on Valentine's Day with $50 worth of chocolate truffles and a suspiciously funerary flower arrangement—but it takes a truly loving guy to say it on a random Tuesday with a rag full of cat vomit.

GETTING OVER THE FRUMP Is there a nice way to tell your girlfriend that you really don't like what she wears to come hang out with your friends? My girlfriend can look so cute in certain outfits, but whenever we're seeing my friends, it seems she dresses more conservatively, and often, she really looks kind of frumpy. I'm not looking for her to look like a stripper. I just want her to look as good as she does when she's out with her friends or we're out together. —Holding Back A woman can go a little too far in trying to avoid crossing the border from sexy to slutty—all the way over to "sturdy Amish woman about to churn butter." Chances are, your girlfriend thinks she's protecting you— keeping you from looking bad in the eyes of your friends or from worrying that she's covertly shopping for your replacement. Unfortunately, women don't always understand the workings of competition between men. Basically, it's good to get the girl. It's even better if your guy friends and any passing male strangers hate you a little for it. To get your girlfriend to dress a little more "Mad Men" than Ma from "Little House on the Prairie," pose a question to her with a compliment folded in: "Hey, can I ask you something? You dress so cute when it's just us hanging out. It seems like you feel the need to dress more conservatively when we're out with my friends." Explain that she really doesn't have to do that, and add, "I just want everyone to see how gorgeous you are." The compliment will rise to the top, and she should get the message: You aren't asking her to wear something that will have drunks trying to slip dollar bills in her bra, just something more in keeping with a night likelier to end in a game of poker than a plague of prairie locusts.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

fant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744

Patience Garbriel

Aquila & Anthony

phone your dad, David Anthony “Hill” Almeida. Cell 509-2703821 “The major theme of the 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) is The Environmental Protection Agencies’ (EPA) consumer awareness / right-to-know Consumer Confidence Report (CCR). This rule requires all community water systems (CWS) to provide drinking water quality reports to their customers. The following CWSs are required to give public notice as to the methods of obtaining a copy of the CCR. We have made available copies of these systems’ CCRs. To obtain a copy of your CCR report, write

to: Crisp Water Technologies, Inc, P.O. Box 2525, Missoula, MT 59806-2525.” Amity HOA 3710 Big Pines Tr. Ct. 0450 Bitterroot Gateway 0443 Blue Mountain Tr. Ct. 0381 Buena Vista 0378 Carol’s Court 0451 Catrina Water Company 2540 Country Side Court 0376 ECO 0870 FBC-RV 0836 Forest Lounge & Apts. 0840 Frenchtown Valley View 0 4 0 4 Futura Park 0374 Hawthorn Springs 4516 Hollywood Tr. Ct. 0454 Meadowbrook Park 4530 Missoula Village West 3012 Mobile City Tr. Ct. 0646 Montana Tr. Ct. 3215 North Davis Duplexes 2121 River Road Tr. Ct 0369 Sorrel Springs HOA 0518 Spring Meadows 3630 Sunset Pines 2538

WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744 YARD SALE MANIA! JUNE 28, 29 & 30!!!Sanders County Yard Sale Event is three days and over 100 yard sales...you are sure to find some treasures! Visit the unique communities along Hwy 200 from Dixon to Heron and up over Hwy 28 into Hot Springs. A perfect getaway weekend of fun, recreation, and of course, pickin! www.SandersSaleing.com Visit www.Tour200.com for Sanders County visitor info. Right in your backyard, who knew?

LOOKING TO BUY:

Remington Model 1100 LT 20 Gauge Shot Gun Reasonable condition.

Will pay up to $700.

941-697-4276 No calls after 9pm EDT

USED APPLIANCES

NEEDED

to help fund child abuse prevention through The Parenting Place. Free pickup available. Tax deductible. Donation Warehouse, 240-4042, 1804 North Ave W

MEDICAL MARIJUANA CARD Please call 830-6890 to renew or get a new Medical Marijuana Card for Montana.

POST 27 HALL IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENTING

$350*Per Day

Capacity 299 people. Chairs, tables, etc. included. Wet Bar with large (*$450 w/ band) +$200 refundable round tables, two 58" TV's with Cleaning/Damage Deposit plugins. Floating wood floor installed on dance floor and bar area. **Very Special Rate for Post 27 and Auxiliary Members**

EMPLOYMENT BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 Compassionate PCA CAREGiver Missoula /

9977177 If you have a special place in your heart for seniors, then why not get paid to reminisce, run errands, go shopping, prepare meals, do light housekeeping, enjoy conversations and just have fun? $8.25 $12.00 Hourly. Missoula Job

Service 728-7060

ice 728-7060

Entry Level sanding/painting position / 9977193 $8.50 Hourly. Opportunity to learn the painting trade in a professional environment. Missoula Job Serv-

FAIRGROUNDS DIRECTOR / 2984549 Work is fulltime and pay is $70,000/yr. CLOSE DATE: 06/24/13. Missoula Job Service 728-7060


EMPLOYMENT Front Desk Admin Asst. / 9977188 Highly energetic person wanted for rapidly expanding Wellness Center. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take your career to the next level. Benefits: $50,000 Loan Repayment Program. Montgomery GI Bill. Up to 100% tuition assistance for college. Medical & dental benefits. Starting at $13.00/hr. Paid job skill training. Call 1-800-G0-GUARD. National Guard. Part-time job...Full-time benefits. LABORERS / 2984553 50 Laborers needed for 2 to 3 weeks. Will start immediately! Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266 Parts Counterman / 9977191 Experienced parts counterman for large trucking company.Missoula Job Service 728-7060 PROBATIONARY DEPUTY SHERIFF / 2984548 Initial assignment is to the patrol division. Candidates must submit a County application. PAY: $21.85/hr. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Coding. Minimum 5 years experience adult inpatient medical surgical or critical care nursing; or minimum 5 years inpatient coding. Full time; M-F; day shift. Full benefit package provided. /lat. Missoula Job Service 7287060 FINANCE DIRECTOR / 2984552 Health Center is seeking a regular, full-time FINANCE DIRECTOR. $60,000.00 Yearly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 NORTH DAKOTA HIGHWAY PATROL TROOPER. Begin a challenging and rewarding career with opportunities for growth and advancement. Apply at www.nd.gov/ndhp or call 701328-2455. Closing dates: 6/19/13 for applicants testing in Grand Forks and Fargo and 7/2/13 for applicants testing in Bismarck. EOE. Roots Preschool seeks creative, unique, cooperative, physically active, mindful, empathetic, and loving teachers to work with our families. Interest in looping and a movement oriented background necessary. 23-26 hrs/wk $911/hr DOE Summer hours possible. Send resume, letters of recommendation, and philosophy of learning to 216 Commerce St. 59808 c/o Tamara Visser.tamaravisser@hotmail.com

“Professional” environment. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

HEALTH CAREERS E N V I R O N M E N TA L HEALTH SPECIALIST 1 / 2984550 Seeking a regular, fulltime ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST. $18.37 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SALES DIGITAL SALES MANAGER. Are you an entrepreneur looking to

Must have own transportation.

$15/Hr • 543-1268

Registered/Certified MAs or LPNs. Schedule varies depending on location. Requires strong clinical and computer skills, customer service, teamwork. Join a team of providers making a difference in health care in our community for 90 years. Competitive compensation and benefits. Cover letter and resume to

hresource@tmimontana.com.

Entrepreneur opportunity If you are an entrepreneur who is interested in capitalizing on the timing of the exploding wireless industry, we’d be honored to have the opportunity to introduce you to Lightyear. We work closely with our business partners, helping them build a lucrative business. To get started go to website: www.arelon.net

Live-in caregiver needed to provide support to a person with a developmental disability to live as independently as possible in their own home and participate in community activities to the fullest extent possible. Monthly stipend provided. Call Sheila at: 329-1765 or Kelly: at 329-1737.

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Foster Care provider needed for a person with developmental disabilities. A 34 year old gentleman is looking for a home. A $1500 monthly stipend w/room and board will be paid; respite money is available through the individual cost plan. Call Sheila at: 329-1765 or Kelly at: 329-1737.

for application & job description; deadline 6-24

www.umwestern.edu/ job-opportunities. Montana Western is an EEO/AA employer.

LIVE-IN CAREGIVER

FOSTER CARE PROVIDER

Applications available at: OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 or online at: www.orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE

To apply, please send resume and compensation expectations to: lfoland@missoulanews.com. EOE

sussexschool.org

A complete job description and application instructions are available at

HAB TECH I

OPPORTUNITIES

Independent Publishing is seeking an enthusiastic, personable part-timer to assist in our classified advertising department. Must have ability to handle heavy phone work and provide top-notch customer service. Flexible hours.

part time Middle School Science Teacher go to

PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER.

HAB TECH II FT position providing support to staff providing services to Adults w/disabilities. Supervisory exp preferred. F and Sa: 10p-10a and Su: 10p-9a. $10.30/hr. Closes: 6/25/13, 5p. PT position providing services in a res/com setting. Supervisory experience preferred. Sa and Su: 8a-8p. $9.55/hr. Closes: 6/25/13, 5p.

Inside Sales/Customer Service Rep

Experienced Painters / 9977194 1-2 years Brush and Roller experience required in a

seeks applicants for the position of

LPN/MAs Needed

INTERACTIVE / ONLINE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE / #2984085 A minimum of 3 years successful sales experience, preferably in media sales. Solution based selling background. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR

CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical

Linda Vista area/Maloney Ranch

Proficiency in Microsoft Office Power Point, Word and Excel. Must have a valid driver’s license and reliable transportation. Bozeman Connext.

Valid MT driver license No history of abuse, neglect or exploitation

PROFESSIONAL

HOUSEKEEPER WANTED

put your stamp on an organization? Have you been described as energetic and a strong leader? Does the idea of going to work each day in a “Google” work environment appeal to you? Then apply today to be a key member of the leadership team at Bozeman Connext. We are a cutting edge, digital agency that partners with local businesses to help build their digital business. Our long standing partnership with the Bozeman Daily Chronicle make us a strong, local brand that is here to stay. We seek an experienced Digital sales leader to plow the road for a talented group of Digital sales experts. You must be a Digital evangelist who can keep up with a fast paced, fast growing company. Strong sales and sales management skills required. A desire to make a lot of money and never be satisfied with your income preferred. Full benefits including Medical, Dental, Vision and Paid Vacation. Give yourself a raise by emailing your resume to javgerls@pioneernewsgroup.com A four year business degree is preferred. A minimum of two to five years sales management experience is required, preferably in internet/digital environment.

Hilton Garden Inn is now hiring for the following positions: • Sales Admin • Bartender part-time • Banquet Captain • Laundry Attendant • Room Attendants Applications available at the Front Desk:

3720 N. Reserve ENJOY THE BENEFITS OF BEING HILTON Equal Opportunity Employer

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

[C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Maybe you've seen that meme circulating on the Internet: "My desire to be well-informed is at odds with my desire to remain sane." If you feel that way now— and I suspect you might soon if you don't already—you have cosmic permission, at least for a while, to emphasize sanity over being well-informed. Lose track of what Kim Jong-un and Kim Kardashian are up to, ignore the statements of every jerk on the planet, and maybe even go AWOL from the flood of data that relentlessly pours toward you. Instead, pay attention to every little thing your body has to tell you. Remember and marvel at your nightly dreams. Go slow. Lay low. Be soft. Have fun with unspectacular influences that make you feel at home in the world. TAURUS (April 20-May 20):I expect you will be called on to move fluidly between opposing camps or competing interests or different realities. Maybe you'll volunteer to serve as an arbiter between the crabby good guys and the righteous bad guys. Perhaps you'll try to decode one friend's quirky behavior so that another friend can understand it. You might have to interpret my horoscopes for people who think astrology is bunk. You may even have to be a mediator between your own heart and head, or explain the motivations of your past self to your future self. You can't be perfect, of course. There will be details lost in translation. But if you're as patient as a saint and as tricky as a crow, you'll succeed. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Pablo Casals was one of the greatest cello players who ever lived. Among his early inspirations was the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Casals discovered Bach's six cello suites when he was 13 years old, and played them every day for the next 13 years. Have you ever done something similar, Gemini? Devoted yourself to a pleasurable discipline on a regular basis for a long time? I invite you to try it. The coming months will be an excellent time to seek mastery through a diligent attention to the details.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22):"I know that I am not a category," said philosopher Buckminster Fuller. "I am not a thing—a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process." Philosopher Norman O. Brown had a similar experience. "The human body is not a thing or substance, but a continuous creation," he mused. "It is an energy system which is never a complete structure; never static; is in perpetual inner self-construction and self-destruction." Now is an excellent time to imagine yourself in these terms, Cancerian. You're not a finished product, and never will be! Celebrate your fluidity, your changeableness, your instinctual urge to reinvent yourself.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):Renowned 20th-century theologian Karl Barth worked on his book Church Dogmatics for 36 years. It was more than 9,000 pages long and contained over six million words. And yet it was incomplete. He had more to say, and wanted to keep going. What's your biggest undone project, Leo? The coming months will be a good time to concentrate on bringing it to a climax. Ideally, you will do so with a flourish, embracing the challenge of creating an artful ending with the same liveliness you had at the beginning of the process. But even if you have to culminate your work in a plodding, prosaic way, do it! Your next big project will be revealed within weeks after you've tied up the last loose end.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):Susannah Cibber was a popular 18th-century English contralto whose singing was expressive and moving. On one occasion, she performed Handel's Messiah with such verve that an influential priest responded by making an extravagant guarantee. He told her that as a result of her glorious singing, any sins she had committed or would commit were forever forgiven. I'd like to see you perpetrate an equivalent amazement, Virgo: a good or beautiful or soulful deed that wins you a flood of enduring slack. The cosmic omens suggest that such an achievement is quite possible.

d

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS AUTHENTIC TIMBER FRAME & POST & BEAM BARNS. Premium Coastal, Dry #1 & BTR DF. Reclaimed Timber & Barnwood. Complete Packages. Installed. Standard plans free of charge. Visit our website: www.bitterroottimberframes.com Call Brett at 406-581-3014. 2yr Warranty Damsel in Defense Personal defense products for women. Stun Guns, Pepper Spray, Security Items. Dani Stewart. 406-370-0982. mydamselpro.net/PRO1512 Dani’z Designz Montana Inspired Jewelry. 406-3700982. danizdesignz.com FOR SALE 2010 Chevy Impala LT, under 40K, $14,000 • (4) 16” studded tires, $350 • 26” ladies bike brand new, $100 • Computer armoire, $250. OBO on all items. 406214-7298 leave message. New Thrift Store. Heaven’s Hidden Treasures. 1810 North Ave. 406-317-1001. 10-6 Monday thru Saturday. SAWMILLS from only $3997.00. Make & Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. FREE info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363, Ext.300N

Outlaw Music

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop! Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

STEEL BUILDINGS: 5 only. 16x20, 25x36, 30x40, 45x74, 60x140. Selling for balance owed! Must move now! Still crated/free delivery. 1-800-3210174, Ext. 263

SPORTING GOODS 16ft green canoe with three orange life jackets $200. 246-7715

ELECTRONICS Get FREE 10” INTERNET TABLET when you order DISH installed FREE. FREE HBO. Offer ends soon. Call for details. 1-866845-7776. Restrictions apply with approved credit.

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner

of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com

ings, fun personalities. Quality pups. $250. Can deliver to Missoula. 406-465-0081

Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com

OUTDOOR GEAR

Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.org 406-207-0765 Jack Russell Puppies. Purebred. Tails docked, first shots. 7 wks old. Excellent mark-

Thift Stores 1136 W. Broadway 930 Kensington

Summertime Sale! 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Johnny Appleseed was a 19th-century folk hero renowned for planting apple trees in vast areas of rural America. During the 70 years this famous Libra was alive, he never got married. He believed that if he remained unwed during his time on earth, he would be blessed with two spirit-wives in the after-life. Have you ever done something like that yourself, Libra? Is there an adventure you've denied yourself in the here and now because you think that's the only way you can get some bigger, better adventure at a later date? If so, now would be an excellent time to adjust your attitude.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): "It is kind of fun to do the impossible," said Walt Disney, a pioneer animator whose cartoon innovations were remarkable. Judging from your current astrological omens, I think you Scorpios have every right to adopt his battle cry as your mantra. You've got an appointment with the frontier. You're primed to perform experiments at the edge of your understanding. Great mysteries will be tempting you to come closer and lost secrets will be teasing you with juicy clues. As you explore and tinker with the unknown, you might also want to meditate on the graffiti I saw scrawled on a mirror in a public restroom: "Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible."

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Astronauts on lunar expeditions have orbited the moon and seen its entire surface. But the rest of us have never seen more than 59 percent of it. As the moon revolves around the Earth, it always keeps one side turned away from our view. Isn't that amazing and eerie? The second most important heavenly body, which is such a constant and intimate factor in our lives, is half-hidden. I'd like to propose that there is an analogous phenomenon in your inner world, Sagittarius: a part of you that forever conceals some of its true nature. But I'm pretty sure you will soon be offered an unprecedented chance to explore that mysterious realm.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Anglo-Irish novelist Laurence Sterne married his wife Elizabeth in 1741. Twenty-five years later he fell in love with another woman, Eliza. In composing love letters to his new infatuation, he lifted some of the same romantic passages he had originally written to Elizabeth when he was courting her. Try hard not to do anything remotely resembling that, Capricorn. Give your intimate allies your freshest stuff. Treat them as the unique creatures they are. Resist the temptation to use shticks that worked to create closeness in the past.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): "It's important that you not punish yourself or allow yourself to be punished for the sins that other people have committed. It's also crucial that you not think nasty thoughts about yourself or put yourself in the presence of anyone who's prone to thinking nasty thoughts about you. Self-doubt and self-criticism may be healthy for you to entertain about ten days from now, and at that time you will probably benefit from receiving compassionate critique from others, too. But for the moment, please put the emphasis on self-protection and self-nurturing.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For over three decades, a man in Assam, India has worked to build a forest. When Jadav "Molai" Payeng started planting and tending seeds at the age of 16, the sandbars bordering the Brahmaputra River were barren. Today, almost entirely thanks to him, they're covered with a 1,360-acre forest that harbors deer, birds, tigers, rhinos, and elephants. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you could launch a comparable project in the next 12 months, Pisces -- a labor of love that will require your persistent creativity and provide you with sanctuary for a long time. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Is it time for you? Call our Therapist Bernie Kneefe, MSW, LCSW today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-721-6056

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

IT'S TIME TO

PLAY

OUTSIDE! SWINGS! BIKES! TOYS!

829 S. Higgins On the Hip Strip

406.543.1179 Mon-Sat 10:30-6 • Sun 12-4


BODY, MIND & SPIRIT MITCHELL

MASSAGE THERAPY

Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. In my office at 127 N Higgins or in your home. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358

JIN SHIN JYUTSU. Eliminate pain and stress on all levels with safe, healing touch. Animals like it too! Hot Springs. Lila 406-741-5709

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

MASSAGE TRAINING INSTITUTE MONTANA “Weekend Classes - Online Curriculum” 500 Hr Certification for MT License. (406) 250-9616

Why has acupuncture been around for about 5000 years? Because it works. Ask how acupuncture may help you!

Gentle Acupuncture by Karen Hayberg L.AC. 396-0815

MASSAGE TRAINING INSTITUTE MONTANA

ERIC MITCHELL, LMT Massage Therapist/Owner

*Online Curriculum *Hands-On Class 1-Weekend/Month 2601 S 3rd St. W

500 Hr Certification for MT License

Find me on Facebook

(406) 250-9616 www.mtimontana.com

MitchellMassage.abmp.com

406-207-9480

Need a medical cannabis provider in Missoula or the surrounding areas? Big Sky Provider Referral works with reputable medical cannabis providers in and around Missoula.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC Family Care • Nutritional Consultation & IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Homeopathy • Massage Christine White N.D. & Elizabeth Axelrod N.D. Monday-Thursday 9:00-4:00 Friday & Saturday appointments available

For more information visit

Bigskyproviderreferral.com

or call 406-672-3172

2204 Dixon, Missoula • 542-2147 • MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

PUBLIC NOTICES Cassie R. Dellwo MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Ph: (701) 227-1841 Fax (701) 227-4739 Attorney for the Plaintiff CDellwo@mackoff.com MT Bar #11880 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION Cause No. DV-12-1502 Ed McLean. Federal National Mortgage Association, Plaintiff, -vsDouglas H. McCollum; and any person in possession, Defendant. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT DOUGLAS H. MCCOLLUM: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within ten (10) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an eviction and subsequent possession upon the following described real property in the County of Missoula, State of Montana: LOT 36 OF STILLWATER ADDITION AT MALONEY RANCH PHASE II, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, this 8th day of May, 2013. (SEAL OF THE COURT) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: /s/ Cady Sowre, Deputy Clerk Dated this 30th day of April, 2013. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for Plaintiff 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 MT BAR ID#11880 By: /s/ Cassie R. Dellwo, Attorney Attorney for the Plaintiff

CITY OF MISSOULA City of Missoula Vehicle Maintenance Division Public Works Department 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana 59802 COMPETITIVE SEALED PROPOSALS (CSP) TO REMOVE A SHED The City of Missoula (City) is requesting competitive sealed proposals (CSP) to remove a shed (canopy building). This CSP will result in a contractual agreement to remove a canopy shed at

the City of Missoula Central Maintenance Facility located at 1305 B Scott Street, Missoula, Montana 59804. Copies of the detailed Competitive Sealed Proposals, including a description of the services to be provided by respondents, the minimum content of responses, and the factors to be used to evaluate the responses, may be obtained on the City’s website: http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids or at the Vehicle Maintenance Division during normal business hours at 1305 B Scott Street, Missoula, MT 59804, starting June 14th, 2013. For more information, contact: Jack Stucky, Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent at (406) 552-6387, or email jstucky@ci.missoula.mt.us. Sealed proposals must be submitted to the Missoula City Clerk’s Office by 5:00 p.m. MST, July 15th, 2013, at 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802-4297. A demolition contractor will be selected and a contract will be made shortly thereafter. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, City Clerk

CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m., on Tuesday, June 25, 2013, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Scott/Toole Intersection Urban Mini-Roundabout Project 11-010 This project consists of a concrete roundabout, splitter islands, curb, sidewalk and associated work. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 11-010 Scott/Toole Intersection Urban Mini-Roundabout” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Registration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Mon-

tana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of the City Engineer, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor performing work on a “Public works contract” shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The provisions of this part do not apply in those instances in which the standard prevailing rate of wages is determined by federal law. “Public works contract” means a contract for construction services let by the state, county, municipality, school district, or political subdivision or for non-construction services let by the state, county, municipality, or political subdivision in which the total cost of the contract is in excess of $25,000. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against on the basis race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical

condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on June 25, 2013. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406) 5526079. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk

security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the city is exempt from them and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City of Missoula Fire Department reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. The City of Missoula Fire Department reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. The City of Missoula Fire Department reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of a substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Fire Department (406) 552-6210. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, City Clerk

CITY OF MISSOULA

SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for construction of the East Broadway Lift Station Replacement will be received by the City of Missoula at the Office of the City Clerk, Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana 59802, until 1:00 PM local time on July 2, 2013, and then publicly opened and read aloud in the Mayor’s Conference Room. Late bids will be returned unopened. Each Proposal shall be submitted in a sealed envelope. The envelope shall be clearly marked on the outside with the bidder’s name, address, contractor’s registration number and the following language: “Bid Proposal for City of Missoula Project No. 13-001 East Broadway Lift Station Replacement” The project generally consists of, but is not necessarily limited to, the following major items: Demolition of the existing lift station dry-pit Removal and disposal of the upper cone section of the existing wet well and installation of a new 8 foot diameter wet well section; Installation of a new submersible package lift station, including sewage pumps, piping and valves, and ancillary control equipment; Finish grading, graveling and reseeding of all areas disturbed during construction, including fence installation; Installation of new wiring and con-

CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk Office, Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 3:00 P.M. Tuesday, June 25, 2013, and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for furnishing the City of Missoula Fire Department with the following: One (1) Class A Triple Combination 1250 GPM Fire Apparatus. Bidders shall bid by returning required bid forms and completed apparatus specifications to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in a sealed envelope marked plainly on the outside, Bid for Fire Department Apparatus, Opening 3:00 PM, June 25, 2013. Each bidder shall submit a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City of Missoula. This should be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit for each bid. The bid

duit for new package lift station. This work includes the furnishing and installation of equipment, materials and related appurtenances in the following general trades of work: piping, concrete, equipment installation, electrical, HVAC, instrumentation and other related trades to complete the work. The work will be done under a single contract. The Contract Documents consisting of half size Drawings and Project Manual may be viewed or obtained by either electronic documents on-line, or a hard copy at the office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer St, Missoula, MT, telephone 406-542-8880. Complete digital project plans and specifications can be viewed and are available for downloading at the Morrison-Maierle, Inc. website “www.m-m.net”, by clicking on the “Projects Bidding” link. They can also be downloaded at the Quest CDN website “www.questcdn.com” by registering and selecting this project on the website’s “Project” page. A project number and password is not required. You may register and download the digital plan documents for $40.00. For assistance in the free membership registration, downloading, and working with this digital project information, please contact QuestCDN at 952-233-1632 or email “info@questcdn.com”. Required fee for hard copies is $75.00 per set, which is not refundable, by regular mail or United Parcel Service (UPS). Payment of an additional $25.00 is required for express mail. In addition, the Project Manual may also be examined at the following locations: City of Missoula City Hall 435 Ryman St Missoula, Montana 59802 Missoula Plans Exchange 201 North Russell St Missoula, MT 59801 There will be a mandatory Pre-Bid conference at the Missoula Wastewater Treatment Plant, 1100 Clark Fork Lane, at 10:00 a.m., local time (Mountain Time Zone), on Monday, June 24, 2013. Interested CONTRACTORS are required to attend. Bids from CONTRACTORS not in attendance will not be considered for this specific project. It is the CONTRACTOR’s responsibility to be familiar with the site and any constraints material to his bid. A tour of the project site will be conducted after the meeting. Actual prior experience performing the type of work in this project is an important factor for performance of this project. The Bidder is required to submit, with the bid proposal, proof of experience performing work of a similar nature. Lack of experience in successfully

completing projects of a similar size, with similar complexity may be construed as constituting a non-qualified bidder as determined by City of Missoula. CONTRACTOR(s) and any of the CONTRACTOR’s subcontractors bidding on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI). Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect, Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406444-7734. Forms for registration can also be obtained online at MT.Contractor.Com. CONTRACTOR’s are required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by CONTRACTOR(s) or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by the laws of the United States and the state of Montana in accordance with the schedule of Montana Prevailing Wage Rates established by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry included in the Project Manual. The CONTRACTOR must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their actual or perceived race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, creed, sex, age, marital or familial status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or because of their association with a person or group of people so identified. Each bid or proposal must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to the City of Missoula, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid. Successful BIDDERS shall furnish an approved Construction Performance Bond and a Construction (Labor and Materials) Payment Bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful BIDDER(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with the City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The CONTRACTOR(s) is required to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of the Bids specified above. The right is reserved to re-

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

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PUBLIC NOTICES ject any or all Proposals received, to waive informalities, to postpone the award of the contract for a period of not to exceed sixty (60) days, and to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid which is in the best interest of the City of Missoula. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the Clerk and Recorders’ Office prior to the bid opening. /s/ Martha L Rehbein, City Clerk

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION Community and Planning Services has received an after-the-fact floodplain permit application from Dale Kohler to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 10971 Rustic Rd, in Section 35, Township 13N, Range 18W and includes the importation of fill for a horse riding arena within the floodway fringe. The full application is available for review at Community and Planning Services at 317 Woody St in Missoula. Written comments from anyone interested in floodplain permit application #13-17 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., July 12, 2013. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Community and Planning Services, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE 2012 DELINQUENT REAL ESTATE TAX SALE All 2012 delinquent taxes, including penalties, interest and costs, are now a lien upon the real property upon which those taxes were assessed. Unless the delinquent taxes, penalties, interest and costs are paid prior to the time of the Treasurer’s tax sale, the county’s lien will be offered for sale. The Treasurer’s tax sale is scheduled for 10:00 a.m., Thursday, July 11, 2013 in the County Treasurer’s Office, first floor, Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W. Broadway, St, Missoula, Montana. A list of all properties on which 2012 taxes are delinquent will be on file at the time of the sale and open for public inspection during business hours 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Penalties, interest and costs will be added to the delinquent taxes upon payment by the owner or purchaser. Before a tax lien can be purchased for assignment, “Proof of Notice” according to MCA 15-17-323 (5) must be presented at the time of purchase. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer, Missoula County, Montana

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT PUBLIC COMMENT SOUGHT The DRAFT City of Missoula’s Program Year 2012 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) will be available for public review and comment starting Thursday, June 13, 2013. The CAPER describes activities undertaken by the City as a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME) entitlement grantee for the program year ending March 31, 2013. Public comments on the City’s performance received by noon, Friday, June 28, 2013, will be included in the final version of the CAPER to be submitted to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Comments may be made in writing to the Missoula Dept. of Grants and Community Programs (GCP), 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT, 59802 or via email to nharte@co.missoula.mt.us. The City of Missoula and GCP welcome comments on its CDBG and HOME activities, Consolidated Plan and annual Action Plans on a yearround basis. Copies of the CAPER are available for review at GCP’s office at 127 W. Spruce or at www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgweb. Persons wishing to receive a copy of the CAPER or to review it in an alternative format should contact Nancy Harte at GPC, 258 4934.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Partnership Health Center (PHC) until 10:00 A.M., Friday June 21 2013, at which time bids will be opened and read for the purpose of evaluating proposals to provide On-Site Laboratory Services at the clinic. Laboratory Services are comprised of performing lab tests as ordered by PHC’s health providers, courier service and data analysis. Specifications and bid procedures may be obtained at the Partnership Health Center 323 W Alder Street Missoula, MT 59802 or by emailing seatonj@phc.missoula.mt.us. Questions may be directed to Jeff Seaton, Finance Director, via telephone (406) 258 4181. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Laboratory Services” and addressed to: Partnership Health Center ATTN: Laboratory Services Proposal/Jeff Seaton 323 W Alder Missoula, Montana, 59802

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-13-118 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARGARET L. WILLIAMSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Donald H. Williamson, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of May, 2013. /s/ Donald H. Willliamson, Personal Representative WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ Sean Morris MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-13-89 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF TIMOTHY L. KENNEDY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Timothy Schreiber, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested at 3995 Stevensville River Road, Stevensville, MT 59870 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of May, 2013. /s/ Timothy Schreiber, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-13-111 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MELVIN DEWEY PALIN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Hildegarde Palin has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana the foregoing is true and correct. Dated this 24th day of May, 2013 /s/ Hildegarde Palin, Personal Representative of the Estate of Melvin Dewey Palin /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-61 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARIE C. MATTE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to SHAWN E. ROSSCUP, attorney for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at PO Box 9410, Missoula, Montana 59807-9410 or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. DATED: March 18, 2013. /s/ JAMIE B. YULE, Personal Representative. WELLS & McKITTRICK, P.C. /s/ Shawn E. Rosscup, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4, Cause No. DP 13-119, NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LaVON FAUSETT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to JOSEPH DOUGLAS FAUSETT, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Claude I. Burlingame, Attorney at Law, P.O. Box 1587, Thompson Falls, Montana 59873, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief. DATED this 4th day of June 2013, at Thompson Falls, Montana. /s/Joseph Douglas Fausett, Personal Representative Claude I. Burlingame, Attorney-at-Law, P. O. Box 1587, Thompson Falls, MT 59873 (406) 827-3372 Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-13-110 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JUANITA M. HIRSCHI, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ARTHUR J. SCHEFFER has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to ARTHUR J. SCHEFFER, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested at c/o Victor F. Valgenti, Attorney at Law, 200 University Plaza, 100 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court. I declare under penalty of perjury that the fore-

going is true and correct. Date: 5/28/2013 Place: Missoula /s/ Victor F. Valgenti, Attorney for Arthur J. Scheffer, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-13-113 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HAROLD E. HOGAN, SR., Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Marcia L. Hogan has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Marcia L. Hogan, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Sally Johnson, Johnson Law Firm, 234 E. Pine Street, Missoula, Montana 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 7th day of June, 2013. /s/ Sally Johnson, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-13-115 Dept. No. 1 Hon. Ed McLean NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF ROBERTA ANN DEMMERT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Eleni Adams, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 29th day of May, 2013 /s/ Eleni Adams, Personal Representative. MONTANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE REGULATION BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF MONTANA REGULATORY DIVISIONDOCKET NO. D2012.7.81 IN THE MATTER OF the Application ofMountain Water Company for Authority toIncrease Rates and Charges for Water Serviceto its Missoula, Montana, Customers NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Montana Public Service Commission (Commission) will conduct a public hearing in the Matter of the Application of Mountain Water Company (Mountain Water) to Establish Increased Rates and Charges for Water Service to its Missoula, Montana, Customers. The public hearing will commence on July 10, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at the DoubleTree Inn, 100 Madison Street, Missoula, Montana. The hearing will continue from day to day, as necessary. On July 30, 2012, Mountain Water filed an application with the Commission to increase rates and charges for water service to its Missoula, Montana, customers. Mountain Water is requesting a total revenue requirement increase of $919,105. Mountain Water is also requesting interim rate relief in the amount of $575,036. Mountain Water is a Montana corporation providing water utility service in and near Missoula, Montana, and is subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission. Mountain Water is requesting to increase its rates and charges to produce a return on rate base of $3,375,016, which represents an overall rate of return of 9.29% on a rate base of $36,325,650. Mountain Water requests the rate increase to allow it to recover its operation and maintenance expenses, depreciation and amortization expenses, taxes other than income and income taxes, and to earn a return of 9.29% on rate base. If Mountain Water’s application was approved as filed, its rates would increase as follows: 1) flat rates, excluding Fire Protection Service and Flat Rate Sprinkling Service, would increase by 5.8498%, or $2.93 per month for a single family home; 2) metered rates would increase by 5.6796%, or $2.61 per month for a 5/8 x 3/4 inch meter with 15 Ccf usage (1 ccf = 748 gallons); 3) Private Fire Protection Service rates would increase approximately 5.0900%, or $2.50 per month for a six-inch sprinkler line; 4) Flat Rate Sprinkler Water service rates would increase approximately 6.0342%, which would increase the annual bill for watering a 5,000 sq. ft. yard by $11.77; 5) Public Fire Protection Service rates would decrease 15.4962% or $0.24 per month for a customer with a 5/8 x 3/4 inch meter. In addition to Mountain Water’s application for a revenue requirement increase, since its last general rate case application in April of 2010, Mountain Water has made two filings pursuant to its power cost tracker adjustment tariff. On September 13, 2010, Mountain Water filed a power cost adjustment increase of $336,854. On September 16, 2011, Mountain Water filed a power cost adjustment increase of $171,099.30. Both filings were approved on an interim basis, subject to review and final approval in this general rate case. The Commission’s jurisdiction over this matter is provided for in Title 69, MCA. The applicable law includes provisions of Title 69, MCA, and corresponding administrative rules of the Commission. The hearing itself will be conducted as a contested case hearing pursuant to Title 2, Ch. 4, MCA (MAPA); ARM Title 38, Ch. 2 (Commission procedural rules); and any prior orders of the Commission which may bear on the issues presented. The hearing is for the purpose of receiving technical evidence (testimony and exhibits) with respect to this Docket and public comment for consideration by the Commission. Testimony submitted at hearing is subject to cross-examination. Any person may be represented by legal counsel at the hearing. The Montana Consumer Counsel, with offices at 111 North Last Chance Gulch, Suite 1B, P.O. Box 201703, Helena, MT

[C6] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

59620-1703, telephone (406) 444-2771, is available and may be contacted to assist and represent the interests of the consuming public in this matter. Anyone needing an accommodation for a physical, hearing, or sight impairment in order to attend or participate in the hearing should contact the Commission at (406) 444-6199 at least one week prior to the hearing. The Commission will make every effort to accommodate individual impairments. BY THE MONTANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION W. A. (BILL) GALLAGHER, Chairman BOB LAKE, Vice Chairman KIRK BUSHMAN, Commissioner TRAVIS KAVULLA, Commissioner ROGER KOOPMAN, Commissioner Notice of pending tax deed issuance to: Sterling Properties, LLC 1729 Eldon Lane #1 Missoula, MT 59802, Missoula County Treasurer 200 West Broadway Missoula, MT 59802, Sterling Properties, LLC 4285 U.S. Highway 93 South Missoula, MT 59804-9274, Sterling Properties, LLC 216 West Main Street Suite 200 Missoula, MT 59802, Sterling Properties, LLC 333 University Avenue Missoula, MT 59801, Sterling Properties, LLC 1515 Union Street Seattle, WA 98101, Sterling Properties, LLC c/o Worden Thane, P.C. Attn: Sean M. Morris Esq 111 N. Higgins Suite 600 Missoula, MT 59802, Sterling Properties, LLC c/o Worden Thane, P.C. Attn: Sean M. Morris Esq P.O. Box 4747 Missoula, MT 59806-4747, Sterling Properties, LLC c/o Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, P.C. Attn: Trent N Baker 201 West Main Ste 201 Missoula, MT 59802, Heather G. Vines - Registered Agent Sterling Properties, LLC 615 Woodford Avenue Missoula, MT 59801, Jon O. Shields - Registered Agent Remington Properties, LLC Member of Sterling Properties, LLC 216 West Main Street Missoula, MT 59802, Spencer Properties, LLC 65 Goose Lane Stevensville, MT 59870, Spencer Properties, LLC 1729 Eldon Ln #1 Missoula, MT 598049274, Spencer Properties, LLC 805 Evans Missoula, MT 59801, Miriam Mindich - Registered Agent Spencer Properties, LLC 805 Evans Missoula, MT 59801, Shields Law Firm PC Jon Shields, Esq. P.O. Box 8384 Missoula, MT 59807, Allegra, Ltd., a Washington Corporation 88 Lenora Avenue Seattle, Washington, 98121, Allegra, Ltd., a Washington Corporation c/o Keller Rohrback, LLP Attn: Benjamin J Lantz and Robert S Over 1201 Third Avenue Suite 3200 Seattle, WA 98101-3052, State of Montana ex rel. Department of Environmental Quality Norman J. Mullen, Special Assistant Attorney General Department of Environmental Quality Legal Unit, Metcalf Building P.O. Box 200901 Helena, MT 59620-0901, Current Occupant 4285 Hwy 93 S Missoula, MT 59804 Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana Code Annotated, notice is hereby given: Please take notice that a property tax lien exists on the following described property in which you may have an interest. TAX ID #: 1715804 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 4285 HWY 93 S, MISSOULA MT 59804 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE WEST 1/2 OF LOT 4 AND THAT PART OF THE NEoNWo WEST OF THE BITTERROOT RIVER AND NORTHWEST OF HIGHWAY 93; AND THE E1⁄2NWoNWo; PART OF THE SEoNWo, NORTHWEST OF HIGHWAY 93, LYING IN TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M., ALSO DESCRIBED AS ALL THAT PORTION OF THE SEoNWo LYING NORTH OF HIGHWAY 93, STATE OF MONTANA, AND LOTS 3 AND 4 OF THE NWo OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, LESS THE RIGHT OF WAY FOR THE MONTANA STATE HIGHWAY NO. 93, MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 710 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 313 LESS AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE FOLLOWING; THE WEST HALF (W1/2) OF LOT 4, SECTION ONE (1), TOWNSHIP TWELVE (12) NORTH OF RANGE TWENTY (20) WEST, MONTANA PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 131 OF DEED RECORDS AT PAGE 103 The property tax lien exists because property taxes were not paid on the property. The property taxes became delinquent on June 1, 2010. Missoula County purchased the property tax lien at a tax sale on July 16, 2010. The lien was subsequently assigned to Tim Christensen, PO Box 1832, Missoula, MT 59806. By, law, you have a 36-month redemption period, beginning on the date of the Treasurer’s tax sale, during which you may pay ALL delinquent taxes, penalty, interest and county costs to stop the issuance of a tax deed. The period will end for your property on July 11, 2013. If the taxes, penalties, interest and costs are not paid as required by Law to the County Treasurer on or before August 5, 2013, the County Treasurer may then issue a tax deed to Tim Christensen by order of the County Commissioners. The amount of delinquent taxes, penalty, interest and cost owing as of the date of this notice is as follows: 2009-2012: $36,495.25 TITLE COSTS: $260.00 TOTAL DUE: $36,755.25 For the property tax lien to be liquidated, the total amount listed above must be paid by August 5, 2013. If all taxes, penalties, interest and cost are not paid on or before August 5, 2013, a tax deed will be issued on the following day, August 6, 2013. Dated this 6th day of June, 2013 Tim Christensen Notice of pending tax deed issuance to: Stillwaters Development, Inc. 501 N. Graham St. Suite 250 Portland, OR 97227, Missoula County Treasurer 200 West Broadway Missoula, MT 59802, Stillwaters Development, Inc. PO Box 6008 Portland, OR 97208-6008, Stillwaters Development, Inc. c/o Carrie M. Wood Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt, PC 1211 SW Fifth Avenue, Suite 1800 Portland, OR 97204, Jeri Fisher - Registered Agent Stillwaters Development, Inc. 1821 South Avenue West Suite 409

Missoula, MT 59801, Bitterroot Valley Bank Lolo Shopping Center P.O. Box 9 Lolo, MT 59847, Yellow Stone Fly LLC 501 N. Graham St. Suite 250 Portland, OR 97227, Jeri Fisher Registered Agent Yellow Stone Fly LLC 1821 South Avenue West Suite 409 Missoula, MT 59801 Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana Code Annotated, notice is hereby given: Please take notice that a property tax lien exists on the following described property in which you may have an interest. TAX ID #: 3855409 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: STILLWATERS ON THE CLARKFORK # 1, S09, T13 N, R20 W, Lot 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. The property tax lien exists because property taxes were not paid on the property. The property taxes became delinquent on June 1, 2010. Missoula County purchased the property tax lien at a tax sale on July 16, 2010. The lien was subsequently assigned to Tim Christensen, PO Box 1832, Missoula, MT 59806. By, law, you have a 36-month redemption period, beginning on the date of the Treasurer’s tax sale, during which you may pay ALL delinquent taxes, penalty, interest and county costs to stop the issuance of a tax deed. The period will end for your property on July 11, 2013. If the taxes, penalties, interest and costs are not paid as required by Law to the County Treasurer on or before August 5, 2013, the County Treasurer may then issue a tax deed to Tim Christensen by order of the County Commissioners. The amount of delinquent taxes, penalty, interest and cost owing as of the date of this notice is as follows: 2009-2012: $6330.28 TITLE COSTS: $181.00 TOTAL DUE: $6511.28 For the property tax lien to be liquidated, the total amount listed above must be paid by August 5, 2013. If all taxes, penalties, interest and cost are not paid on or before August 5, 2013, a tax deed will be issued on the following day, August 6, 2013. Dated this 6th day of June, 2013 Tim Christensen NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT AND AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to Section 71-1-301 et seq. of the Montana Code Annotated, the undersigned trustee hereby gives amended notice of a trustee’s sale to be held on the 18th day of July, 2013, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., at or near the south entrance to the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, Missoula, Montana. The sale date reflects postponement of the original sale date, made according to law. Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following-described real property located in Missoula County, Montana:The NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 and the SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 18, Township 12 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M, Missoula County, Montana; and A tract of land being in the SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 18, Township 12 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, Excepting Therefrom the E 1/4 of said tract previously conveyed by grantors to Judy D. Jones pursuant to an Order of the Missoula County Fourth Judicial District Court dated April 15, 1987 and recorded in Book 260 of Micro Records at Page 1021 and 1022 of Missoula County, Montana and that certain quit claim deed dated April 13, 1987 and recorded in Book 260 of Micro Records at Page 1023 of Missoula County, Montana. Recording Reference: Book 826 Micro Records, Page 954 Property Address: 7000 Graves Creek Road, Lolo, MT 59847 ESI #187, LLC, as exchange intermediary for owners Kella J. Babcock and John B. Leone, as Grantor, conveyed the above-described real property, and the improvements situated thereon, to First American Title Company of Missoula, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Stuart F. Larkin, Mary Jo Dunham, and Julie B. Oman, now known as Julie B. Crawley, who were designated as Beneficiary in a Montana Trust Indenture dated May 1, 2009, and recorded May 1, 2009 in Book 838 of Micro Records, Page 791, and as instrument No. 200910154, records of Missoula County, Montana. Said Trust Indenture anticipated and called for the transfer of the real property to Babcock and Leone, and their assumption of the obligations contained therein. The obligation secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture is now in default, in that payments on the promissory note secured by the Trust Indenture have not been made as required. Monthly payments of $3,101.20 which became due on November 1, 2012, December 1, 2012, and January 1, 2013, plus late charges and other charges are now due and owing. The total balance owing as of January 18, 2013 is the sum of $371,643.50, which amount includes principal and unpaid interest from October 10, 2012, inclusive of default interest rate. In addition, late fees, long term escrow fees, title/foreclosure guarantee expense, and legal expenses are due and owing; plus all additional accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, title expenses, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. In addition, Beneficiary is in default of terms and provisions contained in Section 23 of said Trust Indenture. In accordance with the provisions of the promissory note and Trust Indenture, the amount owing the Beneficiary has accelerated to the full remaining balance due under the terms of the Trust Indenture and promissory note, and Beneficiary has elected to sell the interest of ESI #187, LLC and its successors and assigns Kella J. Babcock and John B. Leone, and their successors and assigns, in and to the aforedescribed property, subject to all easements, restrictions, encumbrances or covenants existing of record at the time of the said Trust Indenture, to satisfy the obligation owing. Beneficiary has designated Chris Johnson, of Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C. a licensed Montana attorney, as Successor Trustee to conduct such sale proceedings. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Benefici-

ary and excepting only the Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. Bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding and no later than the end of business on the date of sale, in cash or cash equivalent (certified checks, cashier’s checks, or wire transfers). Conveyance will be by trustee’s deed without any representations or warranty, express or implied, with sale strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale noticed herein may not be terminated except by the tender to the Successor Trustee of all amounts in arrears due and owing to the date of such payment, together with all fees, costs and expenses of sale as incurred. Please contact the Successor Trustee prior to tender of any such payment to verify amounts owing. Those with an interest in the property and who appear from public record to be entitled to notification of these proceedings are: ESI #187, LLC P.O. Box 549 Missoula, MT 59801 Kella J. Babcock John B. Leone P.O. Box 224 Lolo, MT 59847 Kella J. Babcock John B. Leone 8000 Graves Creek Rd. Lolo, MT 59847 Kella J. Babcock John B. Leone 7177 Graves Creek Rd. Lolo, MT 59847 Kella J. Babcock John B. Leone 7000 Graves Creek Rd. Lolo, MT 59847 Occupant 7000 Graves Creek Rd. Lolo, MT 59847 Lumberjack Saloon, Inc. P.O. Box 224 Lolo, MT 59847 Farmers State Bank c/o Jennifer Caton 3130 N. Reserve St. Missoula, MT 59808 Trustee is unaware of any party in possession or claiming right to possession of the subject property other than those persons noticed herein. Trustee may postpone such sale by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. DATED this 3rd day of June, /s/ Chris Johnson, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA): ss. County of Missoula) This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 3rd day of June, 2013 by Chris Johnson, Successor Trustee. /s/ Susan D Schwarz Notary Public for State of Montana (seal) Residing at: Missoula, Montana My Commission expires: September 03, 2016. This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information received may be used for that purpose. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Homeword Board of Directors will hold their quarterly board meeting on Tuesday, June 25th, from 46pm at 1535 Liberty Lane, Ste 114. This meeting is open to the public. For further information, contact Kellie Battaglia, Homeword Operations and Program Director, at 532-4663 x12. If you have comments, please mail them to: Homeword, 1535 Liberty Lane, Ste 116A, Missoula, MT, 59808-2026. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 5, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main door of the First American Title Company located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 52 of Hidden Trail-Phase 1, a plated subdivision in Missoula County, Montana according to the official recorded plat thereof Derrek Spring, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 29, 2011 recorded October 4, 2011 in Book 883, Page 1028 under Document No. 201116601. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $869.22, beginning November 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 06, 2013 is $181,478.74 principal, interest at the rate of 3.875% now totaling $3,631.78, late charges in the amount of $130.38, escrow advances of $107.84, and other fees and expenses advanced of $63.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in

interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 22, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 22nd day of March, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase V Spring 41954.339 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to Section 71-1-301 et. seq. of the Montana Code Annotated, the undersigned Successor Trustee hereby gives notice of a trustee’s sale to be held on the 10th day of September, 2013 at 10:00 o’clock A.M., at the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, to sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following-described real property located in Missoula County, Montana: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 4313, located in the Northeast one-quarter of the Southwest onequarter of Section 8, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana Property Address: 3460 Grant Creek Road, Missoula, Montana Clawson, LLP, a Montana limited liability partnership, as Grantor, conveyed the above-described real property, and the improvements situated thereon, if any, to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation arising under a promissory note owed to CLS Mortgage, Inc. who was designated as Beneficiary, in a Deed of Trust dated January 13, 2011, and recorded on January 18, 2011 in Book 872 of Micro Records, Page 827, records of Missoula County, Montana in the principal sum of $300,000.00. CLS Mortgage, Inc. subsequently conveyed its interest to Dietzel Living Trust, Orval Dietzel and Darlene M. Dietzel, Trustees, Equity Trust Company, custodian FBO Darlene M. Dietzel Account #93579, Equity Trust Company Custodian FBO Orval W. Dietzel Account #100780, Waco Investments LLC, David W. Hanson, and Sherry A. Hanson by Assignment of Deed of Trust filed February 10, 2011 in Book 873 of Micro Records, Page 1016 and by Assignment of Deed of Trust filed February 25, 2011 in Book 874 of Micro Records, Page 594. By a Substitution of Trustee dated May 31, 2011, and recorded on June 20, 2011, in Book 879 at Page 210, records of Missoula County, Montana, the Beneficiaries substituted and appointed John K. Tabaracci, of Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C. a licensed Montana attorney, as Successor Trustee. The obligation secured by the aforementioned Deed of Trust is now in default, in that payments on the promissory note secured by the Deed of Trust have not been made as required. As of the 18th day of April, 2013, the balance owing on the promissory note secured by the Deed of Trust is $396,872.57, which amount includes principal and interest, late charges, and escrow fees owing. Interest continues to accrue at the rate as set out in the promissory note, until paid, plus all additional accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, title expenses, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Deed of Trust. In accordance with the provisions of the promissory note and Deed of Trust, the Beneficiaries have elected to accelerate the full remaining balance due under the terms of the Deed of Trust and promissory note and to sell the interest of the original Grantor, its successors and assigns, in and to the property described above, subject to all easements, restrictions, encumbrances or covenants existing of record at the time of the said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the remaining obligation owed. Beneficiaries have designated the Successor Trustee to conduct such sale proceedings. The sale noticed herein may be terminated and the Deed of Trust and Promissory Note obligation reinstated by the tender to the Successor Trustee of all amounts in arrears to the date of payment, together with all fees, costs and expenses of sale as incurred. Please contact the Successor Trustee prior to tender of any such payment to verify amounts owing. Those with an interest in the property and who appear from public record to be entitled to notification of these proceedings are as follows: Clawson, LLP, a Montana Limited Liability Partnership 3460 Grant Creek Road Missoula, MT 59808 Clawson, LLP, a Montana Limited Liability Partnership P.O. Box 17557 Missoula, MT 59808 Eugene H. Clawson, Jr. P.O. Box 17557 Missoula, MT 59808 James M. Clawson P.O. Box 17557 Missoula, MT 59808 Trustee is unaware of any party in possession or claiming right to possession of the subject property other than those persons noticed herein. DATED this 19th day of April, 2013. /s/ John K. Tabaracci, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA ): ss. County of Missoula ) This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 19th day of April, 2013, by John K. Tabaracci, Successor Trustee. /s/ Michelle M. Fontaine Notary Public for State of Montana Residing at Bonner, Montana My Commission


PUBLIC NOTICES Expires February 04, 2017 Recording Reference 201307569 B: 911 P: 935 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/12/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200813255, B: 820 P: 833 and Modified November 15, 2011 as Instrument No. 201119208 B: 885 P: 835, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Matthew D. Stafford was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The North 71.4 feet of Lots 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 in Block 72 of School Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201200134 B: 887 P: 1011, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 16, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $330,214.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $299,905.80, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 26, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7021.14624) 1002.247602-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/31/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200723791 Bk 805 Pg 797, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Bruce A Hart and Stephanie A Hart husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Financial Montana, Inc was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 8 in Block 9 of Lake View Addition, a Platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/06/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 17, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $241,241.74. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $215,660.12, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 28, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately

upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.19077) 1002.247650-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/27/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200907164 B: 836 P: 599, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Gregory D Zimmerman and Becky Jo Zimmerman, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp., its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 117 of Piney Meadows, a platted subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201114750 B:882 P:577, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 12/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 18, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $263,112.97. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $221,026.02, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 29, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16998) 1002.247824-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/09/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200810219 B:818 P:595, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Robert D Muscutt was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and American Pioneer Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded American Pioneer Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 21 of Bitterroot Meadows, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201117607 B: 884 P: 634, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to The Bank of New York Mellon FKA the Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders of the CWABS INC., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-22. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”)

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s "Product Placement” – we’ll just slip this in there.

400 West Broadway #206 • $239,000 MLS #20133489

• 2 bed, 2 bath downtown condo • Efficient kitchen design • Floor-to-ceiling windows for city, river & Lolo Peak views secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 19, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $338,147.06. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $241,919.08, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 29, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 15, 73, 237, 239, 358, 480, 489, 510, 602 and 639. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, June 24,, 2013. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, June, 27, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16984) 1002.248255-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/20/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200904055 B:834 P:288, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kristin A. Brueck and Barton A. Brueck, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC was Beneficiary and Title Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property

by Matt Jones

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 4 in Hurt First Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official Plat of record in Book 17 of Plats at Page 41. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201003037 B: 855 P: 520, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 24, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $232,274.26. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $219,755.49, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if

LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The City of Missoula Design Review Board will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following applications: A request from EPCON Sign Group; Signs as Part of Building for Towneplace Suites by Marriott, located at 3055 Stockyard Rd. (SEE MAP P).

THE MISSOULA BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will be conducting a public hearing at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 in Room B14 of the County Admin Building, located at 199 W. Pine Street in Missoula, MT on the following item: 1. A request by Gerald Zieg for a 6.8 foot side yard setback variance for a single family home on Lot 60 of Dinsmore’s Orchard Homes No. 4, zoned ZD #9. See map D.

Your attendance and your comments are welcome and encouraged. E-mails can be sent to kcolenso@ci.missoula.mt.us. Project files may be viewed at the Missoula Development Services at 435 Ryman St., Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 552-6636. The City of Missoula will provide auxiliary aids and services.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling Missoula County Community and Planning Services (formerly Office of Planning and Grants) at 2584657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the variance request you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us

ACROSS

1 ___ fate 6 "Rated ___ 'General Audience'" 10 Dutch tourist attraction 14 Poker variant named for a city 15 "First lady of song" Fitzgerald 16 High point 17 "___ Tag!" 18 Ship of agreeing fools? 20 Duck or elephant silhouette on the wall? 22 ___-Coburg and Gotha (royal house of Europe) 23 "Affirmative" 24 Rum cake 27 Texting sign-off 30 Field animal's harness 34 Astronomy muse 36 Assistant 39 Mitochondrial material 40 Person who can't enjoy great evenings out? 43 Chou En-___ 44 900-line psychic Miss ___ 45 Like grunt work 46 "To be," to Brutus 48 Cobra Kai, for one 50 "Bill & ___ Excellent Adventure" 51 Tease 54 "For ___ in My Life" (Stevie Wonder) 56 "And so this foul vixen kept me broadcasting for years" response? 63 Guy who walks through water? 64 Company with a famous joystick 65 Hot spot? 66 Egg, in Latin 67 Kind of criminal 68 Vera of gowns 69 Idee ___ 70 October option

DOWN

1 "Animal House" chant 2 Big birds 3 Adding and such 4 Long-tailed game bird 5 Blue material in movies and musicals, for short 6 Jump in the pool 7 ___ powder (traveling substance for Harry Potter) 8 "Lemony Snicket" evil count 9 Australian actress Mitchell 10 Coleman of "Nine to Five" 11 Apple MP3 player 12 New Zealand parrots 13 Abbr. after a phone no. 19 Kermit-flailing-his-arms noise 21 Jamaican stew ingredient 24 Crooner Michael 25 Fields 26 Cornerstone 28 Tumblr purchaser of May 2013 29 Brightened up 31 "Live Free ___" (New Hampshire motto) 32 Deal with dough 33 British noblemen 35 Firm ending? 37 Focus of an exorcise plan? 38 Part of NYE 41 Dropout's alternative 42 Termite targeter 47 Blowing it 49 Quest leader's plea 52 Quality ___ 53 "___ Bones" (Stephen King novel) 55 Artfulness 56 "___ Nagila" 57 Fall garden? 58 It was only VII years ago 59 Evian waters 60 Flamboyant surrealist 61 ___-Z ('80s muscle car) 62 "Old MacDonald" noise 63 "That's so cool!"

Last week’s solution

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

[C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 3, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.104323) 1002.248467-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/15/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200821375 B: 826 P: 559, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Brian P. Wardner and Samantha J. Wardner, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 16 in Block 4 of Spring Hills Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 23, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $199,630.43. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $189,124.38, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 3, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.104981) 1002.248430File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/20/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200615081, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Michael A. Lowe, Linda K. Lowe, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for AHM Mortgage, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Western Title & Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title & Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 89 of Maloney Ranch Phase VII, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201223795, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee,

successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association, as Trustee, successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates WMALT Series 2006-8 Trust. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 26, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $219,046.45. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $211,537.10, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 9, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.102411) 1002.248830-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/30/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200817900 B: 823 P: 1281, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Chad R Day was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Charles J Peterson was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J Peterson as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot A108 of Windsor Park Phase V, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201202536 B: 889 P: 613, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. F/K/A Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 29, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $242,804.30. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $189,000.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 9, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and can-

cellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.17144) 1002.248638-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/07/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200517167 Bk 755 Pg 1215, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Scott Knight, and Billie Anne Knight was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., it successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 in Block 4 of Wapikiya Addition No. 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201111169 B: 879 P: 1184, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A. successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of May 2, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $164,117.07. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $152,879.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16382) 1002.248685-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/10/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200801007 Bk-811 Pg-1240, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Douglas T. Kiewatt and Ronda R. Kiewatt, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage, LLC., its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., a Corporation was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., a Corporation as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: Tract 15A of Certificate of Survey No. 1877, located in Section 28, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Parcel II: Together with a non-exclusive easement for private road and public utility purposes as shown on Certificate of Survey No. 1608. Further together with a non-exclusive easement for private road and public utility purposes as shown on Certificate of Survey No. 1877. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201218558 B:900 P:1235, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of April 30, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $276,437.89. This amount includes the out-

[C8] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

standing principal balance of $192,678.17, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on September 10, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.17000) 1002.248855-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 12, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 19 IN BLOCK 5 OF LINDA VISTA FIRST SUPPLEMENT, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Richard M Medeiros and Alyssia M Medeiros, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to American Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corp., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on October 6, 2004 and recorded on October 13, 2004 on Book 741 at Page 747 as Document No. 200429159. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association successor by merger Chase Home Finance LLC, successor by merger to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $983.16, beginning March 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 1, 2013 is $148,662.77 principal, interest at the rate of 5.999% now totaling $20,090.56, late charges in the amount of $294.96, escrow advances of $8,274.77, and other fees and expenses advanced of $411.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.43 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OB-

TAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 3, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 3rd day of April, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Jpmc/Medeiros – 41954.928 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 12, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 7 OF KELLY ISLAND ESTATES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISON IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Michael J Riska and Vicki L Riska, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 12, 2009 and recorded March 17, 2009 in Bk-835, Pg-692 under Document No. 200905858. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. is the Trustee. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,576.94, beginning July 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 28, 2013 is $375,559.71 principal, interest at the rate of 5.125% now totaling $14,811.19, late charges in the amount of $861.20, and expenses advanced of $1,393.35, plus accruing interest at the rate of $53.47 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 5, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 5th day of April, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Guild V Riska 41291.450 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 12, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 18 OF HIDDEN TRAIL- PHASE 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Lutoria E. Riechers, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Regis-

tration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 4, 2008 and recorded September 5, 2008 in book 825, page 1303, under document number 200820720. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,237.14, beginning November 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 26, 2013 is $181,643.83 principal, interest at the rate of 6.75% now totaling $7,003.89, escrow advances of $571.05, suspense balance of $585.82 and other fees and expenses advanced of $49.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $33.59 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 3, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 3rd day of April, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Chase Vs. Riechers 42062.012 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 16, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 2 of Orchard Garden Subdivision, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. TOGETHER WITH a 15 foot wide private sewer and private utility service easement as shown on Lot 1 of the plat of Orchard Garden, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana. Raymond A. Sprano Jr. and Carol L. Sprano, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 6, 2010 and recorded January 11, 2010 in Book 853, on Page 863, under Document No. 201000582. The beneficial interest is currently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,117.19, beginning January 1, 2012; and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of MAY 3, 2012 is $205,144.01 principal, interest at the rate of 4.875% now totaling $15,001.20, late charges in the amount of $179.64, escrow advances of

$4,692.31, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,798.29, plus accruing interest at the rate of $27.40 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the Sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 17, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 17th day of April, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 5-26-2015 Boa Vs. Sprano 42048.427 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 5, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 1 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3643 A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. A.P.N.: 1194200 Charles L. Harnist Jr. and Kirstie Jo Harnist, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated February 09, 2006 and Recorded on February 22, 2006 in Book 769, Page 559 under Document # 200604097. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Certificateholders of Bear Steams Asset Backed Securities I LLC, Asset Backed-Certificates, Series 2006-HE5. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,943.50, beginning November 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 15, 2013 is $234,875.52 principal, interest at the rate of 9.0% now totaling $71,295.62, late charges in the amount of $1,323.32, escrow advances of $9,875.88, and other fees and expenses advanced of $5,055.77, plus accruing interest at the rate of $57.91 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the


PUBLIC NOTICES close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 27, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 27th day of March, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shauna Romrell Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 06/04/2016 Chase Vs. Harnist 41206.438 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on August 5, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 IN BLOCK 2 OF MILLER CREEK VIEW ADDITION-PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. William L. Ekren and Amy E. Ekren, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated November 28, 2007 and recorded November 30, 2007 in book 809, page 982, under document number 200731081. The beneficial interest is currently held by Bank of American, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,409.66, beginning December 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 21, 2013 is $220,042.95 principal, interest at the rate

of 6.125% now totaling $17,585.60, escrow advances of $3,753.67, and other fees and expenses advanced of $37.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $36.93 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 2, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 2nd day of April, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Boa Vs. Ekren 42048.324

ficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 26, 2002, and Recorded June 28, 2002 in Book 684, Page 752, under Document No. 200218611. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association as successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank fka Washington Mutual Bank, FA. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $250.29, beginning November 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 31, 2013 is $72,344.78 principal, interest at the rate of 2.58900% now totaling $936.48, late charges in the amount of $75.06, suspense balance of $-399.82 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,671.61, plus accruing interest at the rate of $5.13 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may

be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 13, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 13th day of March, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 ChasevWeber 41816.174 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 30, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND BEING LOCATED IN THE SOUTH ONE-HALF OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 9A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1725. #005821635 Craig Puccinelli and Jolanda Puccinelli, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Fremont Investment & Loan, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 25, 2001 and Recorded on April 30, 2001 in Bk650, Pg-43, under Document No. 200108926. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMC Specialty Mortgage LLC f/k/a WM Specialty Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $881.96, beginning December 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of April 05, 2013 is $96,469.08 principal, interest at the rate of 9.250% now totaling $21,687.22, late charges in the amount of $54.95, escrow advances of $5,827.02, suspense balance of $-498.20 and other fees and expenses

advanced of $9,067.77, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.45 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 22, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 22nd day of March, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs. puccinelli

SUSTAINAFIEDS

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 22, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6A OF RIVER ROAD ESTATES LOTS 6A & 7A, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Theodore D Weber, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, a Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Washington Mutual Bank FSB, a Federal Association, as Bene-

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CLEANING Kitchen Deep Clean $150-$200. Includes cupboards, drawers and appliances. Inside and out, top to bottom. RC Services 241-0101 www.rcservices.info THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on August 13, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 1 in Block B of Meadowlark Addition No. 1 a platted SUBDVISION in Missoula County, Montana, according to official recorded plat thereof Chris Latray and Julia M. Latray, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronics Registration Systems, INC, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated February 17, 2009 recorded on February 23, 2009, Book 833 Page 1344 as Document No. 200903712. The beneficial interest is currently held by EverBank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,032.73, beginning December 1, 2012 and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 29, 2013 is $181,240.54 principal, interest at the rate of 5.00% now totaling $3,775.85, late charges in the amount of $394.99, and other fees and expenses advanced of $788.24, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.83 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if

APARTMENTS

SOLAR ACTIVE HOME

369-0940 or 642-6863

1 bedroom, 1 bath, $575, quiet culde-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

• Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels

www.naturalhousebuilder.net

1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING Able Garden Design & Services LLC Full-service Commercial/Residential Lawn Care & Garden Maintenance. Competitive pricing. Call Rik 406-549-3667

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient SOLAR ACTIVE HOME • Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels. 369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

MISCELLANEOUS POST 27 HALL IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENTING. $350* (*$450 w/ band) Per Day +$200 refundable Cleaning/Damage Deposit. Capacity 299 people. Chairs, tables, etc. included. Wet Bar with large round tables, two

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58” TV’s with plugins. Floating wood floor installed on dance floor and bar area. **Very Special Rate for Post 27 and Auxiliary Members** American Legion Hellgate Post 27. 825 Ronan St., Missoula. 406-543-7391

PERSONAL $45/hour Deep Tissue Massage. Zoo City Massage located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131 to schedule an appointment. zoocitymassage.com.

any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: April 9, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 9th day of April, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Everhome Vs. Latray 41470.995 RFQ Broadband Feasibility Next Generation Broadband Feasibility Study. The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD), Inc. is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit qualifications to perform a joint City of Missoula-Missoula County analysis of how local government can help develop affordable, high-capacity (gigabit or greater) broadband infrastructure. Up to $50,000 is available for this project. Proposals are due June 24, 2013. Access the full Request for Qualifications at www.bredd.org. Contact Kelly Yarns at kyarns@bredd.org or 406-258-3434 with questions.

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 721-7744

RENTALS 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $550, across from Public Library, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

SERVICES CHILDCARE

41916.429

1304 1st: 1 bedroom, new carpet & lino, FREE CABLE, second floor, small pet OK! $575. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106. 1409 S. 3rd West: 1 bedroom, private deck, storage, laundry, heat & cable paid, $595. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1805 Phillips. 1 bedroom $666 h/w/s/g paid. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org 2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome, $750 W/D in unit, carport, DW, microwave S/G paid. Cat Upon Approval. No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 448 Washington 1bed/1bath, downtown location, off-street parking, coinops on site, cat? $700. Grizzly

Property Management 542-2060 807 SW Higgins: 1 bedroom, base of southhills, FREE CABLE, cat welcome, $525. Garden City Property Management 549-6106. 825 SW Higgins Ave. B7. 2 bed/1 bath, single garage, DW, W/D hookups, near Pattee Creek Market $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Fireweed Apartments. 3 bedroom $695 w/s/g paid. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org Garden District. 2 bedroom $580 w/s/g paid. Washer/dryer included. Contact Jordan Lyons at 406-5494113, ext. 127., jlyons@missoulahousing.org Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bedroom $691 all utilities paid. 3 bedroom $798 all utilities paid. Contact Jordan Lyons at 406-549-4113, ext. 127 or jlyons@missoulahousing.org Orchard Gardens 1-bedroom, $572/month, all utilities included. Contact Jordan Lyons at Missoula Housing Authority 406-549-4113 ext. 127. jlyons@missoulahousing.org Palace Apartments. (2) 2 bedrooms $527-$659/$650 deposit. (3) 1 bedrooms $553-$665/$550 deposit. Contact Matt Reed at 406-549-4113, ext. 130. mreed@missoulahousing.org Solstice Apartments. 1 bedroom units available. $500-$517. W/S/G paid. 2 bedroom $725 W/S/G paid. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Colin Woodrow at 406-549-4113, ext. 113 or cwoodrow@missoulahousing.org Studio $475. North Russell, separate room for bedroom, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

[C9]


RENTALS DUPLEXES 1016 Charlo St. #1. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, shared yard, cat? $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

119 Turner Ct. #4. 2 bed/1 bath, close to Northside Park, W/D hookups

and storage unit, pet? $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

$900. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1708 Scott St. “B” 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, W/D hookups, all utilities paid. $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN

2423 55th St. “A” 3 bed/1 bath, shared yard, single garage, South Hills.

11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coin-ops, central location in Lolo. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 121 Ridgeway: Lolo 2 bedroom, onsite laundry, fenced yard, parking, gas heat, $525. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

2 bedroom, 1 bath $595 (in Lolo), DW, hardwood floors, off-street parking, coin-op laundry, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

HOUSES 1303 Linnea Lane 4 bed/2.5 bath, single garage, DW, W/D hookups, newer

3901 O’Leary: 1 bedroom, 2nd floor, laundry, storage, private deck, heat & cable paid, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 5496106. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP AND $300 GIFT CARD.

1&2

MOBILE HOMES

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

Rent Incentive

251-4707

549-7711 Check our website!

107 Johnson 1 Bed Apt. $485/month

www.alpharealestate.com

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

www.gatewestrentals.com

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

FIDELITY

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

home, central location, pet? $1300. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

Visit our website at fidelityproperty.com

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den"

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Finalist

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1010 Vine $179,900.Wonderful lower Rattlesnake home close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM and downtown. Home includes many updates. Don’t miss out on this Rattlesnake gem. Properties 2000. Call Pat for more info or a tour today: 406 -240-7653 www.1010vinest.epropertysites.com 1010 Vine. 2 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM & downtown. Many upgrades. $179,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240—7653. pat@properties 2000.com 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1815 West Central. 3 bed, 2 bath centrally located home with updated kitchen, hardwood floors, large fenced yard & shop. $240,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 5417355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 2 Bdr, 1 Bath Northside home. $182,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Northside home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2365 Village Square. 2 bed, 1 bath with fenced yard, patio & single garage. $159,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2607 Deer Canyon Court. 6 bed, 3 bath on Prospect Meadows cul-de-sac.

2000. Call Dean Ross for more details-239-4726. www.3200Jack. uCanBuyMe.com

Fenced yard, deck, hot tub and sweeping views. $465,000. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

3324 West Central. 4 bed, 2.5 bath with open kitchen, covered patio & 2 car garage. $271,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Grant Creek / Prospect Meadows home. $459,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Big Flat home on 5.3 acres. $475,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Rose Park/Slant St home. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on 5 acres in Target Range. Borders DNRC land. $499,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres overlooking Clark Fork River. Missoula Valley and Mission Mountain views. $420,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free com-

RICE TEAM

4834 Scott Allen Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath 4level on approximately 1/3 beautifully landscaped acre. $372,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

3200 Jack Drive $315,000. Just listedDon’t miss out! Amazing, well-maintained lower Linda Vista home. 5 bedrooms 3 baths, plus an additional office. Beautifully landscaped, extra off street parking. Storage abundance inside & out w/huge deck. Properties

6301 Hillview. 5 bed, 3.5 bath with 360 degree South Hills views. Game

THE UPTOWN FLATS Unit #103 One bedroom, one bath with full washer and dryer. Handicap accessible unit. Ask Anne About The Great Invest-

$155,000

ment Opportunities In This Highly Sought-After Condo Development Call Anne for more details CloseTo Downtown Missoula

546-5816

room, 2 gas fireplaces & 3 car garage. $399,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmailcom

theuptownflatsmissoula.com

Anne Jablonski annierealtor@gmail.com movemontana.com

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

[C10] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

Robin Rice 240-6503

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

102 Boardwalk • $285,000 Great Stevensville property with beautifully landscaped yard. Lot is zoned commercial with heated 48'x30' shop with three 10’ x 9' doors and benches and shelves. Wired for 220 50 amp for welder and a 30 amp 220 for air compressor. PRICE REDUCED! 11082 Cherokee Lane, Lolo. $245,000. 3 bed, 3 bath, well-maintained. Pergo floors throughout the upstairs. Large deck with great view of the Lolo Valley. Fenced yard with amazing landscaping & mature trees.

PRICE REDUCED! SELLER MOTIVATED! 13465 Crystal Creek $244,000 3 bed, 2 bath well-maintained with mature landscaping. Two wood stoves, large deck & bonus room for small shop.

23645 Mullan $169,900 Beautiful 14 acre building lot on Mullan Road in Huson

4834 Scott Allen Drive $327,500 4 bed, 3 bath multilevel Light & bright 3,500 sq\ft. 2 car garage & 3 storage sheds

1815 West Central $240,000 3 bed, 2 bath with updated kitchen & baths, wood floors, 24x30 shop and fenced yard

5905 Ocean View $315,000 4 bed 3 bath on 1.63 acres in Clinton. 3 fireplaces, 2 car garage & many updates

11689 Stolen Rock, Frenchtown $319,000 5 bed, 3 bath on over 3 acres Great valley & mountain views


REAL ESTATE parative market analysis. 360-8234 Fantastic Lewis and Clark Area Home 130 Fairview. $265,000, 4 bedroom, 2 bath. Close to schools, downtown, University, hiking, biking, shopping. The basement has been recently remodeled, with new egress windows, bathroom, and carpet. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Farm House On 1/2 Lot In Town 203 N Curtis. 4 bed, 2 bath home so conveniently located near bike trails and Good Food Store. Great lot, great home, great big shop! $199,500. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com HISTORIC STEVENSVILLE Historic Stevensville town charmer come see this first time on the market home in Montana’s oldest town. 3 bedrooms and two baths on one level. Custom high-end remodel done in 2012 on this 12 year old home. In floor radiant heating throughout the home and the oversized finished garage. Large “cook’s” kitchen offers all stainless steel “LG” brand appliances and glass door cabinets. All new master bath offers glass and stone tile, smooth sides “toto” brand toliet, spacious custom tiled oversized shower enclosed in glass and double on counter vessel sinks. New carpet, decorator paint and lighting throughout. oversized fenced yard with mature lawns and landscaping all on auto sprinklers and drip system. very low property taxes. ski, hike, fish, ride & hunt all offered in the National Forest surrounding the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. Call: 310-889-4448. . Location Location Location! 1289 River Street: 4 bed, 2 bath newer home near the river, bike trails, Good Food Store, Home Resource and more! This location rocks! $219,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Newer University Home 327 Eddy. Custom, Lonski built, 3 bed, 2.5 bath home in the heart of the U District! Small footprint, large personality,

tons of character and such a great floor plan with lots of light and character. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

with fenced yard, patio & single garage. $159,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

home. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Rose Park Cottage 403 Mount. Under Contract- Accepting Back Up Offers. 4 bedroom, 1 bath. New windows, newly refinished hardwood floors, new kitchen flooring, new paint, newer roof and furnace. $227,500 Call KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com 1010 Vine $179,900.Wonderful lower Rattlesnake home close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM and downtown. Home includes many updates. Don’t miss out on this Rattlesnake gem. Properties 2000. Call Pat for more info or a tour today: 406 -240-7653 www.1010vinest.epropertysites.com

2607 Deer Canyon Court. 6 bed, 3 bath on Prospect Meadows cul-de-sac. Fenced yard, deck, hot tub and sweeping views. $465,000. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

4834 Scott Allen Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath 4level on approximately 1/3 beautifully landscaped acre. $372,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

1010 Vine. 2 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM & downtown. Many upgrades. $179,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240—7653. pat@properties 2000.com 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1815 West Central. 3 bed, 2 bath centrally located home with updated kitchen, hardwood floors, large fenced yard & shop. $240,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 5417355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 2 Bdr, 1 Bath Northside home. $182,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Northside home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2365 Village Square. 2 bed, 1 bath

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

6301 Hillview. 5 bed, 3.5 bath with 360 degree South Hills views. Game room, 2 gas fireplaces & 3 car garage. $399,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmailcom

3 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Big Flat home on 5.3 acres. $475,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on 5 acres in Target Range. Borders DNRC land. $499,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres overlooking Clark Fork River. Missoula Valley and Mission Mountain views. $420,000. Pat Mc-

3200 Jack Drive $315,000. Just listedDon’t miss out! Amazing, well-maintained lower Linda Vista home. 5 bedrooms 3 baths, plus an additional office. Beautifully landscaped, extra off street parking. Storage abundance inside & out w/huge deck. Properties 2000. Call Dean Ross for more details-239-4726. www.3200Jack. uCanBuyMe.com

4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Rose Park/Slant St

,SQIPSERW[MXL WXVIIXWQEVXW 'LYGO7GLQEYX^6IEP)WXEXI0SER3JJMGIV

21079-

Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234

OPEN HOUSE • SUNDAY, JUNE 23 • 1-4 1090 Mecate Lane, Potomac

bath offers glass and stone tile, smooth sides “toto” brand toliet, spacious custom tiled oversized shower enclosed in glass and double on counter vessel sinks. New carpet, decorator paint and lighting throughout. oversized fenced yard with

Farm House On 1/2 Lot In Town 203 N Curtis. 4 bed, 2 bath home so conveniently located near bike trails and Good Food Store. Great lot, great home, great big shop! $199,500. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com HISTORIC STEVENSVILLE Historic Stevensville town charmer come see this first time on the market home in Montana’s oldest town. 3 bedrooms and two baths on one level. Custom high-end re-

MLS #20132371

PRICE REDUCTION! $295,000

Very cute 3 bed, 2 bath country home with double garage only 20 minutes from town. Perfectly situated for country privacy on 6.62 acres

406.239.2049

Broker/Owner

jeannette@montana.com

400 W Broadway #206 MLS#20133489 $239,000 Fantastic downtown condo near St. Patrick Hospital, the courthouse, and Caras Park. Enjoy the urban lifestyle with over 1,400 sq.ft. of living space. The floor to ceiling windows in the living room provides exceptional views of the cityscape, river, and Lolo Peak.

Call Pat McCormick for details 240-7653 2500 Larch Camp Rd. MLS#20132135 $689,000

6IEP)WXEXI0IRHMRK'IRXIV`+EVJMIPH` GWGLQEYX^$JWFQWPEGSQ

model done in 2012 on this 12 year old home. In floor radiant heating throughout the home and the oversized finished garage. Large “cook’s” kitchen offers all stainless steel “LG” brand appliances and glass door cabinets. All new master

Fantastic Lewis and Clark Area Home 130 Fairview. $265,000, 4 bedroom, 2 bath. Close to schools, downtown, University, hiking, biking, shopping. The basement has been recently remodeled, with new egress windows, bathroom, and carpet. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

11580 Sleeman Creek, Lolo

3324 West Central. 4 bed, 2.5 bath with open kitchen, covered patio & 2 car garage. $271,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Grant Creek / Prospect Meadows home. $459,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Cormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

The best of both worlds; country feel with easy access to Missoula. Enjoy the peace and quiet of this 5 bedroom, 3 bath home situated just over 4 acres has been lovingly remodeled. The kitchen is a cooks delight with tons of storage, great cabinetry and beautiful granite countertops. The dining and living room share a two sided fireplace to create a wonderful entertaining area. The windows are perfectly sited to take in the view of the Missoula Valley.

Call Steve Schultz for details 240-1075

4920 Christian Dr. MLS#20130290 $289,900 Lots of living and storage space with great views of Missoula. Main level living with W/D off the kitchen. Three bedrooms & two baths on the main level. Lower level has a large bonus area for you to create your own space. Three car garage for extra storage and/or to get your toys out of the weather.

Call Paula Crews for detail 360-8655 5604 Bridger #19 MLS#20133428 $139,000 GREAT INVESTMENT!! This southside condo has been updated recently with fresh paint & new flooring. Spacious main floor with fireplace, open layout and vaulted ceiling. Large bonus room in the basement with closet & egress window. Nice appliance package, tile countertops and ample cabinet storage with pantry. Enjoy the views from the deck or have a quiet evening on the patio.

Call Pat Dauenhauer for details 406-240-2442

$400,000 Gated 5 bed, 4 bath homestead on 40 acres bordering Lubrecht Forest. Greenhouse, yurt, gardens, chicken coop, finished 40’ x 60’ heated shop and numerous green features.

Call me today! 406.239.2049

jeannette@montana.com

missoulanews.com • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

[C11]


REAL ESTATE mature lawns and landscaping all on auto sprinklers and drip system. very low property taxes. ski, hike, fish, ride & hunt all offered in the National Forest surrounding the beautiful Bitterroot Valley. Call: 310-889-4448. .

526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $120,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

Location Location Location! 1289 River Street: 4 bed, 2 bath newer home near the river, bike trails, Good Food Store, Home Resource and more! This location rocks! $219,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

5604 Bridger Ct #19 $139,000. GREAT INVESTMENT!! This 3 bd/2.5 ba southside condo has been updated with fresh paint & new flooring. Spacious main floor with fireplace, open layout and vaulted ceiling. Properties 2000. Call Pat @ 406-240-2442 for more information on lease amounts or to schedule a showing.

Newer University Home 327 Eddy. Custom, Lonski built, 3 bed, 2.5 bath home in the heart of the U District! Small footprint, large personality, tons of character and such a great floor plan with lots of light and character. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Rose Park Cottage 403 Mount. Under Contract- Accepting Back Up Offers. 4 bedroom, 1 bath. New windows, newly refinished hardwood floors, new kitchen flooring, new paint, newer roof and furnace. $227,500 Call KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1725A Park Place. 3 bed, 1.5 bath with central air, single garage, fenced yard with patio and no HOA fees. $145,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com 1845 B West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. Large, open kitchen, patio & garage. No HOA dues! $158,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 400 West Broadway #206. 2 bed, 2 bath downtown condo with great river and Lolo Peak views. $239,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653

6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 6632 MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath with gas fireplace, Jacuzzi and wonderful views. $273,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Bistro cafe and Missoula Food Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

dream cabin on Flathead Lake. Visit: www.FlatheadLakeLot.uCanBuyMe.co m. Properties 2000, Call Kris Hawkins 396-6542.

downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

531 Minnesota. Building Lot 9. $55,000. Robin Rice Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit

East Missoula Building Lot Sweet lot with mature trees and a great middle of town location. $55,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Georgetown Lake Make Offer Easy year-round access on Elk Meadows Road. Lot 1 2.97ac; Lot 2 2.25ac; Lot 3 6.0ac with 3 septic sites approved; also vacation rental cabin on 2ac that produces $20,000 income annually. Great location, best prices at Georgetown, lets make a deal! 5464797

LAND FOR SALE

Near Riverfront Park. 1265 Dakota #B. To-be-built, 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Lot: $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

38487 Dandelion Lane, Polson, $485,000. 129’ of Flathead Lake Frontage. 2.94 acres w/views across the lake of the Mission Mountains. Property is split into 2 separate parcels. Great spot to build your

NHN Bear Creek Road $225,000. Beautiful views from this desired west side property. 20.53 acre property with great access just off of a paved road. Fenced, septic, and irrigation water rights. Properties 2000. Call Kristin Larson (406)6727030

1845 B West Central $158,900

NHN Lewis and Clark Drive, Lolo, $39,000. Unzoned building lot in Lolo. Lolo services are available. Has been pasture in the past. Take a look at this for your spring building project. Property is unzoned so you can be creative. Partially in the flood plain so check with the flood plain administrator on any additional requirements. Properties 2000. Call Steve Schultz for details 240-1075. NHN Mormon Creek Road. 12 acres with Sapphire Mountain views. $150,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties.2000.com Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpetrealty.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES MLS# 20132764 3 bed, 1.5 bath 2 story townhome with open floor plan on quiet cul-de-sac. AC, UG sprinklers, patio & garage. No HOA fees! For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $83,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

COMMERCIAL 514 West Spruce. Great office space in vintage building near St. Pat’s. Upgrades to wiring, plumbing, roof & more. $244,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the awardwinning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and

[C12] Missoula Independent • June 20 – June 27 , 2013

www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN 102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on almost 3 acres with large 48’x30’ heated shop. $285,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties, 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net 11082 Cherokee Lane, Lolo. 3 bed, 3 bath with basement, deck, 2 car garage & fantastic views. $245,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net 13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves & 2 car garage. $244,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 15000 Neil Drive, Lolo. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with covered decks & 2 car garage close to Lolo Creek & Forest Service land. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $460,000.

Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 366 Haley Ct., Stevensville $250,000. Amazing use of space within and outside to enjoy your new home. Main level offers four nice sized bedroom, two bathroom with granite vanities & stainless steel appliances in the kitchen. Geothermal Heating and Cooling system. Privacy fence and underground sprinklers throughout the property. Properties 2000. Call Paula Crews for more details 360-8655 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

Blackfoot River Corridor 19500 Highway 200 East. 2 acres, beautiful newer 2 story, 3 bed, 2.5 bath home across the road from the river and set back in the trees with lovely landscaped yard. Attached garage and detached enormous insulated shop. KD: 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Gorgeous Wooded Property Bordering Forest Service Land 17290 Remount, Huson. $190,000. 2 bedroom, 3 bath, 2.4 acres. Remodeled bedrooms with laminate floors, updated bathroom, newer windows and added insulation. A hop skip and a jump from the freeway. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com LotB MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900.

Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net Potomac Log Cabin 1961 Blaine, Potomac. $200,000. 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 8.77 acres. Light-filled log cabin with an open floor plan with high ceilings and large windows. Hiking in the summer and sled hill in the winter! KD: 2405227 porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL Looking for a local mortgage lender? Call Lisa Holcomb, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Cell: 406-370-8792 or Office: 258-7519

2316 Craftsman Place

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com 5000 Schuman, Florence $350,000. Only 30 minutes from town, a natural paradise, large ranches on 3 sides, very private, cross fenced & large pole barn. 3bed/2bath home on 80 acres. Properties 2000. Call Don Sokoloski 544-7830. 5905 Ocean View, Clinton. 4 bed, 3 bath on 1.63 acres with 3 fireplaces, 2 car garage and many new improvements. $300,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

$234,500 • Darling 2-story, 3 bed, 1.5 bath home. • Fenced back yard. Insulated two car garage. • UG sprinklers and AC too!


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Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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