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OFFICIAL 2013 BEST OF MISSOULA BALLOT INSIDE

NEWS

SOUTH CAMPUS OR FORT MISSOULA? CRITICS COME OUT AGAINST NEW MISSOULA COLLEGE PROPOSAL

IMAGINARY MAJORITY DOC MAKES MUSICGOURDS OPINION SWINGS GUN DEBATE MISSOULA PREMIERE

THE WILD: IWFF FILM INTO TREADS NEW GROUND


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


OFFICIAL 2013 BEST OF MISSOULA BALLOT INSIDE

NEWS

SOUTH CAMPUS OR FORT MISSOULA? CRITICS COME OUT AGAINST NEW MISSOULA COLLEGE PROPOSAL

IMAGINARY MAJORITY DOC MAKES MUSICGOURDS OPINION SWINGS GUN DEBATE MISSOULA PREMIERE

THE WILD: IWFF FILM INTO TREADS NEW GROUND


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[2] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

april 25th


Cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters

News Voices/Letters CEO pay, aid in dying and guns.................................................................4 The Week in Review ADUs, bacon and Baucus backs out................................................6 Briefs Outsourcing, job fairs and the circus ......................................................................6 Etc. Griz football and moneyball........................................................................................7 News South Campus opponents prep for next salvo ........................................................8 News Billionaire “Bison Baron” opens up in new book....................................................9 Opinion Why Baucus voted against background checks.................................................10 Opinion Dry conditions carry big implications across the West .....................................11 Feature Montana’s fastest growing sport is also North America’s oldest ........................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Bare Bait Dance takes a new step in company-choreographed show......................18 Music Aesop Rock, Todd Snider, Bleached and Jacob Robert Stephens..........................19 Film IWFF overcomes challenges to deliver 36th annual event........................................20 Film Some work, more play in new Gourds doc, All the Labor......................................21 Film Gosling, Cooper put Place Beyond the Pines in rare company ..............................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films .........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Know thine onions...............................................................................24 Hangriest Hour Biga’s calzones ......................................................................................26 8 Days a Week She shoots, she scores ............................................................................27 Mountain High Rocky Mountain Roubaix.......................................................................37 Agenda Missoula Food Bank’s 30th Anniversary Bash......................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk..........................................................................................................................4 In Other News .................................................................................................................12 Classifieds ......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y .......................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World .....................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson INTERIM ARTS EDITOR Kate Whittle PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jamie Rogers COPY EDITOR Brooks Johnson ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2013 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [3]


[voices]

Two problems

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, April 23, near the corner of Higgins and Broadway. Sen. Max Baucus announced this week that he will not run for re-election in 2014 and will retire at the end of his sixth term. How will you remember his service to Montana? Follow-up: Who would you like to see take his seat in the Senate?

Glen Phelps: He’s had a good, long run. He’s been a senator most of my adult life. Is it that obvious?: Boy, I don’t have a person in mind. I think Schweitzer may be a logical choice.

Ethel MacDonald: Unfortunately, disappointing. I feel the worst action is that he ignored the single-payer universal health care option. Instead he catered to the insurance interests that have bought him off. Undecided: A good progressive candidate and I don’t know right now who that could be. Not Schweitzer.

Mac McGregor: Being kind of new to the area I only know what representatives there are in the area. From the City Council to the mayor, everyone is compassionate. I’m so grateful I’ve picked this place to retire. Anyone goes: People are so dedicated to make Montana a better state. I’m confident that anyone who takes the job will do great.

Barry Padget: What I remember about him is that he was truly a Montanan. He seemed to listen to Montanans. He wasn’t overly liberal or conservative and he tried to listen to his roots. He was a real politician. Time will tell: It would be fun to see Schweitzer in there but I don’t think he will run.

Charlie Beaton: I don’t completely agree with him politically, but he’s a pretty dedicated Montanan. His family has a long history here. Dark horse: Maybe John Engen should take a shot at it? He’s got good leadership qualities.

[4] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

I am a general medical practitioner with 30 years experience. I work in Emergency Medicine and with nursing home residents and incarcerated persons. I have two problems with the conduct of Dr. Eric Kress, who assisted three patient suicides, as described in Alex Sakariassen’s article (see “Cowardice to courage,” April 11) and in an editorial written by Kress. First, since when did assisted suicide become legal? Second, I have concerns about his cases. Kress claims that his patients were not depressed. In his editorial, however, his description of one of those patients suggested otherwise. Someone who is “often … found weeping and bemoaning the miserable fate that had befallen him” sounds depressed. Similarly, in the article by Mr. Sakariassen, Kress is described as using a “one question” screening tool for depression (“If the disease were gone tomorrow, would the request for life-ending medication still stand”). Asking a single question hardly seems sufficient for a life-or-death decision. Of course, I do not know the medical facts of these cases; I do know that there were other options than committing suicide, whether or not they were explored. Doctors diagnoses can also be wrong. I have seen patients in my own practice live longer than expected. With this situation, patients participating in medical suicides can be throwing away their lives. I have also seen suicidal people get better, and rebuild lives that looked pretty grim. I do not agree that doctors or anyone else should be assisting other people to commit suicide. Carley C. Robertson Havre

Opinion wanted Much hubbub has been made recently in the press about the Public Service Commission’s decision to consider repealing what has come to be called the “PSC Executive Pay Rule” (see “Salary secrets,” April 11). Much of the commentary has been misleading, even downright inaccurate. The commissioners need and want your input and feedback on the matter. I’ve outlined a number of issues for your consideration and hope you’ll take the time to call us or send your commissioner feedback. One argument for repeal is that the Executive Pay Rule is duplicative, and simply repeats what is already in the state law (MCA 2-6-102) as well as the PSC’s rule (ARM 38.2.303). All utility information, including executive compensation is, even without the executive Pay Rule, public information and available to the public at the PSC unless a request for protection is requested and granted before we get it. We get relatively few of these requests. The Executive Pay Rule states that if the PSC has it, the compensation of the top three utility executives is public information unless a request for protection is requested and granted. But, that’s already the rule and law! Are you in favor of having more rules

even if they duplicate or restate other existing rules and laws, or should duplicative directives, such as the Executive Pay Rule, be repealed? Some claim that the Executive Pay Rule is not just a restatement of other existing law, that it does, in fact, change the law. Some argue that the PSC does not, and should not, have the authority to make a new law, especially law or rules affecting constitutional rights. They argue that new law should only be made by the people or the legislature and not executive agencies. (Although some judges may argue they too have the power to make new law.) Should executive agencies have the authority to make new law, even if it affects your constitutional rights?

“Even Mexico ranks lower than us at 53.”

The PSC was immediately sued over the Executive Pay Rule. The pending lawsuit challenges the PSC’s authority to make such a one-size-fits-all rule that changes the balance between two competing constitutional mandates, in this instance the public right to know versus the individual right of privacy. Attorneys for the PSC say that based on existing Montana case law the Executive Pay Rule will probably not pass muster. Continued defense of this rule in the lawsuit, and the subsequent appeals, will cost tax and ratepayers a lot of money. Should the PSC continue to spend your money defending the Executive Pay Rule in court? Regrettably, some people are always in re-election campaign mode. My predecessor, Ken Toole, who conceived and championed this toothless tiger rule for his 2010 PSC re-election campaign, has a reputation for costing tax payers big money in court defending poor choices. As he does all too often, one of my colleagues on the commission adopts Toole’s position and argues fervently in favor of the rule and for fighting for it in the courts. I said it in 2010: This issue is classic political ruse. Gin up a donothing but emotional issue or rule aimed at a group we all dislike. It makes for good headlines, generates lots of fighting, but really does absolutely nothing to make your government better. It works especially well when a politician needs to distract you from their actual work or voting record. Public comment on this issue will be ac-

cepted through April 26. Tell us what you think. Contact your PSC Commissioner at (406) 444-6199 or at psc.mt.gov/. Bill Gallagher Chairman Public Service Commission Helena

Gunned down Sen. Max Baucus responded to a constituent’s concern about gun violence as follows: “I oppose the assault weapons ban, and I will oppose any effort that would negatively affect our Second Amendment rights to keep and bear arms.” When a society suffers a seemingly unending series of gun related mass murders— 62 since August 1982—and when those mass murders include innocent men, women and children—Texas District Attorney Mike McLelland, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, and 20 Sandy Hook Elementary School students— it would seem inconceivable that anyone would stand in the way of taking steps to control this senseless killing. It is interesting to note that a Wikipedia list of countries by firearm-related deaths ranks the U.S. at 57 out of 75 countries and dependencies. Yes, there are still 18 countries that have a higher firearm death rate than us, but those are countries like Colombia, Argentina, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Swaziland. Even Mexico ranks lower than us at 53. Canada ranks 43 and Great Britain, where gun control is taken seriously, ranks 5. Japan is No. 1 with with only 0.07 deaths per 100,000 compared to our 10.2 deaths per year. There is a good chance that national efforts at gun control have something to do with these statistics. Baucus claims that he opposes an assault weapons ban based upon the Second Amendment. Keep in mind that this amendment was adopted in 1791—222 years ago. At that time a renegade government that intended to steal a “free state” from its citizens might well reconsider in the face of a citizenry armed with muskets. Today, a onearmed drone could probably deter such a citizen uprising. For better or worse, today, we must depend more on our electoral process to put morally responsible and socially aware individuals in positions of power. idual would realize that times change. The keeping of slaves once stimulated the national economy, the woman’s vote was an unnecessary complication and prohibition of alcohol was to improve societal morals. The Second Amendment no longer protects us from government tyranny and it is being selfishly misrepresented. Perhaps it is time for a change. Paul Pacini Helena Correction: In our April 11 cover story, “Practicing patience,” we incorrectly stated the lineage of Namchak Buddhism. It’s derived from Vajrayana, not Mahayana Buddhism. The Indy regrets the error.


missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, April 17 The Missoula City Council evaluates whether to expand a poplar tree farm at the Missoula Wastewater Treatment Facility. Expansion would enable the farm to absorb as much as 10 percent of the city’s effluent, thereby reducing flow into the Clark Fork.

Thursday, April 18 LGBT rights activists and their allies surround Gov. Steve Bullock as he signs Senate Bill 107 into law. The bill removes a provision from the state’s deviate sexual conduct code that classified gay sex as a crime akin to bestiality.

Friday, April 19 The Progressive Change Campaign Committee releases an ad targeting Sen. Max Baucus of Montana for his vote against expanding background checks for gun purchases. The ad says, “Stand with us, not gun manufacturers ... keep our families and communities safe.”

Saturday, April 20 Locals gorge on bacon ice cream, bacon doughnuts, bacon lattes and traditional microbrews at Z100’s Bacon and Brewfest at the Missoula County Fairgrounds. One Indy staffer is delighted to win a free package of bacon at the event.

Sunday, April 21 A 91-year-old woman from Elmo and her daughter die when the car they’re riding in crashes into a pickup truck near St. Ignatius. Law enforcement says that the man driving the car is injured, while the three people in the truck are not seriously hurt.

Monday, April 22 The Missoula City Council advances a proposal that would allow “accessory dwelling units,” or granny flats, to be built in neighborhoods that are now limited to single-family homes. A final vote on the ordinance is slated for May 6.

Tuesday, April 23 Sen. Baucus makes the surprise announcement that he will not seek re-election in 2014 and will retire. The chairman of the Senate Finance Committee was first elected in 1978 and was instrumental in crafting major legislation, such as national health care and Bush-era tax cuts.

A hide broker refuels in Belgrade after picking up 71 cow and two bison hides from local slaughterhouses and processing plants on Thursday. The hides are destined for Dell, where they’ll be salted and eventually shipped to Wisconsin and Illinois to be made into purses and furniture.

Outsourcing

Lee Enterprises cuts designers As part of an ongoing effort to cut expenses, the Missoulian’s parent company, Lee Enterprises, has notified at least eight employees at three of its Montana newspapers that their jobs are being terminated because the company is shipping a portion of its graphic design work overseas. “Those jobs have been outsourced, I believe it was to India,” says Kathy Yankoff from the Montana Department of Labor, which helps people who have lost jobs to outsourcing find new employment and access training programs. Yankoff says that in order to receive help from the DOL the Lee staffers must have been notified that their jobs would be terminated. According to the agency, five Billings Gazette employees, one from the Helena Independent Record and two from Butte’s Montana Standard have been terminated or given notice. “I believe they were all graphic designers,” Yankoff says. In 2005, Lee acquired the Pulitzer Newspaper chain and took on $306 million of its debt. Economic turmoil,

[6] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

along with the difficulties newspapers have faced maintaining profit margins during an increasingly internetdependent era, have exacerbated Lee’s financial challenges. Months after the company emerged from a Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization last year, two Missoulian senior staffers accepted buyout offers. According to Lee, the company had 8.2 percent fewer full-time employees during the fiscal quarter that ended March 31 than it did during the same period the year prior. In October, Lee Vice President Carl Schmidt told investors how the company planned on regaining its financial footing. He said overall newspaper design would increasingly be completed at regional hubs and that the company is “in the early stages of outsourcing the bulk of our ad production ...” Lee’s bankruptcy filings note that it had a trade debt of $55,554 to Express KCS, based out of Pittsburgh. According to the company’s website, “Express KCS is the leading independent provider of offshore marketing production services … Our clients have maintained quality levels whilst dramatically reducing labor rates, achieving as much as 60% reduction in operational costs.” Missoulian Publisher Jim McGowan would not comment about whether the newspaper is outsourc-

ing jobs. He did acknowledge, however, that the publication has recently eliminated one graphic design position. “It was more of a job reclassification,” McGowan said. “Whether that’s supposed to stay dark or not, I’m not sure.” Jessica Mayrer

Animal rights

Circus sparks controversy In April 2012, a group of people from the Missoulabased animal rights organization Other Nations stood outside the Adams Center and protested the circus that was happening inside. One man held a sign with a picture of an elephant that read, “I’d rather die free than live as a slave.” Another sign, referring to the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, which has sponsored circuses in Missoula for nearly 70 years, read, “Charity is no excuse for animal abuse.” That sign depicted an elephant gripping the word “Help!” with its trunk. The Shrine Circus returns to the Adams Center April 26 and 27, and for the third year in a row, Other Nations plans to be there too.


[news] The Other Nations' website, which is updated regularly with news about animal rights issues, provides a summation of the group’s effort: “Welcome to Other Nations … offering information, inspiration, and support for human beings working to end speciesism.” Other Nations founder Kathleen Stachowski says that events like the Shrine Circus are a stark reminder of the unjust treatment of “animals who cannot advocate for themselves.” “Traveling circuses simply cannot meet the emotional and physical needs of the animals. They are caged and chained-up constantly. That’s the reality of their lives,” she says. “Circuses are no fun for animals.” But Barry Hartman, secretary of the Western Montana Shrine Club, says the concerns raised by Stachowski are unfounded. He believes that the Las Vegas-based Jordan World Circus, who could not be reached for comment and who the Shriners contract to produce the event, treats its animals with respect. “They take the best imaginable care of those animals,” he says. “Their livelihood depends on them.” He adds that the circus is not geared toward satisfying what he calls “the PETA people.” He says that his organization is one of the largest philanthropic groups in the world, and since 1922 has sent more than a million youths to Shriners Hospitals for Children. For this year’s circus, his club will pass out some 16,000 free circus tickets to children “from Polson to Darby.” “Those PETA people come out every year and beat up on us,” he says. “But they don’t seem to make any difference. They’re like flies at a picnic.” Jamie Rogers

Fish

Stocked by night Over the past two decades, the walleye population in northwestern Montana’s Noxon Reservoir has steadily grown. The fish have proven popular among certain anglers, and have spread as far down the Clark Fork as Idaho’s Lake Pend Oreille. There’s just one problem: Noxon shouldn’t have walleye. The fish are there as a result of illegal introductions, which state officials say most likely occurred in the early 1990s. Bruce Farling, executive director at Montana Trout Unlimited, calls the perpetrators “midnight bucket biologists,” rogue anglers who import fish from elsewhere and release them in nonnative waters. Region 1 Supervisor James Satterfield with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks adds it doesn’t take much for them to get something started. “Most of these illegal introductions started with just a handful of fish,” Satterfield says. “Believe it or not, [FWP] did an analysis on the DNA of the lake trout in Swan Lake and concluded that that population started with like 2.7 fish.”

Farling says walleye in Noxon are problematic for many reasons. They’re a highly competitive species and can edge out native trout and bass populations. Plus, they’re spreading. It’s just one example of a major issue wildlife managers across the West are facing. FWP estimates that 295 illegal introductions of fish species have already occurred in Region 1 alone. “You got to catch the guy either red-handed or he’s got to have a big mouth,” Satterfield says. “We haven’t had an awful lot of luck apprehending people that do this.”

FWP released an environmental assessment last month outlining plans to tackle Noxon’s walleye problem. The proposal called for gillnetting and electrofishing during spawning in an effort to put a dent in the population. But Satterfield says the “vast majority” of public comment opposed the plan. “We got a lot of comments from local anglers and local citizens that are worried about the impacts on the economy that they feel a blossoming walleye fishery could provide,” Satterfield says. Satterfield says his office will most likely respond by drafting a new EA and providing more public inclusion, perhaps even an advisory group. But ultimately, he adds, “it’s not a vote.” Even if FWP moves forward with such a plan, Satterfield acknowledges there’s nothing the agency could possibly do to eliminate the walleye entirely. “I don’t believe we could eradicate walleye in that reservoir if the history of human civilization rested on it,” Satterfield says. Alex Sakariassen

Economy

Job fair bounces back Just after the economy nose-dived in 2009, the Missoula Job Service held its last Career Fair. For three years,

BY THE NUMBERS Years Max Baucus has represented Montana in the U.S. Senate. The six-term Democrat, who announced this week he’ll retire in 2014, is the longest serving senator in the state’s history.

35

general manager Wolfgang Ametsbichler says there was simply no point in holding another one. “The recession was so bad that nobody was hiring,” Ametsbichler says. “This year we saw things picking up.” That’s why the Career Fair will attempt a comeback April 25. Employment Services Supervisor Saundra Long says she hoped to get at least 60 potential employers to take part in the event. By Friday morning, 83 had signed up. “It does make me feel hopeful,” Long says. “I feel like we’re in the upswing.” Surviving a major recession changed how some businesses operate, which Long says is why many may have only a few openings at the event. By comparison, she says Montana Rail Link could be looking to fill 25 to 30 jobs. Regardless of how many positions are available, Long says the participating companies were vetted based on whether they could put people to work within three to six months. While the majority of participating companies will be hiring locally, oil giant Halliburton is the fair’s biggest sponsor. The company hopes to tap into Missoula’s labor force and ship employees elsewhere, most likely to the Bakken oil patch in eastern Montana and North Dakota. “They’re here to recruit for out-of-area,” Long says. Diane Matthews typed away at a laptop in the Missoula Job Service offices last week, studying the employers she planned to approach at the fair. Matthews spent the last decade working her way toward a degree in engineering while cleaning hotel rooms, flipping burgers and doing whatever else was available after the recession hit. In 2010 she wound up job hunting in Phoenix. “I couldn’t even find a job cashiering,” she says. “There was nothing to even apply for.” Matthews, who has been unemployed in Missoula since Feb. 1, says she’s fortunate enough to be in a position to take a job that requires her moving out of Missoula, if the right offer came along. Right now she’s thinking Halliburton will most likely have a job that best uses her skill set. “I’d like to find something that’s challenging, something that uses my education,” she says. “I don’t want mindless activity.” Mike Gerrity

ETC. When University of Montana President Royce Engstrom recently fielded questions from a room of College of Arts and Sciences faculty about UM’s budget shortfall, one matter kept coming up: How the cuts would affect the athletics department. One faculty member jokingly asked Engstrom if the university had considered privatizing the football team as a way to raise money. Another commented that he remembered the days when Montana State University–Billings had football. He pointed out that it no longer did. The source of the prickly undertone regarding school athletics was clear. When allegations of sexual assault by UM football players first surfaced in December 2011, the university’s enrollment had been trending upward for years. By 2012, though, amid mounting accusations and controversy, enrollment began to decline, as did the university’s revenue from tuition. By 2013, with on-going investigations and questions about UM’s handling of sexual assault cases, the university’s full-time undergraduate enrollment had fallen from a 2011 high of 10,305 to 9,266. The result is a projected $17 million budget shortfall. UM Director of Athletics Kent Haslam knows faculty members are anxious about budget cuts, but he feels it’s unreasonable to “tie a direct line that athletics is the cause of the enrollment drop.” He points out that despite the “perception that athletics gets everything that it wants,” his department is not immune to the shortfall, and says his office will have to “tighten up” next year. Though he says he has not been forced to cut any employees or reduce salaries, next season’s Griz games may have fewer ushers and ticket takers. Even if one does accept an apparent correlation between the dip in enrollment and UM’s sexual assault scandal, Haslam says the university’s “investment on athletics returns tenfold.” In 2012, the football team alone brought in nearly $5 million to the university. And of the athletic department’s roughly $17 million budget, he says, less than $6 million comes from the university’s general fund. The rest is supported by private donations and revenue generated from things like ticket sales and stadium advertising. “There’d be an argument to be made that the tremendous enrollment growth this university experienced was because of the tremendous success coming from a tremendous athletic program. So you just can’t take the good and then get rid of it when you feel like it’s bad,” he says. “Athletics is not the most important thing we do here. But it’s important.” Especially when it comes to money.

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missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [7]


[news]

Build up South Campus opponents prep for next salvo by Alex Sakariassen

Roughly two dozen community members and local officials gathered in the Missoula City Council chambers April 17 for the first full meeting of the newly established Community Quality of Life Advisory Committee. Mayor John Engen, along with representatives from the University of Montana administration and student senate, addressed topics ranging from bus system improvements to potential increases in off-campus student housing. But David Werner’s hand was first up, and he wasted no time raising issue with UM’s plans for future expansion—starting with a new Missoula College building at what’s currently the UM golf course. Werner, a member of the citizen group Advocates for Missoula’s Future, reiterated what critics of the university’s South Campus Master Plan have been saying for nearly six years—namely that he’d prefer Missoula College be located near Fort Missoula. “If paired with the Fort Missoula Regional Park plan,” Werner said, referring to a massive city initiative to revitalize open space at the Fort, “that would be a beautiful area. The city needs that.” Werner and his cohorts have been clear: They’re not opposed to a new Missoula College building. They just don’t feel sacrificing UM’s golf course, or any of the open space below Mount Sentinel, is the right move. Debate over the fate of UM’s golf course has waxed and waned for decades, but recent developments in the Montana Legislature have revived the topic. Just one day before Werner’s comments, the Senate passed an amended state funding bill that included a $32 million allocation for construction of a new Missoula College. The House approved the measure April 20. Sen. Dave Wanzenried, D-Missoula, was the only Democrat in both houses to oppose the Missoula College amendment. Should Gov. Steve Bullock sign the bill, the university’s next step will be to conduct a string of public meetings and gather input on how best to proceed, says Peggy Kuhr, UM’s vice president for integrated communications. “We know there are conversations that have to be had,” Kuhr says, “and we look forward to it.”

While Advocates for Missoula’s Future will almost certainly be involved in those discussions, the group isn’t counting on public testimony to change the university’s decision to build below Mount Sentinel. According to an email shared with the Independent last week, Missoula attorney Quentin Rhoades has committed to representing the Advocates pro bono in an effort to stop what UM admits is the first phase toward additional expansion. Advocates member Ian Lange believes the group has amassed plenty of material to challenge the university’s current proposal. Much of the work has focused on undermining UM’s reasons for deeming the nearly 51 acres it owns near Fort Missoula unfeasible for future expansion. First off, Lange says, the claim that floodplain issues reduce the acreage appropriate for development is a nonstarter. The Advocates have repeatedly pointed to county maps that show only three of the acres owned by UM fall in the floodplain. The group alleges this leaves “ample room” for the consolidation of the existing Missoula College campuses at the Fort and on South Avenue. The Advocates have also challenged a list of historic and archeological considerations UM says “further constrain building opportunities at this location.” They cite numerous consultants who have found that the university’s property at the Fort doesn’t retain historic integrity, despite findings of numerous artifacts at various sites over the past three decades. H.D. Hampton, a former professor who has led digs at the site in the past, wrote in a letter to the Advocates that UM’s assertions that these historical artifacts would prevent any development is a “small, pink herring.” UM, however, believes these points fail to address the larger concerns regarding infrastructure needs at the Fort. Any expansion near Fort Missoula would require extending sewer service along South Avenue at significant cost. UM would likely meet opposition from Target Range residents over increased traffic and decreased open space. Most parties agree that, no matter where UM decides to place Missoula College, neighbors will raise concerns. Rep. David “Doc” Moore, R-Missoula, voted

against the funding measure for the same reasons the Advocates have spoken up against the South Campus. He feels addressing existing concerns could prove simple. “I think if the U wanted to defuse the situation, they would just go around publicly tomorrow and say, ‘We’re going to do a full EIS,’” Moore says. “That would tremendously defuse what’s going on in the community, because if we’re going to do a project of that scale and that amount of impact on so many neighborhoods, let’s do it right.” Kuhr doesn’t deny that the new Missoula College building would alter the golf course, nor that it marks the first step to eventually closing the course entirely. But UM and Missoula College both need room to grow, she says, and South Campus would provide easier connectivity to UM’s main campus. According to the university, 532 Missoula College students took classes on the main campus in fall 2012. Nearly 750 students from the main campus took classes at Missoula College. Kuhr says the new building will likely occupy 7 to 10 acres on the South Campus. What programs will be housed there “will be decided through the design phase,” she says. But with the funding bill still unsigned, UM is trying not to get too far ahead of itself. “We’ve been very clear all along … that we and the Board of Regents are committed to a South Campus development plan, and that it goes beyond one building—Missoula College,” Kuhr says, adding that UM estimates expansion as a whole would require 210 acres. “Obviously we think there are more studies that need to be done, and the results of those studies [will] help us as we decide where we’re going in the future.” She adds that if citizens want to revisit the issues with Fort Missoula, “we’re happy to talk about it.” And while much remains uncertain about Missoula College and South Campus, one thing is clear: The debate will continue even after Bullock makes his decision. “I think it will be passed,” Lange says. “And then, we’ll go to court. I hope I’m wrong.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

[8] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013


[news]

Ted talks Billionaire “Bison Baron” opens up in new book by Jamie Rogers

In spring 1992, environmental journalist Todd Wilkinson was driving through a snowstorm on the 113,000-acre Flying D Ranch near Bozeman when a bull bison wandered into the middle of the dirt road. It wasn’t an ideal situation. He was already running late for his interview with the Flying D’s new owner, and Wilkinson had heard the man had little patience for tardiness. Eventually, though, Wilkinson made it to the interview, which would end up being the first of many between the journalist and the charismatic billionaire whom the media once dubbed “Captain Outrageous.” In his new book, Last Stand: Ted Turner’s Quest to Save a Troubled Planet, Wilkinson recalls the first thing Turner said to him when he finally arrived for the interview: “My name’s Ted. What’s yours?” Today, Turner owns approximately 2 million acres of ranch land in 12 states and Argentina, where he maintains the largest commercial bison herd in North America (55,000 head). That herd has earned him a new nickname: “The Bison Baron.” The Indy recently caught up with Wilkinson to discuss the Bozeman author’s new book, Turner’s legacy and how capitalism and environmentalism can co-exist.

T W: Early in his career Turner subscribed to the ideals of Ayn Rand—this sort of me-first selfishness, a rational self-interested approach. But he ultimately rejects that. One of his motivations was meeting with Jacques Cousteau aboard the Calypso (Cousteau’s research vessel). Cousteau said to him that he could do good in the world and make money and become successful as a businessman. Moving forward, Turner began to realize that capitalism isn’t the problem but how we’ve been practicing

T W: When he arrived in Montana, many people thought Turner might turn around and subdivide his land. He put those fears to rest when he put a conservation easement on 113,000 acres. And there were people even at Montana State University who thought Turner’s venture into bison would be a fly-by-night operation. It would just be something that he would deal with and then move on. But he has longevity here. He has built his bison herd and expanded his land ownership. He’s proven that he’s committed to this. Other books have been written about Turner, and in 2008 he penned a memoir. Your book delves into issues not formerly covered, namely the suicide of his father, Ed, and his marriage with actress Jane Fonda. How did you get him to open up? T W: So many celebrities have this sort of public face, but there’s often a lot more going on behind the scenes. Turner is an incredibly private person—very hard to penetrate. It took a while to actually get to the point where we could have a discussion where he actually lowered his guard. It really took a lot of prying and pushing and backand-forth to get him to go to that place.

You’ve known Turner for more Turner is best known as the than 20 years now, and spent eight founder of CNN and TBS, owner years writing a book about him. of the Atlanta Braves and a bomDo you consider him a friend? bastic sharer of opinions. How T W: We are friendly. He did you get interested in writing photo courtesy of Todd Wilkinson trusts me. But my goal was never about him? Todd Wilkinson: When I first Bozeman author Todd Wilkinson reads from his to become Ted’s friend. My goal interviewed him 20 years ago, I new book, Last Stand: Ted Turner’s Quest to Save was to maintain an arm’s length a Troubled Planet, at Fact & Fiction Tuesday, April sense of objectivity and to really didn’t know much other than 30, at 7 p.m. push him in ways his friends what the headlines were in newspapers. Generally, the public had this no- capitalism is. It’s been presented as the couldn’t. And so in discussions about his tion of Ted Turner as being outspoken economy versus ecology argument—that in father’s suicide and the impact it had on and some called him a loudmouth. He order to have financial prosperity we have him or discussing his relationship with had this reputation for saying outrageous to trash landscapes. I think Ted charts a mid- Jane Fonda, he told me it was really diffithings, and I would say he was deservedly dle ground in this time in our country when cult to read those chapters. But he was pilloried for some of the things he’s said. everything is polemic, everything is divisive grateful they were in there. I didn’t enter (For example, Turner once publicly re- and everything is expressed in ideological this project to hobnob with Ted. What I ferred to abortion opponents as “idiots” terms. Ted thinks that’s nonsense. You can did it for was to investigate Turner, and I and “bozos.”) But with this book I wanted be a good steward of the land and still think anyone who reads this book will realize that Ted isn’t a saint, doesn’t aspire record a profit. to go behind the public persona. to be a saint. He’s a perfectly flawed In the book, you mention that Turner human being, and whether you like him Your book makes the argument that Turner’s efforts to restore bison to the wasn’t immediately welcomed by his or don’t like him, I hope it challenges peoAmerican landscape make him not only a neighbors in Montana, and he made mat- ple to realize that he’s far more compliconsummate capitalist but an environ- ters worse when he publicly disparaged cated than you think. mentalist of the highest order. How do beef cattle as inferior to bison. How does jrogers@missoulanews.com he fit in these days? those ideas dovetail?

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [9]


[opinion]

Imaginary majority Why Baucus voted against background checks by Dan Brooks

To call Manchin-Toomey the most popular piece of legislation to fail the U.S. Senate this year would be irresponsible, because what does “popular” mean, anyway? The amendment to implement criminal background checks for all firearm purchases— currently, they’re only required for purchases from licensed dealers—had bipartisan support, but plenty of unpopular ideas have that. The federal income tax, for example, or not being allowed to go to the National Archive and take an Instagram of your baby lying directly on the Constitution both enjoy broad support across the aisle. So what senators like is not necessarily what the American people are into, for better or worse. You can’t trust the polls, either. Between 83 and 90 percent of respondents say they favor expanded background checks, but we all know statistics lie. Just because The Washington Post, CNN, Quinnipiac and CBS each found that Americans overwhelmingly support criminal and mental health checks for all advertised gun sales doesn’t mean it’s what voters want. Such polls notoriously skew toward people who own landlines, and they sorely underrepresent those Americans who, hearing a ringing sound in their homes, whirled around and shot the phone. That kind of unscientific survey, albeit technically scientific, is no substitute for representative government. America is a republic, not a democracy, and if we all voted on everything by phone Kelly Clarkson would be Secretary of the Treasury right now. By the same principle, you can’t just let the Senate do what a majority of senators want. Casual fans of legislative government may be surprised to learn that ManchinToomey failed with 54 votes in support and 46 against—the kind of numerical majority that previous Senates called a win. In the 2013 session, however, Manchin-Toomey was a lock for Republican filibuster, and pro-

ponents knew they needed a 60-vote supermajority to bring it to the floor. That didn’t happen. Despite majority support in the Senate, overwhelming consensus in the polls and the quiet parents of Newtown, Conn., in the gallery, the Senate moved April 17 to keep letting whomever buy firearms at gun shows and on the internet.

“The death of the Manchin-Toomey amendment sure wasn’t democratic.” Probably it was the wise thing to do, because who ever met a crazy person at a gun show or on the internet? Maybe it was even popular. But the death of the ManchinToomey amendment sure wasn’t democratic. Four Senate Democrats voted nay in Wednesday’s attempt to break Republican filibuster: Alaska’s Mark Begich, North Dakota’s Heidi Heitkamp, Arkansas’s Mark Pryor and Montana’s own Max Baucus. As Ezra Klein pointed out in the Post’s Wonkblog, all four come from rural states with low populations and active gun cultures. Begich and Pryor also face tough elections next year. It is reasonable to say that in last week’s Senate, a small percentage of swing voters from three of the least-populated states in the union overruled the wishes of a vast majority of Americans. That doesn’t sound so great, though. Better to go with the single-word explanation for his vote that Baucus offered the Los Angeles Times: “Montana.”

That is true. Baucus is the senior senator from Montana, whose population of one million has seated him among those lawmakers who represent the smallest number of actual Americans—right down there with Alaska and North Dakota. But that’s how the Senate works. Why shouldn’t we get just as much say as any other state? With a little help from a Republican filibuster, why shouldn’t we get more say than all the other states put together? Everybody knows that we Montanans love our guns. There is no specific polling evidence to say how we feel about preventing the mentally ill from buying guns on the internet, but probably we hate it. Montana has a gun culture, whatever that means, and last week Baucus took our general sense of how people like us probably feel and imposed it on the rest of the country. It may not have been democratic, at any level. It may not even have been popular. But in terms of satisfying our knee-jerk associations with that one word, “Montana,” it was politically expedient. Call it the imaginary majority. They don’t respond to polls, they don’t compose a majority of votes in the Senate, but they cast the swing votes in future elections. They play to stereotypes, and they don’t go in for such fine distinctions as exist between “expanded background checks at gun shows and on the internet” and, you know, “guns.” The imaginary majority likes its politics in one word. That’s what makes them such a powerful force in American government— more powerful than Senate majorities or polls or any specific policy idea. They’re easy to represent: You just think of what you already know about the kind of people who are going to vote in your next election, and you ignore everything else. Dan Brooks writes about politics, consumer culture and lying at combatblog.net.

photo by Chad Harder

[10] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013


[opinion]

Dust in the snow Dry conditions carry big implications across the West by Tim Lydon

The recent online series, “Trip,” features Swiss free-skiers Nicolas and Loris Falquet skiing through snow colored with yellow, blue and umber dyes, all apparently non-polluting. It’s beautiful, slow-motion cinematography that captures the complexity of snow, with vivid contrasts between storm layers, cornices, powder and slabs. It’s also a timely metaphor, because the color of snow is actually changing across the globe, including in the West. The phenomenon is attributed to various human activities and carries big implications for everything snow-related, including skiing, farming, forest health and municipal water supplies. The latest example comes from southwest Idaho, where March winds transported a layer of desert dust onto the snowpack at an Owyhee Mountains research station. Snow surveyors over 60 miles away also observed the dusty snow. Dust absorbs heat and can be ruinous for snowpacks. During the following 10 days, research cameras showed accelerated melting that contributed to an early runoff in local rivers—a big deal for farmers, rafters, fly fishers, fish and wildlife. Scientists blamed the event on exceptionally dry conditions in the Great Basin desert. Water specialists told the Idaho Statesman they’d never seen anything like it. But in Colorado, I remember the umber-colored snowstorm the day after Valentine’s Day, 2006, during one of my last winters in the high country. Weather observers reported dusty snow from Durango to northern Colorado, across over 100 miles of mountains. The dust stained every mountain face and plagued the snowpack for the rest of the winter. It happened again in 2009, leading some snowpacks to melt 48 days early, according to University of Utah researchers. Scientists tied these events to drought conditions as well: an abnormally dry desert Southwest. Dust kills snow dead. It reduces the reflectivity that keeps snowpacks cool. Its dark particles also absorb heat, further warming snow. And the accelerated melting uncovers vegetation and soil, revealing dark surfaces that absorb additional heat and melt more

snow. With snow producing up to 75 percent of water for many Westerners, and climate change already diminishing Western snowpacks, these events are causing alarm. Research adds to concerns. Satellite imagery and analysis of dust confirms its origins in U.S. deserts. In Colorado, researchers using pond sediments created a 5,000-year dust-deposition record that showed dramatic increases in the late 1800s, synchronous with the arrival of hordes of settlers with herds of cattle, which destabilized soils.

“One researcher estimates dust on snow reduces the Colorado River’s flow by 5 percent, stealing enough water to supply Los Angeles for 18 months.” Current dust deposition remains at 500 times pre-settlement levels, and contributors to the problem include grazing, development, off-highway vehicles and drilling. The impacts are felt high in the mountains and follow rivers downward, from ski areas to reservoirs, farms and cities—all the way to thirsty Los Angeles. One researcher estimates dust on snow reduces the Colorado River’s flow by 5 percent, stealing enough water to supply Los Angeles for 18 months. Pollution is also changing the color and impact of snow. Department of Energy research shows soot from coal-fired energy plants and diesel engines causes widespread

snowmelt in the Cascades and Rockies. This reflects a growing global threat to snow and ice. Industrial soot travels far and increasingly is blamed for the rapid melting of Arctic sea ice and Alaska’s incredibly shrinking glaciers. Asian coal-fired energy plants enhance melting in the Himalayas. Meanwhile, millions of wood-burning stoves in Africa launch additional soot into the atmosphere, to be later carried Earthward by faraway snows. In Greenland, researchers tied melting to soot from fires in the Alaskan Arctic. Here in the American West, scientific models show a hotter, drier region with less vegetation and more dust. In both Idaho and Colorado, abnormally dry desert conditions contribute to dust-on-snow events. Increasing forest fires, including last summer’s blazes downwind of the Owyhees, can also remove vegetation and destabilize soils. In the Arctic, increasing fires produce soot destined for sea ice and globally significant ice caps. The implications are wide-ranging. For instance, if off-roading and drilling are sending dust aloft from increasingly arid deserts, it lends ecological credence to long-standing proposals to designate some of Utah’s BLM lands as wilderness, places where the dust itself can remain undisturbed. And if soot from Asian coal plants is dirtying snow and melting glaciers, including on our own continent, it undermines the economic argument for building enormous coal export facilities in Washington. This new world we’re in also makes the December 2012 decision to strengthen Clean Air Act soot standards—lambasted by Republicans as “job-killing”—look like a good idea. The same goes for the multi-national initiative to reduce soot that was announced last year by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. In these and other examples, seemingly distant policy decisions have a bearing on snow and the people who rely on it, including here in the West. Tim Lydon is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He writes from south-central Alaska.

• live music by Kira Means 10:30-12:45 • great local food • bedding plants and veggie starts Visit clarkforkmarket.com, facebook for music calendar, what's in season, coupons and deals

• the freshest greens • nonprofit guests with demonstrations and educational info

invites you to the 2013 Dean Stone Lecture

Coal Trains: When Journalism Is Not Enough. Eli Sanders, an associate editor at The Stranger and the winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing.

Thursday, April 25, 2013 7PM • UC Theater • Free & Open to the Public. missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [11]


[quirks]

Featured Lecture

Diabetes: Prevention, Treatment & You Speakers are Dr. Christopher Corsi and Jennifer Troupe, MS, RD, CDE

Thursday, May 2, 2013 • 6-8 p.m. Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Avenue, Missoula CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Authorities charged Ruth C. Amen, 46, with embezzlement after she paid for a surprise birthday party for her boss. Amen had been the office manager at a real-estate company in Boca Grande, Fla., for more than 10 years, but her decision to foot the bill for the party aroused the suspicion of company officials. They alerted Lee County sheriff’s investigators, who discovered that Amen had stolen $181,674. (South Florida Sun-Sentinel)

Doors open at 5:30 p.m. • Free and open to the public For more information contact Denise at

(406) 523-9909

Elizabeth A. Hoen, 18, was charged with stealing three steaks from a grocery store in Wausau, Wis., after she attracted attention by standing naked from the waist down on a street corner. She had put her pants back on by the time police arrived but ran when officers approached. They caught her, found the steaks in her purse and determined they’d been stolen from a nearby grocery store. (Wausau Daily Herald)

The event is brought to the community by SENIOR OPTIONS & SERVICES, a group of area senior care providers committed to working together to find the best possible solutions for every senior.

Clark Fork School Summer Camps – Now Enrolling! Clark Fork School summer camps initiate kids into a life-long, meaningful relationship with the natural world by providing fun, hands-on experiences in nature. Children will be empowered to learn and discover according to his or her own unique talents.

Each week explores a different and exciting theme. All weeks guarantee to spark children’s curiosity and sense of wonder. Parents can enroll week-to-week throughout the summer. Each day runs from 8:30 am – 3:30 pm. Extended care is available until 5:30.

We look forward to a fun-filled summer with you! Call 728-3395 for more information.

Connecting Education, Nature & Community • clarkforkschool.org

BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY - Worried that unseasonably warm temperatures this winter bode ill for next year’s Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, local organizers have stockpiled 450,000 cubic meters of snow near the Black Sea resort. “We’ve prepared seven separate areas for snow storage high up in the mountains,” said Sergei Bachin, whose Roza Khutor ski resort will host Alpine skiing, snowboarding and freestyle competition. He pointed out the snow, which is costing an extra $11 million to store, will be covered with a “special thermal seal” to minimize melting during the summer. Even so, he expects 140,000 cubic meters of the snow will melt. (Reuters) SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - Logan Bunn, 27, injured himself after firing a gun at a tree outside a home in northwest Iowa. The Allamakee County Sheriff’s Office said the bullet ricocheted off the tree and hit him. (Associated Press) Police were called to a Wal-Mart store in Northborough, Mass., after employees reported a man in his 40s opened a package containing a flare gun and fired it, damaging the floor. Sgt. Joseph Galvin said that when employees asked the man why he shot the flare, he told them he “wanted to see if it worked.” (Framingham’s MetroWest Daily News) Florida State Sen. Audrey Gibson introduced a bill making it unlawful to “sell ammunition to another person who does not present certification that he or she has successfully completed an anger-management program.” The bill adds that the certification “must be renewed every 10 years.” (Fox News)

PROBLEM SOLVED - Prostitution arrests in Salt Lake City dropped 92 percent in 2012 from the previous year. The decline occurred after the city police department disbanded its vice squad. Police Chief Chris Burbank explained that prostitution is the type of crime where “the more you put officers out working it, the more arrests they’re going to make.” (The Salt Lake Tribune) FAIR FOWL - Emu ranchers who’ve seen demand for their birds’ meat decline see hope in the large block of fat that covers most of the 6-foot-tall emu’s body, between the hide and the flesh. When the fat is processed as oil rubbed into a person’s skin, it’s touted as a treatment for wrinkles, burns, acne, arthritis, psoriasis and eczema. It’s also used in shampoo and cosmetics. Taken orally, it can treat cholesterol, symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and allergies. “The oil is beneficial for almost any kind of skin condition,” said Clover Quinn, who owns the Wild Rose Emu Ranch in Hamilton, Mont. A single bird produces 250 ounces of oil, which Quinn sells for $10 an ounce. Mike Eppley of the American Emu Association warned that rising prices in the past five years have tempted some producers to cut the pure emu oil with soybean or canola oil. (The New York Times) PEDI TO THE METAL - Scientists from New York University will measure the degree of contamination from hexavalent chromium, a “well-established carcinogen,” in Garfield, N.J., by collecting toenail clippings from city residents. Because toenails grow slowly, researchers will be able to determine how much of the metal has accumulated in the body over the past 18 months as a result of a chemical spill in a residential neighborhood 30 years ago, according to environmental medicine professor Judith Zelikoff. (Associated Press)

Show & Share, installation detail.

SHOW &

FATHER OF THE YEAR - Shawn Wayne Hughes, 32, agreed to sell his 6-year-old daughter for $1,500, according to police in Kingsport, Tenn., who said Hughes told the buyer, a 75-year-old woman who agreed to his offer under police direction, that he needed the money to bail his girlfriend out of jail. When he showed up to exchange the child for cash, police were waiting. (Knoxville News Sentinel)

SHARE

CRIMINAL HYGIENE - Beate Proeller, 47, stole more than $16,000 worth of toothbrushes from Kohl’s stores in Middletown Township and Morton Borough, according to Pennsylvania State Police, who accused Proeller of placing phony price tags over the real price tags on some 200 high-priced electronic toothbrushes so they’d scan at a fraction of their true retail value. (Philadelphia’s WPVI-TV)

SHOW us what you collect, and SHARE it with the community at the Art4All: Show and Share. This is your chance to participate in a community based installation. Add a token of your collection to the Art4All installation at MAM today!

AVOID THE SNOW TRAPS - Huang Nubo, a former official in the Chinese Communist Party’s Propaganda Department who’s now a property developer in Beijing, intends on building a golf resort in a remote village in northeastern Iceland. He believes the luxury hotel and “eco golf course” at Grimsstadir would attract wealthy Chinese seeking clean air and solitude. Foreign Minister Ossur Skarphedinsson said he saw no reason to block the venture, which is expected to cost more than $100 million, but added that he’s puzzled why Huang would want to build a high-end resort in a place so isolated that “you can almost hear ghosts dancing in the snow.” Xu Hong, a vice president at Huang’s company, said Grimsstadir was chosen because “there is a market demand in China” for peace and quiet. (The New York Times)

BE PART OF THE ART // THROUGH MAY 19

Art4All: Show & Share sponsored by

free expression. free admission. 335 N. Pattee // missoulaartmuseum.org // 406.728.0447 Tuesday - Saturday 10AM - 4PM // Sunday 12PM - 4PM

OCCUPATIONAL HAZARD - Edgardo Toucet sued a Florida temp agency that assigned him to a manufacturing plant near Orlando to operate a peeler machine, which uses a razor-sharp blade to cut carpet foam. He claims he “received no orientation or other formalized instruction or training in preparation for his temporary work assignment as a peeler machine helper,” and that while working, he “came into contact with the machine’s spinning blade and his penis and testicles were completely severed.” (Courtroom News Service)

SHORT FUSE - Upset when a bank ATM wouldn’t return his card, John Ouillette, 44, tried to pry open the machine’s front cover, causing roughly $11,000 in damages, according to police in Nashua, N.H., who charged Ouillette with felony criminal mischief. (Nashua’s The Telegraph)

[12] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013


Vote by May 8

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2013 OFFICIAL BEST OF MISSOULA BALLOT

Life consists of millions of tiny choices that determine who you are, how you live and for what you will be remembered. Some of these decisions are easy, others sorta hard and daunting and the type that leave you paralyzed at the thought of what could happen if you make one choice over another. Let’s keep this on the easy side of things. What if we told you that you could answer a bunch of questions that you already know the answers to—and your answers could help fuel Missoula’s biggest celebration of the year? Sound good? Well, luck would have it that we have a Best of Missoula ballot right here. All we’re looking for is your opinion about what makes our city so great. Easy, right? And if you get on a roll and figure you’d like to answer a few more questions, we have even more categories listed on our online ballot at missoulanews.com. All of your focus and dedication comes with a reward, of course. The Independent’s annual Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park takes place Thursday, July 11, and we’d like you to join us. There’ll be live music, food and drinks as we toast your votes and honor this year’s winners. Okay, now get to the ballot. Filling it out will be the best decision you make all day.

Best Local Arts & Entertainment Art Gallery Band Musician Photographer Writer Movie Theater

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Cosmetics Day Spa Jewelry Kids' Clothing Women’s Clothing Men’s Clothing Lingerie Place for a Men’s Haircut Place for a Women’s Haircut Shoe Store Tattoo Parlor Thrift Store

Ice Cream Milk Shake Mexican Food Pizza Restaurant New Restaurant Family-Friendly Restaurant Restaurant Service Restaurant Wine List Outdoor Dining Romantic Dining Salad Sandwich Shop Seafood Steak Supermarket Retail Beer Selection Retail Wine Selection Vegetarian Food Wings

Appetizers Asian Food Bakery Breakfast Budget Lunch Coffee Delicatessen Burger French Fries Desserts

Auto Repair Bank/Credit Union Big Box Store Bookstore CDs and Music Dry Cleaner Furniture Store Hobby/Craft Shop Lodging Motorcycle/ATV Dealer New Car Dealer

Consider this the fine print: We require ballots to include your full name, e-mail address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 40 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below. Ballots must be received by Wednesday, May 8, by 5 p.m.

New Retail Store Adult Store Pet Supplies Plant Nursery Ranch Supply Store Store for Gifts Home Appliances Home Electronics Store for Musical Instruments Toy Store

Best Local Nightlife Bar Bar Food Bar for a Stiff Pour Beer Selection Bloody Mary Margarita Martini Casino Happy Hour Karaoke Bar Microbrewery Place to Dance Place to Hear Live Music Pool Table Sports Bar

Best Local Goods & Services Best Local Food & Drink

Used Car Dealer

Best Local Sports & Recreation Bike Shop Bowling Alley Fly-fishing Shop Golf Course Health Club Store for Paddle Sports Gear Place to Get a Snowboard Sporting Goods Store for Guns Store for Mountaineering Gear Store for Skis

Name:________________________________________ Email: ________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________________

Ballot Box Locations: Bagels on Broadway, Bernice's Bakery, Bridge Pizza, Brooks & Browns Downtown, Buttercup Market, Butterfly Herbs, Doc’s Sandwich Shop, Draught Works Brewery, Flathead Lake Brewing, Go Fetch! (all locations), Food for Thought, Good Food Store, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Orange Street Food Farm, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Sushi Hana, Taco del Sol (all 3 locations), Taco Sano, The Trail Head, UC Center Market, Westside Lanes, Worden's Market missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [13]


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ain was spitting and a cold wind had the few dozen sideline spectators pulling their winter coats tightly around themselves as they watched the Hellgate Knights lacrosse team play its home opener against the Big Sky Eagles. Lacking access to high school facilities, the teams played at DeSmet School, west of the airport. The tiny schoolyard was barely big enough to accommodate a regulation

lacrosse field and one sideline was just six inches from the asphalt basketball court. The whistle blew. A Hellgate midfielder won the face-off and quickly ran the ball upfield. He passed to a waiting attacker, who was immediately confronted by an Eagle defender. Panicked, the attacker fired the ball toward the far sideline, hoping a teammate was there. Five yards off the corner of the goal, Hellgate’s Spencer Schultz leaped high into

the air to spear the ball with his stick and save it from sailing out of bounds. As he came down, he rotated toward the goal and curled his stick down low, sneaking a shot an inch or two beneath the goalie’s stick and into the goal. Schultz pulled off the move in one seamless motion that left jaws gaping both on the field and along the sidelines. After a moment of stunned silence, the crowd went nuts. If only more people had been there to see it.

Lacrosse is still an anomaly in western Montana, an exotic “prep school sport” they play Back East. The West is catching up, though, with high school and college programs thriving in Washington, Oregon and Colorado. Even the University of Montana has a club team with a national championship under its belt. But it’s taken more than 400 years for the oldest game in North America to make steady inroads throughout the Treasure State. Lacrosse’s origins are hard to pin down. European explorers and missionaries first witnessed American Indians playing in the 1630s, but different precursors of the game, such as shinny and double ball, were part of Native culture for centuries. The age of lacrosse is usually placed between 400 and 1,000 years, but many tribes familiar with the sport believe it has been around longer than they have,

MONTANA’S FASTEST GROWING SPORT IS THE OLDEST IN NORTH AMERICA by Ednor Therriault • photos by Cathrine L. Walters

Dave Whyel of the University of Montana club lacrosse team attacks the goal during a 6-on-6 scrimmage. The Griz won a Division B national championship in 2007.

[14] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013


a game that was played by the animals before man even existed. The Native version of the game was a deeply spiritual undertaking; it is still referred to by tribal members as “The Creator’s Game.” American Indian lore tells of games sometimes lasting for days. The playing field frequently stretched for miles, involving as many as one thousand players on each side. Games were played to entertain the Creator, but also to heal the sick, train and strengthen warriors and as an alternative to war itself. Christened “lacrosse” by a French Jesuit missionary in 1836, the sport became popular in the eastern Canadian provinces and in the U.S. Northeast. In 1867, Canadian George Beers codified lacrosse with field dimensions, equipment standards and rules. The first U.S. high school team was fielded in New Jersey in 1887. Today, it’s finally catching on with Montana kids faster than you can say “Harlem Shake.” They’re drawn to a game that requires a variety of physiques, from speedy midfielders to stout defenders to twitch-quick goalies. It rewards speed and quickness over size, brains over brawn. “Any kid that enjoys football, soccer, hockey or basketball usually picks up lacrosse and loves it right away because there are so many shared skill sets,” says Tucker Sargent, head coach of the Griz lacrosse team. Montana Lacrosse, the 3-year-old state arm of US Lacrosse, reports that 47 kids registered to play statewide in 2009— about the size of a typical high school football roster. By 2011, the number had increased nearly tenfold. Last year’s count was 697, and in 2013 there may be close to 1,000 Montana kids playing the game. That’s not good enough for Kevin Flynn.

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ithin Montana’s lacrosse community, Missoula is regarded as the hub, and Kevin Flynn represents its centrifugal force. Since winning the Division B national championship with UM in 2007, the 30year-old Chicago transplant has made it his mission to spread the lacrosse love across Montana. He started in 2008 by enlisting the help of Griz teammate Jamie Pyke, who had already begun a flagship middle school program. The pair started Missoula Elite, the lacrosse organization responsible for introducing the game to a rapidly growing market of all ages and both sexes. “Kevin has created a great program with Missoula Elite,” says Big Sky High School coach Keith Kreiner. “It is difficult to build a high school program without having an influx of players. As more freshman start coming in with an understanding of the game and an established skill set, coaches can spend less time teaching fundamentals and focus more on strategy. Picture a basketball coach having to teach his players how to dribble two weeks before a game.” The game isn’t that complicated. In lacrosse, as with hockey, soccer and basketball, the object is to put the biscuit in the basket. In this case, the biscuit is a

hard rubber ball about the size of a tennis ball, weighing five ounces. It is just a little less dense than a Super Ball, and when it hits you at 80 mph, it will leave a mark. Players throw and catch the ball using a three-and-a-half-foot (longer for defense) stick that is topped with a roughly triangular-shaped head strung with a shallow mesh. The net doesn’t grip the ball like the pocket of a baseball glove, however, so players constantly spin the shaft back and forth, or “cradle,” to try and keep the ball in place. It’s like trying to carry a cue ball in a loosely strung tennis racket while an opponent is using his stick to whack the bejesus out of you. Although it’s fast-paced and bristling with hits, it’s not as dangerous as it looks. Players collect bumps and bruises as their opponents use their sticks to try and separate them from the ball, but that’s generally the worst of it. State-of-the-art helmets and high-tech body and elbow pads complement heavily cushioned gloves to offer players plenty of protection without hindering their movement. Since Flynn founded Missoula Elite, all three Missoula public high schools have a team. Now, Flynn is taking his show on the road. Part Johnny Appleseed and part Pied Piper, he plans to throw a “lacrosse kit” in the back of his pickup and introduce the so-called “fastest game on two feet” to 50 Montana high schools this summer in an ambitious barnstorming effort he calls the Grow Montana Lacrosse Experiment. His goal: a high school team in every town by 2015. He’s already logged hundreds of miles putting on clinics over the past couple years. “I’ve met kids who want to play,” says Flynn, who is in his third year coaching Hellgate alongside assistant Brandon Kendall. “I could go (to a town) 50 times but there has to be a person there who’s interested. What’s important is that somebody gets the light turned on in their head.” He’s hoping to find more people like Amber Guge, the Helena mom who drove her 8-year-old son to Missoula twice a week all last spring for Elite practice sessions and games. Last fall Flynn took a few high school players with him from Missoula and set up a demo in Helena. About 20 players showed up. It was clear that the interest was there; all he needed was that one parent to step up to the plate and act as director. Amber raised her hand. This year Helena’s program has grown to 50 kids. “That’s just one mom,” says Flynn. “She had no lacrosse experience, no team management experience, just the willingness to do a little bit of work. There’s somebody in every one of these towns who has the capability of running a great program.” To Montana players and coaches, Flynn is known as Mr. Lacrosse, but he’s not the only ex-player who’s come out West to establish a beachhead in Montana. Programs have come to life in Whitefish, Billings and Bozeman as well. These nascent organizations typically share one key ingredient: a Northeasterner who’s familiar with the game and its culture.

Top: Clyde the Hound, otherwise known as Coach Clyde, offers support during a recent UM practice. Middle: Griz coach Tucker Sargent tosses a ball against a homemade wall. Bottom: Hellgate High School coach and Missoula Elite founder Kevin Flynn.

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [15]


Matt Rizzolo, a New Jersey native who has played lacrosse his whole life and now coaches the Flathead Lacrosse Club in Whitefish, has seen remarkable growth in the northwest corner of the state. “We started with 40 kids four seasons ago,” he says. “Then 85 the next year. Last year our first high school team had 25 kids. This year we have 38 on varsity and JV.” He says there are 125 kids of all ages in the program, enough to allow them to launch two teams for those 13 or younger, or U13. One of the issues the Whitefish team shares with Missoula and pretty much every other team in Montana is the difficulty of practicing a spring sport outdoors. “The seasons take a long time to start,” Rizzolo said in a phone interview just before spring break in late March. “We’re heading out to the field at 4:30 today to shovel snow so we can practice.” In late March, Bozeman also had a ton of snow—and a ton of lacrosse players. High school coach John Merkovsky grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and picked up his first lacrosse stick at age 7. He is in his second year of coaching. “Fields in March? Let’s just say there are none. We had our beginning practices in a horse barn. Thankfully we had some

tions. Bozeman also has U15, U13, U11 and U9 youth programs as well as middle school and girls high school teams. While Bozeman may be enjoying an embarrassment of riches in lacrosse-crazy kids, the sport has faced a much harder time gaining a toehold in other parts of Montana—most notably, on Indian reservations.

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lex Alviar, a teacher at Salish Kootenai College, had always wondered why the Creator’s Game was not available for young tribal members on the rez. Then he decided to do something about it. Alviar was a two-time All-American at his Detroit high school, and when he discovered a cache of lacrosse sticks and balls in a dusty corner of the gym storeroom, he was delighted. Unsure of what to do next, he queried Flynn, with whom he played on a men’s league in Missoula. “All you need is 10 kids and 10 sticks,” Flynn said. Ten kids. Alviar figured he just had to get a stick into a kid’s hands and he’d be hooked. He contacted five high schools along Highway 93 North and was allowed to give demos at three of them. He lured potential players to after-school informational meetings with pizza and soda, even-

Two Missoula Elite women’s coaches demonstrate a face-off during practice at Jefferson School.

each name with phone calls and emails. Alviar was deeply discouraged, but then he got an email from a kid named Dan “Big Dan” LaFranier, an American Indian football player from Polson, one of the schools that had refused Alviar’s request

coached lacrosse in Indiana. Alviar had his 10 kids. He credits the Malcolm Gladwell book The Tipping Point with affecting a change in his focus. Instead of casting a wide net for players, Alviar started going

Blackfeet Indian Reservation were met with “intensive opposition” from the high school in Browning, Alviar says. There was plenty of interest from the kids, but no parents or coaches stepped forward to coordinate and run the program. The high

“We’re here to change what it means to love lacrosse. I want lacrosse to be as ubiquitous as basketball in Indian country out here in Montana, and it all starts here.” —Alex Alviar, 10Sticks club founder warm days early, so we finally got outside just this week.” As Bozeman has only one public high school, “depth is not a problem,” Merkovsky says. They have 50 players split into a varsity and JV team, which provides at least two players at each of the 10 posi-

tually collecting 200 signatures on a sign-up sheet. His new organization, 10Sticks, was off and running. Or so he thought. Of the 200 boys who put their name on the sign-up sheets, not a single one showed up to his first clinic, even though he had followed up on

to stage a demo. Big Dan had somehow gotten wind of the lacrosse clinic and wanted to check it out. He brought a couple of friends, and his buddy Al Plant from Arlee brought a couple of his friends. Soon the friends brought more friends, including a boy whose dad, J.R. Daniels, had

photo courtesy of Content Monkey

10Sticks founder Alex Alviar. “What I love about Montana lacrosse is, it’s small. It’s still intimate,” he says. “In five years we’ll all be looking back on these days with nostalgia.”

[16] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

after the kids who really cared about the sport, or “the 20 percent who do 80 percent of the work,” as he puts it. The 10Sticks club has bootstrapped its way up since that “borderline disaster” first year, Alviar says. He secured a grant to buy helmets. One player went out into the community to seek donations for the team. Gatorade, bottled water, printed team jerseys, even the occasional check started to trickle in. 10Sticks is in its third season now, and continues to grow and improve. Daniels handles the Xs and Os, freeing Alviar to write grants, schedule games and clinics, lead community outreach and generally “craft the narrative” of the Creator’s Game on the Flathead Indian Reservation. His latest venture is a crowd-funding project, “Ten Sticks In Ten Days,” that will raise money to send three or four players to a tournament hosted this summer by the Six Nations of Iroquois, which he calls “the motherland of lacrosse.” Alviar is highly driven, and dead serious about telling the story of lacrosse and sharing its meaning among Native Americans. “We’re not just here to change the face of lacrosse,” he says. “We’re here to change what it means to love lacrosse. I want lacrosse to be as ubiquitous as basketball in Indian country out here in Montana, and it all starts here.” Ironically, the Creator’s Game can be a tough sell in some Native communities. Efforts to start a lacrosse program on the

school administration did not want to make room for a new sport, even one with deep Native roots. Browning is a tight community, and parents didn’t want to be viewed as opponents of the school. “They need someone who’s immune to the school board,” Alviar says.

R

ick Roy is a garrulous, affably self-assured devotee of lacrosse who runs the Nadzitsaga lacrosse program in Burns, Ore. The club, which attracts kids from all over Harney County, just east of Bend, largely comprises American Indians. Astonishingly, Nadzitsaga and 10Sticks are the only two mostly Native lacrosse high school teams in the West, although a Native program in Umatilla, Ore., is reportedly gearing up. Like 10Sticks, Nadzitsaga forms a spirit circle before and after games, offering up prayers of thanks to the Creator. The Missoula teams they’ve faced eagerly join the circle, sharing their respect for the game and for each other. Other Oregon teams, Roy says, will have no part of it. Nadzitsaga has been around since 2008, and the program faces the same funding challenges as 10Sticks and other Montana club teams. “It’s a marketing game,” Roy says bluntly, when asked how he generates the resources for his team. “We have access to three fields, and I’m working on getting lights on one of them.” It comes across as


a boast, but it’s a well-earned one. Lacrosse can be difficult to establish in any school district when parents and school administrations fear that it will take a bite out of the school’s thin budget. But Roy understands the game’s spiritual essence and its positive impact on the lives of Nadzitsaga’s players. He’s worked hard at fostering a mutually beneficial relationship with Burns’ school administrators. “We don’t get direct financial support from the schools, but we get lots of tangible support like fields for no charge, early releases, morning announcements, inclusion in the yearbook, et cetera, from the school district,” he says. “That is very important. It’s about outreach, not just coaching Xs and Os. I think we are seen as benefiting kids, not just playing a sport.” Nadzitsaga players are highly visible in the Burns community. The team is regularly featured in the local paper and radio, and they host Indian Taco feeds to raise money. Roy says they have sent six or seven kids to college to play lacrosse. By heavily networking within his community, Roy just may have found the template to navigate the tricky waters of high school athletics. Although it takes constant effort to keep the cash and equipment rolling in, Roy—like Flynn in Missoula and Alviar in Pablo—would rather not see lacrosse become fully sanctioned by the high schools at this point. It would stifle the current growth of the sport. “The prayer circle?” Roy says. “That would be the first thing to go.” Flynn concurs. “My perfect world is to keep it a club sport. As soon as they give you money, they can start telling you what to do,” he says. For one thing, Flynn says, the school district would probably not allow his team to play non-conference games like this year’s Spring Break matchups with Nadzitsaga and two other Central Oregon teams. Missoula teams also frequently travel to Sandpoint, Idaho, and Spokane,

Tristan Jacobson, Hellgate’s talented goalie, has found his own path to college through lacrosse. Jacobson has been offered a scholarship to play lacrosse for the University of Great Falls, an NAIA school. The Argos just added a varsity lacrosse program, and are offering scholarships for men and women.

L

Montana Lacrosse reported 47 registered statewide players in 2009. In 2013, that number is closer to 1,000.

Wash., for tournaments. Nor would they fund or approve the cross-country travel to summer clinics that can gain exposure and face time with big-name lacrosse pros for high school players hoping to continue their careers into college. These clinics are crucial to players like Hellgate star Spencer Schultz, since college recruiters from Division I schools tend to think of Montana as nothing more than that guy who used to throw passes to Jerry Rice. Last summer, Matt Gibson, Major League Lacrosse’s rookie of the year, worked out with Schultz in Chicago and told Flynn he had no doubt Schultz could play at a Division I level. But Schultz has received no offer to play at a Division I school. “Frankly, that’s somebody’s loss,” says Flynn.

He points out that full-ride athletic scholarships for lacrosse are practically nonexistent, even at the big D-I schools back east. “The whole scholarship thing is a huge myth.” Even if a kid goes to college in-state, he will pay anywhere from $2,500 to $4,000 each year to play for the lacrosse club. “That’s something that UM and MSU have to get figured out,” says Flynn, who would love to see homegrown players get a financial break. Full-ride lacrosse scholarships are almost nil, but big-school programs that want a player on their squad will help a student with good grades locate grants, loans and other financial aid to help get him into the school and onto the team.

acrosse, like most sports, still revolves around a love of the game. And that love comes with a price. The trade-off for a club sport’s autonomy is the burden of having to pay for everything. Bob Rowe, treasurer of the Hellgate team, shared a list of expenses “from soup to nuts” that must be paid for by the club. “We pay for refs, tons of balls, cases of spray paint, a couple of team barbeques a year and then we have funds for nickel and dime things. For instance, we’re talking about grabbing a tent for the boys to stand under in the sun or the rain and that sort of thing.” Rowe and a few parents helped organize a spring fundraiser to supplement the $400 dues paid by each varsity player. Gangs of three or four boys bearing rakes and shovels fanned out through Missoula and spent a pre-season Sunday cleaning up yards at $100 a pop. They raised $2,100 in one day. Lacking any funding from the high schools, the clubs also are responsible for procuring the fields for practice and games. That has been a major struggle for Hellgate. Flynn says the school feels that the fields are under the purview of the district; the district says field use is up to the individual schools. Since neither entity has given the okay for Hellgate’s team to use any of the school’s fields, the 2012 state champion Knights have had to work out this spring on a patch of grass at the edge of a housing development on Mullan Road while Hellgate’s Rattlesnake Fields stood empty.

Sentinel gets to use its adjacent Stegner Field, but they are paying a fee for the privilege. Big Sky was also turned away from practicing on its own school’s fields this spring. After scrambling for practice fields at various middle schools, Kreiner was finally given the nod just last week to play on a field next to the high school. Coaches and players are mystified as to the district’s reluctance to open up the school fields to lacrosse. The teams feel they deserve access to the same facilities as “legitimate” sports like football and soccer—or at least fields that don’t butt up against asphalt and threaten player safety. Getting the cold shoulder from the very schools they represent has been frustrating for the players, coaches and parents, but those with experience in establishing new sports programs recognize it simply as growing pains. It’s a new sport. It’s unconventional. It’s misunderstood. “They’ll get used to it,” says Alviar, who has seen the cycle play out before. “They always do. What I love about Montana lacrosse is, it’s small. It’s still intimate.” He flashes the smile of a man who has a crystal ball and likes what he sees. “In five years we’ll all be looking back on these days with nostalgia.” Flynn, the unflappable sideline presence who majored in Native American Studies, takes it all in stride. He has the vision. He sees lacrosse fields everywhere. He knows lacrosse develops more than just athletic skill; it nurtures a sense of respect and honor within its players. He gathers his team on whatever patch of grass he can scrounge up and continues to teach the philosophy and the purity of spirit of Montana’s newest, oldest sport. All he wants is to grow the game. Bob Rowe has no doubt that he will succeed. “Kevin is very optimistic,” he says with a laugh. “Everything is possible. He won’t be happy until we get a stadium.” editor@missoulanews.com

The Hellgate Knights defeated the Sentinel Spartans during the March 16 season opener at DeSmet School.

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Spring fling Bare Bait Dance takes a new step in company-choreographed show by Melissa Mylchreest

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xpect plenty of visual variety from Bare Bait Dance’s Springboard show, including orange fruits, red shoes and pink beehive hair-dos. There’s also boxing and bickering, business suits and floral costumes, giddy laughter and genuine tears. Oh, and some professional-quality dancing, too. While this may sound like a disparate sampling of tone and style, the diversity makes sense. Springboard is Bare Bait’s first company-choreographed performance, which means that each individual dance has been created by one of the members of the company. Since its inception last year, all of Bare Bait’s shows have been choreographed by the company’s founder and artistic director, Joy French. But, as much as she loves creating evening-length pieces, French says she felt that for this spring show it was high time to let company dancers showcase their own choreography. “There are a lot of dancers in Missoula, but there aren’t very many opportunities for them to create work,” French says. “If you’re a dance major, you can choreograph in college, but after you graduate, there just aren’t really many options.”

photo courtesy of Jessica Shontz

French also notes that just because someone is a highly skilled dancer, it doesn’t mean that they’re automatically a skilled choreographer. “Just like anything, choreography takes practice,” she says. “I wanted to give Bare Bait dancers the chance to practice and work together on ideas that maybe they’ve been thinking about for a long time, but haven’t been able to make a reality.” The resulting show is a nice mix of styles, offering insight into the company members’ personalities and choreographic inspirations. Considering that some of the choreographers have only created a few dances before, the show feels remarkably coherent and professional. French’s piece, “1st/2nd,” kicks off the evening with two alternating duets that explore the world of competition. It is at turns silly and poignant, effectively using sound (noise from an auction and a boxing match) and props (one duo dances exclusively with wooden chairs). Other highlights of the evening include two pieces by Elizabeth Pertis. The first, “The Center

[18] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

Holds,” is danced solo by Pertis, and offers a stirring portrait of emotional torment. Her performance holds a certain stark grace: Pertis is able to appear both powerful and fragile in the same moment. Her second piece, “Above the Waveline,” is much lighter, with a trio of slip-clad dancers exploring the catty world of female competition. “Past is Present” encompasses both joy and heartache, addressing the fraught world of race relations, both historically and today. Set to old-time jazz and Billie Holiday, and choreographed by guest dancer Capri Richardson and company member Roxanne Madler, its themes are familiar, but are no less affecting for being so. Jordan Dehline presents a fun solo piece called “Atalanta in 9 Scenes,” vignettes that offer a smattering of different ways to view, approach and dance with a certain unexpected prop. The piece is poetic, whimsical and, taking place as it does within a large circle of rope laid on the stage, feels almost like an old-time circus act. Other performances include “Infloresence,” a ballet-inspired piece by Madler, which, though some-

what diminished by its childish costumes, is well-performed. “Expectations” by Jilyn Debray is a cleanly choreographed modern piece that feels like it is set amid the hustle and bustle of an urban financial district. “Borrowed Diction,” a lovely duet, features a series of phrases by choreographer Mark Haim, and “Compulsion: The Red Shoes Saga,” a delightful company piece choreographed by Morgan Shaw, is reminiscent of both a fashion show and a military drill. Springboard is a new step for Bare Bait Dance, and it’s a smart one. For those who have been following the company since its inception, this sampler presents a fantastic opportunity to get to know the dancers not just as dancers, but as artistic creators as well. Springboard continues at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., Fri., April 26, at 8 PM, and Sat., April 27, at 2 PM and 8 PM. $12/$10 in advance at Downtown Dance Collective or online at ddcmontana.com. arts@missoulanews.com


[music]

Inscrutable rhymes Aesop Rock goes down the doughnut hole Aesop Rock has a tattoo on each forearm. One says “Must not sleep,” and the other says “Must warn others.” Those quotes, from Invasion of the Body Snatchers, encapsulate the most lauded and criticized elements of his career. The Long Island-born MC has been prolific since his 1997 debut, both in albums released and in sheer quantity of lyrics packed into each track. Here lies the criticism: Aesop is abstract, and his homophonic imagery can sound like word salad to the uncharitable ear. For heads, though, his name is synonymous with backpack rap. Consider this opening salvo on “Fryerstarter,” from his most recent release, Skelethon: “Let me put you up on Bob’s Donuts, controller of the warm deep

fryer that charms cobras. Mostly it was aggravated ulcers over goat’s legs. Will they go for maple, custard, buttermilk or wolfsbane?” That one may not move as many records as “Life ain’t nothing but bitches and money,” but Aesop is selling a product you can’t get anywhere else. His obsessive surrealism is horrorcore without the horror, like Tyler the Creator if he cared less about Tyler and more about creation. It’s not for everyone but, like a Rorschach blot, it may just contain everything. (Dan Brooks) Aesop Rock, Busdriver, Rob Sonic and DJ Big Wiz play the Badlander Tue., April 30, at 9 PM. $20/$17 in advance at Ear Candy, plus $5 surcharge for ages 18-20.

Todd Snider Like Todd Snider, I think people use religion as a disguise to control what other people do. And that greed was the culprit when the housing bubble burst and people’s retirements vanished. On the country-folk artist’s most recent album, 2012’s Agnostic Hymns and Stoner Parables, we get a buffet of political issues like these delivered in fairly black and white bites. If you’re a Snider fan, you’re probably a supporter of the Occupy movement and listen to NPR. The thing is, NPR’s “Planet Money” does a much better—and more entertaining–job of explaining the remarkable complexity of these issues. So, in anticipation of his upcoming show in Missoula, let’s talk about the Snider of yesteryear. The Portland-born artist has always claimed Jerry Jeff Walker as an inspiration, and he’s best with that kind of storytelling country music. Songs like “Doublewide Blues” from 1998’s Viva Satellite, and “Tillamook County Jail”

from his 2004 album East Nashville Skyline aren’t exactly ducking the country tropes, but they’re the kind of ditties you want for an encore. More importantly, they tell a story in good details: “Metallica song blastin’ out from two trailers down/ It’s them cut-off T-shirt nunchuck kids comin’ around/Tonight they’ll get drunk, try to get laid/End up in a fight out behind the arcade.” You can picture it. That said, Snider’s classic “Conservative Christian, Right Wing Republican, Straight, White, American Male” is as much of a generalization as you can get, but at least he has fun with it. And that’s how a self-described “tree huggin’, peace lovin’, pot smokin’, porn watchin’ lazyass hippie” should be. (Erika Fredrickson) Todd Snider plays Stage 112 Tue., April 30, at 8 PM. $20. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and seafarerentertainment.com.

Bleached, Ride Your Heart If you’re looking for a dose of summery fun, Los Angeles duo Bleached’s beachy, pop-rock melodies could be just the thing. Bleached is sisters Jennifer and Jessica Clavin. They previously played in the allgirl lo-fi punk outfit Mika Miko, but don’t expect to hear much of that band’s grit here. On its first fulllength, Ride Your Heart, Bleached takes punk rock and runs it through an Instagram filter, adding pretty harmonies and a Pitchfork-friendly aesthetic to album covers and videos. Bleached lacks the snarl of Mika Miko, but in interviews, Jennifer Clavin says she intended to be more

serious than she was in the playful punk band, telling Bust magazine, “With Bleached, I’m finally like, ‘Fuck it, this is what I feel, and I’m singing about it.’” It’s not all heartbreak, though. The Clavins can party, too, judging by how they swig beer while applying eyeliner before going out in the video for “Next Stop,” or dive into a pool fully clothed in “Think of You.” Bleached’s formula might not be complicated, and neither is sitting on a beach, but both are quite appealing at times. (Kate Whittle) Bleached, Ex-Cops and Needlecraft play the VFW Tue., April 30, at 10 PM. $7/$12 for ages 18-20.

Jacob Robert Stephens, Here Comes Hindsight It’s refreshing to see that the pop music market has rediscovered the beauty of folk, with bands like Mumford & Sons and the Avett Brothers topping charts. After the stadium crescendos and anthemic composition of Mumford and the Avetts, however, a good dose of simple Americana goes a long way. On Here Comes Hindsight, Montana songwriter Jacob Robert Stephens gets back to the basics of a well-worn genre, mixing graceful melodies and familiar chord changes with rural, working-class themes and characters. This album is a perfect listen for long nights in candlelit cabins, and you can almost hear the flames flicker and

the hardwood floor creak in the very fabric of Stephens’ songs. Runaway women flit in and out of a majority of the tunes here, which Stephens sings with a breathless John Prine drawl, lending an earthy feel to tunes like the pensive “Dust Falls,” and blending beautifully with Andrea Harsell’s voice on the duet “Dance.” Harsell is one of many guests that bring depth to this album. Chicken pickin’ electric guitar, pedal steel swells and Stephens’ own mandolin prowess round out these compositions tastefully. It’s a no-frills, organic mixture that satisfies the whole way through, with no commercial additives necessary. (Jed Nussbaum)

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [19]


[film]

Natural selections International Wildlife Film Festival overcomes challenges to deliver 36th annual event by Nick Davis

You can’t blame the International Wildlife Film Festival if its feels a bit defensive these days. First, the venerable institution—now in its 36th year, it’s the oldest and longest-running wildlife film festival in the world—has seen its position of local prominence diluted a bit over the last decade, with the emergence of the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival. (Of course, it’s not as if the two festivals can’t—or don’t—peacefully coexist.) Secondly, longtime IWFF director Janet Rose departed abruptly, in a career move to Pittsburgh, just a few short months before the kickoff of this year’s festival on Saturday, April 27. But the IWFF board responded gamely, hiring former Big Sky director Mike Steinberg to lead the 2013 event. The Independent recently spoke with Steinberg about the challenges of getting up to speed, and his vision for the festival going forward.

IWFF is a significant logistical challenge, and you had just over two months to pull it together. What were your thoughts when the IWFF board approached you? Mike Steinberg: I knew if I could pull together a team, we could do this because I have great resources and a great network in the Missoula community. Having worked with several awesome people at the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, I knew if they were available we could make it happen. After little research, we said, “Okay, nine weeks until the film festival—let’s do it!” The tagline for this year’s festival is “Come Back To The Wild.” Is the focus of this year’s festival to reengage the Missoula community? MS: Absolutely. Our primary goal is local audiencebuilding, to get our audience back and get them to recognize how relevant and extraordinary this content is.

What are some other goals this year? MS: Our second focus is emerging filmmakers. We feel that IWFF can be the place for emerging filmmakers, for people trying to connect to the broader industry and trying to bring their work to bigger audiences. We’re doing that through the newly established Newcomer Award, and through the panels and discussions that have been the hallmark of festival week. And our third focus, because it’s a crucial issue in wildlife filmmaking and conservation, is the question of ethics in the media. How do you tell a scientific story, keep it true to the science and reality of the issue, but not make it “reality TV”? The popularity of nonfiction films in general has exploded over the past decade. What makes wildlife films relevant in this burgeoning industry?

MS: Wildlife films offer the most primordial sense of voyeurism. We can’t get close to many of these animals in the wild, but we can sit there and watch and observe in that way we probably did a long time ago. Coming back to the wild myself, I realized once again, what’s so awesome is the kind of understanding about our own species that we can gain from these films. Wildlife films are made for our species, right? They’re for our benefit, but ultimately they’re for the benefit of all living creatures, because we’re learning things about ourselves, we’re learning things about them and we’re doing what we can to help as a result of what we learn. Many of the films address environmental issues, species being threatened by pollution, poaching, climate change, etc. In terms of relevance, what more could you ask?

Feisty picks For all the changes to IWFF in 2013, it’s important to note that the festival will still deliver the events and programming that have allowed it to thrive for three decades. Those highlights include the ever-popular WildWalk Parade and WildFest, youth programming outreach, industry workshops, readings and the awards ceremony. And then, of course, there are the films. More than 75 wildlife and nature films will be screened over the eight days of the festival, covering just about every type of species and habitat on the planet. Here’s a sneak peek at a few of them: Wings of Life An incredibly shot and beautifully constructed film, Wings of Life tells the story of the unsung heroes of plant life—pollinators—and the complex

symbiotic relationships they hold with the plants they service. The high-speed, slow-motion footage of bees, bats, hummingbirds and monarch butterflies going about their business is jaw-dropping, as are the wiles by which plant species have evolved to attract and assist their winged helpers. Wings of Life screens Sat., April 27 at 7 PM at the Roxy Theater and Mon., April 29, at 5 PM at the Top Hat. Battle for Elephants Bozeman filmmaker John Heminway’s latest is a compelling combination of conventional documentary and investigative journalism work. Part call to action, part exposé, Battle for Elephants outlines the dire condition of African elephant populations and the seemingly insatiable desire The Last Lions

Wings of Life

[20] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

for ivory in Asian markets. Along the way, Heminway calls out corrupt government officials, black marketers and the wealthy collectors who drive demand for the precious ivory. Battle for Elephants screens Wed., May 1, at 7 PM and Sat., May 4, at 5:15 PM at the Roxy.

rear her infant cubs outside the fold. At once heartbreaking and uplifting, and packed with all the action and suspense you’d expect from a Hollywood blockbuster, The Last Lions is a constant wonder. The Last Lions screens Sat., May 4, at 3:15 PM at the Roxy.

The Last Lions While it calls attention to the plummeting populations of African lions, The Last Lions engages viewers on a much more personal level. The film documents a story with eerie parallels to the human experience: A newly widowed lioness chooses independence rather than subservience to the pack that killed her mate, and she struggles to survive and

The International Wildlife Film Festival runs Sat., April 27 to Sat., May 4 at the Roxy Theater, Wilma and Top Hat. Single screenings are $7/$6 for seniors/$5 for students/$3 for children. Full festival passes are $45. Visit wildlifefilms.org for full schedule and details. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

Hard day’s night Some work, more play in new Gourds doc by Nick Davis

At the risk of bouncing a smug note into the surrounding areas of western Montana, Missoula is one hell of a town. There are a million reasons why this is so, but the one exemplified by this weekend’s shot of Gourds mania is worth particular mention. Simply put, Missoula attracts creative talents of astonishing quantity and quality. And when you put that many dynamic minds in a place hemmed by mountains and fed by rivers, good stuff is bound to happen. Good stuff, like a late-night backyard barbecue, sparked what would become All The Labor, the new documentary from Doug Hawes-Davis and High Plains Films about one of the greatest American bands to never quite hit it big (yet).

everything hand-held,” Hawes-Davis says. “And I’m really glad he did—it matches the style of the band.” That style, like the band’s music, is a hard one to define. Frontman Kevin Russell kicks out sweet mandolin ballads and guitar-driven rippers with equal aplomb, and dances like his joints were made of ball bearings. The songs of co-frontman and bass player Jimmy Smith sound as if they were constructed in the lab of a mad scientist—surreal, absurd and strangely compelling. Together, they’re a classically oppositional rock-band nucleus, and All the Labor explores that dynamic to great effect. But all five band members figure prominently in the film as well. “We wanted to give each band member a scene—while they’re all in the film all

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All the Labor

The Missoula vortex snared Hawes-Davis back in 1990; in the 20-plus years since he moved here, he’s been largely responsible for two Missoula institutions: the documentary production company High Plains Films, and the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival. The Gourds, an alt-county/roots/Americana band from Austin, Texas, first performed in Missoula in 1998, and the resulting mutual love affair between the band and the town has translated to dozens of concerts since. It was after one of those shows in 2011 that the band ended up in Hawes-Davis’ backyard eating barbecue, drinking beer and planting a seed in the filmmaker’s brain. “The next day it just dawned on me that this could be a great music documentary,” Hawes-Davis says. Once the band got on board, Hawes-Davis was faced with a new challenge. Despite a heavy use of music in High Plains’ films, he had never before made a film about a band. “I’ve always loved music documentaries, but even the best ones can sometimes sound like a bootleg,” he says. “I wanted to make one that sounds great but still tells a story.” To that end, he enlisted his friend and colleague Brendan Canty (the multi-talented filmmaker and former Fugazi drummer). “I essentially got mentored by Brendan on how to make a rockumentary, in the first week of shooting with him,” Hawes-Davis says. “He and Mark Creaney [The Gourds’ sound tech] recorded all of the early shows, and I really leaned on them.” Canty’s influence is found in the camera work, as well. “Brendan really convinced me to shoot almost

the way through, they’d each get a profile on how they connect and what they do,” Hawes-Davis says. That balance makes All The Labor something more than a tour film, though the live performances—both on stage and in rehearsals—are top-shelf by the highest standards of that genre. A healthy dose of archival performances and interviews provide a sense of where the band comes from, and when combined with new interviews and behind-the-scenes footage it tells the intriguing story of a band occupying the odd glow of semi-fame. “What they’re doing is actually really hard,” Hawes-Davis says. “I’m not sure many people realize that, because what they’re doing is also really fun, and they embrace that. But it’s not easy in a lot of ways. “I set out to make a film that celebrates the band,” he continues. “I made a movie that will surely be a treat for existing fans. But if there’s one thing I want people who haven’t been exposed to The Gourds to come away with, it’s that these guys are among the top-10 American bands of all time. Because I believe that they are.” All The Labor makes its Montana premiere at the Wilma Theatre Fri., April 26, at 8 PM, as part of the Big Sky Film Series. A Q&A with the filmmakers and Jimmy Smith of The Gourds will follow the screening. $10/$8 in advance at Ear Candy. Smith also plays a solo show Sat., April 27, at 9 PM, at the Crystal Theatre. $15. arts@missoulanews.com

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missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [21]


[film]

Raised stakes Place Beyond the Pines packs a punch by Molly Laich

Finally, the dismal spring season has given us the first truly awesome film of 2013. The Place Beyond the Pines is a tragedy told in three movements. It’s a careful portrait of two men and their families, the choices they make and the consequences of those choices. The film stars Ryan Gosling as Handsome Luke, a motorcycle stuntman who rolls through Synecdoche, N.Y., with the carnival only to discover that a girl he ran around with once, Romina (Eva Mendes), had his baby a year ago and she and another man are raising the kid without him.

sequences these days are safe and boring. Nobody ever gets hurt fighting a tennis ball in front of a green screen. The bank robberies are violent and jarring, and like the opening sequence, they’re done in uninterrupted takes. The chase scenes are reminiscent of the stuff you see late at night on “Cops.” “The suspect has a flat tire,” goes the crackle of the police radio. The motorcycle makes a sharp turn into a cemetery before Luke crashes into a partition and tries to hobble off pathetically on foot. His desperation is heartbreaking and palpable.

“Soon, I’ll be able to afford that shirt.”

Desperate times call for desperate bank robberies. Handsome Luke has a run-in with a police officer named Avery (Bradley Cooper) and the narrative flips. Now the story belongs to Avery, as he tries to reconcile his newly acquired hero status with his own guilt and a corrupt police force. The story takes a third turn that isn’t a surprise, per se, but having gone into the theater knowing nothing of the plot, I found this final narrative shift at once jolting and satisfying, so I will hold my tongue rather than deprive you of that feeling. This is director Derek Cianfrance’s second widely distributed film, after 2010’s Blue Valentine, a story about a failed marriage that’s so true and profound it’s almost painful to watch. As good as Blue Valentine is, The Place Beyond the Pines is even better, because the stakes are raised. In the opening scene, we trail Handsome Luke as he takes a long walk through the crowd and into the big tent, where we discover that he’s the star of the show. He puts on a helmet, gets on his motorcycle and then he and two other guys ride their bikes into a big metal sphere where they circle each other at lightning fast speeds. What’s happening on-screen is thrilling and legitimately dangerous. Legend has it that a cameraman got squashed by an errant motorcycle during production and was knocked unconscious. That’s what I’m talking about! Most action

[22] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

It’s not easy to make a movie that looks and feels real. Once you’ve achieved that, it’s even harder to tell a story that’s both relatable and unexpected, with characters who do bad things and still manage to evoke our sympathies. A lot of the credit here goes to the strong performances. Cooper and Gosling give us real tears and holy hell, they have something to cry about. The Place Beyond the Pines is the apex of masculine, American cinema. In one moment, there’s a confrontation between Luke and Romina’s boyfriend Kofi (played by Mahershala Ali). Kofi wants Luke out of his house. He tries to stand up to him, but he’s afraid. The alpha wolf wins this round, but who’s the winner overall? This exchange has something important to say about what it means to be a good man. Is it about brute strength, or is it knowing when to stand down? How are fathers supposed to model the right way to live for their sons? After 140 minutes, the film isn’t any closer to an answer, and yet it never feels long. I want everyone to go see it, go home and think about it, and then go see it again. The Place Beyond the Pines continues at the Wilma. arts@missoulanews.com


[film] OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN A disgraced Secret Service agent is the only one who can rescue the president. Redemption, y’all, it’s the best. Starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart and Morgan Freeman. Rated R. Carmike 12 and Village 6.

OPENING THIS WEEK THE BIG WEDDING A long-divorced couple have to pretend to be married in order to satisfy their adopted son’s ultra-conservative birth mother, a woman who flies halfway around the world to attend his wedding. Quick question: why? Starring Robert De Niro, Katherine Heigl and Diane Keaton. Rated R. Carmike 12.

OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL How exactly did homeboy become the Wizard of Oz? Learn how in this Disney creation story involving a small-time circus magician of dubious community standing who makes his way to the magic land of Oz. Starring James Franco, Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz. Rated PG. Carmike 12.

THE COMPANY YOU KEEP A nosy ol’ journalist outs a former member of the Weather Underground (look it up), forcing the former activist to go on the run at his advanced age. In other words, Boomers vs. Millenials. Perhaps the young man learns a thing or two about Creedence. Based on Neil Gordon’s novel. Starring Robert Redford, Shia LaBeouf and Susan Sarandon. Rated R. Wilma. PAIN & GAIN I have three words for you: Zubaz, fanny-pack and misogyny. If those things sound good to you, then check out a trio of bodybuilders who get caught up in a criminal caper. Directed by the Michael Bay. Starring Rebel Wilson, Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Kurt Angle. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex.

NOW PLAYING 42 Fans of clever baseballists should find this biographical film about the life of Jackie Robinson and his history-making time with the Brooklyn Dodgers to be a figurative home run. Starring Chadwick Boseman, T.R. Knight and Harrison Ford. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex. THE CROODS Join the first prehistoric family for the very first family road trip and laugh for the very first time at Ryan Reynolds’ jokes. Starring the voices of Nicolas Cage and Emma Stone. Rated PG. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex. EVIL DEAD See if this sounds familiar: Five young friends go to a cabin for a weekend. They discover

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES A gorgeous motorcycle stuntman starts robbing banks to support his lady and their baby; unfortunately, a less handsome rookie cop looks to take the handsome one down. Starring Ryan “Gos” Gosling, Eva Mendes and Ray Liotta. Rated R. Wilma.

The glowing reviews are in and they are tanfastic. You can take that to the bank. Pain & Gain opens Friday at Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex.

the Book of the Dead and can’t but help but to summon evil demons. Everyone who has sex in the film dies. Oops, sorry about the spoiler. Starring Jane Levy, Shiloh Fernandez and Jessica Lucas. Rated R. Carmike 12 and Village 6. G.I. JOE: RETALIATION Great American heroes, the G.I Joes are at battle on two fronts: one involving mortal enemy Cobra, the other involving their own government. Somebody best watch out for that Stormshadow. Starring Channing Tatum, Dwayne Johnson and Bruce Willis. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6 and Pharaohplex. THE HOST Can Melanie save her friends and family and humanity from mysterious beings taking over human bodies and erasing precious memories? Well, yes, most likely. Starring Saoirse

Ronan, Max Irons and Jake Abel. Rated PG13. Carmike 12. JURASSIC PARK 3D Universal Pictures calls this 1993 Steven Spielberg film “a groundbreaking masterpiece.” I call it a movie about our future! Cloning! Dinosaurs running amok! Me and Laura Dern! You and Jeff Goldblum! Me and Jeff Goldblum! Whatever, it’s rated PG-13. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex.

SCARY MOVIE V Are you ready to laugh? Too bad, cuz this is the fifth installment of the franchise and all the good jokes about nefarious babies and diaper changes were used up in Three Men and a Baby. Starring Simon Rex, Ashley Tisdale and Charlie Sheen. Rated PG-13. Village 6 and Pharaohplex. Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com or contact the theaters in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603

OBLIVION In 2077, Tom Cruise is one of the last humans left on Earth. With only two weeks to go until he can leave the war-ravaged planet and join other humans on a lunar colony, a mysterious woman arrives and everything he thinks he knows comes into question. Also starring Morgan Freeman and Olga Kurylenko. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Showboat.

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [23]


[dish]

photo by Ari LeVaux

Know thine onions by Ari LeVaux

APRIL

COFFEE SPECIAL

GIFTS FOR MOM

Butterfly House Blend $10.95/lb.

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

Coffees, Teas & the Unusual

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

[24] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

Onions can be tricky to grow, which is why a farmer’s onions have long been considered a litmus test for agricultural skill. Hence the expression, “he knows his onions,” which is like saying “he knows the ropes.” Knowing one’s onions in a literal sense is a great thing to aspire to, and this applies as much in the kitchen as it does in the garden. Onions are absolutely fundamental to cooking. I may love garlic more, but I need onions. This time of year presents unique opportunities for onion knowers, in both kitchen and garden, because last year’s crop is starting to sprout. In your pantry, on the counter, in mesh bags at the local grocery store before you even bring them home, the onion’s yearly urge to grow will no longer be denied. At the very least, what you need to know about sprouting onion season is that you should give your prospective bulbs another squeeze before putting them in the cart, because onions usually soften as they sprout. If you find yourself with some sprouting onions on your hands, and you probably will, it’s worth letting them do their thing on the counter. The sprouts are edible, and taste like scallions. Both sprouted onions and scallions, which are grown from seed, are forms of green onion, and for culinary purposes are virtually identical. Unlike the flesh of the onion bulb, which rarely steals the show in a meal, green onions often stand out, adding bitter pungency where bulbs add sweetness. Green onions are at their best when served raw, when they taste sharp and spicy, and have a bright green radiance. Just a few thin slices of green onion on your miso soup, for example, will crank up the contrast and make it significantly more interesting and beautiful. Those with garden space can and should plant their sprouted onions and watch them grow into rejuvenated, non-rotting versions of themselves. Depending on the onion, and when you plant it, you might get a full-sized bulb again, or a small bulb with a big, stunningly beautiful flower attached. Those without dirt can place their sprouting onions on the windowsill. There you can enjoy their beauty, and do a little pruning anytime you need some green onion pizzazz in your food. If you’re really into it, plant the sprouting onions indoors in pots. If sprouting onions don’t find you, there are many ways to hunt them down. The adventurous and thrifty might consider Dumpster diving behind the grocery store. You could also point out the sprouted onions among the bulk bins inside the store, in hopes the produce manager will let you have them—especially if the bulbs that host the sprouts are soft.

FLASH IN THE PAN

If you happen to find a sprouting onion bulb that’s still firm, it’s possible to carefully cut the bulb from around the sprout, leaving the roots at the bottom of the bulb attached to the sprouted part. The firm flesh of the bulb can be eaten, while the sprout can be planted. It seems too good to be true, but the blog Anktangle (anktangle.com) has a beautifully illustrated post on how to do just this. While there is adventure to be had in the pursuit of onion greens, casting off in search of half-rotten root crops is not everybody’s idea of a good time. An important part of knowing one’s onions is knowing one’s limitations. Even if the greens of sprouted onions aren’t in your cards, their scallion cousins are coming into season at the farmers market and the store. To know your onions is more than how you grow, cook and eat them—it’s also remembering how much you need them, and to be grateful. Here’s a recipe that will help you know and appreciate the green onions of springtime in a powerful way. Steamed fish with ginger, scallion and soy sauce Ingredients: One whole fish, 1-2 lbs., preferably white-fleshed, like red snapper or Pacific cod, cleaned and scaled. A handful of shiitake mushrooms, sliced 1 tablespoon (or so) brown sugar 1 cup (or so) soy sauce A handful of green onions, chopped. Keep the lower, solid parts of the onion green separate from the upper, hollow parts. A cubic inch of ginger, julienned A few drops of toasted sesame oil. Directions: Make slits, crosswise, on each side of the fish, 1.5 inches apart. Stuff pieces of ginger into each slit. Steam the fish for 10 minutes. If you don't have a steamer, put the fish on a plate on top of a bowl, or some other prop, inside a pot with water beneath a tight-fitting lid, so the fish steams on the plate. While the fish is steaming, sauté the mushrooms in oil over medium heat. If you want to add a little butter, I won't tell. When the mushrooms are done, add the solid chopped scallions and let them sauté with the mushrooms for two minutes. Add the soy sauce, the sugar, the rest of the ginger, and kill the heat. Stir the sauce to dissolve the sugar. Move the steamed fish onto a serving plate. Pour the sauce over it. Garnish with the chopped hollow onion greens.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am MonSun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 When the sun shines, the trail along the Clark Fork beckons me for a stroll. As I pass Boone & Crockett I realize one quick side step up the hillside and I can stop at Bernice's. Mmmmm. Iced coffee to help me kick into the last leg of my cruise and a chocolate chip cookie. Or an herb cream cheese hard roll and a loaf of Sourdough for tomorrow's lunch. Tradition. While you kick into April remember Bernice's can accent your spring adventure any time, any day. Open 6a - 8p seven days a week. xoxo bernice. $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 This week at Brooks and Browns... Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). TUESDAY (Burger + any draught beer $8). THURSDAY is Trivia Night. (7:30-10 pm) FRIDAY David Boone 6-9 pm SUNDAY: Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 40 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

$…Under $5

Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$ Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! (Happy Hour 3-6 PM Mon-Sat. 2 Empanadas for $7) Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 9am5pm Monday-Saturday. Downtown Missoula. $-$$

Times Run 4/26/13 - 5/2/13

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater The Company You Keep (R) Nightly at 7 & 9:10• Sat at 1 & 3:10• NO show Fri 4/26, Wed 5/1 or Thur 5/2

The Place Beyond the Pines (R) Nightly at 7 & 9:20 Sat at 1 & 3:20 9:10 ONLY on Fri 4/26, Wed 5/1, Thur 5/2

www.thewilma.com

Beer & Wine AVAILABLE

131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$ GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall 406-728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St • 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [25]


[dish]

Biga’s calzones HANGRIEST HOUR Biga Pizza is best known for its brick ovencooked pies topped with ingredients like Flathead cherries, local beef and toasted hazelnuts. It’s why the eatery is one of the most consistently filled joints in downtown. But crafting artisan za is not the only thing that makes Biga among Missoula’s tastiest hangouts. The B-side of the menu: The list of calzones on Biga’s menu comes after items like the portobello mushroom salad and the pizza with caramelized onions, goat cheese and roasted garlic. So unless you know what you’re looking for, it’s hard to make it all the way to the calzones before finding something you’d very much like to put in your belly. But next time you’re there, we recommend trying. Clearing the air: Just so we’re all on the same page, a calzone is basically a pizza turnover. They are usually filled with ricotta and mozzarella cheeses and typical pizza toppings. If you’ve never had a calzone, don’t feel bad—there aren’t many options in Zootown (Philly West and UM’s Country Store, to name two on a pretty short list). The Biga ’zones: Biga has five calzones on its menu: cheese, sausage, pesto, spinach and mushroom, and the Joey’s Calzone, which is stuffed with prosciutto di Parma, whole milk ricotta, mozzarella and mascarpone cheeses, garlic and roasted peppers. They are all delicious,

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

but recently we’ve been loving on the spinach and mushroom, which is salty, appropriately unctuous and a tad sweet with the ricotta. A note on method: The best calzones are served with marinara on the side. When they are cooked with sauce inside, you’ll be dealing with a dough sack of molten juices and steam. Get the marinara on the side, and dip your ’zone accordingly. It’s not only safer for the roof of your mouth, but it allows you to taste the calzone’s filling. At Biga, it’s well worth it. When to go: Biga Pizza is located at 241 W. Main St. and serves lunch Monday through Friday, and dinner Monday through Saturday. —Jamie Rogers Hangriest Hour serves up fresh details on western Montana eats. To recommend a restaurant, dish or chef for Hangriest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. • 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:3012:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces inhouse so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-214-2659 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$ Sis’s Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Center, where people from various backgrounds meet on the last Thu. of each month at 5 PM for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info. The Open Aid Alliance brings us Dr. Rebecca Kinney’s hepatitis C presentation which provides an overview of infection, transmission and recommendations for testing. MCT Center for the Performing Arts, Rm. 302, 200 N. Adams St. 5–6 PM. Free. For more information, call Open Aid Alliance at 543-4770 or e-mail stephanie@openaidalliance.org.

April 25 – May 2, 2013

The UM American Indian Student Services hosts an eight-week Insider/Outsider Film Series at the Payne Family Native American Center on the UM campus. It has a strict “B.Y.O.F. (bring your own frybread)” policy, according to the group’s press release. This week’s film is Rez Dogs/Lost Birds. 5–7 PM. Free. Thursday is just Friday eve, they say, so warm up with dinner and a show at the Top Hat with tunes from Andrea Harsell. 6-8 PM. Free. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Pulitzer Prize winner and associate editor of the Seattle alt-weekly newspaper The Stranger, Eli Sanders, gives the annual Dean Stone Lecture in the UC Theater at 7 PM. His lecture is called “Coal Trains: When Journalism is Not Enough.” Free.

This is my prayer: I’m as free as my hair. Dubtonic Kru plays the Palace Sun., April 28, at 8 PM, with Kool Johnny Kool, Jah Sun and local DJ Supa J. $7/$5 in advance at stonefly-productions.com.

THURSDAYAPRIL25 Jazz vocalist Laura Gabriele and accompanists perform at Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., from 6-8 PM. Hear the tunes, enjoy delicious beverages. Dan Dubuque makes fine tunes for you to drink some beers to while you think about what might have been at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free.

Each year the Hospice Foundation of America presents a nationally recognized distance learning program, Living With Grief. This year’s program for healthcare professionals is called, “Improving Care for Veterans Facing Illness and Death.” Community Medical Center, Gallagher Board Room, 2827 Fort Missoula Rd. 10:30–2 PM. CEU credits are available for a $35 online registration fee, and participants are encouraged to bring a brown bag lunch. Beverages and snacks are provided. Please contact Mindy at Partner’s Hospice, 327-3721, for more information.

Go to work, like a doctor, or if you can’t do that head to the Missoula Job Service’s job fair at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St., where employers are waiting to hook you up with a jobby-job. Veterans and their families can come down at 2:30 PM, all others 3 PM. For more information and tips on preparing for the career fair, go to employmissoula.com.

nightlife Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Intercultural Dialogue Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace

The Montana World Affairs Council hosts Ambassador Said Jawad, former Ambassador of Afghanistan to the US, who gives a talk called, “The Future of Afghanistan: 2014 and the Road Ahead.” DoubleTree Hotel, 100 Madison St. 7 PM. $5/council members free. Visit montanaworldaffairs.org. Former Montana Supreme Court Justice James Nelson and Professor Anthony Johnstone lead a lecture and discussion titled Scrutinizing the Marriage Cases: Windsor, Perry, Donaldson, and Beyond, at the UN School of Law Bldg., Rm. 101. 7 PM. Sponsored by the ACLU student group, the Outlaws student group, the American Constitution Society and the Federalist Society. Are you ready to laugh? Ventriloquist Jeff Dunham performs his “Disorderly Conduct” stand-up comedy show featuring puppet sidekicks Walter the Grumpy Retiree, Achmed the

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [27]


[calendar]

Dead Terrorist, Bubba J, Peanut, Jose Jalapeno and more. Adams Center. 7:30 PM. $45.50. Tickets available at griztix.com. Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Shorty get low when baritone guitarist Matt Miller is joined by Stu Jackson for an evening of guitar antics at the Dark Horse, 185 Regent St. 8 PM. Free. Dance your way to a free mind and an open body at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance. Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 8 PM. $8. Visit turningthewheel.org. 

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The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. The Rocketz blast on down to Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., with the intention of rocking your space pants off psycho-billy stylie, with Frederick Kruger & the Sweet Dreamers and Thee Infernals. 9 PM. $5. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive� when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Burst your ear holes and bust an old time groove in your robot walkers at Archaic Revival, an evening of electronic music with Lil Sassy and DJs Rockstocki, HAuLi and Nic Jaymes, at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Also includes a 2-for-1 well drink special. Hear bands battle blissfully with bandoleers of bass, booming guitar and beautiful voices at Top of the Mic 4, a yearly music contest for area musicians. Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St. 9 PM. Free. Boogie down with Bobby Brady when the Dark Horse Country Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. Show up in your best Murph and the Magictones garb to rawk out to the blues-southern rock stylings of Tony Holiday and the Velvetones, all the way from Asheville, N.C. Local blues fellas Black Mountain Moan open. $5. Ian Ziering is now a Chippendale, so it must be the final week of Vera’s VFW residency. Cougar-rock never sounded so good. The trio is joined by the Magpies and

[28] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

Butte’s Rose Gold. 245 W. Main St. 9:30 PM. $2. Leave the rusty automobiles at home when Cash for Junkers and Left Coast Country play the Top Hat, starting at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA

FRIDAYAPRIL26 The Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival is back for two nights of swanky tunes at the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. For a full price list and schedule of performers visit umt.edu/music. Keep the Earth Week party rolling at the Fence Pull at MPG Ranch. Help remove barbed wire fence to open wildlife corridors. Lunch provided for this all-day event. Dress appropriately for the weather and bring gloves. 9:30–4 PM. RSVP at jlisbon@mpgranch.com. The Missoula Exchange Club hosts the inaugural Mile of Dollars fundraiser, wherein peeps can prevent child abuse and neglect by donating a dollar to the walk which begins at the Missoula County Fairground entrance on Russell Ave. Noon to 6 PM. Visit missoulaexchangeclub.org.

Who’s your favorite musician?

Vote online at missoulanews.com See some elephants and have a pony ride or two at the Shrine Circus in the Adams Center, but steer clear of them clowns. 3 PM and 7 PM. Tickets available at local stores including the Orange Street Food Farm and Safeway. They also are available at the Adams Center the day of the show. The Missoula Fraternal Order of Eagles #32 8th Annual Silent Auction is held in conjunction with The Hands Across the Border Meeting. This meeting brings members from Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Alberta and Saskatchewan. All money raised is donated to local charities. For more information or to donate items, please contact Junior Past Worthy President and auction chairman Trent at 239-3205. Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 4–7 PM. Holy hip-hop hoedown, Jenny. And wowie-zowie EDM, you

lovers of poolside partying. Lolo Hot Springs hosts an afternoon and night and morning of partying with artists, fire spinners, tunes and bonfires. Tons of performers including ir8 prim8, Enzymes, Osiris, Tygerlilly and many more. So bring your camping stuff, some moola, snacks, water and leave your dogs, guns, drugs and fireworks at home. Starts at Fri., Apr. 26, at 4 PM and rolls, ahem, until Sun., April 27, at 8 AM. $10.

nightlife Speak the language of fashion and say stuff like “hot mess� and “cloying� at the 7th annual Project Selvedge fashion show. Contestants spend eight weeks battling for supremacy and only one can be called the victor. This is the finale, biznitches. Crystal Theatre, 518 S. Higgins Ave. 6:30 PM. $5. The UM Payne Family Native American Center and the American Indian Institute announce the screening of Dakota 38, a documentary film telling the story of the largest mass execution in US history. UM Payne Family Native American Center. 6:30 PM, opening ceremonies with the Flathead Nation Drum Group; 7 PM, screening; 8:30 PM, conversation with Peter Lengkeek, a Dakota leader, former Dakota 38 staff carrier and veteran, and Silas Hagerty, cinematographer. Free. Zan Bockes reads and signs a book of poetry titled Caught in Passing, at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Free. Fans of the Gourds take note, tonight is the Montana premier of the documentary, All the Labor, a film about the band. Film crew and Gourds’ singer/songwriter/bassist Jimmy Smith are in attendance for a Q&A following the screening. Wilma Theatre. 7 PM. $10/$8 advance at Ear Candy. (See Film.) The Bob Wills-approved Country Kings play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. Party people, take your bestest bike and polish her up for Free Cycles Pedal Party and fundraiser, at 732 S. First W. Tunes and the like. 8–11:30 PM. The Hamilton Players presents The Women, a very feminine play that gives men the chance to understand the fairer sex and offers the fairer sex a chance to nod in agreement. 8 PM. 100 Rickets Rd. $15. Huka.a.Hey is fun time folk and country at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs. 8 PM. Free.


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lunachicks Lunafest, the nationally touring short film festival, once again returns to Missoula to serve as a fundraiser for the YWCA of Missoula. The money raised goes to scholarships for the YWCA’s Girls Using Their Strengths, or GUTS!, summer wilderness adventures for girls ages 9 to 18. YWCA staff say over half of last year’s participants required a full or partial scholarship. The GUTS! gals also plan to give a multimedia performance in collaboration with local dance and theater company Turning the Wheel Missoula. The event features the Labors of Love Silent Auction, which offers hand-crafted Lunch Date items, baked goods and guitar lessons, according to the Lunafest website. Last This year’s films, all directed by women, cover a year, Lunafest raised $6,000 for GUTS! and over $1 variety of topics in places including the United States, million nationally. Canada, England and New Zealand. Stories vary from an animated story about dating a plastic surgeon, in Flawed, to a young gymnast’s adventures in Chalk. In Amanda Zackem’s GeorWHAT: Lunafest short film festival gena Terry, she follows the founder of Terry Bicycles. Terry was a bicyclist who designed a WHO: YWCA of Missoula bike frame specifically to fit women’s bodies. WHERE: Wilma Theatre Terry’s success story of working in a maledominated industry is the kind of inspirational WHEN: Wed., May 1, at 5:30 PM tale that can transform how a young woman thinks about her world and her place in it. HOW MUCH: $12/$10 advance at lunafest.org —Jason McMackin

Bare Bait Dance Company presents Springboard, a dance event that features individual performances with oranges, boxing and cowboy boots. Yowza. At Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. 8 PM. $12/$10 advance at ddcmontana.com. (See Arts.) John Adam Smith plays for you and the big sack of kittens at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., 8:30 PM. Free. Comedian Jeff Dye, who you may or may not remember as a “Last Comedy Standing” finalist, performs twice at the Top Hat, at 8:30 PM (18plus) and 10:30 (21-plus), at the Missoula Food Bank 30th Anniversary Fundraiser. $20, tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s, The Hub and tophatlounge.com. Bring a nonperishable food item to get a picture with Dye. School is almost out. That means Professor [Redacted] might be lurking around the Union Club and hoping to dance with someone who is mos def not his wife and mos def you. Joan Zen provides the soundtrack to your love affair. 9 PM. Free. The John Floridis Trio plays music at Sean Kelly’s, 130 Pine St., at 9 PM. Free.

You dress as Bonnie, I’ll be Clyde at The Manhattan Project Presents: Wanted DOA, with DJs Spacebag, Wargasm, Lunchbox and Dubsfeld. 9 PM. Free. No need to dress up as a mill worker and buy diapers and cake mix with beer when ZooMa award winners MIP play the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406721-2416 or just show up.

SATURDAYAPRIL27 Always awesome, never boujie, award-winning Montana poet and essayist Melissa Kwasny reads from her new book Earth Recitals: Essays on Image & Vision, at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third St. 5 PM. Free.

Cycling roadies are summoned to the fair burg of Frenchtown for a day of brutal racing at the Rocky Mountain Roubaix, a race tailor-made for sprinters who have a pocket full of luck and just enough guts to charge hard on the climbs. More info at montanacycling.net. (See Mountain High.) The Five Valleys Dahlia and Glad Society holds its annual tuber and corm sale in front of Ace Hardware at Trempers Shopping Center on Brooks Street, from 8 AM–4 PM. The local non-profit uses funds from the sale to present yearly flower shows at both the Western Montana Fair and Southgate Mall. For information call Barbara at 360-9983. The Missoula Exchange Club hosts the inaugural Mile of Dollars fundraiser, wherein peeps can prevent child abuse and neglect by donating a dollar to the walk which begins at the Missoula County Fairground entrance on Russell Ave. 9 AM to 6 PM. Visit missoulaexchangeclub.org. Make that Rock Creek a more better place and attend the Rock Creek Confluence work day where volun-

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [29]


[calendar] teers can remove barbed wire and silt fencing, clean up trash, and maybe pull some invasive plants, too. Snacks and water provided as well as a kids’ activity. 9:30 AM–2 PM. RSVP at tracy.wendt@umontana.edu. Learn to chill til the next episode at Big Sky Mind Two-Day Meditation Retreat, a weekend of Buddhist practice. This two-day event takes place at the Red Willow Learning Center, 825 W. Kent St., from 9:30 AM–2 PM. Suggested donation of $50-$108 for both days; however, everyone is welcome regardless of ability to pay. To register call 961-5131 or email info@ tibetanlanguage.org. Hear the sheepish story of sheeps in the Bitterroot Valley at the Daly Mansion Spring Lecture Series with Maureen “Mo” Lischke’s lecture, “Ba Ba Black Sheep: Where did they go?” This wild and wooly time is sure to enlighten all who have asked themselves that very same question. 251 Eastside Hwy. in Hamilton. 10 AM. Free. Hop in the crummy with Hippie Dan and head to Forestry Day 2013. The event is held at the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula and features a timber sports competition as well as tours of the old-timey mill and logging goodies. 10 AM–4 PM. $3/$2 seniors/$1 students. As part of Bike-Walk-Bus Week, anyone riding a bike, walking, or taking the bus will get in free. The Met: Live in HD presents David Daniels and Natalie Dessay starring in David McVicar’s production of Handel’s most popular opera, Giulio Cesare. I hope Caesar and Cleopatra can finally make this thing work. Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. 10 AM. $20/$18 seniors/$15 students. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and morrisproductions.org. The Missoula Winter Market is a family-friendly market much like the Saturday markets, but indoors and during wintertime! Come and enjoy local crafts, artisans, food and entertainment every weekend at 10 AM. 2036 Mullan Rd. Visit missoulawintermarket.com. Have the kids celebrate National Poetry Month by attending the Missoula Writing Collaborative Writing Workshops taught by the state’s Poet Laureate Sheryl Noethe. For kids 7– 12. Fort Missoula, Officer’s Row, #28. 10:30–noon. Free. Call 5493348 or 360-5664. Never fear lovers of fresh, local vittles, the Heirloom Winter Market at the Missoula County Fairgrounds in the Floriculture Building offers you remedies of local produce, meat, baked goods, jam, honey and so much more. 11 AM–2 PM. See some elephants and have a pony ride or two at the Shrine Cir-

[30] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

cus in the Adams Center, but steer clear of them clowns. 11 AM, 3 PM and 7 PM. Tickets available at stores including Orange Street Food Farm and Safeway. They also are available at the Adams Center the day of the show. Help get the UM Recycling Shed back in order after the Earth Week festivities, from 1–3 PM. Do it! The Hamilton Players presents The Women, a very feminine play that gives men the chance to understand the fairer sex and offers the fairer sex a chance to nod in agreement. 2 PM. 100 Rickets Rd. $15. Bare Bait Dance Company presents Springboard, a dance event that features individual performances with oranges, boxing and cowboy boots. Yowza. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. 2 PM. $12/$10 advance at ddcmontana.com. (See Arts.) Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 2 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. The ZACC hosts its 3rd annual Last Best Printfest, an event which features a portfolio exchange, art opening and demos. 3 PM until late! 235 N. First St. Free. For a full schedule visit zootownarts.org.

nightlife Living Art of Montana’s 9th Annual The Light Show event is fundraiser with a Bollywood theme, with the a cocktail reception, auction, plated dinner and more. Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 Reserve St. 5:45 PM. $75/person $560 table of eight. Visit livingartofmontana.org. If I wanna take a guy home with me tonight it’s Nuno Business, which plays Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free. Check out the live auction of incredible ceramic art works at the Clay Studio of Missoula’s fundraiser, Potsketch 2013 Gala. Tunes by the Discount Quartet, food and plenty of attainable art. UC North Ballroom. 6– 10 PM. $50. The Heart to Heart Duo plays the Missoula Senior Center’s Saturday Night Dance, so slide into those glad rags and show the youngsters how it’s done. 705 S. Higgins. 7–10 PM. $5. The Buddy DeFranco Jazz Festival is back for two nights of swanky tunes at the Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. For a full price list and schedule of performers visit umt.edu/music. With a hearty stamp of approval from the Missoula community via a round of bong rips, Jimmy Smith of The Gourds performs solo tuneage at the Crystal Theatre, 515


[calendar]

Zipper sniffer. Lexington, Ky.’s Street Gnar plays the VFW with tasty locals Bacon and Egg, Shahs and J. Sherri on Sat., April 27, at 10 PM. $5, plus $2 surcharge for ages 18-20.

S. Higgins Ave. 8 PM, meet and greet. $15, available at Ear Candy. The Hamilton Players presents The Women, a very feminine play that gives men the chance to understand the fairer sex and offers the fairer sex a chance to nod in agreement. 8 PM. 100 Rickets Rd. $15. The Bob Wills-approved Country Kings play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. Bare Bait Dance Company presents Springboard, a dance event featuring individual performances with oranges, boxing and cowboy boots. Yowza. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. 8 PM. $12/$10 advance at ddcmontana.com. (See Arts.) J.P. Williams is a Hot Springs singer and songwriter, so he is peforming at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs. Duh. 8 PM. Free. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. Pack your bags and don’t forget the sunscreen when Missoula rockers Airstream Safari cruise the Palace before Portland reggae/alt rock outfit Sunny Travels. 9 PM. $5.

MIP and Airstream Safari make the do-whack-a-do down at the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are like ShabbaDoo and Boogaloo Shrimp, saving rec centers one beat at at time. Get hip to their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. $2. The Dark Horse Band makes them dancing tunes out at the Lumberjack Saloon up Graves Creek Rd. So get a cabin or take the shuttle, cuz partying at the Jack ain’t no joke, son. 9 PM. Free. Cash for Junkers brings springtime to Missoula with some fine tunesmithery at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. Don’t mess with my toot-toot, cuz Whiskey Root plays Sean Kelly’s, 130 Pine St., and my toot-toot is down to groove. 9 PM. Free. Put on a frilly apron and break it down when bluegrass outfit Kitchen Dwellers play the Top Hat at 9:30 PM. Free. Hop in the Duster cuz it’s a MOPAR or no car kinda night when indie-popsters Street Gnar kick the tire and light the fire down VFW way, with local shred maestros Bacon & Egg, the sublime Shahs (not a Sub-

lime tribute...yet) and the dutifully delightful J. Sherri. 245 W. Main St. 10 PM. $5/$7 for 18 plus.

SUNDAYAPRIL28 The Ugandan Orphans Choir comes to Missoula to share its story and music. The group wears traditional costumes and is accompanied by authentic African instruments. They sing African songs in their native language, which is Luganda. Rad. Missoula Alliance Church, 100 E. Foss Ct. 6 PM. Free. The Missoula Winter Market is a family-friendly market much like the Saturday markets, but indoors and during wintertime! Come and enjoy local crafts, artisans, food and entertainment every weekend at 10 AM. 2036 Mullan Rd. Visit missoulawintermarket.com. The Hamilton Players presents The Women, a very feminine play that gives men the chance to understand the fairer sex and offers the fairer sex a chance to nod in agreement. 2 PM. 100 Rickets Rd. $15. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Per-

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [31]


[32] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013


[calendar] forming Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 2 PM and 6:30 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org.

Union is looking to commit some regicide and make some fine old western swing tunes for you all to dance by at the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way. 6 PM. $5.

Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their guitars, mandolins, harmonicas, fiddles, banjos, dobros, or other acoustic instrument. Music includes old-time country, bluegrass, swing, cowboy, folk, old standards, etc. Folks who want to play or just listen are encouraged to come. For more information, call John at 381-2483. Free.

Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free.

Fred Boner and the Walk of Shame put their underpants in their front pockets and play the Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 4–6 PM. Free.

nightlife Get to celebrating Poetry Month by attending the Missoula Writing Collaborative’s Spring Soiree, which has auction action and delights. Caffe Dolce, 500 Brooks Ave. 6–8:30 PM. $55/$100 per pair. Bob Wills is still the king of Western Swing, but our very own Western

Sip on that positive juice when Jamaican reggae/dub group Dubtonic Kru chills out in the Palace with openers Jah Sun, Kool Johnny Kool and Missoula’s Supa J. $7/$5 in advance at stonefly-productions.com. Quit trying to wind that cassette tape, turn off Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and put on some stirrup pants before heading to Dead Hipster’s I <3 the ‘90s dance party at the Badlander. $3, with $1 wells. Don’t you mess with Prezident Brown when he and some Reggae Angels bring the suede-denim secret police to the Top Hat. 9 PM. $11/$9 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and tophatlounge.com. 18-plus.

MONDAYAPRIL29 Mr. Russ Nasset performs honky tonk blues for us peeps at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7–10 PM. Free. Come on down for Moscow Monday at the Montgomery Distillery, 129 W. Front St., where the distillery redistributes the wealth. (It ain’t called Wall Street Wednesday, amiright?) $1 from every drink sold is donated to a different non-profit each Monday. Join them for a family friendly snoot, from noon–8 PM. The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/rough-cut-series for the schedule. Super-smarty prof. Seth Lerer of UCSD presents a seminar titled Hamlet’s Lyric Theater, in UM’s Gallagher Business Bldg., Rm. 123, from 3:10–4:30 PM. Free.

nightlife The birds do it and the bees do it: Pollinating, that is, and it’s pretty croosh for growing all of the tasty food we like to eat. Watch gorgeous photography of pollinators at the IWFF showing of Wings of LIfe at the Top Hat. 5 PM. Free, all ages. (See Film.) Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM. Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. If you love beer, doughnuts and Canadians you’ll love the Top Hat’s movie and beer tasting night with Big Sky Brewing and showing of the Calemander-approved movie Strange Brew. Free to attend, with deals on beer and menu pairings. 7PM. Word nerds unite under the wings of Seth Lerer, distinguished professor of literature and dean of arts and humanities at the University of California,

San Diego, who gives the final installment of the President’s Lecture Series. His lecture is called “The Verve: Humanism, Scholarship and Modern Life,” and he uses it to explain how the study of literature and history allow us to understand the present. Dennison Theatre. 8 PM. Free. Show the Man how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 8:30 PM. Free. You know it’s gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. Drop the needle and lift your feet at Milkcrate Monday’s Vinyl Night April, with DJs Digerati, Justy, Deadline and Hi-Jak. 9 PM. Palace. Free, with $5 PBR pitchers and free pool. Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488.

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missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [33]


[calendar]

TUESDAYAPRIL30 Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. Today is the deadline for the Missoula Cultural Council’s call to artists to participate in The Last Best Solstice: Art on the River, a celebration of visual art and artists occurring in Caras Park on Fri., June 21. Proposal applications are available at missoulacultural.org. Back in January, Aesop Rock was supposed to bust rhymes in Missoula. Instead, he busted a few ribs

and had to cancel. No worries, hiphop heads. He’s rescheduled, with Busdriver, Rob Sonic and DJ Big Wiz opening, at the Badlander. $20/$17 in advance at Ear Candy, plus $5 surcharge for ages 18-20. (See Music.) Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

nightlife PFLAG of Hamilton hosts a community event called Understanding

our LGBT Families, Friends & Community at the Daly-Leach Chapel, 1010 W. Main St. 5 PM, light supper; 5:30–7 PM, program. Free. Visit PFLAGHamiltonBitterroot@yahoo.com. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Polson peeps who live in the Catholic Church Neighborhood and others are invited to the Polson Heart and Soul Neighborhood Gathering which discusses how to develop “a stronger, healthier Polson.” 1002 Fourth Ave. E. 6– 8:30 PM. All ages and all players are welcome at the open bluegrass picking circle at the Top Hat. 6:30. Free.

Todd Wilkinson reads and signs his book, Last Stand, at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Free. (See News.) Drink from the cup of knowledge during the Socrates Café at the Bitterroot Public Library West Meeting room in Hamilton. Questions are chosen, terms discussed and thoughts given. 7–9 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free. Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expression-filled improvisational dance bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:30-9 PM. $10.

Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs. MCPS Fine Arts Department’s SPARK event offers an opportunity for the general public to see some of the best of this school year’s band, choir, orchestra and drama students in celebrated performances. Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. Free. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: What country was legendary anarchist Emma Goldman born in? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musi-

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[34] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013


[calendar] During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

cian Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8– 11 PM. Free. 18 plus. Find out who really left that Coke can on the moon when Captain Wilson Conspiracy plays the Top Hat at 8:30 PM. Free, 18-plus.

Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAYMAY01 Put down the pole and head to the VFW, 245 W. Main St., where some fine-ass (with some fine asses) bands are taking part in the May Day Feed the Hungry event. Artists include con/sequence, The Whoop Ass Girls, Buddy Jackson as well as Cain and Fable. 9:30 PM. Donations accepted, all proceeds go to the Missoula Food Bank.

Burst your ear holes and bust an old time groove in your robot walkers at Archaic Revival, an evening of electronic music with Lil Sassy and DJs Rockstocki, HAuLi and Nic Jaymes, at the Palace. 9 PM. Free. Also includes a 2-for-1 well drink special. Hear bands battle blissfully with bandoleers of bass, booming guitar and beautiful voices at Top of the Mic 4, a yearly music contest for area musicians. Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St. 9 PM. Free.

nightlife Lunafest is a nationally touring film festival that showcases nine short films by, for and about women. The event is a benefit for the YWCA’s Girls Using Their Strengths (GUTS!) program. Wilma Theatre. Doors open at 5:30 PM for the preshow Labors of Love Silent Auction. $12/$10 adv. Tickets can be purchased in advance online at lunafest.org. (See Spotlight.) Looking for the ultimate athletic experience? Need something fun to do this spring? Then register for the Missoula Ultimate Frisbee Spring League. No prior experience necessary. Fee includes disc, shirt, beer (21+) and fun times every Wed. evening at 6 PM through May 29. Playfair Park, 1600 Bancroft St. $45. Visit missoulaultimate.com. Perhaps munch on some persimmons and listen to the musical stylings of Chris Timmons at the Top Hat’s dinner show. 6:30 PM. Free. The Co-Occurring Court of Missoula seeks volunteers to work with the mentally ill. Head to Zootown Brew, 121 W. Broadway, for an informational meeting, from 6:30–7:30 PM. Hey, spring is here and TV ain’t exactly pumping out the good stuff these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30 PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the Missoula Community Theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org.

Someone in the top row is totally faking it. Pentatonix, the a capella group that won season 3 of NBC’s “The Sing Off,” graces the Wilma Thu., May 2, at 7 PM. $25, tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and jadepresents.com.

Mark Sexton Band is here all the way from Reno, and they are going to love y’all up with some funky soulpop along with our local Zeppo, at the Palace. 9 PM. $5.

for Chemistry, Ada Yonath, delivers a seminar titled “The Fruits of Curiosity: The Ribosome and Its Tiny Enemies.” UM Interdisciplinary Science Bldg. Rm. 110. 4:10 PM. Free.

Julie Bug and the Northern Lights play that good time tuneage for all the sweet people. Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand. 9 PM. Free.

Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Fellow musicians have your frail yet massive egos destroyed when 12-year-old guitar virtuoso Jaden Carlson brings herself and her band to Stage 112 inside the Elks Lodge, 112 Pattee St. 9 PM. $10/$8 advance. (Pub trivia answer: Goldman was born in Lithuania.) Dance merrily round the Maypole when the Space Cadets and Eden and the Gardeners play the Palace for Community Collision. 9 PM. Free. Arr, matey, celebrate May Day with Potcheen, a Celtic pirate band playing the Top Hat at 10 PM. Free.

THURSDAYMAY02 See future filmmakers now during the MCAT 8th Annual High School Film Festival. Students show off their films of eight minutes or less and someone will be awarded $500. Crystal Theatre, 518 S. Higgins Ave. 7 PM. Free. UM School of Art Bachelor’s in Fine Arts Senior Thesis Exhibition opening reception takes place at the UC Gallery from 4–6 PM and at the Gallery of Visual Arts from 5– 7 PM. Free. Ribosome fans stand up and shout, cuz 2009 Nobel Prize Winner

nightlife The UM American Indian Student Services hosts an eight-week Insider/Outsider Film Series, which takes place at the Payne Family Native American Center on the UM campus, and has a strict “B.Y.O.F. (bring your own frybread)” policy, according to the group’s press release. This week’s film is Miss Navajo. 5–7 PM. Free. The John Floridis Trio plays music at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. The Kimberlee Carlson Jazz Trio performs for you suds suckers down at Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, from 6–8:30 PM. Free. Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Take the kids and teach ‘em to howl at the moon when Amy Martin and the Missoula Coyote Choir play Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat. 6-8 PM. Free. Try some roasted grouse when Shane Clouse plays the Top Hat dinner show at 6:30 PM. Free. Get your farce on, Shakespeare fans at the UM School of Theatre & Dance’s production of Comedy of Errors at the Masquer Theatre. 7:30

PM. $16/$14 seniors/$10 for those 12 and under. Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

What’s your favorite bar?

Vote with the ballot

on Page 13 Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Everybody cut, everybody cut down to the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St., for the theatre’s production of the song and dance classic, Footloose. 8 PM. For cost and more info visit mctinc.org. If you’re like me, you are stoked that the Pentatonix, season 3 winners of “The Sing-Off,” are in MSO to perform a cappella versions of your fave pop tracks (Do “Gangnam Style,” purty please!). Wilma. 8 PM. $25. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s and tickets300.com.

The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Sign-up by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free. Montana country-fied fella Tyler Barham, back from a recent recording session in Nashville, plays the Top Hat with guest Jessica Mullikin. 9:30 PM. $7/$5 in advance at the Source, Ear Candy, Rockin Rudy’s and ticketing.com. Once the kids are tucked into bed, party with a bunch of parents when Magpies, VTO and Secret Powers play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Free. It’s springtime and ch-ch-changes are happening everywhere. Face the strange and send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., April 19 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online at missoulanews.com.

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [35]


[36] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

F

For those not in the know, the Paris-Roubaix road race in France is one of the nastiest bits of professional bike racing in the world. Obviously, any race with nicknames like “The Hell of the North” and “A Sunday in Hell” is bound to be gnarly. There is a lot of cobblestone, a lot of bad weather and cows standing in the midst of the course. So of course, our local version, the Rocky Mountain Roubaix, takes place around Frenchtown (basically, Montana’s Paris) and features pot holes, gravel, a decent hill climb (or more if you’re a category 1, 2, or 3

racer) and plenty of surprises. With last week’s snowstorm fresh in many racers’ minds, a normal person might want to reconsider taking part in this race, but road cyclists aren’t normal. They are natural-born freaks, and that is wonderful. —Jason McMackin The Rocky Mountain Roubaix begins and ends near the Frenchtown Pond State Park Sat., April 24, at 11:30 AM. The race distances are between 31 and 61 miles. Register at usacycling.org.

presents

2013 HIGH SCHOOL FESTIVAL SCREENING and RECEPTION Thursday, May 2nd 7pm at the Crystal Theatre 515 South Higgins

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

THURSDAY APRIL 25 At REI’s Barefoot Walking and Earthing 101 spiel by best-selling authors Michael Sandler and Jessica Lee, learn how barefoot walking and hiking can help you reconnect to the earth and become stronger of body, mind and “sole.” Whoot! 3275 N. Reserve St. 6:30 PM. Free.

FRIDAY APRIL 26 Hop in the way back machine and visit the early 1800s at the David Thompson Black Powder Shoot & Rendezvous, which boasts primitive competitions like muzzle loading, rifle and pistol shooting, and knife and tomahawk throwing. The three-day event near Eureka invites all to attend, especially those still wearing buckskins. Call 8824691 or 889-3845. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free. Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY APRIL 27 Don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occur at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. in Missoula. It’s after the run/walk that you can grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Delicious. The Montana Made Run 5K, 10K and 5K Doughnut Challenge begins at Currents Aquatics Center. Those who choose to participate in the Doughnut 5K challenge are required to eat one doughnut at mile 1, two doughnuts at mile 2, and 3 doughnuts at mile 3. Awards are given to the top overall male and top overall female. Entry includes a raffle ticket for Montana Made products along with a meal ticket for the BBQ. 9:30 AM. $15. Visit montanamaderun.org.

Come and do the locomotion with the Montana Natural History Center’s during the Saturday Kids’ Activity: Animal Locomotion. Learn how fast a hummingbird flap its wings or what’s really going on with jackrabbits legs. 120 Hickory St. 2–3 PM. $3/$1 members. Free if you bike, walk or bus.

SUNDAY APRIL 28 There’s more to Great Falls than mermaids. Check out the long-running Ice Breaker Road Race, which offers competition at distances of 5 miles, 3 miles and 1 mile. The event, which Runner’s World magazine listed it as one of the 100 best road races in the country, was established in 1980 and is still going strong. Register at icebreakergf.com.

WEDNESDAY MAY 1 Hey there, big game hunters: Today is the deadline to put in for the following permit drawings: bighorn sheep, bison, moose and mountain goat. Visit fwp.mt.gov. Looking for the ultimate athletic experience? Need something fun to do this spring? Then register for the Missoula Ultimate Frisbee Spring League. No prior experience necessary. Fee includes disc, shirt, beer (21+) and fun times every Wed. evening at 6 PM through May 29. Playfair Park, 1600 Bancroft St. $45. Visit missoulaultimate.com.

THURSDAY MAY 2 Hey bro-daddies, check the Mt. Sentinel Budburst, with the Native Plant Society guide, botanist Michael Krebs. See 130 plants and stretch them legs. 6:30 PM. Meet on the south side of the UM campus, at the corner of Beckwith Ave. and Madeline Ave. at the picnic table east of the Forest Service research lab. Call Clare 728-0189 for details.burn@partnerscreative.com. calendar@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [37]


[community]

photo by Chad Harder

I both love and hate the Missoula Food Bank. I love what it does for our community. I hate that it is a necessity for our community. For those who deem the food bank unnecessary, a quick look at last year’s stats says otherwise: 53,495 individual clients and 5,557 separate households served. But the number that struck me most is that 43 percent of the clientele visits the Missoula store only one time, while a mere 13 percent visits six or more times. That means all the barroom hollering about “welfare queens” and other folks taking advantage of a system is pretty much bunk in my book. Many people live on the edge of poverty in western Montana. A trip to the emergency room or some other unexpected bill could force a lot of us to make some tough choices about where to spend our money. Perhaps a little help from the food bank gives people the chance to right the ship and pay

those bills and not have to make a tough decision between, say, food or heat. With all that said, it’s time to help out and celebrate the Missoula Food Bank, whose 30th Anniversary Bash at the Top Hat includes dinner and drink, a silent auction, trivia, music by Whippletree, as well as a performance by comedian Jeff Dye courtesy of Missoula Comedy. —Jason McMackin The Missoula Food Bank’s 30th Anniversary Bash takes place Fri., April 25, from 6 to 8 PM, at the Top Hat, 134 W. Front St. Tickets are $50 each or $40 each for bundles of two or more. Ticket includes dinner and first drink. To RSVP call 549-0543 or jessica@missoulafoodbank.org

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY APRIL 25

Practice being peaceful in a world of differences during the Intercultural Dialogue Group at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, where people from various backgrounds meet on the last Thur. of each month at 5 PM for an afternoon of conversation and peacemaking. Library of the Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call Betsy at 543-3955 or email peace@jrpc.org for more info. Former Montana Supreme Court Justice James Nelson and Professor Anthony Johnstone lead a lecture and discussion titled “Scrutinizing the Marriage Cases: Windsor, Perry, Donaldson, and Beyond,” at the UM School of Law Bldg., Rm. 101. 7 PM. Sponsored by the ACLU student group, the Outlaws student group, the American Constitution Society and the Federalist Society.

FRIDAY APRIL 26

The Missoula Fraternal Order of Eagles #32 8th Annual Silent Auction is held in conjunction with The Hands Across the Border Meeting. This meeting brings members from Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Alberta and Saskatchewan. All money raised is donated to local charities. For more information or to donate items, please contact Junior Past Worthy President and auction chairman Trent at 239-3205. Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. 4–7 PM. The UM Payne Family Native American Center and the American Indian Institute announce the screening of Dakota 38, a feature length documentary film tells of the story of the largest mass execution in US history. UM Payne Family Native American Center. 6:30 PM, opening ceremonies with the Flathead Nation Drum Group; 7 PM, screening; 8:30 PM, conversation withPeter Lengkeek, a Dakota leader, former Dakota 38 staff carrier and veteran, and Silas Hagerty, cinematographer. Free.

SATURDAY APRIL 27

The Missoula Exchange Club hosts the inaugural Mile of Dollars fundraiser, wherein peeps can prevent child abuse and neglect by donating a dollar to the walk which begins at the Missoula County Fairground entrance on Russell Ave. 9 AM to 6 PM. Visit missoulaexchangeclub.org.

Living Art of Montana’s 9th Annual The Light Show event is fundraiser with a Bollywood theme, with the a cocktail reception, auction, plated dinner and more. Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 Reserve St. 5:45 PM. $75/person $560 table of eight. Visit livingartofmontana.org.

SUNDAY APRIL 28

Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.

TUESDAY APRIL 30

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. PFLAG of Hamilton hosts a community event called Understanding our LGBT Families, Friends & Community at the Daly-Leach Chapel, 1010 W. Main St. 5 PM, light supper; 5:30–7 PM, program. Free. Visit PFLAGHamiltonBitterroot@yahoo.com. Polson peeps who live in the Catholic Church Neighborhood, and others, are invited to the Polson Heart and Soul Neighborhood Gathering which discusses how to develop “a stronger, healthier Polson.” 1002 Fourth Ave. E. 6–8:30 PM. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeanette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Noon. Free.

WEDNESDAY MAY 1

The Co-Occurring Court of Missoula seeks volunteers to work with the mentally ill. Head to Zootown Brew, 121 W. Broadway, for an informational meeting, from 6:30–7:30 PM.

THURSDAY MAY 2

Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013


missoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [39]


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Big Sky Bouncers Your biggest and best bouncer house rental company this side of the divide. Half and full day rental (free delivery within 15 miles of Lolo). (406) 273-9001 www.bigskybouncers.com CHERRY FESTIVAL SEEKING VENDORS Wanted: Seeking vendors for Polson’s Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival. This is a very well-attended event, held on the main streets of Polson July 20th and 21st. This unique celebration of Montana’s cherries draws

many thousands of visitors each year. Three booth sizes are available, making this affordable for anyone. Local Montana-made and cherry-themed products are preferred. Food vendors welcome. To view and fill out an application, please visit www.flatheadcherryfestival.com. Booth spaces are limited and our deadline is May 24, 2013. This is a two-day event and we reserve the right to refuse duplicate products. You can direct questions to vendors@flatheadcherryfestival.co m, or 406-686-1155.

Curious about Acupuncture? Experience a MiniAcupuncture Treatment for Stress Relief & Relaxation. Rejuvenate your Mind, Body & Spirit. 30 Minutes only $20. Ask how acupuncture may help you! Gentle Acupuncture by Karen Hayberg L.AC. (406) 396-0815 Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com NEED CLEANING? Students Bachelors - Builders - Move-in -

Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 721-7744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.c om

morning of the 14th. We live on corner of 10th and Garfield in Missoula. He is white with gray and brownish markings. Three little girls are very sad to have him gone. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Lorie 721-2355 Most of us quit going to church for the same reasons you did. Then we found...

LOST & FOUND LOST BUNNY: Charlie disappeared from our yard April 13th or

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C3 Free Will Astrology . . .C4

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C5

FREE

This Modern World . .C12

Estimates

406-880-0688

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At Red Willow Learning Center 825 West Kent in Missoula Join us weekly for: Buddhism & Meditation Mondays at 6:30 pm Morning Meditation Tuesdays 7-7:50 am

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"A year from now you may wish you had started today" - Karen Lamb

PET OF THE WEEK Hello, I’m Baby, and I sure would like to find my forever home. I’ve been a resident of the Western Montana Humane Society for over six months, and while I enjoy all the affection, it’s just not home. I’m a sweet girl, who’s 9-year’s old, and I enjoy the quieter life. My “family” could include other dogs, cats and children. If you’re a senior, my adoption feel will be waived as I’m one too! Let’s meet!Humane Society of Western Montana 549-9864. www.myHSWM.org


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

Ring Found at Mustard Seed Sunday 4/14. Call 721-7444 to identify

WHEN YOU WISH UPON A SLEAZEBUCKET I was seeing a guy for four months—a guy I liked better than I've ever liked anyone. Two months in, he was calling me his girlfriend, putting me on the phone with his mom, and saying that I shouldn't look to be dating other people. Yet, I noticed that he remained on the dating website we met on and was checking in there daily. I asked him whether he was seeing other girls on the site, and he said, "Only a friend I work with and she is older anyway." When I'd ask whether he was sleeping with other girls, he'd always say no. Well, he left his email open on my computer, and I searched it and discovered he'd been contacting several women daily on the dating site and sleeping with at least one other woman. I contacted her and told her he's contacting numerous other women so she'd know he's a sociopath, a sex addict, a liar, and a cheat. Now I'm thinking about warning other women he's contacted. Is that crazy? —Badly Betrayed We all want to believe—in the tooth fairy and talking dogs, that Santa got to the mall on his airborne sleigh and not the bus after his car got impounded for DUIs. Sticking to your preferred version of reality works when you're six. At 26 or 36, it tends to end badly. You, for example, tried to ignore the wildly obvious: A guy isn't logging in at a dating site daily because his mouse gets lost on the way to the sports scores. Eventually, Reality popped up to ask you, "Am I really going to have to bite you?" So, you asked the guy whether he was seeing anybody from the site, and he said, "Only a friend I work with." Note that this was not a no. To a woman seeking the truth, it sounds like what it was—a truth-flavored lie. But, determined as you were to keep believing you'd found your Mr. Husband, you cut up all the red flags and did a remarkable job repurposing them into throw pillows. The fact that your suspicions finally got too big and stanky to ignore didn't give you the right to plow through the guy's email— the techno-quivalent of breaking in to his house and reading all his mail. People are entitled to privacy. Even scummy people. Even scummy people who are sleeping with you. If a guy's level of sharing doesn't match your need to know, find the door— not an opportune moment to go all Nancy Drew on his Gmail.

Railing about what a bad guy your ex is and contacting every woman he ever said "'sup?" to on some dating site is a great idea, as it will keep you far too busy to admit that you made it possible for him to skeeve you. (Your not wanting to know coincided rather neatly with his wanting to keep his options open.) You can't control whether somebody lies to you. You can only control whether you do—and whether you treat reality like the 50-foot brick wall it is or pretend, for as long as you can, that it comes with an elastic waistband like fat men's pants.

A BREATH OF FRESH STARE I'm back in college in hopes of changing careers, and I'm interested in a woman I've become friendly with in one of my classes. Our schedules rarely seem to mesh, so it's been difficult for me to find a time to express my feelings. In fact, there's never an appropriate time to ask her out due to other students always being present. Still, I think it would be a shame not to let her know that somebody really cares for her. —Continuing Ed There are sometimes great barriers to two people coming together—warring nations, conflicting religions, violent family feuds, and other students seated in nearby desks. You're taking college classes, which suggests your problemsolving ability exceeds that of most boiled vegetables. This, in turn, suggests you could figure out the obvious solution: Pull this woman aside and ask her out. But maybe what you're most interested in is a convenient excuse for spending the rest of the semester staring at the back of her head while drawing little hearts in a notebook, allowing you to feel connected to her without risking rejection. The problem is, this can cause your feelings to fester— to the point where you have such a huge one-sided relationship with her that you become unable to speak to her without seeming creepy. If you do want to date her, ask her out now, before "Wanna knock a few back at Kelly's bar?" comes off like "You know, you'd look really pretty chained to my cabin wall."

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

Stolen Bike 4th st Red Women’s Trek Multitrack 700, Skull and crossbone sticker under handlebars. My only way to work, school 406-320-0637

TO GIVE AWAY Free house to recycle. Yours free for the taking. Vinyl siding, windows, interior doors, carpet, trim, fixtures, furnaces, tub/shower, wood and much more. 406-543-1931 TO GIVE AWAY: Miscellaneous clothing, toys, bedding, Christmas stuff, etc. 728-0889 WE MOVED!! Pass It On Missoula is now located at 2426 W Central Ave. We are a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location. PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 2426 W Central Ave and open

Monday-Saturday 10AM-5:30PM. 274-6430. www.passitonmissoula.com

INSTRUCTION

ADOPTION

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 7217744

Montana School of Massage & Massage ClinicProfessional Massage Therapy Training MontanaMassage.com 549-9244

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 721-7744

VOLUNTEERS Volunteer Tutors Needed. Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) is seeking college students and community members to work with children in transition in the Missoula public schools. • give just 1 to 2 hours per week • provide academic support • provide mentoring. Tutoring is offered during the school day. Placements are available in both the Middle and Elementary Schools depending on your preference. Ben Brewster, Volunteer Coordinator, bbrewster@wordinc.org, 406-5433550 x 218. Changing the World, One Child at a Time

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

Bruce- 546-5541 Now accepting applications for a few new patients. SB 423 compliant Multiple strains and edibles.

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Ken's Barber Shop Children and Walk-in Welcome Haircuts-$8.50 • Beard trims-$4 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m Tuesday-Saturday 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

MONTANA WOODCARVERS' SHOW May 4th and 5th 2013

WESTERN MONTANA FAIRGROUNDS Saturday 9AM to 5PM Sunday 11:30 AM to 4 PM

Admission: $3 per person, under 12 free with an adult


SUSTAINAFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL Courtesy Driver / #9974567 We have an opening for a Shuttle Driver. Must have valid driver’s license and excellent driving record. Will transport customers to and from requested destination. Other duties as assigned. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

level. Benefits: à$50,000 Loan Repayment Program. àMontgomery GI Bill. àUp to 100% tuition assistance for college. àMedical & dental benefits. àStarting at $13.00/hr. àPaid job skill training. àCall 1-800-G0GUARD. National Guard. Part-time job...Full-time benefits. New company in Lolo. Now Hiring! Days and Nights. Call John or Mike 273-2266

Gardening, Landscaping, Metal Work, Construction. Live-in Work-exchange at Retreat Center, California. Clean wholesome lifestyle, spiritual inquiry, vegetarian. Includes monthly pocketmoney. Min. age 23. Sorry, no pets or children. 510-981-1987 website: volunteer.odiyan.org

PT Administrative Assistant Missoula Butterfly House and Insectarium is seeking a detailed-oriented individual who is proficient with computers and has strong verbal and written communication skills. For a complete job description go to www.missoulabutterflyhouse.org.

GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take your career to the next

Temporary Warehouse Employees / #9974582 $9.00 Hourly. Warehouse workers to perform order picking in warehouse.This a temporary seasonal position that has the potential to become long term. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL CLINICAL DOCUMENT COORDINATOR / #2984087 $40,560.00 - $46,800.00 Yearly. Associate degree in Nursing or Medical Coding. Full benefit package provided. /lat. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Entry Level Insurance Agent / #9974565 $8.00 - $9.00 Hourly. Entry level candidate who will be given the opportunity to grow with an insurance company. . Hours have the potential to be flexible. Days are Monday- Friday. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

SKILLED LABOR FAS Maintenance Worker / #9816178 $14.98 Hourly. The incumbent in this position is responsible for completing maintenance of fishing access site facilities and grounds. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Inside Sales/Customer Service Rep Independent Publishing is seeking an enthusiastic, personable part-timer to assist in our classified advertising department. Must have ability to handle heavy phone work and provide top-notch customer service. Flexible hours.

To apply, please send resume and compensation expectations to: lfoland@missoulanews.com. EOE

GIVE BACK. GET MORE. Donate life-saving plasma.

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Must present this coupon prior to the initial donation to receive a $50 bonus on your fourth successful donation. Initial donation must be completed by 4.30.13 and subsequent donations within 30 days. Coupon redeemable only upon completing successful donations. May not be combined with any other offer. Only at participating locations.

Restoration Technician / #9974566 $12.00 Hourly. Fulltime (weather permitting). Mid May through August. Hours are weekdays 6am until 1pm. Spray and pull weeds in natural park areas. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement As-

sistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

HEALTH CAREERS REGISTERED NURSE - FLOAT POOL / #2984086 Medical center is seeking to hire a REGISTERED NURSE - FLOAT POOL position. Missoula Job Service 728-7060

SALES Local Sales Employee / #9974589 Seeking a candidate that is capable of receiving and approaching clients! Our clients are looking for someone that is organized and works well with others. Wage- D.O.E. Base plus commission. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 RESIDENTIAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE / #9974574 $25,000.00 Yearly. The Residential Account Executive will aggressively target market residential non-subscribers in the provider’s footprint, in an effort to persuade customers to choose the provider as their telecommunications provider for Digital Video, High Speed Data and Telephone service. Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Summer at the Lake! Full-time benefited sales position open at The Lake County Leader in Polson. We train. Generous compensation plan. Interested applicants please call Dan 406-827-2432. Telemarketing Experience? Hiring at $8 plus commission and benefits. Long Standing Missoula Company. Start now with paid training. Call 532-5599

CREW SUPERVISOR FLOAT FT position providing supervisory support to a variety of work crews. Supervisory and Customer service experience preferred. M-F: Days and some varied shifts. $9.91/hr. Closes: 4/30/13, 5pm.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN LEVEL 1 Want to live, work and be able to Fish, Hunt, Ski, Snowmobile, & Boat 5 minutes from Work or Home? Now Hiring Full Time Level 1 Automotive Technician, Must have own tools and VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE. The auto tech works with lube and oil changes, transmission service, alignment, computer systems diagnosis, tune-up, brake systems, steering and suspension, Engine, Transmission replacement. Position is in SEELEY LAKE, approximately 50 miles

from Missoula. Glen’s Automotive Service Inc. 406-677-2141 Glen’sauto@blackfoot.net

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Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted

building* Solar Heating* 3690940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net

Natural Housebuilders, Inc. ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes Additions/Remodels • Solar Heating HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building

369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

A nonprofit organization that collects and sells reusable building materials to reduce waste, help build healthier communities, and promote a more vibrant and sustainable local economy. We also offer Good Wood Sustainably Harvested Lumber. New, select grade framing lumber from local, sustainable harvests and processed through local mills.

1515 Wyoming • 541-8300 www.homeresource.org

CREW SUPERVISOR BID CLEAN TEAM FT Position providing scheduling, training and supervision of work crew in a community setting. Grounds maintenance knowledge and Supervisory and Customer Service preferred. M-F: 8a-4p. $ 9.91/hr. Closes: 4/30/13, 5pm.

LPN ¾ time position responsible for healthcare of individual’s w/disabilities in their homes. Experience in providing PAS services, Program Management preferred. M-F: Varied $17.50/hr. Position is open until filled.

EMPLOYMENT TECH FT position determining and providing job coaching support to individuals w/disabilities in a community environment. Effective problem solving, communication and organizational abilities are essential. Varied hours and days. $10.00/hr. Closes: 5/6/13, 5p. Valid MT driver license No history of abuse, neglect or exploitation Applications available at: OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): How we react to the sound of the wind gives clues to our temperament, said philosopher Theodor W. Adorno. The unhappy person thinks of "the fragility of his house and suffers from shallow sleep and violent dreams." But for the happy person, the wind sings "the song of protectedness: its furious howling concedes that it has power over him no longer." I bring this up to illustrate a point about your life. There will be a strong and vivid influence coming your way that is like the wind as described by Adorno. It's neither bad nor good in itself, but may seem like one or the other depending on the state of mind you choose to cultivate. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1921, Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev -- born under the sign of the Bull -- premiered his opera The Love for Three Oranges in the United States. Here's how The New York Times felt about it: "There are a few, but only a very few, passages that bear recognizable kinship with what has hitherto been considered music." It's possible, Taurus, that you will get a similar reaction when you debut your new approach or endeavor. And that may disturb you. But I think it would be a good omen -- a sign that you're taking a brave risk as you try something innovative and unfamiliar. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I'm passionate about doing whatever I can to make the world a better place. How boring and sad it would be if I only thought of satisfying my personal needs. But I also remember what Aldous Huxley said: "There is only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that's your own self." Even if you have mad skills at healing and fixing everyone whose life you touch, Gemini, Huxley's reminder is good for you to honor right now. The place that's in most pressing need of transmutation -- and where you're most likely to be successful -- is within you. Now here's the trick ending: To the degree that you regenerate yourself, you will improve everyone around you. Your inner work will be contagious.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Thomas Jefferson almost pulled off a miracle in 1784. America was a young country. There were only 13 states and a few unorganized territories. As a representative to the Continental Congress, Jefferson proposed an ordinance that would have prohibited slavery in those territories, including what would later become Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. By just one vote, alas, the provision failed to pass. Can you imagine what the United States would have been like if slavery had been partly extinguished decades before the Civil War? The moral of the story, Cancerian, is that at certain pregnant moments, small shifts can have big consequences. The astrological omens suggest your life will be proof of that in the coming weeks.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I believe you will crawl or scramble or glide to the top of some mountain in the next four weeks. What mountain do you want it to be? A crumbly molehill? A pile of cheap but useful gravel? A lofty peak where you can see for miles and miles? I urge you to decide soon on which of the possibilities you will choose. Then affirm your intention to call on all your resources, allies, and powers to help you make the ascent. This is a chance for serious expansion, Leo. Unleash your soulful ambitions.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Have you ever seen a moonbow? It's like a rainbow but is created by the reflected light of the moon instead of the sun. For this phenomenon to occur, the sky must be dark. The moon has to be full and setting in the west, near the horizon, and rain must be falling. So it's a rare event. All the conditions have to be just right. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it's more likely than usual that you'll spot one of these exceptional beauties in the coming days. Your affinity for curious wonders and mysterious marvels of all kinds will be at a peak. I suspect you will have a knack for being exactly where you need to be in order to experience them.

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Lonesome George was about a hundred years old when he died last year. He was the last remaining member of a giant tortoise species that had lived on Ecuador's Pinta Island for thousands of years. But scientists say his kind is not necessarily extinct forever. They believe that by cross-breeding tortoises of other related species, they could recreate a 100-percent-pure version of Lonesome George's species. I suspect, Libra, that you may be able to pull off a metaphorically comparable resurrection -- especially if you initiate the effort in the coming weeks.

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. In my office or your home. Mobile massage available. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358 The quintessential revolution is that of the spirit - Aung San Suu Kyi. Learn Buddhist methods

to free your mind and change your life. 2-day meditation retreat with Big Sky Mind’s David Curtis at Red Willow in Missoula. Sat-Sun, April 27-28 9:30am 5pm. Email info@tibetanlanguage.org or call 406-961-5131.

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Curious about Acupuncture? Experience a Mini-Acupuncture Treatment for stress relief

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Is it time for you? Call our Therapist Bernie Kneefe, MSW, LCSW today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Let's imagine ourselves near the snowy summit of Washington's Mount Rainier. We're in an unusual kind of cave. Volcanic steam rises from cracks in the rocky floor. Above us is a roof made of ice. As we stand between the heat and the chill, we find the temperature quite cozy. The extremes collaborate to produce a happy medium. Can you accomplish something in your life that's similar to what's going on in this cave? Metaphorically, I mean? I think you can.

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): "We cannot accept the world as it is," remarked Belgian author Hugo Claus. "Each day we should wake up foaming at the mouth from the injustice of things." I don't subscribe to the idea that each day should begin like this. On some mornings we should rise and greet the world singing songs of praise for the great fortune of being alive. But I do think Claus's approach is precisely right on certain occasions -- like now, for you Sagittarians. The time is ripe to tap into your reservoir of righteous anger. Fight to right the wrongs that disturb you the most.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "Your story begins the moment Eros enters you," says Anne Carson in her book Eros the Bittersweet. "That incursion is the biggest risk of your life. How you handle it is an index of the quality, wisdom and decorum of the things inside of you. As you handle it you come into contact with what is inside of you, in a sudden and startling way. You perceive what you are, what you lack, what you could be." I want to extend Carson's dramatic hypothesis. I'd like to propose that eros enters you again and again in the course of your life, and your story resets each time. How will you handle it when it makes its next incursion? Get ready, because here it comes.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): "I prefer by far warmth and softness to mere brilliancy and coldness," wrote Anais Nin in one of her early diaries. "Some people remind me of sharp dazzling diamonds. Valuable but lifeless and loveless. Others, of the simplest field flowers, with hearts full of dew and with all the tints of celestial beauty reflected in their modest petals." I suspect that even if you normally love cold brilliancy, Aquarius, you will need an abundance of warmth and softness in the coming days. To attract the best possible embodiments of this influence, get clear about your favorite forms of it. Be picky! Don't accept sloppy sentimentality.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Ludwig Wittgenstein was a genius. His last book, which influenced many different fields of thought, is regarded as one of the most important philosophy tomes of the 20th century. And yet he was a big fan of foolishness. "If people did not sometimes do silly things," he observed, "nothing intelligent would ever get done." Another time he said, "Never stay up on the barren heights of cleverness, but come down into the green valleys of silliness." Here's one more of his opinions: "Don't be afraid of talking nonsense! But you must pay attention to your nonsense." I hope that's enough evidence to support my advice, Pisces, which is: Now is a good time for you to get both smarter and wiser. And a good way to do that is to play and play and play some more. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC Family Care • Nutritional Consultation & IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Homeopathy • Massage Christine White N.D. & Elizabeth Axelrod N.D. Monday-Thursday 9:00-4:00 Friday & Saturday appointments available

2204 Dixon, Msla • 542-2147 • MontanaNaturalMedicine.com


MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 Make & Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363, Ext.300N.

AUCTIONS J. CONTWAY WESTERN AUCTION. Sat., May 11, 11am, Fairgrounds, Lewistown, MT. 20 sculptures, oil paintings, Will James sketches, Win., Colt, Ruger & Remington guns; saddles, spurs, chaps. View @ ShobeAuction.com 1-406-538-5125.

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 5490013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.org 406-207-0765 CATS: #2334 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 15yrs; #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF, 6yrs; #3114 Calico, Maine Coon X, SF, 3yrs; #3142 Orange, DSH, SF, 12yrs; #3139 Calico, Maine Coon X, SF, 1yr; #3187 Torbie, ASH, SF, 7yrs; #3226 Grey/white, Perisan X, SF, 4yrs; #3238 Blk/white, DLH, NM, 3yrs; #3240 Calico, DSH, SF, 8yrs; #3248 Black, DMH, NM, 2yrs; #3252 Blue, Blue Russian, SF, 9yrs; #3255 Torbie(red/grey), Persian X, SF, 2yrs; #3257 Orange, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #3265 Orange/white, Manx X, NM, 3yrs; #3271 Black, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #3273 Black, DSH, NM, 16yrs; #3277 Black, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3278 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3280 Black, DSH, NM, 5yrs; #3282 Orange,

Accepting Spring Consignments 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s "Xzibit A"–24, meet 26.

BUY & HOLD $83,000

by Matt Jones

1825 Burlington • Two City Lots Zoned RM2.7 (Multi-dwelling) Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker • Current Mobile rents for $900/mo Real Estate With Real Experience • Gas, MT Water, City Sewer connections pat@properties2000.com • Buy & Hold until you're ready to build 406-240-SOLD (7653) Properties2000.com DSH, NM, 9yrs; #3307 Tri/Torbi, DSH, SF, 1.5yrs; #3333 Grey, DSH, NM, 4yrs; #3339 Grey/white, DSH, SF, 3yrs; #3340 Blk/tan, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #3350 Grey Tabby, DSH, SF, 6 mo; #3355 Grey, Am Bob X, SF, 8yrsFor photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 3 6 3 5 3 1 1 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2851 Brown, Boxer X, NM, 1yr; #3149 White, Malamute, NM, 7yrs; #3152 Choc/blk, Boxer/Lab X, NM, 2yrs; #3166 Blk/white, Border Collie X, SF, 1yr; #3291 Brindle, Pit Bull, NM, 3yrs; #3305 White/red, Pit Bull, SF, 2yrs; #3314 Black, Shepherd X, SF, 10 mo; #3315 Blk/white, Aussie/Lab, NM, 4yrs; #3318 Buff, Lab/Sharpei, NM, 1yr; #3329 Black/brn, Shepherd X, SF, 8mo; #3336 Red/tan/white, Heeler X, SF, 3yrs; #3341 White/Blk, Rat Terrier, NM, 4yrs; #3362 Cream/grey, Shitzhu X, NM, 5yrs; #3363 Red, Sharpei, SF, 5yrs For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.montanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

GARAGE SALES Builders Surplus Garage Sale Saturday 4/27, 8am-5pm. Appliances, doors, lumber, tools, misc. inventory items. Sale in rear ally at 1327 Dakota. Please park in front on Dakota St.

WANTED TO BUY 2011-2012 ALFALFA or ALFALFA/GRASS HAY NEEDED. Paying cash everyload/everytime. Sell us anything from 18 to 400 large round or large square bales. Help out your fellow ranchers and put some cash in your pocket at the same time. 406-823-0442. sknowles@trailanimalnutrition.com ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES WANTED. Old Bottles, Trade Tokens, Casino chips, Advertising signs, old Montana memorabilia. Can travel. Circa 1860-1920’s. See photos: Outhousepatrol.com Call James 805-689-0125, Jason 406-461-0425.

AUTOMOBILE Wanted 1964 Ford Thunderbird for parts. 406-362-4186 CASH FOR CARS: Any Car or Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

PUBLIC NOTICES ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that separate sealed BIDS for the Demolition of 1106 W. Broadway Property, Poverello Center, Inc. will be received by the Poverello Center, Inc., c/o MMW Architects, located at 125 West Alder Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 PM on May 9, 2013, at which time bids will be opened and read aloud. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications prepared by MMW Architects. Copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be obtained at the office of MMW Architects, located at 125 West Alder Street, Missoula, MT 59802 upon payment of $100.00 refundable deposit for each set and a non-refundable shipping and handling fee of $35. The documents will be available @ MMW on Friday, April 26, 2013. Any BIDDER, upon returning the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS promptly and in good condition, will be refunded their payment, and any NON-BIDDER upon so returning the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS will be refunded $100.00. Any shipping and handling fee will not be refunded. Each Bid or Proposal must be accompanied by a cashiers check, certified check, or Bid Bond payable Poverello Center, Inc. in the amount of not less than ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid and must be in the form specified in MCA 18-1-201 through 206. The bid bond or other security shall protect and indemnify Poverello Center, Inc. against the failure or refusal of the bidder to enter into the contract within 30 days of bid acceptance. Bid security will be returned to the unsuccessful bidders as soon as practicable after the opening of the bids. Late bids will not be accepted and will automatically be disqualified from further consideration. Bid must be signed by an authorized representative of the bidder. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula Business Licensing requirements. The contractor is required to be an equal opportunity employer. Copeland :AntiKickback” Act provisions apply to this project. Federal Davis-Bacon Act Prevailing Wage Rates for Building Construction 2013 apply to this project.

Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act provisions apply to this project. Contracts shall not be made to any person debarred or suspended or otherwise excluded from or ineligible for participation in Federal assistance programs. Federal Energy and Environmental Conservation provisions apply to this project. ByrdAnti-Lobbying Amendment provisions apply to this project. Contractors must make positive efforts to use disadvantaged businesses, including small businesses, minority-owned firms, women’s business enterprises, and firms in labor surplus areas, whenever possible. The Owner reserves the right to waive informalities, to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid, which is in the best interest of the owner, to reject any and all proposals received, and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award, as in the judgment of its officials, best meets the owner’s requirements. Successful bidders shall furnish an approved performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Insurance as required shall be provided by the successful bidder(s) and a certificate(s) of that insurance shall be provided. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is 2:00 PM, local time, May 9, 2013. There will be a pre-bid conference at the project site, 1106 West Broadway on May 2, 2013 at 10:00 AM. Attendance is recommended but not mandatory. Please meet at the project site. CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF JOINT CITY/COUNTY PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council and the Board of County Commissioners will hold a joint public hearing on May 6, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on a resolution to expend up to $200,000 of the 2006 Open Space Bond funds to contribute towards the purchase of a 3.25 acre parcel by Garden City Harvest and to accept a conservation easement granted from Garden City Harvest to the City of Missoula on the parcel for purposes of preserving the parcel’s use as a community garden and neighborhood farm. A copy of the resolution is available in the City Clerk Office, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. For further information, contact Jackie Corday, Parks & Recreation at 552-6267. Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on May 6, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to hear public comment on an ordinance to amend MMC 8.40.040 entitled “Hazardous Vegetation and Nuisance Weeds” to change

ACROSS

1 "The Simpsons" small businessman 4 "No Scrubs" group 7 Midori liqueur flavor 12 Tampa Bay player, for short 13 Vexing 15 Candle type 16 Place to find zebras in New York 18 Former PLO leader 19 Wine prefix 20 Get out of control 22 20,000 pounds 24 Bad variety of cholesterol 25 "Breathe Me" singer 28 Wright-Patterson, e.g. 29 "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia" role 30 Store runners, for short 31 What one undecillion contains 36 Last word in a 1978 #1 song title 37 Hot time in Paris? 38 Accident-___ 39 85003, 85004 and 85007, for example 42 Kitchen items 43 Porker's pad 44 Start for nob or goblin 45 Deflating beach ball sound 46 Leader once known as "The Four Greats" 47 City in the Allegheny Mountains 51 Making attempts at 54 Pants, as it were 55 Grandma, in Granada 57 Bond villain played by Christopher Walken 59 Miss Montana? 60 Native Canadian 61 "Was ___ das?" 62 Ire 63 Comcast, e.g. 64 47-down successor

DOWN

1 Head of a monastery 2 Blender setting 3 Home to the Huskies 4 "The Audience Is Listening" system 5 George who played Bond only once 6 Get to the other side 7 Fable ending 8 State, to the French 9 Optimist's worldview 10 Eggs 11 Paycheck line 14 Bashful companion 15 Notorious Exxon tanker 17 They confirm you signed 21 Kovalev of hockey 23 More ___ than not 26 "Fame" actress Cara 27 Stubborn critters 29 Like, totally unfocused 30 1983 song where the title character gets thanked a lot 31 Baseball card brand 32 Hostess selection, once 33 "Ow, a bee!" 34 Poet Anne 35 Center of Florida? 40 Washington dropped from "Grey's Anatomy" 41 Purple perennials 46 Silvery balloon material 47 Pitfall platform 48 Senator Hatch 49 Bump in the night 50 Mom’s sisters 52 Philosopher Descartes 53 Yukon XL manufacturer 55 "Now I see!" 56 Outlaw 58 “Houses of the Holy” band, to some fans

Last week’s solution

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES the way fees are assessed. For further information contact Jessica Miller, Development Services at 552-6347. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT. 59802 until 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, May 7th, 2013 and will be opened and publicly read in the Mayor’s Conference Room, City Hall at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Purchase of one Parks Department Top Dresser- Materials Handler. Bidders shall bid by City bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Parks Department Top Dresser Top Dresser- Materials Handler., Closing, 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, May 7th, 2013”. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and \ or for products made in Montana equal to the

LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT The City of Missoula Design Review Board will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, May 8, 2013 in the City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine Street, Missoula, at 7:30 p.m. to consider the following applications: 1. A request from Robert and Alyssa Strauch for Design Review of an addition along a nonconforming setback to the home located at 4205 Reserve St. (SEE MAP J).

2. A request from Big Sky Motorsports; Signs as Part of Building for Big Sky Motorsports, located at 2315 South Avenue West. (SEE MAP I)

Your attendance and your comments are welcome and encouraged. Request for information via E-mails can be sent to cityzoner@ci.missoula.mt.us for request 1; and to kcolenso@ci.missoula.us for request 2. Project files may be viewed at the Missoula Development Services at 435 Ryman St., Missoula, Montana. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide 24 hours advance notice by calling 552-6630. The City of Missoula will provide auxiliary aids and services

preference provided in the state of the competitor. Each and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. Vendors requesting inclusion or pre-approved alternatives to any of these bid specifications must receive written authorization from the Vehicle Maintenance Superintendent a minimum of five (5) working days prior to the bid closing. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 20, 203, 223, 247, 248 and 261 Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 5/13/2013 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 5/16/2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 219, 568, and 665. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, April 29, 2013. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, May 7th, 2013. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from the City Vehicle Maintenance Division at (406) 552-6387. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, City Clerk Joan E. Cook, LAW OFFICE OF JOAN E. COOK, 2423 Mullan Road, Missoula, MT 59808. (406) 543-3800 office@cooklaw.com Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-13-70 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DARLENE MORGAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that John P. Morgan has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the above-named as the attorney of record for the Personal Representative, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 3rd day of April, 2013. /s/ Joan E. Cook MISSOULA COUNTY FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION Community and Planning Services has received a floodplain application from Mr. Joel Cusker to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 300 Cote Lane in Section 27, Township 13N, Range 20W and includes the construction of an open-walled picnic shelter. Mr. Cusker’s previous submittal (#13-07) was denied due to non-compliance with zoning. The project was subsequently granted a zoning variance by the Missoula County Board of Adjustment. The

PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, May 6, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 2130 Livingston – Car Wash/Cleaning Service Conditional UseRequest from Peter McCue for a Conditional Use approval at 2130 Livingston (see Map E), zoned C1-4 (Neighborhood Commercial). The applicant requests the Conditional Use in order to continue

an auto detailing business. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Development Services office, 435 Ryman Street. Call 552-6630 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 552-6630. The Development Services office will provide auxiliary aids and services.

[C6] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

full application is available for review at Community and Planning Services at 317 Woody St. in Missoula. Written comments from anyone interested in floodplain permit application # 13-13 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., May 10, 2013. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Community and Planning Services, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION for the issuance of a MISSOULA AIR QUALITY PERMIT Source: Gravel Crushing-Recycling Plant Applicant: Elder Demolition Inc. The Missoula City-County Health Department has received a complete application for an Air Quality Permit for a gravel crushing plant to be operated at the following location: Section 13, Township 14 North, Range 21 West at 14377 Pulp Mill Road, Missoula County. Upon review of the permit application and other information, the Department finds that Elder Demolition Inc. has filed a complete application indicating the proposed facility is capable of meeting applicable requirements of the Air Pollution Control Program. Therefore, the Department hereby gives notice of the preliminary determination to issue an Air Quality Permit to Elder Demolition Inc. to operate the gravel crushing plant. The permit will be issued with several conditions attached. The Department will make a final determination concerning the application on May 10th, 2013. Any interested person may review a copy of the application and proposed permit at the Environmental Health Division, 301 West Alder, Missoula, MT 59802. Written comments on the preliminary determination will be accepted until 3:00 PM May 10th, 2013. Comments should be sent to the attention of Benjamin Schmidt, Air Quality Specialist (email: bschmidt@co.missoula.mt.us ). MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING INCREASE BUILDING PERMIT EXEMPTIONS, ELIMINATE AGRICULTURAL BUILDING EXEMPTION & ESTABLISH NEW BUILDING CATEGORY AND FEE STRUCTURE Notice is hereby given that the Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on proposed modifications to the Missoula County Building Code Enforcement Program. Modifications are to increase the building permit exemption for detached storage structures from 120 square feet to 200 square feet; increase fence exemption from 6 feet high to 8 feet high; eliminate agricultural building exemption and create a new building category and fee structure for detached accessory storage and shop buildings. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at a Public Meeting on Wednesday, May 8, 2013, beginning at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Administration Building, Room B14, 199 W. Pine St., Basement Level, Missoula, MT. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may submit written comments or other materials to the Commissioners and/or speak at the hearing. Comments may also be submitted any time prior to the hearing by phone, fax, e-mail or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices at the Missoula County Administration Building, 199 W. Pine St., Missoula, MT 59802; Fax: (406) 721-4043, Phone: (406) 258-4877; E-mail: bcc@co.missoula.mt.us Additional information on the hearing may be obtained from the Missoula County Building Codes office at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 or www.co.missoula.mt.us/building MISSOULA COUNTY Missoula County Competitive Funding Opportunity Missoula County is currently accepting competitive applications from governmental or nonprofit organizations that are currently engaged in substance abuse prevention work in Missoula County. If your organization meets one or more of the following criteria you may be eligible for funding: (1) maintains a coalition that coordinates substance abuse prevention efforts; (2) provides community education about the risks and costs of abusing alcohol, tobacco and other drugs; (3) offers supervised non-school hour activities that give young people alternatives to drug use and

opportunities for positive youth development; or (4) provides early intervention to help youth and families address alcohol, tobacco and other drug problems. Activities must be research based. Funding will be for twelve months, beginning July 1, 2013 and ending June 30, 2014. For more information or to receive an application form, please call Peggy Seel, Senior Grants Administrator at 258-4743. Applications may be picked up at the Missoula Department of Grants and Community Programs 127 West Spruce or on the web, http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgweb/G rants/. Deadline for submittal is Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 3:00 p.m. MISSOULA COUNTY Notice of Close of Regular Voter Registration Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Woodman Elementary School District Elections to be held on June 11th, 2013 will close at 5:00 p.m., on May 13th, 2013. Ballots will be automatically mailed to Active Electors only. If you are a registered voter and do not receive a ballot, contact the county election office to update your information as necessary and receive a ballot. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. If you have moved, please update your registration information by filling out a new voter registration card and submitting it to the county election office before 5:00 p.m. on May 13th. DATED this 8th day of April 2013. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Missoula County Election Administrator MISSOULA COUNTY VICKIE M. ZEIER, MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER, HEREBY NOTIFIES MISSOULA COUNTY TAX PAYERS THAT THE SECOND HALF OF 2012 REAL ESTATE TAXES & THE FIRST HALF 2013 MOBILE HOME TAXES LEVIED AND ASSESSED WILL BE DUE AND PAYABLE BEFORE 5:00 P.M. ON MAY 31, 2013. UNLESS THESE TAXES ARE PAID PRIOR TO THAT TIME, THE AMOUNT THEN DUE WILL BE DELINQUENT, WILL ACCRUE INTEREST AT THE RATE OF 5/6 OF 1% PER MONTH AND WILL BE ASSESSED A 2% PENALTY FROM THE TIME OF DELINQUENCY UNTIL PAID . IF YOU INTEND TO PROTEST YOUR TAXES, YOU MUST MAKE PAYMENT BY THE DUE DATE AND MUST INCLUDE A LETTER OF PROTEST WITH YOUR PAYMENT. THE LETTER OF PROTEST MUST INCLUDE YOUR NAME, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION, GROUNDS FOR PROTEST AND THE AMOUNT YOU ARE PROTESTING PURSUANT TO MCA § 15-1-402. /s/ VICKIE M. ZEIER MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY. Cause No. DV-13-138. Dept. No. 3. SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION. THAO MOUA, Plaintiff, v. TOM MOUA, Defendant. TO: TOM MOUA, 10210 Waldo Rd, Missoula, MT 59808. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear and answer the Complaint in this action. which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy herewith served upon you. You are directed to file your answer and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiffs attorneys within twentyone (21) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the date of service. If you fail to appear and answer as above required, judgement will be taken against you by default according to the Complaint filed herein for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court this 18th day of April, 2013. Clerk of District Court /s/ By: Casie Kragh, Deputy Clerk. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY PROBATE NO. DP-12-11 DEPT. NO. 3 HON. JOHN W. LARSON NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH ANDREW TROTCHIE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jackie Trotchie, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Morales Law Office, P.C. at 422 West Spruce S., PO Box 9311, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 15th day of April. 2013. /s/ Jackie Trotchie, Personal Representative

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Case No. DV-13-340 Dept. No. 1 Ed McLean NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Jesse Thomas Whiddon-Allen, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Jesse Thomas Whiddon-Allen has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Jesse Thomas WhiddonAllen to Jesse Thomas Whiddon and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 8th day of May, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, in courtroom number 1. At any time before the hearing, objections my be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 22nd day of March, 2013. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Cady Sowre, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-347 Dept. No. 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III Notice of Hearing on Change of Name In the Matter of the Name Change of ROBIN RENAE GOULD, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from ROBIN RENAE GOULD, to ROBIN RENAE GOULD-JONES. The hearing will be on April 30, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: 03/28/2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court by: Maria Cassidy, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-13-404 Dept. No. 1 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of May Riggs Adams, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Mary Adams Riggs to Mary Jean Adams Riggs. The hearing will be on 05/29/2013 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: April 9, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Cady Sowre, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DP-13-75 Department No.: 2 Robert L. Deschamps, III District Court Judge NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RONALD ALLEN PFLUG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jennifer Heindel, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Grant S. Snell, Crowley Fleck PLLP, PO Box 759, Kalispell, Montana 599030759, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. Dated this 4th day of April , 2013. /s/ JENNIFER HEINDEL, Personal Representative Ronald Allen Pflug Estate CROWLEY FLECK PLLP P. O. Box 759 Kalispell, MT 59903-0759 By /s/ GRANT S. SNELL Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DR-13-166 Department No.: 3 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION In re the Marriage of: JAMES K. LEWIS, Petitioner, And DANA LEE LEWIS, Respondent. THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT, DANA LEE LEWIS: YOU, THE RESPONDENT, ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Petition in this action which is filed in the office of the Clerk of the above-named Court, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons, and to file your answer and serve a copy of your answer upon the Petitioner within twenty-one (21) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service. If you fail to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Petition. This action is brought to obtain a dissolution of marriage. TO PETITIONER §40-4-121(3), the Petitioner and Respondent are hereby restrained from transferring, encumbering, pawning, pledging, hiding, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether jointly or separately held, without either the consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life. Each party must notify the other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days before incurring the expenditures and must account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after the service of the summons. This restraining order does not prevent either party from using any property to pay reasonable attorney fees in order to retain counsel in the proceeding. Petitioner and Respondent are further restrained from cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, or changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or other coverage, including life, health, automobile and disability coverage held for the benefit of a party or a child of a party for whom support may be ordered. This temporary restraining order shall continue until another order of the Court is issued either amending or vacating this temporary restraining order. VIOLATION OF THE ORDER IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE UNDER MCA §45-5-626. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, the 16th day of April, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of the District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-372 Dept. No.: 3 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Karen Iris Bogen, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner Karen Iris Bogen has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Karen Iris Bogen to Kari Ann Owen. The hearing will be on the 9th day of May, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated this 8th day of April, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Jeremy Scott MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-399 Dept. No.: 1 Ed McLean Notice of Hearing On Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Andrea Montee, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Andrea Christine Montee to Andrea Christine Knight. the hearing will be on 05/29/2013 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Date: April 9, 2013. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Cady Sowre, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DV-13-452 Dept. No.: 3 John W. Larson. NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION TO CHANGE NAME OF MINOR CHILD. IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF: A.R.R.V. Edgar B Morales, PETITIONER, on behalf of, A.R.R.V., MINOR CHILD. PLEASE TAKE NOTE THAT Petitioner Edgar B. Morales has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name for minor child from Aalyiah Raelynn Ruth VanHaele to Aaliyah Raelynn Ruth Morales, and the Petition to Change Name of Minor Child will be heard by the District Court on Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, Courtroom located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. Dated April 22, 2013. Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court. /s/ By: Jeremy Scott, Deputy Clerk of Court. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-13-77 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EARL E. MORGENROTH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to David J. Morgenroth, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807-9199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 9th day of April, 2013, at Denton, Texas. /s/ David J. Morgenroth PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE’S ATTORNEY: BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Thomas H. Boone, Esq. P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for David J. Morgenroth, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-56 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Leland E. Graves, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Mary Ellen Osowski, return receipt requested, at 401 River Drive, Lolo, MT 59847 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 8th day of March 2013. /s/ Mary Ellen Osowski MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ALLYSON J. BALDWIN, Deceased. Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-13-84 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jake O. Ziegler, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 59807-9199, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 19th day of April, 2013, at Helena, Montana. Jake O. Ziegler APPLICANT’S ATTORNEY: BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: Cynthia K. Thiel P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, Montana 59807 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY Gregory G. Schultz, P.C., Attorney at Law, 210 East Pine Street, Suite 200, Missoula, Montana 59802, as Successor Trustee, that the Successor Trustee under the terms of the Deed of Trust described herein, and pursuant to §§ 71-1-301, et seq., MCA, will sell the property described in the Deed of Trust


PUBLIC NOTICES by public sale to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. A. PARTIES TO THE DEED OF TRUST: Grantor: Lee E. Burrington Successor Trustee: Gregory G. Schultz, P.C. Beneficiaries: Thomas Nadeau and Patricia Nadeau B. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY COVERED BY THE DEED OF TRUST: Lot 80 of Drew Creek Addition Phase VII to the Double Arrow Ranch, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. C. DEED OF TRUST RECORDING DATA: The Deed of Trust under which this sale is to be conducted was recorded October 23, 2008, as Instrument No. 200824148, at Book 828 of Micro Records at Page 534, Records of Missoula County, Montana. D. DEFAULT: The Grantor’s default for which this foreclosure is made consists of the failure by Grantor to pay the following amounts on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust: E. SUMS OWING: The following are now due and owing to the Beneficiary on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust: Principal balance: $44,000.00 Accrued Interest to the date of this Notice: $11,440.00 Late fees : $550.00 Interest at the rate of 10% per annum from and after the date of this Notice which will continue to accrue to the date of the Trustee’s Sale at a per diem of $14.46 Beneficiaries are also entitled to the costs and expenses of sale, the cost of a title report, filing and recording fees, reasonable trustee’s and attorney’s fees, and any expenditures for taxes and assessments, all incurred up to and including the date of the Trustee’s Sale, with interest thereon at the obligation rate. F. ELECTION TO SELL: The Beneficiaries have elected and have directed in writing that the Successor Trustee sell the real property above-described for the satisfaction of the aforesaid obligations. G. TIME AND PLACE OF SALE: Time: May 29, 2013, at 12:30 p.m. Place: The sale will be held at the main entrance to the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59801. H.TERMS OF SALE: This sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiaries (excepting only the undersigned Successor Trustee), may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash (except for any creditbid by the Beneficiaries) and the conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession of the subject real property. The real property may be subject to prior liens and bidders are advised to determine the status of same as of the date of sale. By Montana statute, the sale purchaser is entitled to possession of the property on the tenth (10th) day following the sale. Dated this 27th day of December, 2012. /s/ Gregory G. Schultz Gregory G. Schultz, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA) : ss. County of Missoula) On this 27th day of December, 2012, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Gregory G. Schultz, known to me to be the individual that executed the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my notarial seal the day and year first above written. /s/ Roxie Hausauer (SEAL) Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Lolo, Montana My commission expires: 1/6/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/23/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200621607 *Bk. 781 Pg. 1021 Micro Records, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Lloyd A. Carrell was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC,its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Western Title & Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Western Title & Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 4 in Block 5, Bellevue Addition No.2, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded Plat of record in Book 4 of plats at page 26 1/2, on file and of record in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201224932, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 22, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $178,644.16. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $171,869.98, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 8, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close

of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.100866) 1002.243735-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/03/11, recorded as Instrument No. 201102369 Bk: 873 Pg: 784, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Nancy K. Coleman, a married woman was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Sterling Savings Bank, a Washington Corporation, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principle Meridian, Montana. More accurately described as: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201118745 Bk: 885 Pg: 372, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 7, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $324,720.91. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $293,547.41, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7021.15903) 1002.244289-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/19/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200822003, Bk: 826 Pg: 1187, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John H. Simon Jr and Candy L. Lundgren was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for WCS Lending, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Commonwealth Land Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Commonwealth Land Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly

described as follows: Lot 4 of Lolo Heights, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. More accurately described as Lot 4 of Lolo View Heights, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Plat recorded in Book 16 of Plats at Page 68. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201112998, Bk: 881 Pg: 213, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 7, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $187,279.51. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $167,479.60, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7021.14772) 1002.244011-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/16/10, recorded as Instrument No. 201005413 B: 857 P: 98, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kevin J. Thomas and Danielle T. Thomas, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 68 of 44 Ranch, Phase 5, a Platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 6, 2013, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $310,424.63. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $301,109.90, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 16, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such

portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.104863) 1002.244508-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 17, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 2 IN BLOCK 1 OF GARY HOMESITES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Don O. Holst, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 8, 2004 and recorded September 13, 2004 in book 739, page 1148, under document number 200426170. The beneficial interest is currently held by Federal National Mortgage Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,027.91, beginning September 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 15, 2013 is $194,724.10 principal, interest at the rate of 3.25% now totaling $3,325.87, escrow advances of $1,163.46, suspense balance of $180.37 and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,289.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 7, 2013 Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 7th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Seterus Vs. Holst 42008.226 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 21, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main door of the First American Title Company located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 16 and the West One-Half of lot 17 in block 3 of residence addition, a platted subdivision in the city of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Re-

bekah A Dubois, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. A Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 12, 2012 recorded July 16, 2012 under Document No 201213099, Book 896, Page: 1376. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,524.38, beginning September 1, 2012 and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 1, 2013 is $230,648.45 principal, interest at the rate of 3.5% now totaling $4,020.14, late charges in the amount of $182.94, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,616.38, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.12 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 15, 2013 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 15th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Guild Vs. Dubois 41291.880 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 24, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 51 of Cornerstone Phase II, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Susan Catherine Butler, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to American Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 25, 2002 and recorded August 15, 2002 in Book 686, Page 1469 under Document No. 200223098. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association S/B/M Chase Home Finance LLC, S/B/M to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $537.37, beginning September 1, 2012, and each month subsequent which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 06, 2013 is $69,942.08 principal, interest at the rate: of 6.875% now totaling $1,681.88, late

charges in the amount of $64.47, escrow advances of $200.65, and other fees and expenses advanced of $63.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $13.17 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 15, 2013 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 15th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Chase Vs. Butler 41954.307 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 7, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 6 IN BLOCK 1 OF TREASURE STATE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Eric Kelley and Allison Kelley, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., A Montana Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 30, 2008 and recorded October 2, 2008 in book 827, page 385, under document number 200822600. The beneficial interest is currently held by Guild Mortgage Company. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,515.29, beginning August 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 22, 2013 is $185,586.80 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5000% now totaling $6,869.55, late charges in the amount of $604.66, and other fees and expenses advanced of $255.35, plus accruing interest at the rate of $33.05 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified

checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 28, 2013 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 28th day of January, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Guild Vs. Kelley 41291.876 Published April 11, 18 and 25, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on June 24, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 38 OF EAST MISSOULA ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. David O. Larson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 8, 2008 and recorded April 9, 2008 under Document No. 200807824 in Book 816, on Page 1000. The beneficial interest is currently held by Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,250.79, beginning December 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 22, 2013 is $180,898.85 principal, interest at the rate of 6.87500% now totaling $16,261.72, escrow advances of $2,930.75, and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,130.67, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.07 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES

Statement of the Location of Mail Ballot Drop Off Locations & Accessibility Designations for the May 7, 2013, School/Special District Election: All drop off locations will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Notice of Voting System Exhibition, Diagram and Voting Instructions: Please note that the county’s voting systems are on public exhibition at the Missoula County Fairground’s Election Center. Please see diagrams of the voting system(s) and ballot arrangement and instructions on voting below. Sample Instructions on How to Vote on an AutoMARK Voting System The AutoMARK is a ballot-marking system that will be in use during the upcoming election. Its main purpose is to allow voters with disabilities and other special needs to mark a ballot privately and independently. If you wish to vote on the AutoMARK, please inform the election judge at your drop off location that you would like to do so. You will need to insert the ballot you received by mail into the machine. After the system accepts the ballot, the system will provide instructions on how to vote the ballot. In order to make the ballot easier to read, you can change the contrast and font size.

[C8] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

You can mark your choices by touching the screen or by using the keypad, which features written and Braille markings. The AutoMARK system will confirm your selections on the screen and by audio. After you verify that your selections are correct, the system will fill in your choices on the ballot and print the ballot. The ballot will then go to an election judge for depositing in the ballot box. If you need assistance at any time during the process, simply request it.


PUBLIC NOTICES sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 14, 2013 Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 14th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Bana Vs. Larson 42048.354 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013 O. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEES SALE on June 24, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated In Missoula County, Montana: LOT A-82 OF CANYON CREEK VILLAGE, PHASES 9 AND 10, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY. MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Ja’ton L. Simpson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to National City Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 17, 2008 and recorded December 30, 2008 in book 831, page 328, under document number 200828139. The beneficial interest is currently held by PNC Bank, National Association successor by merger to National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,019.03, beginning August 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 1, 2013 is $179,380.67 principal, interest at the rate of 5.000% now totaling $5,979.36, late charges in the amount of $262.80, escrow advances of $1,358.54 and other fees and expenses advanced of $411.12, plus accruing interest at the rate of $24.57 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the dose of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made

strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to ail existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 15, 2013 Shandale Gordon Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 15th day of February, 2013, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Shandale Gordon, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov. 6, 2018 Pnc Vs. Simpson 41230.886 Published on 4/25, 5/2 and 5/9/2013 NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: DARROW, DONNA J., 3212 S. 7TH ST. W., MISSOULA, MT 59804-2016 TAX ID #5804833. Pursuant to section 15-18212, Montana code annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: DINSMORES ORCHARD HOMES #4, S19, T13N, R19W, LOT 31 B. OF LOTS 31B & 31C 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: 11/302009 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: 4/12/2012 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: 4/12/2012, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and cost is: Tax: $7,123.98 Penalty & Interest: $994.14 Costs: $163.08 Total: $8,281.20 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing a tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847 Further notice for those persons listed below whose

addresses are unknown: PIEDALUE, DANIEL A. PETERSON, DONALD E. & NANCY L. 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: 4/10/13. M.I.P. Assets, LLC NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: DAY, ROY A. 14450 US HWY 12 W., LOLO, MT 59847-9483 MISSOULA CO. TREASURER, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802 WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, 1200 S. RESERVE ST., MISSOULA, MT 59801 BENEFICIAL MONTANA INC. dba BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO., 2880 GRAND AVE., BILLINGS, MT 59102-6525 TAX ID #1450154. Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana code annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: LOLO VIEW ACRES #1, S35, T12N, R21W, LOT 4 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: 11/30/2009 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: 12/05/2011 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: 12/05/2011, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and cost is: Tax: $1,577.84 Penalty & Interest: $628.69 Costs: $162.00 Total: $5,169.92 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing a tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 2584847 Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: 4/10/13. M.I.P. Assets, LLC NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: GEHRKE, WILLIAM L. & ARDYCE T. PO BOX 16, SEELEY LAKE, MT 59868 MISSOULA CO. TREASURER, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802. TAX ID #704358. Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana code annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: SEELEY LAKE HOMESITES # 02,S03, T16N, R15W, BLOCK 7, LOT 10 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: 11/30/2009 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: 7/30/2012 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: 7/30/2012, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Mis-

soula, MT 59808 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and cost is: Tax: $3,660.43 Penalty & Interest: $585.47 Costs: $158.40 Total: $4,404.21 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing a tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 2584847 Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: 4/10/13. M.I.P. Assets, LLC NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: LAMBDIN, THOMAS J. & WINSTENIA K., 3375 MOUNTAIN DR., CLINTON, MT 59825-9709 MISSOULA CO. TREASURER, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802 I.R.E. PROCESSING, 290 BILMAR DR., PITTSBURG, PA. 15205-4601 BENEFICIAL MONTANA INC. dba BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO., 2880 GRAND AVE., BILLINGS, MT 59102-6525 AMERICAN PIONEER TITLE INSURANCE CO., 1635 TAMPA ST., TAMPA, FL 33602 TAX ID #995206. Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana code annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: MOUNTAIN ACRES, S36, T13N, R18W, LOT PT OF 4 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: 11/30/2009 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: 7/30/2012 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: 7/30/2012, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and cost is: Tax: $5,001.96 Penalty & Interest: $681.31 Costs: $165.24 Total: $5,848.51 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing a tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 2584847 Further notice for those persons listed

below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: 4/10/13. M.I.P. Assets, LLC NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: RICHARDSON, MAURICE L. & CAOLYNN, PO BOX 460078, HUSON, MT 59846-0078 MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802 TAX ID #2024628. Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana code annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: SIX MILE TIMBER TRACTS, S23, T15N, R22W, LOT 16, #1. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: 11/302009 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: 12/13/2011 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: 12/13/2011, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and cost is: Tax: $5,404.00 Penalty & Interest: $766.79 Costs: $153.72 Total: $6,324.51 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing a tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847 Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: 4/10/13. M.I.P. Assets, LLC

tax sale on: 10/11/2011, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and cost is: Tax: $4,363.36 Penalty & Interest: $455.42 Costs: $164.16 Total: $4,982.94 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing a tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847 Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: 4/10/13. M.I.P. Assets, LLC NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: WALTER, KIMBERLY ANN & SHARBONO, DEAN E. 123 CURTIS ST., MISSOULA, MT 59801-1319 MISSOULA CO. TREASURER, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT 59802 WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, 1200 RESERVES ST., SUITE M, MISSOULA, MT 59801 DONALD & JEANETTE NEU, ADDRESS UNKNOWN TAX ID #5800999. Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana code annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: EL MAR ESTATES,

PHASE 3, S15, T13N, R20W, BLOCK 1, LOT 6. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: 11/302009 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: 4/11/2012 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a tax sale on: 4/11/2012, by Missoula County whose address is 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802 5. The lien was subsequently assigned to M.I.P. Assets LLC, whose address is P.O. Box 16561, Missoula, MT 59808 6. As of the date of this notice, the amount of tax due, including penalties, interest, and cost is: Tax: $5,690.23 Penalty & Interest: $994.78 Costs: $163.08 Total: $6,848.09 7. The date that the redemption period expires is 60 days from the giving of this notice. 8. For the property tax lien to be redeemed, the total amount listed in paragraph 6 plus all interest and costs that accrue from the date of this notice until the date of redemption, which amount will be calculated by the County Treasurer upon request, must be paid on or before the date that the redemption period expires. 9. If all taxes, penalties, interest, and costs are not paid to the County Treasurer on or prior to the date the redemption period expires, or on or prior to the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed, a tax deed may be issued to M.I.P. Assets, LLC, on the day following the date on which the redemption period expires or on the date on which the County Treasurer will otherwise issue a tax deed. 10. The business address and telephone number of the County Treasurer who is responsible for issuing a tax deed is: Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, (406) 258-4847 Further notice for those persons listed below whose addresses are unknown: DONALD & JEANETTE NEU: 1. The address of the interested party is unknown. 2. The published notice meets the legal requirements for notice of a pending tax deed issuance. 3. The interested parties rights in the property may be in jeopardy. Dated this: 4/10/13. M.I.P. Assets, LLC

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NOTICE THAT A TAX DEED MAY BE ISSUED TO: SCHLIEBE, KATHY, 4 ORCHARD CT., MISSOULA, MT 59803-2041 MISSOULA COUNTY TREASURER, 200 WEST BROADWAY ST., MISSOULA, MT 59802-4292 TITLE SERVICES, INC., 2425 W. CENTRAIL AVE., MISSOULA, MT 59801 FIRST SECURITY BANK OF MISSOULA, PO BOX 4506, MISSOULA, MT 59806 TAX ID #5863219. Pursuant to section 15-18-212, Montana code annotated, Notice is hereby given: 1. As a result of a tax delinquency a property tax lien exists on the real property in which you may have an interest. The real property is described on the tax sale certificate as: LOT 32B-4 OF ORCHARD COURT ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. 2. The property taxes became delinquent on: 10/11/2011 3. The property tax lien was attached as a result of a tax sale on: 10/11/2011 4. The property tax lien was purchased at a

SERVICES CHILDCARE

EXCAVATING

HANDYMAN

Diaper Service averages 18 cents per change, so why are you throwing your money away? Local cloth diaper sales & service. Missoula peeps order online and get your goods delivered during diaper route Wednesdays. 406.728.1408 or natureboymontana.com

Gravel Pot Hole Blading We specialize in gravel driveway and parking lot grading using our specialized gravel grooming equipment. Make yours look like new again for a fraction of new gravel cost. 273-2151

Squires for Hire. Egress Windows, Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

CLEANING NEED CLEANING? Students - Bachelors - Builders - Move-in - Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

Gravel Pot Hole Blading We specialize in gravel driveway and parking lot grading using our specialized gravel grooming equipment. Make yours look like new again for a fraction of new gravel cost. 273-2151

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HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-COMFORT crafted building* Solar Heating* 369-0940 or 642-6863* www.naturalhousebuilder.net Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

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www.rcservices.info montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • April 25 – May 2, 2013 [C9]


RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $515 across from Public Library, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $675 off South Reserve. Garage, DW, microwave, deck W/D in unit, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom. (2 Weeks Free to Qualified Applicant) $675 (62+ Complex) elevator, microwave, deck, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1213 Cleveland “C”. 1bed/1bath, HEAT PAID, central location, coin-ops, off-street parking, pet? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1315 E. Broadway #9. 2bed/1.5 bath, coin-ops, shared yard, pet okay. $800 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1404 TOOLE: DOWNTOWN 2 BEDROOM, NEW CARPET & VINYL, LARGE, BRIGHT, BIG YARD, CAT OK, $710, GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP 1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $595 coin-op laundry, off street parking, storage, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $595 W/D hookups, carport, off street parking, storage, W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom house on 1 acre $850. Rural setting, S/G paid. Pets upon approval, No smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2221 FOOTHILLS: 3 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 BATHS, VERY NICE, PORCHES, GARAGE, DINING, SOUTHHILLS, $925, GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP 446 Washington Street. RENT INCENTIVE. 1bed/1bath, downtown location, coin-ops onsite, cat? $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

512 E. FRONT: DOWNTOWN 2 BEDROOM, WOOD FLOORS, ON-SITE LAUNDRY, PORCH, CAT OK, $725, GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $300 GIFT CARD

Studio $495. Near St. Patrick’s Hospital, separate room for bedroom, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

Equinox Apartments. 2 bedroom: $620. W/S/G paid. Comes with Mountain Line EZ Pass. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Colin 549-4113 ext. 112

MOBILE HOMES

Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bed: $691 all utilities paid. Application fees are $40. Comes with Mountain LIne E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Jordan 549-4113 ext. 127. Lenox Flats. Studio: $550 all utilities paid. Comes with Mountain Line EZ pass. Missoula Houseing Authority. Contact Jordan 549-4113 ext. 127. New Complex, 1 & 2 bedroom units, $625-$795 DW, A/C, deck, storage, coin-op laundry, limited off-street parking, W/S/G paid, 2 bedroom units have W/D hookups or 2nd bath. No pets. No smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 Palace Apartments. 2 beds from $527$799. 1 beds $550-$666. Studio(s) 510. Application fee $30. W/S/G and Heat paid, coin-op laundry. Missoula Housing Authority Contact Matty or Connie 5494113 ext. 130 or ext. 131.

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

DUPLEXES 1016 Charlo St. #1. 2bed/1bath, W/D hookups, shared yard, cat? $700 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1708 Scott St. “B” 1 bd/1ba, shared yard, w/d hkups, all utilities paid … $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 524 South 5th Street East “B”. 2bed/1bath near University. All utilities included. $900. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

HOUSES 1314 Linnea Ln 3bd/1.5 ba, newer home, 2X gar., w/d hkups, pet? … $1250. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

$840, GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP & $300 GIFT CARD 833 CHERRY: LOWER RATTLESNAKE 2 BEDROOM, PORCH, NEW CARPET, MUD ROOM, LAUNDRY, ALL PAID, $995, GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MAN-

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

1&2

Alberton 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom, 1025 North Runyon Dr. (Petty Creek exit) on 1/2 acre. Pets ok. $625/mo. $625/dep. Photo’s available at realtor.com. 602-499-4640

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RENTALS OUT OF TOWN 11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coin-ops, central location in Lolo. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 3901 O’LEARY: 2 BEDROOM, 2 STORY, 1 1/2 BATH, PRIVATE DECK, CARPORT & STORAGE, HEAT & CABLE PAID,

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

Property Management

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

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1-YEAR

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Solstice Apartments. 1 bed: $500. 2 bed: $725. W/S/G & recycling paid. Comes with Mountain Line E-Z Pass. Missoula Housing Authority. Contact Colin 5494113 ext. 112

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For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

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REAL ESTATE HOMES 11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $319,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 141 Burlington. Charming 4 bed, 1 bath with 2 car garage in Rose Park neighborhood. Wood floors under carpet, original hardware. $225,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 2 Bdr, 1 Bath single-level Windsor Park home. $168,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 2 Bdr, 2 Bath Northside home. $160,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

210 Burlington. 4 bed, 2 bath wellmaintained home with wood floors, fenced yard & single garage. $272,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 2402 Mount Ave. $175,000. Centrally located, this 2 bed/1bath home has some nice features to it. Vaulted ceilings, arched doorways, wood laminate flooring, and much more. Properties 2000 Visit www.2402MountAve.uCanBuyMe.co m or Call Kris Hawkins 396-6542 253 Strand. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, coved ceilings, updated bath. Charming house close to UM. $247,000. Go to MoveMontana.com for more information. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2961 Mary Jane Boulevard. 3 bed, 2 bath with cathedral ceilings, private backyard, patio & 2 car garage. $205,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico

Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr. 2 Bath Windsor Park home. $215,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3325 West Central. 4 bed, 2.5 bath with open kitchen, covered patio & 2 car garage. $288,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 4 Bdr, 2.5 Bath, Grant Creek / Prospect Meadows home. $469,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

[C10] Missoula Independent • April 25 – May 2, 2013

4039 Yorkshire Place. Immaculate 3 bed, 2 bath Pleasantview home on large corner lot with covered front porch, deck & 2 car garage. $235,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 4315 Melrose. 3 bed, 2 bath with vaulted ceilings, covered front porch and 2 car garage. $247,500. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties, 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 4433A Bordeaux. 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage, fenced yard with pergola. Many upgrades including new flooring. $177,900. Rochelle Glasgow, Missoula Prudential, 728, 8270. glasgow@montana.com 5209 Dutton Court. 5 bed, 3 bath with fantastic kitchen, laundry room and 3 car garage. Near city park. $339,900. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com

6301 Hillview. 5 bed, 3.5 bath with 360 degree South Hills views. Game room, 2 gas fireplaces & 3 car garage. $450,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmailcom 6455 Linda Vista $289,900. Beautiful one-owner Linda Vista Home on a large lot. One level living with 3bed/2bath on main level with 2 large bonus rooms and additional bath in the basement. Many updates inside and out! Properties 2000. Call Pat Dauenhauer 240-2442 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Fantastic Home With View 6305 St. Thomas. 4 bed, 3 bath, updated and gorgeous setting with large

private lot, double garage, landscaped and ready to move into! $310,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

with 2 car garage, trail up to Mt. Jumbo out the door, newer home with great colors and awesome floor plan. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Linda Vista Home to be built at top of Linda Vista with amazing views! One level living, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on corner lot on Jeff Drive. $279,900. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES

Lot 16B MacArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath to be built with fantastic views. $189,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

Totally Green Remodel 1221 Kemp. 4 bedroom, 2 bath. It’s a mustsee. $269,500. A sustainability model, this unique and beautifully upgraded home made the Homeword Sustainable Home Tour twice! KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Very Sweet Hidden Trails 548 Utah. 4 bedroom 2 bath home

526 Minnesota #B. 2 bed, 1.5 bath energy-efficient condo with large front yard. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Pre-


REAL ESTATE ferred Properites. riceteam@bigsky.net

240-6503

ferred Properties. riceteam@bigsky.net

240-6503

803A Pattee Creek. 2. bed, 1.5 bath condo with garage in 55+ community. $129,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000, 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

839 Discovery. 2 bed, 1.5 bath at base of Mt. Jumbo. Patio, balcony, fenced yard & single garage. $164,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmailcom

3010 West Central. Nearly 5 acres in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. Rural living in town. $499,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com

Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. $250,000. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 240-5227. porticorealestate.com State of the Art Green-Built Innovative stand-alone 3 bedroom condo with radiant floor heat, superior insulation, concrete countertops, yard and garage and more! $265,000 KD porticorealestate.com 240-5227 Townhome On The River Land Stewardship Program buyers must qualify. Call KD to find out more about this 2 bedroom 1.5 bath condo with the balcony facing the river and right next to the river trail and close to downtown. $135,000. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $83,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 715 Clements. 3 bed, 2 bath mobile & 1 bedroom house on 1/4 acre. $120,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties, 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

LAND 23645 Mullan. Beautiful 14 acre treed meadow west of Huson. Modulars on permanent foundation allowed. $169,900. Robin Rice, Montana Pre-

531 Minnesota. Two great East Missoula building lots. $55,000 each. Robin Rice Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net NHN Bear Creek Road $225,000. Beautiful views from this desired west side property. 20.53 acre property with great access just off of a paved road. Fenced, septic, and irrigation water rights. Properties 2000. Call Kristin Larson (406)672-7030

COMMERCIAL 3817 Stephens $350,000. Well maintained Professional/Medical office condo. Just off of SW Higgins on Stephens only three condos in development. Good Parking. Lots of Extras. Properties 2000. Call Don Sokoloski 544-7830. 514 W. Spruce $244,900. Fully remodeled 3 bed/1 bath home with newer furnace, roof, wiring, plumbing, etc. Zoning allows for numerous uses including office or retail. Low maintenance yard w/ UG sprinklers. This is a must see property. Properties 2000. Patrick McCormick 240-7653.

Commercial Lease Space Fantastic opportunity to be neighbors with the award-winning Homeword Organization. New, LEED registered, high quality, sustainably-built office space close to river and downtown. $11-$15 per sq.ft. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com Gorgeous Victorian home zoned for commercial use in a great location $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-

6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com NHN Derby $150,000. Great commercial opportunity. Level 1.127 acres in Missoula Industrial Park. Easy access to utilities. Property features a security fence. Properties 2000. Call Deana Ross 239-4726.

OUT OF TOWN

& 2 car garage. $249,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

102 Boardwalk, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath on almost 3 acres with large 48â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x30â&#x20AC;&#x2122; heated shop. $285,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties, 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net

15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $480,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

13475 Crystal Creek, Clinton. 3 bed, 2 bath with large deck, 2 wood stoves

RICE TEAM

514 West Spruce. Great office space in vintage building near St. Patâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Upgrades to wiring, plumbing, roof & more. $244,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

Robin Rice 240-6503

riceteam@bigsky.net missoularealestate4sale.com

102 Boardwalk â&#x20AC;˘ $285,000 3 bed, 2 bath with beautifully landscaped yard. Lot is zoned commercial. Heated 48'x30' shop with three 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 9' doors, benches and shelves. Wired for 220 50 amp for welder and a 30 amp 220 for air compressor.

210 Burlington $272,000 MLS #20131400

4 bed 2 bath well-maintained home with basement, garage and fenced yard. New energy-efficient furnace and wood floors.

922 Palmer $123,000 Affordable Northside 3 bed, 1 bath, fenced lot w/ mature trees and garden areas. Full unfinished basement, great for storage or workshop! Updates include, new laminate flooring, new paint throughout, a sun tube in the large bathroom, new carpet in the back bedrooms.

MLS #20132408 For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 â&#x20AC;˘ glasgow@montana.com

Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos $144,900 - $249,900 Under new ownership! 1 and 2 bedrooms. Large units, nice finishes, secure entry, secure U/G parking, riverfront, affordable HOA dues and much more. Owner financing comparable to FHA terms available with as little as 3.5% down! Units, pricing and info available at www.mullanheights.com

2405 W. Kent MLS#: 20131013 $199,900

Seller Motivated! Must Sell! 15305 Spring Hill $485,000

11082 Cherokee Ln, Lolo. $252,000.

244 7th St., Clinton. $135,000.

Private setting, 4 bed, 3 bath cedar sided home, wrap around deck. Boarders forest service land. Large kitchen/dining area. Fire place, heated three car garage, finished basement.

3 bed, 3 bath, well maintained. Pergo floors through out the upstairs. Large kitchen/dinning area for entertaining. Large deck, great view of the Lolo Valley. Amazing landscaping.

3 bed, 1 bath beautiful landscaping. Many updates through out home which included new furance, paint and floors. Room for your toys. Short walk to river, for fishing, swimming, or rafting.

NEW LISTING!

NEW LISTING!

5562 Klements Lane, Florence MLS#20131252 $500,000

TAKE A LOOK AT THIS ONE!! Very well maintained and updated 3 bedroom/2 bath home in central Missoula. Full basement with family room, bedroom, bath & unfinished storage area. 700sq.ft. main/700sq.ft. basement.

This unique property has a ranch style 4bed/2 bath home on the Bitterroot River. This home sits on 10+ acres and a separate 10+acre parcel right beside it to keep or sell.

Patrick Dauenhauer 240-2442, Pfdauenhauer@gmail.com

Paula Crews 360-8655, Paula@PaulaCrews.com

514 W. Spruce MLS# 20130702 $244,900

2500 Larch Camp Road MLS# 20132125 $689,000

Fully remodeled 3 bed/1 bath home with newer furnace, roof, wiring, plumbing, etc. Zoning allows for numerous uses including office or retail. Low maintenance yard w/ UG sprinklers. This is a must see property.

The best of both worlds; a country feel with easy access to Missoula. This 5 bed/3bath home on 4.03 acres has been lovingly remodeled to suit the most discriminating buyers. The nighttime skyline is a view not to be missed. There is something for everyone here.

Patrick McCormick 240-7653, Pat@Properties2000.com

Call Steve Schultz 240-1075, Steve@Properties2000.com

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missoulanews.com â&#x20AC;˘ April 25 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; May 2, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12-2PM 6301 Hillview Way $439,000 Straight up Hillview Way, close to the top. 5 bed, 2 bonus room, 3 bath, triple car attached garage. AWESOME views from top of hill.

Call Anne for more details

546-5816 Anne Jablonski annierealtor@gmail.com movemontana.com 170 South 1st Street, Clinton. 2 bed, 1 bath mini-farm on 2.2 fenced acres. 2 car garage, mountain views & walk to the river. $165,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula, 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 22020 Frontage Road, Frenchtown. 3 bed, 2 bath on beautiful 1 acre with playhouse & small pond. Many recent upgrades. Betsy Milyard, Montana

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 33634 Spirit Trail $239,000. Single level living with 3bed/2bath on 10+ acres with a four stall barn in Potomac.

Great views with open areas and trees. Properties 2000. Call Paula Crews 360-8655

tana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

7911 Sugaree, Lolo $319,000. The home offers 3 bed/3bath, wrap around deck, and great views of the mountains. The yard is fully landscaped and has u/g sprinklers. The garage is an oversized attached double car garage. Steve Schultz, Properties 2000. 240-1075, Steve@Properties2000.com

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Mon-

Clark Fork River 20525 Schwartz Creek Road. $250,000 3 bed, 2 bath, 1 acre. Single level, country living only 20 minutes to Missoula. Walk to the fishing access and Clark Fork River. KD: 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

Homes: 203 N. Curtis . . . . . . . .Farmhouse On Large Lot . . . . . .$217,000 418 Church . . . . . . . . .Stevensville Charmer . . . . . . . .$174,500 506 Central . . . . . . . . .Sweet Stevi Home . . . . . . . . . .$174,900 1520 S 6th W . . . . . . .Sweet & Charming . . . . . . . . .$185,000 Jeff Drive . . . . . . . . . .One Level Living . . . . . . . . . .$279,900 6305 St. Thomas . . . . . .Quiet, Views, Immaculate . . . . . .$310,000 253 Strand . . . . . . . . .Solid & Sweet . . . . . . . . . . . .$250,000 925 Discovery . . . . . . .Sweet and Sunny . . . . . . . . . .$197,500 2365 Village Square . . . .Compact and Efficient . . . . . . .$168,999 716 N 4th. . . . . . . . . .Fabulous 1910 Charmer . . . . . .$189,000 128 Meadowlark . . . . . .Many upgrades . . . . . . . . . . .$240,000 6301 Hillview . . . . . . . .Wow - 5 BR 3 ba . . . . . . . . .$439,000 1635-37 Defoe . . . . . . .2 homes 1 price . . . . . . . . . .$270,000 3324 W Central . . . . . .1/2 acre lot! . . . . . . . . . . . .$288,000 Homes w/land: 20135 Wambli . . . . . . .Top of the world . . . . . . . . . .$599,000 20525 Schwartz Creek . .Clinton Near River . . . . . . . . .$250,000 2348 River Road . . . . . .Home & Land to Build . . . . . .$535,000 Land: Rattlesnake Lot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$160,000 East Missoula Building Lot With Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55,000 Townhomes/Condos: 839 Discovery Way . . . . .Comfy 2-Story Townhome . . . . .$164,000 1405 Phillips . . . . . . . .Innovative Green-Built . . . . . . .$265,000 1400 Burns . . . . . . . . .Cheaper Than Rent . . . . . .From $79,000 Uptown Flats . . . . . . . .Upscale Downtown . . . . . .From $149,900 1401 Cedar . . . . . . . . .River Views-Income Qualified . . . .$135,000 Commercial: 1535 Liberty Lane . . . . .New Lease Space . . . . . . . . . . .$11-$15

[C12] Missoula Independent â&#x20AC;˘ April 25 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; May 2, 2013

Home On the River Stevensville River Road home on 1.87 acres. 4 bedrooms, views of the Bitterroot Mountains and right on the Bitterroot River. This is awesome! Attached garage plus detached RV garage. $340,000. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH FOR REAL ESTATE NOTES and Land Installment Contracts. We also lend on Real Estate

with strong equity. 406-721-1444. www.Creative-Finance.com

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com


St. Anthoney Parish Center 217 Tremont

THURSDAY, 4/25 Hall of Fame Night •Joan Zen •Salsa Loca •Hall of Fame Award Winner Ed Norton Big Band •Melody & Clipper Anderson •Buddy DeFranco All Stars

Friday and Saturday, 4/26 & 4/27, 7:30pm University Theatre, UM Campus Tickets available at UM Arts Box Office

Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture.

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