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MUSIC

BITTERROOT RESIDENT HUEY LEWIS REFLECTS ON FAME AND POP MUSIC 30 YEARS AFTER RELEASING SPORTS

HEALTH NEWS PARTNERSHIP HIT WITH 6 LAWSUITS

WITH FILM HANGIN’ LEVON HELM

DEFENDERS NEWS FEDERAL GO ON THE OFFENSIVE


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


MUSIC

BITTERROOT RESIDENT HUEY LEWIS REFLECTS ON FAME AND POP MUSIC 30 YEARS AFTER RELEASING SPORTS

HEALTH NEWS PARTNERSHIP HIT WITH 6 LAWSUITS

WITH FILM HANGIN’ LEVON HELM

DEFENDERS NEWS FEDERAL GO ON THE OFFENSIVE


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%DQN%HWWHU JWFQWPEGSQ` [2] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

(-:-7-323*+0%'-)6&%2/


Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

News Voices/Letters Guns, aid in dying and Baucus ..................................................................4 The Week in Review Mavericks and motorcycles .............................................................6 Briefs Alleged harassment, gay rights and Schweitzer.......................................................6 Etc. DOJ ends yearlong investigation of UM ......................................................................7 News Revisiting the Moon-Randolph strategic plan ..........................................................8 News Federal Defenders of Montana goes on the offensive..............................................9 Opinion Responsible meat...............................................................................................10 Feature Barry Beach gets sent back to prison .................................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Photographer Richard S. Buswell captures unusual beauty.....................................18 Music The Grizzled Mighty, Sera Cahoone, Uncluded and Fall Out Boy........................19 Music Huey Lewis, Sports and hitting it big.....................................................................20 Film Going under a sexy spell in Trance .........................................................................21 Film Hangin’ with Levon Helm ........................................................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Harvesting horses.................................................................................24 Hangriest Hour Bayern’s Bavarian brats.........................................................................26 8 Days a Week And you thought you had a tough week ................................................27 Mountain High Tour of the Swan River...........................................................................33 Agenda Watershed Education Network............................................................................34

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson INTERIM ARTS EDITOR Kate Whittle PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jamie Rogers COPY EDITOR Brooks Johnson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [3]


[voices]

Hardly legendary

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, May 14, on the UM campus. Have you ever been blamed or gotten in trouble for something you did not do? Follow-up: If you were locked up for 29 years, what’s the first thing you would do when you got out?

Mike Hopkins: Yes. I was at the bar with a shot of 151 that was lit on fire and it got knocked over. I got blamed for it and for burning my friend’s hand. It was the bartender! Cocktails and streams: I’d probably get a glass of cognac and a cigar and go for a walk along the river.

Josie Ulibarri: I got fired from the Food Zoo for eating on the job. They claimed I was sneaking brownies into my apron pockets. They never said anything until they fired me but they didn’t know if I was doing it. I ate all the evidence. Natty girl: Get drunk. I’d hit the nearest gas station and buy whatever they had on special.

Andreas Freiburg: When I was a kid we lit off Bumble Bee fireworks and one landed in the neighbor’s bush and caught on fire. My parents made me go over and apologize even though they didn’t know it was us. Hugs then drugs: First thing I would do is hug my mom. Then I’d hang out with friends and make them buy me drinks all day—if I still had friends.

Morgan Sanden: I had a roommate who was engaging in certain illicit activities in our apartment and I got lumped in with those accusations. I protested fiercely with 3 inches of paperwork proving my innocence … It all worked out for me. Blades of glory: Take my shoes off and walk in the grass.

Sam Ryan: Last spring me and a buddy were assaulted at the Rhino by three individuals. A couple months later the kid who started the fight accused us of assaulting them. He tried to press charges but the police knew he was full of shit. Big house to the K-house: I’d go to the Kettlehouse and get an Eddy Out.

[4] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

I must take exception to Gabriel Furshong’s stunt to paint Montana Sen. Max Baucus as an unrelenting conservationist (see “Lasting impression,” May 2). It might be true that Baucus used some back door sway to protect Montana’s wild areas, such as his creation of the Montana Legacy Project. But Max never publicly stood up against big money to protect the frontal assault threatening the rivers we fish, the roadless lands we hunt and the wide-open spaces that animals like the grizzly and the bull trout need to survive. Both Baucus and Pat Williams agreed on a bill in 1988 that would protect 1.4 million acres out of 6.2 million acres available for protection, hardly legendary. The majority of that acreage was high-altitude country, not prime habitat where Montanans hunt and fish, or where the grizzly bear roams. I am not alone as a Montanan in remembering that we were short-changed then, as we are short-changed now with Jon Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act. Montana is a special place. That’s why we live here. Not to use really big words, but in the continental United States, Montana has more habitat to offer than any other, except our sister state Idaho. As Montanans we have a responsibility to represent ourselves as protectors of these last remaining precious lands. I would be inspired as a citizen of Montana to see my elected officials buck the trend of bowing down to the big-money interests of other states and say, “Hey, here in Montana these lands mean more to us than anything—so back off, or we’re gonna kick your ass.” While this sort of rugged language may be abrupt and lost to the rest of the country, we know what it means here in Montana. Before I see Baucus or Williams or Tester touted as behind-the-scenes gurus of environmental integrity I would have liked to see them stand up for Montana’s wild country, against all odds, and say enough is enough, no more horse trading. Protect it all, no matter the fallout. That sort of action earns a public lands legacy. Max Baucus’ contribution is not worthy, no matter what his public-relations team says. Josh Mahan Missoula

Appalling testimony This letter responds to Alex Sakariassen’s article about the physician who admitted during a legislative hearing to assisting three suicides (see “Cowardice to courage,” April 11). I was at that hearing and

L

I was appalled with the doctor’s testimony and his goal to legalize assisted suicide. Doctors and nurses abuse the power they already have to cause patient deaths. We should not give them more power to cause death by legalizing assisted suicide. My mother, Sharon Moe, was diagnosed with cancer in February. After her surgery, we were told that she may be able to live for six months to two years. She was placed back in the care of a nursing facility where hospice began to care for her. My mother was adamant that she wanted to live and told the hospice nurse that she wanted to stay on a continual feeding tube. Hospice scared her into taking it off. Hospice also placed a pain patch on her when she wasn’t in pain. They overrode my power of attorney to do this. My mother

“Max Baucus’ contribution is not worthy, no matter what his public-relations team says.” died on March 9 due to the effects of pain medication, dehydration and starvation caused by hospice. I have since learned of other people with similar experiences. I was disappointed to see House Bill 505 fail. Its enactment would have clarified that assisted suicide is not legal in Montana. Its passage would have helped stop a bad situation from getting worse. Mike Moe Great Falls

New questions It is really alarming to me that the focus of the recent mass shootings has been on gun control instead of the broader and more relevant subject of “What the hell is wrong with people?” And I don’t mean the people pulling the triggers. I mean the people arguing about what to do and holding everyone and everything, including inanimate objects, responsible while not removing the beams from their own eyes. Each time I hear about another one of these tragedies my first thought is always, “What drove this person to such a tragic des-

perate act?” and, “What is going on? Why is there so much violence in our country?” Focusing on the instrument that was used to commit a crime instead of focusing on the person who committed it makes no sense. Focusing on laws to regulate inanimate objects instead of focusing on all the human factors that contributed to and led up to the person’s actions does not help solve this problem. A gun doesn’t decide to hurt and kill people. A person decides that. Only a desperate, alienated, deeply hurt person who feels powerless to change their life and who believes they have nothing to lose would commit such atrocities. Each one of these tragedies should be a wake-up call for all of us. None of us are excluded from this problem. We need to stop reacting with anger, blame and frenzied debates about laws. Instead, we should be asking, “What are the messages in these desperate acts? What are we, as a society, missing? What are the factors that come together and congeal within someone to motivate them to make that kind of horrifying decision? What are the signs and symptoms of a person who feels that desperate and that alone? And how can we intervene in that process? How can we help desperate people before they reach the point of carrying out horrifying tragedies?” The National Rifle Association, gun manufacturers and gun rights activists need to stop going into defensive modes and start having heart-to-heart conversations about the bigger picture of what is going on and asking sincerely, “What can we do to stem this tragic tide?” Those who line up on the other side of the debate and automatically start demanding stricter gun control laws need to let go of their reactionary anger and their need to blame someone or something else (guns, faulty gun laws, the gun industry and the NRA) and their simple-minded Band-Aid level solutions that simply keep them in a frenzy of “do-good-ed-ness” and prevent them from looking at the root of the problem. All the ridiculous statistics that people throw around to support their side of the gun debate only make both sides even guiltier of distracting everyone from the real problem, and hence the real solution. We are spending far too much energy focused on the completely wrong thing! We are spending too much time blaming each other (gun rights groups versus gun control groups) and not enough time really talking about the human factor and about the solutions that might really work to help reduce gun violence in America. Wendy Mair Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, May 8 Several items are stolen from the porch of a house in the Orchard Homes neighborhood, prompting the Missoula County Sheriff’s Department to ask the public for help finding the burglars. According to a witness, the suspects are driving a white Ford Ranger.

Thursday, May 9 Yoon Hee Cho, 38, pleads guilty to misdemeanor charges stemming from the April 1 incident where she struck and killed 18year-old Chance Geery with her car. Cho is sentenced to 30 days house arrest and ordered to pay $5,000 to the Chance Geery Memorial Fund.

Friday, May 10 A discarded cigarette sparks a small blaze at Flathead Lake Brewing Company of Missoula. Damage is estimated at $2,000. The fire comes on the heels of a water line break last fall that prompted the taproom to close for several months.

Saturday, May 11 Paul Harrison, 49, is unable to stop his motorcycle at a stop sign and crashes into the side of a Mountain Line bus on Phillips Street. Harrison, who wasn’t wearing a helmet, dies as a result of his injuries.

Sunday, May 12 The Missoula Mavericks American Legion baseball team wins the first contest in a Mother’s Day doubleheader against the Billings Royals, 7-6. In the second game, umpires invoke the 10-run “mercy rule” after five innings. The Mavericks lose 14-1.

Monday, May 13 The Missoula City Council for the first time hosts a formal meeting between city representatives and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation. Council made a promise months earlier to recognize government-to-government relations.

Tuesday, May 14 Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks dismisses wildlife advocate claims that Montana outfitter and wolf critic William Hoppe illegally baited wolves with sheep carcasses in an effort to kill them on his land near Yellowstone National Park.

University of Montana President Royce Engstrom speaks at a May 9 press conference announcing the conclusion of the Department of Justice’s investigation into the university’s handling of sexual assault complaints. The DOJ concluded that there was a “significant problem” with UM’s procedures and training, and announced new policies for the university to follow in the future.

Labor

Clinic hit with lawsuits Since February, six Partnership Health Center staffers have filed lawsuits alleging a range of grievances against the Missoula clinic including harassment, wrongful discharge and that management required employees to perform tasks without pay. “We consider this to be a serious and pervasive problem in this workplace and felt that we had a responsibility to file these lawsuits,” says Great Falls attorney Elizabeth Best, who represents the plaintiffs in six separate cases. Partnership provides health care and dental services to roughly 10,000 patients each year and more than half of those patients are uninsured. Missoula County helps facilitate Partnership services and is named as a co-defendant in all six cases. Among the most serious complaints against the clinic comes from Partnership dentist Adam Jensen, who alleges in his lawsuit that Executive Director Kim Mansch “has worked to establish and sanction a culture of fear and intimidation” by “screaming at employees, yelling obscenities, calling employees derogatory names.” Mansch denies that she’s fostered a hostile workplace and declined to comment further about the law-

[6] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

suits other than to say, “People at Partnership work really, really hard.” Jensen also claims that the clinic is understaffed. That complaint is echoed by former Partnership receptionist Shawnel Trenary, who says she was required to carry a “crushing workload” and that management threatened her with discipline if she didn’t keep up. According to her lawsuit, “Almost 100 calls were being missed on a daily basis.” One-time medical records coordinator Lisa Nelson and Partnership dental practice manager Patricia Morgan say in their respective lawsuits that the clinic forced them to work unpaid overtime. Both allege that they were subjected to a hostile work environment. Those complaints mirror ones brought by former Medical Director Alison Forney-Gorman and pharmacist Lorraine Rowe-Conlan, who also allege that they were unlawfully discharged from their positions. Missoula County Risk Manager Hal Luttschwager says the county hasn’t been served with the five most recent lawsuits, which were all filed May 3. (Rowe-Conlan filed suit February 27.) He adds that none of the claims have been substantiated. “It’s so easy to raise lots of allegations,” Luttschwager says. Jessica Mayrer

Equality

ACLU targets first responders The Montana ACLU has argued for years that the state discriminates against gays. But even the nonprofit’s legal director, Jon Ellingson, did a double take when he discovered to what extent same-sex partners of deceased police and fire department officers are treated differently. “I was shocked,” he says. While preparing to amend a lawsuit that seeks domestic partnership rights for gay couples in committed relationships, Ellingson set to work identifying the state’s most discriminatory statutes. He found one in particular that stands out—the law that governs how pensions for Montana’s municipal law enforcement and fire department officers, along with members of the Highway Patrol, are distributed to surviving family members. It works like this: If a police officer who’s 45 years old and earned a maximum of $3,000 per month retires after 20 years of service, that officer would have saved $35,400 in his retirement account. If that officer were to die, his surviving spouse would receive a lifetime monthly payment of $1,500, despite the fact that the savings account would be drained in two years. That scenario contrasts the pension paid to the sur-


[news] viving member of a same-sex couple, who only receives the monthly payment until the officer’s retirement account runs dry. “It seems to me to be a superb example of the inequity of our statutory structure,” Ellingson says. Aiming to mobilize support to change the existing law, Ellingson last week itemized his concerns in letters to Missoula Police Chief Mark Muir and city Fire Department Chief Jason Diehl. Both chiefs are supportive of change, Ellingson says. Diehl and Muir passed the information along to their staffs, and Muir this week is presenting a copy of the ACLU letter to the Montana Association of Chiefs of Police at a conference in Billings. “He is definitely trying to make sure that we pass this information on to our members,” says Capt. Chris Odlin, “so they can have the information to make a change if they see fit.” As for Diehl, he’s paid into the firefighters retirement fund for more than two decades. When first presented with the ACLU letter, he was most concerned about leaving the pension fund intact for his family and those of his colleagues. He now believes that the financial impacts of changing the statute would be negligible and therefore sees modernizing the statute as “a no-brainer.” Jessica Mayrer

Schweitzer

Drafting a “game changer” Adam Green has been following Brian Schweitzer from afar for years. Even before he co-founded the Washington, D.C.-based Progressive Change Campaign Committee with former union organizer Stephanie Taylor in 2009, he saw Schweitzer as “an authentic guy who says what’s on his mind and generally stands up for the little guy.” Now Green and Taylor are trying to draw Schweitzer out of his post-gubernatorial life on Georgetown Lake and convince him to run for the U.S. Senate in 2014. They’re already primed to hand him $24,000 in contributions the moment he declares. “We look for game changers,” Green told the Indy during one of several stops in western Montana early this week. “People who will both represent their state well and have a systemic impact on the culture of politics in Washington. Brian Schweitzer’s authenticity and economic populism is something that the Democratic Party sorely needs right now, and could have huge ripple effects across the nation if he has a bully pulpit in Washington, D.C.” PCCC has collected 16,000 signatures from supporters of its “Draft Brian Schweitzer” campaign, and Green and Taylor have already talked directly to Schweitzer about their initiative. “They’re taking note,” Green says of those around the former governor, adding that mounting grassroots support—and the money raised so far— could sweeten the pot as Schweitzer makes up his mind.

PCCC isn’t alone in actively courting a candidate to vie for retiring Sen. Max Baucus’ open seat. An anonymous website went live earlier this month encouraging conservatives to draft former Republican Gov. Marc Racicot for 2014. A February Public Policy Polling poll showed Racicot beating Schweitzer by a margin of 46 to 45. The difference is PCCC has been successful before in recruiting winners. The organization convinced Sen. Elizabeth Warren to run in Massachusetts last year, and

BY THE NUMBERS

20

Homes evacuated near Philipsburg in response to the Rumsey Gulch fire, one of the first wildfires of the 2013 season.

curious how such a development might affect the existing ecosystem. What they found was a dramatically higher proportion of invasive bird species on the main campus, and a parity between the golf course and Mount Jumbo regarding the prevalence of native birds. The scope of the project was admittedly too small to drive the current debate over the South Campus expansion, says Ryan Milling, one of the students involved. Professor John Roach, who advised the project, cautions that a one-semesterlong study, no matter how well executed, is far from conclusive. But he says the effects of development on bird communities would be “an interesting question to examine in more detail.” “It just serves to say that maybe there’s more we could be doing to look at the actual impact this change could have,” Milling says, adding that the trio isn’t necessarily against the expansion itself. Critics of the South Campus plan have been pressuring the university to conduct a full environmental impact statement for years. Quentin Rhoades, the attorney retained by opposition group Advocates for Missoula’s Future, recently photo by Chad Harder cited the lack of an EIS as a major legal concern. eventually raised more than $1 million for her campaign. “Until there is one, and a period of time for the pubGreen calls Warren a “game changer” too. But lic to study and comment upon it,” Rhoades wrote in a Schweitzer’s folksy shtick—like his wielding of a veto May 5 letter to the Montana Board of Regents, “the Misbranding iron in 2011—has Green convinced he’s an eas- soula College cannot be developed, as currently proier sell in his home state. posed, in compliance with Montana law.” Rhoades went PCCC plans to host a string of house parties pro- on to suggest that, unless the Regents reconsider their moting a Schweitzer bid throughout the state in the com- decision to construct Missoula College at the golf course, ing weeks. The man himself is still undecided. “I think litigation will be imminent. he’s torn,” Green says, “mostly because he loves being UM did release the results of an environmental asin Montana and D.C. is so depressing and dysfunctional.” sessment done by consultants with PBS&J back in 2007. When pressed, Green offered his own prediction: The document’s findings regarding impacts on terres“My guess is he’ll run.” trial, avian and aquatic species were brief, concluding Alex Sakariassen that “these species have shown to be very tolerant of development and would continue to use the planning area UM golf course and vicinity for cover and/or forage.” While Milling and his project partners, Karyn GreenRaising more questions wood and Elliott Conrad, have developed a keener inLate last month, three students from the University terest in the South Campus issue in the wake of their of Montana spent nine hours surveying bird populations study, they hardly feel they’re in a position to influence on UM’s main campus, UM’s golf course and the Mount the debate in any meaningful way. The most the trio can Jumbo Saddle. They’d recently heard of the university’s hope to do, Greenwood says, “is raise more push to establish a South Campus at the golf course— questions.” beginning with a new Missoula College facility—and were Alex Sakariassen

ETC. Few details could be gleaned from the May 9 press conference announcing the conclusion of the Department of Justice’s yearlong investigation into the University of Montana’s handling of sexual assaults. The prepared statements made by U.S. Attorney Michael Cotter, UM President Royce Engstrom and DOJ Assistant Attorney General Roy Austin all seemed to reiterate the same point: What the investigation discovered is less important than the fact that the university can now move forward. “What is noteworthy about this announcement today is not the problems our investigation found at the university,” Austin said, “but a shared commitment to the equality of women students and their safety.” Austin went on to explain that issues with sexual assaults are not unique to the Missoula campus, and that by cooperating with the DOJ investigation, UM “will transform … into a national model for Title IX compliance.” The forward-looking perspective was to be expected, and for many people in the Missoula community it provided a sense of catharsis. For more than two years UM has been tangled in the sexual assault scandal that saw one member of the football team plead guilty to rape and another player acquitted of similar charges after a lengthy and widely publicized trial. Following the bad publicity, the school is faced with plummeting enrollment and a significant budget shortfall. Though the statements of Cotter, Engstrom and Austin avoided details about the findings, hard copy investigation summaries released at the presser revealed exactly what the men were leaving out. Among the revelations was that in 2012 UM waited a week to report two incidents of sexual assault to Missoula police, and that over a three-year period, six UM football players were implicated in sexual assaults. The documents also revealed that “unwarranted gender-based assumptions and stereotypes influence [UM’s Office of Public Safety’s] initial response to sexual assault.” Nothing good can come from dwelling on the past. A readiness to move on and a willingness to change will serve UM and the Missoula community well in the wake of this investigation. But there is also a danger in moving on too quickly and succumbing to the temptation to forget this period of UM’s history. The scandal, more or less, is over. How it is remembered will define the university for years.

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missoulanews.com • May 9 – May 16, 2013 [7]


[news]

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Beer Drinkers’ Profile Life Of Leisure

Sue & Mike

What brings you to the Iron Horse? Initially, a grad student we know recommended it. Now we stop in before and after our trips–in this case to Yellowstone. You seem mellow and relaxed . . . Yup. We're strolling around in new Keens. We're thinking of going up Sentinel but having a few more beers may win out. Beers of choice? Summer Honey Ale & Big Sky IPA

UM Grads: Congratulations and thank you for your support. Celebrate with your friends at the 'Horse! Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse

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[8] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

by Alex Sakariassen

the things I think I personally can help to do is give this place a face and get some advertising out there.” Turner adds that the mystery is “part of the charm” of the homestead, but that the property’s future depends on public awareness and input regarding its value to the community. For Philip Maechling, who recently retired as Missoula’s historic preservation officer, the most obvious topic to revisit is fundraising. The homestead used to rely heavily on a core of committed citizens called the Hill and Homestead Preservation Coalition, founded in 1998. But that oversight group has quietly dissolved, leaving grant writing and other administrative tasks to either the caretakers or NMCDC. “Fundraising is a point we need to get back to more actively,” Maechling says. “We haven’t been doing it much in the recent past.” He adds that the property’s addition to the National Register of Historic Places in 2010—one of the original goals of the 2003 strategic plan—could lend more heft to fundraising efforts. LaRubbio, a local graphic artist, and Turner, a swing-shift nurse at St. Patrick Hospital, are the latest in a long line of caretakphoto by Cathrine L. Walters ers at the 470-acre Randolph famMatthew LaRubbio and Meredith Turner recently took over caretaking the Moon- ily homestead, which the city purchased in 1996. Jennifer BarRandolph Homestead and hope for community input on their new to-do list. rett and Chris Kailing were hired the homestead the last month has been “all tional programming to establishing an on- to the position last year, but left this spring site water source. Ultimately, however, Oaks when Barrett got a job in Saskatchewan. we could ask for in life right now.” As the duo reminisces, they’re inter- and others hope to let citizens drive the dis- The caretakers aren’t paid, and money for rupted by the bleating of two four-week-old cussion on what the next 10 years will hold even small improvement projects is tight. “We’re not even on a shoestring budget goats that have been dogging their every for the homestead. “It’s such a huge place, and it does be- here,” LaRubbio says. “We don’t have laces.” step for the past hour. Sunlight filters The new caretakers have been able to through the freshly pruned branches of an long to the city,” Turner says. “So we should apple orchard that up until last month had all be contributing to all these awesome get started on their own short-term goals. They’ve discussed creating a farm-to-table gone wild. A pair of pigs nap in the shade ideas.” Public awareness is the first hurdle the program in partnership with Burns St. of a lean-to. LaRubbio and Turner—aided by visiting school children—have planted rows homestead will need to overcome this Bistro. LaRubbio wants to host more workof squash, potatoes and other veggies in a month. The property lies just over the rise shops like the tree-grafting one recently of the North Hills, up a large draw east of held in the orchard, and attract volunteer garden nearby. The couple has already scratched quite the city landfill. But in their short time on help for improving some of the animal ina few items off their personal to-do list, but the property, LaRubbio and Turner have frastructure at the homestead. Perhaps the in the coming week LaRubbio and Turner had a number of curious locals wander biggest item on LaRubbio’s to-do list is to will see how the community wants to shape down from the Waterworks Hill trail and in- revitalize the Hill and Homestead Preservatheir new home. The North Missoula Com- quire about the collection of hardscrabble tion Coalition and create “a new generation of people who give a shit about this place.” munity Development Corp. and other old buildings. He’s hoping the May 18 meeting will “There’s so many people that we run stakeholders have scheduled a May 18 public meeting to discuss revisions to the 10- into that have never heard of the place,” mark the beginning of that movement. year-old strategic plan that guides LaRubbio says. “That’s one of the biggest isasakariassen@missoulanews.com sues here is promotion, and that’s one of management of the property. About six months ago, Matthew LaRubbio and Meredith Turner were driving through a snowstorm in Oregon when they got word that they’d be the next caretakers of the Moon-Randolph Homestead in Missoula’s North Hills. The couple had been eyeing the property for seven years, their minds filling with ideas on how to improve one of the area’s most overlooked historic landmarks. “We had always known it peripherally and had always had ideas about, if we lived here, what we’d want to do,” Turner says, adding that living full time on

“A good bit of what’s in here actually has been accomplished now, and I don’t see much that’s obsolete,” says NMCDC Executive Director Bob Oaks of the existing plan. “But this is a good time to come up with a new to-do list.” Oaks says the goal of the May 18 public meeting is to strike-out items that have now been accomplished such as the refurbishment of the old Randolph residence and repairs to the root cellar, and update the document with new priorities. Those may include everything from increased educa-


[news]

Counsel cuts Federal Defenders of Montana goes on the offensive by Jamie Rogers

On Friday, May 10, John Rhodes, a public defender who works in the Federal Defenders of Montana’s Missoula office, stood outside the Russell Smith Federal Courthouse holding a sign that read, “What about the Sixth Amendment right to counsel?” Another man, who had joined Rhodes for the lunch-hour protest, held a sign with the message, “You have a right to an attorney. If you can’t afford one … Sorry, furloughed.”

the hearing was set for a furlough day.” He says in another instance, he was forced to ask a judge to push back a sentencing hearing that was scheduled for a Friday he was not allowed to work. That client, he says, will be forced to remain in the county jail until the scheduling issues can be resolved. FDOM Executive Director Tony Gallagher says the effects go beyond furloughs. Federal defenders, he says, are

Rhodes understands why the federal government has turned to extreme budget cuts. Less clear to him is why the cuts are being implemented the way they are. When sequestration was announced last February, the average federal agency, including the Defenders Program, was slashed 5.17 percent. But the federal defenders took an additional hit when the U.S. Court, which controls the program’s funding and is constitutionally prohibited from reducing certain costs, voted to cut an additional 5.52 percent. “Right now, in Montana federal court, it’s only the defenders who are being furloughed,” Rhodes says. “But my clients haven’t changed, the charges against them haven’t changed, and their rights haven’t changed. But now I’m forbidden from working on my furlough days.” The May 10 protest was sparsely attended. Support seemed to pique when a group of rugby players in town for the annual Maggot Fest tournament wandered by and briefly offered their pot-valiant support. Otherwise, Rhodes’ efforts didn’t seem to elicit much attention from passersby. At one point, the man holding photo by Cathrine L. Walters the sign next to Rhodes wondered Federal defender John Rhodes says recent budgets cuts to the federal defense out loud how many people understood Rhodes’ sign and its refersystem are restricting his ability to represent his clients. ence to the Sixth Amendment. Rhodes stared into the street and apThe focus of Rhodes’ efforts was the now forced to justify every expense. Exmore than 10 percent budget cut FDOM— pert witnesses must be thoroughly scruti- peared to consider this idea, before menand all federal defender offices in the nized and are only hired if deemed tioning the 1963 Gideon v. Wainwright United States—is facing in the wake of “absolutely necessary.” Additionally, decision, in which the U.S. Supreme Court Washington, D.C.’s recent austerity meas- FDOM can no longer send its attorneys to ruled that an indigent Florida man who was ures, commonly called “sequestration.” out-of-state conferences to receive contin- convicted of larceny had been denied his According to Rhodes, the penny pinching uing legal training. Two such conferences, right to legal counsel. The case was sent is not only affecting the way his office the Seminar for Federal Defender Parale- back to the Florida court in which the man spends money, but it’s restricting his and gals and Investigators and the National was convicted, where he was afforded an athis colleagues’ ability to properly repre- Seminar for Federal Defenders, have been torney, retried and acquitted. altogether canceled. sent their clients. Gideon v. Wainwright is remembered While no FDOM employees have lost as a landmark moment in the history of the One of the immediate effects of budget cuts is furloughs. Since mid-April, Rhodes their jobs (Arizona's office was recently United States’ public defense system—a deand every other employee of the FDOM forced to cut 10 employees), Gallagher cision not only affirming the rights of indihave been forbidden to work the second says “the cuts are having a devastating im- gent people accused of crimes but, by proxy, Friday of each two-week pay period. It may pact.” If any of his attorneys or staff decide the rights of all Americans. Rhodes can’t benot seem like a lot, but Rhodes says given to quit, Gallagher says a mandatory hiring lieve that on the 50th anniversary of the decihis already hectic work schedule—he rep- freeze will prevent him from filling their sion, “when we should be commemorating resents as many as 35 clients charged with positions and he will have to distribute the constitutional right to counsel, federal felonies at any given time—one less day in their work among an already stretched of- defense is having a budget cut that is twice fice. And while this round of cuts is set to as large as any other agency.” the office is significant. “When you’re prohibited from working expire September 30, he adds there is no “The Sixth Amendment is the right that one out of 10 business days, it interferes un- reason for optimism beyond that. shines light on all other rights,” Rhodes doubtedly with the flow of work,” he says. “We still have to deal with Fiscal Year says. “The irony is evident.” “I’ve already had an instance where I had to 2014,” he says. “It could be worse than reschedule a motion to suppress because 2013.” jrogers@missoulanews.com

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missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Responsible meat A lesson from a pig called Eddie by Lori Bell

I love animals and always have, but I am also a meat eater. In my early 20s, I tried a short stint as a vegetarian, but jumped off the meat-free wagon after a happy encounter with bacon. At the time I felt a twinge of guilt, but the truth is I never gave vegetarianism a second thought. When I became a mother of two boys while trying to maintain a full-time job as a pharmaceutical sales rep, food was often an afterthought for my family. Then something happened: I lost my job. My predictable world was shattered. The unexpected changes in my life meant that lots of things had to change in the way I lived, and the biggest change was that I cooked a lot more at home. The silver lining was I had more time to spend with my boys as we started eating meals together—at the table, every day. Eventually, I found a local part-time job that affected me in ways I’d never anticipated. The job was with Friends of Family Farmers, an organization whose mission is “to promote and protect socially responsible agriculture in Oregon.” While that sounded admirable, I started working there because I really just needed some extra cash. Then one day in the office, I picked up a coffee table book, CAFO—The Tragedy of Industrial Animal Factories, and began to thumb through it. As I flipped through the pages, learning that CAFO was short for “confined animal feeding operation,” I remember pausing and looking up to ask the ladies in the office, “This isn’t real, right?” Yes, it turns out it is. That specific moment, looking at those images of miserable-looking animals, changed everything for me. This was the “food” I was so proud to be feeding my family? I couldn’t bring myself

[10] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

to keep doing that, so I stopped buying meat altogether. Of course, vegetarian substitutes couldn’t satisfy my male-dominated household for long and soon I was on a mission to find socially responsible meat. But was there even such a thing? Yes. My desire to understand the life cycle of an animal and be a part of that process is how I came to know the sweet little black pig named Eddie. It all began when my neighbor and I purchased a pair of heritage pigs and decided to raise them together. Once the

“How could I have spent so long with him, doing my best to nurture this sweet animal, and then leave him to die with strangers?” piglets settled in, they quickly learned that we liked treating them with belly scratches and food. They were extremely intelligent and once they saw us coming would run to get their daily affection and treats. When Eddie had grown to an impressive 250 pounds, his job on earth was nearly complete. It wasn’t easy, but I decided to be present at his slaughter. I felt that I needed to. How could I have spent so long with him,

doing my best to nurture this sweet animal, and then leave him to die with strangers? On the day the truck rolled up, my stomach was in knots. I scratched Eddie as he lay on his side with an expression of bliss. I thanked both him and Elton, my neighbor’s pig, for doing their jobs well, for being good pigs, and for the food they would give to my family. I cried and felt a deep sadness that they would die but also much appreciation for these two creatures. Eddie waddled over to check out his new visitors for treats. He sat down and got a scratch under his chin— then bang. Done. I stayed with the carcasses while they were broken down. I noticed the beauty of the pigs’ skin, the depth of their fat as it stretched over the bodies, how bright and healthy their organs looked, and the vibrant color of the meat. The slaughterer noticed too, telling us that our pigs were some of the best he had seen in 20 years in the business, attributing their quality directly to the quality of their life and their breed. “This is a nice pig,” he kept saying. So, of course, I thought of Wilbur and Charlotte from Charlotte’s Web, when the spider wrote “SOME PIG” in her web to honor her friend. Eddie, too, was one terrific pig. Even the men who slaughtered him gave him the respect he deserved. It sounds silly to say that a pig changed my life, but as I look back, that’s exactly what happened. That sweet pig helped me in my journey as both a meat eater and an animal lover. I learned to take responsibility for the meat brought to my dinner table. And I don’t think Eddie ever suffered. Lori Bell is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She writes in Colton, Ore.


missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - A teller at a Washington, D.C., bank failed to comply with a robber’s demands because she didn’t understand them. The holdup note read simply “100s 50s 20s 10s.” Authorities said the teller handed the note back to the robber, who added “all mona.” Still not comprehending, she told him to leave. Three blocks away, the robber entered a second bank, where the teller was equally confused, until the man announced he wanted “what’s on that,” referring to the note. “Oh my God, are we getting robbed?” the teller said and alerted security, causing the man to flee. Police arrested suspect Maurice Fearwell, 20, a block away. (The Washington Post) Marius Ionescue, 31, was burglarizing a home in Benesti, Romania, when he heard a noise. Fearing it might be another thief, he hid and called police. Officers showed up, searched the house and found no one but Ionescue, whom they arrested. The noise he heard, police official Mihaela Straub said, “was probably just the family cat.” (UK’s Metro)

HOMELAND INSECURITY - Objecting to the bipartisan immigration bill, U.S. Rep. Louie Gohmert, RTexas, declared that radical Islamists infiltrating the United States “are trained to act Hispanic.” (CSPAN) FECUNDITY FOLLIES- Layne Hardin, 44, accused his ex-girlfriend of stealing his sperm and conceiving a child without his permission. According to his lawsuit against Toby Devall and a Houston sperm bank, Hardin and then-girlfriend Katherine LeBlanc froze his sperm in 2002. The couple broke up, and Hardin began dating Devall. After that relationship ended in 2011, Hardin’s lawyer, Cade Bernsen, said Devall “bluffed her way into getting the sperm” from the sperm bank, which handed her “two vials of sperm in a paper lunch sack.” Bernsen said Devall then had herself impregnated “purposefully out of vindictiveness and to punish him for breaking up with her.” Devall had a son, now 2, and Bernsen said his client is suing because he’s concerned that he may ultimately be forced to pay child support. (ABC News)

MENSA REJECTS OF THE WEEK - A 22-year-old man trying to fly a kite while riding on the trunk of a moving car fell off, according to authorities in Riverside County, Calif., and was critically injured when he struck his head on the pavement. (Riverside’s The Press Enterprise) After losing $300 trying to win an Xbox Kinect at a carnival ball-toss game in Manchester, N.H., Henry Gribbohm, 30, went home, returned with his $2,300 life savings and lost that as well. “You just get caught up in the whole ‘I’ve got to win my money back,’” he explained after complaining to police. (Boston’s WBZ-TV)

DUCK AND COVER - Minnesota’s Rocori School District, where two students were shot to death in 2003, spent $25,000 for 200 bulletproof whiteboards, which their manufacturer, Maryland-based Hardwire, claims are stronger than police-issued bulletproof vests. “The company is making these in response to the Newtown shooting, and has been making similar products for our soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan,” Rocori school board Chairwoman Nadine Schnettler said, noting the boards “will be an additional layer of protection” for students and teachers. Cold Spring-Richmond Police Chief Phil Jones demonstrated the effectiveness of the 18-by20-inch white boards by kicking one, stabbing it with a knife and whacking it with a police baton, all without penetrating it, although he didn’t fire his gun at the whiteboard. (NPR and Minnesota’s KARE-TV)

FAIR GAME - The Pennsylvania Game Commission accused Arcangelo Bianco Jr., 40, of “firing multiple rounds” from a handgun at a white-tailed deer he spotted in a Walmart parking lot in Burrell Township. After killing the animal, Bianco loaded it into his pickup truck and took it to a meat processor. “Obviously we can’t have someone running through a Walmart parking lot shooting at a deer,” wildlife conservation officer Jack Lucas said, adding, “It was the nicest buck I’ve seen taken in Indiana County in a couple of years.” (The Indiana Gazette) BEER DOESN’T COUNT - As a first step to having ice fishing included in the Olympics, organizers of the World Ice Fishing Championship in Wausau, Wis., had this year’s winners provide urine samples to the United States Anti-Doping Agency. “We do not test for beer,” Joel McDearmon, chairman of the United States Freshwater Fishing Federation, noted, “because then everyone would fail.” Other fringe sports that perform drug testing are darts, miniature golf, chess and tug-of-war. According to the World Anti-Doping Agency, two out of 76 miniature golfers tested positive in 2011, as well as one chess player, two bowlers, eight roller skaters and one tug-of-war competitor. (The New York Times)

SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - William Hotz, 59, punched a 55-year-old ice cream cashier several times in the face, according to police in Nassau County, N.Y., because she wouldn’t accept his expired coupon for a free ice cream cone. (Fox News) Police accused David Anthony Smith, 38, of pouring gasoline on his 60-year-old father and setting him on fire at their Oklahoma City home after the father asked the son to turn down the music on his stereo. (The Oklahoman)

GOOD RIDDANCE - Two days after the Mars One project announced it was looking for volunteers to go on a one-way mission to Mars, more than 33,000 people from around the world had applied. (Canada’s QMI Agency) IT HAPPENS - After his dog ate five $100 bills, Wayne Klinkel said he washed pieces that he recovered from the dog’s poop and took them to several banks, asking for new bills to replace the destroyed ones. The banks refused but advised him to send the evidence to the Treasury Department’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing, which requires at least 51 percent of a bill to be eligible for reimbursement. “Each case is carefully examined by an experienced mutilated currency examiner,” the bureau’s website explains, noting the verification process could take as long as two years. (Helena’s Independent Record) Having failed to reduce sewage spillover into the Potomac and Anacostia rivers during rainstorms, the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water) announced it would try a new tactic: digging a tunnel beneath the rivers for the runoff. It unveiled a 400-foot-long, 1,323-ton boring machine that will drill a 12.8-mile tunnel at a depth of about 100 feet to serve as a holding tank during storms. After the storms subside, the rainsewage mixture will be released to the city’s wastewater treatment plant. DC Water officials named the tunnelboring machine “Lady Bird,” after former first lady Claudia Alta “Lady Bird” Johnson. (The Washington Post)

[12] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013


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photo by Cathrine L. Walters

O

n a recent evening in Billings, Barry Beach sifted through stacks of handwritten notes in his garage. They were bundled and meticulously sorted by era and by which prison he was housed in during his 29 years behind bars. “Very special stuff in this tub,” Beach said. “This here actually holds all the letters that were written to me while I was in the Louisiana jail when I was first arrested.” There were other bins holding other mementos from Beach’s life. He still had his childhood baseball mitt and Boy Scout’s manual, along with his Little Britches rodeo outfit. In another bin were reams of press clippings that detailed his long legal fight. The clippings were stored alongside a faded copy of a list of Poplar High School’s 1979 graduates. “There’s Kim’s name right—Kim Nees right there,” he said, pointing to the yellowed paper. “I keep that as a memorial to her.” It was 30 years ago this month, on May 3, 1983, that prosecutors charged Beach with deliberate homicide for the murder of 17-year-old Nees on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. A jury found Beach guilty. He received 100 years in prison with no chance of parole. However, in an unusual move, a district court judge in 2011 freed Beach after reviewing new evidence that could alter the verdict if presented to a jury during a new

trial. The evidence hinged on an alternative theory that a group of young women killed Nees. The Montana Attorney General’s Office appealed the district court’s decision. For the past year and a half, Beach has been out

He wanted to travel, although the terms of his release mandated that he get advanced permission before leaving Montana. He knew there was a looming uncertainty that the Montana Supreme Court, at any time, could either send him back to prison or uphold

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

The license plate on Barry Beach’s 1996 Ford Ranger.

of jail and a productive member of society. He had a full-time job. He made regular public speaking appearances. He talked about wanting to buy a house.

[14] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 24, 2013

the district court’s decision to grant him a new trial. On May 14, he received the news. He was likely heading back to prison.

“I don’t understand,” he said to a reporter who delivered the information. There was a long pause. “I need to make a few phone calls.”

Peter Camiel, Beach’s attorney, learned of the Montana Supreme Court’s 4-3 decision just after leaving a court appearance in Washington state. When the Independent contacted him on his cellphone, he was rushing back to his office to digest the court’s 93-page document and identify what it will mean for his client. His initial reaction was that Beach would be remanded into custody to continue serving out his 100-year sentence. “I think that probably the Attorney General’s Office will seek an order or a warrant to have him remanded into custody,” Camiel said. “It could be right away.” Camiel said that he and his colleagues will regroup this week to evaluate their next course of action, potentially appealing the Montana Supreme Court’s decision in the federal judicial system. “We have to go through our options,” he said. The State Supreme Court’s decision sides with the Montana Attorney General’s Office in its appeal of the 2011 district court order for a new trial. The state’s highest court opined that Beach’s new evidence “was not reliable” and that the lower court


erred when it allowed Beach to go free. Specifically, the decision noted that key evidence contradicted the theory that a group of women killed Nees and that her injuries were consistent with those of a single attacker. Justices Jim Rice, Beth Baker, Laurie McKinnon and District Court Judge Richard Simonton, who sat in place of Chief Justice Mike McGrath, voted with the majority. (McGrath recused himself because during his tenure as Attorney General his office prosecuted Beach). “Beach’s new evidence—in the form of testimony that is primarily hearsay, internally inconsistent, and inconsistent with evidence presented at Beach’s 1984 trial—does not reliably displace the evidence tested at Beach’s trial, including his confession,” Supreme Court Justice Jim Rice wrote for the majority. Justice Brian Morris wrote the Supreme Court’s dissent, with Justices Patricia Cotter and Michael Wheat concurring. They argued that the district court is better positioned than they are to determine the credibility of Beach’s new evidence. Morris struck a bittersweet tone when noting that Beach would not be granted a new trial. “This ruling marks what will likely be the final chapter in the saga of Barry Beach,” he wrote. “We oversee a criminal justice system that seeks to resolve a defendant’s guilt through processes created and administered by humans. Humans, by nature, are fallible and the processes that humans create share this same fallibility.” Morris went on to quote a 1953 precedent in his conclusion: “We are not final because we are infallible, but we are infallible only because we are final.”

The mood among Beach’s scattered supporters on May 14 was in stark contrast to that of Dec. 7, 2011, when Beach walked out of the Fergus County Courthouse to a cheering crowd and reporters from Montana, Germany and Canada. Back then, cameras flashed and Beach gave interviews. His family and friends hugged him. Signs at a reception held for him a few blocks from the courthouse welcomed him home. “I was so overwhelmed,” Beach said. Too busy to eat at the reception, Beach’s first meal was a McDonald’s Quarter Pounder with Cheese, fries and a strawberry milkshake. Once out of prison, Beach set off on a whirlwind of activity. He attended rodeos, plays and sporting events, and visited with family that he hadn’t embraced for decades. Last July, he caught his first Montana trout on a fly rod on the Boulder River. On his 51st birthday in February, Beach went skiing for the first time. He mostly stuck to the bunny hill. During Beach’s initial days of freedom, even pumping gas was an adventure. “You assume that the button says, ‘Start,’” he said. “I stood there for over 30 minutes before I figured out that it was the little yellow grade button.” Beach wasn’t allowed to leave the state without permission, but he notes that Montana is big enough to allow for substantial road trips. “I will actually travel quite a distance just for ice cream,” he said. On a whim, Beach would drive the nearly 30 miles from Billings to Rockvale to a fast-food restaurant that offers dozens of ice cream flavors, including pineapple. He went to Roundup one day for a root beer float, chili dog and tater tots. The license plate on his blue 1996 Ford Ranger reads, “BBFree.” When he wasn’t driving for ice cream, Beach kept a busy schedule. His phone constantly rang with calls from friends, family and supporters who kept in regular

Longtime Beach supporters Stella and James “Ziggy” Ziegler in Billings.

contact. He had a good job, working as the chief engineer at Billings’ Clock Tower Inn, and he maintained a good sense of humor about his situation. “I come from a different style of mass housing,” Beach quipped. “The guests where I come from aren’t so picky.” Beach also accepted invitations to talk about what had happened to him. He rattled off a list of all of the public speaking engagements, including four high schools, two elementary schools, 15 churches, seven colleges, the Montana Wyoming Leaders Council, the Kiwanis Club and the Elks Club. His talks varied depending on the audience. When addressing kids, Beach focused on how his lifestyle as a young man left him a prime target for

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

not for Centurion Ministries, it’s doubtful Beach would have been released from prison in 2011. Beach’s public appearances and ongoing media attention have brought fame. He said that waitresses and gas station attendants often recognize him. He bristled, however, when asked if his celebrity status was a boon to his social life. He was aware that a stigma lingered. Dating, for instance, was tough. He said that because women in Billings largely steer clear of him, he hadn’t been on a real date since his release. “I don’t know about famous,” he said. “I’m still fighting for my life.”

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Beach has kept the hundreds of letters he’s received from supporters in plastic bins in his garage.

law enforcement. Before his arrest for Nees’ murder, Beach had exhibited a pattern of unruly and unlawful behavior. “I was a thief, a drug addict, a drug dealer, a liar, a cheater, you know? I was everything dysfunctional about society that you can possibly be,” he said. “But I wasn’t a murderer.” When addressing crowds on behalf of the Innocence Project and Centurion Ministries, Beach talked about the importance of supporting such groups. If

Beach’s biggest problem remains the fact that in 1983 he confessed to the crime. Weeks after admitting to the murder, Beach said that he “broke weak” on the heels of a seven-hour law enforcement interrogation. Beach, who was 21 at the time, said detectives threatened him with the electric chair. He was willing to say anything to make the questions stop. Even without Beach’s disputed confession, the

case constitutes a classic who-done-it. There’s the bloody palm print on the truck Nees was driving the night of her death that has never been identified, a pubic hair that the prosecutor erroneously told the jury belonged to Beach during the initial trial, and missing evidence—including the sweater Nees wore the night she was killed, an audio recording of Beach’s admission and the suspected murder weapons, a tire iron and a 12-inch chrome crescent wrench. June 15, 1979, was a warm and dry day in Poplar. It was the Friday before the town’s Wild West Days, filled with rodeo events and raucous parties. Nees had graduated from Poplar High School just two weeks earlier as valedictorian of her class. Her 18th birthday was less than two months away. Nees was a sturdy and athletic girl. She was on the school track team and hauled hay bales effortlessly. The day before her death, she went to a drive-in movie with her boyfriend. They got into a fight. Unwilling to stew at home, she took her dad’s pickup truck for a drive. It was sometime after midnight, prosecutors say, that Nees met Beach at the Exxon station in Poplar. Beach said in what his family refers to as his “so-called” confession that he had been drinking in the sun that day, took a nap and then woke up after dark to go for a walk. According to Beach’s recanted confession, he asked Nees if he could ride around town with her. Cruising was a popular pastime in the rural community. She agreed. They drove to the “train bridge,” a gathering spot for teenagers on the banks of the Poplar River. They parked, talked and smoked a joint. Beach tried to kiss Nees, he told detectives in 1983. She turned him down. He became enraged. A heated verbal exchange ensued. “I started asking her questions about why girls around here don’t like me,” Beach said in the confession. “She said it was because I was a—because I was an asshole.” A scuffle ensued, according to the confession. He hit her with his fist and then picked up a 12-inch chrome crescent wrench off the truck’s floor. He hit Nees in the head. “I was going to kill her,” Beach told police, “calling her a bitch and cussing her.”

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 24, 2013 [15]


The crime scene from Kim Nees’ 1979 murder on the banks of the Poplar River.

bar’s owner, Roberta Louise Ryan, called “Bobby,” testified later that the Bum Steer was busy that night until closing time. Ryan recalled that Atkinson had been in and out of the bar into the early morning hours of June 16, sneaking alcohol to her underage friends, Maude Greyhawk, Jordis Ferguson and two sisters, Joanne and Roberta Jackson. Atkinson had a baby at home. The child’s father, Alex Joseph Trottier Jr., had also dated Kim Nees. Beach’s legal team believes that Atkinson was the ringleader behind Nees’ attack. They say jealousy was the motive. Ryan testified that the young women seemed energized as they came and went through her bar. She noticed the girls because they were underage and kicked them out. When investigators arrived at the crime scene on the morning of June 16, there was a blood spot about 10 feet to the right of the truck. Nees’ bloody purse and sweater lay on the ground outside the passenger side of the vehicle. Officers followed a trail littered with pieces of hair and spots of blood to the river where they found Nees lying in about two feet of water. In Nees’ truck, there was blood spatter on the ceiling and the driver’s Barry Beach’s senior high school photo side rear window. There was blood and urine on the truck’s seat and three gouge marks on the ceiling with hair hanging out of them. The Roosevelt County Sheriff, FBI, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Fort Peck Tribal Police and Poplar City Police investigated the crime. According to a 1979 autopsy, Nees sustained injuries to the head and neck and defensive wounds on her hands. Her attacker, or attackers, struck Nees more than 30 times, causing extensive skull fractures and brain bleeding. A forensic pathologist believed that Nees could not have lived longer than 30 minutes after receiving the head injuries.

Nees lay motionless in the sand. Beach checked her pulse. It was weak. Beach said in the confession that he threw the crescent wrench and another murder weapon, a tire iron, into the river. He then found a plastic bag in the truck and used it to haul Nees’ body to the water and pushed her in. Beach told law enforcement that he burned his clothes in a Burlington Northern boxcar and ran home in his underwear, shoes and socks. “I went in my bedroom and shut the door and I started thinking about it and telling myself, ‘I didn’t do it,’” Beach said in the confession. “And I finally went to sleep. And then I went—I woke up a couple of hours later and I went down and my mother was cooking eggs and bacon and she asked me if I was hungry. And I said, ‘Yeah.’ And she asked me where I had been all night and I told her I had been upstairs in my bed asleep. She said, ‘Oh, I was wondering where you had been. I been looking for you.’”

Sissy Atkinson had been drinking at Poplar’s Bum Steer Bar the night Kim Nees was killed. The

Kim Nees

[16] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 24, 2013

For the last 18 months, Beach says he would read his Bible every morning inside his Billings home. He’d sit next to his living room window, under a buffalo head that’s mounted on the wall. Beach said he’s always believed in God. While in prison, his faith strengthened. “I really believed that they were going to end up executing me and that my life was going to end in the

He learned to channel his emotions and energy. Beach got a job in the prison maintenance department. He took classes and honed his skills in construction, electrical wiring and computer basics. During Beach’s nearly three decades in prison, he earned 64 certificates of achievement for his educational accomplishments. Beach appeared destined to never leave prison until Centurion Ministries picked up his case in 1999. The New Jersey-based nonprofit, which works to exonerate the wrongly convicted, was struck by its initial findings. “We felt that Barry demonstrated in his confession a complete ignorance of the crime and how it happened,” said Jim McCloskey, Centurion’s founder and executive director. “So we were very, very skeptical of that confession.” McCloskey estimated that he and his staff have made at least 100 trips to Montana since taking on Beach’s case. While Nees hasn’t been ruled out as the person who left the bloody palm print, FBI scientists say that it doesn’t belong to Beach. Furthermore, Centurion investigators have discovered multiple people who say that Atkinson and Greyhawk admitted to harming Nees. Maude Greyhawk’s sister-in-law, Judy Greyhawk, testified during Beach’s 2011 evidentiary hearing that Maude admitted to luring Nees to the river and kicking her. Another witness, Janice White Eagle-Johnson,

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

Barry Beach has kept extensive records from his long legal battle.

electric chair,” he said. “And so I just wanted to know that there really is a spirit world … I just wanted to know, so that when they pushed that button on me and that electricity raced through my body, I’d be able to smile because I’d know.” While in prison, Beach took Bible classes through the mail, creating his own hybrid of Christianity and Native American traditions. Beach said his evolving belief system helped him fend off depression. In the early days of his imprisonment, he prayed that God would end his life. He contemplated suicide. “Because you just can’t do another day of it,” he said. He eventually figured that his death would only concede victory to the state. “I would never give the state of Montana that satisfaction,” Beach said. “I was never going to let them win.”

said that Greyhawk admitted to her that her car was present at the crime scene. One of Sissy Atkinson’s former coworkers, Carl Four Star Jr., testified that he overheard Atkinson say that law enforcement “Got the wrong man.” Four Star said that Atkinson admitted to beating Nees with a few other women. He added that Atkinson bragged that the women, “‘Got away with the perfect crime.’” A fourth witness, Richard Holan, testified during Beach’s evidentiary hearing that he noticed Nees’ truck early on June 16. Inside the vehicle, he saw silhouettes of five people, including who he believed to be Nees and an unidentified male. He testified that he saw two vehicles in the train bridge area that night. Holan told the court that a few days after the


crime he reported what he saw to Poplar Police Officer Steve Greyhawk, but Holan said nothing came of it. Bobby Atkinson, Sissy’s brother, was the Poplar Police Chief at that time. Steve Greyhawk is Maude’s father. On June 17, before the Poplar Police sent evidence collected at the Nees crime scene to the county sheriff, Steve Greyhawk admitted to breaching an area that had been locked temporarily to keep the evidence safe. Greyhawk said that he kicked the door down because he had to use the restroom. Beach’s legal team also notes that during the opening statements of Beach’s trial, Marc Racicot, the prosecutor from the Montana Attorney General’s Office, said that a forensic scientist from the State Crime Lab would present the jury with a pubic hair found at the crime scene. Racicot specifically told the jury that the scientist “will tell you … that this hair located on the sweater of Kim Nees was in fact the defendant’s.” That hair was never proven to be Beach’s. Nor was it introduced in court, because Steve Greyhawk breached the evidence room. Beach’s attorney, Peter Camiel, believes that Racicot’s comments about the hair still influenced the verdict. “You can’t get that out of the jury’s mind,” he said. McCloskey acknowledged that it may seem odd for Beach to confess to a crime he didn’t commit. McCloskey once believed it was odd himself. But after years of working with the wrongly convicted, he knows better. McCloskey said roughly 20 percent of the 51 exonerated Centurion clients admitted to a crime that they did not commit. Of the 300 DNA-based exonerations across the U.S. to date, roughly 25 percent of them made incriminating statements, pleaded guilty or falsely confessed. “I’ve come to understand that we human beings are a malleable species, we’re not as strong as we think we are,” McCloskey said. “Until you’re faced with that situation—being alone in a room, being browbeaten by authoritative police officers one after the other, hour after hour after hour, they wear you down. They scare you to death. It’s a very coercive environment. You will do anything to get out of that room … They get psychologically and emotionally and physically worn to the nub.”

In 2007, during Beach’s three-day clemency hearing before the Montana Board of Pardons and Parole, the prosecutor, Racicot, conceded that the crime investigation was “a mess.” Despite the mistakes, he also said that he remained convinced that Beach killed Nees. The detectives that secured Beach’s confession also continued to stand by their work. They testified during the clemency hearing that prior to his admission, Beach “was allowed snacks, drinks, cigarettes, and bathroom breaks.” Louisiana detective Alfred Calhoun denied threatening Beach with the electric chair, as Beach alleged. Calhoun said that Beach’s confession came willingly and was bolstered by its emotional nature. Beach told detectives that he had a tendency to “fly off the handle” and dealt with frustration in a “physical way.”

photo by Sarah Daisy Lindmark

Beach, pictured in 2006, served 29 years in prison before his release in 2011. The Montana Supreme Court’s recent decision could put him back behind bars.

Law enforcement and prosecutors persuaded the parole board to discount Beach’s claims. According to the board, “the facts simply did not unfurl as they were alleged and characterized in the Centurion Ministries claims. The multiple eyewitnesses, the allegations of physical evidence of the ‘real killers’ being ignored by law enforcement—either crooked or inept—did not materialize. We have great sympathy for those who read only the Centurion Ministries allegations and became alarmed, be-

hearing to vet whether Beach’s legal team had in fact discovered new evidence. The judge specifically noted in his opinion that Steffanie Eagle Boy was among the most compelling witnesses to testify. Eagle Boy wept on the stand in front of the crowded courtroom as she recalled being 10 years old and hearing the screams of enraged women early in the morning of June 16, 1979. Eagle Boy lived on a bluff above the Poplar River that overlooks the area where Nees was killed. She

photo by Sarah Daisy Lindmark

In the early days of Beach’s imprisonment, he prayed that God would end his life. He contemplated suicide “because you just can’t do another day of it,” he said.

cause that was our experience; but those allegations were not demonstrated as true even with the very wide latitude afforded Centurion Ministries—the facts simply have not been demonstrated to be as representatives for Mr. Beach have alleged. Mr. Beach’s culpability has been contested vigorously and eloquently, but we have found that contest to be lacking in substance.” Despite the parole board’s findings, Roosevelt County District Court Judge E. Wayne Phillips found Beach’s arguments persuasive during the 2011

testified that on the night that Nees died, she and a cousin were sitting on a rock on the edge of the bluff when they saw two vehicles enter the train bridge area. She told the court that she heard girls yelling, “‘Get her,’” and, “‘Get the bitch, kick the bitch.’” Eagle Boy added that a police car with lights joined the two vehicles parked at the train bridge area. She said the police car shut off its lights and she heard digging sounds and the clinking of tools. Eagle Boy said in court that the girls’ voices were, “High pitched, angry… It’s something I’ll never for-

get. I’ve had nightmares all my life about it. It’s something I won’t forget.” The state dismissed Eagle Boy’s testimony, arguing that it was highly unlikely she could have heard the girls yelling from her perch on the bluff. But shortly after Beach’s evidentiary hearing, Fort Peck Journal reporter Louis Montclair decided to conduct an experiment. He gathered several female friends at the train bridge and cued them to recreate the sounds that a group of angry women would have made. He asked them to yell, “Kill the bitch.” “We got the cops called on us twice,” Montclair recalled. That experiment proved to Montclair that Eagle Boy could have heard Nees’ murder from the bluff. The Montana Supreme Court’s ruling, however, essentially discounted Eagle Boy’s version and the others who testified at the 2011 evidentiary hearing.

Before Beach heard the news of the Supreme Court decision, he talked about being happy. His tidy home on a quiet, tree-lined street offered plenty of room to do woodworking in the garage. In the workshop, he built a squirrel feeder that hanged outside his house. A sickly squirrel that Beach called “Charlie” lived on his back porch. Beach fed it by hand. He referred to his four fish in a small tank in the living room as his “kids.” A cottontail rabbit that Beach called “Baby Girl” sometimes accompanied him as he roasted s’mores under the moonlight in a backyard fire pit. Beach admitted that he does get angry when he thinks about the resources the state has committed to preserving his conviction. But a few weeks ago, as he continued to wait for the Supreme Court’s ruling, he said the emotion quickly passes. “Am I going to give them the satisfaction of sitting here and worrying about what they may do?” he asked. “No. Absolutely not. Life is as simple as ice cream and I’m here to try every flavor there is. When they come down with their ruling, I’ll deal with whatever comes my way at that time. Today I’m free.” jmayrer@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 24, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Remnants and residents Photographer Richard S. Buswell captures unusual beauty by Kate Whittle

Richard S. Buswell’s “Coyote Skull,” silver selenide gelatin print, 2010

N

ot every kid would be enthralled if his family took him walking around deserted historic areas. But for Richard S. Buswell, who grew up on a cattle ranch outside Helena, it was a defining part of his childhood, one that he came back to after moving around the country for medical school. “It persevered in my subconscious so when I returned to Montana, I began photographing sites that I visited with my parents at an early age,” he says. “Been doing it ever since.” Buswell, now 68 and semi-retired from private practice at an allergy clinic, has spent years documenting historic artifacts in Montana ghost towns. While elements of traditional Western iconography like bison skulls, barns and farm implements appear in Buswell’s lens, there’s no trace of kitsch or romanticism in his photos. Instead, the unusual angles and stark black backgrounds impart a sense of beauty and morbidity that gothic art fans might appreciate.

A close-up of a calf ’s skull looks like layers of an alien rose. A potato bucket’s raggedy spikes resemble a menacing, ancient torture device. Tattered scraps of hanging canvas are labeled “Window Shade.” His photos used to be more representational of their subjects, but now many are abstract to the point that their title cards, like “Gas Lamp” and “Three Milk Cans,” are the only clues to what they depict. Buswell likes to hike to abandoned homesteads with his gear, looking for just the right shot, never taking many photos. He calls it “hunting with my camera.” As he gets older, he says he feels a sense of urgency to document untended places like Comet, south of Helena, and Deer Lodge County’s Coolidge, that are vandalized and decaying. He finds a kind of meditative quality to visiting abandoned homesteads. “Because I will find artifacts of people who lived there, like toys, boots, shoes and other per-

[18] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 24, 2013

sonal artifacts, which always raises questions of, ‘Whose toy was that, are they even alive anymore?’” he says. “It’s a place where I go to commune with remnants and residents of Montana history.” Buswell’s photos are in collections throughout the United States, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and internationally, including galleries in Scotland and France. Buswell thinks the wildness of the West intrigues people around the world. “A lot of the American frontier history is painted by mythology, whereas the reality of the American frontier West is that it was largely harsh,” he says. “You had inhabitants riddled with diseases, smallpox, diphtheria, measles, accidents that are very much the opposite of the mythology.” He prefers to show the starkness of the West in his blackand-white photos. Buswell has used the same equipment for 42 years: two manual Nikkormats, four lenses and

black-and-white film, which he develops himself. “The paper is getting hard to come by because so many people have gone to digital,” he says. Buswell chooses black-and-white silver selenide gelatin prints not just for style, but because they’re sturdy. He prepares a silver print then tones it with selenium, an inert metal which binds to the silver and prevents it from breaking down. He stores his photos in acid-free boxes in a climate-controlled room. “When I’m gone and all these ghost towns and homesteads are gone, hopefully these black-and-white prints will last for centuries,” he says. Richard S. Buswell’s Close to Home is on display at the Paxson Gallery in the Montana Museum of Art and Culture on the UM campus now through Aug. 3. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music]

Rough-hewn The Grizzled Mighty doesn’t play nice Seattle duo The Grizzled Mighty is sometimes billed as “blues rock,” but the description doesn’t quite hit the mark. My mother likes blues rock, and my mother would not care for The Grizzled Mighty. She’d be put off by the cover of its latest release, Thick Hand Grip, which is an illustration of a hand holding three, um, thick and veinylooking long objects. Thick Hand Grip’s five songs are sludgy, drawnout and hypnotic in a way that reminds me of some metal bands. Ryan Granger’s echoey vocals are overshadowed by his twisting, jammy guitar work and drummer Whitney Petty’s determined skinpounding. The Grizzled Mighty takes an admirably irreverent approach to infusing rock with blues, which might offend anyone drawn by the “recommended if you like The Black Keys” descriptions. If this is blues rock, it’s blues rock for head-banging and slam-dancing. It’s low-down,

trashy and sweaty. It sounds like it has the potential for an excellent time. (Kate Whittle) The Grizzled Mighty, Skin Flowers and Shahs play the Palace Fri., May 17, at 9 PM. $7/$5 in advance at Ear Candy or stonefly-productions.com.

Sera Cahoone, Deer Creek Canyon Sera Cahoone is stationed in Seattle, but her basic Americana sounds more like a drive around the Olympic Peninsula in autumn. The extended guitar picking, the ease with which she turns from poetry to guitar slide to near-bluegrass—it all sounds familiar but sprawling. There’s a vastness to her music; you can pinpoint where it came from, though not what it is. Deer Creek Canyon, while nothing out of the ordinary, is still enchanting with its diversity of arrangements. It’s a disciplined take on Laura Gibson—less experimental, more personal and individual. Or maybe she’s more like Eisley—heart-on-the-sleeve,

flighty when necessary. “Nervous Wreck” is the first spark of excitement four tracks in, unless you prefer the percussion-less charm of the title track. “Shakin’ Hands” really rounds out the argument that this is driving music. If you don’t picture ponderosas passing overhead, then you must not enjoy a good soundtrack. Deer Creek Canyon glows like a summer drive with the windows down, but just don’t expect it to give you any new scenery. (Brooks Johnson) Sera Cahoone opens for Blitzen Trapper at the Palace Lounge Mon., May 20, at 9 PM. $15 in advance at Ear Candy and stonefly-productions.com.

Uncluded, Hokey Fright Aesop Rock’s opening verse on “Delicate Cycle,” the third single from Uncluded’s Hokey Fright, is a thicket of rhymed spondees that is maybe about having parts of your body amputated. Then Kimya Dawson, the former member of The Moldy Peaches who is the other half of Uncluded, chimes in with a verse about working in her parents’ laundromat, and the whole thing snaps into focus. That’s Uncluded in a nutshell: Dawson is as modest and evocative as Aesop is ambitious and baffling. The two do not so much complement each other as take turns offering respites, the way coming up for air complements a long swim.

Lyrically, Dawson and Aesop function as counterpoints to each other’s styles, but musically, the match is less intuitive. Hip-hop and weirdo folk guitar emphasize different beats in an immutably technical sense, and the compromise between the forms makes Hokey Fright something of an interesting failure. Dawson and Aesop have similar sensibilities, but the logistics of combining their approaches have muted both. Whether you consider Uncluded a Dawson side project or an Aesop Rock side project depends on your musical background, but fans of each artist will have to work to like them together. (Dan Brooks)

Fall Out Boy, Save Rock and Roll Considering the context of this album—the resurrection of a pop-punk-turned-pop-star band three years into a hiatus—it’s not half bad. Fall Out Boy has always done well to capitalize on the sounds of the time. When the Chicago boys broke through in the early aughts with From Under the Cork Tree, they sounded like the edgier brothers of the All-American Rejects. With Save Rock and Roll, they sound like an opener for Fun. Pete Wentz and co. have grown in the way a teenager listens to songs in her bedroom until she gets to hear some remixes in a club. That might explain the excessive boom-chick drums.

On the first few tracks, Patrick Stump sounds like he finally grew into his voice, still reminiscent of Adam Levine. He pushes a little too hard and the writing is still adolescent, but at least the last human element of this band is alive and well. It sounds like most of the poprock instrumentals came out of computers. Even where the guitars are supposed to lead, someone in the studio must have said, “Put a synthesizer there!” The band has finally grown enough to quit faking it and cut out the punk entirely—if it was ever there to begin with. (Brooks Johnson)

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 24, 2013 [19]


music

Unhiply square Huey Lewis, Sports and hitting it big by Dan Brooks

Last month, Huey Lewis recreated the iconic scene from American Psycho in which Wall Street sociopath Patrick Bateman, played by Christian Bale, speaks rapturously about the musical genius of Huey Lewis. In a parody video for Funny Or Die, Lewis mimics Bale’s original facial expressions with uncanny accuracy, praising the consummate professionalism of Sports before he hits Weird Al Yankovic with an ax. It’s funny. Imagine, though, that you are Huey Lewis. Thirty years ago, you recorded an album you now describe as “aimed right at radio,” and it worked. Sports generated four top-10 singles and went platinum 10 times. You are a superstar. Then, in 1999, you watch a movie in which the murderous yuppie who symbolizes the emptiness of the 1980s announces that he loves your band. How do you feel? “Somebody told me that [Bret Easton Ellis] had written about us in the book, and I read his little dissertation on us,” Lewis says when I ask him that question during a recent interview. “He hit it right on the head. Clearly, he was a fan.” Huey Lewis has always been a man of his time. He was that man in 1983, when Sports gave American radio listeners the combination of synthesizer arrangements and Anglo doowop they didn’t know they were ready for. And, perhaps paradoxically, he is still that man now, playing songs from Sports at casinos and county fairs around the country to celebrate its 30th anniversary this year. “I realize it was an album of its time,” he says, “in that it’s a collection of singles, for the most part. We didn’t know we were gonna have five hits. We knew we needed one.” Here is the portion of the legend that uncharitable listeners tend to forget. In 1983, Lewis was staring at the most terrifying possibility a 33-year-old man could face: He might have to get a job. His band was two commercially unsuccessful albums into a threerecord deal. If Sports tanked, their label likely wouldn’t give them another chance. “That could have been the end of our recording career,” Lewis says. “In those days, it was a radio-driven world. There was only one avenue to success, and that was a hit single.” Sports yielded those hit singles—“I Want a New Drug” and “The Heart of Rock and Roll” are on there, as are “Walking on a Thin Line” and “If This Is It.” Along with “Hip to Be Square,” these songs would come to define both Lewis and 1980s pop rock for the next three decades. They would also make him a metonym for an older, possibly more evil approach to popular culture. They would make him the kind of musician that fictional ax-murdering stockbrokers get into just before

[20] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 24, 2013

they realize they’ve lost their essential humanity. “Interestingly, the film is making the same point that ‘Hip to Be Square’ makes,” Lewis says. “I wrote it in the third person, you know—‘he used to be a renegade.’ It was meant to articulate a phenomenon that was better explained in a book called Bobos In Paradise: bohemians becoming bourgeois.” It’s not the kind of thing you want to hear Lewis say. You don’t want him to cite David Brooks and use “bourgeois” in conversation. You want him to say that “Hip to Be Square” was an expression of his secret heart, because that would justify the last decade you spent making fun of him.

Instead, Lewis is a smart guy who figured out how to win pop music. He didn’t make Sports in the grip of a malevolent zeitgeist that wanted to eat Americans’ souls and force them to wear pink sports jackets. He made it because he wanted to be in a band forever. Over the course of our interview, he spoke most passionately about how his touring apparatus employs 25 people. His guitar tech has kids in college now, and Lewis is proud of that. He didn’t quite make Sports for the money. He made it so that he could do pretty much what he wanted for the next 30 years. “The trouble is the tendency to pretend that it’s brain surgery or torture, music and pop. It’s very seductive to fall into that trap,” he says. “The reveal for us is that we were unabashedly trying to make a pop record, but I’m unapologetic for that, because we actually did it ourselves. We figured out how to do it.” If Sports inspired a generation of yuppies to drive to work a little faster, so be it. If it inspired a subsequent generation to sneer at how unhiply square those yuppies were, that’s all right, too. Huey Lewis may symbolize a popular culture beloved by homicidal finance executives, but he never actually worked in the office. Huey Lewis has spent the last 30 years playing in a band. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

Don’t make fun of his finger painting.

Mesmerized Going under a sexy spell with Trance by Molly Laich

The crooks in director Danny Boyle’s latest film, Trance, sure have found a trippy way to make a little money. From the very beginning, Boyle (Trainspotting, 28 Days Later) gets you in a state of bewildered suspense. You’re constantly wondering: Who are these people? How do they know each other? What’s their end game? You might feel like you spaced out and missing something pivotal, but that’s not it; you’re being toyed with. Simon ( James McAvoy), a down-on-his-luck art auctioneer, takes us through the elaborate security procedures involved whenever a big-ticket item is on the block, such as Francisco Goya’s 1798 painting, “Witches in the Air.” We know that civilians are to follow a strict “Don’t be a hero” policy, and there’s a van full of Ukrainian ex-military men at the ready if anything should go down. But the criminals have studied well, and led by their impetuous French leader Franck ( Vincent Cassell), they storm into the auction, outsmart the Ukrainians, knock Simon on the head and presumably take off with the painting in what is a thoroughly entertaining and well-executed heist sequence. It’s a tiny but necessary spoiler to inform you that Simon was in on the heist. But the knock on the head wasn’t planned, and it turns out that the plush suitcase Simon handed off to Franck doesn’t have the painting in it after all. Now Simon can’t remember where he squirreled the thing away or even why he did that. Franck and his goons try to torture out the information, because, as Franck puts it, “Amnesia is bullshit!” Yes, yes it is. But this is just one of the film’s many insane conceits, and now we’re off to see Elizabeth the hypnotherapist (Rosario Dawson), who they all hope will be able to uncover the memory of the missing painting. (I can never buy a devastatingly handsome woman in a ho-hum position. Women who look like

Angelina Jolie don’t become police detectives and Kim Basinger would never live in a trailer park on 8 Mile! But I digress.) Simon claims to be looking for his car keys, but Elizabeth senses trouble and Googles him. She puts the story of the missing painting together and wants in on the action. She will get inside Simon’s head and retrieve the painting, but there are all these unconscious resistances to giving up the truth. He’s afraid of being tortured again, for example. They’ll have to simulate a hypnotic state in which Simon murders Franck and his goons so he feels safe, which is a fun scene to watch. Elizabeth is the film’s central mystery. They’re all smitten, but whose team is she playing for? Trance is undeniably sexy, and it’s not just when Dawson gets completely naked and saunters slowly toward the camera. This is one of those rare films where a lady’s vagina isn’t just a provocative thing to look at but also represents a pivotal plot point. Not since Citizen Kane’s Rosebud have we seen such an audacious flower. Of course, hypnotherapy doesn’t really work the way it does in Trance. I’ve dabbled in self-hypnosis and I’ve been put under by professionals, and there’s nothing magical or supernatural about it. You don’t go to some other place. If memories were really like a book on a shelf in a library, then everybody would be reading more, but they’re not. Don’t let the utter implausibility bother you, though. Those trance states lend themselves to a deeply satisfying structure. We follow Simon’s neuroses to weird conclusions, suffer Elizabeth’s sexy manipulation and find ourselves constantly wondering whether what we’ve seen is real or in somebody else’s head. Trance continues at the Wilma. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 24, 2013 [21]


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[22] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 24, 2013

[film]

Cure-all Hangin’ with Helm in Ain’t in It for My Health by Skylar Browning

By the end of Ain’t in It for My Health, director Jacob Hatley’s endearing and laidback look at music legend Levon Helm, I found myself making a list of reminders. The film’s casual structure and pace—not to mention the rich material throughout—allow for such mental wanderings. Here’s what the list included: 1. Be more like Levon. More than anything, Hatley’s documentary captures the former drummer of The Band hanging out with musicians, with his wife and daughter, with celebrities, with his dogs, alone smoking a joint. He hangs out onstage, backstage, at his kitchen table, in his doctor’s office, in his home recording studio and performance space in Woodstock, N.Y., on the tour bus and watching TV in an easy chair. He hangs out while telling stories, singing old songs, learning new lyrics, working his land, listening to advice, and simply nodding along when his battered, cancer-stricken voice Levon Helm can’t be heard. In all of these situations, Helm demonstrates a stately grace, unassuming presence and blue-collar ethic. Filmed in 2008, four years before Helm died of throat cancer at age 71, he’s still vibrant and prolific. I’d give anything to have had a chance to sit across from him at his kitchen table, patiently waiting for the joint to get passed my way, hearing tales about Jimi Hendrix getting pissed at Woodstock. 2. Buy more snacks. The aforementioned kitchen table in Helm’s house looks like the centerpiece of an epic college apartment. During frequent late-night hangouts it’s covered in open cereal boxes, bags of chips, cans of Coors Light, Solo cups, ashtrays and lord knows what else. Helm parties better at 67 than you will/do/did at 21. 3. Shut up when the music starts. For all the priceless anecdotes and candid conversations traded through clouds of marijuana smoke, Ain’t in It for My Health is about great music. Helm is never far from a drum kit, acoustic guitar or mandolin. Even with his throat suffering from years of radiation therapy, he holds onto his distinct drawl when he sings. He’s the type of performer who silences a room, even when he’s just tuning an instrument. A cover of Bob Dylan’s “When I Paint My Masterpiece” is just one of the standouts. 4. Listen to Music from Big Pink again. The Band released its debut album in 1968, and it included three tracks written by Dylan and one of the most influential songs in rock ’n’ roll history, “The Weight.” Barney Hoskyns, a British journalist and author of Across the Great Divide: The Band and America, explains in the film that Robbie Robertson wrote “The Weight” about the American South and specifically Helm, an Arkansas native. 4. Reconsider the roots of roots rock, or Americana, or folk rock, or whatever you want to call it. Like any worthwhile rock doc, Ain’t in It for My Health includes a history lesson—mainly, how The Band changed rock music by incorporating country and folk,

tapping into a distinctly southern romanticism and dismissing any need for showmanship. Without belaboring the point or becoming heavy-handed, it’s a lesson worth noting as bands like Mumford & Sons make an impression in the current rock landscape. 5. Reconsider Canada. It’s mentioned at least once that one of America’s most influential rock bands actually included four Canadians and just one American, Helm.

photo courtesy Ahron R. Foster

6. Listen to Dirt Farmer again. Helm’s first studio album since 1982 came out a year before this documentary was filmed and introduced him to a new generation of music fans. About halfway through the film, Helm learns that the album has been nominated for a Grammy and that he’s been chosen to receive a lifetime achievement award. His ambivalence to the lifetime achievement “bullshit” is vintage Helm. He’s much more interested in working through the lyrics of a recently uncovered and still unfinished Hank Williams song. 7. Don’t smoke. Almost all of the archival footage of The Band shows Helm singing with a butt bobbing on his lips. Juxtapose those images with scenes of Helm’s doctor shoving a tiny camera up his nose and down his throat to diagnose the drummer’s failing voice. The latter offers a humbling view of an aging icon. 8. Don’t get high with Billy Bob Thornton. 9. Keep money in perspective. During one part of the film, Helm vaguely says that the money didn’t always add up for The Band. Despite the writing process being largely collaborative, Robertson took the credit—and the considerable royalties. But Helm’s creative approach to covering his debt and medical bills overshadows any lasting bitterness. Intimate concerts at his Woodstock, N.Y., home, dubbed “Midnight Rambles,” helped raise desperately needed funds and further his standing among roots rock fans. Those concerts—like Helm’s legacy—continue today. A film like Ain’t in It for My Health can only help bolster the effort because Hatley does more than just document the man’s music and place in history. It spends time with the man himself, unguarded and real. Ain’t in It for My Health makes its Montana premiere as part of the Big Sky Film Series Mon., May 20, at the Top Hat Lounge. 7 PM. Free. editor@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK EMPEROR In this post-WWII drama set in Japan, a general, played by Matthew Fox, must decide whether Emperor Hirohito should be tried as a war criminal. The general also has the hots for a Japanese exchange student gal. Expect plenty of long, pained looks. Also starring Tommy Lee Jones and Eriko Hatsune. PG-13. Wilma. STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS In the next Trek prequel from director J.J. Abrams, Captain Kirk and crew must save Earth by capturing a weapon of mass destruction. Cumberbitches, start your engines: Benedict Cumberbatch is the baddie. Also starring Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex. THE ROYAL BALLET: GISELLE The Royal Ballet of London presents this romantic tale, and one of the most technically challenging classic dances, which portrays the power of love in the face of betrayal. Showing on Sun., May 19 at 2 PM and Tue., May 21 at 7 PM. Carmike 12.

NOW PLAYING 42 Fans of clever baseballists should find this biographical film about the life of Jackie Robinson and his history-making time with the Brooklyn Dodgers to be a figurative home run. Starring Chadwick Boseman, T.R. Knight and Harrison Ford. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Entertainer. THE CROODS Join the first prehistoric family for the very first family road trip and laugh for the very first time at Ryan Reynolds’ jokes. Starring the voices of Nicolas Cage and Emma Stone. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex. THE GREAT GATSBY In this film adaptation of the greatest game of Red Light/Green Light in all of literature, our narrator bears witness to the glitz and glam of the Roaring Twenties, where people drive on toward death through the cooling twilight. Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Mulligan and Tobey Maguire. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex. IRON MAN 3 Iron Man proves that he doesn’t have an iron heart as he struggles to deliver retribution after his enemy, Mandarin, destroys Peter Stark’s world. Heads are gonna roll, y’all. Starring Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow and Don Cheadle.

“Joining the Mile High Club would only be logical.” Star Trek Into Darkness opens Friday at the Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex.

Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Showboat. OBLIVION In 2077, Tom Cruise is one of the last humans left on Earth. With only two weeks to go until he can leave the war-ravaged planet and join other humans on a lunar colony, a mysterious woman arrives and everything he thinks he knows comes into question. Also starring Morgan Freeman and Olga Kurylenko. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Showboat. PAIN & GAIN I have three words for you: Zubaz, fanny-pack and misogyny. If those things sound good to you, then check out a trio of bodybuilders who get caught up in a criminal caper. Directed by the Michael Bay. Starring Rebel Wilson, Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Kurt Angle. Rated R. Village 6.

PEEPLES In this “warm, amiable farce” from the mind of Tyler Perry, a man must ask an uppity family if he can marry their daughter. Expect wacky dysfunction and dysfunctioning wacky. Starring Craig Robinson, Kerry Washington and David Alan Grier. PG-13. Village 6. THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES A gorgeous motorcycle stuntman starts robbing banks to support his lady and their newborn; unfortunately, a less handsome rookie cop looks to take the handsome one down. Starring Ryan “Gos” Gosling, Eva Mendes and Ray Liotta. Rated R. Wilma.

Capsule reviews and Kate Whittle.

by

Jason

McMackin

Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com or contact the theaters in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

TRANCE This Danny Boyle-directed thriller follows a sexy fine art auctioneer who gets in trouble with a gang, and then has to team with a sexy hypnotherapist to find a lost painting. Starring James McAvoy, Vincent Cassel and Rosario Dawson. Rated R. Wilma.

A “Five Star” experience! Who would have thought health care could be so luxurious?

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 24, 2013 [23]


[dish] Times Run 5/17/13 - 5/23/13

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater Emperor (PG-13) Nightly at 7 & 9

The Place Beyond the Pines (R) Nightly at 7 Will not show Saturday (5/18)

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

Trance Nightly at 9:20 Will not show Saturday (5/18)

131 S. Higgins Ave.

www.thewilma.com

Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

photo by Ari LeVaux

Harvesting horses by Ari LeVaux

MAY

COFFEE SPECIAL

Butterfly Organic FAIR TRADE

$10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[24] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

Barring an act of Congress, Valley Meat Company in Roswell, N.M., will soon become the first horse slaughterhouse in the U.S. since 2007, when the nation’s last equine abattoir closed its doors. For the time being, the resulting meat will be exported. Domestic sale of horsemeat is not illegal, but Congress doesn’t currently allocate funds to regulate it for human consumption, something Valley Meat owner Tim Sappington hopes will change. A vocal consumer of horsemeat, Sappington eats it three times a week, he told Bloomberg News. Chicken fried horse steak is his favorite preparation. The opening of the Valley Meat slaughterhouse, and the outcry it has provoked among some horselovers, highlights the complex relationship Americans have with horses. To many, horses are friends, up there with dogs and cats, and the thought of killing them is deeply disturbing. The problem is, Americans love horses so much that we have too many of them. The racehorse industry produces a regular supply of spent thoroughbreds and quarter horses. Farmers and ranchers have to dispose of old workhorses, as do big-city horse-drawn carriage operators. In the cold light of the bottom line, selling used-up horses rather than paying to keep them alive is a logical choice. Since Congress stopped funding activities related to horse slaughter in 2007, the unwanted horses have been auctioned off to meat buyers and quietly shipped to Mexico and Canada for slaughter. Last year nearly 200,000 were shipped across the border, in a journey that is often brutal. These retired workhorses can contain vaccines, antibiotics, steroids, painkillers and other medicines unapproved for use in food animals. For this reason the European Union, some member countries of which have a taste for horse flesh, is planning to be more selective about the horsemeat it allows in. There are similar stirrings in Japan and Russia, other big consumers of horsemeat. Meanwhile, a burgeoning population of mustangs is roaming the arid open spaces of the West, often in dense-enough numbers to become an ecological nuisance. While often called “wild,” these freeroaming horses (and burros) are descended from animals brought over by Europeans. They are an in-

FLASH IN THE PAN

troduced, invasive species, with few predators to worry about. “Horse populations left in the wild, unmanaged, would double in size every four years,” says Paul McGuire, public affairs specialist at the Oklahoma Field Office of the Bureau of Land Management. “The land cannot sustain that kind of growth in horse populations.” The BLM spends $75 million annually to manage the mustangs that live on federal land. This budget includes $43 million dedicated to “holding costs” for approximately 40,000 “excess horses” that have been removed from their range and currently reside on five long-term pasture facilities in Kansas and Oklahoma. The animals deemed most adoptable, meanwhile, are held in one of 54 facilities across central and western U.S. According to a report on the BLM website, these facilities are currently at capacity. Animals that aren’t adopted join the others in a long-term pasture. Perhaps these free-roaming horses are the ones that should be slaughtered. The animals are coming from clean, if not pristine environments. Given the changing preferences among the world’s purchasers of U.S. horsemeat, the market prospects for clean meat from free-range horses are good. Why spend money maintaining something that you could make money by selling? As long as the American relationship with horses remains so conflicted, with a powerful horse-loving lobby holding the stronger hand, sensible horse management policy might not be in the cards. Until Congress decides otherwise, millions of taxpayer dollars will be spent each year to manage and protect an invasive species that also happens to be a great source of lean protein and is delicious. (I’ve tried it trice myself: stir-fried in China, where it tasted like a sweet cross between beef and pork, and canned in Mongolia, which was better than Spam.) If we began harvesting horses, perhaps prospective horse adopters would consider sheltering an old horse that’s already given its best years to some human cause. Arguably, those are the horses that most deserve pampering. And once those E.U. restrictions on horsemeat go into effect this summer, old horses with medical histories will probably be less wanted than ever.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 It is the 5th year for Bernice's Cupcake Maynia! We are celebrating by bringing back the last four years favorite cupcakes! That's right....Pancakes and Bacon, Peanut Butter Cup, Caramel Popcorn, Whisky Sour, Cookie Monster, What The Bear's Eat, Spaghetti and Meatballs, Breakfast, Banana Split, White Russian, Just For Kids, Strawberry Shortcake and more!!!. 15 flavors to choose from and a Baker's Choice every day! Cupcakes are great for Mother's Day, Graduation, other special occasions and a quick sugar fix. Follow Bernice's Facebook in May as we participate in Bike Walk Bus Week, kick out awesome cupcakes and continue to provide Missoula with a solid cup of joe & pastries for breakfast. We are having so much fun and bringing it directly to you. See you soon. xoxo bernice. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). THURSDAY is Trivia Night. (7:30-10 pm) FRIDAY John Floridis 6-9 pm SUNDAY: Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

$…Under $5

Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 10am-6pm Mon-Thurs/10am-7pm Fri+Sat. Downtown Missoula. $

Mon-Fri 7am - 4pm

(Breakfast ‘til Noon)

531 S. Higgins

Sat & Sun

541-4622

(Breakfast all day)

8am - 4pm

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall 406-728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • May 9 – May 16, 2013 [25]


[dish]

Bayern’s Bavarian brats HANGRIEST HOUR What you’re eating: Bayern has long billed itself as the “only German microbrewery in the Rockies”—a bragging right that goes well beyond the brewery’s strict adherence to the German purity law. Bayern also imports traditional Bavarian brats all the way from owner Jürgen Knöller’s homeland, in three flavors: smoked, jalapeno cheese or chicken andouille. No limp backyard Johnsonville knockoffs here. No stale buns or watered-down generic ketchup. Bayern’s as picky about wurst as it is about bocks and weizens, serving up your beer-time snack in a hollowed-out baguette with toppings ranging from Hawaiian pineapple mustard to an imported German curry ketchup. Who you’re eating with: Odds are you won’t be the only one chowing down on the patio. Taproom tender Jenna Behle says the a la carte brats have developed a strong following, and continue to catch on with newer Bayern patrons. “I feel like once you get them into your rotation, the same people always get a brat.” The a la carte brats are available now, but the brewery hopes to rekindle an old tradition of offering fresh-grilled

photo by Alex Sakariassen

brats on the patio during summer weekends. An independent cook used to prepare brat platters complete with potato salad every Friday from April through October, but he retired last year. Brewer Justin Lee says the brewery is actively scouting for a replacement.

What you’re drinking with it: On a recent Friday, the chicken andouille brat—which Behle carefully notes is the spiciest of the three—paired well with a pint of Bayern’s Dump Truck Summer Bock. But you could easily opt for a St. Wilbur, Dancing Trout or Maibock instead. As Behle says, “I think the type of beer depends more on the season than the brat.” Where to get one: Bayern Brewing serves brats a la carte every day from 1 to 8 p.m. for $4 a piece. Bring your appetite to 1507 Montana St. —Alex Sakariassen Hangriest Hour serves up fresh details on western Montana eats. To recommend a restaurant, dish or chef for Hangriest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


THURSDAYMAY16 Local songster Aran Buzzas gets to picking with an A-lister team for his CD release party, with a band made up of Travis “Big Money” Yost, Caroline “I’ve got the Mott’s” Keys, Sam “Chillmaster Flex” Nasset, Gibson “Deborah” Hartwell, and more. With Owen Mays & The 80 Proof Boys, Mickey & The Bonepickers and BanjerDan. Stage 112 at the Elk’s Lodge, 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $5.

May 16 – May 23, 2013

Release some stress during T’ai Chi classes every Thu. at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks. $10 drop-in class. Call Chris at 728-0918. They say you can’t spell team without an “I,” but at least you can spell it with a meat. I digress. The Missoula Nonprofit Network presents a leadership/team building training, with psychological assessment expert Steve McArthur, at Mountain West Bank, 3301 Great Northern. RSVP to michael@ missoulaunitedway.org. Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gardeners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montananaturalist.org.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. We find stouts pair the most nicely with the tasty musical stylings of Tom Catmull, who plays Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-8 PM. Free.

But is the chicken local? Blitzen Trapper plays the Palace, with opener Sera Cahoone, Mon., May 20, at 9 PM. $18/$15 in advance, plus $5 surcharge for ages 18-20. Tickets available at Ear Candy and stonefly-productions.com.

Celebrate Endangered Species Day (maybe celebrate is the wrong word) with the Endangered Species Coalition at the Montana Natural History Center. Kick it off at the native plant sale at 5:30 PM. At 7 PM, there is a lecture by USFWS Bull Trout Biologist Wade Fredenberg titled “Bull Trout Recovery in the Clark Fork: From Boundary to Butte.” Free.

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [27]


[calendar]

no small feat

To some of us, classic rock radio sounds like a wasteland. The same 99 tunes consistently receive the kind of airplay that they haven’t deserved for 35 years. Seriously, let’s stop with the “Dream Ons,” “La Granges” and the “Frankensteins.” In a perfect world, any song recorded before 1984 would be placed in an airtight trunk and lowered into the Mariana’s Trench, not to be recovered for 125 years. It’d be a shame to do that, though, and miss out on some of the music that hasn’t been shoved into our earholes by the milquetoast corporatocracy of modern radio. We’d miss out on prolific and influential artists like Bill Payne, one of the founders of Little Feat, and a legendary rock and roll keyboardist. Payne is one of those dudes who you’ve heard a million-billion times on the construction site or in your uncle Pat’s Trans-Am. He bangs the piano on the Doobie Brothers’ “China Grove, ” keeps it chill

on Bob Seger’s “Like a Rock” and plays on hundreds of tracks by artists such as Jimmy Buffet, Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor and basically everyone else that matters. Payne’s in-studio advice and songwriting abilities have had as much effect on FM radio as the Gibson Les Paul and cocaine. Speaking of the good old days, Payne, who now lives in southwest Montana’s Paradise Valley, is spending this tour reminiscing about past glories and sharing the good, the bad and the ugly of life on the road with music aficionados and fans. He is joined by Dennis McNally, former Grateful Dead publicist and author of A Long Strange Trip: The Inside History of the Grateful Dead. Before Tuesday’s gone and the great musicians of the past are just dust in the wind, we might want to take one last listen before we lower that trunk into the sea. —Jason McMackin

WHO: Bill Payne and the Hooligans, along with Grateful Dead biographer and publicist Dennis McNally WHAT: Tracing Footsteps Tour: music, photography and tales of the road WHERE: Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. WHEN: Tue., May 21, 8 PM HOW MUCH: $20

[28] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013


[calendar] John Floridis plays the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton from 69:30 PM. Free. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where its Sewing Lounge goes from 6 to 8 PM. $9–10/hour. Call 541-7171. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Learn how that dirty old scrog Grendel gets his just desserts in Beowulf, with Dave Caserio, in a dramatic performance of ye Olde English poem. Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St. 6 PM. Free. Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free. Nosh on hors d’oeuvres and sweets while preparing this year’s plants for sale at the Missoula Farmers Market with the Native Plant Society. Bring fingers and finger foods to share. 2 September Drive (left off Lincoln Hills Drive partway up the hill). 6:30 PM. Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Plus, all-youcan-eat wings, $10 two-topping pizzas, $6 domestic pitchers and $7 Blue Moon pitchers. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

Tell a tale and take it on the road when local alt/rock outfits Cain and Fable and Airstream Safari play the Palace at 9 PM. Free. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Burst your ear holes and bust an old time groove in your robot walkers at Archaic Revival, an evening of electronic music with Lil Sassy and DJs Rockstocki, HAuLi and Nic Jaymes, at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Also includes a 2-for-1 well drink special.

FRIDAYMAY17 Howl at the moon, wear a paper crown and party through the evening at the Wild Things Music Spring Rumpus, a music celebration by all ages, for all ages, at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. The press release promises “no one will leave the theater un-Rumpused!” Pre-show carnival at 6:30 PM, show at 7:30 PM. $12/$10 in advance at MCT. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. The Women’s Circle Group Acupuncture at Mountain Sage Acupuncture Clinic, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 1, focuses on women’s health issues and sounds comfy and nice. 2–5 PM, last appointment at 4 PM. Sliding scale treatments $20-40 with a first time administration fee of $10. Call (503) 593-7073. Teens go toward the literary light during the Missoula Public Library’s Teen Writers Group, which meets every Fri. at 3:30 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM.

nightlife

During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com.

Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. They say children are just like drunks, or maybe it’s drunks who are like children. Anyway, bring those free-spirited kiddos to Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat, with tunes by country-folkers 17 Mile from 6-8 PM. Free. Don’t yell out your ex-girlfriend’s name during Hump Day Bingo with Bob at the Lucky Strike Casino where you’ll win prizes. Beware: $5 mini-fishbowls served all day. Bingo starts at 6:30 PM. If it ain’t Baroque, don’t fix it at a night of music composed by Telemann, Bach, Marais and more played on wooden Baroque-period instruments by Seattle and San Francisco musicians. Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St. $25, tickets available at locations including The Music Box and Chapter One Books. You’re a cheap date, not a cheapskate. The Missoula Public Library hosts another installment of its cheap date movie night, which starts at 7 PM sharp at the library, 301 E. Main St. Enter from the parking lot side of the building. Free. Call 721-BOOK and visit missoulapubliclibrary.org. Go off and see the wizard at the Stevensville Playhouse’s performance of The Wizard of Oz. 7:30 PM. $10/$8 for children 12 and under. Visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org. Hold on, there just might be a big wave of fun at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., when the Flood Band plays that folky stuff starting at 8 PM. Free. Practice your fist pumping and skip the shave (ladies too!) when Seattle’s The Grizzled Mighty plays the Badlander, with locals Skin Flowers and Shahs, starting at 9 PM. $7/$5 in advance at stonefly-productions.com. All ages. (See Music.) Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. Grow a pair when Confidence Man and guests play Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St., starting at 9 PM. Free. Head on up to Frenchtown with your rock goggles when Corporate Defiance and Hellbound Express play the Alcan Bar and Grill, 16780 Beckwith Ave., starting at 9 PM. Free.

Karl Rangikawhiti Leonard is a Maori master weaver and performer as well as Fulbright scholar and visiting Flathead Valley Community College professor. As part of New Zealand Day in Missoula, he presents his knowledge about traditional Maori art and culture Sat., May 18 at 6 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free.

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [29]


[calendar] John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406-721-2416 or just show up. Tom Catmull and the Clerics will dazzle you with rays of light when they play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., starting at 9:30 PM. Free. Don’t confuse your beef pasties for your sparkly pasties when the Cigarette Girls Burlesque entertain you, along with the pretty 17 Mile and very pretty Dodgy Mountain Men, starting at 10 PM. Top Hat. $5.

SATURDAYMAY18 Don your caps and gowns, kids, and put those years of sneaking in flasks to good use, it’s time for the 2013 University of Montana Commencement Ceremony, starting at 10 AM in Washington-Grizzly Stadium. This year’s speaker is Jim Messina, chief campaign manager for President Barack Obama and a ‘93 UM graduate. He’ll tell you how to make political science and journalism degrees worthwhile, I reckon. Take a two-day toodle and clear your noodle at the 43rd annual Tour of the Swan River Valley, a supported bicycling tour that leaves Missoula via Hwy. 200 and swings on up to Seeley Lake before heading over to Flathead Lake and returning to base. Food, baggage arrangements and accommodations are all handled by tour organizers—just bring your self and your bike. Visit missoulabike.org. (See Mountain High.) Pretty people, fresh numnums, seas of strollers, a man eating a waffle barehanded—it must be summer and time for folks to make the pilgrimage to area Farmers’ Markets. In Missoula at Circle Square (missoulafarmersmarket.com), on Pine St. (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), under the Higgins Avenue bridge (clarkforkrivermarket.com) and in Hamilton at South Third and Bedford Streets. Hours vary slightly, but most take place between 8 AM and 1 PM. Get a hit of cardiovascular exercise during Nia: The Joy of Movement, from 9 AM to 10 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $12/$10 members. Call 541-7240. Veg out with your carrot out during the Hamilton Farmers Mar-

[30] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

ket, where folks can purchase all sorts of dee-lish local goodies from area farmers. Third and Bedford Streets. 9 AM to 12:30 PM. Get musical while finding your flow when Brian Baty leads a live music Vinyasa yoga class, which features music by Nathan Zavalney, this and every Sat. from 9:30–10:45 AM at Inner Harmony Yoga, 214 E. Main St. Ste. B. $10 drop-in/$8 students drop-in, with various prices for punch-card holders. Call 581-4093 or visit yogainmissoula.com.

As part of New Zealand Day f est i v i ti es , Kar l Ran g i k aw h i t i Leonard, a Maori master weaver and performer as well as Fulbright scholar and visiting Flathead Valley Community College professor, presents his knowledge about traditional Maori art and culture. Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. at 6 PM. Free. Hold on, there just might be a big wave of fun at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., when the Flood Band plays that folky stuff starting at 8 PM. Free.

Music is an aeroplane so share the gift of it with the chilluns at Kids’ Vibrations, a 45-minute funtime featuring local musicians, dancing and playing instruments. Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W., Ste. F. 11–11:45 AM. Donations accepted.

A b s o l u t e l y, w i t h D J s K r i s Moon and Monty Carlo, is like Shabba-Doo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2.

Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Vacation is all you ever wanted so start your summer solidly with Couches, The Magpies, BOYS and Armaund Hammer, at the VFW, 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $3.

Former State Rep. Diane Sands presents a talk on Thai elections, and how they impact women in that country, at Jaker’s, 3515 Brooks St., starting at 11:30 AM. Hosted by the Missoula League of Women Voters. The historic, working Moon-Randolph Homestead, 1515 Spurlock Road, hosts a public meeting to update its 10-year strategic plan, starting at 1 PM. Lunch provided for those who RSVP. Call 406-728-0451, or learn more at the homestead’s Facebook page. (See News.) Take the kids to learn about critters when Jessie Castaneda of Animal Wonders presents lessons with live animals starting at 2 PM at the Alberton Senior Citizen Center, 1.6 miles west from Petty Creek Exit 77 on Interstate 90.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Put on some shades and stay cool as a cucumber when Russ Nasset plays Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave., from 5-8 PM. Free.

Here’s your chance to show up Buford Uling Davis when Mark Duboise and Crossroads play the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., starting at 9 PM, with mechanical bull riding. Free. Soak it up and sing it down to some 67,000 tunes when The Outpost Restaurant & Saloon, 38500 W. Hwy. 12 at Lolo Hot Springs, presents karaoke with KJ Mark, starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-4733. Ask that nice fella from HR to dance when Zeppo MT lights up the Union Club, starting at 9 PM. Free. Celebrate that commencement by boogying with The Hasslers, Trees and Ryan Bundy at Stage 112, inside the Elk’s at 112 Pattee St., 9 PM. $2.

SUNDAYMAY19 Tom Attard will soothe man and beast when he plays Draught Works, 915 Toole Ave., from 4 to 6 PM. Free. No more excuses, Mr. Beergutsen, it’s time to pedal your patoot to work and win prizes for yourself and your company, not to mention you may just drop a few pounds during the Commuter Challenge. This year Missoula in Motion has made this event two weeks long, so you have a full two weeks to, uh, get ‘er done. Final day is Sat., May 25. Visit missoulainmotion.com. Catch new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the Internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads


[calendar] a spiritual message for your viewing pleasure at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM this and every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. Bob Bowers presents worship with his Singing Trumpet at the The King’s Christian Church, 9830 Valley Grove Dr. 10:45 AM. Free. Your bedtime tales of collegeage debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like storytelling, finger plays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM on Sat. and 2 PM on Sun. at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Go off and see the wizard at the Stevensville Playhouse’s performance of The Wizard of Oz. 2 PM. $10/$8 for children 12 and under. Visit stevensvilleplayhouse.org. Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Explore the idea of open intelligence and the peace, happiness and skillfulness that exists within you during the Balanced View open meeting, which runs every Sun. from 6-7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free, but donations accepted. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free. Bellow out your favorite pop tune so you can impress your friends and perhaps win a prize during a karaoke contest this and every Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9 PM. Free. $3 Fireball specials. Call 721-1798.

Porchin’ it. The Wyoamericana Tour with Jalan Crossland, Screendoor Porch and Jshogren Shangai'd, is Thu., May 23, at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. $8, advance tickets available at the venue.

MONDAYMAY20 It turns out we can all blame The Band. The Top Hat hosts a Big Sky Documentary Film Night screening of Ain’t in It for My Health, a documentary about the great, late Levon Helm. Free, all ages. (See Film.) Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM. The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/rough-cut-series for the schedule.

More events online: missoulanews.com Those looking for mother-tomother breast feeding support can find it when the La Leche League meets every first Mon. of the month at 10 AM and every third Monday of the month at 6 PM at the First Presbyterian Church, 201

S. Fifth St. W. Free. Children and babies are always welcome.

nightlife Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. Lo, tinkerers and makers, it is time to come forth for the Missoula Public Library’s Makerspace Information Session. Makerspace offers DIYers the chance to learn about 3D printing and scanning, electronics prototyping and soft-tech development. What can’t you do, friends? Missoula Public Library. 7 PM. Free. Wind down your Monday when Cash for Junkers plays the Red Bird, 111 N. Higgins Ave., inside the Florence Building, from 7 to 10 PM. Stay off the crack and don’t break your mother’s back when Skippin’ A Groove plays the Missoula Folklore Society Contra Dance, with Round Robin calling, on the second floor of the Union Hall, 208 E. Front St. Beginners’ workshop at 7:30, dance from 8-11 PM. $9/$6 for members. Get mindful at Be Here Now, a mindfulness meditation group that

meets every Mon. from 7:30 to 8:45 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Visit openway.org. Show how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. You know it’s gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. Head past the Sunset Strip and watch out for the Black River Killer when Blitzen Trapper plays the Palace, with opener Sera Cahoone, at 9 PM. $18/$15 in advance, plus $5 surcharge for ages 18-20. Tickets available at Ear Candy and stonefly-productions.com. Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488. Yar, there be Timothys afoot at the Milkcrate Monday Random Timmys for Random Kitties, a going away party for local DJ Asyn9. DJs include Milkcrate Mechanic, Atom, Geeter and Asyn9. 10 PM. Free, with $6 pitchers of PBR.

TUESDAYMAY21 “So much depends upon a red wheelbarrow...” Learn to mine great lines from that fabulous mind of yours just like William Carlos Williams when you join other seasoned and novice poets for Poetry Club every Tuesday at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First W. Dance cuz everybody’s watching at the American Cabaret Style bellydance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. This class is great for beginners and experienced dancers alike. 6–7 PM. Visit madronadance.wordpress.com. Get a breath of fresh air at the ninth annual Air Toxics Under the Big Sky symposium, presenting high school student research on air quality. In the North Underground Lecture Hall on the UM Campus from 9 AM to 2 PM. Free. Fun with Yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum might work for you and the kids. It might make you cry, too. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon– 1 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [31]


[calendar] Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Missoula Aging Services offers its Caregiver Support Group every third Tue. of the month at 337 Stephens Ave from 4–5 PM. Free.

original member of the Doobie Brothers Tom Johnston? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) I’ll see you THIS Tuesday, beeyatch, when the Chalfonts do that rock thing at the Badlander’s Live and Local Night starting at 10 PM. Free.

Expand your mind, wave your booty at Progressive, with tunes spun (or pressed play?) by DJs Mark Myriad, Hotpantz, Cadence and Kig Traxiom. 9 PM. Free, with $2 Fireball shot special. Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out

deners and become an expert on local flora. Thursdays from 4–6 PM at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Gardens. Visit montananaturalist.org.

nightlife End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice

nightlife Bill Payne, who you may remember from Little Feat, presents storytelling, photographs by former Grateful Dead publicist Dennis McNally, and a performance by Bill Payne and the Hooligans. Top Hat, 8 PM. $20. (See Spotlight.)

Find some clarity at the Meditation Class Series at the Living Art Offices, 725 W. Alder Suite 17, which offers several different meditation styles on four Tuesday evenings through June 11. Register by calling 406-443-3439 or emailing info@patrickmarsolek.com.

Community Conversations on ADD/ADHD with James Fix intends to provide folks with tools, tips and strategies to make your home life less chaotic, all without pharmaceuticals. Missoula Public Library. 7 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free. Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expression-filled improvisational dance bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:30-9 PM. $10. Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs. The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18-plus. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: Who replaced

During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight.

It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900.

Baby, we were born to run. Montana author Karen Buley reads from her first novel, Nanny on the Run, the story of an 18-year-old Butte woman who becomes a nanny in New York City, at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W., at 7 PM.

Show ‘em that pop culture knowledge is just as important as having a job during Trivial Beersuit at the Lucky Strike Casino. Prizes for podium finishers. Karaoke follows. 1515 Dearborn. 8–10 PM.

More events online: missoulanews.com

Under the sea, darling it’s better, down where it’s wetter, take it from me. Surfer Blood plays Stage 112, inside the Elk’s at 112 N. Pattee St., Thu., May 23, at 9 PM, along with local Sick Kids XOXO. $15/$12 in advance at Ear Candy and stonefly-productions.com.

WEDNESDAYMAY22 Watch the fine musicians of tomorrow perform today at Sentinel High School’s spartan and symphony band concert, starting at 7:30 PM. Potluck awards banquet at 6 PM.

nightlife Looking for the ultimate athletic experience? Need something fun to do this spring? Then register for the Missoula Ultimate Frisbee Spring League. No prior experience necessary. Fee includes disc, shirt, beer (21+) and fun times every Wed. evening at 6 PM through May 29. Playfair Park, 1600 Bancroft St. $45. Visit missoulaultimate.com. Try the marinated cukes when Dan Dubuque plays the Top Hat dinner show from 6-8 PM. Free, all ages. Hey, spring is here and TV ain’t exactly pumping out the good stuff these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. Touch the lizard—no, not that one—to find out your state of mind when Andre Floyd and Mood Iguana play the Top Hat this evening. Free. (Pub trivia answer: Michael McDonald.)

[32] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

THURSDAYMAY23 NCBI Missoula hosts a 15th anniversary celebration at the Florence Hotel Governor’s Room, 111 North Higgins Ave., from 6– 8 PM. The celebration will highlight NCBI’s community of past and current volunteers, youth leaders, board members, staff, and community partners. Free. Release some stress during T’ai Chi classes every Thu. at 10 AM at The Open Way Center, 702 Brooks. $10 drop-in class. Call Chris at 728-0918. Fresh produce should be for everybody. Missoula Aging Services needs help throughout the market season to assist older folks on the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program. Volunteer orientation is from noon to 1 PM. Learn more by calling Megan Hill at 406728-7682 or email mhill@missoulaagingservices.org. Who has two green thumbs and likes learning about native plants? Potential Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden volunteers, that’s who. Work beside botanists and gar-

when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 2–7 PM Mon.Sat. and 2–5 PM on Sun. 5646 W. Harrier. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. Sip on some well-fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Call 549-8703. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. See what’s fryin’ when Darah and Ryan play the Top Hat dinner show from 6-8 PM. Free, all ages. Win $50 by using your giant egg to answer trivia questions at Brains on Broadway Trivia Night at the Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway Ave. 7 PM. Plus, all-youcan-eat wings, $10 two-topping pizzas, $6 domestic pitchers and $7 Blue Moon pitchers. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM.

Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Burst your ear holes and bust an old time groove in your robot walkers at Archaic Revival, an evening of electronic music with Lil Sassy and DJs Rockstocki, HAuLi and Nic Jaymes, at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Also includes a 2-for-1 well drink special. Floridian “anthemic, bombastic, life-affirming” indie pop group Surfer Blood plays Stage 112, inside the Elk’s on 112 N. Pattee St., at 9 PM, along with local Sick Kids XOXO. $15/$12 in advance at Ear Candy and stoneflyproductions.com. Make a convoy out of it when the Wyoamericana Tour stops at the Top Hat, with Jalan Crossland, Screendoor Porch and Jshogren Shangai’d, starting at 9:30 PM. $8, tickets available at the Top Hat.

Lo, peons, a new calendar age is upon ye. All hail Calapatra! Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., May 17 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website, scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH Spring done sprung and beautiful Missoula people have been pedaling about town for a few weeks now, blowing out lungs filled with wintertime crud and embracing the season with audacious displays of pasty thighs and sun-scorched shoulders. That said, it’s time to push a bigger gear (ahem) and get a gander at some fine scenery, the kind where the honking comes from a stray goose skimming on a pond near Condon, not an automobile parked on Higgins. How to do it? Easy, sign up for the 43rd annual Tour of the Swan River Valley. This year’s supported ride takes place on what the old-timers call the “Big Loop.” That’s 226 miles over the course of two days. On the first day, the tour departs from the UM campus and makes its way up

the Blackfoot River corridor and hangs a “Leroy” up the Clearwater River Valley before landing in Bigfork. Day two begins with a big old pancake breakfast and a tootle down the Flathead Valley before returning to Missoula via Evaro Hill (yes!). Hopefully you’ve managed at least a 75-mile ride in the past couple months or this deal could make for some sores on top of saddle sores. Proceeds benefit Missoulians on Bicycles, which promotes bicycling in western Montana. —Jason McMackin The two-day, 226-mile Tour of the Swan River Valley takes place on May 18 and May 19. For a full schedule, gear list and costs visit missoulabike.org.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

FRIDAY MAY 17 Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY MAY 18 Cast off to the northwest corner of the Treasure State for two days of fine fishing during the Koocanusa Resort Salmon & Trout Derby, a competition where you try to catch a big one or a mess of biggish ones on the Koocanusa Lake, just 23 miles upstream from Libby. Call 406-293-7474 for info. “Tri” your best at Missoula’s PEAK Triathlon, which includes a 500-yard swim, 12.4 mile bike and 3.1 mile run. All levels of athletes are invited to take part. Go to peaktri.com for more info.

swing by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary’s free 15minute vessel safety exams at Gull Boats and RV, 2601 W. Broadway, from 11 AM to 4 PM. If you don’t trap, but want to learn about Montana trapping season and how to release traps, check out the free clinic at the Lolo Community Center, 12345 Hwy 93 S., from 5-6:30 PM. Free, no registration necessary.

SUNDAY MAY 19 Uh oh, here comes the hammer. The Heron Hammer, that is. This cross-country bike race takes place at Heron Park outside of Kalispell and features technical sections, downhills and tight switchbacks. Visit montanacycling.net for a list of categories and costs. Might want to get two tickets for the 11 Miles to Paradise Run, starting at Quinn’s Hot Spring Resort, 190 Quinn’s Canyon Road Route 135 in Paradise. Runner check-in at 7:15. More info at runnersedgemt.com.

The Helenduro is not what state legislators call their biannual session, but rather a two-day endurance test for cross-country mountain bikers. Competitors battle for the fastest times through various race-course sections, with slowpokes penalized for slothful riding. Only the strong survive. Cruise on over to montanacycling.net for more info.

MONDAY MAY 20

Don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occur at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. in Missoula. It’s after the run/walk that you can grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

WEDNESDAY MAY 22

Celebrate all things Kiwi on New Zealand Day, which celebrates Missoula’s sister city, Palmerston North in N.Z. Events touch off with a rugby clinic for ages 7-14 from 10 AM to noon on the Fort Missoula Rugby Pitch, followed by the middle school boys and high school girls Montana Youth Rugby Association State Championships. Free. If you got your swim trunks and your flippyfloppies and you’re ready to sail on your boat, first

The wildflowers sure are purty this time of year up Mount Jumbo. Join the Sierra Club’s five-mile outing on the North Loop Trail starting at 9 AM from the Lincoln Hill Trailhead. Sign up by emailing mairemt@earthlink.net. Bring snacks and water.

Learn how not to battle your paddle and instead make it an extension of your inner desires and outer limbs at the American Canoe Association Whitewater Kayak Course. Become a more fluid paddler and get certified to instruct others. Following the introductory class, the course takes place May 23–May 27. Visit zootownsurfers.org. Looking for the ultimate athletic experience? Need something fun to do this spring? Then register for the Missoula Ultimate Frisbee Spring League. No prior experience necessary. Fee includes disc, shirt, beer (21+) and fun times every Wed. evening at 6 PM through May 29. Playfair Park, 1600 Bancroft St. $45. Visit missoulaultimate.com.

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [33]


[community]

Travis Leitch

I once spent a summer living in Los Angeles, where I’d occasionally go on trips with friends down to the beach in Santa Monica. I could never understand the appeal: It was hot, dry, crowded, the ocean waves knocked me over and the only critters to be seen were seagulls. I was homesick for the rocky, cool, shady riverbanks of the Clark Fork, where I could find weird bugs, see muskrats and blue herons, and soak my feet unperturbed by other people. Los Angeles, where the tap water is sometimes suspect and most folks drink bottled, also made me appreciate how abundant and good the water is in western Montana. I owe my love of rivers to a childhood growing up near one, where my family would go fishing or my school would take us on field trips. I want more kids to grow up like I did, playing by rivers and exploring waterways. And thankfully, we have the nonprofit Watershed Education Network, which takes local children on dozens of field trips throughout the year to learn about and appreciate the glo-

rious waters we have in Montana. The upcoming Spring Fundraising Hour will help support those programs, and foster another generation of kids who appreciate a clear, cool, vibrant river. —Kate Whittle The WEN Spring Fundraising Hour for Kids At the River, with music and refreshments, is Wed., May 22, from noon to 1 PM at The Loft, 119 W. Main St. Please RSVP by calling 406-541-9287 or emailing water@montanawatershed.org.

(406) 546-5317 leitchmt@gmail.com

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY MAY 16 They say you can’t spell team without an “I,” but at least you can spell it with a meat. I digress. The Missoula Nonprofit Network presents a leadership/team building training, with psychological assessment expert Steve McArthur, at Mountain West Bank, 3301 Great Northern. RSVP to michael@missoulaunitedway.org. Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

SATURDAY MAY 18 State Rep. Diane Sands presents a talk on Thai elections, and how they impact women in that country, at Jaker’s, 3515 Brooks St., starting at 11:30 AM. Hosted by the Missoula League of Women Voters.

SUNDAY MAY 19 No more excuses, Mr. Beergutsen, it’s time to pedal your patoot to work and win prizes for yourself and your company, not to mention you may just drop a few pounds during the Commuter Challenge. This year Missoula in Motion has made this event two weeks long, so you have a full two weeks to, uh, get ‘er done. Final day is Sat., May 25. Visit missoulainmotion.com.

Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

TUESDAY MAY 21 Get a breath of fresh air at the ninth annual Air Toxics Under the Big Sky symposium, presenting high school student research on air quality. In the North Underground Lecture Hall on the UM Campus from 9 AM to 2 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

THURSDAY MAY 23

MONDAY MAY 20

Fresh produce should be for everybody. Missoula Aging Services needs help throughout the market season to assist older folks on the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program. Volunteer orientation is from noon to 1 PM. Learn more by calling Megan Hill at 406-728-7682 or email mhill@missoulaagingservices.org.

Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Family friendly, from noon–8 PM.

NCBI Missoula hosts a 15th anniversary celebration at the Florence Hotel Governor’s Room, 111 North Higgins Ave., from 6–8 PM. The celebration will highlight NCBI’s community of past and current volunteers, youth leaders, board members, staff, and community partners. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[34] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 AVATAR• Avatar usually does have a sad

look on his face, and he's quite uncertain with new people. Once he gets to know you, however, you couldn't wish for a friendlier, happier dog. He just wants to be some special person's constant companion.

RILEY•Riley is all puppy, which means she

is also all cute. Even when her ears aren't arranging themselves in interesting configurations, she's still one to catch your eye. She's lively and full of fun, as well as being the perfect age for training.

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quite reserved when he was first brought to the shelter, which is not unusual for a cat living on his own. Now, however, he is a bit portly, has a soft, smooth coat, and he couldn't be friendlier.

FERN•Fern is a big, quiet lady who seems

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

to be made up completely of circles and curves. She has a very round face and big, round eyes, and her rather chubby body is very curvy too. She's a lovely cat with a sweet personality.

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HENDRICK•Hendrick is quite reserved in his cage, but when he thinks we're not watching he's often reaching out to play with the cat in the cage next door. We think he'd develop into a great pet once he had a home and family of his own.

Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat)

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 TINKER•At 12 years young, Tinker enjoys helping you with projects underway or just hanging out. Friendly, she’s thrilled to receive a good brushing, head rub, or kitty treats. This little girl is good with adults, really likes dogs, but wants to be an only cat in her forever home. She is a diabetic kitty, and needs a supportive family. Might that be you? GIBSON•Let’s meet Gibson, a lovely 8-10-

year-old boy who wants to be your constant companion. Black with stunning yellow eyes, Gibson is social and enjoys being picked up, hanging out in your lap, or a good head rub and will acknowledge your affection with his unmistakable purr. This sweet boy is diabetic and just needs a little extra care.

SCOUT•A special grey Schnauzer/Maltese mix, Scout came to Missoula from Great Falls where she was part of a hoarding case. She’s been spending time in a HOPE foster home where she’s learning that people make great companions, and can be quite loving. Perhaps you can scout out a place in your life for this sweet girl? Flowers for every bride. In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

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SAM• Sweetness.

Yes, that’s Sam. This social 6-year-old boy is loved by just about everyone. He delights in a fine brushing, head rub, and playing with toys. Easygoing, he’s lived with dogs and children. Sam does require insulin (he’s a diabetic) - a small price to pay for the love and affection he’ll bring your family.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

GRAVY•A dark chocolate Chihuahua mix, Gravy is a goofy, fun-loving 2-year-old boy. Independent and smart, he’s playful and demonstrates a strong desire to learn. A California Little with a big personality, he’d prefer a home of adults where lots of kindness, love and attention would come his way. Have a big heart for this gravy train?

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DALLAS•Howdy, Missoula! I’m an energetic 2-year-old Cattle Dog/Pit Bull cross named Dallas, and yes, I’m a tall drink of pup! A friendly gal, I love exercise and adult engagement. I’ve already completed the Paws Ahead training, am house- and crate-trained, and a great cuddler (a.k.a. bed hog). Need a little excitement in your life? I may just be your gal.

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4701 TABITHA•Tabitha is a 4-year-old female

orange tabby who has been with AniMeals for two years. She is a very sweet girl; however, she will need a single cat home and a patient owner. She is shy upon first introduction, but once she gets to know you, she is very loving.

ROCKY• Rocky is a large 5-year-old male tabby. He is declawed on the front, extremely loving and prefers to live with other female cats. He is tentative and cautious around men, but instantly cuddles with women.

GALENA•Galena

is a 3-year-old female, long-haired tabby. She is playful and full of energy. She is looking for an indoor/outdoor environment and would do well in a multiple-pet home, as long as she has her own space.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

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LEONA•Leona is a 6-year-old female lilac

Rockin Rudy’s World Headquarters 237 Blaine • 542-0077

tortoiseshell who has been at the shelter since January of 2012. She gets along well with children and other cats but is often overlooked because of her quiet, calm disposition.

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [35]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

May 16 - May 23, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 4 Week Meditation Class - Learn how to calm your mind! Tuesdays, May 21st - June 11th - 6:30 - 7:30 PM - $45 - Contact Patrick: 406443-3439 or www.InnerWorkingsResources.com Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com CHERRY FESTIVAL SEEKING VENDORS Wanted:

Seeking vendors for Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival. This is a very well-attended event, held on the main streets of Polson July 20th and 21st. This unique celebration of Montana’s cherries draws many thousands of visitors each year. Three booth sizes are available, making this affordable for anyone. Local Montana-made and cherry-themed products are preferred. Food vendors welcome. To view and fill out an application, please visit www.flatheadcherryfestival.com. Booth spaces are limited and our deadline is May 24, 2013.

This is a two-day event and we reserve the right to refuse duplicate products. You can direct questions to vendors@flatheadcherry festival.com, or 406-686-1155. Join Missoula Medical Aid at Draught Works Chug for Charity May 21st from 5pm-closing. Curious about Acupuncture? Experience a MiniAcupuncture Treatment for Stress Relief & Relaxation. Rejuvenate your Mind, Body & Spirit. 30 Minutes only $20. Ask how acupunc-

ture may help you! Gentle Acupuncture by Karen Hayberg L.AC. (406) 396-0815

GROUP FORMING. Exploring human place on the planet based on Deep Ecology & Tribal Wisdom. Tuesdays/7:00 p.m. 406214-2410

Piano Lessons

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At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

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546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C5 Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C8

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Estimates

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PET OF THE WEEK

Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not

Rizzo What a looker – white fur with black accents, and green eyes! Meet Rizzo, a very pretty 12-year-old lady, who is very social and active. Talkative, Rizzo likes to be in on the action or to play with any toy. She’s great with adults and loves to be, brushed, or hang out in your lap. Rizzo’s front paws are declawed, and she prefers the indoors. Need some fun in your life? Rizzo knows how to bring it! Check out the Humane Society of Western Montana, a great animal shelter and pet resource. Become a Facebook friend or check out www.myHSWM.org! 549-9864

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ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

IN SICKNESS AND IN STEALTH This woman and I were involved 13 years ago, before I met my wife, but she was married then. She got divorced and moved away. We reconnected recently on Facebook, and I discovered she's now only 20 miles away. I told her I'm happily married and I've never cheated on my wife, but I would risk everything for her and want to meet her for an intimate encounter. (She and I had great sex, far better than I have with my wife.) She said she still has feelings for me but is happily married and couldn't cheat on her husband because she would feel "too guilty." She says he is her "rock" and has done so much for her, including taking her and her three kids in during the ordeal of her divorce. I'm perplexed. She cheated on her first husband with me, and we had lots of fun. I thought the leopard couldn't change its spots. How could it be okay for her to cheat then and not now? —Spurned It's so annoying when a woman lets a little thing like a lifelong commitment get in the way of providing you with an hour and a half of better-quality sex. No, a leopard does not wake up in the morning and think, "Maybe I'll do paisley today." Humans, on the other hand, have an irritating tendency to fail to conform to pat aphorisms. For example, this woman, who, in the past, has provided you with some seriously excellent adulterous sex, now refuses to run off to Goodwill to get back her leopard-print blouse with the scarlet A on it. Amazingly, she feels it would be wrong to reward a guy who's "done so much" for her by doing you whenever you can both sneak out for a nooner. As for why she cheated in the past, maybe she was young and narcissistic and thought being unhappily married was enough of an excuse to be happily adulterous. She's since picked herself up a set of ethics—maybe after seeing the ravages that conscience-free living can cause on husbands and children. And tempted as she may be, she seems to realize that the best way to avoid going around feeling all queasy with guilt is to avoid sexual multitasking: trying to gaze in one man's eyes like you love him while trying to remember what time you were supposed to meet the other man at the motel. Economist Robert H. Frank explains in "Passions Within Reason" that moral behavior seems to be driven by the emotions. Guilt, clearly, has worked for your former

cheatums, and Frank sees love as a "commitment device" that bonds people beyond what would be in their sheer self-interest (like running off to the first opportunity for better sex that moves back to town). In other words, if you focus on what you're grateful for about your wife and engage in little loving touches and gestures, you can reinforce what you have—which seems fairer than rewarding her for making you happy by giving her believable excuses for your disappearances. Remember, they're called marriage vows, not marriage suggestions—as in, you don't get to live according to "Till the prospect of really great sex do us part, but only for an afternoon, and I wouldn't even think of it if she weren't double-jointed."

BELITTLE MISS SUNSHINE I met a girl online, and we exchanged some email and planned to meet for happy hour. About three hours before, she texted me, "Sorry, have 2 cancel." That was the last I ever heard from her. I'm not bothered by being texted (since we didn't have a relationship), but at what point do you owe somebody more than the briefest possible blow-off? —Prematurely Dumped Sometimes the technology at hand demands that a person send an abbreviated message—like when their chisel breaks just as they're etching the last letter of "cancel" into the stone tablet. Sometimes, the brevity is the message. For example, in the briefest way, this woman told you everything you need to know about her: "I'm not about to type out eight words of explanation just to preserve some stranger's dignity." In Internet dating, because you're meeting face to online dating profile, the coldly calculating find it easier to treat you like you're just a bunch of digital information that has the possibility of becoming a boyfriend. Being kind and polite takes very little—just some excuse that suggests you matter enough as a human to put some effort into blowing you off. So, this woman didn't need to give you the real reason, just some reason—"realizing i'm not over my x so sorry"—instead of simply unsubscribing to you and your offer of a date like you were unwanted email from Lyndon LaRouche or the Pantyliner Of The Month Club.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

Select 2012 & 2013 Felt Road Bikes 20-30% MISSOULA BIKE SOURCE 1521 S Russell SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 721-7744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com The ARTISTS’ SHOP, LOCAL ART & CRAFT, 127 N. Higgins, downtown Missoula. Hand-bound GUESTBOOKS, handcrafted CUTTINGBOARDS & BOWLS, lovely BRIDESMAID JEWELRY for perfect June WEDDINGS!

Time for Spring Cleaning. Call for an estimate. RC Services 241-0101 www.rcservices.info

LOST & FOUND lost wallet on 5/11 silver metal wallet lost on north side(palmer st), greyhound, or glacier ice rink. call or txt Kasey 406239-1194 Ring Found at Mustard Seed Sunday 4/14. Call 721-7444 to identify

TO GIVE AWAY Pass It On Missoula is now

USED APPLIANCES

NEEDED

to help fund child abuse prevention through The Parenting Place. Free pickup available. Tax deductible. Donation Warehouse, 240-4042, 1804 North Ave W

LINGERIE

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Home of the Stay-In-Bed Weekend! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Couples-Friendly Shopping 137 E MAIN • 543-3423

located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open Monday-Saturday 10AM-5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS

www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744 Patience Aquila & Garbriel Anthony phone your dad, David Anthony “Hill” Almeida. Cell 509-270-3821 WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 7217744

VOLUNTEERS Volunteer Tutors Needed. Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) is seeking college students and community

POST 27 HALL IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENTING

$350*Per Day

Capacity 299 people. Chairs, tables, etc. included. Wet Bar with large (*$450 w/ band) +$200 refundable round tables, two 58" TV's with Cleaning/Damage Deposit plugins. Floating wood floor installed on dance floor and bar area. **Very Special Rate for Post 27 and Auxiliary Members**

ADULT-AVE.COM

Sponsors: Good Food Store Missoula Federal Credit Union The Green Light Bayern Brewing The Bookstore at UM Montana Radio Company The Missoulian Rich Guest Ranch and Outfitters and the Missoula Independent

CALLING ALL VENDORS FOR GARDEN CITY LOCALFEST! June 22, 2013, 11am - 5pm, Caras Park, Missoula Tables: $40 SBC members, $65 non-members

Register at www.gardencitylocalfest.com


COMMUNITY members to work with children in transition in the Missoula public schools. • give just 1 to 2 hours per week • provide academic support • provide mentoring. Tutoring is offered during the school day. Placements are available in both the Middle and Elementary Schools depending on your preference. Ben Brewster, Volunteer Coordinator, bbrewster@wordinc.org, 406-5433550 x 218. Changing the World, One Child at a Time

INSTRUCTION AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL

EMPLOYMENT

Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

vary. WAGE: $8.00/hour. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

HOUSEKEEPING / 9975609 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com

Inventory Auditor / 9975627 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

MASSAGE TRAINING INSTITUTE MONTANA “Weekend Classes - Online Curriculum” 500 Hr Certification for MT License. (406) 250-9616 www.mtimontana.com

Framed by an artist.

THE

ART

HANG-UP

Artistic Custom Framing & Design Gallery 839 S Higgins | Missoula | 327-8757

Now Hiring Call Today! 273-2266

PROFESSIONAL CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Full-time Public Works Superintendent. Applications and Job Descriptions may be picked up at the City Hall or online www.hardinmt.com Wage is DOE. COMPLETE application and resume must be received no later than May 22, 2013 to 406 N. Cheyenne Ave., Hardin, MT 59034. The City of Hardin is an EOE and a drug and alcohol free work place. Applicants must have a valid driver’s license, 5 years experience in public utilities including 3 years supervisory capacity

performance. **HIRING AS SOON AS POSSIBLE** Missoula Job Service 728-7060 CARPENTER / 9975639 Local Missoula Business seeking skilled carpenter for 6 months. Must have at least 24 mo. experience as skilled carpenter, able to demonstrate high level of skill in framing, drywall, and finish work. Don’t hesitate to apply, we need you asap! The wage is $11-14/hr D.O.E. Missoula Job Service 7287060 Home Entertainment Technician / 9975618 Become a Home Entertainment Technician and learn a trade you can use nationwide. We provide paid certified training. Submit your application online today. $12.00 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 7287060 LOOKING FOR PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS for auto transport company. Experience preferred but not

required. Competitive wages and benefits, plus bonuses. Call Scott 406-855-4248 or online www.jandstransport.com TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

SALES INTERACTIVE / ONLINE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE /

#2984085 A minimum of 3 years successful sales experience, preferably in media sales. Solution based selling background. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

OPPORTUNITIES Discover the “Success and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Success and Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1-800790-5752 Entrepreneur opportunity If you are an entrepreneur who is interested in capitalizing on the timing of the exploding wireless industry, we’d be honored to have the opportunity to introduce you to Lightyear. We work closely with our business partners, helping them build a lucrative business. To get started go to website: www.arelon.net

Sussex School Marketing & Development Coordinator go to www.sussexschool.org

for application and job description

Hab Tech I / 9975603 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 HEAD COACH, WOMEN’S SOFTBALL, COLLEGIATE / 2984262 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR AUTO DETAILER / 2984264 Needed for Lolo, MT business. Requires valid driver’s license, good driving record and ability to drive a stick shift—no exceptions. Pay: starts at $8.00/hour. Pay raises upon proven ability and

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN LEVEL 1

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL ASSISTANT PROPERTY MANAGER WANTED! Responsible for day-today administration. Must be willing to work with tenants and their concerns/needs and help increase value of property. Send Resume to michael.rodriquez@aol.com DIRECT CARE / 9975601 Evenings & weekend hours providing assistance to Adults w/disabilities. Position open until filled. Valid MT driver license No history of abuse, neglect or exploitation. $9.00 Hourly. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

GENERAL LABOR / 9975586 Short-term and long-term temporary work available any time of year. Come get your application on file for temporary and last-minute work! Missoula Job Service 728-7060 HOUSEKEEPER / 2984266 Local hotel is seeking a part-time and full-time HOUSEKEEPER. QUALIFICATIONS: Responsible, reliable, efficient. Will train. DUTIES: Clean and dust guest rooms and fixtures, vacuum floors, change linens, clean bathrooms, restock cleaning cart at end of shift and take out garbage. DAYS/HOURS: Day shift; hours

Want to live, work and be able to Fish, Hunt, Ski, Snowmobile, & Boat 5 minutes from Work or Home? Now Hiring Full Time Level 1 Automotive Technician, Must have own tools and VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE. The auto tech works with lube and oil changes, transmission service, alignment, computer systems diagnosis, tune-up, brake systems, steering and suspension, Engine, Transmission replacement. Position is in SEELEY LAKE, approximately 50 miles

from Missoula. Glen’s Automotive Service Inc. 406-677-2141 Glen’sauto@blackfoot.net

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the alternate universe created by Marvel comic books, there is a mutant superhero called Squirrel Girl. She has the magic power to summon hordes of cute, furry squirrels. Under her guidance, they swarm all over the bad guy she's battling and disable him with their thousands of tiny chomps and thrashing tails. She and her rodent allies have defeated such arch-villains as Dr. Doom, Deadpool, Baron Mordo, and Ego the Living Planet. Let's make her your role model for the coming weeks, Aries. The cumulative force of many small things will be the key to your victories. As in Squirrel Girl's case, your adversaries' overconfidence may also be a factor. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have arrived at the edge of reality. Or rather, to be precise, you have arrived at the edge of what you think of as reality. Here's where things could get very interesting. Just on the other side of that edge you're brushing up against, there is much, much more reality—a vast territory you have barely imagined, let alone believed in or explored. Are you feeling brave? If you're willing to find out about stuff you didn't even realize you would love to experience, I suggest you slip across the border and wander around on the other side.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT 4 Week Meditation Class - Learn how to calm your mind! Tuesdays, May 21st - June 11th - 6:30 - 7:30 PM - $45 - Contact Patrick: 406443-3439 or www.InnerWorkingsResources.com

Hypnosis & Imagery

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Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. In my office at 127 N Higgins or in your home. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358

MSW, CHT, GIS www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

JIN SHIN JYUTSU. Eliminate pain and stress on all levels with safe, healing touch. Animals like it too! Hot Springs. Lila 406-741-5709

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A character in Neil Gaiman's graphic novel A Game of You delivers this speech: "Everybody has a secret world inside of them . . . No matter how dull and boring they are on the outside, inside them they've all got unimaginable, magnificent, wonderful, stupid worlds. Not just one world. Hundreds of them." As a Gemini, you are not, of course, dull and boring on the outside. That may have something to do with why your secret inner worlds are often even frothier and sparklier than most people's. But lately, I'm afraid, some of those secret inner worlds of yours have gotten a bit shabby and dank. It's time for a deep cleansing. To be thorough, don't just wash your own brain. Wash your wild heart and funky soul, too.

*Online Curriculum *Hands-On Class 1-Weekend/Month 500 Hr Certification for MT License

(406) 250-9616 www.mtimontana.com

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): "You begin saving the world by saving one person at a time," said writer Charles Bukowski. "All else is grandiose romanticism or politics." I invite you to make that thought one of your guiding principles in the coming week, Cancerian. Translate your high ideals into actions that make a practical impact on particular human beings and animals. Instead of merely talking about what good things you want to do, actually do them. As much as possible, be sure that every detail of your daily life reflects your vision of ultimate truth and beauty.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you were a fledgling savior, now would be a propitious moment to begin your messianic mission. If you were a musician hoping to leap to the next level of career success, this would be prime time to plan an extensive tour. If you were the inventor of the Next Big Thing, I'd suggest that you get your marketing campaign in gear. And if none of those descriptions fits your personal situation, regard them as apt metaphors for your use. How can you spread the word about what's most important to you?

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): As frontman of the band Queen, Virgo singer Freddie Mercury made use of his four-octave range with flamboyant showmanship and breathtaking technique. Many critics regard him as one of the greatest vocalists in the history of pop music. Freddie joked that he was perfect except for one glaring flaw: his overbite. Because he had four extra teeth in his upper mouth, his top jaw protruded. But he chose not to alter his appearance with surgery because he suspected it might change his singing voice in unpredictable ways. Is there a comparable situation in your own life, Virgo? A so-called imperfection that seems to be entwined with a beautiful asset? I urge you to be like Freddie. Accept the paradox—embrace it and celebrate it—and move on.

Curious about Acupuncture? Experience a Mini-Acupuncture Treatment for stress relief

30 Minutes $20 Ask how acupuncture may help you!

Gentle Acupuncture by Karen Hayberg L.AC. 396-0815

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The 14th-century poet Dante was a major influence on 20th-century novelist James Joyce. "I love Dante," wrote the author of the epic novel Ulysses. "He is my spiritual food." And yet Joyce felt he had to absorb Dante in small doses. "Dante tires one quickly," he said. "It is as if one were to look at the sun." Is there any influence like that in your own life, Libra? Judging from the astrological omens, I'm guessing it's a fine time for you to get as much sustained exposure to that glorious source as you can bear.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Greek poet Sappho was renowned in antiquity. The nine books she wrote were so esteemed that the historian Strabo wrote, "in this whole span of recorded time we know of no woman to challenge her as a poet even in the slightest degree." And yet little of Sappho's work survives. As of 2004 there were just 264 fragments and three complete poems. But then a fourth complete poem emerged. Its text was written on papyrus that had been wrapped in the casing of an Egyptian mummy. The mummy had been stored for years in a back room at Cologne University in Germany before someone discovered its hidden treasure. Your assignment, Scorpio, is to seek an equivalent recovery. Search for a part of the past that's still beautiful and useful, even if that quest leads you to unlikely and obscure places.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When I turn my psychic attention in your direction, I smell smoldering smoke. Here's how I interpret that: Your internal fire is burning with less than maximum efficiency. Do you agree, Sagittarius? If so, do you know why that might be? Did you not provide enough kindling? Is the wood too green? Is the ground wet? I urge you to find out what the problem is. You can't afford to have sputtering flames and sooty light and spotty warmth. You need a steady blaze that radiates brilliant light and strong heat.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC Family Care • Nutritional Consultation & IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Homeopathy • Massage Christine White N.D. & Elizabeth Axelrod N.D.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Very few of us are completely uninhibited about expressing who we really are. Most everyone is shy about revealing at least one facet of his or her identity. Why? Maybe because we're afraid that people will judge us harshly for being different from what they think we should be. Or maybe our secret side is at odds with our self-image, and we hesitate to acknowledge it even to ourselves. What is this part of you, Capricorn? In what sense are you still in the closet about a truth or quality or event that's central to your character? I urge you to have a conversation with yourself about it. You aren't necessarily ready to tell the whole world about it, but now might be the right time to start considering the possibility that you can give it more room to play.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I absolutely forbid you to be a slave of happiness, a victim of pleasure, or a prisoner of love. Wait. Sorry. I take that back. What gives me the right to forbid you from doing anything? It's your life. You're the boss. So let me reframe my previous advice. Dear Aquarius, I beg you not to be a slave of happiness, a victim of pleasure, or a prisoner of love. None of the good things in life will give you what you need if you make yourself crazy or sick while pursuing them. That's the cautionary news. The encouraging news is that in the next five weeks, I think you will have a knack for cultivating a graceful relationship with happiness, pleasure, and love.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don't be like the ducks that are floating on Phoenix Lake a short distance from where I'm sitting. They're feeding entirely on the surface, happy to skim a few insects from the top of the placid waters they're drifting on. No, Pisces, be more like the frogs that are diving to probe for morsels down below. This is a phase of your astrological cycle when the quest for more variety can deepen your perspective and provide better nourishment. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

Monday-Thursday 9:00-4:00 Friday & Saturday appointments available

2204 Dixon, Missoula • 542-2147 • MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS Damsel in Defense Personal defense products for women. Stun Guns, Pepper Spray, Security Items. Dani Stewart. 406-370-0982. mydamselpro.net/PRO1512 Dani’z Designz Montana Inspired Jewelry. 406-3700982. danizdesignz.com

SAWMILLS from only $3997.00. Make & Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363, Ext.300N

lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com

MUSIC

Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday

MUSIC LESSONS

In-house

12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 5417 5 3 3 . Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com


MARKETPLACE PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.or g 406-207-0765 CATS: #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #3114 Calico, Maine Coon X, SF, 3yrs; #3142 Orange, DSH, SF, 12yrs; #3139 Calico, Maine Coon X, SF, 1yr; #3187 Torbie, ASH, SF, 7yrs; #3226 Grey/white, Perisan X, SF, 4yrs; #3238 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 3yrs; #3240 Calico, DSH, SF, 8yrs; #3248 Black, DMH, NM, 2yrs; #3255 Torbie(red/grey), Persian X, SF, 2yrs; #3257 Orange, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #3271 Black, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #3273 Black, DSH, NM, 16yrs; #3277 Black, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3282 Orange, DSH, NM, 9yrs; #3307 Tri/Torbi, DSH, SF, 1.5yrs; # 3313 Flame Point, Siamese, SF, 6yrs; #3333 Grey, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #3339 Grey/white, DSH, SF, 3yrs; #3340 Blk/tan, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3355 Grey, Am Bob X, SF, 8yrs; #3356 Grey, Russian Blue, NM, 5yrs; #3369 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 1yr. For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montana pets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2851 Brown, Boxer X, NM, 1yr; #3149 White, Malamute, NM, 7yrs; #3152 Choc/blk, Boxer/Lab X, NM, 2yrs; #3166 Blk/white, Border Collie X, SF, 1yr; #3291 Brindle, Pit Bull, NM, 3yrs; #3314 Black, Shepherd X, SF, 10 mo; #3315 Blk/white, Aussie/Lab, NM, 4yrs; #3341 White/Blk, Rat Terrier, NM, 4yrs; #3362 Cream/grey, Shitzhu X, NM, 5yrs; #3363 Red, Sharpei, SF, 5yrs; #3368 White/brown,

Outlaw Music

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop! Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

541-7533

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Pointer/Pit X, NM, 1yr; #3374 Blue/tan, MinPin, NM, 4yrs; #3376 Brown w Spots, Catahoula X, SF, 6 mo; #3377 Yellow/Red, Golden/Beagle X, SF, 9 mo; #3381 Black, Lab/Rott X, NM, 2yrs; #3382 Black, Schnauzer X, SF, 2yrsFor photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

GARAGE SALES 9TH ANNUAL NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE SALE! Pleasant View home just off Flynn Lane across from Hellgate Elementary School in northwest Missoula. It’s your top stop for Saturday sales. One neighborhood, many houses. On North Reserve head west on England Boulevard. Saturday 5/18. 8:00 a.m - 2:00 p.m.

TOOLS Electric Pallet Jacks 4000lb 24 volt jacks. $450/each. Interstate Battery 1380 Maple St. Helena, MT. Call 449-8699 or 431-2389

AUTOMOBILE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car or Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Graduation Specials! 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA City of Missoula Vehicle Maintenance Division Public Works Department 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana 59802 COMPETITIVE SEALED PROPOSALS (CSP) TO INSTALL AN AUTOMATIC GATE FOR THE CITY OF MISSOULA CENTRAL MAINTENANCE FACILITY The City of Missoula (City) is requesting Competitive Sealed Proposals (CSP) to install a 25 foot long automatic gate on the East side entrance to the 1305 Scott Street Central Maintenance Facility. Copies of the detailed Competitive Sealed Proposals including a description of the services to be provided by respondents, the minimum content of responses, and the factors to be used to evaluate the responses, may be obtained on the City’s website: http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids or at the Vehicle Maintenance Division during normal business hours at 1305 B Scott Street, Missoula, MT 59804, starting May 1st, 2013. For more information, contact: Jack Stucky, Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent at (406) 552-6387, or email jstucky@ci.missoula.mt.us. Sealed proposals must be submitted to the Missoula City Clerk’s office by 5:00 p.m. MST, May 23rd, 2013 at 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802-4297. A contractor will be selected at that time to install the automatic gate. /s/ Jack Stucky, Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 3:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 30, 2013, and will then be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the following: City of Missoula Curb and Sidewalk Improvements Van Buren Ph. II – Elm to Lilac Project 12-017 This project consists of installing approximately 3,500 lineal feet of curb/gutter, 22,000 square feet of sidewalk and driveway and associated improvements. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to the City Clerk, City of Missoula, enclosed in sealed envelopes plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for City of Missoula Project 12-017 Van Buren Ph. II – Elm to Lilac curb and sidewalk improvements” The envelopes shall also be marked with the Bidder’s Name, Address and Montana Contractor’s Regis-

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 239, 275, 346, 439, 451, 481, 489, and 678. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Tuesday, May 28, 2013. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Thursday, May 30, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

tration Number. Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula against liability. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from the Office of Development Services, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana, upon payment of $50.00 by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash can not be accepted). Full amount of payment will be refunded upon return of the plans and specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after bid opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor performing work on a “Public works contract” shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage as determined by the U.S. Secretary of Labor. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The provisions of this part do not apply in those instances in which the standard prevailing rate of wages is determined by federal law. “Public works contract” means a contract for construction services let by the state, county, municipality, school district, or political subdivision or for non-construction services let by the state, county, municipality,

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s or political subdivision in which the total cost of the contract is in excess of $25,000. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against on the basis race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The City of Missoula reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to the bid opening at 3:00 p.m. on May 30, 2013. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (406)552-6079. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON STREET VACATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana, passed Resolution Number 7774 at their regular meeting held on May 1, 2013. A resolution declaring it to be the intention of the City Council of the City of Missoula, Montana, to close and vacate the alley right-of-way in block 61Daly’s Addition (located in Section 29, Township 13 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M). The City Council will hear all matters pertaining to the proposed street vacation at its regular meeting on May 20, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine St. The full resolution is on file and open for inspection in the City Clerk’s Office from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at City Hall, 435 Ryman, Second Floor. For more information, contact Jessica Miller, Public Works at 552-6347. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk

ACCEPTING BIDS As the General Contractor/Construction Manager, Jackson Contractor Group, Inc. on behalf of The University of Montana (UM) will be accepting bids from subcontracting firms for Bid Schedule #2 for the Complete Lab Facilities Project at the Interdisciplinary Science Building at The University of Montana in Missoula.

The bids will tentatively be opened on June 4th at 2:00pm MST in the Office of Facilities Planning, Design, and Construction located at 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, Montana 59812. Plans will be available after May 10th from StudioFORMA Architects in Bozeman, Montana for a refundable $150.00 plan deposit and at the following plans centers: Builders Exchange of Billings, Bozeman Builders Exchange, Butte Builders Exchange, Great Falls Builders Exchange, MCA of Helena, and the Missoula Plans Exchange. Pre-qualified firms will be bidding Bid Schedule #1 which includes the following scopes of work on May 21st and JCG will not be taking bids on the following past that date: Fire Protection, Plumbing, Mechanical, Temperature Controls, Electrical, Tele/Data Low Voltage. Refer to the invitation to bid inside the specifications for detailed bidding instructions. Bid Schedule #2 will include the balance of work to include: Steel Stud Framing & Sheetrock, Acoustical Ceiling Systems, Flooring, Paint, Building Specialties, etc.

"Sound Off"–or so I've heard. by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Convention city 7 Network with videos 10 Greenish-blue 14 Where mimes may be trapped 15 Hokkaido "yes" 16 Phoenix five (plus the bench) 17 How termites start on trees? 19 Good last name for a veterinarian 20 ___ out a living 21 Chipmunk in a red shirt 23 AFL-___ 24 "___ for Ricochet" (2004 mystery novel) 25 Restaurant handout 27 Pillager 29 Place for a pedicure 31 Quiz site 32 Get bigger 35 Make a remix for YouTube, often 39 Ditch 41 Bubbly mixer 42 Like some women's bathing suits 44 Ramona's sister, in the Beverly Cleary books 45 Gaza gp. 46 Like some pools 48 Home of the Oregon Ducks 51 Itty-bitty city 52 Maritime abbr. that predated SOS 55 "Weekend Edition Saturday" airer 56 ___ whale 58 Feng ___ 59 "Bloom County" penguin 61 Modern mini-obituary? 64 Fallon's replacing him 65 Alley ___ 66 Most wintry 67 Bohemian 68 Ball or top 69 Humpty-___

DOWN

1 Futuristic artist H.R. 2 Japanese mushroom 3 Local areas, casually 4 Subsides 5 Stereo knob abbr. 6 Fire truck accessory 7 Taco-like Taco Bell item 8 Sports announcer Albert who says "Yesssss!" 9 Polynesian idols 10 Be a good journalist 11 Hype around a bad doctor? 12 Set loose 13 Fur tycoon John Jacob ___ 18 Cessations 22 Complex guy? 25 Extra-large pads 26 Singer Gorme 28 Word after cookie or cigar 29 Horse with spots 30 Sydneysider's nat. 32 Tokyo of old 33 Prefix meaning "foreign" 34 Lackey who hauls around seasonal marshmallows? 36 Kneeler on the field 37 Modern, in Munich 38 Urgent care alternatives 40 VII times XIII 43 Tendency toward chaos 47 Acronym in 2013 Supreme Court news 48 ___ Gay 49 Not lower 50 Center in central Florida 52 Chick noise 53 A Tribe Called ___ 54 Simple song 57 Ending for switch 58 Take to the lake 60 Miso makeup 62 Joke (around) 63 Fort Worth sch.

Last week’s solution

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 20, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on an ordinance to amend Chapter 12.12 Missoula Municipal Code entitled “Curbs, Sidewalks and Paving” to generally update and clarify the regulations for improvements in public rights-of-way and to establish and clarify certain fees. For further information contact Doug Harby, Development Services at 552-6091. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 20, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, on the following: A resolution fixing the annual appropriations and the capital improvement program for the City of Missoula as set forth in the fiscal year 2014 budget. The Tourism Business Improvement District work plan and budget for fiscal year 2014 The Business Improvement District work plan and budget for fiscal year 2014. The Park District Number 1 work plan and budget for fiscal year 2014. The Road District Number 1 work plan and budget for fiscal year 2014. The Council has completed the City’s preliminary annual budget for fiscal year 2014. A copy of the budget is on file and is open to inspection on the City website at: www.ci.missoula.mt.us or contact the Finance Office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 552-6108. The City Council will keep this public hearing on the agenda continue to take public comments at each City Council meeting until the final budget is approved (tentatively slated for June.) Any taxpayer or resident may appear at the meeting and be heard for or against any part of the proposed budget. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or e-mail City Council at council@ci.missoula.mt.us. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk) CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on June 3, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Title 15, Chapter 15.32, entitled “Building Permits,” section 15.32.020 increasing the fees for building, electrical, plumbing and mechanical permits and inspection, re-inspection and plan review fees by three percent (3%). A copy of the ordinance is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on June 3, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending Title 5, entitled “Business Licenses and Regulations, Chapter 5.08 entitled “Licensing provisions generally,” Chapter 5.20 entitled “Junk dealers”, Chapter 5.24 entitled “Pawnbrokers,” Chapter 5.28 entitled “Second Hand Dealers” and Chapter 5.52 entitled “Liquor,” amending each chapter’s section pertaining to fees to increase the fees by 3% percent in accordance with the results of an official 2010 fee study commissioned by the City of Missoula. A copy of the ordinance is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 552-6108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk

CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on June 3, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending portions of Missoula Municipal Code increasing fees by three percent (3%) in the following chapters; 12.04 entitled “Street Vacation,” 12.14 entitled “Right-of-way Occupancy Permit,” 12.16 entitled “Sidewalk Maintenance,” 12.24 entitled “Excavations,” 12.30 entitled “Fences,” 13.07 entitled “Wastewater Pretreatment Regulations,” 15.38 entitled “Accessibility Standards,” 15.44 entitled “Oversized Loads and House Moving,” and 15.65 entitled “Grading, Drainage, Erosion Control and Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). A copy of the ordinance is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 552-6108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on June 3, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance amending chapter 8.50, Missoula Municipal Code, entitled “Fire inspection fees” section 8.50.010 entitled “Establishment of Fees” and chapter 8.52 entitled “Fireworks,” section 8.52.020 entitled “Manufacture in City Prohibited—permit for sale or discharge increasing the fees by three percent (3%) in accordance with the results of an official 2010 fee study commissioned by the City of Missoula. A copy of the ordinance is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on June 3, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution to increase Municipal Court administrative fees from $18 to $25 effective July 1, 2013. A copy of the resolution is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on June 3, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution to increase fees for services related to the review and processing of land use applications pursuant to city adopted regulations pertaining to zoning, subdivision and floodplain services by three percent (3%). A copy of the resolution is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on June 3, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance to amend Title 12, Chapter 12.58, entitled “Special event permit Fee,” Section 12.58.035 increasing the fee for special events conducted on a public sidewalk, street or public right-ofway by 3%. A copy of the ordinance is on file in the City Clerk office. For further information, contact Brentt Ramharter, Finance Director at 5526108. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman,

Missoula, MT 59802. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC, City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO MODIFY A CERTAIN URBAN RENEWAL PROJECT FOR CITY OF MISSOULA URBAN RENWAL DISTRICT II NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council (the “Council”) of the City of Missoula, Montana (the “City”), will hold a public hearing on the modification of a previously approved urban renewal project for the City of Missoula Urban Renewal District II (the “District”) on May 20, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., at the Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana. Pursuant Montana Code Annotated, Title 7, Chapter 15, Parts 42 and 43, as amended (“the Act”), Resolution No. 7688 adopted April 9, 2012 and Ordinance No. 3475 adopted April 23, 2012, the Council previously approved the private redevelopment of 9.29 acres of the former Intermountain Lumber Site located in the District on Russell Street, generally between Wyoming Street and South 2nd Street (the “Project Site”), as an urban renewal project for the District and modified the Plan accordingly. The redevelopment included the construction of a private mixed-use development consisting of 196 market-rate apartments within seven, three story, garden style buildings, including a clubhouse, swimming pools and landscaped lawn areas at an estimated cost of $17.9 million (the “Project”). The developer of the Project, Montana Apartment, L.P. (“Montana Apartment”), an affiliate of Farran Group, LLC, proposes to increase the scope of the Project to include a total of 224 market-rate apartments at an estimated cost of $19.95 million and a 28,000 square foot health and fitness facility at an estimated cost of $4.2 million to be developed by Lifestyle Fitness, Russell LLP (“Lifestyle”). The Project will be located in the District at 1580 Milwaukee Way, Missoula, Montana, generally along the west side of Russell Street on Lots 2A, 3A and 5A of the Garden District Homes Amended Plat. The City proposes to modify the Project as described herein and issue up to $1,800,000 of Tax Increment Urban Renewal Bonds (Intermountain Lumber Site) (the “Bonds”), to be used to pay the costs of eligible Project activities under Section 7-15-4288 of the Act, including: construction of Milwaukee Way, including new curbs, gutters and sidewalks; demolition and removal of concrete foundations and asphalt from the Project Site; improvements to Russell Street, including sidewalks, retaining walls, pedestrian lighting and other public improvements; extension and/or relocation of basic utilities to the Project Site, including water, storm water and wastewater main lines, power and communication lines, and gas mains; improvements to public access easements across the Project Site, the design, engineering, testing and survey work necessary to accomplish the foregoing; and amounts necessary to pay capitalized interest on the Bonds during construction of the Project and costs of the sale and issuance of the Bonds. The Bonds would be payable from the tax increment generated by the Project Site. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard or may file written comments with the City Clerk prior to such hearing. Dated: May 6, 2013. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PROPOSED LEVY OF SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS IN RURAL SPECIAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 8489 MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on April 10, 2013, the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”), adopted a resolution regarding special assessments against benefited property in Rural Special Improvement District No. 8489 in the County (the “District”) for the purpose of financing the costs of certain local improvements and paying costs incidental thereto. A complete copy of the resolution, which includes the proposed as-

[C6] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

sessment roll and the amount of each special assessment, is on file with the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer and is available for public inspection. On May 22, 2013, at 1:30 p.m., in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, 2nd Floor, Room 201, in Missoula, Montana, the Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing and pass upon all objections, whether made orally or in writing, to the proposed levy of the special assessments. Further information regarding the special assessments or other matters in respect thereof may be obtained from Amy Rose, Missoula County RSID Office, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana or by telephone at (406) 258-3723. Dated: April 10, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA /s/ Vickie Zeier County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF ELECTION EQUIPMENT TESTING A test of the ES&S M100 Ballot Counters and test of the ES&S AutoMARK ballot-marking system that will be used to tabulate ballots on Election Day will be starting at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, May 23, 2013, at the Missoula County Record’s Center at 2147 Ernest Ave, Missoula, Montana. All tests are open to the public. /s/ Vickie Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By /s/ Rebecca Connors, Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Election: Woodman Elementary No.18 School District Election Notice is hereby given that on June 11th, 2013, a mail ballot election for the election for the Woodman Elementary School District No. 18 will be held. The Missoula County Courthouse is the drop off location for this election and will open at 7:00 a.m. and will continue to be open until 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. All electors, as defined in Title 13, are those who reside in the District and are registered to vote by the close of registration on May 13th, 2013. DROP OFF LOCATIONS: Missoula County Courthouse, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 ELECTIONS BEING HELD: Technology Levy Absentee ballots and replacement ballots for the June 11th, School Election may be acquired at the Elections Office at the Missoula County Courthouse, weekdays between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Dated this 8th day of April, 2013. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator, Missoula County MISSOULA COUNTY CALL FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Missoula County Department of Public Works until 10:00 A.M., Thursday, May 23rd, at which time bids will be opened and read for the purpose of purchasing one (1) Track Type Excavator. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Office of Public Works at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: Cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE lowest responsible qualified bidder whose bid proposal complies with all the requirements. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposal for Track Type Excavator Purchase” and addressed to: Missoula County Department of Public Works 6089 Training Drive Missoula, Montana, 59808 MISSOULA COUNTY Missoula County Invitation to Bid Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the Mis-

soula County Public Works Department until 10:00 A.M., Wednesday, May 22nd, at which time bids will be opened and read in the conference room, for the purpose of providing 10,000 tons of 3/4” minus crushed gravel. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications on file in the Office of the Public Works Department and shall be performed under the supervision of the Director of Public Works or his designated representative. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula Montana, 59808. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE lowest responsible qualified bidder whose bid proposal complies with the BID REQUIREMENTS and is in the best interest of the county. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “2013 Bid for 3/4” minus crushed gravel” and addressed to: Missoula County Public Works Department 6089 Training Drive Missoula, Montana, 59808 MISSOULA COUNTY Missoula County Request for Proposals Missoula County is seeking proposals from qualified newspapers for a printing contract for legal advertising. A one (1) year contract is contemplated, with an optional one (1) year renewal period. The contract shall be awarded in accordance with MCA §§18-7-411-413. The full text of the Request for Proposals is available on Missoula County’s website: http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals/bidandproposals.htm. Questions should be directed to Barbara Berens, Missoula County Auditor, 406258-3227, or bberens@co.missoula.mt.us. Proposers must submit three (3) printed, doublesided copies of their proposal to the County Auditor’s Office by 3:00PM, Thursday, May 30, 2013. Proposals may be hand delivered to to the County Auditor’s Office, Missoula County Administration Building, 199 W Pine St, Room 136 or mailed to the Missoula County Auditor, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Envelopes must be sealed and marked “Proposal for Printing Contract for Legal Advertising.” No late proposals will be accepted. Missoula County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. MISSOULA COUNTY PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula County Tax Appeal Board will be in session from July 1 through December 31, 2013 for the business of hearing appeals. Any taxpayer who disagrees with the appraised value may file an appeal with the Missoula County Tax Appeal Board on or before the first Monday in June or 30 days from the receipt of the Notice of Classification,or Notice to Change Valuation (assessment notice), whichever is later. It is possible that not all taxpayers will receive an assessment notice. If you have not received a notice of classification and appraisal, consider the first Monday in June as the deadline to file an appeal. Appeal forms are available at the Department of Revenue’s Office, 2681 Palmer Suite I, Missoula, 59808 or you can download the form from www.mt.gov/doa/stab. Appeals must be submitted to the Missoula County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Dated this 9th day of May, 2013 //s Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-92 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF

THE ESTATE OF DANIEL JOSEPH TRENKLE, SR., Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Daniel Joseph Trenkle, Jr., Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the above-named Court. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 18th day of April, 2013, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ Daniel Joseph Trenkle, Jr., Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-96 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ALTA IRENE THORNING, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Justin Barba, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the abovenamed Court. GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, /s/ Nancy P. Gibson, Attorney for Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 3rd day of May, 2013, in Missoula, Montana. /s/ Justin Barba, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-449 Dept. No.: 3 Notice of Hearing on Name Change of Minor Child In the Matter of the Name Change of Nathan Robert Turner, Christa Ritter Bigley, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from Nathan Robert Turner to Noah Benjamin Bigley. The hearing will be on 06/04/2013 at 3:00 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: April 22, 2013 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-449 Dept. No.: 4 Karen S. Townsend Notice of Hearing on Name Change of Minor Child In the Matter of the Name Change of Noah Benjamin Turner, Christa Ritter Bigley, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from Noah Benjamin Turner to Noah Benjamin Bigley. The hearing will be on 06/04/2013 at 3:00 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: April 22, 2013 /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-452 Dept. No.: 3 John W. Larson. NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION TO CHANGE NAME OF MINOR CHILD. IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF: A.R.R.V. Edgar B Morales, PETITIONER, on behalf of, A.R.R.V., MINOR CHILD. PLEASE TAKE NOTE THAT Petitioner Edgar B. Morales has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name for minor child from Aalyiah Raelynn Ruth VanHaele to Aaliyah Raelynn Ruth Morales, and the Petition to Change Name of Minor Child will be heard by the District Court on Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, Courtroom located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. Dated April 22, 2013. Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court. /s/ By: Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk of Court. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No.: 3 Cause No.: DR-13-400 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE OF MINOR CHILD In re the Matter of the Name Change of HAYZEN KEITH STEVENS: JUANITA E. YEHEYES, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court to change a child’s name from Hayzen Keith Stevens to Hayzen Keith Yeheyes. The hearing will be held on June 6, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. The hear will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED this 2nd day of May, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk of Court

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate Case No. DP-13-90 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Margaret J. Gadbow, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, DARYL J. GADBOW, return receipt requested, at 618 Brooks Street, Missoula, MT 59801 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 26th day of April, 2013. /s/ Daryl J. Gadbow, Personal Representative, 618 Brooks Street, Missoula, MT 59801 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-13-99 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RUTH L. RICHARDS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to JUDITH L. RICHARDS, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at P.O. Box 391, Superior, Montana 59872 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 8th day of May, 2013. /s/ Judith L. Richards, Personal Representative P.O. Box 391, Superior, Montana 59872 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on June 25, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NE1/4 OF SECTION 29 AND W1/2NW1/4NW1/4 OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4367 Jeffrey S. Malek, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 14, 2003 and recorded on August 19, 2003 in Bk 715, Page 419 under Document No. 200330670. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSFB MORTGAGE BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-8. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,486.89, beginning April 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 11, 2013 is $224,518.46 principal, interest at the rate of 6.0% now totaling $40,819.22, late charges in the amount of $247.44, escrow advances of $17,460.52, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,756.15, plus accruing interest at the rate of $36.91 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of


PUBLIC NOTICES trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 19, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 19th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Chase V. Malek 41916.657 Published on 5/9, 5/16 and 5/23/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/24/09, recorded as Instrument No. 200910705, Bk 838, Pg 1342, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jeffrey McCaffree and Megan McCaffree was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Bank was Beneficiary and Madison Settlement Services was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Madison Settlement Services as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 419 of Pleasant View Homes No. 4, Phase 2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201210741, Bk. 895, Pg. 418, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 13, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $261,668.11. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $245,000.83, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 22, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.102808) 1002.230120-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/25/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200710841 Bk 796 Pg 883, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which James M. Watt and Barbara J. Watt, husband and wife, as joint tenants and not as tenants in common was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Reg-

istration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Equity One, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company of Montana was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company of Montana as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 31 in Block 5 of Elms Addition No. 4, in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 14, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $299,916.48. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $242,389.93, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 25, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7069.25824) 1002.245298-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/22/10, recorded as Instrument No. 2010020992 Bk. 868 of Micro Records Pg. 285, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Joyann Powell and Guy Powell, wife and husband was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Network Funding, L.P. was Beneficiary and First American Title Co. of Montana, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Co. of Montana, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 4, 5, and the East one-half of Lot 6, in Block 52 of Car Line Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 548 of Micro Records at Page 593 By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201211716 Bk. 895 of Micro Records, Pg. 1393, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 22, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $203,202.39. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $194,838.14, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula,

MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 1, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.105059) 1002.245897-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/11/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200701747, Bk 790, Pg 1285, and Modified February 24, 2011 as Instrument No. 201103461, Bk 874, Pg 476, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Randie M. Pringle was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the SE1/4 of Section 7, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract D of Certificate of Survey No. 1816. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 21, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $401,667.05. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $381,526.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 1, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.93790) 1002.236945-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Book 791, Page 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real

property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 21, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $950,938.77. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 1, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200631097, Bk. 788, Pg. 366, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Matthew M. Miller and Rebecca L. Miller was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 of Kalberg Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201200002, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Structured Asset Securities Corporation Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-WF1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 17, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $571,416.16. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $365,584.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 29, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close

of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.17612) 1002.99556-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/12/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200611513 Bk: 774 Pg: 867 Modified by Agreement on 9/4/2012 under Auditor’s File No. 201217027 Bk: 899 Pg: 1104, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Nedra Gasvoda, an unmarried Woman was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for America’s Wholesale Lender, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Charles J. Peterson was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J. Peterson as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 358 of Pleasant View Homes No. 4, Phase 1, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201114842 Bk: 882 Pg: 669 and Rerecorded under AF# 2011184818 Bk: 885 Pg: 45, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 21, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $193,032.33. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $184,732.61, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 2, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16322) 1002.245370-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/24/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201010184 B: 860 P: 672, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Kienan D Slate and Jeannette M Slate, as joint tenants was Grantor, Bank of America, N.A. was Beneficiary and Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law was Trustee. First American Title

Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: Tract B of Certificate of Survey No. 1487, located in the Southwest quarter (SW1/4) of Section 16, Township 13 North, Range 18 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Parcel II: Together with an easement 20 feet in width for ingress and egress to said Tract B, bordering and along the East boundary of Tract A of said Certificate of Survey No. 1487. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to . Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 28, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $218,480.85. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $209,108.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 8, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.15992) 1002.246489-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 1, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 35 of Shelby Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Benjamin D. Krantz and Jenna K. Krantz, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 6, 2007 and recorded April 11, 2007 in Book 795, Page 152 as Document No. 200708457. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation aka PHH Mortgage Services. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $778.96, beginning October 1, 2012 and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 22, 2013 is $155,792.51 principal, interest at the rate of 6.000% now totaling $3,653.65, late charges in the amount of $155.76, escrow advances of $3.70, and other fees and expenses advanced of $53.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.61 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amount are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of

this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 20, 2013 /s/ Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 20th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Phh Vs. Krantz 41392.943 Published on 5/9, 5/16 and 5/23/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 28, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE NORTH ONE-HALF OF LOT 1 AND THE NORTH ONE- HALF OF LOT 2 IN BLOCK 14 OF BUTTE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF Joe Long, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on October 11, 2006 and recorded on October 16, 2006 in Book 785, Page 371 under Document No. 200626757. The beneficial interest is currently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $469.23, beginning April 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 4, 2013 is $153,441.43 principal, interest at the rate of 2.000% now totaling $5,651.52, late charges in the amount of $182.10, escrow advances of $3,050.89, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,254.90, plus accruing interest at the rate of $8.41 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the Sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 19, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services

P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 19th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 BACVs. Long 42019.517 Published on 5/9, 5/16 and 5/23/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 28, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 1 AND 2 IN BLOCK 1 OF BECK’S HOME ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. E. Martin Hyland and Nur Nora Hyland, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 01, 2009 and recorded on October 6, 2009 in Book 848, Page 925, under Document No. 200924278. The beneficial interest is currently held by Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to

SUSTAINAFIEDS make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,233.50, beginning January 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 12, 2013 is $216,338.85 principal, interest at the rate of 5.25000% now totaling $15,143.68, late charges in the amount of $395.64, escrow advances of $5,046.25, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,062.76, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest

in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 19, 2013 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 19th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 BAC Vs. Hyland 42048.315 Published on 5/9, 5/16 and 5/23/2013

Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

LEGAL SERVICES GOT HURT? GET HELP! www.bulmanlaw.com Montana’s Best Health & Safety Lawyers FREE CONSULTATION. 721-7744

SERVICES CHILDCARE Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

CLEANING Kitchen Deep Clean $150-$200. Includes cupboards, drawers and appliances. Inside and out, top to bottom. RC Services 241-0101 www.rcservices.info THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

Care & Garden Maintenance. Professional & Affordable Services. *Spring Cleaning Specials* Call Rik 406-549-3667

residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

HANDYMAN

MASSAGE

Squires for Hire. Egress Windows, Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 5444671

$45/hour Deep Tissue Massage. Zoo City Massage located at 1526 S. Reserve St., Missoula. Call (406) 370-3131 to schedule an appointment. zoocitymassage.com.

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHERCOMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

Able Garden Design & Services LLC Full-service Lawn

SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems:

TIME FOR SPRING CLEANING CALL FOR AN ESTIMATE. RC SERVICES 241-0101

www.rcservices.info

[C8] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

406.241.2432

406.241.2432


RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom off North Russell, $565, wood floors, walk-in closet, coin-op laundry, off street parking. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, Southside, $500, W/D hookups, storage, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 101 Turner Court: 1 Bedroom, Near park, Breakfast bar, Parking, Shared yard, Cat ok, $525. Garden City Property Management 549-6106. 1-Year Costco membership! 1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1301 Montana: Newer studio, Pergo floors, Full kitchen & bath, Dishwasher, Laundry, Hear & cable paid, $595. Garden City Property Management 549-6106. 1-Year Costco membership! 1304 S. 1st Street W.: 1 Bedroom, Second floor, By Trail System, Storage, FREE CABLE, Small pet ok! $575. Garden City Property Management 549-6106. 1Year Costco membership! 1509 S. 10TH: ONE BEDROOM, DINING AREA, ONSITE LAUNDRY, FREE CABLE, CENTRAL, HEAT PAID, $675. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP! 1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $695 quiet cul-de-sac, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome, $750 W/D in unit, carport, DW, microwave S/G paid. Cat Upon Approval. No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

446 Washington Street. RENT INCENTIVE. 1bed/1bath, downtown location, coin-ops onsite, cat? $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 733 West Sussex #2. 2 bed/1 bath central location, coin-ops, carport, A/C. $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 Equinox Apartments. 2 bedroom: $620. W/S/G paid. Comes with Mountain Line EZ Pass. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Colin 549-4113 ext. 112 Garden District. 1 bedroom. $369, tenant pays electricity. Washer/dryer in unit. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Jordan Lyons 549-4113 ext. 112

paid. Comes with Mountain Line EZ Pass. Contact Jordan 5494113, ext. 127 Palace Apartments. 2 beds from $527-$799. 1 beds $550$666. Studio(s) $510. Application fee $30. W/S/G and Heat paid, coin-op laundry. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Matty or Connie 549-4113 ext. 130 or ext. 131. Russell Square Family Building. 2 Bedroom; $645 W/S/T & heat paid. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Colin 5494113 ext. 112 Solstice Apartments. 1 bed: $500. 2 bed: $725. W/S/G & recycling paid. Comes with Mountain Line E-Z Pass. Missoula

Housing Authority. Contact Colin 549-4113 ext. 112

DUPLEXES

ROOMMATES

Studio $475. North Russell, separate room for bedroom, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

1016 Charlo St. #1. 2bed/1bath, W/D hookups, shared yard, cat? $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

Studio $495. Near St. Patrick’s Hospital, separate room for bedroom, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

Orchard Gardens. 1 bed $572/$550 deposit. All utilities

2423 55th St. “A” 3bed/1bath, shared yard, single garage, South Hills. $900. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 524 South 5th Street East “B”. 2bed/1bath near University. All utilities included. $900. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES

Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bed: $691 all utilities paid. Application fees are $40. Comes with Mountain LIne E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Jordan 549-4113 ext. 127. Lenox Flats. Studio: $550 all utilities paid. Comes with Mountain Line EZ pass. Missoula Houseing Authority. Contact Jordan 5494113 ext. 127.

1708 Scott St. “B” 1 bed/1 bath, shared yard, W/D hookups, all utilities paid. $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

1314 Linnea Lane. 3 bed/1.5 bath, newer home, 2X garage, W/D hookups, pet? $1250. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Property Management

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

www.alpharealestate.com

3901 O’LEARY: 2 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 BATH, 2 STORY, PRIVATE DECK, HOOK-UPS + LAUNDRY, CARPORT & STORAGE, HEAT & CABLE PAID, $810. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP AND $300 GIFT CARD.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707

"Let us tend your den"

Rent Incentive

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

FIDELITY

Grizzly Property Management, Inc. No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing

549-7711 Check our website!

11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coinops, central location in Lolo. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

422 Madison • 549-6106

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

GardenCity

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month Finalist

Visit our website at Finalist

fidelityproperty.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [C9]


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 1010 Vine. 2 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake close to Mount Jumbo trails, UM & downtown. Many upgrades. $179,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240—7653. pat@properties2000.com 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $315,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 120 Grandview Way. South Hills 3 bed, 3 bath with deck, double garage and great views. $245,900. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 128 Meadowlark. 3 bed, 2 bath at end of quiet street. Fenced yard, deck & 2 car garage. $240,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com 1360 Starwood Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath in Grant Creek backing open space. 3 car heated garage, garden shed & deck. $449,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com 141 Burlington. Charming 4 bed, 1 bath with 2 car garage in Rose Park neighborhood. Wood floors under carpet, original hardware. $225,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 5417355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 1480 Cresthaven. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on over one private acre. Open floor plan, dream master bathroom and double garage. $344,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 1815 West Central. 3 bed, 2 bath centrally located home with updated kitchen, hardwood floors, large fenced yard & shop. $240,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 5417355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 1930 Mullan Trail. 4 bed, 2 bath tri-level with deck, hot tub & 2 car garage. $245,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 2 Bdr, 1 Bath single-level Windsor Park home. $168,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Northside home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2 Kasota Court. 4 bed, 2 bath with basement on cul-de-sac near Wapikiya Park. Wood, tile, lots of natural light and wonderful upgrades. $230,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 210 Burlington. 4 bed, 2 bath well-maintained home with wood floors, fenced yard & single garage. $267,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 7288270. glasgow@montana.com

217 North Avenue E. 3 bed, 2 bath U District home with wood & tile flooring, arched doorways & basement. $239,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 229 Mansion Heights. 4 bed, 4 bath Prairie Style with deck, patio, floor to ceiling windows and amazing views. $895,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com 2365 Village Square. 2 bed, 1 bath with fenced yard, patio & single garage. $164.000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2402 Mount Ave. $175,000. Centrally located, this 2 bed/1bath home has some nice features to it. Vaulted ceilings, arched doorways, wood laminate flooring, and much more. Visit www.2402MountAve.uCanBuyMe.com or call Kris Hawkins at Properties 2000. 396-6542. 253 Strand. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, coved ceilings, updated bath. Charming house close to UM. $247,000. Go to MoveMontana.com for more information. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2607 Deer Canyon Court. 6 bed, 3 bath on Prospect Meadows cul-de-sac. Fenced yard, deck, hot tub and sweeping views. $465,000. Properties 2000. Pat McCormick 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 2607 Deer Canyon Crt. $465,000. Stellar six bedroom home with a large “flat” backyard on a cul-de-sac in desirous Prospect Meadows. The home features numerous updates including hardwood & tile flooring, granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances in the spacious kitchen, A/C, and much more. Properties 2000. Call Pat McCormick 240-7653. 2905 Larch Camp Road. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.5 acres in Pattee Canyon. Fully furnished. $621,900. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 2961 Mary Jane Boulevard. 3 bed, 2 bath with cathedral ceilings, private backyard, patio & 2 car garage. $205,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr. 2 Bath Windsor Park home. $215,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3325 West Central. 4 bed, 2.5 bath with open kitchen, covered patio & 2 car garage. $288,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 3455 Jack Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath Linda Vista home with large kitchen, double garage & parklike landscaping. $275,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros

Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 3655 Jack Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath with day light walkout basement and 3 car garage. $290,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com. 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Grant Creek / Prospect Meadows home. $469,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4433A Bordeaux. 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage, fenced yard with pergola. Many upgrades including new flooring. $177,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Missoula Prudential, 728, 8270. glasgow@montana.com 521 North 1st West. 2 bed, 1 bath with front & back decks, fenced yard & garage. $189,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 5222 Forest Hill. 4 bed, 4 bath on over 3.5 acres near Bitterroot River adjacent to USFS land. $1,095,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estae 532-9229. tory@montana.com 5501 Prospect. 4 bed, 4 bath adjacent to common area in Grant Creek. Sun room, hot tub and many upgrades. $385,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 6301 Hillview. 5 bed, 3.5 bath with 360 degree South Hills views. Game room, 2 gas fireplaces & 3 car garage. $399,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmailcom 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 9755 Horseback Ridge. 3 bed, 3 bath on 5 acres overlooking Clark Fork River. Missoula Valley and Mission Mountain views. $420,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Fantastic Home With View 6305 St. Thomas. 4 bed, 3 bath, updated and gorgeous setting with large private lot, double garage, landscaped and ready to move into! $310,000. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Farm House On 1/2 Lot In Town 203 N Curtis. 4 bed, 2 bath home so conveniently located near bike trails and Good Food Store. Great lot, great home, great big shop! $217,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Location Location Location! 1289 River Street: 4 bed, 2 bath newer home near the river, bike trails, Good Food Store, Home Resource and more! This location rocks! $219,000. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Lot 16B MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

[C10] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1845 B West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath on quiet cul-de-sac. Large, open kitchen, patio & garage. No HOA dues! $158,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270 glasgow@montana.com 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 5108 Village View #6. 2 bed, 2 bath with private deck, patio and single garage. $165,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com 526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 5604 Bridger Ct #19 $139,000. GREAT INVESTMENT!! This 3 bed/2.5 bath southside condo has been updated with fresh paint & new flooring. Spacious main floor with fireplace, open layout and vaulted ceiling. Properties 2000. Call Pat @ 406-240-2442 for more information on lease amounts or to schedule a showing. 6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 6632 MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath with gas fireplace, Jacuzzi and wonderful views. $273,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net 803A Pattee Creek. 2. bed, 1.5 bath condo with garage in 55+ community. $129,900. Pat Mc-

Cormick, Properties 2000, 2407653. pat@properties2000.com Townhome On The River Land Stewardship Program buyers must qualify. Call KD to find out more about this 2 bedroom 1.5 bath condo with the balcony facing the river and right next to the river trail and close to downtown. $135,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

3010 West Central. Nearly 5 acres in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. Rural living in town. $499,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 531 Minnesota. Building Lot 9. $55,000. Robin Rice Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Bistro cafe and Missoula Food Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com

Near Riverfront Park. 1265 Dakota #B. To-be-built, 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage. Lot: $55,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

4251 D.J. Drive

Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

East Missoula Building Lot Sweet lot with mature trees and a great middle of town location. $55,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

$439,900 • Luxurious Kitchen • 2 Master Bedroom Suites • 3rd Bedroom & Bath • 2200+ sq ft on single level

Rita Gray

406-544-4226 | ritagray.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $83,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

LAND FOR SALE 3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

1815 West Central $240,000 3 bed, 2 bath with updated kitchen & baths, wood floors, 24x30 heated shop and large fenced yard

11689 Stolen Rock Frenchtown $319,000 5 bed, 3 bath on over 3 acres Great valley & mountain views

Mullan Heights Riverside Condos Starting at $144,900 • Large secure units with affordable HOA dues


REAL ESTATE NHN Derby $150,000. Great commercial opportunity. Level 1.127 acres in Missoula Industrial Park. Easy access to utilities. Property features a security fence. Properties 2000. Call Deana Ross 239-4726.

Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

NHN Edgewood, East Missoula. 3.5 acres bare land. $89,900. Vickie Honzel, LambrosERA Real Estate 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

OUT OF TOWN

NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 11 acre parcel with Mission Mountain views. $215,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

10 River Rock Lane $2,500,000. Beautiful Timber frame design 4 bed, 2.5 bath home PLUS 3 bed, 2 bath fully finished guest house along Rock Creek. Visit www.10RiverRock.uCanBuyMe.co m for details or call Kristin Larson at Properties 2000. 672-7030.

102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on almost 3 acres with large 48’x30’ heated shop. $285,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties, 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 11027 Stella Blue, Lolo. Gorgeous 4 bed, 4 bath two story custom home. Gourmet kitchen, spa-like master bath. $425,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com

11903 Lewis & Clark, Lolo, $250,000. A country feel on a spacious one acre lot with large garden area. Very welcoming covered porch to enjoy your view & a large back deck. 3 bed/2.5bath, double car garage. All three bedrooms are located upstairs with the main level having a den. This is truly a must see home to understand the beauty of the home. Properties 2000. Call Paula Crews for details 360-8655.

11082 Cherokee Lane, Lolo. 3 bed, 3 bath with basement, deck, 2 car garage & fantastic views. $245,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503, riceteam@bigsky.net

13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves & 2 car garage. $247,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $470,000. Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 1623 Wild Turkey Lane, Stevensville. Over 200 acre private ranch with creek surrounded by conservation easement land. $949,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com

Rattlesnake Lot-Ready To Build 1110 Spring Place. Base of Mt. Jumbo building lot ready to go with all utilities on site and ready to build that dream home! $160,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

514 West Spruce. Great office space in vintage building near St. Pat’s. Upgrades to wiring, plumbing, roof & more. $244,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the award-winning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

Robin Rice • 240-6503

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COMMERCIAL

4616 Gharrett $1,300,000. Church and SFR on 3.03 acres. Zoned RLD-4. Outstanding community residential day care or personal care facility. Extra land for development. Properties 2000. Call Don Sokoloski for details 5447830.

RICE TEAM

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NHN Old Freight Road. Approximately 11 acres with Mission Mountain Views. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

1034 Stephens $229,500. HIGHLY VISIBLE CORNER LOCATION AT STEPHENS & MOUNT IDEAL FOR PROFESSIONAL OFFICE COMPLEX ZONED R-IV. Owner will consider owner financing to qualified buyer. Properties 2000. Call Steve Schultz for details 240-1075.

18715 Felicia Lane, Frenchtown. 4 bed, 2 bath manufactured home on 3.39 acres with 2 car garage. $194,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

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439 Hidden Valley Road N

$249,500 3bed/2bath home on 2.68 acres w/area for horses. 2 car garage. Granite counters & stainless appliances in kitchen.

1225 Rodgers MLS# 20131183 $2,000,000 8.69 acres in a good area. Near downtown, easy access from interstate. Excellent land for a housing project or project of any nature.

Don Sokoloski, (406)544-7830, Soko@Properties2000.com NHN Bear Creek, Victor MLS#: 20130978 $225,000

Lease Space 1200 S. Reserve, Msla HUGE PRICE REDUCTION! $8.00-$12.00 per sq. ft. based on length of lease. Prime highly visible end cap space of 1,322 sq.ft. Former Verizon location. Over 35,000 daily traffic count. Well maintained building with on-site management. Motivated owners, many different price options and lease incentives.

Deana Ross 239-4726 or Dross@Properties2000.com 38487 Dandelion Lane, Polson • MLS#: 20131290 $485,000

Beautiful views from this desired west side property. The 20.53 acre piece would be a great spot to build your dream home and have your horses. Great access not far from highway and just off of a paved road. Fenced, septic, and irrigation water rights.

129’ of Flathead Lake Frontage. 2.94 acres w/ stellar views across the lake of the Mission Mountains. Property is split into 2 separate parcels. Power & phone to the property. 6 GPM well drilled in 2000. Great spot to build your dream cabin on Flathead Lake. Visit: www.FlatheadLakeLot.uCanBuyMe.com

Kristin Larson 672-7030 Kristin@Properties2000.com

Kris Hawkins 396-6542 Kris@Properties2000.com

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties 728-8270

missoulanews.com • May 16 – May 23, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE 244 7th Street, Clinton. 3 bed, 1 bath well-maintained home only a short walk to the river. $135,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3416 Lupine, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath log-sided home with wraparound deck and Bitterroot Mountain views. $289,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call

Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com 606 Stargazer, Florence. 4 bed, 3.5 bath with 2 bed, 1 bath apartment on 5.75 acres. $495,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com Clark Fork River 20525 Schwartz Creek Road. $250,000 3 bed, 2 bath, 1 acre. Single level, country living only 20 minutes to Missoula. Walk to the fishing access and Clark Fork River. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate with strong equity. 406-721-1444. www.Creative-Finance.com

3.5 Acre Building Site• $89,900 NHN Edgewood Drive, East Missoula Side at the Base of Mt. Jumbo www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12:00-2:00

$245,900 120 Grandview Way

• 3 Bed, 2 Bath On Main • Full Basement • Double Car Garage • Unencumbered Mountain Views • Open Floor Plan

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • May 16 – May 23, 2013


Specializing in bereavement camps, Tamarack Grief Resource Center strengthens and honors individuals and families throughout their journey with grief.

Tamarack Grief Resource Center presents The 5th Annual

A Taste to Remember Benefit Dinner • Monday, May 20 The Governor's Room, Florence Hotel Downtown

Five Great Chefs - Five Great Courses Featuring Chef Beth Higgins, Two Sisters Catering; Chef Stacy Jo Vizzo, Redbird; Chef Abe Risho, Silk Road; Chef Noel Mills, James Bar; Chefs Ana & Jason Willenbrock, Posh Chocolat • Limited Seating • For reservations, call 406-541-8472

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture

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