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CONCERNS VOICED FROM ALL SIDES AS LOOKOUT PASS EXPANSION PLAN ENTERS SCOPING PROCESS

TRAILER PARK RESIDENTS SUPAMAN MERGES FOUND A GEM NEWS OPINION MONTANA MUSIC FORCED TO MOVE OUT HERITAGE, HIP-HOP IN COMMISSIONER MOTL


NEWS

CONCERNS VOICED FROM ALL SIDES AS LOOKOUT PASS EXPANSION PLAN ENTERS SCOPING PROCESS

TRAILER PARK RESIDENTS SUPAMAN MERGES FOUND A GEM NEWS OPINION MONTANA MUSIC FORCED TO MOVE OUT HERITAGE, HIP-HOP IN COMMISSIONER MOTL


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


[2] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014


cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters

News Voices/Letters School shootings, politics and pay.........................................................4 The Week in Review WildWalk, floods and newborn care............................................6 Briefs Coal, Bum Steer and trailer park torn up ............................................................6 Etc. Yellowstone conspiracies and some cool science ...................................................7 News Poplar residents find time doesn’t heal all wounds..............................................8 News Lookout Pass expansion enters scoping process amid concerns .........................9 Opinion The wrong way to attack the commissioner of political practices ................10 Opinion Craft beer has become an intrinsic part of the West......................................11 Feature Hadley Ferguson faces her biggest project and biggest challenge .................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts A Crow fancy dancer finds his niche in the world of hip-hop ..............................18 Music Three-Eared Dog, Stab Me Kill Me and The Whizpops!.....................................19 Books Poet Brian Blanchfield multiplies his world......................................................20 Books Kate Lebo’s delicious language of pie ...............................................................21 Film Gingerdead Man ushers in 4/20 B-movie style....................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ......................................................23 Flash in the Pan The true San Francisco treat.............................................................24 Happiest Hour Lochsa Lodge ......................................................................................26 8 Days a Week Art is not a thing, it is a way ................................................................27 Mountain High Ecopentathlon....................................................................................41 Agenda Gender in Everyday Life ..................................................................................42

Exclusives

Street Talk ......................................................................................................................4 In Other News..............................................................................................................12 Classifieds...................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y....................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ......................................................................................................C-5 Camp Sleepover.........................................................................................................C-9 This Modern World..................................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Heidi Starrett CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS Christie Anderson ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Cathrine L. Walters CALENDAR EDITOR Kate Whittle STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING, PROMOTION & EVENTS COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Jason McMackin, Brad Tyer, Nick Davis, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest, Rob Rusignola, Josh Quick, Brooks Johnson

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2014 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [3]


[voices]

Cheers for Curdy

STREET TALK

by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday, April 15, on Higgins Avenue. This week the Indy profiles artist Hadley Ferguson, who is best known for her murals around town. What’s your favorite piece of public art in Missoula? Follow-up: What aspect of historic Missoula do you think deserves to be captured in a mural?

Zac West: There’s an electrical box on the corner of Broadway and Pattee of a swimmer. I love the artist’s style. It’s not photo-realism but more abstract. Summer love: All the brick buildings in the downtown area, with the river, and people floating in the summer.

Emily Sumstine: It used to be on the parking garage—the “Before I Die. . .” wall that was installed. I read about that movement across the country and it was amazing. Historical piece: I would say the peace sign on Waterworks Hill.

Keith Lenard: I love the utility boxes in town. I think that is the coolest thing. They are so multifaceted and different. Saloon spittoons: The Oxford. I’ve heard so many stories of that place and think the outside corner is pretty iconic.

Since moving to wonderful Missoula in 1979, I’ve met countless folks who love the state of Montana and its people as much as I do. Many seem to have a deep understanding, awareness and compassion for all Montanans. Some of these same people make it their business to study and learn facts about how to have our state be prosperous and productive. I can say that I’m among those who have done considerable listening and learning. My 30-plus years working in the medical world (hospice, home care, hospital and medical clinic settings) here in Missoula has taught me the importance of each precious Montana life. What a joy it is for me to meet and get to know political candidates like Willis Curdy running for HD98 who believe as I do that all Montanans have a basic right and need for quality health care. Willis has researched the fact that if our state addresses the health care needs of all Montanans, we can also improve business productivity, job growth and support our state’s economy. We need to elect a candidate like Willis Curdy who doesn’t just talk about helping minorities, veterans, folks with disabilities, etc.—he gets out there and works for all to have a chance at a quality life. His years helping our children reach their full potential by tirelessly teaching school in our community, along with countless community service activities has not gone unnoticed. I confidently endorse Willis Curdy. He deserves our vote. Denalie Bruins Missoula

ica. I don’t like that my second grader knows what to do when a gunman comes to her classroom, or the fact that this scenario has even entered the consciousness of American schoolchildren. These measures taken by schools across the country are reactionary and do not get to the root of the problem: dangerous people with easy access to guns. Rather than training our children to hide from the bad guys, shouldn’t we focus on keeping guns out of dangerous hands? There is no simple solution to ending school shootings, and I do appreciate the steps MCPS has taken to try to protect our kids when a horrible situation occurs. But there are commonsense things we can do to prevent those situations from happening, like strengthening our background check system. Background checks work—since the system was created, more than two million gun purchases were blocked from prohibited buyers. Unfortunately, background checks are not universal and there are

“I don’t like that my second grader knows what to do when a gunman comes to her classroom”

From the source

Steve Thorstenson: There’s a bronze sculpture by Tom Rippon up by the bus depot. It’s a really nice piece. Logger days: The timber industry. I’m from Libby and always like the historical aspect of the industry and what it brought and still brings to the state.

Genevieve Fix: The big concrete cat at Central Park on W. Main Street. I love kitties. We have four cats. Native lands: I think a mural of the Indian settlements in the valley before we were here would be good.

[4] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

I’m a mom to two young Missoula schoolchildren and since the Sandy Hook shooting in December of 2012, gun violence prevention is my world. Jamie Rogers’ story on what Missoula County Public Schools is doing to deal with potential school shootings was important and engaging (see “A history of violence,” April 10). But the elephant in the room was scarcely acknowledged. There have been 63 school shootings in America since the Sandy Hook tragedy, illustrating the fact that we’re not dealing with the problem at the source. No matter how we fortify our schools, rigorously train our teachers, unnerve our children with lockdown drills, we won’t be able to save them. Not until we deal with the obvious epidemic of gun violence and fix our lax gun laws in this country. How can we put the onus of protecting our children and teachers from a gunman on our children and our teachers, when we won’t demand that our legislators stand up to the gun lobby? Nearly eight children and teens are shot and killed every single day in Amer-

loopholes in the system, which allow gun sales to occur with no check, like sales at gun shows and online transactions. In Montana, no mental health records are submitted to the NICS system (this is in direct conflict with federal law). On any given day in Montana, anyone with a criminal history or a severe mental illness can buy a gun at will … no questions asked. This needs to stop. The Montana Chapter of Moms Demand Action is working to fix the system to make our communities safer, which in turn will make our schools a safer and more peaceful place for kids to learn and grow. That’s really what we all want, right? So let’s stop fearing talking about guns and start solving the problem from the source. If we keep up this mentality of reacting, we have failed to protect our children and it will again and again be too late. Nancy de Pastino Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America Missoula

Out of balance As we discuss our various financial concerns with friends and neighbors, it might be well to reflect on some details that have influenced the current economic situation. In the era from 1947 to 1979 all classes of Americans saw their incomes grow together. We are now in a new era in which the wealthiest have realized a significantly greater growth in income. From 1979 to 2008, according to census data, the middle 20 percent of Americans saw their incomes grow only 11 percent, compared with a 111 percent growth in the previous 30 years. Meanwhile, the poorest 20 percent of Americans saw their incomes actually decrease by 7 percent, compared with a 118 percent growth in the previous 30 years. Since the 1980 election, and the tax cuts that ensued, America’s top 1 percent have seen their incomes increase by 275 percent. Today, workers’ wages as a percentage of GDP are at an all-time low. Yet corporate profits as a percentage of GDP are at an all-time high. The top 1 percent of Americans own 40 percent of the nation’s wealth. In fact, just 400 Americans own more wealth than 150 million other Americans combined. This economic inequality translates into a change from a representative democracy into a “corporatocracy,” and thanks to a 5-4 ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States, we no longer have a government “of the people, by the people, and for the people,” but a government “of the corporations, by the corporations, and for the corporations” that has been put into place by the lobbyists who have been employed by these corporations. As concerned members of the American society, we need to reach out to our friends and neighbors, and urge them to become informed and involved in taking actions that result in the recovery of the middle class. Most of us, however, continue the grand delusion. We prefer to be spoon-fed comfortable ideological anachronisms while debating the symptoms of inequality with little or no relation to the underlying cause. In the months ahead that lead up to our opportunity to elect new representatives, let’s seek out candidates who will aggressively stand up for the American values that result in a government with a moral mission; to protect and empower all citizens equally. Perhaps they will rediscover the policies from the past that allowed for a successful middle class. Edd Blackler Big fork


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missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Cathrine L. Walters

Wednesday, April 9 Ronald James Ward Jr., who was serving a life sentence for the murder of Hamilton’s Craig Sheldon Petrich in 2000 and was linked through DNA evidence to three additional killings, is found dead in his cell at Montana State Prison.

Thursday, April 10 The Missoula Rural Fire District responds to an afternoon wildland fire along the 5000 block of Pattee Canyon Road. Twenty-two firefighters from various agencies eventually arrive and contain the fire, which results in no injuries or structure damage.

Friday, April 11 A 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex fossil leaves Montana State University en route to the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. The fossil was found in Montana in 1988 and is on a 50-year loan to the Smithsonian.

Saturday, April 12 A Bitterroot resident shopping at a Florence sporting goods store recognizes a firearm that had been stolen from his home years prior. The information enables Missoula County Sheriff’s Department investigators to find the thief, who admits to stealing the weapon during a housewarming party.

Sunday, April 13 Locals dressed as bumblebees, tigers and pandas march down Higgins Avenue during Missoula’s annual WildWalk parade. The event kicks off the 37th International Wildlife Film Festival, which this year features more than 60 films.

Monday, April 14 St. Patrick Hospital announces the addition of “comprehensive women’s and children’s services,” including obstetrical and newborn care. CEO Jeff Fee says the changes are part of the area’s “new, competitive marketplace.” Two hospital groups recently purchased Community Medical Center and said it would become a for-profit operation.

Tuesday, April 15 As temperatures rise, emergency responders assess the risk of flooding in areas most affected by last year’s Lolo Complex Fire. The blaze destroyed five homes and burned nearly 11,000 acres, creating a landscape susceptible to spring flooding.

The Missoula Fire Dept. burned stacks of sinker logs on the Clark Fork Natural Park island April 10. The nearly 100-year-old logs floated downstream from the old Milltown Dam, clogging the headgate in the diversion channel that feeds water to local irrigation canals.

Coal

Where good karma is born From a few hundred yards east of the railroad’s junction with Greenough Drive, a train whistle pierces the calm Sunday afternoon. Seven protesters—flanked by two city police officers—sit unfazed and undaunted next to the tracks. One of the officers gives them a final polite warning: Continue the protest and be arrested for disorderly conduct. No one moves. A banner reading “No coal exports” flutters in the wind. The train, cars laden with coal, continues its approach. The entire scene came together on less than two hours notice. The Blue Skies Campaign and 350-Missoula put the word out days earlier that the weekend would feature some sort of civil disobedience; the exact date, time and location were withheld. Blue Skies organizer Nick Engelfried says he’s pleasantly surprised that two dozen people made it despite the short notice. “If I believed in karma,” protester Cate Campbell says from near the tracks moments before the police roll up, “this is where good karma is born.” Coal trains have become a flashpoint in the West in

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[6] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

Alex Sakariassen

Development

Trailer park residents evicted On a recent spring afternoon, a Christmas tree lies atop a pile of scrap wood inside the dilapidated Third Street trailer park adjacent to the Good Food Store in Missoula. A broken toilet rests near mangled fencing. Not far from the refuse sits 60-year-old Ken Nettleton, who learned last week that, after living here for eight years, he’s being evicted. “I’ve been so damned worried about getting booted out of here,” Nettleton says. On April 11, Missoula Property Management, on behalf of the parcel’s new owner, Fishmore Associates, notified roughly 44 Third Street trailer park residents

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and pose for photos with the tickets. Campbell, who used to work as a brakeman for Burlington Northern Sante Fe in Missoula, says protests like this are a chance to act on her convictions. “I just feel like the time has come and gone,” she says, “when outside companies can use us like a resource rich colony.”

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recent years, as mining companies express ever-growing interest in developing coal deposits in Montana and Wyoming for shipment to markets in Asia. Critics argue the potential 50- to 100-percent increase in coal trains bound for West Coast ports could irrevocably ruin communities large and small along the way. “This is the beginning of a sustained, nonviolent resistance to the exporting of coal,” says 350-Missoula co-chair Jeff Smith. Dave Jones, the protesters’ designated police liaison, first warned the Missoula Police Department days earlier that a nonviolent protest would be occurring, but kept even them in the dark about the specifics until the last minute. The secrecy was deemed necessary after Montana Rail Link got wind of a similar protest in Helena last September and stopped the train outside of town. The goal for today, Jones says, is to get photos of the coal train with protest signs in front of it. “These folks are willing to risk arrest to dramatize the issue and make a point,” Jones says. The train is nearly upon them before the protesters along the tracks—Engelfried and Campbell among them—quietly get to their feet and follow the officers to their cruisers. All seven are cited for disorderly conduct

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[news] that they’d have to move within 180 days. The announcement leaves Nettleton and many of his mostly low-income neighbors unsure where they will go. “All of a sudden, we’re being displaced,” says Mike Horstman, who’s also lived here for eight years. “Nobody has any money.” Horstman and Nettleton both own their trailers. They’ve also invested a significant amount of cash renovating them. In Horstman’s case, he built a garage onto his mobile home. Nettleton constructed a living-room addition for his two-bedroom trailer. He fears the addition will make moving the unit impossible. While Nettleton grapples with the problem of whether he’ll be able to transport his home at all, he’s also been searching for a new space in Missoula that can accommodate his trailer. The prospect is especially daunting in light of Nettleton’s financial situation. Nettleton says he has heart problems and lives on $720 a month from Social Security. He currently pays $350 rent, plus $48 for water and trash. His research shows that a new rental space would cost significantly more than that. And then there’s a security deposit. “There’s no way to come up with that kind of money,” he says. The parcel’s new owners intend to build apartments on the site, says Michael Priske, who along with partners Albert Osellame and Lucas Osellame comprise Fishmore Associates. “That’s the plan,” Priske says, “if we can get everything through the city.” Priske says he feels badly about the evictions. He notes the property is in need of significant work, including sewer repairs that would likely have required the trailers be moved anyway. He adds the partners aim to improve the area by building as many as 40 units of affordable housing. “I always try to do stuff that’s going to enhance, or make Missoula a better place to live,” Priske says. Apartments will mark a significant change for the site, which William Clark owned for 30 years. At 73, Clark’s failing health prompted him to move to an assisted living facility, says his nephew, Timothy Seward. Clark’s waning energy also motivated him to sell the property. “I know it’s definitely hard on Bill,” says Seward, who owns a restaurant in Columbia Falls. “But it has to be done, he understands that.” The property is being sold as two parcels. The rear half, where Nettleton lives, was purchased by Fishmore. Residents there must be out by October. Clark still owns the front half, which abuts Third Street. Seward says a chain store is eyeing the front parcel for a possible new location. “AutoZone is the one we’re dealing with,” Seward says.

To make way for development on the front parcel, the Clark estate evicted roughly 44 additional residents from 22 trailers in February. Nettleton says his neighbors were not prepared to move as winter temperatures plummeted. One mobile home owner couldn’t haul his trailer away because it had sunk into the ground, which, Nettleton says, was frozen solid. He adds that many of the park’s former residents didn’t know where they were going to live next. “They said, ‘We got nowhere else to go,’” Nettleton recalls. “A lot of ’em had to throw their food, their groceries, everything out.” Seward acknowledges the evictions were tough for his family to stomach. He says Clark had many oppor-

tunities to sell the land over the years, but didn’t because he felt responsible for the residents. “Bill, he’s a true liberal,” Seward says. “He really cares about these people.” That sentiment provides little solace to Nettleton, who’s especially worried about becoming homeless in light of his legal challenges. Nettleton’s on parole and fears that without a home address to report to the state, he’ll be sent back to prison. That reality leaves him feeling pressured to find a new place quickly. “I have been out every day looking,” he says. Jessica Mayrer

Sexual harassment

Bum Steer busted On Lyndsay Stover’s first day of work as a bartender at the Bum Steer Bar, Cafe and Casino in Florence, tavern owner Jay Wilson told her that she should wear more revealing clothing. “Tits equal tips,” he said.

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Amount raised by Missoula’s Rivertop Renewables to begin mass producing dish detergent and corrosion inhibitors made from plant sugars. The company announced last week that the capital investment will enable it to hire 20 new employees. On April 23, 2012, Stover, who was a University of Montana graduate student at the time, filed a complaint with the Human Rights Bureau alleging that Wilson and the Bum Steer sexually harassed her and, in doing so, unlawfully discriminated based on sex. Last month, the HRB issued a scathing 70-page report summarizing findings from its investigation into Stover’s complaint. After interviewing 24 people, including employees and bar owners, the agency found multiple incidents of “verbal and physical harassment” against Stover. To compensate for the unlawful discrimination and the emotional distress Stover experienced during her five months of work at the bar, the HRB ordered the Bum Steer to pay Stover $100,000. The tavern must also pay Stover an additional $19,000 for lost wages and the costs of future psychiatric therapy sessions. “It was an awful experience for her,” says Elizabeth Clark, Stover’s Missoula attorney. Stover told a HRB hearings examiner that the harassment intensified after her first day. At one point in 2012, according to HRB findings, “Jay Wilson followed Stover into the ice storage area, spun her around, reached inside her shirt, exposed her breast and placed his mouth on it. Stover pushed him away and told him she did not like what he was doing. Jay Wilson said ‘Oh yes you do.’” Stover told the HRB hearings examiner that Wilson’s behavior left her constantly uneasy and upset. “I would tell him, ‘I don’t like this. I don’t know why you are doing this,’” Stover said. Wilson declined to comment on Stover’s claims or the HRB’s findings. On behalf of Stover, Clark says that, because they believe Wilson has subjected other women to similar harassment, she and her client are especially pleased by the agency’s decision. “She was not the only one that experienced this,” Clark says. In addition to the financial award, the HRB is mandating the Bum Steer adopt new sexual harassment policies that will be overseen by an independent investigator. Wilson must also undergo 16 hours of sexual discrimination law training within the next six months. Jessica Mayrer

ETC. The story arrived earlier this month in Facebook updates, Twitter feeds and urgent ALL CAPS emails from your kooky uncle. Yellowstone was going to blow. A recent 4.8-magnitude earthquake provided the first signal. Wildlife could sense the trouble, and they were fleeing in droves. Look, there was even video evidence of bison getting the hell out of Dodge. And, by the way, we’re all about to die in a cloud of volcanic ash and molten rock. As Yellowstone National Park officials, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Associated Press made clear since the story–and bison “stampede” video–went viral, the whole thing was a wild fabrication cooked up by the same conspiracy theorists who always seem to sucker your kooky uncle. A swarm of earthquakes did occur, but the USGS assures the activity is “not unusual for Yellowstone.” The video of bison running for their lives turns out to pre-date the earthquakes and, worth noting, they are actually running into the park. Nevertheless, the Internet being as it is, the USGS published an FAQ to respond to this “flurry of news, real and imagined,” and Yellowstone Public Affairs Chief Al Nash posted a YouTube video titled “Rumor Control” to set the record straight. “We’ve seen no signs to suggest that Yellowstone’s volcano is about to erupt,” he says. No doubt, this will do nothing to calm your kooky uncle’s fears, but the science appears to be conclusive. We’re not going to die–at least not right away–from the world’s largest volcano. But the mildly amusing hysteria surrounding Yellowstone did turn us on to another eye-opening geothermal development at the park. Some conspiracy theorists attached the earthquake news to a report published in February in the journal Nature that revealed vast amounts of helium were escaping from Yellowstone. How much? Oh, you know, about 60 tons a year–hundreds, maybe thousands of times more than initially anticipated, according to researchers. Enough, in fact, to fill one Goodyear blimp every week. While this sounds infinitely more alarming than a misrepresented bison video, alas, the helium research has “no implications about volcanic hazards,” according to the USGS. Plus, as one researcher explained to the Los Angeles Times, this “sudden” release of gas began roughly 2 million years ago–a really long time by most measures, but a drop in the bucket when it comes to a geologic study. These findings help to show that Yellowstone remains a natural wonder for researchers–not to mention tourists–even if the details prove problematic for those wearing tinfoil hats.

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missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [7]


[news]

Still spreading Poplar residents find time doesn’t heal all wounds by Kelly Conde

Residents of the town of Poplar on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation continue to deal with a massive groundwater contamination from oil and gas activity, and a new report released last week by the U.S. Geological Survey shows that the contamination is only spreading. The federal agency says the issue has led to polluted drinking water for more than 3,000 people. The contamination was first discovered in the 1980s, when residents living near the East Poplar oilfield noticed their drinking water tasted especially salty and contained an odd, amber hue. Since those initial complaints, the USGS and the Fort Peck Office of Environmental Protection have worked to understand the cause of the contamination and its extent. Though it is now well established that the problem resulted from antiquated oil production practices nearly 60 years ago, experts have had considerably more trouble determining just how far the polluted water has spread. The terrain surrounding Poplar includes a predictable mix of soft rolling hills and deep gullies, but the area is more complex below the surface. The USGS can only track the contaminated water by drilling small individual wells and sampling the water beneath, or by flying expensive electromagnetic detectors over the area via helicopter. The report released last week used a combination of the two methods to draw its conclusions, and found the contamination has increased from 12.1 square miles in 1997 to 17.9 square miles today. The reason the contamination continues to spread can be linked to the location of the oilfields. The East Poplar oilfields connect to the Williston basin. “The water that is produced with oil and gas development in the Williston basin is extremely saline,” USGS hydrologist Joanna Thamke says. In fact, the water beneath the Williston basin is some of the most saline water in the nation. When oil is extracted from deep underground, it also brings water back to up the surface. The Williston basin water is saltier than seawater, so a little bit goes a long way to causing contamination issues. In this case, time will not heal the damage already done. The USGS data suggests the situation will only get worse over time. “The implications show that in this area there are quite a few individual plumes that might have originally started out small, but with time the effects add up to a larger area,” Thamke says.

[8] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

The slow spreading of the contamination means that nothing in the groundwater’s gravity-drawn path is safe. Nearly 20 years after the contamination was first discovered, it seeped into the city of Poplar’s water supply. The problem went from affecting the drinking water of 100 residents to impacting more than 2,900.

The permanent damage caused by the contamination prompted the Fort Peck tribe to make sure nothing like it ever happens again. The tribe is in the process of establishing a set of strict stipulations that oil and gas developers are required to incorporate into their Application for Production Approval.

photo by Kelly Conde

Poplar resident Donna Whitmore holds a jar of polluted drinking water that came from her tap. While the contamination has been acknowledged for years, a new USGS report reveals just how far the situation has spread throughout the area.

In a rare stroke of good fortune during more than three decades of pollution, the Fort Peck Reservation Rural Water System project neared completion just as the contamination reached Poplar. The federally funded project pumped water from the Missouri River to a water treatment plant to be purified. Poplar was the first city to benefit from this project. “Thank god for the water pipeline,” says Deb Madison, manager of the Fort Peck Office of Environmental Protection, “because that means we have potable sources of water for drinking.” But there are still problems that cannot be fixed by a pipeline. According to Madison, the area’s groundwater is so salty that any long-term development for irrigation or stalk water is inadvisable. On a reservation where the majority of the land is used for agriculture or to raise cattle, the lack of options presents a huge challenge.

“[These stipulations] work to really make sure that where they say gas is going or water is going, it actually gets there, and stays there,” Madison says. The tribe’s proactive response comes as welcome news to Thamke at the USGS. She says it’s important for oil and gas developers both on the reservation and in other areas of the Williston basin to learn from the mess of the East Poplar oilfields. “I think what’s important to know is that today, we still have very saline water being produced with the oil and gas,” Thamke says. “I think it’s something that’s important for managers to be aware of and development companies to be aware of, so they proceed carefully to develop one resource and minimize the effects to the others.” editor@missoulanews.com


[news]

Snow growth Lookout Pass expansion enters scoping process amid concerns by Alex Sakariassen

Nearly four years have passed since the public got its first detailed look at an ambitious 20-year, $20 million expansion plan for the ski area at Lookout Pass. The new vision for one of the region’s smaller, more affordable ski destinations called for additional lifts, a relocated base area and a tripling of the amount of skiable acreage. At the time of its initial release, Sharon Sweeney, then a district ranger on the Lolo National Forest, told the Spokesman-Review that Lookout owner Phil Edholm had prepared “a well-thought-out plan.” The U.S. Forest Service earlier this month announced the beginning of the scoping process for Lookout’s first phase, which calls for two new lifts and 15 new trails on more than 650 acres off the resort’s backside. The public comment period—ending May 5—precedes the agency’s initial environmental review. Christopher Barrett, Lookout’s marketing director, estimates that if all goes smoothly, the resort could get Forest Service approval to begin clearing runs and installing the new chairlifts by late 2015 or 2016. In the meantime, Lookout aims to expand its existing base lodge and upgrade the frontside chairlift to a quad. Barrett says these moves are necessary due to the neartripling in crowd numbers over the past 15 years, during which the resort has already expanded from one chairlift to three. Just this season, Lookout set a new annual record of 65,620 skier visits. “We’re kind of bursting at the seams, to say the least,” Barrett says. “On busy weekends and holidays, it feels like we’re past what we can hold, even though we’re not.” However, some Lookout ski enthusiasts are raising concerns about just how long the Forest Service review process could take. The Friends of Lookout Pass—a nonprofit independent of the resort but advocating in its favor—formed this month in the wake of the Forest Service’s announcement. For spokesman Barry Dutton, the fact that it’s taken four years for the scoping process to start doesn’t bode well for the ski area’s expansion timeline. “We’ve sort of been watching the lack of progress for the last five years of the new expansion proposal, and we were expecting the Forest Service to start public comment and scoping sometime during the ski season,” says Barry Dutton, a longtime Lookout skier and consultant with “over 25 years experience” in the ski industry who worked on Lookout’s previous expansion proposal. “Now they’ve put it off until after ski season, which we’re really concerned with. That itself suppresses comment because people aren’t thinking about skiing.”

Friends of Lookout Pass are now in the process of improving their website and disseminating informational flyers about the hurdles the expansion project could face. Dutton says the group initially began spreading the word at Lookout during the last weekend of the ski season. His group points to expansion proposals submitted by other ski areas in the region over the past 20 years as examples—particularly that of

the area will still be more affordable and feel less crowded than resorts of similar size. “I really don’t foresee us coming to that point where it feels like we’re just another giant corporation,” he says. “It’s going to be okay.” While Friends of Lookout Pass advocate for a quicker process, others would just as soon see Lookout remain as is. Since the area first released its expansion proposal to

photo courtesy of Lookout Pass

The U.S. Forest Service this month announced the beginning of the scoping process for the first phase of a huge expansion plan at Lookout Pass Ski and Recreation Area. Some skiers feel the project is already moving too slowly.

Montana Snowbowl, which first proposed new lifts and runs on TV Mountain a decade ago. The Snowbowl proposal won Forest Service approval last December. Dutton feels there’s an ongoing indication, based on the four years it’s taken for the scoping process to begin, that “we’re setting ourselves up for another Snowbowl at Lookout.” “The fact is, we’ve gone through a dozen of these small ski area expansion projects in the Northern Rockies in recent decades, and none of them have been controversial,” Dutton adds, citing expansions at Blacktail Mountain, Discovery and Lost Trail. “None of them have disclosed environmental impacts that were significant. None of them have seen significant opposition.” The delay at Snowbowl is admittedly more nuanced, but the broader concern from Friends of Lookout Pass is that a long, drawn-out review process at Lookout will drive up lift pass rates currently among the lowest in the region. Barrett is quick to assuage these concerns, stating that maintaining Lookout’s affordable, family-friendly atmosphere remains a high priority. Even after the full expansion project is complete–including the other lifts, lodges and runs contained in phase two–Barrett says

the public in 2010, several groups of backcountry skiers have taken an oppositional stance. John Latta, spokesman for the Inland Northwest Backcountry Alliance, says the new boundaries contained in Lookout’s first phase could result in user conflict in the nearby backcountry. Snowmobilers and non-motorized travelers like skiers and snowshoers already have a shaky agreement on which part of the St. Regis River basin to stick to. Skiers ducking the rope off Lookout’s new lifts to access the backcountry could displace snowmobilers, who might in turn displace the non-motorized contingent. Latta’s group has spent nearly a decade advocating for a 6,400-acre winter non-motorized area behind Lookout, part of which lies in phase two of the ski area’s expansion plan. Latta feels there needs to be a broader discussion by the Forest Service regarding winter use in the region surrounding Lookout. “It’s like when you get three people in a bed that only sleeps two,” Latta says. “One person rolls over and the other person falls out. It’s going to be the backcountry skiers and snowshoers that fall on the floor.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [9]


[opinion]

Beautiful disaster Montana found a gem in Commissioner Motl by Dan Brooks

Last week, Sen. Dee Brown, R–Hungry Horse, said something beautiful, in the same way that a collapsing ice shelf or any other tragic revelation is beautiful. She was speaking to Montana Commissioner of Political Practices Jonathan Motl at a meeting of the State Administration and Veterans’ Affairs Interim Committee to determine whether his office wielded too much power. “The complaint is that you are the jury, the executor, the all-knowing,” Brown said. “Sometimes complete power corrupts, and I wouldn’t want that to happen in the commissioner’s office.” It was beautiful partly because Motl got to point out that he lacks the power to punish or even indict anyone, so in fact he is neither jury nor executor. As for the claim that he is all-knowing, Brown seemed to support that one herself. You know the political practices commissioner is on to something when a legislative committee tries to shut him down. Specifically, Motl is on to Art Wittich, R– Bozeman. When last we saw the Senate majority leader, he had filed his candidacy for a seat that was not up for election this year. Correcting that mistake on the last day before the deadline allowed him to file for HD 68, where he happens not to face any opponents in the Republican primary. Wittich called Motl a “partisan hack” last week, shortly after the political practices commissioner complained to a district court that the majority leader illegally coordinated with Western Tradition Partnership during his 2010 campaign. Now called American Tradition Partnership, WTP is notable for three things: • publishing a fake newspaper called the Montana Statesman that bore the headline “1 in 4 sex offenders go unregistered” over photographs of Steve Bullock and three sex offenders; and • arguing in court that a box of documents found in a Colorado meth house de-

tailing their coordination with various Republican campaigns was A) not theirs and B) they wanted it back; and • printing and mailing about 13,000 letters in support of the Wittich campaign. That last one we just heard about. Although Wittich claims he never coordinated with WTP—that would violate Montana election law—his signature was printed at the bottom of their letters. He paid WTP a little more than $7,000 for the batch, which Motl

“Our elected representatives seem to feel about election commissioners the way pro wrestlers feel about referees” said wouldn’t cover the costs of printing and stamps. From the commissioner’s report, it appears that Wittich accepted in-kind contributions from and illegally coordinated with Montana’s most notorious dark-money group. Maybe that’s why Senate Republicans decided that the commissioner shouldn’t report so much. And maybe that’s why Montanans should try to hang on to Motl with both hands. Our state Senate hasn’t confirmed a commissioner of political practices since 2010. It’s a six-year appointment, but no commissioner has served a full term since Linda Vaughey was nominated in 1999. Our elected representatives seem to feel about election commissioners the way pro

wrestlers feel about referees: They can be safely ignored, and when they can’t be ignored they can be thrown out. The week after our election commissioner accused the Senate majority leader of violating campaign finance laws, the majority essentially moved to throw him out. The State Administration and Veterans’ Affairs Interim Committee drafted a bill that would strip the governor of his power to appoint commissioners, requiring him to choose instead from a list of Senate nominees. Republicans complain that the office had become too partisan, but this bill would guarantee that whichever party wins the Senate could install one of its own as election commissioner. If Brown really believes that “complete power corrupts,” she should not let the winners of elections decide who will investigate how they won. That goes for the governor, too. Bullock appears to have made a good choice in Motl, but his status as a political appointee leaves him open to the kind of cynical criticism that Wittich levied last week. If we want the commissioner of political practices to be above partisan politics—as both parties say they do—we should make it a nonpartisan office, selected by the voters or by some knowledgeable, apolitical constituency like sitting judges. It’s not as if Motl has much power to abuse. He cannot pass judgment on campaigns or levy fines against elected officials. He cannot even bring charges. All he can do is make his findings known to the public, as he did last week. That Senate Republicans called an out-of-session committee meeting to shut him up should tell Montanans that he is saying something worth hearing. Dan Brooks writes about politics, culture and professional wrestling at combatblog.net. His column appears every other week in the Independent.

photo by Chad Harder

[10] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014


[opinion]

Pride by the pint Craft beer has become an intrinsic part of the West by Michael Dax

After sampling 50 different beers and spending a number of hours searching for garages converted to breweries, I was content. A friend and I had planned this getaway for weeks, and the night in Bend, Ore., was as central to the trip as was Crater Lake National Park in southern Oregon. In fact, the visit was more of a pilgrimage: We would follow the “Bend Ale Trail” and visit all eight of the town’s craft breweries. As I struggled through a headache the next morning, I had an epiphany. In the West, beer really matters, and what might seem like a mere curiosity has become central to the identity of this changing region. In the past two decades, the number of craft breweries has exploded, and every moderate-sized city and even some small towns now have at least one. Tap lines have become a kaleidoscope of shapes and colors that are distinct from the relatively mundane red, silver and blues of the major domestic brands. While this trend is national in scale, its significance has assumed greater proportions in the West, where a brewery culture has become vital to the local character. Eastern states produce a lot of craft beer and tend to distribute in higher volumes, but with few exceptions, taprooms featuring local beer haven’t rooted themselves in the cultural fabric. In the West, taprooms often double as community centers, and beer is designed to accommodate the outdoor lives of the people who drink it. As a result, the identities of cities like Portland and Bend, Ore., Missoula and Bozeman, and Fort Collins, Colo., are now almost as closely linked to the beer they produce as to the scenery that surrounds them. Furthermore, the West has always fancied itself exceptional, and producing and consuming beer locally offers a new outlet for celebrating these differences. For starters, seven of the top 10 states ranked by craft breweries per capita are in the West, which means Westerners have access to

a wide variety of craft beers. However, numbers are only a small part of a much larger story. In Montana, which ranks number two on that list, many of the state’s breweries are located in small, isolated towns. They are local businesses that exist to serve their communities. The population of Philipsburg hovers around 800, yet since opening in 2012, the Philipsburg Brewing Company has become a cornerstone of the community. As is true of places like Bend, Missoula and Fort Collins,

“The identities of cities like Missoula and Bozeman are now almost as closely linked to the beer they produce as to the scenery that surrounds them.” the town’s brewery is now an inextricable part of it. Not only does locally produced beer satisfy Westerners’ sense of self-reliance and authenticity, but breweries have also deliberately ensured that their beer is compatible with the outdoor lifestyle New Westerners cherish. With that in mind, Oskar Blues Brewery of Longmont, Colo., became one of the first craft breweries to can its beer when it opened in

1999. Since then, other Western craft breweries such as Missoula’s Kettlehouse have followed suit. The decision to can instead of bottle derives, in part, from Westerners’ iconoclastic nature, but it’s also practical. As every Kettlehouse can explains, cans are both environmentally friendly and easy to tote. Glass is prohibited on some of Montana’s rivers, which means that tubers, kayakers and anglers must imbibe from cans. Additionally, cans are lighter than glass, which make them far more appealing to take hiking, biking or backpacking. In the West, taprooms have become as essential to the craft beer experience as the beer itself. Because sampling craft beer has assumed the same ritual (some would say pretentious) nature of wine tasting, taprooms have earned an identity separate from bars. Parents bring their children, professors meet with students, and community groups host fundraisers. In a perfect distillation of this phenomenon, Tamarack Brewing Company of Lakeside, Mont., crafted a special ale that it named in honor of Democratic Sen. Max Baucus’ Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act. At the ale’s release party, Baucus discussed the importance of protecting the West’s wildlands while he sampled beer made from the clean water that his bill would help protect. The next evening, as I casually sipped a Deschutes Black Butte Porter and watched the sunset illuminate Crater Lake, I thought about the significance of all these breweries, micro and macro, for the region. Craft beer may never be as essential to the landscape of the American West as its epic scenery and intact ecosystems, but its place here is as enjoyable as it is undeniable.

Beer Drinkers’ Profile

THROWBACK TO THE WAYBACK

Michael Dax is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He writes in Fargo, N.D., where he longs for Montana beer.

Outside Chance You know it's coming: T-shirts, sunglasses, shorts, vitamin D, and...beer. We'll be closed on Easter to spend time with family and friends. We're open again on Monday. Have a safe and happy holiday. Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse photo by Skylar Browning

501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [11]


[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – Yafait Tadesse went to prison for stealing names and Social Security numbers of a dozen people and using the stolen identities to claim tax refunds. The bogus returns instructed the IRS to load the refunds onto debit cards and mail them to the same address in Georgia that led authorities to Tadesse. Among his victims was Attorney General Eric Holder. (Fox News) Police named Travis Devonte Rice, 21, as one of their suspects who stole four cars from a car dealership in Plantation, Fla., because he dropped his photo-identification card at the scene. Rice was on probation for armed robbery. Surveillance video confirmed his identity and showed him and another man leaving the scene through a broken window, even though the door right next to it was unlocked, dealership owner Adnan “Eddie” Radoncic said. (South Florida Sun Sentinel)

NOT ALL CROOKS ARE DUMB – Police reported that a man walked into a liquor store in Bradenton, Fla., and told the clerk he and a friend were having a disagreement about the new $50 bills and needed a picture of one. He asked the clerk to hold one up while he took a photo, but when the clerk did, the man snatched it and ran away. (Sarasota’s WWSB-TV)

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E-HAZARDS – Fire officials blamed two fires in Medford, Ore., on the lithium batteries that power vaporizers in electronic cigarettes. In the first incident, an overcharged battery caused a mattress to catch fire, but a resident put it out in time. In the second incident, Fire Marshal Greg Kleinberg said an e-cigarette exploded while being charged, sending bits of burning battery flying into the ceiling and walls of a house. One hot piece of battery landed on a pillow, causing it to smolder and filling the house with smoke. (Associated Press) Poison centers across the country report a surge in calls involving e-cigarettes, from one per month in September 2010 to 215 per month this February, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half the calls involve children younger than 6 who swallow liquid nicotine, which is heated to create vapors. The highly toxic substance is readily available on store shelves in flavors that include bubble gum, chocolate mint and cherry. Urging against “a knee-jerk reaction” to the numbers, Cynthia Cabrera, executive director of the Smoke-Free Alternative Trade Association, said the benefits many consumers claimed to get from using e-cigarettes must be weighed against the relatively small number of accidental incidents linked to them. (The Washington Post)

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SECOND-AMENDMENT RITES – Faced with declining memberships, Baptist churches in Kentucky hired Chuck McAlister, the former host of an outdoor TV show, to recruit new members by raffling off guns. “If simply offering them an opportunity to win a gun allows them to come into the doors of the church and to hear that the church has a message that’s relevant to their lives, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that,” he said. Tom Jackson, one of 1,300 people at a church dinner in Paducah raffling off 25 guns, said he wanted to win a gun because although he believes in turning the other cheek, if “somebody kicks your door down, means to hurt your wife, your kids, you — how do you turn the other cheek to that?” (NPR) As the number of guns sold in America rises, gun safes are enjoying record sales and becoming centerpieces of home decor. “Because they are so pretty, people are putting them in their front rooms,” said Brandon Payne of Liberty Safe, which sells 500 safes a day, most of them big ones costing more than $1,000 and able to withstand hours of exposure to fires and being dropped from 200 feet. Its Fatboy model can hold 64 long guns and several pistols. Competitors such as Fort Knox and Browning offer customized safes with wood-paneled interiors, dehumidifiers and lighting kits on the inside, and biometric locks and artwork on the outside. (The Economist) DRINKING-CLASS HEROES – Four Idaho hockey fans sued Boise’s CenturyLink Arena for $10,000, claiming it defrauded customers by charging $7 for a “large” beer served in a tall, narrow cup and $4 for a “regular,” served in a shorter, wider cup, even though both cups hold 20 ounces. Arena officials blamed a mix-up in cup orders and promised to begin selling large beers in 24-ounce cups. (Associated Press) FIRST-AMENDMENT FOLLIES – Mark Adams was charged with a felony after he spoke too long at a township board meeting in Saginaw County, Mich., and several police officers had to pull him from the podium. Township supervisor Augie Tausend pointed out that Adams has been asked on previous occasions to curtail his remarks after exceeding the posted public comment time limit of three minutes, but Adams declared, “Freedom of speech doesn’t have a time limitation.” (Grand Rapids’s WXMI-TV)

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[12] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

SCAN FOR MORE INFORMAT INFO RMATION ION INFORMATION

WHEN TINFOIL HATS AREN’T ENOUGH – Forty-nine percent of American adults believe the federal government, corporations or both are involved in one or more conspiracies to cover up health information, according to an online survey reported in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Among the findings: • 37 percent believe the Food and Drug Administration is concealing natural cures for cancer because of “pressure from drug companies.” • 20 percent believe health officials are hiding evidence that cellphones cause cancer. • 20 percent believe doctors and health officials push child vaccines, even though they “know these vaccines cause autism and other psychological disorders.” Study co-author Eric Oliver, a political science professor at the University of Chicago, explained that a lot of these beliefs come from friends, family and celebrity TV and online doctors, and reflect a human tendency to explain the unknown as the work of “malevolent forces.” (USA Today) POUTINE FOR POTHOLES – Saskatchewan’s Prairie Energy has discovered that used cooking oil from restaurants is an effective topping for dusty rural roads. “It basically penetrates about an inch and a half,” explained the company’s Mark Hryniuk, who came up with the idea. “As you drive on it, it gets harder and harder. And it looks like poor man’s pavement. We’ve done complete villages already.” (CBC News) WEBSITE JUSTICE – When Christopher Viatafa, 27, searched his name on Google, he found a picture of himself on the “Northern California Most Wanted” website and immediately surrendered to San Leandro police. Viatafa had been unaware he was being sought for allegedly firing a semiautomatic at a private party at the San Leandro Senior Center. (San Francisco Chronicle)


missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [13]


H

adley Ferguson is everywhere. She’s on the center beam that runs through Sean Kelly’s pub. She’s above the cozy nook in Liquid Planet where baristas grind espresso, along the wall of Paul’s Pancake Parlor and next to the bar at the Rhino. She’s in the wine section at Worden’s Market and at the edge of the Clark Fork in Caras Park. Most notably, she’s overlooking the intersection of Broadway and Higgins, Missoula’s busiest downtown streets. You can even find her on the outskirts of town, in a warehouse on Expressway and at historic Fort Missoula. The mural artist has created largescale paintings on walls inside and outside, across the city. She’s depicted images of Celtic folklore, local bar life and Grizzly football, and, in more recent years, Fergu-

son has painted historical scenes of Missoula in what has become her distinctive style of rich colors flooded in warm light. Starting last year, Ferguson began to tackle even larger projects. Each morning she scales a stepladder in the gymnasium at Loyola Sacred Heart and works on four 12by-8 murals illustrating the history of Catholic schools in Montana, a project commissioned by the Loyola Sacred Heart Foundation. In the afternoons, she focuses her paintbrush on a mural for the University of Montana’s College of Forestry and Conservation of people managing the land. She also has to find time in the day for her most highprofile project to date: creating two large murals that will become permanent art pieces at the Capitol building in Helena. In a political space where images of men have

[14] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

long dominated, the murals will finally offer a homage to the contributions from everyday women—like Ferguson—to the state. In the open upstairs studio of her downtown home, part of the forestry mural hangs on one wall while designs for the Capitol spread across a table in the center of the room. Sun beams through the windows and the smell of brewing coffee drifts up from the downstairs kitchen. Ferguson, barefoot, willowy with long auburn hair, possesses an ageless quality as she sketches. She’s 37, but she doesn’t look much different from her years at Hellgate High School when she first started painting. It’s a disarming quality but one that, especially in the early years of her career, forced her to work hard to get would-be clients to take her seriously.

It takes a careful set of eyes to notice other details about Ferguson: The way her slender toes curl slightly upward. The way she climbs the stairs just a little bit stiffly. How her bright smile accompanies a slight tenseness in her jaw. Those are the visible effects of multiple system atrophy, a degenerative condition that damages the nervous system. It’s an atypical form of Parkinson’s with similar symptoms—rigid muscles, tremors, impaired balance—but it’s more aggressive and it affects more of the body. Ferguson first noticed neurological problems in 2009, but she only recently received the MSA diagnosis. The condition has made it harder to take on large-scale murals, and so the Capitol piece will be Ferguson’s last big work. She’s been researching the project for sev-

eral months now, sifting through old photographs, documents and history books to discover the stories of women of all backgrounds who lived on this soil. “What struck me the most in my research was how diverse the Montana landscape was and how amazing it must have been to make a life here,” Ferguson says. “It was not the easiest of conditions for women. I think it must have taken so much determination. This piece I’m working on is a broad look at how women of all cultures in Montana influenced family, economy and politics—how they built community together.” The Capitol commission would be a dream legacy project for anyone, but it’s particularly apt for Ferguson, a willful artist who has built her career on art proj-


Hadley Ferguson’s “The Heart of Missoula” overlooks the intersection of Higgins and Broadway in downtown Missoula. The mural, completed in 2005, depicts some of the area’s cornerstone industries, and helped launch Ferguson’s artistic career.

ects that require collaboration and that speak to community, even while she faces unimaginable challenges.

Anyone who knows Ferguson’s palette of moss greens, rust oranges and brick reds can pick her work out of a lineup. But there was a time when the artist shied away from working with bright colors, when she found painting intimidating. As a young girl and into her college years, she felt content to merely admire artists from afar. Ferguson grew up in Missoula, but her parents often took her on extended trips to far away places. Before kindergarten, the family moved to Bratislava for a year-long adventure (Ferguson’s mother, Jana, is a Czech native), and during her stay in the now-Slovakian capital, Ferguson recalls admiring the tones of a print of “The Mona Lisa” on her bedroom wall. As a preteen, she spent a year in New York City and two years in Japan. (Later, in college, she and her father, Fred, traveled through Russia together.) In between the trips abroad, Ferguson lived in Missoula, but it was always those international adventures that piqued her interested in art. In New York especially, when she was just 9, her mother often took her to museums. “I would sit and stare at paintings and study how the brush strokes were assembled and how color was used to create the beautiful illusions in front of me,” she says. “I remember focusing in on small details like buttons on a shirt or a fold in a cloth. I remember a man interrupting my thoughts once while staring at a painting and saying,

‘I can tell you are going to be an artist someday. You are very young to spend so much time looking at one painting.’” Despite her desire to make paintings like the ones she saw at the big city museums, technique eluded her. During her college years at the University of Montana she studied sculpture and music. She didn’t want to paint. “I did everything to avoid painting because I was really afraid of color,” she says. “I understood the value of black and white but I didn’t know how to transfer that through color. I didn’t know what would make the highlights. It was a whole complex level that I didn’t understand.”

Even working in sculpture, Ferguson sometimes felt out of step with the artist world. While at UM, she did a studyabroad program in Japan where she learned to make sculptures of people—full figures and busts of family and friends— from clay and cast epoxy-plastic. When she returned to Missoula, she recalls someone asking her what the sculptures meant. “I said that wasn’t the point. I didn’t go to Japan to say anything, I went there to learn how to sculpt,” she says. In response to the pressure she felt to create “important” art, she made a self-portrait series showing images of a person—a

model she hired to represent herself—in classic art poses, like Auguste Rodin’s “The Thinker.” Photographs of edgier imagery like graffiti and cars with broken windows were transposed onto the skin. “I was saying, ‘This is how I feel like I have to be—dark and gritty. Don’t make me be that way.’ I just wanted to learn technique so that when I do have the ideas I can express myself well,” she says. The piece, “Self-Portrait,” won a merit award through a juried exhibition at UM. Though Ferguson continued to avoid painting, she experimented with color in a few installations that ended up being

Ferguson studied sculpture and music at the University of Montana, and says she was initially reluctant to paint. Later, she developed a distinct palette that is now well-recognized among fans of her work.

both strong in technique and profound. For The Children’s Peace Crane Project, her senior thesis, Ferguson hung 50,000 folded paper cranes in an array of shades (made by children in Montana, Japan and Europe) on hundreds of strands like a fragile curtain around the room. Inside that curtain, she set up six storyboxes filled with objects—a pair of tiny moccasins, military tags from young soldiers, a box of bone and ash—perched on pedestals, each one accompanied by handwritten quotes and poems by children who had experienced war and violent conflict. After she graduated from UM, she and her future husband, John, moved to Portland, Ore. An advertisement caught John’s eye: McMenamins, the chain company that restores historic buildings into funky bars, breweries, music venues, hotels and theaters, was hiring artists to paint murals. Ferguson decided to face her fear and apply. Myrna Yoder, an artist with McMenamins, recalls meeting Ferguson when she showed up at the Blue Moon Tavern. “She was persistent, but not in an annoying way,” Yoder says. “Even though painting wasn’t her first thing she studied for art—and decorative painting is something you have to learn as you go—she wasn’t afraid to learn. It matters if you keep your word and show up, and she did.” Owner Mike McMenamin hired Ferguson to paint 150 pipes around the building. It was a small job, but it was a start. Ferguson says it was like how you begin dishwashing at a restaurant and work your way up. She learned the tools of the trade and the business of murals. She didn’t stay at McMenamins long—she and John de-

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [15]


cided to move back to Missoula the next year—but she made an impression. “She was young compared to the rest of us, but I think she has an old soul,” Yoder says. “She is a very focused and intense kind of person and if she decides she’s going to do something, she does it—in a good way, with a good energy and a good heart. She has an ability to draw you in and keep you.” Back in Missoula, Ferguson printed business cards and hit the streets, picking up small jobs here and there, paying the bills by working at a furniture restoration shop. In 2005, after several restaurant and office commissions, she received an offer to paint seven murals on the prominent corner of Broadway and Higgins. “The Heart of Missoula” project required her to research images depicting the development of Missoula’s railroad, the establishment of the university and the beginning of cornerstone industries in the early 1900s. “It was so fulfilling getting an opportunity to paint something of such impor-

n’t allow her to do art the way she’d always done it, she’d find another way. In the piece, she and her husband and daughter are walking into a grove of trees that are bursting with radiant fall colors. “It was absolutely incredible,” Dana says. “It was just sheer emotion.”

Even as a small child growing up in Missoula, Ferguson dealt with health issues. She had a heart murmur that required open-heart surgery when she was 4 years old. It was 1980, Mount St. Helens had just blown up and she wore a mask en route to a medical facility in Salt Lake City. She remembers having a dream at the hospital about doctors pulling her organs out one at a time, telling her, “This is your heart. This is your liver.” “I know I remember this dream,” she says. “But I don’t get how I would have known to dream about seeing my organs

After doctors diagnosed Ferguson with a neurological condition that affected the muscle control in her dominant hand, she painted this scene of her family with her off-hand as an experiment.

Ferguson spends her mornings at the gymnasium at Loyola Sacred Heart working on four murals about the history of Catholic schools in Montana. It’s one of three major projects she’s looking to complete this year.

[16] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

tance for the city I grew up in and loved,” she says. “After that project, my commissions increased and I was building a consistent amount of work and income.” Dudley Dana, owner of the Dana Gallery, admired Ferguson’s work. After “The Heart of Missoula” mural went up, he invited her to be a part of his annual Paint Out, a plein air-style event where artists from all over the country come to paint scenes on the streets of Missoula and in the countryside. Over the next few years, Ferguson created pieces for the gallery and Dana watched her technique continue to evolve. One of the turning points, he says, was when she started understanding how light played on water. “Water is extremely hard to do, and that really allowed her skills to come through and to give her paintings more contrast,” Dana says. “What has happened over time is her work got a little more depth to it and became even more alive.” In 2010, when she was diagnosed with Parkinson’s, Ferguson, who is righthanded, made a painting with her left hand as an experiment. The small tremors she’d been experiencing had gotten her thinking about adaptation. If her body did-

at the age of 4. That has never made sense to me.” At 5 she began having fainting spells that have continued for the rest of her life. “I got used to the feeling and actually have had some interesting experiences with it,” she says. “Sometimes I have quick dreams, or I have music run through my mind. A few times I had dreams where my life would pass almost like a quick moving slideshow.” As a young woman in her early 20s, she suffered abdominal pain that turned out to be cysts. Each new health issue made her self-conscious, worried that she looked like a hypochondriac. Ferguson says her general practitioner had always seemed dismissive but one time, when the doctor found Ferguson had a collapsed lung, she told her, “Oh, I guess you really do have something going on.” “At that moment, I realized that my instincts had always been right,” Ferguson says. “I really had felt her put off energy that indicated I was wasting her time. This is probably the foundation that caused me to mistrust myself with whether or not things I thought were health issues were really anything at all.”


Just before she gave birth to her daughter, Sarah, in 2007, Ferguson dealt with a kidney stone and then mild congestive heart failure. The exhaustion she felt after the birth never went away and, in 2009, when she started noticing the numbness in her hands and her fainting spells became more severe, she tried to take it in stride. “I think my skill of adjusting to stressful situations and appearing on the outside that I am doing great is the skill that derailed me from being taken seriously by the medical field at times,” she says. “I am very good at putting up with things and creating a façade that everything is fine.” Ferguson exhibits a soothsayer quality in the way she talks about her health and life, as if she can see the future. But it may simply be that she enjoys a certain knack for self-fulfilling prophecies. She met her husband, John, after seeing him from afar at the Missoula Farmers Market where he sold baked goods, and she decided he was the one.

panels were so big. Ferguson worked on part of it at Western Truck Rebuild and the other at Rick’s Auto Body. Often, she and White arrived at the site at 9 or 10 at night and worked until 3 or 4 in the morning. They snacked on a bucket of candy and pop and took Cosmo magazine quizzes to stay awake. During the day, the trucking owner allowed Ferguson to use a forklift to reach top sections of the canvas. White says the staff was drawn to the artist—and she to them— just like with her clients. “Anyone she works with, she always wins them over,” White says. “They become her friend. They feel comfortable with her and because of that she’s been given all sorts of great opportunities.” Back when Ferguson first noticed her health issues, she continued working. Even after doctors diagnosed her with Parkinson’s, she could take her medication and get back to painting. She cofounded a nonprofit called Summit for

supposed to be, and I think this is the first real curve she’s ever been thrown.” The MSA diagnosis came last summer, from a specialty doctor in Texas. It’s a condition that mostly affects men over 60, one reason that Ferguson had a hard time getting a diagnosis. The Mayo Clinic says people typically live six to 10 years after MSA symptoms first appear, although some have lived longer than 15. Ferguson’s doctors acknowledge that she doesn’t fit the typical profile of someone dealing with MSA. No one knows what causes Parkinson’s or MSA, despite decades of studies. A combination of environmental and genetic factors—and individual reactions to those factors—make it difficult to trace. Some studies point to prolonged exposure to plastic resin—the kind that Ferguson used in her early works. “In Japan, I did cast all those sculptures in plastic resin and never wore a mask,” she says. “I was in this room with all these fumes for an entire year. And

After she completes two murals for the Capitol building in Helena, Ferguson plans to focus on smaller projects and spend more time with her daughter, Sarah.

“I do think she sets things in motion with her thoughts and actions that then do end up with her realizing them,” John says. After she asked John out for coffee, the two of them spent a mere 10 days together before Ferguson left for Japan to do her independent study in sculpture. “One evening we were together and I did something that made him laugh,” she says. “When I heard his laugh I thought to myself, ‘What a wonderful laugh. I get to hear that laugh the rest of my life.’ I was shocked at my own thoughts and realized someplace deep within me I knew we were going to be together for life.” Olivia White, a longtime friend, says Ferguson gets what she wants because she’s oblivious to obstacles. “She has this innocence about what she does, especially when she first started painting murals,” White says. “She didn’t know that she wasn’t supposed to do certain things. She didn’t see any barriers. She just went and did it and she’s always had that—not arrogant, not aggressive in a mean way, but a strong personality.” White frequently keeps Ferguson company during her long hours of painting. “The Heart of Missoula” project required a large work space because the

Parkinson’s to help connect patients to resources, and she traveled to Portland often to work with other organizations to raise awareness through art shows. In 2012, she saw the artist’s call for the Capitol’s “Women of Montana” mural project, but she put her ambitions for it on hold when her Parkinson’s medication stopped working. She flew across the country to different doctors—in California, Oregon and the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota—but received no answers. Some doctors told her it was in her head. Others kept searching. Not knowing what she had—or even if she had something—gnawed at Ferguson. She stopped making art. “She put all of that energy that she would have put toward her work toward her diagnosis,” White says. “It speaks to her character that she was still able to get through that time. But also, because of who she is and how she makes friends, she has this core group of people who wouldn’t let her believe that she was crazy. “She’s always known what she wanted and she always gets it,” White adds. “And that’s good because she deserves it. So, she has a very specific idea of how her life is

then when I was in Portland for a period of time I was really interested in clear resin molds and that stuff is really toxic. I thought that could be a possibility. You’re young and you think, ‘I don’t want to wear a mask, it’s too much bother.’ But I don’t go there. You can’t get upset about things like that that you really don’t know.”

Inside her house, Ferguson is everywhere. A painting of a lighthouse under pink-tinged clouds hangs above the fireplace. One time, she tried to sell it and her daughter got upset. Ferguson returned it to the mantle and keeps it there so Sarah can hang it in her own house one day. In the backyard bar and practice space ( John plays guitar and Ferguson plays drums), John keeps several of her paintings of Prague street scenes on the walls. Another favorite of his is a rare self-portrait—“She doesn’t like it,” he says, laughing—that reminds him of when they first met. Many of Ferguson’s pieces were created specifically for the people who own them. She made a painting of a fictitious

“Ferguson’s Pub” for John’s parents and she’s done dozens of family portraits— scenes of children and parents and grandparents in candid action playing in fields or sitting on a dock by the lake. For her mother, Jana, she painted a young girl, an imagined older version of Sarah walking through farmland. Other pieces she’s done illustrate landscapes and buildings that are so familiar to people, so quintessential to the experience of living in Missoula and in the surrounding valleys, that they feel personal. Missoula residents Mike and Rayna Schaus own nine of Ferguson’s pieces, which they’ve hung in their home in a space they’ve dubbed “The Hadley Wall.” Those paintings include images of a calm lake near Ovando, a hidden trail at the back of Mount Sentinel and a hillside in Arlee just after a rainstorm. “We found her work to be magnetic, the pieces are so iconic in their own way,” Mike says.

and a lot of times it’s not what they expected—but it’s exactly what they wanted.” Lynda Moss, a former majority whip in the Montana Senate, chairs the committee that oversees the Capitol mural project, working with Ferguson as well as historian Mary Murphy. Moss says that mural projects in the building happen rarely. This is a lifetime opportunity that requires historical accuracy, precise technique, a good visual story and collaboration—a culmination of what Ferguson has learned over the years. The process parallels the stories told through the murals. “In some ways this project speaks to the way women have worked together collaboratively,” Moss says. “It’s about being willing to listen and invite information and use a lot of different perspectives to make sure there’s a final image that really is respectful to the communities and the everyday people that make up not only Montana but this country.” After she finishes the Capitol commission, Ferguson plans to work on smaller

Ferguson’s work appears in some of Missoula’s most familiar places, including Worden’s Market, above.

Mike’s favorite might be one of downtown Missoula in the golden gloam of a summer evening. “It’s from probably down across the river looking back towards where the bridge comes across,” he says. “You can see the Wilma right there with Caras Park behind it. She really captures those views we all know. That’s one of her strengths.” In the upstairs of Ferguson’s house, stacks of books and papers line the walls, most of it research for the two Capitol murals. Everything about that project is under wraps until its big reveal in the fall. As with all her murals, she works with various people to get just the right tone and imagery. She has to walk the line between delivering what the client wants and realizing the image she envisions. But she’s not against compromise. “I like the challenge,” she says. “I may not know anything about the subject I’m painting, so I have to learn about it and get to know it and feel connected to it. Often people give me a list of things they need in the mural, but it’s when they start telling stories that what they want really comes out. I listen and I find the core of what it is. And then I’ll show the drawing to them

projects, like an upcoming one with the Hellgate Rollergirls calendar. As much as she loves working with others, she’s excited to paint things for herself now, to experiment with color and design in new ways—something she’s never had much time for—and to spend more hours with her family. It’s been 15 years since she walked into the Blue Moon Tavern and set the wheels in motion to become one of the most recognized and ubiquitous artists in Missoula, with a legacy that extends to Oregon watering holes and, soon, to the People’s House in the state capital. And this new direction—it isn’t an end to her artistic life, it’s the next chapter of a story she’s penned from the beginning. “It’s actually really liberating,” she says. “This can be whatever I want it to be.” With her health, she has bad days and good days, but mostly she doesn’t let it consume her. She’s young and her path has never followed the odds. “I think I’ll do better than average,” she says. “I’ve been atypical all my life, so I might as well continue with that.” efredrickson@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [17]


[arts]

Waiting for Supaman A Crow fancy dancer finds his niche in the world of hip-hop by Jed Nussbaum

I

t’s common practice for rappers to wear a little bling, and Supaman wears it from his head to his toes. Instead of gold and diamonds, however, he’s adorned with beads and feathers. It’s a pretty unconventional style in the world of hip-hop, which isn’t a bad thing—artists are always looking for a way to stand out. Unlike so many mainstream artists on MTV and BET, Supaman’s style is not about status, it’s about roots. For the champion Native American fancy dancer of the Crow Nation, the ensemble is just one of the links between his music and his cultural heritage. “Wearing my outfit definitely makes me feel proud,” Supaman says. “I’ve always kept the hip-hop and culture life separate, but to bring them together now feels good to me at this time. It is in no way a gimmick but an opportunity of expression in a positive way.” The fancy dance regalia is the first image that greets viewers of his hit YouTube video, “Prayer Loop Song,” but it’s hardly an indicator of what’s to come. In the video, produced by the Billings Gazette, Supaman uses a loop pedal and a microphone and builds a beat with a traditional Native American drum and flute. A beatbox rhythm adds a hip-hop backbone, followed by layers of traditional chanting, after which he walks over to a turntable and expertly executes DJ scratches. Finally, Supaman returns to the mic and delivers a meticulous verse before showing off the fancy footwork that won him countless competitions on the powwow circuit, lit-

erally dancing to the beat of his own drum. It’s an audiovisual experience that connects technology to tradition, age-old culture with contemporary expression. Supaman, born Christian Takes Gun Parrish, was exposed to hip-hop as a kid by his parents, young party-goers who had an affinity for the Sugarhill Gang’s early rap anthem “Rapper’s Delight.” He began breakdancing in the sixth grade, and from there he forayed into DJ-ing, adopting the Supaman moniker as he competed in DJ battles. He began rapping about a decade ago, releasing the album Crow Hop in 2008, followed by Deadly Penz the next year. His delivery is rugged, intelligent and to the point, matched by beats that evoke ’90s East Coast hiphop influences peppered with samples relating to his Supaman’s Native American roots. Much of his lyrical content deals with the trials and tribulations of reservation life, stories of poverty, alcohol and crime similar to the inner city struggles touted by most rappers. Underneath the roughneck flow and gritty subject matter, however, is another message. Raised in the church by his

mother, Supaman reconnected with his Christian faith as an adult and began using his music to spread the gospel. “That’s where I get my strength from when things are down and out,” he says. “In my mind and my heart, that’s what really matters. The overall purpose [with my music] is to point people in that direction.” Faith-based hope is a constant throughout his songs. Still, he’s uncomfortable with the “Christian rapper” title and refrains from calling what he does a ministry. “I try to stay away from church terminology and just focus on love,” he says. “The most important thing is just being kind.” It’s a belief system that’s not always embraced by either the Native American or hip-hop cultures that surround him. On the hip-hop front, Supaman overcomes that adversity with sheer talent, silencing naysayers with humorous, syllable-flipping lines like in “Enuff ” where he says, “Start mobbin’ for God with cold flows ridiculous/ have you bobbin’ your head so hard you’ll get motion sickness/ indigenous with miraculous tactics/ bold enough to get naked and tackle a cactus.”

“If you bring enough skill and you’re good with the craft of hip-hop, of lyricism, they’re more open to what you’ve got to say,” Supaman says. “People say, ‘Oh, I’m not really down with your message of Jesus and all that, but you can flow man, you’re a dope emcee.’” As evidenced in the “Prayer Loop Song” video, he’s not just adept at rhyming. Along with his beat making, DJ-ing and dancing, he is a singularly talented package deal. In just two months the video has garnered more than 200,000 views. That exposure, combined with being voted “artist of the week” recently on an MTV blog, has turned an independent artist from the Crow Nation into a worldwide phenomenon. Supaman says his bookings have quadrupled as a result. Before the success of the “Prayer Loop Song” video, Supaman usually performed more orthodox hip-hop sets in street clothes, but now he says more and more venues are booking him hoping to get the full experience displayed in the video. It’s a challenge he sees as an opportunity. “All that powwow stuff, that’s just normal to me, you know?” he says. “But then to see how much the world embraces it and respects it, it makes me see that I need to be doing this. I need to be showing the beauty of our culture to the world and using the talents I have in that manner.” arts@missoulanews.com

photo courtesy of Christian Takes Gun Parrish

[18] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014


[music]

Blues party Three-Eared Dog’s Whiskey never loses its kick

Three-Eared Dog

On its new album When the Whiskey Kicks In, Missoula’s Three-Eared Dog doesn’t get too mired in the traditional 12-bar blues structure that sometimes makes blues rock such a bore in lesser hands. All the songs on here are originals, balancing between themes and sounds that pay tribute to jazz, rockabilly, country and blues, but without feeling anything like copycat rehashes. Bassist and singer Jordan “J.R.” Smith has a divine voice that’s smooth and honeyed when it needs to be, agitated and suggestive when he’s going for a little more careless passion. He’s written about a third of the songs, including one of the best, “Sweet Stuff,” which has a fantastic alt-country flair, but with horns.

photo courtesy of Patrick Kirkley

He and guitarist Sam Ore and drummer Aaron Johnson split songwriting duties, and it’s delightful to find that they’re all equally capable. Ore’s “Drinking About You” is as close as you can get to the blues progression songs you’ve heard a million times, but it’s still crafted well and that makes the difference. There’s a warmth and liveliness to this record that makes even the most tragic lines—“strangle me slow, if I can’t have you I’d rather be dead”—feel upbeat. Listening, you feel like you’re at the best party in town with a whole night ahead of you. (Erika Fredrickson) Three-Eared Dog plays an album release show at the Top Hat Sat., April 19, at 10 PM. $3.

Stab Me Kill Me, No Ledge I’m at a loss to explain what exactly it is that sets apart the engaging garage-y punk bands from the mediocre ones in my brain, but I know it helps if you play real fast. And if you have a poppy but rougharound-the-edges vibe like The Spits. And if you have growly bass ripping along underneath the whole deal. It also really helps if you sing about six packs, wanting to fight and not wanting to talk to people. Seattle threepiece Stab Me Kill Me totally fits this criteria, wrapping up familiar ingredients into a satisfying package. Stab Me Kill Me’s been around since spring 2012, releasing just a tantalizing handful of songs, first on

a near-perfect, gritty four-song demo—free for download on Bandcamp—and the only slightly more polished EP No Ledge, recorded and mixed by members of the band. (Astute readers of album credits will note that Stab Me’s drummer, who goes by K2, has also recorded Missoula’s own Buddy Jackson.) I must admit the only thing I don’t really dig about this band is its name; but I still kind of want the T-shirt anyway. (Kate Whittle) Stab Me Kill Me plays the Palace Sat., April 19, along with Ol’ Doris and Buddy Jackson. 9 PM. Free.

The Whizpops!, Sea Blue Sea A parent’s strategy for listening to music with their children usually falls into two categories: finding the right time to introduce them to stuff you like (Is it too early for Beggars Banquet?) and finding any way to avoid the gratingly repetitive crap they tend to pick up from pop culture (Exhibit A: the Frozen soundtrack). Very rarely do parent and child fall into favor with an artist that naturally caters to both of their tastes. The Whizpops, however, have nestled their way into that sweet spot, helping to make the ambitious Missoula band one of the most popular draws in the local music scene. (Well, at least before 8 p.m.) The Whizpops’ third and most polished effort yet, Sea Blue Sea, will be a welcome addition to minivans across the valley. Like their first two albums, this one showcases whip-smart educational lyrics and adroit musicianship. The underwater theme offers plenty of descriptive opportunity, like when a manatee is said to look “like a cow with

no legs.” And the song styles veer from full-on disco to lilting ukulele ballad to indie rock. It’s a credit to Keaton Wilson (keys), Casey Schaefer (guitar), Steve Kalling (upright bass), Daniel Kiely (drums) and Kevin Cashman (guitar), as well as special guests like Grace Decker (fiddle) and Matt Cornette (banjo), that each track fits seamlessly despite crisscrossing so many different genres. But if there’s a breakout star on Sea Blue Sea, it’s Margi Cates. The sextet’s lone woman demonstrates some serious pipes whether she’s lead vocals or providing backup, and delivers some of the album’s best moments. There’s no other way to say it: Anyone who makes zooplankton sound sultry deserves major props. (Skylar Browning) The Whizpops plays a CD release show at the Wilma Fri., April 18, at 6 PM as part of the International Wildlife Film Festival. $5 adults. Kids free.

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [19]


[books]

Steers like gurus Poet Brian Blanchfield multiplies his world by Jacob Kahn

It’s been a decade since Brian Blanchfield’s last book, Not Even Then, but his newest collection, A Several World, feels like a longawaited poetic grail. The poet, essayist and former University of Montana poetry professor has a remarkable talent for connecting language and ideas in mercurial ways. With signature verve and an impeccable ear, Blanchfield’s newest lyrics are just as daring and robust as before, but with greater sensitivity and reach. One other big difference: Not Even Then was a city poet’s book, while A Several World is a book of playfully sculpted eclogues and town-and-country ruminations tethered to a more tactile world. It’s a book of pastoral poems. We can start there. An eclogue is, traditionally, a poem in which two shepherds converse. Although only two poems in A Several World are eclogues by name, all of the poems in the book seem to encounter or reveal a shepherd of some kind (or several): each idea, A Several World figure or allegory is shepherded by Brian Blanchfield something else. Blanchfield’s popaperback, Nightboat Books etry plays with a flirtatious call111 pages, $15.95 and-response between subject and object, an erotic come again between lover and beloved, and a constant, elaborate place is dangerous” as Blanchfield notes in “Edge of sensing between landscape and inhabitant. These Water, Nimrod Falls, Montana,” because, “The situation poems bob, dart and skid on the surface of this provi- arrives/ as we do.” They are poems that dip into the sional tension between whatever’s underway and pastoral’s long history of eroticism (particularly homowhoever’s expressing it. The relationship between the sexual eroticism) with theatrical invention and an atpair is propositional, and proposition is playful. In the tentiveness to the natural world. In “The Inversion,” a beginning of “Pterytium,” for example, he proposes a poem reeking of Missoula, Blanchfield invents a suscheeky postcard view of rural conditions and outlook: penseful situation in a familiar natural landscape: “Hallmark meteorology: a little what-if weather/ sworn Through the truckstop fudge of mascara, over time to the ridgeline conditions/ the basiners threat or ecstasy having subsided, through downvalley to the lucky look/ of trouble. In an updraft either diner window, time apprehension/ replenishes the cloud, a steady sort of to decide, while he’s in the men’s, borrowing/ against promise. Welling at bottom, a slow the dead, tall tangle of mallow in cheat grass spring fills/ centrally where it plummets, a sump and and common tansy font that fills/ convexity out to its inky meniscus...” barely stirs in the opposite lot, Whichever subject each poem takes on—ducks and beyond, farther still from the overpass enraptured by a goose, modernist Italian art in downthe steers like gurus home Charlotte, dating websites, Reformation-themove despair around. ologians Calvin and Luther as lovers, teenagers getting stoned in Missoula—they offer lavish studies This enchanting mix of naturalism and muscular of language overheard in everyday life. The third section of A Several World, “The History musicality—his alliteration and well-crafted asides— of Ideas,” departs from the rest of the book, like a sort brings to life a landscape in which several realities coof outpost or mini-collection within the larger frame- exist. In the last poem of the book, “Edge of Water, work. This section contains some of the most acrobatic Moiese, Montana,” the lived and the created not only poems, and is Blanchfield at his most versed and vir- overlap but multiply: “…Rake your face cheek to jaw/ tuosic, ironic and bedeviling. The other three sections with broken mica, and the moth traffic/ triples at your are composed mostly of the sorts of pastoral eclogues back. Is that a fact?” In Brian Blanchfield’s world it is. that make the collection the ambulatory and conversational book it is. These are poems chiefly about place arts@missoulanews.com and situation, excited by encounter and incident. “No

[20] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014


[books]

Common treat Kate Lebo’s delicious language of pie by Kate Whittle

In the great debate of cake vs. pie, I am on team gers, letting it fall back into the bowl after rubbing cake. This is partly because making pie has always it.” I’d like to see Cook’s Illustrated try such poetry. I sweated over my apple pie for the better part been a confusing bother to me. My mom taught me basic from-scratch baking, like cookies and cakes, and of a Sunday, grumbling about the decidedly not raised me to believe that box mixes are inferior, never lovely amount of dirty dishes generated and the tools to be relied on. But she has no such problem with I don’t have, like a pie server and pastry brush. (Finstore-bought frozen pie crust, and really, pumpkin gers are not a good substitute for a pastry brush, it pie at Thanksgiving is my only childhood experience turns out.) In the end, I was pretty happy with the with the stuff. I’ve tried a couple times to make my hot, cinnamon-and-nutmeg-scented result that own pie crust, and turned out lumpy, tough disasters. emerged from my oven, even though the warped top So I have a ton of respect for dedicated pie bakers crust came out looking like the Monster from Apple and those who are unafraid of pastry. Few bakers are as thoughtful and dedicated to the pie—as an artistic medium and a subject of contemplation—as Seattle author Kate Lebo. Lebo is author of A Pie Lady’s Manifesto zine and hosts piemaking classes, plus she teaches creative writing at the University of Washington and writes for publications like Poetry Northwest and Gastronomica. Lebo’s new work, A Commonplace Book of Pie, is a small collection of short stories, musings and recipes. It’s charming and sweet, with a light-hearted spirit that reminds me of the 2007 Keri Russell movie Waitress, which also A Commonplace Book of Pie centers its plot on pies. I Kate Lebo managed to read about hardcover, Chin Music Press three pages of Lebo’s book 120 pages, $17.95 before I decided I’d better run to the store for apples to make my own pie—with somewhat mixed results. Pie Lagoon. It still tasted more real and buttery than any frozen pre-made crust could ever be, and made (But more about that later.) Commonplace Book’s illustrations, by Washing- the perfect platform for the tangy, lemony Granny ton-based artist Jessica Bonin, are some of my favorite Smith apple filling. I left a big slice in my best friend’s watercolor paintings of all time. I’ve never seen some- fridge as a surprise, because Lebo’s first rule of pie is thing like a measuring cup or bag of flour depicted “share your pie.” Pie is still a pain in the ass, and I don’t think I’ll with such grace and fluidity. The illustrations accompany equally graceful, brief tales that are well suited ever bring one to a birthday party over a cake. But for reading before bedtime. Lebo tells “Facts about the meaning behind Lebo’s work—that perfecting a Pie,” sorted according to type of pie. The pumpkin craft, in defiance of rapid consumer culture, has impie lover, for instance, is “adventurous, good in bed measurable worth—is something I can get behind. We and voluminously communicative.” Strawberry- should all be so lucky as to find something to dedirhubarb is a “marriage of convenience that lucked cate ourselves to being good at, the way Lebo is good into love.” And coconut cream pie, she writes, is what with words and baking. My only complaint with A they serve in heaven. Heaven being an “all-night diner Commonplace Book of Pie is that it’s over all too next door to the realm’s best booze hall and pulltab soon, and like a piece of pie, I wish there were more of it. lounge.” Kate Lebo teaches a Cookbook Club pie-makIt’s easy to pick up Lebo’s love of pie baking while reading this book, but not so much her skills. ing class at Good Food Store on Thu., April 17, at I did love her recipe directions. When cutting butter 6:30 PM. $40, includes copy of book. She also into flour, she says, “position your hands palms up, reads at Shakespeare & Co. Fri., April 18, at 7 PM. fingers loosely curled, the same way you relax your Free. hand above your head while falling asleep. Scoop up flour and fat and rub it between your thumb and finkwhittle@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [21]


[film]

Evil bong hits Gingerdead Man ushers in 4/20 B-movie style by Molly Laich

Floss much?

In Gingerdead Man Versus Evil Bong, right out of the gates we’re met with three sets of titties swarming around the Gingerdead Man in an erotic frenzy. Gingerdead Man is a serial killer doomed to inhabit the cookie body through a bit of magic. If you’ve seen Chucky from the Child’s Play movies, you’ll understand; it’s just like that. This first scene frightened and upset me. I hated G-dead and fretted over the fate of a soul so cruelly wedged in a godless space. I worried I’d made a terrible mistake by agreeing to review this movie, that this was more than a film but a mirror reflecting how the world really is as crude and ugly as G-dead’s face. But, from there, the film gets better. Either that, or I smoked just the right amount to tip me over the tooheady ledge, which it turns out was as much weed as I could possibly smoke in a 70-minute period. Indulge me in a little film history, for these characters didn’t just come out of thin air. Gingerdead Man Versus Evil Bong, which was released last year, represents the culmination of intersecting film franchises from Full Moon Features, a B-movie production company in Hollywood. There are three earlier films starring G-dead and Evil Bong, but this is the characters’ first fight. Charles Band made a name for himself in the late ’80s with his movie Puppet Master and he directs this and all the other films in the series. This is what happens when digital technology meets with old school props and makeup, when a stoner’s laid-back approach mixes with just enough ambition and financing to get the film printed and distributed. In the marketing material we’re told that Gary Busey and Tommy Chung star in the movie, but that’s basically a lie. They appear for brief moments in archival footage from the earlier films, the plots of which have been helpfully summarized. After the erotic frenzy, the film cuts to “Dick’s Head Shop” where our hero Larnell ( John Patrick Jordan) runs the worst head shop I’ve ever seen. The counter’s red and green lights cast a sickly Christmas glow on all the pieces, which are mostly cheap, plastic

[22] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

and sparsely arranged. (Later on, a man with a pig face show up, adding to the hopeless and trapped atmosphere.) The head shop looks like a dusty room in the basement of someone else’s dream, which is also where 70 percent of the film feels like it takes place. There’s a suspiciously short man in a tie-dyed Tshirt working in the shop called String. His voice sounds both raspy and high-pitched, like it’s not really coming out of his body, but it is. And why this man is so short? The camera goes out of its way to keep him in close-up or medium frame. We never see his knees. IMDB says this actor’s real name is “The Don” and he’s 4-feet-5-inches, but I have lingering doubts over both facts. He spends the whole movie dreaming of pot and murder until he eventually meets with bad luck. Evil Bong, voiced by a sassy actress named Michelle Mais, lives bound and gagged in a locked safe in the back of the head shop and for good reason: People seem to go crazy in her presence. They kill people or get killed, or if not that, they enter a weed dimension in a fantasy forest. Evil Bong thrives on weed, and is summoned just like the character in Beetlejuice, except instead of saying her name three times, you take a huge bong hit in order to enter the marijuana underworld. Larnell joins forces with Sarah Leigh (Robin Sydney), the heroine of the Gingerdead series, and together they defeat the monsters. Or the monsters defeat each other? It’s pretty open to interpretation and possible sequels. If anything, I hope kids seeing this movie on 4/20 (or Sunday, as many of us call it) will be inspired by the fact that making terribly written and poorly conceived films is a fun and worthwhile thing that anyone can do. Gingerdead Man Versus Evil Bong screens at the Wilma Theatre Sun., April 20. Doors at 7 PM, raffle, giveaway and film at 8 PM. $8. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK 13 SINS A broke dude gets a mysterious phone call offering millions of dollars if he completes increasingly gross and sinister tasks. Starring Mark Webber, Devon Graye and Tom Bower. Rated R. Wilma. BEARS Alaskan bear cubs run, play and grow up in the backdrop of majestic and dangerous wilderness. Narrated by John C. Reilly. Rated G. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. GINGERDEAD MAN VS. EVIL BONG A dude named Larnell teams up with Sarah Leigh to combat The Gingerdead Man and an evil bong. Happy 4/20! “Starring” Gary Busey, Tommy Chong and Ryan Curry. Screening at the Wilma Sun., April 20. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. (See Film.) GREENING OF SOUTHIE Skeptical construction workers must band together to work on Boston’s first eco-friendly residential building. Screening at the Roxy Theater Wed., April 23 at 7 PM. A HAUNTED HOUSE 2 Malcolm thinks he’s exorcised his demonic ex, but he and his new ladyfriend are in for more trouble. Starring Marlon Wayans, Jaime Pressly and Cedric the Entertainer. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. TRANSCENDENCE A terminally ill scientist gets his mind uploaded into a giant computer, promptly becomes all-powerful and potentially evil. Starring Johnny Depp, Rebecca Hall and Morgan Freeman. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Showboat, Pharaoplex.

NOW PLAYING CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER Steve Rogers and his jawline are just trying to keep on the down-low in modern-day Washington, D.C., but must team up with the Black Widow to fight off assorted villainous mischief. Starring Chris Evans, Frank Grillo and Sebastian Stan. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

Ever feel like you’re being watched? Transcendence opens Friday at Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex.

DIVERGENT A teen living in a weirdo dystopia discovers she’s “divergent” and must save her own kind. Starring Shailene Woodley, Theo James and Kate Winslet. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. DRAFT DAY Kevin Costner is an NFL team executive trying to decide which talented young men to select for a career that inflicts irreversible head injuries. (Maybe they’ll save that part for the sequel.) Also starring Chadwick Boseman and Jennifer Garner. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Quirk-lovers rejoice, Wes Anderson brings us the lighthearted adventures of a mid-1930s concierge and a lobby boy. Starring Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham and Mathieu Amalric. Rated R. Wilma. HEAVEN IS FOR REAL A family is astonished to hear that their son believes he visited heaven after a near-death

experience. Based on the 2010 best-selling book. Starring Greg Kinnear, Kelly Reilly and Connor Corum. Rated PG. Carmike 12. NOAH “NOAH...um, a huge ah NO. Probably one of the worst movies I’ve ever seen. Huge rock monsters called Watchers build the Ark. Reediculous.” (This review brought to you by Kate’s mom.) Starring Russell Crowe, Jennifer Connelly and Anthony Hopkins. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. OCULUS A convicted murderer’s sister tries to prove that his crime was really committed by an evil supernatural force in an antique mirror. Can you put ghosts in an evidence locker? Starring Karen Gillan, Brenton Thwaites and Katee Sackhoff. Rated R. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex.

Anne Hathaway and Jemaine Clement. Rated G. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex. Capsule reviews by Kate Whittle. Planning your outing to the cinema? Visit the arts section of missoulanews.com to find up-to-date movie times for theaters in the area. You can also contact theaters to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 541-7469; Wilma at 7282521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

RIO 2 The goofy family of macaws returns for an Amazon adventure and more bird-brained antics. Starring the voices of Jesse Eisenberg,

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [23]


[dish]

photo courtesy of Kelly Sue DeConnick

The true San Francisco treat by Ari LeVaux Cioppino is a seafood stew that originated in San Francisco, supposedly a creation of the Italian-born fishmonger Achille Paladini. It was originally a stew made with whatever fish was available when the boats came back, aka catch of the day, with some Dungeness crab thrown in the tomato- and wine-based broth. Cioppino is thought to have evolved from ciuppin, a dish from Genoa, Italy, that also evolved as a way to use whatever the fishermen brought home. Fishing villages and port towns around the Mediterranean, and much of the world, have their local chowders that make the most of whatever bones, bits and pieces, not to mention chunks of flesh, are available. Another such dish is the French bouillabaisse, which is typically made in large batches with saffron and a diverse assortment of fish and shellfish, including the boney rascasse, or scorpionfish. Bouillabaisse also has potatoes, and, sensibly, is often served with rouille, a mayo-like emulsion of egg, olive oil, garlic, saffron and cayenne pepper, which is rubbed on grilled slices of bread. There are many other Italian, Spanish and French versions as well, such as cacciucco, brodetto, buridda and bourride. While each of these recipes has its own distinguishing characteristics, they’re also all flexible, by design, thanks to the catch-of-the-day mentalities that shaped them. If you put fresh fish, olive oil, tomato, parsley, lemon, onion, garlic and butter in a pot, the result will generally taste good. Catch-of-the-day flexibility can be applied at the fish counter as well as the dock. When shopping for my fish soup, I assess what’s available, cheap, fresh and in line with my sustainability principles (for which I use Seafood Watch as a reference). Cod (Pacific or North Atlantic) and mussels are the backbone of my soup. Cod because it’s flaky and delicate, and the disintegrating chunks of flesh find their way into the mussel shells. When you open the mussel shells you find not only a tiny mollusk but pieces of fish, plus maybe a garlic chunk, carrot fragment or a shred of tomato skin. Other similarly textured fish, like salmon or sole, and other bivalves, like clams or even oysters, can produce a similar result. I’m open to crab, scallops, sardines, octopus, snails, sea urchins and whatever else meet my criteria with respect to price, ethics and quality. Shellfish contribute more than just their flesh; the shells add flavor to the broth. This is a key distinction between cioppino and its mother soup, ciuppin,

[24] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

FLASH IN THE PAN

which contains only fish. I will sometimes buy a token section of crab leg, but mussels are a much cheaper way to get both shell in your soup and protein in your belly. And mussels are some of the most plentiful and sustainable goodies in the sea. Another difference between cioppino and ciuppin is that ciuppin, which translates to “chopped,” is a pureed soup. I’m firmly in the chunky, San Francisco-style camp. While some disintegrated fish is crucial, I want large chunks as well, like whole shrimp, and maybe some scallops, as well as my shells and their innards. Cod is so fragile that careful effort is required to ensure the filets don’t completely atomize in the soup. My recipe begins with adding 1 pound cod piece to a mix of 2 tablespoons each olive oil and butter in a heavy bottom pan on low/medium heat. As it slowly browns to the bottom, I add to the pan 2 cups of a mix of equal parts onion, carrot and celery, all coarsely grated. Add 2 or more cloves worth of minced garlic. Mix and sauté these veggies without disturbing the fish. Then add a 14-ounce can of chopped tomatoes, or the rough equivalent in fresh tomatoes, 2 teaspoons sea salt, a teaspoon of thyme, 2 tablespoons of capers, the juice of two lemons, a tablespoon of paprika to brighten the already bright soup, a cup each of red and white wine, and enough water that everything is swimming, except the fish that stuck to the bottom of the pan. Raise the heat to medium and simmer. As it cooks, just to make sure I get my point across, I also like to add a little Thai-style fish sauce. Anchovies or anchovy paste would do the trick—in fact, those would be more authentic—but that bottle of fish juice is so convenient. As it simmers, wash one bunch of parsley and chop off the bottom inch of the stems. Then, holding the leaf-end of the bunch, begin mincing the stems, working your way towards the leaves. Add the chopped stem and leaf to the soup. Chop the leaves for later use as a garnish. Traditional versions of this soup are served with grilled bread, for dipping into and mopping up broth. Put a bowl for empty shells in the center of the table, make sure everyone has plenty of napkins, and serve the soup garnished with bright green parsley leaves. Imagine yourself in some weathered seafood stall near a salty waterfront, watching the sailors, whores, poets, cargo and seagulls go by.


[dish] Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway 728-8900 (across from courthouse) Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Easter brings bright colors to Bernice's palate. Fill your loved one's Easter basket with hand-made coconut eggs, macaroons, frosted eggs & bunnies, baby chick cupcakes, or full size for the bigger kid in all of us. Mom likes Easter gifts too. Try showing up with a chocolate cream pie, box of breakfast goodies, a cup of freshly brewed Bernice's coffee or a few 6 packs of dinner rolls for afterbrunch ham sandwiches. YUM! She'll be telling you how much she loves you all day long. Happy Easter. xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Mon.–Fri., 7:30–4, Sat. 8-4. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Brooks & Browns Inside Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. 532-2056 Friday 4/18 Blue Moon 6-9pm. Sunday 4/20 Easter Brunch 11am-2pm. Sunday Funday (Happy Hour all day). Martini MONDAY ($4 select martinis). Tuesday 4/22 Burger & Beer $8. Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 41 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

$…Under $5

El Cazador 101 S. Higgins Ave. 728-3657 Missoula Independent readers’ choice for Best Mexican Restaurant. Come taste Alfredo's original recipes for authentic Mexican food where we cook with love. From seafood to carne asada, enjoy dinner or stop by for our daily lunch specials. We are a locally owned Mexican family restaurant, and we want to make your visit with us one to remember. Open daily for lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. Mon-Sat 11am5pm. Downtown Missoula. $ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD The GFS Deli features made-to-order sandwiches, a rotating selection of six soups, an award-winning salad bar, an olive & antipasto bar and a self-serve hot bar offering a variety of housemade breakfast, lunch and dinner entrées. A seasonally changing selection of deli salads and rotisserie-roasted chickens are also available. Locally-roasted coffee/espresso drinks and an extensive smoothie menu complement bakery goodies from the GFS ovens and from Missoula’s favorite bakeries. Indoor and patio seating. Open every day, 7am – 10pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St. 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Voted Missoula's Best Liquor Store! Largest selection of spirits in the Northwest, including all Montana micro-distilleries. Your headquarters for unique spirits and wines! Free customer parking. Open Monday-Saturday 9-7:30 www.grizzlyliquor.com. $-$$$ Heraldo's Mexican Food 116 Glacier Dr. Lolo, MT 59847 406-203-4060 HeraldosMexicanRestaurant.com Lunch and Dinner. Open 7 Days • Eat-in or Carry-out • Handmade Tamales • Burritos • Chimichangas • Flautas • Fajitas • Combo plates and MORE. See our menu at www.heraldosmexicanrestaurant.com. Order Your Holiday Tamales Now! Also sold year-round. Call for details. $-$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$

SATURDAYS 4PM-9PM

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS ALL DAY

$1

SUSHI Not available for To-Go orders

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We’re the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we’ll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$ Iza 529 S. Higgins • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [25]


[dish]

The Lochsa Lodge HAPPIEST HOUR chicken, chorizo or steak Who you’re hangsell briskly, too. Haley calls ing out with: On a rethem a good deal at cent afternoon, a family $10.99. “It’s a heaping wearing pointy “Happy mound,” she says. Birthday” hats and whitehaired tourists who What you’re drinkmunch on hamburgers. ing: Among the Lodge’s As the summer sets in, most popular drinks is the an increasing number of dark and smooth Irish rafters, hikers and bikers photo courtesy of Alan Davey Death, an ale from the keen to experience the Clearwater-Lochsa Wild and Scenic River Cor- Iron Horse Brewery in Ellensburg, Wash. A pint runs $4. Haley speaks admiringly, however, of the ridor will flock to the Lodge. Lodge’s wine sangria served with seasonal fruit. Ambiance: Inside the dining room, a locally A colorful 23-ounce glass costs $7.99. “They’re harvested black wolf lies stuffed and prone not really pretty,” Haley says. far from the wolverine pelt hanging on the wall. Happy Hour specials: The Lodge is sellThe taxidermy, coupled with the restaurant’s wooden décor, creates a rustic feel. There’s also ing Pabst Blue Ribbon through the end of an outdoor deck nestled among the towering April for $1.50. Ask about rotating Thursday night drink deals. grand fir, larch and cedar trees. What you’re eating: During the summer, the Lodge sells a lot of “Breakfast Rafter” sandwiches, says resort manager Kelly Haley. For $5.99, you get eggs, cheese and your choice of sausage, bacon or ham on Texas toast. The Lochsa burger, topped with ham, Swiss and American cheese is a favorite for lunch at $9.99. And at night, nachos topped with your choice of

How to find it: Lochsa Lodge is 57 miles from Missoula, just off Highway 12. —Jessica Mayrer Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

EASTER BRUNCH Sunday April 20th 10am- 2pm

Best Patio in Town NOW OPEN! Antipasti Station, Omelette Station, Eggs Benedict, Roasted Potatoes, Sausage, Bacon, Fresh Fruit, Pastries, Cold-Smoked Salmon, Salad Station, Ham-Carving Station, Garlic Mashed Potatoes with Mascarpone Cheese, Chef’s Harvest Vegetable, Sliced Turkey with Rhubarb Compote, Penne Pasta with Red Sauce, Cocktail Shrimp, Dessert Station. + Kids’ Station: Chicken Fingers, Green Beans, Mac-n-Cheese.

LIVE HARPIST

200 South Pattee, Missoula

from 11am-2pm $29.99 per person $13.99 per child 12 & under • Children 4 and under eat free • Limit 4 children per 1 adult

Make Reservations Today

532-2040

Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $ Lucky Strike Sports Bar. Casino. Restaurant 1515 Dearborn Ave. 406-549-4152 Our restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Are you looking for Delivery without all the extra charges? Call 549-4152 and talk to Jacquie or Judy for more details. You can also get lunch and Coffee from Bold Coffee in the parking lot. Come into the casino for your chance to play Plinko, Spin the Wheel, or Roll the Dice for machine play. Open Mon-Sun 7am-2am. $-$$ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. 543-7154 (on the hip strip) Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:30-12:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. The Mustard Seed Asian Cafe Southgate Mall 542-7333 Contemporary Asian fusion cuisine. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combine the best of Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences. Full menu available at the bar. Award winning desserts made fresh daily , local and regional micro brews, fine wines & signature cocktails. Vegetarian and Gluten free menu available. Takeout & delivery. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Parkers’ Restaurant 32 East Front Street Exit 153, Drummond 406-288-2333 Find us on Facebook, Yelp or Foursquare. Offering over 125 different Burgers. Parker’s burgers are ground fresh daily. We patty them 1/4 pound at a time. We also have 1/2 pound and pound burgers! Most burgers are available all the time too, except for seasonal items. We’re open Tuesday thru Saturday 11am to 8 pm. We’ve also got Steaks, Pastas, Salads, Daily Specials and NOT the usual variety of home made desserts. Private parties and catering available. $-$$ Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Country French meets the Northwest. Idaho Trout with Dungeness Crab, Rabbit with Wild Mushroom Ragout, Snake River Farms Beef, Fresh Seafood Specials Daily. House Made Charcuterie, Sourdough Bread & Delectable Desserts. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadwa • 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$ Plonk 322 N Higgins • 926-1791 www.plonkwine.com Plonk is an excursion into the world of fine wine, food, cocktails, service and atmosphere. With an environment designed to engage the senses, the downtown establishment blends quality and creativity in an allencompassing dining experience. Described as an urban hot spot dropped into the heart of the Missoula Valley and lifestyle, Plonk embodies metropolitan personalities driven by Montana passions. Romaines 3075 N. Reserve Suite N 406-317-1829 www.romainessalads.com We provide you with the convenience of delicious salads, sandwiches and soups. Our salads include over 30 wholesome ingredients. Our homemade soups change with the season as different ingredients become available. If hearty sandwiches are your favorite, then visit Romaines for one of our braised meat sandwiches. We also have a Montana Hummus sandwich made from Montana grown garbanzo beans. Now serving omelettes and mimosas on Sunday, 11-4. At last, local, fresh, and healthy! $-$$ Roxiberry Gourmet Frozen Yogurt Southgate Mall Across from Noodle Express 317.1814 • roxiberry.com Bringing Missoula gourmet, frozen yogurt, using the finest ingredients (no frozen mixes), to satisfy your intense cravings with our intense flavors. Our home-made blends offer healthy, nutritional profiles. We also offer smoothies, fresh-made waffle cones, and select baked goods (gluten-free choices available). Join Club Roxi for special offers. See us in-store or visit our website for information. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you’re in the neighborhood. We’ll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula’s best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 11-10 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 • tacosano.net Once you find us you’ll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


April 17–April 24, 2014

Traveling in style. Shovels and Rope plays the Top Hat, Fri., April 18, along with Parker Millsap. 10 PM. $16/$13 in advance at the Top Hat and Rockin Rudy’s.

THURSDAYAPRIL17 Migizi Pensoneau, member of the 1491s Native American comedy collective (and occasional Indy contributor), presents “Intent, Reception and the Reclamation of Native Imagery” at the University Center Theater. 4-5 PM. Free, with reception to follow.

The International Wildlife Film Festival promises to make your heart sing, with several films screening April 12-19 at the Roxy, plus special events throughout the week. $7 per film/$5 seniors/$5 students/$3 kids 12 and under. $75 for festival pass. Visit wildlifefilms.org. The two-day Indian Child Welfare

Act Conference starts today at the Wingate by Wyndham Hotel, 5252 Airway Blvd., and includes discussions with legal experts, psychologists and Indian adoptees. Call 406-203-2213 or email hillary.plouffe@umconnect.umt.edu to learn more. Undo that keyboard hunchback with Lunch Re-Boot Yoga, a gentle practice

with Mary Hanson. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Thursdays, noon-1 PM. $40 for six classes/$9 drop-in. The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all manner of media. ZACC. 2:15-5 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 6-11. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [27]


[calendar]

“It’s like there’s a wall between us.” Britchy plays the Ten Spoon Winery for a CD release show of the band’s new album, Every Heartache. Sat. April 19 from 6-9 PM. Free.

Nature poet Bob Pack reads from his newest works at the Davidson Honors College at 4 PM. Free. Anne Carlson of The Wilderness Society presents “Adaptive Management and Forest Restoration in a Changing Climate,” part of the conservation social science spring seminar series. Forestry Building, room 301. 4:10-5 PM.

nightlife Salute cool women and girls with the Soroptimist Spirit of Excellence’s Celebration of Achievement gala at Ruby’s Inn. Includes dinner, music, magician and award ceremonies. 5 PM. $25. Call Michelle at 406240-5991 to learn more. Ain’t no party like a garden party ‘cause a garden party don’t stop when experts from Missoula County Extension, MUD, Five Valleys Seed Library, MUD and more offer gardening resources and tips at the Missoula College, 900 South Ave. W. 5-7 PM. (‘K, so I guess it does stop. Or does it?) Kick it at a cool soirée in support of talented young folk at the seventh annual Aerie International gala, a fundraiser with hors d’oeurves, desserts, live jazz and readings from the 2014 issue of the Big Sky High School literary magazine. Dana Gallery. 5:30-8 PM. $10/$8 for students/$5 for

[28] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

ages 12 and under. $25 for four adult tickets. The four-week Introduction to Herbal Medicine course with clinical herbalist Britta Bloedorn presents a wholebody approach to preventing illness and self-care with western herbal medicine. 210 N. Higgins, Ste 318. Meets at 6 PM on Thursdays until May 1. $145. Call 406-830-0949 or email britta.bloedorn@ gmail.com to learn more.

Seattle poet and pie expert Kate Lebo serves up a mix of her recipes and wordsmithery at the Cookbook Club hosted by Good Food Store. 6:30 PM. $40, includes copy of A Commonplace Book of Pie. (See Books.) Southern rock outfit Blackberry Smoke plays the Wilma, along with The Delta Saints. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $18.50. Tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and knittingfactory.com.

Overcome your fears and take a stand when Treasure State Toastmasters mentors folks in leadership and public speaking. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

Go down where it’s wetter, down where it’s better with Underwater Films of Jean Painlevé, live-scored by Next Door Prison Hotel to eight avante-garde films. 8 PM. $10/free with International Wildlife Film Festival pass.

Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free.

During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

“Cultural Minister” Andre Floyd is here to spread the gospel of blues at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6-8 PM. Singer-songwriter Kristi Neumann plays tunes while you kick back at the Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton. 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

Party like a spring chicken when the Youngblood Brass Band plays Stage 112. 9 PM. $10. Check out Stage 112’s Facebook page for more info. Take our deputy calendar editor out for spin when Dark Horse Country Band plays tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9 PM. Blessed be the drunks when the Hangover Saints play the


missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [29]


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Hoodie ninja. T-Pain performs at the Wilma Tue., April 22. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $37/$32 in advance at griztix.com and Griz Tix outlets.

Palace, along with Cain and Fable, Lunacy and the Moon and Max Ammons play the Palace. 9 PM. No cover. It’s going down, I’m yelling timber when the Badlander hosts the Drop Culture Dance

Party, featuring hot trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight; women get in free before 10.

with Family Friendly Friday at the Top Hat, 6-8 PM. No cover. April 19 features tunes from Andrew Norsworthy.

Get an earful when singersongwriter Dan Tedesco plays the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM.

Show ‘em your best smize for the annual Project Selvedge fashion design contest at Selvedge Studio. Fridays on April 4, 11 and 18, with finale on May 2. 6:30 PM. $1.

FRIDAYAPRIL18 You’ll be smashing pumpkins, I’ll be smiling politely when Pinky and the Floyd presents a “full-throttle, ripthe-roof-off” three-hour show of material from every Floyd era. Stage 112. 8 PM. $15 at Rockin Rudy’s.

The International Wildlife Film Festival hosts a blowout awards show with tunes from the Whizpops!, followed by a screening of IMAX productions Journey To the South Pacific and Island Of Lemurs: Madagascar. Wilma. 6 PM. $5/free for kids.

The International Wildlife Film Festival promises to make your heart sing, with several films screening April 1219 at the Roxy, plus special events throughout the week. $7 per film/$5 seniors/$5 students/$3 kids 12 and under. $75 for festival pass. Visit wildlifefilms.org.

You’ll be all squared away when Basses Covered plays the Ten Spoon Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Tasting starts at four 4, tunes from 6-9 PM. Biga antipasto available, or bring your own treats to nosh on.

The annual Kyi-Yo Powwow gets on down at the Adams Center, with Grand Entry at 7 PM on Friday, followed by dancing, children’s village and more on Saturday. $5/$12 for weekend pass. Free for ages 65-plus or 6-under. Check out griztix.com.

nightlife Chilluns can play while Mom and Pop get their whiskey on

[30] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit. Live fast, pie young when Seattle poet and baker Kate Lebo reads from A Commonplace Book of Pie at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM. (See Books.) Bare Bait Dance is breaking out of the box for performances of Wall City News. Above


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Stage 112. April 18-19 and 2526 at 7 PM, plus 2 PM matinee on April 26. $15/$13 in advance at the Downtown Dance Collective, ddcmontana.com or 214-0097. Your paramour will appreciate your thriftiness at the Cheap Date Night, where the Missoula Public Library screens a free, recently released motion picture. Doors open at 6:45 PM and close at 7:15. Enter from the Front Street side of the building. Free. The UM Percussion Ensemble and Islanders Steel Drum Band will en-snare your heart with the spring percussion concert. Guest artists include Lalo Davila on timbales, Casey Cangelosi on marimba and David Gluck on drumset. Dennison Theatre. 7:30 PM. $11/$6 seniors/$5 students. Cut a rug when the Golden Age Club hosts dancing and live music in an alcohol-free environment. 727 S. Fifth St. in Hamilton. 7:30-10 PM. $3. Call 240-9617 to learn more. Take our junior arts editor out for a spin when the Western Union Swing Band plays classic country and swing dance tunes at the Eagles Lodge. 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. No cover. The Hot Springs Artists Society hosts Pony Conan, who takes you for a folky ride at the Symes Hotel. 8-10 PM. Passthe-hat donation. Get the 411 on kickin’ back when Nashville 406 plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave. 9 PM. Get totally housed when DJs Kris Moon, Mike Stolin and Hotpantz bump beats for another edition of I’ll House You. Badlander. 9 PM. No cover. Bozeman’s own Doctors of Geography will groove in the right direction at the Palace, along with the Boxcutters and Birddogs. 9 PM. No cover. Wear your toughest dancing shoes when Ted Ness and the Rusty Nails play Sean Kelly’s, along with Kayla Hutchins. 9 PM. No cover. Party down, Garden City

style, when Zoo City plays tunes at the Dark Horse, 1805 Regent Ave. 9:30 PM. Get galvanized into action when Band In Motion plays the Union Club. 9:30 PM. No cover. Get equipped to party when raucous duo Shovels and Rope, with Michael Trent and the badass Cary Ann Hearst, play the Top Hat, along with Parker Millsap. 10 PM. $16/$13 in advance at the Top Hat and Rockin Rudy’s.

Celebrate Earth Day by getting some fresh air at the Superfun(D) Run 10K, 5K and 1-mile, which starts at Our Saviors Lutheran Church, 8985 Highway 200 in Bonner. Race day registration from 7:30 to 9 AM at the church, $25/$23 for Run Wild Missoula members. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Run free at the monthly dance at the American Legion Hall, 825 Ronan St., with tunes from the Wild Coyote Band. 7-

11 PM. $7. Call 240-9617 to learn more. You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. I like big buttes and I cannot lie, so you other brothers

better not deny the Big Butte Challenge and Trifecta at Hell Roaring Gulch, which includes a one-miler, 5K and 11K (do ‘em all for the trifecta). 8:30 AM. Check out buttespissandmoanrunners.com. Baby got Back from Bridger, the annual run with distances ranging from 3 to 17.5 miles, all starting at the Bridger Bowl parking lot. 8 AM. Water provided at the finish, but you’ll need your own transportation

Weird Missoula presents another end-of-the-month party at the VFW, this time with Modality (“endorsed by Carl Sagan’s ghost”) and Ancient Forest, Copilot Eyedrops and J. Sherri. 10 PM. $3.

SATURDAYAPRIL19 Check out all the good things in small packages with the second annual {mini} benefit gala at the ZACC, which includes a itty-bitty cocktail hour with Montgomery Distillery, weensy chef challenge and panel of celebrity judges. 5 PM. $45. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.org to learn more. The International Wildlife Film Festival promises to make your heart sing, with several films screening April 1219 at the Roxy, plus special events throughout the week. $7 per film/$5 seniors/$5 students/$3 kids 12 and under. $75 for festival pass. Visit wildlifefilms.org. The annual Kyi-Yo Powwow gets on down at the Adams Center, with Grand Entry at 7 PM on Friday, followed by dancing, children’s village and more on Saturday. $5/$12 for weekend pass. Free for ages 65-plus or 6-under. Check out griztix.com. You’ll bear-ly stand the suspense at the annual Grizzly Triathlon, which includes a 1,000-yard swim, 20K bike ride and 5K trail run. Takes place at the University of Montana campus, along the Kim Williams Trail and on Highway 10. Check out grizzlytri.com or call Giles at 406-543-2532 for info.

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [31]


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back to the start. Visit winddrinkers.org. As part of Earth Service Day, volunteers are helping weed, plant and fence on Mount Sentinel and the “M” trail. 9 AM-2 PM. Bring work gloves and water. Meet at the trailhead at 9 or hike up to join workers. RSVP to marilyn.marler@umontan.edu if you want lunch. Aspiring avian enthusiasts are invited to the Beginning Birder Walk at the Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge outside Stevensville, with a bit of walking. Meet at the Metcalf headquarters at 10 AM for a two-hour field trip guided by local experts. Families with kids welcome. Call Terry at 214-1194 to learn more. Earn that liquid lunch when Missoulians on Bicycles host a 70-mile ride on backroads from Stevensville to Hamilton, with lunch at Bitterroot Brewery. Meet at McCormick Park at 9 AM to carpool. Call Wayne at 721-6330 to learn more.

Speaking the tooth. The African Children’s Choir plays Discovery Alliance Church in Missoula Sun., April 20, at 8:30 and 10:20 AM, and the Bitterroot Valley Church of the Nazarene Mon., April 21 at 6:30 PM. Donations appreciated.

[32] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

You’ll be fabulous, dahling, after the DIY Floral Accessories class at Habitat Floral, part of the Missoula Fashion Week. 211 N. Higgins Ave. Classes at 10


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AM, 1 PM and 3 PM. $15/$8 for kids 12 and under.

AM at Caras Park and returns at noon for a free barbecue. Check out clarkfork.org.

Kiddos 10 and under are invited to the annual Hellgate Lions Easter egg hunt, at the park on West Riverside by the Hellgate Lions Club Barn, 1357 Haaglund Drive in Bonner. 11 AM.

“Who Cares about the Past?” Lots of peeps, as UM librarian Helen Keremedjiev will make the case for in the Mansfield Library, room 512. Part of Montana Archaeology Month. Noon-1 PM.

Music is an aeroplane so share the gift of it with the chilluns at Kids’ Vibrations, a 45-minute funtime featuring local musicians, dancing and playing instruments. Missoula Senior Citizens’ Center, 705 Higgins Ave. 11–11:45 AM. Donations accepted. April 19 features the Whizpops!

It’ll be a Pleasure State hoedown when the Montana Musician and Artist Coalition Showcase comes to Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. Noon-8 PM.

Remember a remarkable Missoula gal at the memorial celebration of life for the late Pat Simmons. Music Recital Hall. Noon, with lunch reception to follow.

The Easter Bunny set out a whole mess of eggs on the UM Oval, and kiddos ages 9 and under are invited to search for them during the annual Easter Eggstravaganza on the Oval. 1 PM. Families encouraged to use the Dornblaser park-and-ride or free Mountain Line buses.

Lend a hand at the 11th annual Clark Fork River Cleanup, which meets at 9:30

Valerie Harms reads and discusses her inspirational workbook for choosing

Complete your ballot online to vote for all categories, including these WEB EXCLUSIVES: Best Local Arts & Entertainment

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Earning their stripes. Bare Bait Dance presents Wall City News above Stage 112 April 18-19 and 25-26 at 7 PM, plus 2 PM matinee on April 26. $15/$13 in advance. Check out ddcmontana.com.

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missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [33]


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dancing from 8-11 PM. $9/$6 for members and students. Quit wasting away in Margaritaville and class it up when Triple Sec plays jazz at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier St. 7:30-10 PM. $5. Take our junior arts editor out for a spin when the Western Union Swing Band plays classic country and swing dance tunes at the Eagles Lodge. 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. No cover. Captain Wilson Conspiracy plays jazz tunes with covert flair at Finn and Porter, 100 Madison St. 8-10 PM. No cover. You’ll be living well when Living Well plays acoustic and rock tunes at the Symes Hotel. 8-10 PM. Donation appreciated.

Sweat it out. Singer-songwriter Dan Tedesco plays the Top Hat Thu, April 17 at 10 PM. No cover.

the right path in life, Your Soul at a Crossroads, at Fact and Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. 1-2:30 PM. Writers ages 8-11 should check out the Missoula Writing Collaborative’s Creative Writing Workshop with Sheryl Noethe, meeting at Fort Missoula, Officer’s Row, No. 28, from 1-3 PM on April 12, 19 and 26. Free. Call 549-3348 to learn more. The Sundog Ecovillage hosts a potluck with live tunes. 1090 Mecate Lane in Potomac. 2 PM. Check out sundogecovillage.org. You’ll bearly stand the suspense

when local wildlife experts host a screening and discussion of the new Disney documentary Bears, about an Alaskan grizzly and her cubs, at Carmike 12. 4 PM. $5.75.

nightlife Hitch up your partying pants when Britchy plays the Ten Spoon Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Tasting starts at four 4, tunes from 6-9 PM. Biga antipasto available, or bring your own treats to nosh on. John Floridis plays his folk and bluesy tunes at Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton, 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

[34] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

Bare Bait Dance is breaking out of the box for performances of Wall City News. Above Stage 112. April 18-19 and 25-26 at 7 PM, plus 2 PM matinee on April 26. $15/$13 in advance at the Downtown Dance Collective, ddcmontana.com or 214-0097. Get hog-Wylde when Black Label Society rocks out at the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $33/$29.50 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and knittingfactory.com. The Missoula Folklore Society presents a contra dance with tunes by Skippin A Groove, upstairs at the Union Hall. Beginner workshop from 7:30-8,

You can be positively sure that Absolutely DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo will juice up the joint at the Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until midnight. Now free. Strike gold when Paydirt plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave., from 9:30 PM to close. Earn more chords, better value when Ol’ Doris plays the Palace, along with Stab Me Kill Me and Buddy “Slutty” Jackson. 9 PM. Free. (See Music.) Get galvanized into action when Band In Motion plays the Union Club. 9:30 PM. No cover. Three-Eared Dog takes over the Top Hat to celebrate its CD release once again, along with Tony Holiday. 10 PM. $3.


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SUNDAYAPRIL20 Jamaica’s own Prezident Brown is going green for the 4/20 party at the Top Hat, along with Muzikata. 9 PM. $10. 18-plus. Advance tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and the Top Hat. Those about to rock, we salute you at the University of Montana Outdoor Program’s Fundamentals of Rock Climbing course for all levels. Must know how to belay. $35, registration required by April 16. Visit life.umt.edu/CREC/Outdoor/ default.php to learn more. The internationally known African Children’s Choir performs at the Discovery Alliance Church, 2630 Connery Way, at 8:30 and 10:20 AM. Donations appreciated. Make like an energizer bunny when the Missoulians on Bicycles go on the 50-mile Easter Tour of the Town, which meets at Eastgate Center for pavement riding around the Rattlesnake, Grant Creek, Miller Creek and Pattee Canyon. 11 AM. Call Chris at 593-0032 to learn more.

Getting sole-d on this. Blackberry Smoke plays the Wilma, Thu., April 17, along with The Delta Saints. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $18.50. Tickets at Rockin Rudy's and knittingfactory.com.

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [35]


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Kick out the jams down the ‘Root at the dining room of the Sapphire Lutheran Homes, corner of 10th and River streets. Players of all levels are invited to bring their acoustic instrument, or just sit a spell and listen. Call John at 381-2483. Free.

nightlife Sample some tasty herbs and grains while Tom Catmull

plays tunes at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5-8 PM. No cover. Knock back some ethanol alcohol for a scientific buzz with the The Missoula Area Secular Society’s viewing party of “Cosmos” with Neil deGrasse Tyson. 501 Lounge in the upstairs of the Iron Horse. Get there and order your dranks at 6 PM or so.

Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Starts at 8 PM with Front Street Jazz. Free. Local bluesy types hang out at the Palace for a 4/20 blues jam. (Beats me what’s different about this as opposed to any other show.) 9 PM. Fre.

MONDAYAPRIL21 Great Falls-ian poet Saif Alsaegh (originally from Baghdad) reads from his debut piece, Iraqi Headaches, at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W. 7 PM. Registration is now open for the Volunteer Vacation at the Bob Marshall Wilderness, with several trips throughout the summer where you can pitch in with trail maintenance, weeding and campground restoration. Trip leader, pack support and food provided. First trip is May 27. Check out bmwf.org. Rasa O’Neill presents Therapeutic Yoga for Wellness and Healing, with gentle stretches, breath work and guided meditation. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent St. Mondays from noon to 1 PM. $40 for six weeks/$9 drop-in. Ongoing class. Call 721-0033 to learn more. Try some food for thought at the Careers in Sustainable Food Systems Panel, in the University Center Commons. Noon. Part of Earth Week festivities. Brush up on your skillz with the Bridge Group for beginners/those in need of a refresher course. Missoula Senior Center, Mondays at 1 PM. $1.25.

nightlife Local Deadheads have got you covered when the Top Hat presents Raising the Dead, a curated broadcast of two hours of Jerry Garcia and co. from 5 to 7 PM. Free, all ages. Dr. Nerissa Koehn and others will discuss “How International Experiences as Students Led to an Interest in Pursuing Family Medicine as a Career” as part of UM’s spring lecture series on global health. Gallagher Business Building Room 106, 6:30-7:30 PM. The Bitterroot Valley Church of the Nazarene hosts the African Children’s Choir for another installment of their spiritual and traditional tunes. 803 Fifth St. in Victor. 6:30 PM. Donations appreciated.

[36] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

Captain Wilson Conspiracy makes it an inside job at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., inside the Florence Building. 7-10 PM. No cover. LCD Soundsystem’s final show at Madison Square Garden is captured in the 2011 doc Shut Up and Play the Hits, screening at the Top Hat at 8:30 PM. All ages, free. Open mic at the VFW, 245 W. Main St., seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Maintain dignity for best results at Super Trivia Freakout. Winners get cash prizes and shots after the five rounds of trivia at the Badlander. 9 PM. Free. You be DiCaprio, I’ll be Jeremy Irons at Masquerade Monday, a shindig with DJs Layln Tang, Nick a’ Time, Owlie and Hause at the Palace. 9 PM.

TUESDAYAPRIL22 Environmental lit magazine Camas hosts “Prairie Songs,” a reading with nature writers including Richard Manning, Sheryl Noethe, Josh Snotnick and Janisse Ray. Top Hat. 6-8:30 PM. Free. Watch your little ones master tree pose in no time during yoga at the Children’s Museum of Missoula. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Veterans and their families and caregivers are invited to the Yoga Warriors class, sponsored by the Learning Center at Red Willow and hosted at The Peak Health and Wellness Center, 150 E. Spruce Street. Free, but limited to 20 participants, so sign up at 721-0033. Survivors in any stage are welcome to Yoga Beyond Can-


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cer with Dena Saedi, a gentle practice which includes breath work, meditation and body scanning. Students must have a doctor’s okay. Learning Center at Red Willow, Tuesdays from 45 PM. $40 for six classes.

nightlife Put on your red shoes and dance at the Country Dance Lessons, Tuesdays at the Hamilton Senior Center. The shindig steps off at 6 PM with a line dance, followed by 7 PM twostep and 8 PM country cha-cha. Celebrate everyone’s favorite oblate spheroid with the Earth Day mini-fest at the Roxy Theater. Includes screening of the documentary Seeds of Time and animated film The Man Who Planted Trees. 6 PM. Free, plus first 100 attendees get a free bare-root tree sapling from Good Food Store. Urban forest experts will help you learn how to plant it. (See Spotlight.) Big ones, small ones, ones as big as your head. The UM Flute Choir presents “flutes of all sizes!” at a concert in the UM Music Building, room 218. 6 PM. Free. The always down-to-the-

earth Montana Dirt Girls host a hike or bike ride every Tuesday at 6 PM. Check out the Montana Dirt Girls page on Facebook for ride info. Dust off that banjolin and join in the Top Hat’s picking circle, from 6 to 8 PM. All ages. Steve Bunk reads from his new book, Goliath Staggered: How the People of Highway 12 Conquered Big Oil, at Fact and Fiction. 7 PM.

Hall. 7:30 PM. $12/$8 students and seniors. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. Here’s a question to tickle your brainwaves: Which venerated jazz singer and bandleader performed the 1932 classic “The Reefer Man”? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.)

Henryk Szadziewski, with the Uyghur Human Rights Project, presents “The Uyghurs: An Identity Crisis In China’s Borderlands,” at the University Center Theater. 7 PM. Part of the annual Central and Southwest Asia Conference at UM. Check out umt.edu/cswa. Take down the Athenian hegemony but pass on the hemlock tea at the Socrates Cafe, in which facilitator Kris Bayer encourages philosophical discussion. Bitterroot Public Library. 7-9 PM. Have a grand time when the Can Am Piano Duo, featuring Christopher Hahn and Karen Bere, plays the Music Recital

Ape art. The Bat Honey comedy duo performs the “Squidbelly” puppet show as part of the International Wildlife Film Festival Sat., April 19 at 11 AM. $5/free with festival pass.

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [37]


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[38] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014

Declare who is Lord Smartypants of Them All and get a $20 bar tab at KBGA’s Tuesday Trivia night, which includes music and picture rounds, plus drank specials. Pro tip: $20 is enough to buy almost everybody in the bar a Natty Light. Free to play. VFW, 245 W. Main St. 8-10 PM. Shawty, I’ll buy you a drank when the one and only T-Pain performs as part of the “I Am TPain” tour at the Wilma. Doors at 7 PM, show at 8. $37/$32 in advance at griztix.com and Griz Tix outlets. Solo acoustic country fella Eric Barrera plays down-home tunes at the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand Ave, this and every Tuesday at at 9 PM. No cover.

Telephone Directory

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Get to the truthiness of the matter when Canadian rock outfit Fuck the Facts plays the Badlander, along with Walking Corpse Syndrome and Arctodus. 9 PM. No cover, plus $3 Montgomery drink special. A whole raft of creative types are celebrating the album release of Tall Tale Medicine Machine, a collaborative digital/orchestral music project. Plus, Joie Rainbeau, Phil Maher and Kris Moon spin the tunes. Palace. 9 PM. Free. Reggae veterans Steel Pulse are back in town for their rescheduled show at the Top Hat, along with Muzikata. 9 PM. $33/$30 in advance at Rockin Rudy’s and the Top Hat. 18plus.

WEDNESDAYAPRIL23 Shukri Abed, of Jerusalem’s Al-Quds University, presents “Palestine and the Arab Spring” as part of the Central and Southwest Asia Conference. University Center Theater. 7 PM. Check out umt.edu/cswa. Get a calming start to the morning with the Weekly Sit Meditation at the Learning Center at Red Willow. Wednesdays, 7:30-8:15 AM. Previous experience meditating is helpful. $35 for four weeks/$8 drop-in. UM professor Own Sirrs presents “China’s Maritime Disputes and the Prospects for Further Confrontation” as part of the Mansfield Center’s Brown Bag Lecture Series. University Center, room 333. 12:10-1 PM.

nightlife Dena Saedi presents the Yoga for Chronic Pain class at the Learning Center at Red Willow, which uses gentle stretches, meditation and breath work geared toward easing conditions like chronic back pain, fibromyalgia and arthritis. Wednesdays from 5-6 PM. Prerequisite one-on-one screening with Dena required. To schedule an appointment, call 406721-0033. Sip a giggle water and get zozzled, baby, with the Top Hat’s weekly Jazz Night. 6 PM. Free, all ages. April 16 features Captain Wilson Conspiracy. If you think your Prince falsetto is good, that’s what matters, dear. Now go forth and


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green day When you think about it, almost all of our national holidays are about consumption, be it gifts, food, drink, or all of the above. (Don’t get me wrong, on Easter Sunday I’ll be all over the basket of goodies the “Easter Bunny” still puts together for me.) Earth Day is one of few holidays that’s about stopping to appreciate the world we have, to enjoy it for what it is and lend a hand preserving parts of it. There’s plenty of ways to celebrate this around western Montana, perhaps just with a bike ride or jaunt up your favorite trail. If you’d like to really get into the spirit of things, the Roxy hosts a special Earth Day film screening on April 22. It includes the 2013 documentary Seeds of Time, WHAT: Earth Day Mini-Fest WHEN: Tue., April 22, at 6 PM WHERE: Roxy HOW MUCH: Free MORE INFO: theroxytheater.org

about agriculture’s efforts to catch up with climate change. Seeds of Time makes stops around the world, including the famous world seed vault in Svalbard, Norway, which almost seems too cool and scifi to be real. The Roxy’s shindig also includes The

APRIL 25-27, 30 | MAY 1-4, 7-11 WED-FRI 7:30 PM | SAT 2:00 & 7:30 PM | SUN 2:00 & 6:30 PM

The Man Who Planted Trees

Man Who Planted Trees, a beautiful short animated French film from 1987. Man Who Planted Trees is about how one person can make a difference, which is a heartening thing to be reminded of when so much talk about climate change can make it seem insurmountable. Plus, the first 100 moviegoers on April 22 will get a free bare-root sapling from Good Food Store, and urban forest experts will tell you how to plant it—thereby adding just a little more oxygen to our little valley. It’s hard to make the mysteries of nature and threats to biodiversity into something easily bought and sold at a party supply store; all the more reason why Earth Day is one holiday that’s really worth celebrating.

rule the school at the Badlander’s Kraptastic Karaoke, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $6 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free.

with the Natural Step Framework. University Center room 332. $450; email paul@paulhortongroup.net or call 360918-1079 to learn more.

Get turnt up and Shwomp Down, a Milkcrate Wednesday dealio with DJs Butter That Shit Up, Red Velvet, Mikey Smalls and Sounds That Happen. Palace. 9 PM. No cover. (Trivia answer: Cab Calloway.)

The Vestibular Dysfunction Local Support Group meets every third Thursday of the month to share experiences and increase awareness at Element Physical Therapy, 2455 Dixon Ave. Noon-1 PM. Visit elementpt.com.

Hey, butterfly in the sky, go twice as high when Philadelphia’s Bleeding Rainbow plays the VFW, along with Magpies and Vera. 10 PM. $5.

THURSDAYAPRIL24 Chris Johns, editor-in-chief of National Geographic, presents “Looking Beyond 125 Years” for the 57th annual Dean Stone lecture. University Center Theater. 7 PM. Paul Horton presents a oneday sustainability workshop

200 N. ADAMS STREET, MISSOULA (406) 728-7529 | www.MCTinc.org

Undo that keyboard hunchback with Lunch Re-Boot Yoga, a gentle practice with Mary Hanson. Learning Center at Red Willow, 825 W. Kent Ave. Thursdays, noon-1 PM. $40 for six classes/$9 drop-in. The Thursday Young Artists After School Program gets the chilluns involved with all manner of art history and media. ZACC. 2:15-5 PM. $12/$10 for members. Ages 611. Call 549-7555 to learn more.

—Kate Whittle

Experts from Shanghai International Studies University get together for the “China and the Middle East in the New Era” discussion. Part of the Central and Southwest Asia Conference, in the University Center Theater. 3-5 PM. Check out umt.edu/cswa. UM professor Steve Schwarze presents “Under Pressure: Coal Industry Rhetoric in the Age of Neoliberalism,” part of the spring seminar series on conservation social science. (Say that three times fast, why dontcha.) Forestry Building, room 301. 4:10-5 PM.

nightlife Bitterrooters are gonna Take Back the Night in recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, with pizza and sign-making at Hamilton City Hall at 5 PM, followed by a march through town and rally with poetry and youth performances ‘til 9 PM.

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [39]


[calendar] The four-week Introduction to Herbal Medicine course with clinical herbalist Britta Bloedorn presents a whole-body approach to preventing illness and self-care with western herbal medicine. 210 N. Higgins, Ste 318. Meets at 6 PM on Thursdays until May 1. $145. Call 406-830-0949 or email britta.bloedorn @gmail.com to learn more.

masters mentors folks in leadership and public speaking. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free.

Dam it, honey, you better pay attention to guest speaker Sam Mace, of Save Our Wild Salmon, when she chats about the effects dams have on salmon runs and watershed health. North Underground Lecture Hall. 6 PM. Free.

Tony Holiday and the Velvetones get snazzy at Bitter Root Brewery in Hamilton, 6-8:30 PM. No cover.

Overcome your fears and take a stand when Treasure State Toast-

Heads up, it’s that special time of the month when Blue Moon plays jazz at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. No cover.

Expect a tall tale or two when John Gierach reads from All Fishermen Are Liars, a fly-fishing adventure story collection. Fact and Fiction. 7 PM.

Misty specializes in fibromyalgia treatment, post-operative recovery, low back, neck and shoulder pain, along with stress reduction.

Ten Skip Stone plays folky country stuff while you sample the goods at the Top Hat dinner show. 7 PM. Free. Blue Mountain Clinic presents Sex In the Zoo: Abortion, featuring locally written monologues on sexuality. Stage 112, at 112 Pattee St. 7:30-9:30 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, local talented folks may titillate your eardrums. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 5421471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Shut up and take my money: Japanese comic-book-themed punk band Peelander-Z plays the Palace, along with Bacon and Egg. 9 PM. $5. (See Music.) It’s going down, I’m yelling timber when the Badlander hosts the Drop Cul-

SPRING LEAGUES START IN MAY. SIGN UP TODAY!

ture Dance Party, featuring hot trax and a rotating cast of DJs. $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight; women get in free before 10. Shakewell and Greenstar play tunes to get loose and wild to at the Top Hat, starting at 10 PM. Free. Tis the season to blast Dookie. Submit events to Calapatra the Calendar Mistress at calendar@missoulanews.com at least two weeks in advance of the event. Don’t forget to include the date, time and cost. If you must, snail mail to Calapatra c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801. You can also submit online. Just find the “submit an event” link under the Spotlight on the right corner at missoulanews.com.

Single or taken, come mingle.

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[40] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

I

’m told that there’s a level of rivalry among factions of runners, bikers, triathletes and ultramarathoners, or at least that they’re dismissive of one another’s chosen fields. I don’t have any firsthand experience with whether this is true, but I’m willing to believe it, having definitely seen that kind of clique behavior among Speech and Drama competitors (with less Lycra involved.) In the spirit of one-upping everybody, I present the Ecopentathlon. On April 19, several local organizations host Earth Service Day volunteering events for anybody excited to get outdoors and help beautify our town. The service day includes trail work on Mount Sentinel, a Clark Fork river cleanup, recyclable sorting on the University of Montana campus, bicycle tuning at FreeCycles, stenciling storm drains and

helping build new gardens. If you bike around and spend an hour or so at five different service day activities, at the end of the day you get prizes and the chance to win a new bicycle. Even if you only do one or two volunteer activities, the Ecopentathlon is one competition where everybody earns bragging rights. —Kate Whittle The annual Ecopentathlon includes trail work, river cleanup, recycling, bike maintenance and storm drain stenciling. Meet on Sat, April 19 at 9 AM at the Kim Williams Trail by the pedestrian footbridge. Visit umt.edu/earthday for complete list of events and contact info.

photo by Cathrine L. Walters

FRIDAY APRIL 18 Make sure your first time is special by attending First Timer Friday at the Freestone Climbing Center, 935 Toole Ave. in Missoula, at 7 PM. Free if it’s your first visit.

SATURDAY APRIL 19

trip guided by local experts. Families with kids welcome. Call Terry at 214-1194 to learn more. Earn that liquid lunch when Missoulians on Bicycles host a 70-mile ride on backroads from Stevensville to Hamilton, with lunch at Bitterroot Brewery. Meet at McCormick Park at 9 AM to carpool. Call Wayne at 721-6330 to learn more.

You’ll bear-ly stand the suspense at the annual Grizzly Triathlon, which includes a 1,000-yard swim, 20K bike ride and 5K trail run. Takes place at the University of Montana campus, along the Kim Williams Trail and on Highway 10. Check out grizzlytri.com or call Giles at 406-543-2532 for info.

Lend a hand at the 11th annual Clark Fork River Cleanup, which meets at 9:30 AM at Caras Park and returns at noon for a free barbecue. Check out clarkfork.org.

Celebrate Earth Day by getting some fresh air at the Superfun(D) Run 10K, 5K and 1-mile, which starts at Our Saviors Lutheran Church, 8985 Highway 200 in Bonner. Race day registration from 7:30 to 9 AM at the church, $25/$23 for Run Wild Missoula members. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

Those about to rock, we salute you at the University of Montana Outdoor Program’s Fundamentals of Rock Climbing course for all levels. Must know how to belay. $35, registration required by April 16. Visit life.umt.edu/CREC/Outdoor/ default.php to learn more.

You’ll be bright eyed and bushy tailed after Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which start at 8 AM every Saturday at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Grab breakfast with other participants afterward. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

Make like an energizer bunny when the Missoulians on Bicycles go on the 50-mile Easter Tour of the Town, which meets at Eastgate Center for pavement riding around the Rattlesnake, Grant Creek, Miller Creek and Pattee Canyon. 11 AM. Call Chris at 593-0032 to learn more.

I like big buttes and I cannot lie, so you other brothers better not deny the Big Butte Challenge and Trifecta at Hell Roaring Gulch, which includes a one-miler, 5K and 11K (do ‘em all for the trifecta). 8:30 AM. Check out buttespissandmoan runners.com.

MONDAY APRIL 21

Baby got Back from Bridger, the annual run with distances ranging from 3 to 17.5 miles, all starting at the Bridger Bowl parking lot. 8 AM. Water provided at the finish, but you’ll need your own transportation back to the start. Visit winddrinkers.org. As part of Earth Service Day, volunteers are helping weed, plant and fence on Mount Sentinel and the “M” trail. 9 AM-2 PM. Bring work gloves and water. Meet at the trailhead at 9 or hike up to join workers. RSVP to marilyn.marler@umontan.edu if you want lunch. Aspiring avian enthusiasts are invited to the Beginning Birder Walk at the Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge outside Stevensville, with a bit of walking. Meet at the Metcalf headquarters at 10 AM for a two-hour field

SUNDAY APRIL 20

Mullan Reserve combines the best of regional design and environmental sensitivity with amenities that promote an exceptional lifestyle. The result is Missoula's most innovative and comfortable apartment community.

Registration is now open for the Volunteer Vacation at the Bob Marshall Wilderness, with several trips throughout the summer where you can pitch in with trail maintenance, weeding and campground restoration. Trip leader, pack support and food provided. First trip is May 27. Check out bmwf.org.

TUESDAY APRIL 22 The always down-to-the-earth Montana Dirt Girls host a hike or bike ride every Tuesday at 6 PM. Check out the Montana Dirt Girls page on Facebook for ride info.

THURSDAY APRIL 24 Dam it, honey, you better pay attention to guest speaker Sam Mace, of Save Our Wild Salmon, when she chats about the effects dams have on salmon runs and watershed health. North Underground Lecture Hall. 6 PM. Free. calendar@missoulanews.com

Energy-Efficient Features: LED Site Lighting Energy Star Appliances • High-Grade Insulation Exterior features include an extraordinary clubhouse, private gardens, open spaces and a pool and fitness center. Residences include oversized storage and balconies, bike hangers, shaker cabinetry, plank-style floors and custom finishes.

4000 Mullan Road • Missoula • 406 543 0060 mullanreserveapartments.com

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [41]


[community]

Olympic ski jumper Lindsey Van was quoted in a recent Washington Post article as saying, "I've had people ask me had my uterus fallen out yet. … I heard that multiple times; it was comical. And embarrassing—not so much for me but for whoever said it.” Women have been barred from ski jumping at the Olympic Games until this year, mostly due to misconceptions about the delicacy of our precious uteruses. In the 21st century, misconceptions abound about gender. There’s a lack of basic understanding of science, like Rep. Todd Akin’s infamous quote about “legitimate rape” and how “the woman’s body has a way of shutting that whole thing down.” And there’s behavioral misunderstandings—many people believe having an XX chromosome translates

to preferring the color pink and playing with dolls. In many ways, we’re still fighting some of the same fights as 100 years ago, when Montana women earned the right to vote. A Nebraska antisuffrage pamphlet from the era says “women are already enjoying a greater measure of protection and privilege under the law than do women of any state where women vote.” The idea that we’ve already got as much protection as we need is a remarkably similar argument to the current ones against the Paycheck Fairness Act, which was recently voted down, despite years of studies indicating that American women face a systemic pay gap. Digging into the unfairness and sexism that still exists today is a meaty topic, so I’d anticipate lively discussion at the upcoming “Gender in Everyday Life: A Dialogue in Humanities and Sciences” discussion. In light of the anniversary of Montana women’s suffrage, UM anthropology and communications professors will discuss how gender concepts shape our perceptions—for better and for worse. —Kate Whittle Anthropology professor Kimber McKay and communications professor Sarah Hayden discuss “Gender in Everyday Life: A Dialogue in Humanities and Sciences,” as part of a celebration of Montana women’s suffrage. Interdisciplinary Sciences Building, room 110. Thu., April 24 at 5:15 PM.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY APRIL 17

TUESDAY APRIL 22

The two-day Indian Child Welfare Act Conference starts today at the Wingate by Wyndham Hotel, 5252 Airway Blvd., and includes discussions with legal experts, psychologists and Indian adoptees. Call 406203-2213 or email hillary.plouffe@umconnect.umt.edu to learn more. Anne Carlson of The Wilderness Society presents “Adaptive Management and Forest Restoration in a Changing Climate,” part of the conservation social science spring seminar series. Forestry Building, room 301. 4:10-5 PM. Ain’t no party like a garden party ‘cause a garden party don’t stop when experts from Missoula County Extension, MUD, Five Valleys Seed Library, MUD and more offer gardening resources and tips at the Missoula College, 900 South Ave. W. 5-7 PM. (‘K, so I guess it does stop. Or does it?) Join Hospice of Missoula for Community Conversations on Death and Dying, where facilitators educate people on how to talk about this oft-uncomfortable subject. The Loft, 119 W. Main St. 6–8 PM. Free.

Henryk Szadziewski, with the Uyghur Human Rights Project, presents “The Uyghurs: An Identity Crisis In China’s Borderlands,” at the University Center Theater. 7 PM. Part of the annual Central and Southwest Asia Conference at UM. Check out umt.edu/cswa.

SATURDAY APRIL 19 Remember a remarkable Missoula gal at the memorial celebration of life for the late Pat Simmons. Music Recital Hall. Noon, with lunch reception to follow. The Sundog Ecovillage hosts a potluck with live tunes. 1090 Mecate Lane in Potomac. 2 PM. Check out sundogecovillage.org.

MONDAY APRIL 21 Dr. Nerissa Koehn and others will discuss “How International Experiences as Students Led to an Interest in Pursuing Family Medicine as a Career” as part of UM’s spring lecture series on global health. Gallagher Business Building Room 106, 6:30-7:30 PM.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 UM professor Owen Sirrs presents “China’s Maritime Disputes and the Prospects for Further Confrontation” as part of the Mansfield Center’s Brown Bag Lecture Series. University Center, room 333. 12:10-1 PM. This week’s community pint night benefits the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation, which works to help the threatened whitebark pine. Northside Kettlehouse. 5-8 PM.

THURSDAY APRIL 24 The Vestibular Dysfunction Local Support Group meets every third Thursday of the month to share experiences and increase awareness at Element Physical Therapy, 2455 Dixon Ave. Noon-1 PM. Visit elementpt.com. UM professor Steve Schwarze presents “Under Pressure: Coal Industry Rhetoric in the Age of Neoliberalism,” part of the spring seminar series on conservation social science. (Say that three times fast, why dontcha.) Forestry Building, room 301. 4:10-5 PM. Bitterrooters are gonna Take Back the Night in recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, with pizza and sign-making at Hamilton City Hall at 5 PM, followed by a march through town and rally with poetry and youth performances ‘til 9 PM. Blue Mountain Clinic presents Sex In the Zoo: Abortion, featuring locally written monologues on sexuality and gender. Stage 112, at 112 Pattee St. 7:309:30 PM.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[42] Missoula Independent • April 17–April 24, 2014


Best Local Arts & Entertainment Art Gallery Band Museum Musician Photographer Writer Movie Theater

Best Local Fashion & Beauty Cosmetics Day Spa Jewelry Kids' Clothing Women's Clothing Men's Clothing Lingerie Place for a Man's Haircut Place for a Woman's Haircut Shoe Store Tattoo Parlor Thrift Store

Best Local Food & Drink Appetizers Asian Food Bakery Barbecue Breakfast Brunch Budget Lunch Coffee Tea Delicatessen Doughnuts Burger French Fries Fresh Produce Desserts Ice Cream/Frozen Yogurt Milk Shake Mexican Food Pizza Restaurant New Restaurant (Since Jan. 2013) Family-Friendly Restaurant Restaurant Service Restaurant Wine List Outdoor Dining Romantic Dining Salad

For the last 20 years, the Independent’s dedicated readers have taken a few minutes out of their day, put aside their Happy Hour beer or lunchtime burrito, and filled in a few answers to help us celebrate this place we call home.We’re talking about Best of Missoula, and while the times have certainly changed—no more Best Video Rental category, the addition of online-only categories at missoulanews.com—the spirit of our reader poll has remained the same. It’s about you, our community, and the people, places, events and businesses that get you excited about living, working and learning here. Best of Missoula is our biggest issue of the year, and we can’t do it without you. In return for your vote, we’re inviting you to the summer’s biggest bash:The Independent’s annual Best of Missoula Party at Caras Park on Thursday, July 10.There’ll be live music from local bands, food, drinks, special activities for the whole family and, of course, plenty of toasts to this year’s winners. But first things first: Fill out your ballot and do your part to make the 2014 Best of Missoula poll our best in two decades. Vote online at missoulanews.com for even more categories!

Best Local Nightlife Bar Bar Food Bar for a Stiff Pour Beer Selection Cocktail Selection Bloody Mary Margarita Casino Happy Hour Karaoke Bar Late-Night Munchies Microbrewery Place to Dance Place to Hear Live Music Pool Table Sports Bar

Best Local Sports & Recreation

Sandwich Shop Seafood Steak Supermarket Retail Beer Selection Retail Wine Selection Vegetarian Food Wings

Bike Shop Bowling Alley Fly-Fishing Shop Golf Course Health Club Place for Paddle Sports Gear Place to get a Snowboard Sporting Goods Store Store for Guns Store for Mountaineering Gear Store for Skis

Best Local Goods & Services Adult Store Auto Repair

Consider this the fine print: We require ballots to include your full name, email address and phone number in the spaces provided. Ballots missing any of this information, or ballots with fewer than 30 categories filled in, will be mocked, ridiculed and not counted. Same goes for photocopied ballots and ballots with unclear markings. Hard-copy ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the Indy office at 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or dropped at any of the ballot locations listed below.

Bank/Credit Union Big Box Store Bookstore CDs and Music Dry Cleaner Furniture Store Garden Center Hobby/Craft Shop Lodging Motorcycle/ATV Dealer New-Car Dealer Used-Car Dealer New Retail Store (Since Jan. 2013) Pet Supplies Ranch Supply Store Store for Gifts Home Appliances Home Electronics Store for Musical Instruments Toy Store

Vote by May 7

R

Name: Email: Phone:

Ballot Box Locations: Bagels on Broadway, Bernice's Bakery, Bridge Pizza, Buttercup Market, Butterfly Herbs, Doc's Sandwich Shop, Draught Works Brewery, Five on Black, Flathead Lake Brewing, Go Fetch, Good Food Store, Iza Asian Restaurant, Kettlehouse, Market on Front, Orange Street Food Farm, Piece of Mind, Press Box, Rockin Rudy's, Skin Chic,Taco del Sol (all four locations),Taco Sano,The Trail Head, UC Center Market, Westside Lanes, Worden's Market

missoulanews.com • April 17–April 24, 2014 [43]


www.missoulanews.com

April 17 - April 24, 2014

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD ADD/ADHD relief ... Naturally! Reiki • CranioSacral Therapy • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Your Energy Fix. James V. Fix, RMT, EFT, CST 360840-3492, 415 N. Higgins Ave #19 • Missoula, MT 59802. yourenergyfix.com Donate used building materials to Home Resource, a non-profit that sells building materials and deconstructs buildings for reuse. Keeping stuff that ain’t garbage outta the dump! Open everyday. 541.8300. homeresource.org

FREE ZUMBA DANCE CLASS! Every Monday & Wednesday 6-7 PM. Lolo School. 406-544-5859. Come join the fun and bring your friends!! May 4, 2014—Spokane, Washington—The Lilac Bloomsday Run is one of America’s classic road races. In its 37-year history over a million runners, joggers and walkers have crossed the finish line. Olympic athletes and thousands of citizen runners navigate a 7.5-mile course that

weaves back and forth across the Spokane River gorge, facing the infamous “Doomsday Hill� at five miles and, spurred on by nearly 30 performers along the route, enjoying a dramatic finish above Spokane Falls. www.bloomsdayrun.org

Missoula Medical Aid: Working for Health in Honduras. In 1998 we responded after a devastating hurricane. The need still continues, and so do we. Will you help? Volunteer or donate today! missoulamedicalaid.org

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Sunday Liturgy 10:00 a.m. Fr. Haralambos "Rob" Spaliatsos 301 S. 6th St. W., Missoula "Come and See"

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2 Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C6 Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C7 Camp Sleepover . . . . .C9 This Modern World . .C11

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"Your imagination is your preview for life’s coming attractions." – Albert Einstein

Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115

Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

TO GIVE AWAY

THE FASTIDIOUS AND THE FURIOUS My boyfriend of nine years is extremely messy, while I prefer things tidy and clean. Cajoling, asking and flat-out begging him for consideration and help on this hasn't worked, nor have tactics like establishing certain areas for clutter. He contends I'm too picky about how he cleans. He says this started when we moved in together, eight years ago, and I rewashed dishes he'd washed. He says he then stopped trying to do much cleaning up and hoped I'd tire of doing everything myself and learn a lesson. I was shocked and hurt by this attitude, especially since he's otherwise a good and loving man who does many sweet things for me. Neither of us wants kids, and I love him dearly, so I'm contemplating something you've written about, being in a relationship but living separately. Could this possibly work after living together for so long? —Worried You just have different styles of mess management. You can't sleep if there's an unwashed glass in the sink. He likes to let housecleaning wait until it's a toss-up between tidying the place and trying to get away with arson. Animals get it. The bunny does not shack up with the thing that tears small furry creatures apart with its teeth. And here we humans are, all top-of-the-food-chain snobby about our ability to reason. Yet no sooner do we fall in love than we start looking to sign a lease together, bright and optimistic about the dreamy home life the neat freak will have with the guy whose idea of housecleaning is picking up a 3year-old magazine off the floor so he'll have a "plate" for his pizza. Because you happen to care about what we generally value—order over chaos— you made the assumption that a devotion to neatitude is The One True Path and should be as important to him as it is to you. It just isn't. (Chances are, he doesn't even notice the messes.) Your distress at his passive-aggressive withdrawing of effort is understandable—as is his feeling that if he can't tidy up right, why bother tidying up at all? The thing is, people will often support their partner in goals they find meaningless or even dopey, but not when their ego is under attack—verbally or in the form of dish-rewashing. When a person realizes their partner doesn't respect them, they tend to take one of two paths: chasing that person's approval or retiring from seeking it.

Still, in the moments you aren't running after your boyfriend with a wheelbarrow and a broom, you love the guy and he loves you, and you seem to have something together. You do need to repair the hard feelings between you, starting by admitting that you were both expecting the impossible in trying to live together. Next, pledge to discuss things that bother each of you instead of silently seething about them—for, oh, eight years. And yes, probably the best way for you to stay together is to live apart. After years of living together, it's easy to see this as a failure. It's actually anything but. You're just making your relationship love-centered by removing all the subjects that cause perpetual disagreement—like why anyone would waste time cleaning until whatever's growing on the coffee table starts hissing at you when you reach for the remote.

BETTER SHERLOCK HOLMES AND GARDENS I had to leave town when prospective buyers were coming to see a used water pump I was selling. My wonderful wife cheerfully agreed to sell it for me. I showed her exactly the parts that went with it. A guy bought the pump, but I saw that an extra box of parts, worth about $100, was also gone. Do I ask my wife where it went? Can I forgive her without an apology? —Annoyed Prepare to get laughed out of marriage counseling after you grumble to the therapist that what's missing from your marriage is $100 worth of junk from the garage. Tempting as it must be to spend the weekend waterboarding your wife for answers, a wiser approach when somebody tries to do something nice for you is to reward their intentions, even when the outcome is less than ideal. Your wife's intention—to help you by standing in for you—tells you she's a loving partner. The outcome—an extra box of parts apparently growing legs and sneaking off into the buyer's car—tells you she may not be the shrewdest salesperson and maybe takes too kindly a view of human nature. Sadly, all relationships come with trade-offs. You have a decision to make—whether to settle for cheery wonderfulness or dump your wife for a woman who can help you open a used-car lot or get rich swindling the elderly by telephone.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com www.advicegoddess.com

[C2] Missoula Independent • April 17 – April 24, 2014

First Friday Free For All. Haircuts will be donated to the first 20 people in the door & you may receive one free haircut every three months. Noon to 4 pm, 1st come, 1st served. Mighty Aphrodite Salon. 406-7211866. 736A S. 1st W. Missoula (next to Free Cycles). Find us on Facebook.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Bosco is a big, happy 6.5 year old Lab/Sharpei mix who came to the shelter after his owner died. Some of his favorite things to do are to talk to you and have a conversation while he shows off all his fun toys. He doesn’t like to go anywhere unless he has a toy or bone to carry in his mouth along the way! If you think this guy with his endearing personality is the dog for you, then come for a visit! Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 www.myHSWM.org

DRIVING LESSONS M&M Driving School Call or Text

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D’Vine Palette - PAINT . SIP . LEARN. *Pick painting *Tell friends to come *Drink & paint. 4 LOCATIONS! MISSOULA’S FIRST PAINT & SIP STUDIO. WWW.DVINEPALETTE.COM. 406.239.6856 Meet Willis Curdy, hd 98 This is a fundraiser at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club on Tuesday, April 22, from 5:30pm to 8pm. Children are welcome. (New HD 98 is Orchard Homes, Target Range, and east of Reserve to Kemp. World’s Largest Garage Sale Join us Saturday, April 26th for “The World’s Largest Garage Sale!” The event will be held at the University Center Parking Structure from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m located next to the Mansfield Library. Setup for vendors will begin at 7:30 a.m.

The sale offers an opportunity to recycle furniture, house wares, clothes - anything that might have value to community residents or to students who are trying to furnish new apartments. For $25, vendors will get two parking spaces, each 9 feet by 18 feet. Additional spaces are available for $10 each. Please make checks payable to University of Montana. The semi-annual garage sale is a fundraiser for the UM Advocates, a campus service organization. The organization’s more than 75 members provide volunteer labor for many campus functions, including Homecoming and new-student orientation.

web master. 406-207-0765 facebook.com/bassethoundrescue

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 273-0368. www.aniysa.com

VOLUNTEERS Basset Rescue of Montana. Looking for a volunteer

T'ai Chi 728-0918 missoulataichi.com

Ken's Barber Shop Children & Walk-in Welcome • 8:30AM-5:30PM • Tue-Sat Haircuts $10 • Beard Trims $5 Senior Citizens $9 1114 Cedar St, Missoula, MT• 728-3957

Single or taken, come mingle. GREAT DRINK SPECIALS

$4.95 Taco & Tot Basket 4pm-9pm KARAOKE CONTEST EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT

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A clinical approach to negative self-talk • bad habits stress • depression Empower Yourself

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EMPLOYMENT GENERAL Administrative temp for 30 days WORK FORCE INC Seeking a temporary administrative temp employee from 4/285/30 for a local Missoula company. Seeking a professional candidate who is familiar with administrative/receptionist duties. Someone who knows all office machines and is familiar with multi-line phones. Call us for as soon as tomorrow! Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043148

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! “http://www.oneworldcenter.org” www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org Kennel Technician WORK

FORCE INC. Seeking someone WITH experience to help us in our shelter. If you have medicated animals before, that is a HUGE plus! Qualifications: Must have worked in a shelter before (cats or dogs); medicating, deep cleaning, customer service, attention to detail, and honesty ARE ALL NECESSARY! We need good references to call for your past jobs. Call for details and time to set up an interview. Full Time position available. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043136 Local Sales Executive KECI KECI TV, Missoula’s NBC affiliate is seeking qualified applicants for a local sales executive. Successful applicant will be self-motivated, high energy individual with excellent verbal and written communication skills. Must be customer focused with ability to utilize research and market knowledge as well as develop an understanding of client’s business to build and present creative and effective marketing plans

including digital platforms and advertising schedules to meet customer’s needs and objectives. Ability to negotiate advertising rates. Responsible for generating increasingly higher revenue through prospecting and development of new clients as well as building strong relationships growing revenue from existing clients. Must be able to prioritize and organize work schedule to achieve agreed to goals and objectives. Prepare accurate and timely reports to sales management. Must have reliable transportation and a valid driver’s license and a good driving record. Must be proficient in MS Office and other computer applications. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043262 Receptionist CITY GLASS is seeking a part-time Receptionist. Computer knowledge and customer service skills are required; employer is willing to train on other skills. Receptionist will prepare and print in-

voices, schedule jobs, answer phones and greet customers. Work will be from 12:00pm-5:00pm, Monday through Friday. Rate of pay is $10-$12/hr to start. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043139 STORE CLERKS ADULT Book/Video Store needs Part-time STORE CLERKS—ASAP! This is a part time position that may work into more hours, depending on employer need. QUALIFICATIONS: Applicants must be able to handle cash accurately and interact with a wide variety of clients. MUST have reliable transportation-some shifts will be on Sunday when the busses are not running. Experience in the retail sales field is REQUIRED! Reliability and honesty are essential. DUTIES: Will be making cash sales, standing on feet for all of shift, stocking and doing daily inventories. Interacting with a wide variety of people and personalities. Job also includes some cleaning duties-


EMPLOYMENT cleaning restroom, etc. HOURS/DAYS: Applicants need to be available to work all shifts, but this will primarily be an evening job. Other days and shifts as needed to fill in for co-workers. **Some shifts may be as long as 10 hours**. Must be able to work until 1:00 am or 4:00 am as needed. WAGE: $7.90/hour to start. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043357

opportunity for you. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043118

SUMMER HELP WANTED. N-Bar Ranch in Grass Range looking for farm help including field work, irrigation and fencing. Temporary housing available. 406-428-2140 for more information

Front Desk/Admin/driver/maintenence Looking for a person to fill a part-time Front Desk/Office position. The duties of this position vary. Some outside duties include: sweeping, pulling/spraying weeds, shoveling snow, picking up trash, and moving some heavy items occasionally. Other duties: unhooking and hooking up batteries, driving customer vehicles, answering the phone, washing and cleaning vehicles, checking customers in, collections, and other occasional office duties. Qualifications/Experience: Excellent customer service and phone skills Must have an excellent driving record.Hours will be 20-24+ hours a week. Mostly afternoons 1-5 in the summer; every other Saturday 9-1, and 8-12:30 in the fall. Pay is $9/hr DOE to start or more for the right person. Email resume and cover letter. No phone calls or walkins. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043297

PROFESSIONAL CHIP TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED FOR LOCAL HAULS • Home daily • Good pay • Benefits • 2 years exp. required Call 406493-7876 FAMILY & COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP COORD RAVALLI COUNTY HEAD START INC. Missoula area Social & Family Service employer is seeking a Family & Community Partnership Coordinator. Requires knowledge of social services, human development & various programs available in the community, along with knowledge of state & federal regulations pertaining to child abuse & neglect & how to abide by reporting standards. Must be skilled in use of computers & office machines, have effective verbal & written communication skills, and have effective program & project coordination skills. Need organizational skills to manage a busy schedule, ability to exercise professional judgment in evaluating before making decisions & maintain all information in strict confidentiality. Must be able to recognize problems in the area of family and social services while maintaining effective working relationships with staff, children, parents and other agencies. This position has operational responsibility for implementing family & community partnership services in accordance with Head Start Performance Standards. Full job description and application available. Will work 30 hours per week, yearround. Pay is $14.63/hour; benefits available after probationary period. **CLOSES 04/18/2014 at 5pm** Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043350 Financial Consultant American Federal Savings Bank seeks a dynamic professional to join their Missoula team as a part of their Wealth Management Division servicing an existing book of business and developing new client relationships. Qualifications: Series 7, 63, 65 and Insurance License. At least two years of customer-facing investment, insurance, and financial planning experience required. Strong business and investments acumen. High achiever with entrepreneurial spirit Application material may be obtained by visiting in our website. American Federal Savings Bank has proudly served the banking needs of Montanans since 1922! If you are looking to work for a Company that prides themselves in offering an excellent work environment to their employees and exceptional services to their customers, we have a great

Flatbed Drivers needed from the Missoula area. Home weekly to Bi-weekly • Top pay • Full benefits • New equipment • 2 years experience required • Clean driving record • Must be present to apply. 406-493-7876 Call 9am-5pm M-F only.

General Assignment Reporter NBC Montana is seeking to fill the position of General Assignment Reporter for its Missoula station, KECI-TV. Applicants should know how to shoot, edit video, write news stories and be savvy with web posting and social media. Must be a team player and a self-starter. This is a full-time position. Must have a valid driverâ¿¿s license and a good driving record. NBC Montana is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043269 Motel Manager On Site Motel Manager responsible for 24 hr day, 7 day week operation running a 40 unit motel in Deer Lodge. Previous supervisory/management experience helpful but not required. Successful candidate will be answering phones, making reservations, checking guests in & out, maintenance duties as needed. Seeking self motivated, reliable, responsible individual/couple. Pay is DOE which includes 2 bedroom manager apartment. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043303 RESTORATION YOUTH CREW LEADER Seeking a temporary, full-time (May thru Sept) RESTORATION YOUTH CREW LEADER. Requires twenty four (24) college semester credits. Courses most applicable to the position will be in Forestry, Natural Resources, biology, botany or other plant sciences. Requires at least two field seasons of experience working in a plant science field or natural resource field work. Will lead of group of high school students in natural resource restoration activities for the Missoula County Weed District. CLOSE DATE: 05/02/14. $14.13 Hourly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043308

Summit Preparatory School on 500 acres in Kalispell is a private, non-profit co-ed therapeutic boarding school for teenagers with psychological, social, family, academic and behavior problems. Seeking male and female Residential Counselors to work as primary resource for team of male and female students to assist with personal needs, track program progression and assist with treatment planning. Req’d: Bachelor’s degree (psych/education related preferred) training or exp. With adolescents, outdoor rec exp. Salary, DOE. Health Benefits. Send resume/cover letter to: Lainsworth@summitprepschool.org or mail to Human Resources at 1605 Danielson Rd. Kalispell, MT 59901.

SKILLED LABOR Distribution Project Engineer Distribution Project Engineer Our Missoula, MT office is seeking a Distribution Project Engineer to join our nationally ranked team of Power Delivery professionals. The primary duties of the Project Engineer will include overhead and underground distribution line design, preparation of cost estimates, specifications, staking sheets, develop construction units, written reports and to perform routine engineering assignments requiring application of standard techniques and procedures. Will work on small projects and assist senior engineers on larger projects and may function as technical specialist with instruction from the Project Manager. 4 years of experience in distribution planning, distribution modeling, distribution... For full info follow application link. HDR is a federal contractor. Our offices are an Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer for Minorities, Females, Protected Veterans and Persons with a Disability. Qualified applicants will be considered for employment without regard to protected veteran and disability status. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043242 Electrician Tired of bouncing around from one employer to another? We offer a tremendous career opportunity for a career-minded journeyman electrician to work for a growing petroleum equipment service company based in Montana. The ideal candidate would have at least 2 years experience working with commercial electrical applications and has a mechanical aptitude. Responsible for wiring of petroleum/service station and carwash equipment. Also responsible for the installation, repair, and maintenance of petroleum equipment and carwashes such as fueling dispensers, POS systems, inbay automatics and tunnels. Experience with electronics is preferred, but not required. Full training is provided. Clean driving record is mandatory and we perform drug screening as well as background checks. Travel expenses paid by employer. Many benefits including health insurance, 401k, dental, disability, vacation and holiday pay. Please be prepared to send a resume. One position available in either Missoula, Great Falls or Butte, Montana. Licensed journeyman electrician only. $24.00 - $28.00 Hourly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043266

EXPERIENCED DRIVER OR RECENT GRAD? With Swift, you can grow to be an award-winning Class A CDL driver. We help you achieve Diamond Driver status with the best support there is. As a Diamond Driver, you earn additional pay on top of all the competitive incentives we offer. The very best, choose Swift. Great Miles = Great Pay LateModel Equipment Available Regional Opportunities Great Career Path Paid Vacation Excellent Benefits Please Call: (520) 375-9632 LOOKING FOR A TRUCK DRIVER. Must have a Class A CDL with a clean driving record. Competitive wages, starting wage $18 DOE. Benefits: Simple IRA, health insurance, dental, paid vacation and paid holiday. B&B Septic Services, Inc., 3604 N. Hwy 7, P.O. Box 1514, Baker, MT 59313-1514; Allan or Trish Barth 406-778-2599. Please send resumes to: allanbarth@yahoo.com or fax to 406778-2794 NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Class” training. New Academy Classes Weekly No Money Down or Credit Check Certified Mentors Ready and Available Paid (While Training With Mentor) Regional and Dedicated Opportunities Great Career Path Excellent Benefits Package Please Call: (520) 375-9632 SHOP WORKER AQUA CREEK PRODUCTS LLC. Missoula manufacturing business is seeking a Shop Worker for their boxing department. Must be able to work hard entire shift—this is a fastpaced work environment. Duties include reading invoice orders to identify which supplies are to be boxed with equipment scheduled for shipping. Build packing boxes. Obtain supplies listed on invoice order from shelving and fill boxes with supplies. Write down supplies packed into box, placing a copy in box and keeping a copy for records. Place foam in box to protect supplies. After quality assurance personnel inspects contents, will tape box closed and stack boxes on pallet for shipping department. Must be able to lift and carry objects up to 25 lbs. and stand and walk on concrete floors for entire shift. Employee needs to be aware of surroundings at all times to avoid injury and be alert to moving equipment. Employee may transition over to the assembly department if needed. Due to federal regulations, this employer cannot hire felons. Drug-free workplace drug testing will be conducted. This is a full time position, day shift, usually Monday-Friday. Pay starts at $10.00/hour. Full job description at

Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043122

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

IT’S A CALLING. GoANG.com/MT 800-TO-GO-ANG

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

HEALTH CAREERS DISHWASHER DOUBLETREE HOTEL EDGEWATER seeks a full time evening shift Dishwasher. Prefer previous experience in restaurant or banquet hall. Is responsible for transporting and cleaning cooking utensils and service ware in the hotel’s continuing effort to deliver outstanding guest service and financial profitability. Operating dishwasher to properly clean all china ware, silver ware and cooking utensils used in the kitchens, restaurants and banquets. Scrub pots and re-stock all supplies in the assigned areas. General kitchen cleaning, including mopping kitchen floors and removing trash. $7.90 Hourly. Full job description at Missoula Job Service: employmissoula.com. Job# 10043151

OPPORTUNITIES BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY. Lot cleaning and striping equipment for sale. Parking lot sweeper, airless striper, dump trailer cargo trailer, power sweeper, cones, stencils, etc. Call 406-535-5275

COORDINATOR FT Position responsible for assisting individuals & supervising staff supporting individuals w/disabilities. Supervisor exp. Preferred.  Varied days/hours. $13.25- $13.50/HR.  Closes:  4/22/14, 5p.

SHIFT SUPERVISOR (2) FT Positions supporting persons with disabilities residentially.  Supervisory exp preferred.  $9.60-$9.85/hr. Varied shifts.

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL

Supporting Persons with Disabilities in Enhancing their Quality of Life.  Nite & Wknd hours, $9.00-$9.65/hr. Valid MT Driver’s License, No Record of Abuse, Neglect or Exploitation. Applications available at OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 or online: orimt.org. Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE.

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • April 17 – April 24, 2014 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Affordable, quality addiction counseling in a confidential, comfortable atmosphere. Stepping Stone Counseling, PLLC. Shari Rigg, LAC • 406926-1453. Skype sessions available

By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): It's Compensation Week. If you have in the past suffered from injustice, it's an excellent time to go in quest of restitution. If you have been deprived of the beauty you need to thrive, now is the time to get filled up. Wherever your life has been out of balance, you have the power to create more harmony. Don't be shy about seeking redress. Ask people to make amends. Pursue restorations. But don't, under any circumstances, lust for revenge.

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): "Do you really have what it takes or do you not have what it takes?" That's the wrong question to ask, in my opinion. You can't possibly know the answer ahead of time, for one thing. To dwell on that quandary would put you on the defensive and activate your fear, diminishing your power to accomplish the task at hand. Here's a more useful inquiry: "Do you want it strongly enough or do you not want it strongly enough?" With this as your meditation, you might be inspired to do whatever's necessary to pump up your desire. And that is the single best thing you can do to ensure your ultimate success.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I swear my meditations are more dynamic when I hike along the trail through the marsh than if I'm pretzeled up in the lotus position back in my bedroom. Maybe I've been influenced by Aristotle's Peripatetic School. He felt his students learned best when they accompanied him on long strolls. Then there was philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, who testified that his most brilliant thoughts came to him as he rambled far and wide. Even if this possibility seems whimsical to you, Leo, I invite you to give it a try. According to my reading of the current astrological omens, your moving body is likely to generate bright ideas and unexpected solutions and visions of future adventures.

c

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Throughout North America and Europe, there are hundreds of unused roads. Many are former exit and entrance ramps to major highways, abandoned for one reason or another. Some are stretches of pavement that used to be parts of main thoroughfares before they were rerouted. I suggest we make "unused roads" your metaphor of the week, Virgo. It may be time for you to bring some of them back into operation, and maybe even relink them to the pathways they were originally joined to. Are there any missing connections in your life that you would love to restore? Any partial bridges you feel motivated to finish building?

d

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Karma works both ways. If you do ignorant things, ignorant things may eventually be done to you. Engage in generous actions, and at some future date you may be the unexpected beneficiary of generosity. I'm expecting more of the latter than the former for you in the coming days, Libra. I think fate will bring you sweet compensations for your enlightened behavior in the past. I'm reminded of the fairy tale in which a peasant girl goes out of her way to be kind to a seemingly feeble, disabled old woman. The crone turns out to be a good witch who rewards the girl with a bag of gold. But as I hinted, there could also be a bit of that other kind of karma lurking in your vicinity. Would you like to ward it off? All you have to do is unleash a flurry of good deeds. Anytime you have a chance to help people in need, do it.

e

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): As they lie in the sand, African crocodiles are in the habit of opening their jaws wide for hours at a time. It keeps them cool, and allows for birds called plovers to stop by and pluck morsels of food that are stuck between the crocs' molars. The relationship is symbiotic. The teeth-cleaners eat for free as they provide a service for the large reptiles. As I analyze your astrological aspects, Scorpio, I'm inclined to see an opportunity coming your way that has a certain resemblance to the plovers'. Can you summon the necessary trust and courage to take full advantage?

f

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Are you sure you have enough obstacles? I'm afraid you're running low. And that wouldn't be healthy, would it? Obstacles keep you honest, after all. They motivate you to get smarter. They compel you to grow your willpower and develop more courage. Please understand that I'm not taking about trivial and boring obstacles that make you numb. I'm referring to scintillating obstacles that fire up your imagination; rousing obstacles that excite your determination to be who you want and get what you want. So your assignment is to acquire at least one new interesting obstacle. It's time to tap into a deeper strain of your ingenuity.

g

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1937, physicist George Paget Thomson won a Nobel Prize for the work he did to prove that the electron is a wave. That's funny, because his father, physicist J. J. Thomson, was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1906 for showing that the electron is a particle. Together, they helped tell the whole story about the electron, which as we now know is both a wave and a particle. I think it's an excellent time for you to try something similar to what George did: follow up on some theme from the life of one of your parents or mentors; be inspired by what he or she did, but also go beyond it; build on a gift he or she gave the world, extending or expanding it.

h

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You have been a pretty decent student lately, Aquarius. The learning curve was steep, but you mastered it as well as could be expected. You had to pay more attention to the intricate details than you liked, which was sometimes excruciating, but you summoned the patience to tough it out. Congrats! Your against-the-grain effort was worth it. You are definitely smarter now than you were four weeks ago. But you are more wired, too. More stressed. In the next chapter of your life story, you will need some downtime to integrate all you've absorbed. I suggest you schedule some sessions in a sanctuary where you can relax more deeply than you've allowed yourself to relax in a while.

Family Care • Nutritional Consultation • IV Therapy • Herbal Medicine • Women’s Health • Massage Physician’s Building #2 • Community Medical Center • 2831 Fort Missoula Road, Ste. 105

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I wonder if it's time for you to modify an old standby. I'm getting the sense that you should consider tinkering with a familiar resource that has served you pretty well. Why? This resource may have some hidden weakness that you need to attend to in order to prevent a future disruption. Now might be one of those rare occasions when you should ignore the old rule, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." So be proactive, Gemini. Investigate what's going on beneath the surface. Make this your motto: "I will solve the problem before it's a problem—and then it will never be a problem."

Christine White N.D. Elizabeth Axelrod N.D.

BLACK BEAR NATUROPATHIC

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): "Our brains are no longer conditioned for reverence and awe," said novelist John Updike. That's a sad possibility. Could you please do something to dispute or override it, Taurus? Would it be too much to ask if I encouraged you to go out in quest of lyrical miracles that fill you with wonder? Can I persuade you to be alert for sweet mysteries that provoke dizzying joy and uncanny breakthroughs that heal a wound you've feared might forever plague you? Here's what the astrological omens suggest: Phenomena that stir reverence and awe are far more likely than usual.

i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You have the power to shut what has been open or open what has been shut. That's a lot of responsibility. Just because you have the power to unleash these momentous actions doesn't mean you should rashly do so. Make sure your motivations are pure and your integrity is high. Try to keep fear and egotism from influencing you. Be aware that whatever you do will send out ripples for months to come. And when you are confident that you have taken the proper precautions, by all means proceed with vigor and rigor. Shut what has been open or open what has been shut—or both. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • April 17 – April 24, 2014

Bioenergetic, CranioSacral & Physical Therapies. 30 years experience. Body-mind-spirit integration. Shana’s Heart of Healing, Shana Dieterle, LPT 396 5788 Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. Insurance accepted. Janit Bishop, LMT • 207-7358 • 127 N Higgins Hummingbird Usui Reiki Attunements at Garden Mother Herbs 345 West Front St. Missoula, 1st level $75, 2nd level $75, Master Level $150. ph 406-529-3834

Need a refreshing point of view? Call our Mental Health Therapist Lois Doubleday LCPC today!

721-1646 www.bluemountainclinic.org

JIN SHIN JYUSTU THERAPY. Eliminate pain & stress on all levels with safe, healing touch. Animals like it too! Hot Springs, MT. Will travel. Lila: 406-741-5709 PEACEFUL HEART YOGA & PRESCHOOL : First Friday Kids Art & Music show: May 2nd 57pm ~ Yoga for Teenagers series Wednesdays 5:30 - 6:45 starts April 16. 406-239-9642, PeacefulHeartYogaMissoula.com; 725 W. Alder #3.

Missoula Friends of Jung presents ROSEN BODYWORK LECTURE WITH ELAINE CONDER, LMT Rosen Bodywork accesses the body’s wisdom and psyche’s content to release the past and restore balance. To learn more call Ken Silvestro, 406-677-7282 April 18, 2014 Red Willow Center 825 West Kent, Missoula  7-9 PM, Donation at door

Soft Touch Therapy Readings by Leslie

Psychic/Medium-Reiki/ Spiritual Healer. I provide a psychic/medium reading, a healing with a soft, loving laying on of the hands approach. All I do, I do within The Light Of God. I consider my abilities a gift from God to provide love, healing and blessings for each and every person I am honored to connect with and during all sessions I do.

406.542.2147

406-493-6428

MontanaNaturalMedicine.com

psychiclesliemissoula.com

A natural healing art based on the principle that there are reflex points on the feet, hands & ears that are actually "reflections" of the body systems & organs. Using gentle acupressure, your reflexologist is able to stimulate the body's own natural ability to achieve better overall balance and energy. It's a perfect complement to traditional health care routines... and you get to keep your clothes on!!

Please call or email for appt. 406-830-7276 mountainreflexology@gmail.com 127 N. Higgins, Ste. 308


SERVICES

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS English Saddles- Crosby 19” and Stubben 17” with saddle bags, pads, covers, and tack. 406498-5786.

AUCTIONS GOLD & SILVER COIN AUCTION - Sat., May 3, 10 a.m. Yogo Inn, Main St., Lewistown, MT. 65 gold coins, 250 Morgans, 50 Silver Eagles & more. Collector Toys & Western Books. See list & bid live: www.ShobeAuction.com 1-406538-5125.

CLOTHING Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new children’s clothing and equipment. Providing ecofriendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1940 Harve • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com

MUSIC Banjo lessons not just for guys anymore. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 721-0190 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS

OUTDOOR GEAR

Basset Rescue of Montana. Senior bassets needing homes. 406-207-0765. Please like us on Facebook... facebook.com/bassethoundrescue

The Sports Exchange - Great Gear. Great Prices. Buy • Sell • Trade • Consignment. 111 S. 3rd W., Missoula, on the Hip Strip. 406-721-6056

Calico Kitty Sisters Autumn and Chloe are adorable sisters born in August 2011. Autumn is a calico and Chloe is a torbie (tortoiseshell tabby). They are exceptionally talkative with vast and varied vocabularies. Their energy, curiosity and enthusiasm are boundless. Both are keen acrobats and puzzlesolvers. In other words, whoever gives these two a home must be prepared for extremely high-energy animals who can leap nearly 10 feet and open cabinets! They are also delightfully sweet. Neither has ever tried to bite or scratch anyone in their lives. They love lots of cuddles, sitting on laps, riding on shoulders and will demand ample love on a daily basis. They aren’t the sort of cats who would rather be alone. Autumn and Chloe have been indoor cats their entire lives. Therefore, I would prefer to find them an indoor-only home too. If this is not possible, a home where they will be carefully transitioned. Please call 206-4274947

AUTOMOBILE CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop! Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

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SPRING SALE! 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments

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Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

Easter Bunny 1 1/2 oz. Dark Creme de Cacao 1/2 oz. Vodka Mix in a rocks glass with ice and drizzle with 1 tsp. Chocolate Syrup 1 tsp. Cherry Brandy

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SUSTAINAFIEDS Kid Crossing offers exceptional value on nearly new children’s clothing and equipment. Providing eco-friendly clothing exchange since 2001. Reduce • Reuse • Recycle • Buy Local! 1940 Harve • 406-829-8808 • www.kidcrossingstores.com Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Energy efficient, small homes, additions/ remodels, higher-comfort crafted buildings, solar heating. 369-0940 or 642-6863. www.naturalhousebuilder.net

PAINTING

Squires For Hire Carpentry, Remodel, Drywall, Custom Tile, Appliance Repair. Free Estimates. Licensed Contract #163074. Bret Squries, Handyman 406-5444671

LIGHTEN UP PAINTING. Celebrating 30 glorious years of painting! Lics’d/ insured free estimates. Carrie 207-9255

HOME IMPROVEMENT Natural Housebuilders, Inc. Building the energy-efficient SOLAR ACTIVE HOME • Custom crafted buildings • Additions/Remodels. 369-0940 or 642-6863 www.naturalhousebuilder.net

SBS Solar specializes in design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. Serving all of Western Montana. www.SBSlink.com

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

ECO EGGS COLORING KIT MADE FROM ORGANIC PLANT EXTRACTS!

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Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Testimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

Bennett’s Music Studio

GARAGE SALES LOLO COMMUNITY CENTER PRESENTS Spring Bazaar. May 3rd. 9:00-2:00. For info call 880-8903

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Makers’ Ball  Repurposed/Recycled  Fashion Competition & Show 

PERSONAL Online Job Offer 1) You must be able to speak English Language.. 2)Is your partners in support of this position for you. 3)You must have any references and achievements ?

WINDOWS Abbott’s Glass Vinyl Windows • Wood Windows • Small Commercial Jobs • “The Meticulous Glass Professionals” Since 1992 728-6499

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JOE'S TILE & STONE, LLC SALES AND INSTALLATIONS

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montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • April 17 – April 24, 2014 [C5]


SERVICES

PUBLIC NOTICES the 7th day of April, 2014. /s/ Shirley E. Faust Clerk of Court (COURT SEAL) By /s/ Heather Olean Deputy Clerk /s/ Howard Toole, Attorney for Plaintif Howard Toole Law Offices 211 N Higgins Ave., Ste. 350 Missoula, MT 59802 Ph. (406) 728-4682 MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No.: DP-14-60 Dept. No. 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: NEAL L. MANDELKO, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lois A. Mandelko-Steinberg, the Personal Representative, returned receipt requested, at P. Mars Scott Law Offices, P.O. Box 5988, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 28th day of March, 2014. /s/ Lois A. MandelkoSteinberg, Personal Representative

Christopher W. Froines, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, Terrace West, Suite K, 619 Southwest Higgins, Missoula, Montana 59803 froines@lawmissoula.com 406-5414940 Attorneys for Plaintiffs MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-14-326 AMENDED SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION CHRIS WARDEN AND LORELEI WARDEN, Plaintiffs, vs. JIM F. AMMEN AND ALICE A. AMMEN, S.F. ERICKSON AND CHRISTINE ERICKSON, QUICKEN LOANS, INC., MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., and any and all persons, known or unknown, claiming or who might claim any right, title, estate, or interest in or lien upon the real property herein described in the Complaint adverse to Plaintiffs’ ownership or any cloud upon Plaintiffs’ title, whether such claim or possible claim is present or contingent, Defendants. TO: The above stated Defendants: This action is brought for the purpose of quieting title in land situated in Missoula County, Montana, and described as follows: The South 1/2 of The West 15 feet of the East 165 feet of the South one-half of Lot 2 in Block 39 of HAMMOND ADDITION NO. 3., a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof, which includes the land on which their garage is partially located, and more particularly described as: Commencing at the southeast corner of Block 39, Hammond Addition No. 3, thence N 86º52’22” W, 150.04 feet, to the true point on beginning; thence N 86º52’22” W, 15.00 feet; thence N 03º08’34” E, 36.71 feet; thence S 86º40’42” E, 15.00 feet, thence 03º08’34” W, 36.67 feet to the point of beginning and containing 550 square feet. A lawsuit has been filed against you. Within 21 days after the service of this Summons on you (or 42 days if you are the state of Montana, a state agency, or a state officer or employee), you must serve on the Plaintiff an Answer to the attached Complaint of Motion under Rule 12 of the Montana Rules of Civil Procedure. Do not include the day you were served in your calculation of time. The Answer or Motion must be served on the Plaintiff or Plaintiff’s attorney, if Plaintiff is represented by an attorney, whose name and address are listed above. If you fail to respond, judgment by default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. You may also file your Answer or Motion with the Court. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said court, this 4th day of April, 2014. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: /s/ Andrew Jenks, Deputy MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY DEPT. NO. 2 PROBATE NO. DP-14-65 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF THELMA S. SAUNDERS, aka THELMA RUTH SAUNDERS, born as THELMA RUTH SCHEFFELMAER, Deceased. NOTICE IS

HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Larry G. Saunders, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Morales Law Office, P.C. at 422 West Spruce S., PO Box 9311, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 3rd day of April, 2014. /s/ Larry G. Saunders, Personal Representative c/o Morales Law Office, P.C. 422 W. Spruce St., PO Box 9311, Missoula, MT 59807-9311 MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DV-14-267 Dept. No. 1 ALIAS SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION JEANETTE K. NEWLON, Plaintiff v. JACK STILLSON, WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK fsb, the successors in interest of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, fsb, HSBC BANK USA NATIONAL ASSN as TRUSTEE for ACE 2005-SN1, ROBERT J. RANGITSCH and HELEN RANGITSCH, RAYMOND R. SEITZ and FLORENCE SEITZ, and EDGAR S. RAMEY and ELIZABETH RAMEY, COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, and ALL OTHER PERSONS, KNOWN OR UNKNOWN, CLAIMING OR WHO MIGHT CLAIM ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE OR INTEREST IN OR LIEN OR ENCUMBRANCE UPON THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO THE PLAINTIFFS’ OWNERSHIP OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFFS’ TITLE, WHETHER THE CLAIM OR POSSIBLE CLAIM IS PRESENT OR CONTINGENT, Defendants, THE STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint to Quiet Title in this Action which is filed with the above-named Court, a copy of which is served upon you, and to file your written answer with the Court and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after service of this Summons, or such other period as may be specified by law, exclusive of the day of service. Your failure to appear or answer will result in judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. A filing fee must accompany the answer. This action is brought for the purpose of Quieting Title to the following-described real property located in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 6, EXCEPT the South 68 feet thereof, and West 40 feet of Lot 5, EXCEPT the South 68 feet of said West 40 feet of Lot 5, and Block 8 of RANGITSCH ADDITION, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. WITNESS MY HAND AND THE SEAL of this Court,

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 4 Cause Probate No. DP14-63 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN LEE SWANSON, ALSO KNOWN AS JOHN L. SWANSON, AND JOHN SWANSON Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice of said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Deirdre Swanson, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, Montana 59807-9197, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 2nd day of April, 2014. /s/ Deirdre Swanson, Personal Representative, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, MT 59807-9197 MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-14-66 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF NEIL W. EASTER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kirk Alan Easter, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Paul E. Fickes, Esq., 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Montana the foregoing is true and correct. Dated this 3rd day of April, 2014. /s/ Kirk Alan Easter c/o Paul E. Fickes, Esq., 310 West Spruce Street, Missoula, MT 59802 /s/ Paul E. Fickes, Attorney for Personal Representative MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-14-70 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MELODEE DRAKE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Karinna Solum, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Boone Karlberg P.C., P. O. Box 9199, Missoula, Montana 598079199, or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. I declare, under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana, that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 8th day of April, 2014, at Missoula, Montana. /s/ Karinna Solum BOONE KARLBERG P.C. By: /s/ Julie R. Sirrs, Esq. P. O. Box 9199 Missoula, Montana 59807 Attorneys for Karinna Solum, Personal Representative MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-14-64 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD LAWRENCE BERTLIN, a/k/a Richard L. Bertlin and Richard Bertlin, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either

[C6] Missoula Independent • April 17 – April 24, 2014

be mailed to BRIAN A. BERTLIN, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 4th day of April, 2014. /s/ Brian A. Bertlin, Personal Representative REELY LAW FIRM, P.C. 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801 Attorneys for the Personal Representatives. /s/ Shane N. Reely, Esq. MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-14-55 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY D. BARMEYER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to BARBARA BARMEYER, return receipt requested, c/o Maser Law Office, PO Box 8688, Missoula, Montana 59807-8688 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 21st day of March, 2014. /s/ Barbara Barmeyer, c/o Masar Law Office, PO Box 8688, Missoula, Montana 59807-8688 MASAR LAW OFFICE, By: /s/ James J. Masar MNAXLP MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-14-59 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DOLORES RAPP, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to William E. McCarthy, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 26th day of March, 2014. WORDEN THANE PC Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ William E. McCarthy, Personal Representative MNAXLP NOTICE OF OUR PLAN TO SELL PERSONAL PROPERTY Lei Ann Cross 199 Cross Country Road Polson MT 59860 Lei Ann Cross 17600 Highway 93 North Missoula MT 59808 Lei Ann Cross 110 Main, Suite 7 Polson MT 59860 Lei Ann Cross PO Box 549 Polson MT 59860 Lei Ann Cross 48901 Highway 93, PMB 433 Polson MT 59860 Lei Ann Cross 1029 W. 1st Ave., Apt. 506 Spokane WA 99201 Subject: Loan No. 20051557, First Security Bank of Missoula, dated February 6, 2003 -Promissory Note, Commercial Security Agreement and Deed of Trust We have an interest in your mobile home described as: 1972 Great Lakes Trailer, Montana Title No. M487388, vehicle identification no. 9720, located at 17600 Highway 93 North, Missoula, Montana 59808, because you broke promises in our agreement. See the attached Notice of Sale dated December 2, 2013. Public Disposition: We will sell the above-described collateral at public sale in conjunction with the Notice of Sale under Deed of Trust. The sale will be held as follows: Date: April 29, 2014 Time: 10:00 a.m. Place: Front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802 You may attend the sale and bring bidders if you want. The money that we get from the sale (after paying our costs) will reduce the amount you owe. If we get less money than you owe, you will still owe the bank the difference. If we get more money than you owe, you will get the extra money after paying all costs, unless the bank must pay it to someone else. You can get the property back at any time before we sell it by paying the bank the full amount you owe (not just the past due payments), including expenses. To learn the exact amount you must pay, call (406) 329-1940, Attention: Christine Altemus. If you want the bank to explain to you in writing how it figured the amount that you owe us, you may call (406) 329-1940 or write to P.O. Box 4506, Missoula, Montana 59806 and request a written explanation. If you need more information about the sale call the bank al (406) 329-1940 or write us at P.O. Box 4506, Missoula, Montana 59806. We are sending this notice to the following other people who may have an interest in the described collateral or who may owe money under your agreement. Edward A. Murphy Murphy Law Offices, PLLC PO Box 2639 Missoula MT 59806 Dwayne Hofschulte North Pole, AK 99705 Montana Land Project LLC PO Box 2163 Great Falls MT 59403 The Parent Company, LLC 915 Crescent Drive Great Falls MT 59404 /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Attorney for First Security Bank of Missoula Garlington,

Lohn & Robinson, PLLP PO Box 7909 Missoula MT 59807-7909 MNAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 02/03/11, recorded as Instrument No. 201102369 B: 873 P: 784, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Nancy K. Coleman, A Married Woman was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Sterling Savings Bank, a Washington Corporation, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 1 of Certificate of Survey No. 6227, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201118745 B:885 P:372, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 14, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $341,775.24. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $293,547.41, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.18019) 1002.264905-File No. MNAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/12, recorded as Instrument No. 201201760 B: 888 P: 1237, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Henry B Jennings V was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for First Interstate Bank, its successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Insured Titles was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3 of River Estates, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Together with a 54 foot wide private access and public utility easement over and across Lot 1 and 2 as set forth in said plat of River Estates. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Branch Banking and Trust Company. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, in-

terest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/13 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 17, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $209,205.26. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $200,453.71, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 1, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7883.20068) 1002.265456-File No. MNAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 07/07/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200517167 Bk:755 Pg:1215, mortgage records of MISSOULA County, Montana in which Scott Knight and Billie Anne Knight was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., it successors and assigns was Beneficiary and Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Charles J Peterson, Attorney at Law as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in MISSOULA County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 in Block 4 of Wapikiya Addition No. 3, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 201111169 B:879 P:1184, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Bank of America, N.A. successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of February 21, 2014, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $182,239.58. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $152,879.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 7, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-

is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7021.16382) 1002.248685-File No. MNAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 2, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The Southwesterly OneHalf of Lot 5 and all of Lots 6 and 7 in Block 5 of South Missoula, in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. APN No: 2345001 Patricia Wagner, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Stream, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, A subsidiary of Lehman Brothers Bank FSB, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 24, 2003 and recorded November 03, 2003 in Book 721 on Page 555 under Document No. 200341976. The beneficial interest is currently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust due to death, beginning September 29, 2013, The total amount due on this obligation as of January 28, 2014 is $95,239.58 principal, interest at the rate of 1.61% now totaling $39,140.07, and other fees and expenses advanced of $13,026.80, plus accruing interest at the rate of $6.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 24, 2014 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 24th day of January, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing


PUBLIC NOTICES instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Financial Freedom V. Wagner 41742.506 MNAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 19, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Parcel 1 of COS No. 4880. A tract located in the NE1/4 of Section 4, Township 12 North, Range 19 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana George L Stevens and Gertrude L Stevens, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronice Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 25, 2006 and recorded September 29, 2006 in Book 784, Page 168 as Document No. 200624919. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, as Trustee for Residential Accredit Loans, Inc., Mortgage Asset-Backed Pass- Through Certificates, Series 2007-QS3. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $6,847.34, beginning February 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of January 23, 2014 is $689,447.70 principal, interest at the rate of 6.75% now totaling $49,381.65, late charges in the amount of $1,816.01, escrow advances of $12,286.63, and other fees and expenses advanced of $292.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $129.27 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 9, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 9th day of January, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Ocwen V Stevens 42048.218 MNAXLP

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 19, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The following described property: In the County of Missoula, State of Montana, The E1/2 SE 1/4 SE 1/4 NW 1/4 of Section 36, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana. Assessor’s Parcel No: 0794308 Larry Stolle and Dawn Stolle, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 1, 2009 and recorded July 13, 2009 in Book 843, Page 798 under Document No. 200917156. The beneficial interest is currently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,041.67, beginning June 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 19, 2013 is $177,929.98 principal, interest at the rate of 5.500% now totaling $6191.17, late charges in the amount of $156.24, escrow advances of $1,470.00, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,502.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.81 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 2, 2014 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham) On this 2nd day of January, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Bac V Stolle 42048.741 MNAXLP NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 27, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1, HAPPY HOLLOW, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN BOOK 6 OF PLATS AT PAGE 59 1/2 Michael S. Daher, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to PHH Mortgage Services, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 10, 2003 and recorded on September 11, 2003 in Book 717, page 1029 under Document no. 200334214. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation fka Cendant Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $785.42, beginning July 1, 2013, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 14, 2014 is $110,564.26 principal, interest at the rate of 6.0% now totaling $4,658.83, late charges in the amount of $94.23, escrow advances of $1,659.33, and other fees and expenses advanced of $495.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.18 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: January 21, 2014 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services PO Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham) On this 21st day of January, 2014, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 PHH V Daher 42067.048 MNAXLP Trustee Sale Number: 13-00819-5 Loan Number: 7090970059 APN: 1227702 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on July 30, 2014 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 WEST BROADWAY, Missoula, MT following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: Lot 8 of Hidden Hills, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded

Plat thereof. More commonly known as: 24600 FRENCHTOWN FRONTAGE RD, HUSON, MT RICHARD SALES AND RENE SALES, as grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES OF MISSOULA, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., AS NOMINEE FOR POPULAR FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC, as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated March 24, 2004, and recorded on March 29, 2004 in Film No. 728 at Page 1369 under Document No. 200408179, in the records of Missoula County, Montana. (“Deed of Trust���). The current beneficiary is: The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as successor trustee for JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the benefit of the Certificateholders of Equity One ABS, Inc. Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2004-3 (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated February 25, 2014 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of March 20, 2014: Balance due on monthly payments from November 1, 2012 and which payments total: $24,604.07: Late charges: $1,404.97 Advances: $7,997.89 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $144,119.67 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 7.25000% per annum from October 1, 2012, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s and attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALESINFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 Dated March 20, 2014 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 P1088664 4/3, 4/10, 04/17/2014 MNAXLP

National Trust Company, as Trustee for Soundview Home Loan Trust 2004WMC1 Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2004-WMC1 (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated February 24, 2014 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of March 19, 2014: Balance due on monthly payments from July 1, 2013 and which payments total: $8,946.81: Late charges: $189.75 Advances: $566.00 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $110,029.39 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 5.87500% per annum from June 1, 2013, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the

Trustee Sale Number: 13-01001-5 Loan Number: 7110043929 APN: 5804299 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on July 29, 2014 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: TRACT 5A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3493, LOCATED IN THE EAST ONE-HALF OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. More commonly known as: 15190 ERSKINE FISHING ACCESS, FRENCHTOWN, MT CHERI LYN DEPHILIPPIS, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to MARK E. NOENNIG, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WMC MORTGAGE CORP., as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated as of October 4, 2004, and recorded on October 12, 2004 in Film No. 741 at Page 479 under Document No. 200428891, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank

CLARK FORK STORAGE

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 42, 79, 141, 380, 383, 384, 385, 399 and 413. Units contain furniture, clothes, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc. household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, April 28, 2014. All auction units will only be shown each day at 3 P.M. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage office at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59804 prior to <B>Wednesday, April 30, 2014 at 4:00 P.M. </B>Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 141, 201, 216, 293, and OS53. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 4/22/2013 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 4/25/2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

"Ron For Your Lives!"–that's all you can do.

by Matt Jones

ACROSS

1 Ski lodge drinks 7 Put up for display 11 "Danny and the Dinosaur" author ___ Hoff 14 Show off 15 Cookie with its name stamped on it 16 Actress Mendes 17 Furniture wheel 18 Club for shorter shots 20 "What's that D.C. university, hon?" response (from a director and former pitcher)? 22 Fish hook 24 Through 25 Controversial director Riefenstahl 26 Affect adversely 27 Dubliner's dance 28 Affirmation at the altar 31 Adjust a clock 32 Become more liked by 34 Like day-old bread 36 Premium-class TV dinner brand (from a fictional boss and an actor)? 40 Oldest of the "Animaniacs" siblings 41 Strainers 43 Miguel's "more" 46 Part of iOS 47 Easter egg coloring 48 Put away 49 Volcano that erupted in 2002 51 Al and Peggy Bundy's son 52 "Srsly?!" 53 Wine that can't decide what it is (from a stand-up comedian and a fictional newsman)? 58 Video game starting point 59 ___ car (child's ride) 62 Compass dir. 63 Advanced 64 Interlock Last week’s solution

65 The Mavericks, on scoreboards 66 '90s Mariners star 67 Agree (to)

DOWN

1 Freon letters 2 Rock-___ (jukebox manufacturer) 3 Movement of money 4 Words before bounds or breath 5 Over again 6 "The Firebird" composer 7 Accord creator 8 Like Death Valley 9 "99 Luftballons" singer 10 Movie or party attachment 11 Sitcom, e.g. 12 Miss ___ ("Pee-Wee's Playhouse" character) 13 "Heck!" 19 Down with something 21 18-wheeler 22 Prank 23 Goes on TV 27 The ___ Brothers 28 "___ Always Sunny in Philadelphia" 29 Short, short shorts 30 Skate park maneuver 33 Method 34 Snoopy ___-cone Machine 35 The night before 37 Allows 38 Common 39 "Are you for ___?" 42 Hog's haven 43 Whimpered 44 Favorite daughter of Zeus 45 Whimper 47 Burrowed 50 Fed on 51 AKC category 52 "This is weird, but..." 54 First name of the "First Lady of Song" 55 Feral pig 56 "...___ dust shalt thou return" 57 Columbus vessel 60 Food preserver 61 Suffix with employ

©2014 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

%montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • April 17 – April 24, 2014 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 DATED:March 19, 2014 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature P1088668 4/3, 4/10, 04/17/2014 MNAXLP Trustee Sale Number: 13-01038-5 Loan Number: 705622199 APN: 3996306 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on July 28, 2014 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT the following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: LOT 25

IN BLOCK 62 OF DALY’S ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. More commonly known as: 1632 SOUTH 14TH STREET WEST, MISSOULA, MT DEVEN O’BLENESS AND KEARA O’BLENESS, as the original grantor(s), conveyed said real property to MARK E. NOENNIG, as the original trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WMC MORTGAGE CORP. , as the original beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated July 19, 2005, and recorded on July 20, 2005 in Film No. 756 at Page 781 under Document No. 200518260, in the Official Records of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”) The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as Trustee for the Pooling and Servicing Agreement Dated as of November 1, 2005 Securitized Asset Backed Receivables LLC 2005HE1 (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor

Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated February 6, 2014 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of March 18, 2014: Balance due on monthly payments from September 1, 2013 and which payments total: $5,726.07: Late charges: $162.90 Advances: $2,040.33 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $141,519.22 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 3.00000% per annum from August 1, 2013, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s and attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, in-

cluding the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALESINFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 Dated:March 18, 2014 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee, By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 P1088672 4/3, 4/10, 04/17/2014 MNAXLP

2 bedroom, 1 bath, $615, N. Russell, coin-op laundry, offstreet parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

cluded. $425/month 406-2736034

ROOMMATES

DUPLEXES

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with

RENTALS APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bath, $575, Downtown, coin-op laundry, storage, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 1024 Stephens Ave. #13. 2 bed/1 bath, central location, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 1213 Cleveland St. “A” 1 bed/1 bath, central location, all utilities paid, pet? $725 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 130 Jefferson: Studio, Downtown & close to the U, Storage, Laundry, Wood floors, All paid, $375. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 1301 Montana: Studio, Newer, Main floor, Pergo floors, Laundry, Heat paid, $595 GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!! 1315 E. Broadway #2. 1 bed/1 bath, near U, coin-ops on site, pet? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2 bedroom, 1 bath, $695, Quite Cul-De-Sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

2423 55th St. “A”. 3 bed/1 bath, single garage, South Hills, pet? $950. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 bedroom, 1 bath, remodeled, $795, near Southgate Mall, storage, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333

3909 Buckley Place 2 bed/1 bath, single garage, W/D hookups, shared yard. $725. RENT INCENTIVE. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, $800, Condo, DW, Microwave, W/D in unit, carport, S/G paid. No Pets, No Smoking. GATEWEST 728-7333 2306 Hillview Ct. #4. 2 bed/1 bath, South Hills, W/D hookups. $600 Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2339 Mary Avenue #3. 2 bed/1 bath, coin-ops, storage, cat? $625. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 442 Washington St. 1 bed/1 bath, downtown, heat paid, coin-ops on site, cat? $700. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 720 Turner “A”. 3 bed/1.5 bath, HEAT PAID, W/D hookups, pet? $900. RENT INCENTIVE. Grizzly Property Management 5422060 807 Ryman: 2 Bedroom, Near downtown, Laundry, Good size, Garden Level, Heat paid, $550. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 549-6106; 1YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

MOBILE HOMES Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent. W/S/G/Electric in-

1&2

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HOUSES 5850 Blue Root Trail 3 bed/2 bath, bonus rooms, W/D hookups, extra acreage, pet? $1250. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 900 Cleveland: 4 Bedroom, Great back deck, Hook-ups, Dining area, Cat OK, All paid, $1295. GARDEN CITY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 5496106; 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP!!

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Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month Visit our website at

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[C8] Missoula Independent • April 17 – April 24, 2014

Finalist

MHA Management manages 13 properties throughout Missoula.

520 Hickory 1 Bed Apt . $510/month

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

Finalist

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com


REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 120 North Easy Street. 3 bed, 2 bath close to river, city park & UM. Fenced yard & 2 car garage. $192,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 1308 Jackson. 3 bed, 1 bath in Lower Rattlesnake. One block from Greeenough Park & Rattlesnake Creek. $289,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 1807 Missoula Avenue. 3 bed, 2 bath cottage-style near Rattlesnake Creek and park. $309,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653. pat@properties2000.com 1944 South 8th West. Remodeled 2 bed, 1 bath with deck on 2 lots. $158,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 1965 Raymond. 4 bed, 2 bath splitlevel in Upper Rattlesnake. Private lower level for mother-in-law apartment. $339,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com 2225 Missoula. 4 bed, 3 bath on Rattlesnake creek with fireplace, outdoor hot tub & Mt. Jumbo Views. $499,000. David Loewenwarter, Prudential Montana 241-3321. loewenwarter.com 2607 View Drive. 3 bed, 2 bath ranch-style home in Target Range. Hardwood floors, fireplace & 2 car garage. $238,500. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com 2609 Old Quarry Road. 4 bed, 3 bath Grant Creek home next to Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation & walk trail. $319,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 53-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 2611 Deer Canyon Court. 4 bed, 3 bath with daylight basement, patio, deck & 2 car garage. $447,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com 29203 Old Hwy 10 West. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 3.39 acres on the Clark Fork River. $539,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, remodeled Central Missoula home. $285,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3000 Sandalwood. 4 bed, 3 bath with 3 garage on one acre near Clark Fork River. Vickie Hozel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 3010 West Central. 3 bed, 1 bath on almost 5 Target Range acres bordering DNRC land. $450,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653, pat@properties2000.com 3501 Paxson.4 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, basement, fenced yard & garage. $225,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $190,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4571 Heaven’s Gate. 4 bed, 4 bath Farviews home on 2 acres. $995,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 4600 Monticello. 3 bed, 2 bath on corner lot in Canyon Creek Village with 2 car garage. $172,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 5465816. annierealtor@gmail.com 5454 Canyon River Drive. 6 bed, 4 bath with 3 car garage on Canyon River Golf Course. $550,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229 tory@montana.com 5619 Prospect. 5 bed, 4 bath wellmaintained Grant Creek home with 3 car garage. $419,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350 shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 716 South 6th West. Classic 3 bed, 2 bath with fireplace, deck, fenced yard & single garage. $259,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 2407653 pat@properties2000.com 756 Angler’s Bend. 3 bed, 2 bath with 3 car gargage on East Missoula golf course. $472,600. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate. 532-9229 tory@montana.com 909 Longstaff. Remodeled 3 bed, 2 bath on 3 lots with 2 car garage. $389,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

sion Valley Properties for more info 406-745-4940 University District 102 East Kent $265,000. University 4 bedroom home with character and a 1 bedroom cottage house. KD 2405227 porticorealestate.com Wonderful Westside 1722 Defoe $226,500. 2 bedroom, 1 bonus, 2 bathroom home on the Wonderful Westside with awesome gardens in the fenced yard. A home with character! KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES 1861 East Broadway. 3 bed, 2.5 condo with deck & single garage. $215,000. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com 324B North Grant. 3 bed, 2 bath condo with fenced yard & 2 car garage. $169,900. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 505 California. 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone near Riverfront Trail. No HOA fees. $289,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 5505 Creekstone. 2 bed, 1.5 bath in Grant Creek. $130,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. milyardhomes@yahoo.com

Beautiful home on Rattlesnake Creek. 4 bed, 3 bath with gourmet kitchen, fireplace and deck. $865,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 5417355, milyardhomes@yahoo.com

Cooley Street Condo 1545 Cooley St. #C. This upper level 2 bedroom condo provides for easy, sweet living close to downtown and has great North Hills views. $128,500 KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

I can help you find your new home! Celia Grohmann @ Banana Belt Realty. 406-550-1014 • celiamontana@gmail.com. Visit my website at www.on93.com

Northside Condo 1400 Burns Unit #15, 3 bedroom 1 bath, with balcony and tons of light. $156,000. KD 240-5227 or Sarah 370-3995 porticorealestate.com

Lot 42 Jeff Drive. To be built 2 bed, 2 bath Hoyt home in Linda Vista with 3 car garage. $369,500. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

Uptown Flats #210. 1 bed, 1 bath modern condo on Missoula’s Northside. $149,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

RE/MAX All Stars; combining local ownership, experienced agents, and the power of #1 RE/MAX. Complimentary real estate advice. Call 406542-8644

Uptown Flats #306. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit with lots of light. W/D, carport, storage & access to exercise room. $162,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com

Slant Street Charmer 733 Marshall $230,000. Slant Street charmer with lots of light, a wonderful yard with raised beds, and an awesome shop all in a convenient location and ready to move in to. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Sustainable Mission Valley Great place for sustainable living! Breathtaking views! Beautiful 3 bedroom 2 bath home on 6.06 acres! No covenants! Two greenhouses, All exterior walls built with minimum 2 x 6 or greater construction. Charming cottage tucked back of road bordering treed Tribal lands to south. Stunning Mission Mountain views of McDonald Peaks. Pesticide FREE for 4 years! Energy efficient home with new kitchen; includes Monarch Cook stove, stacking washer/dryer. Detached 2-car garage with heated food storage & shop area. Excellent soil, some sub-irrigated pasture, small orchard with apple, pear & pie cherry trees, grapes, rhubarb and a nice variety of berries. Great place for sustainable living! Hand pump could be added to well. Contact Mis-

toonah Lodges, a 55+ community. $83,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate, 532-9229 tory@montana.com 1974 Chickasaw. Completely remodeled. Great starter home for student or a place for mom. Must see to appreciate. Park application required. $16,500/OBO. 406-240-2510 2424 McIntosh Loop. Bright & airy 2 bed, 2 bath in 55+ community. Ramp, patio and single garage. $115,000. Vickie Honzel, Lammbros ERA Real Estate. 531-2605 vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com NEW HOME SPRING BLOWOUT!! Single Wides, Double Wides & Modular Homes at Clearance Prices!! 16 x 80 Single Wides - Tape & Texture Throughout, Oak Cabinets, Glamour Bath, Upgraded Insulation = Starting at $45,900 Modular Homes Loaded with Upgrades = Starting at $89,500 Elite Homes - Call Troy at 406-6966282 or Jason at 406-855-2279

LAND FOR SALE 160 acres in Grant Creek bordered on two sides by Forest Service land. $750,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

1625 Lot 12A Cote Lane. Level 1 acre with fantastic views. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com 53.5 acres overlooking Missoula. Utilities in place, septic approved. $927,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

NHN Edgewood. 3.35 end-of-road acres on east side of Mount Jumbo. Close to river. $89,900. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com NHN Frontage Road, Alberton. 2 building sites with Clark Fork River views. $65,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653 pat@properties2000.com

5402 Canyon River Road. Canyon River Golf Course Lot. 15,901 sq.ft. $150,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. 11 acre Mission Mountain building site. $86,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

910 Bandmann Trail. Over 1 acre on Canyon River Golf Course with 252 Clark Fork River frontage. $275,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

NHN Old Freight Road, St. Ignatius. Over 40 acres with 2 creeks near Mission Mountains. $199,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

Cassidy Lane, Philipsburg. Corner lot in Maxville with no covenants. $9500. Pintlar Territories R.E. 406859-3522. pintlarterritories.com

NHN Raymond. .62 acre in Lower Rattlesnake bordering Missoula Open Space. $154,500. David Loewenwarter, Prudential Montana 241-3321. loewenwarter.com

Lot 33 Old Mill Loop, St. Regis. 1.02 acre with 150’ of Clark Fork River Frontage. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate 532-9296. mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com NHN Arnica. Pattee Canyon acreage with great view of Missoula. Mary Louise Zapp-Knapp, Lambros ERA Real Estate. 532-9296 mlzappknapp@lambrosera.com

COMMERCIAL 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. Zoned commercial. $190,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

OUT OF TOWN 109 Church Street, Stevensville. Historic 3 bed, 1 bath with library, parlor & fantastic front porch. $139,000. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate, 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com 11901 Lewis & Clark Drive, Lolo. 2 bed, 2 bath with many upgrades including roof & windows. $197,500. Rita Gray, LambrosERA Real Estate 532-9283. ritagray@lambrosera.com

Noxon Reservoir Avista frontage lots near Trout Creek, MT. Red Carpet Realty 728-7262 www.redcarpet-realty.com Rock Creek Acreage. 20 acres adjacent to Forest Service land. $349,900. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

Uptown Flats #307. 1 bed, 1 bath top floor unit. $158,000. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate. 5465816 annierealtor@gmail.com Uptown Flats. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, carport, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com Why Rent? Own Your Own 1400 Burns. Designed with energy efficiency, comfort and affordability in mind. Next to Burns Street Bistro and Missoula Community Co-op. Starting at $79,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1790 Dukes. 3 bed, 2 bath in Ka-

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • April 17 – April 24, 2014 [C9]


REAL ESTATE 1290 Thunder’s Trail, Potomac. 3 bed, 3 bath on 20 acres. $795,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com 1333 Juniper, Alberton. 5 bed, 3 bath on nearly 20 acres bordered by National Forest. $725,000. Tory

Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229 tory@montana.com 210 Red Fox Road, Lolo. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.59 acres along Bitterroot River. $480,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula, 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

3 Bdr, 1 Bath Alberton home. $125,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $325,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call

Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3416 Lupine, Stevensville. 3 bed, 2 bath log-sided home with wraparound deck & Bitterroot views. $249,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229 tory@montana.com

575 Killdeer, Stevensville. 5 bed, 3 bath on 7.5 fenced acres. Great mountain views. $335,000. Vickie Honzel, Lambros ERA Real Estate 531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

Bitterroot Acreage 994 Pathfinder $599,000. 330 acres with knock-your-sock-off views East Side Stevi/Florence area with a small house. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

River Access 17430 Six-Mile, $285,000. Historic 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home in great condition on stunning 12.51 acre setting with views, fruit trees, tons of gardening space and so much more! KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com

5 Bdr, 3 Bath, Florence area home on 3.2 acres. $575,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507

5 Bdr, 4 Bath, Stevensville area home on 10 acres. $649,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties 728-8270

E UND

RC

ACT R T ON Adorable Lewis & Clark Bungalow 4 bed, 1.5 bath with hardwood floors, finished basement, deck & 2 car garage. Fenced corner lot near mall & schools. Beautiful Home On Rattlesnake Creek 4 bed, 3 bath with cathedral ceilings, wood floors, gourmet kitchen, jetted tub and river rock fireplace. Lovely 2nd floor deck overlooks creek. $865,000

[C10] Missoula Independent • April 17 – April 24, 2014


REAL ESTATE Investments @ 406-721-1444 or visit www.creative-finance.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL EQUITY LOANS ON NONOWNER OCCUPIED MONTANA REAL ESTATE. We also buy Notes & Mortgages. Call Creative Finance &

We are experts in the home lending process. Call Astrid Oliver, Loan Officer at Guild Mortgage Company. 1001 S Higgins Suite A2, Missoula. Office: 406-2587522 or Cell: 406-550-3587

Real Estate is not always Black & White Call Rita Gray 406-544-4226

ritagray@lambrosera.com

507 North Ave E, Missoula • $319,900

4 bed/2 bath Bungalow. Walking distance to U, Paxson. Coved ceilings, hardwood floors. Room for expansion.

NHN Edgewood • $89,900 3.53 end-of-road acres on east side of Mount Jumbo. Close to river, golf, hiking, biking & city life.

1861 E. Broadway

$215,000

MLS # 20141169 • 3 bed, 2.5 bath Cobblestone Condo with deck and single garage. Close to UM, Rattlesnake & Clark Fork River trails.

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com missoulanews.com • April 17 – April 24, 2014 [C11]


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 HANNAH• Hannah is our long-term resident at the shelter. She is great with kids and cats but needs to be the only dog in the home. Hannah deserves a true happy ending. If you are looking for a great companion, hiking buddy, or just a dog that gives great hugs, then come meet Hannah!

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MontanaSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

IZZY•Izzy is a doberman pinscher that is full of puppy energy. She is not good with small dogs or cats. Izzy is very playful and will keep you active. She hasn't been at the shelter very long and we know that she won't last. We don't see her breed in the shelter very often so if you are looking for a doberman, don't hesitate.

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

RUBY•Ruby is another breed that we don't see often in the shelter. She is very calm, mellow, and has a heart of gold. When you see Ruby in her kennel, she will be the 2330 South Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59801 dog that is not barking or jumping up at the Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) kennel door. She will be laying calmly, look- 3708 North Reserve Street, Missoula, Montana, 59808 Lobby: 9:00am-5:00pm (Mon-Fri) ing up at you with her big, beautiful eyes. Drive-thru: 7:30am-6:00pm (Mon-Fri) • Drive-thru: 9:00am-12:00pm (Sat) You can't go wrong with a dog like Ruby.

ABDALA•Abdala came from an overcrowded shelter. He is very independent and loves to do his own thing. He doesn't mind other cats being around, but don't expect him to keep them entertained. Abdala would make a great pet for someone who wants a cat that can keep themselves busy and isn't very needy.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

BANGKOK•Bangkok is a cat that the shelter staff is confused as to why he is still at the shelter. He is very handsome and extremely sweet. It's hard to imagine why no one has come to look for him. Bangkok is mellow and easy going. Sounds like the perfect cat, doesn't it?

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

ADELE•Adele is one of the most strik-

www.dolack.com

ing looking cats we've seen in awhile. She is independent and will quickly scout out the "perfect" resting spot in your home. She is playful but also loves to lounge about. Come meet her and see if she will melt your heart.

Original Paintings, Prints and Posters 139 W. Front St., Missoula (406) 549-3248

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 SADIE• Sadie is a fun-loving girl who is waiting for her future adopter to fall in love with her and take her home! She would enjoy living an active lifestyle and definitely has some endurance! She is a very smart lady who loves learning new things. She is already housetrained and can't wait to find her forever home!

Serving the community’s framing needs since 1993 using environmentally sustainable practices.

139 West Front St. inside the Monte Dolack Gallery, Downtown Missoula, MT

(406) 549-3248 • dolack.com

HAMBONE•Hambone is just as big and

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

JACKSON• Jackson is a playful, affec-

fun as his name suggests! He is a gentle giant who loves toys, playing fetch, and going for adventures. This active and outgoing boy is ready to start a new life with his future adopter. Come meet this goofy and fun-loving guy today!

COCOA•Cocoa's heart is as big as her ears! This two-year-old Plott hound mix just loves people. While she's known to be a little kooky when she's cooped up in a kennel (wouldn't you be, too?) she calms right down when she gets out. She likes running, hiking, and can't wait to explore with you this spring!

BLANCA• Blanca arrived at the shelter with a frostbitten nose and ears. Luckily, she's feeling much better now, and this three-year-old girl is just looking for a nice, warm home where she'll never have to worry about being cold again. Could yours be the home she's looking for?

tionate, and petite 8-month-old boy who loves kids, dogs, and toys! He has long, handsome fur, stunning yellow eyes, and great personality. He can't wait to find a new home where he can play with friends and be a part of the family.

TIGER JACK•Tiger Jack just loves to MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

[C12] Missoula Independent • April 17 – April 24, 2014

snuggle. Give him a lap - or a place on the bed - and he's a happy guy! This two-yearold orange tabby also likes playing with string and meeting new people. Doesn't your home need a tiger?

Missoula’s Locally Owned Neighborhood Pet Supply Store

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 East Broadway • South Russell • North Reserve



Missoula Independent