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NEWS OPINION

MIXED MESSAGES: PRO-CHOICE ADVOCATES QUESTION A PREGNANCY SUPPORT CENTER’S PURPORTED SERVICES

MISGUIDED OUTRAGE OVER YELLOWSTONE WOLF DEATH

MUSIC

LOOK HERE FOR TRUE COWBOYS, COWGIRLS AND COUNTRY MUSIC

NEWS

FOREST SERVICE LOSES YEARS OF HR DATA


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


NEWS OPINION

MIXED MESSAGES: PRO-CHOICE ADVOCATES QUESTION A PREGNANCY SUPPORT CENTER’S PURPORTED SERVICES

MISGUIDED OUTRAGE OVER YELLOWSTONE WOLF DEATH

MUSIC

LOOK HERE FOR TRUE COWBOYS, COWGIRLS AND COUNTRY MUSIC

NEWS

FOREST SERVICE LOSES YEARS OF HR DATA


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[2] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

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News Voices/Letters Magic mining, wolves and Baucus.............................................................4 The Week in Review Stop talking on your cellphone ......................................................6 Briefs Concussions, the Cannabus and Krayton Kerns .....................................................6 Etc. Bitterroot goes bananas over proposed gun ban .......................................................7 News Forest Service starts from scratch with job descriptions .........................................8 News Pro-choice advocates question pregnancy center’s claims ......................................9 Opinion Yellowstone wolf ’s death sparks misguided denigration .................................10 Feature Cleaning up the Yellowstone—and the nation...................................................14

Arts & Entertainment Arts Artist Stephanie Wing celebrates Missoula’s sexual health .....................................18 Music Copper Mountain Band on country roots, Nashville ambition ............................19 Music The Menzingers, The Gypsy Lumberjacks and Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite ....................................................................................................20 Music The Whoopass Girls subvert the message.............................................................21 Film Soderbergh’s Side Effects offers a fitting end ..........................................................22 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films ........................................................23 Flash in the Pan Breakfast complex................................................................................24 Happiest Hour The Naughty Moose ...............................................................................26 8 Days a Week Like oil and water ...................................................................................27 Mountain High Mountaineering in Glacier National Park..............................................37 Agenda Cinderella (the Whitney Houston version)........................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk...........................................................................................................................4 In Other News..................................................................................................................12 Classifieds.......................................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ......................................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y........................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ..........................................................................................................C-5 This Modern World......................................................................................................C-12

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jason McMackin STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen, Jamie Rogers COPY EDITOR Kate Whittle ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Pumpernickel Stewart, Jonathan Marquis CIRCULATION ASSISTANT MANAGER Ryan Springer ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Sasha Perrin, Tawana De Hoyos Alecia Goff, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Allen MARKETING & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Tara Shisler FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, Chris Dombrowski Andy Smetanka, Brad Tyer, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Michael Peck, Matthew Frank, Molly Laich, Dan Brooks, Melissa Mylchreest

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2012 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

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missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [3]


[voices]

Magic mining

STREET TALK Asked Monday morning outside the University Center. by Eric Oravsky

Recent studies indicate that the 2011 oil spill on the Yellowstone River could have been far less damaging if cleanup had happened more quickly. Do you trust regulatory agencies to oversee the petroleum industry in Montana? Follow-up: What’s the biggest mess you’ve ever made? Joe Hughes: Yes, for the most part. Although I think its probably a good idea to keep an eye on everybody working there anyway. Burn one down: One time, when I was 12 or so, I was sent to bed without dinner. So I decided to cook some chili on a camp stove, but ended up catching my room on fire and burning a big hole in the carpet. My punishment was to call carpet repair places, get bids and choose the guy doing the work.

Teresa Hytorwitz: I guess I do. I mean, we should be able to expect them to do what taxpayers pay them to do, right? The wrong foot: I threw up in someone’s shoes at a party. Well, lots of peoples’ shoes lined up at a party. I was a sophomore in college, and yes it was alcohol-related. But I’ve learned my lesson!

Kelsey Chambers: I’d like to, but from what it sounds like, their track record tells me I shouldn’t. So no, I don’t trust them. Five-second rule: I work at the Iron Horse, and I once dropped an entire bucket of au jus onto my shoes! It was like a 5-gallon bucket so it was a mess, but fortunately it wasn’t hot.

It’s alchemy! The University of Montana’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research recently released two different studies on behalf of coal development in Montana, and they prove the bureau has to believe in alchemy, the ancient art of transforming an ordinary material like straw into gold, because they take the economic costs of coal and magically transform them into benefits. For example, UM’s bureau says that mining the Otter Creek will “help create a more productive, prosperous, and populous state economy,” but all the costs of mining the pristine area around Otter Creek in Montana disappear in their reports. To haul the coal out, the Tongue River Railroad will have to be built. This will slice through ranching operations up and down the Tongue River, disturbing wildlife habitat and ranching operations. Selling coal to China will also dramatically increase railroad traffic across Montana, splitting cities like Billings and Missoula in half, harming downtown businesses. Once the coal is burned in China, the emissions from it return to us in Montana faster than we send it over, according to Steve Running, a climatologist at UM. These emissions will include toxic mercury, which will harm the brain development of children across the state, and carbon dioxide, which will cause climate change and harm agriculture. Surly these costs matter, but coal mining is magic. These costs all disappear in the UM reports. Thomas Power and Donovan Power have written an eviscerating rebuttal of the coal reports, and you can read it at meic.org. Wade Sikorski Baker

Help me understand Tara Graham: You know, I’ve never really thought about it. Roll with it: When I first got my driver’s license, I was with a friend in my parent’s Trooper on the side of the road and it was raining really hard. Basically the shoulder gave out, and the Trooper rolled down the hill. It ended on its side and the dogs just jumped out the windows. Fortunately, my parents were very understanding, and nobody was hurt.

David Gilcrest: I have some faith in our regulatory entities, but I still believe they should be highly scrutinized. Bang: The biggest mess was the time I tried to install an on-demand hot water heater. The electronics were never right, and the copper tubing burst when it froze. Basically I violated the K.I.S.S. principle, and everything that could’ve gone wrong, did. I should have taken a shotgun to it.

[4] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

Why would an issue in Montana cause someone in Lebanon Junction, Ky., to suffer sleepless nights and a heavy heart? Let me explain.

Once I had a wolf in my house. It wasn’t a wild wolf, it was a tame wolf recovering after I splinted a nasty fracture of his forearm, but it was a wolf nonetheless. Though stoic, as many wild animals are, I knew him well, and could tell he was in pain. He was snappy, and trying to stay immobile—and this was after his shattered leg had been splinted. There is nothing about pain and fear that require higher levels of thinking. I find myself thinking about this wolf often during this, the first trapping season after the reintroduced wolves have been deemed recovered. I am, quite honestly,

“Surly these costs matter, but coal mining is magic. These costs all disappear in the UM reports.” appalled that anyone would willingly inflict the kind of pain I saw in that wolf on any creature for any reason. Of course, a trapped wolf is also frantic, distraught and desperate, as well as in pain. I think. I don’t actually know. I try very hard to understand the reasoning for leghold traps. I am guessing it is something to do with self-sufficiency values, respect for a way of life and living off the land. I am a smallholder farmer myself, and have had livestock killed by predators — chickens, goats, geese, turkeys. I don’t like it one bit, so I get that. So I’m writing a letter to the folk in Montana: I don’t get it, help me understand. Why are you allowing leghold trapping? I’d actually like to hear. I’d really like

to get it stopped, but maybe there’s something I don’t know. Chris Albert Lebanon Junction, Ky.

Oregon’s mistake I’m told that assisted suicide will again be an issue in the Montana Legislature this session. I am a doctor in Oregon where assisted suicide is legal. A few years ago, I was caring for a 76-year-old man who presented with a sore on his arm, eventually diagnosed as cancer. I referred him to specialists for evaluation and therapy. I had known this patient and his wife for over a decade. He was an avid hiker, a popular hobby here in Oregon, and as his disease progressed, he was less able to do this activity, becoming depressed, which was documented in his chart. During this time, my patient expressed a wish for assisted suicide to one of the specialists. Rather than take the time to address his depression, or ask me, as his primary care physician, to talk with him, she called me and asked me to be the “second opinion” for his suicide. She told me that barbiturate overdoses “work very well” for patients like this, and that she had done this many times before. I told her that assisted suicide was not appropriate for this patient and that I did not concur. I was very concerned about my patient’s mental state and told her that addressing his underlying issues would be better than simply giving him a lethal prescription. Unfortunately, my concerns were ignored, and two weeks later my depressed patient was dead from an overdose prescribed by this doctor. Under Oregon’s law, I was not able to protect my patient. If assisted suicide becomes legal in Montana, you may not be able to protect your friends or family members. I urge you to contact your legislators to tell them to keep assisted suicide out of Montana. Don’t make Oregon’s mistake. Charles J. Bentz Portland, Ore.

[Comments from MissoulaNews.com] Backtalk from “Friends with benefits,” Jan. 31

Jag?

Aw, shucks

Proud history

“Max, give the money back. Max, we don't want to risk a Republican in your office, but some of your behavior makes one think you need to come home. There may be a very good person waiting to run. You know who I mean.” Posted Jan. 31 at 9:23 a.m.

“As a citizen of Montana I’d like to thank the Independent for publishing this article. There seems to be a dearth of Montana media who are willing to touch this story.” Posted Jan. 31 at 10:07 a.m.

“Montana has a proud history of elected representatives who rise on the national and world stage. Think Jeannette Rankin, Thomas J. Walsh, Mike Mansfield, Lee Metcalf. Why do we elect this clumsy, corrupt person?” Posted Jan. 31 at 12:37 p.m.

L

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via email: editor@missoulanews.com.


missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [5]


[news]

WEEK IN REVIEW

VIEWFINDER

by Chad Harder

Wednesday, January 30 A proposed bill from Sen. Terry Murphy, RCardwell, to evaluate the Montana Board of Pardons and Parole and consider its elimination passes the House of Representatives by a 45-4 margin.

Thursday, January 31 The Montana Public Service Commission takes no action on NorthWestern Energy’s request to pass the cost of its increasing tax burden to customers. The inaction means that residential electricity rates will increase by roughly $1.19 per month.

Friday, February 1 Ethel Harding, the first woman elected to the Montana Legislature from Lake County, dies at the age of 83. Harding, who held elected office for 30 years, became an outspoken proponent of the death penalty after the 1974 murder of her daughter, Lana.

Saturday, February 2 The University of Montana men’s basketball team trounces Eastern Washington, 64-46. The win leaves the Grizzlies with a perfect record, 12-0, in Big Sky Conference play.

Sunday, February 3 The Super Bowl’s most critically acclaimed commercial comes from Dodge. The spot, which features a Paul Harvey commentary on the virtues of farming, includes images of a couple from Geraldine, Mont.

Monday, February 4 The Montana Abolition Coalition announces that a bipartisan alliance of four state lawmakers supports House Bill 370, which aims to end the death penalty in Montana. The bill is slated for a Feb. 14 House Judiciary Committee hearing.

Tuesday, February 5 Missoula’s cellphone ban goes into effect. Police can cite anyone for talking on a hand-held cellular device while driving or biking. First-time offenders will be fined $100, with subsequent violations becoming more costly.

A shot-up mailbox marks what’s left of an abandoned homestead on Spring Valley Road outside of Fairfield, near Great Falls.

LGBT

Erickson strikes again Despite gains by the LGBT rights movement this past year, including the Montana Republican Party’s June removal of a plank that for years called to recriminalize gay sex, Dallas Erickson isn’t giving up on his fight to preserve Montana’s long-standing prohibitions against homosexuality. For years, Erickson, founder of a group called Help Our Moral Environment, has testified in front of the Montana Legislature about the perils of homosexual sex. Nearly every time a proposal to further gay equality comes before lawmakers, Erickson opposes it. His most recent effort to fend off the gay rights movement garnered support last month from Republican Rep. Nancy Ballance of Hamilton. Ballance worked with Erickson to draft a bill, now called “Legislative Council 1854,” that aims to create a separate criminal penalty for sexual assault or child molestation, if the crime is perpetrated by an individual who is the same biological sex as the victim. “That should be an additional charge if it’s a deviate rape,” Erickson says. “It’s additional harm.”

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[6] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

In 1997, the Montana Supreme Court struck down the portion of the state’s deviate sexual conduct law that made gay sex a crime punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a $50,000 fine. Since then, progressive lawmakers have attempted to remove the law from the books. Republican opposition has prevented that from happening. Missoula Democratic Sen. Tom Facey estimates that he’s introduced legislation to erase the homosexual acts prohibition during four previous sessions. This year, he’s trying again with Senate Bill 107. “I think it will get a good vote out of the Senate,” Facey says. Erickson says he may hold off on finding a legislator to carry LC 1854—Ballance says she’s too busy— and instead lobby lawmakers to use provisions included in his bill to amend Facey’s legislation. Rather than striking the prohibition against consensual homosexual sex, as Facey proposes, Erickson wants to make same-sex rape, sexual assault and child molestation a felony, above and beyond existing punishments. Jessica Mayrer

Medical marijuana

Williams gets five years Inside the Russell Smith Federal Courthouse in Missoula on Feb. 1, dozens of Chris Williams’ supporters stood when the former Montana Cannabis partner was escorted into the courtroom in handcuffs to be sentenced on federal drug and weapons charges. Some of Williams’ friends wept. Others clenched their hands. The lingering smell of marijuana hung in the air. Across the aisle, federal Drug Enforcement Agency agents stared straight ahead. The scene inside the courthouse was as unusual as the post-conviction agreement that prosecutors and defense attorneys crafted in Williams’ case. Montana Cannabis was once among the largest dispensaries in the state. After federal law enforcement raided the operation in 2011, the Department of Justice indicted Williams and his former partners on felony drug and weapons charges. Three of the partners pleaded guilty and asked the court for leniency. Williams, however, refused to admit guilt. Williams maintained that he operated legally under Montana’s medical marijuana law. The innocent plea, Williams said, constituted a protest of federal marijuana policy.


[news] “The main reason that I went to trial is because I felt it was my duty,� Williams said during the sentencing hearing. In September, a jury found Williams guilty of eight felony counts. Federal sentencing laws mandated that Williams face upwards of 80 years in prison. The prospect of Williams spending the remainder of his life in jail mobilized marijuana advocates who launched a White House petition that called to “Free Chris Williams� and garnered more than 27,000 signatures. Many in attendance at his sentencing hearing arrived via a green “Cannabus� that was arranged by his supporters. In December, when prosecutor Joseph Thaggard agreed to drop six of the eight charges against Williams and waive a $1.7 million forfeiture requirement, speculation swirled about whether the public pressure influenced the peculiar sentencing agreement. During Williams’ sentencing hearing, Judge Dana Christensen shed light on the agreement. Christensen said he was the one who called attorneys together to hash out a more suitable punishment for Williams. “An 85-year sentence in this case would simply be unjust,� Christensen said. On the remaining gun charge, Christensen sentenced Williams to five years in prison. The drug count will be satisfied by the time Williams has already served. In exchange for the deal, Williams agreed to give up his right to appeal. Jessica Mayrer

“We need to recalibrate the way we look at brain injuries in youth athletics,� Blewett says. “When the brain is involved we want the message to be, ‘get the help you need because you’re rolling the dice on the rest of your life.’� Specifically, the bill would work to educate athletic trainers, coaches and student athletes on brain injuries. It would require that “a youth athlete suspected of sustaining a concussion be removed from participation and that medical clearance be obtained prior to returning to participation.� Blewett’s bill comes in the wake of mounting concerns over the effects of head injuries in professional sports. In recent years, more than 2,000 former NFL

Concussions

Score one for safety In early May 2010, former Sentinel High School wide receiver Dylan Steigers took a hit during a scrimmage at Eastern Oregon University. Steigers remained on the ground for a moment before walking to the sideline under his own power. Minutes later he was vomiting. After being rushed to the emergency room, doctors diagnosed him with an acute subdural hematoma resulting from a concussion. Steigers, 21, died the next day. Steigers’ high school coach, Pete Joseph, later told a reporter, “[Steigers] was an exceptional, exceptional football talent. He played the game the way it should be played. He had excellent physical tools, he played the game hard, he played the game fast, and he loved football. He played the right way.� But according to Sen. Anders Blewett, D-Great Falls, “the right way� is exactly what needs re-evaluating. On Jan. 9, Blewett introduced SB 112, or “The Dylan Steigers Protection of Youth Athletes Act,� which would require each school district “to adopt a policy addressing the dangers of concussions.�

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players have filed suit claiming the league withheld information about the risks of chronic brain injury. On Jan. 29 the NFL Players Association announced it would be giving Blewett’s alma mater, Harvard University, a $100 million grant to study sports-related brain injuries. Blewett was a placekicker at Harvard before returning to Montana to play arena football in Billings. “I love the sport of football. I love athletics—the lessons they teach,� he says. “But I also recognize that we have the tools available to potentially save lives and reduce traumatic brain injuries.� On Feb. 2, 24 doctors, athletic trainers and coaches testified in favor of SB 112 before the Senate Judiciary Committee. The committee took no immediate action. Jamie Rogers

Corner-crossing

Why Kerns voted “no� Rep. Krayton Kerns says he had good reason to vote against his own bill in the House Judiciary Committee last week. The measure, House Bill 235, would have le-

BY THE NUMBERS the Mon$49,800.11 Funds tana Department of Corrections spent on poultry in 2012, according to the state’s new database, transparency.mt.gov. galized corner-crossing in Montana. But the Republican from Laurel explained on his blog, Ramblings of a Conservative Cow Doctor, that this is “not a democracy� and, furthermore, that he’s “not a politician.� Instead, Kerns considers this a constitutional republic, and himself a man sworn to uphold the U.S. and Montana constitutions. “If I were a politician strictly basing my decision on the wishes of 170,000 sportsmen over 500 affected landowners, the easy, popular vote was to pass the bill,� Kerns wrote. But he erred on the side of his “core principle� and “yielded to my oath of office to support the constitution.� The Indy followed up with Kerns this week to get a more detailed explanation of why he tabled HB 235, which, in a move that seemed to indicate promising bipartisan work in 2013, he had agreed to co-sponsor alongside Missoula Democratic Rep. Ellie Hill. Turns out the legality of corner-crossing is something Kerns has been interested in for decades. He’s both a landowner and a sportsman. He even has easement access to a corner that touches school trust land. HB 235 would have allowed him to cross that corner. “A no vote, legally, made it so I can’t do that,� Kerns says. In the end, he says the issue boiled down to airspace ownership. Proponents of the bill argued that decriminalizing the act of “stepping over an infinitesimal corner of private land� was hardly a nuisance to private property owners. However, opposition testimony swayed Kerns, particularly the mention of three higher court rulings that extend private property ownership to the airspace above the ground. “It is a trespass,� Kerns says of passing through private airspace, “and therefore, it’s not a legal action.� Hill now intends to blast HB 235 to the House floor Feb. 18, and will head a rally in front of the Capitol with proponents that afternoon. Kerns is hoping that one of two other corner-crossing bills currently being drafted will approach legalization from what he feels is a more constitutional route. For now, he says he’ll continue opposing the bill he co-sponsored last week. “I think we’ve addressed the constitutional aspect of it and the property rights aspect of it,� Kerns says. “So as chairman of the [Judiciary] committee, I will be resisting the blast motion and advising the members of my caucus to resist it as well.� Alex Sakariassen

ETC. Last month, President Barack Obama responded to the December tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary with a list of legislative proposals and potential executive actions in the fight against gun violence. Among them was a call to Congress to reinstate and strengthen a Clinton-era ban on assault weapons. And it was there that members of the law enforcement community nationwide drew a line in the sand. From Alabama to Oregon, hundreds of county sheriffs made it abundantly clear that their offices would have no part in enforcing a federal ban they viewed as a violation of the Second Amendment. Ravalli County Sheriff Chris Hoffman says the issue quickly took on a life of its own in his district. Locals began calling and emailing him on a daily basis, their tones ranging from deep concern to outright fear. But Hoffman’s response differed from the more rhetorical reactions of other sheriffs. “I’m not in a position to decide the law,� Hoffman says. “But I am in a position to uphold my oath of office.� It may sound like a delicate balancing act, but Hoffman explains he’s in the business of enforcing state law, just as he did with Montana’s medical marijuana act. The substance’s federal classification as an illegal drug was a concern for federal—not local— authorities, he says. Hoffman isn’t so much politically entrenched as he is upset about the direction of the gun control debate in the wake of the Newtown tragedy. He sees sense in some of the proposals set forth by the Obama administration, like those addressing mental health care; others he considers “eyewash,� or steps that will ultimately accomplish little. But he says any earnest conversation gets derailed by divisive topics like an assault weapons ban. Congress hasn’t held a vote on any measure to ban assault weapons yet, despite continued pressure from Obama to do so. If a vote does happen, the margin for success is narrow since even some Democrats oppose the ban. But that hasn’t calmed tempers in the Bitterroot. Hoffman says he still hears daily from constituents, even though he’s trying actively to keep his office out of the debate. “In 10 years as sheriff,� Hoffman says, “there has not been another single issue that’s taken more of my time.�

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missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [7]


Beer Drinkers’ Profile

[news]

Joe & Jesse

“Crawdaddy Reunion”

Vanishing act The Forest Service starts from scratch with job descriptions by Alex Sakariassen

What brings you to the Iron Horse today? Today, it's all about food, catching up, and a beer or two. Any crazy plans after lunch? Not really, just hanging out. Maybe take a nap.

Beer of choice? Budweiser times two.

Take your sweet thing to our sweet spot this Valentine's Day. Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

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[8] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

Last September, the U.S. Forest Service decided not to renew a longstanding contract with Avue Digital Services, a privately held firm in Tacoma, Wash., that had been hosting the agency’s online jobs database since 2005. The Avue license cost the Forest Service more than $34 million in the past seven years. But the data created from that pricey partnership is now lost to the federal government; under contract, Avue retains proprietary ownership of the position descriptions it generated for the Forest Service. Now the agency faces the incredible task of rewriting potentially 40,000 position descriptions from scratch. This development recently came to the attention of Andy Stahl, executive director of the Eugene, Ore.-based nonprofit Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics. A friend of Stahl’s from within the Forest Service complained to him of the seeming waste of taxpayer dollars over the years, and of the frustration of having to draft new position descriptions from a blank slate. “She was upset because she thought that the money spent with Avue had not bought the government anything,” Stahl recalls. “All the work had to be redone.” Stahl promptly requested copies of the Forest Service’s Avue contract as well as the agency’s payment records to Avue, all of which he later shared with the Independent. The development is particularly galling, he says, because Avue generated much of its data using previously existing Forest Service position descriptions— meaning the agency can’t use those as a template in redrafting either. Stahl wrote a scathing blog post about what he calls the “Avue debacle” in early January. “The notion that you should...have somebody outside the government writing the document that says what government employees are supposed to do strikes me as bizarre,” Stahl says. “Here at [Forest Service Employees for Environmental Ethics], I wouldn’t contract with the Sierra Club to write the position descriptions for the people who work here.” A Forest Service spokesperson in Washington, D.C., told the Indy this week that the agency is not offering any media comments on its Avue contract or the redrafting of position descriptions “at this time.” The Forest Service’s relationship with Avue—essentially a license-based online database similar to LexisNexis—came as part of a larger move during the Bush administration to competitively outsource

various functions at federal agencies with the perceived goal of increasing efficiency and decreasing expenses. The Forest Service subsequently outsourced a number of jobs ranging from human resources to vehicle maintenance. The Indy wrote extensively about the push to privatize in a June 2006 cover story, citing the Forest Service’s consideration to outsource more

RIGHT Forest Service! To be honest, if we were required to use a 1972 typewriter and mail the application on one of those Wells Fargo stagecoaches, that would be better than AVUE.” Beyond the $34 million the Forest Service dedicated to its contract with Avue, the loss of position description data could pose a significant problem for the

Photo by Chad Harder

The U.S. Forest Service began outsourcing a wide array of its functions during the Bush administration. Now, after severing ties with the company handling its online jobs database, the agency has lost access to as many as 40,000 job descriptions.

than 75 percent of its jobs nationwide. The article specifically mentioned the drawbacks of the move experienced in California, where federal inspectors began to uncover critical safety issues in the maintenance work done on fire engines by a British company. Several Forest Service employees in western Montana at the time complained to the Indy about frustrations directly related to the agency’s outsourcing and centralization efforts. Avue eventually became an extension of those frustrations, particularly within the wildland firefighter community. Online firefighter forums have been punctuated for years with unfavorable comments about Avue and the difficulties many experienced in applying for jobs through the site. The Forest Service’s break from Avue was welcome news for some. “HALLELUJAH!!!!!” wrote one forum user at wildlandfire.com in spring 2012, when the agency first announced its plans to move away from the Avue system. “The end of AVUE is coming soon!!! Lets do this

agency in the short term. Such documents contain a list of the responsibilities individual employees are tasked with and are typically used by employers to execute annual performance reviews. And since those reviews take place on the anniversary of an employee’s hiring, the loss of that data to Avue is possibly already being felt on a daily basis. Stahl offers a hypothetical to underscore the tough road the Forest Service has ahead. “Imagine that your position description vanished if your employer didn’t renew a contract with another corporation. It just vanished, didn’t exist anymore. Nor would your employer be allowed to use that vanished position description to prepare a new one for you. Your employer would have to prepare your replacement position description out of whole cloth.” The scenario doesn’t sound extraordinarily time-consuming—until you multiply it by 40,000. asakariassen@missoulanews.com


[news]

Mixed messages Pro-choice advocates question pregnancy center’s claims by Jamie Rogers

Each semester, an advertising com- more harm than good, and is potentially have you do this counseling piece, which pany called The Campus Special produces “dangerous.” She says “it is not an anom- I was a little bit ambivalent about it,” she a coupon booklet for students at the Uni- aly” for clients to come to Blue Mountain says. “But then she starts crying. I didn’t versity of Montana. Included in the book- after first going to Care Net. She says often get a lot of my questions answered belet are deals on stuffed crust pizza, oil times those clients are misinformed about cause she was crying.” The social worker says she would changes and yoga classes. In recent years, the dating of their pregnancy. “Some there’s also been a coupon for a free preg- women have the perception that Care Net never go back to Care Net, feeling that nancy test “and/or” ultrasound. The is a medical facility with a medically overall the care she received was “excoupon depicts a forlorn-looking woman trained staff,” she says. “But really their tremely unprofessional.” Likins contends that Care Net is more and the words, “Freedom. Knowledge. whole reason for existence is to prevent than unprofessional. She feels the organEmpowerment.” The coupon is re- women from having abortions.” deemable at the Care Net Pregnancy Support Center of Missoula, and also advertises peer mentors, community referrals and confidential support. It’s this coupon, and advertising like it, that members of UM’s pro-choice movement say should be banned from campus. NARAL Pro-Choice Montana Campus Organizer Emily Likins says that Care Net’s advertising is “manipulative and untruthful.” She says that organizations like Care Net are cropping up all over the country as part of a pro-life—or anti-choice— movement “to misinform and mislead women seeking abortion care.” “They offer free pregnancy tests Photo by Chad Harder to get women in the door,” says Likins, “and then they intentionally NARAL Pro-Choice Montana believes Care Net, which does not offer or refer for abortions, intentionally deceives women by “posing as a comprefill their heads with misleading infor- hensive health care clinic.” mation about their options.” One woman, who works as a social ization is intentionally deceptive. She Administrators at Care Net declined to comment for this story, and pointed worker at Missoula-area hospital, says notes that on the website under a page tito their website for more information she went to Care Net after finding out tled “Abortion Recovery,” Care Net exabout the center. The “About Us” page she was pregnant. She requested pounds on the connection between says that Care Net, which is located on anonymity due to her current position abortion and breast cancer. Likins points Fairview Avenue inside the City Life Com- in the health care industry. “I heard they out that Care Net cites studies from the munity Center, was founded in 1978 and had free ultrasounds,” she says, “and I ’70s and ’80s that have since been refuted “has grown from three small counseling didn’t have insurance [at the time] so it by the World Health Organization, the Naoffices to a medical clinic with counseling would be extremely expensive to date tional Cancer Institute and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, rooms, an exam room, meeting room, my pregnancy.” The social worker, who already had among others, over the last decade. clothing room and staff offices.” It continThis spring, NARAL Pro-Choice Monues: “Care Net of Missoula endeavors to three children, remembers the examinaremain one of western Montana’s fore- tion was unlike any she had ever had. She tana plans to lobby the Associated Stumost authorities on abortion issues, adop- says the staff member asked her to insert dents of the University of Montana to pass the ultrasound probe herself. She also re- a “truth in advertising” mandate on camtion information, and agency referrals.” There is no indication of whether or members the ultrasound monitor was a pus. Though NARAL has not yet drafted not Care Net staff are medical profession- giant flat screen TV positioned so that specific language, the mandate would aim als. “Care Net of Missoula carries out its “there was no choice whether or not to to regulate the way advertisers present mission by employing volunteer advo- see.” She says the staffer dated the fetus their businesses to students. But for Likins and NARAL, the issue cates and relying on private funds for op- at six weeks and then repeatedly referred eration,” the website reads. Though the to it as “little guy” and “little man” (she is bigger than information disseminated website also states, “We do not offer, rec- later gave birth to a girl). “It was a much through coupons. “The anti-choice ommend or refer for abortions...,” the different experience than any of my other movement has built a network of gener“title” that appears on the center’s home- three pregnancies. I was pretty sure six ally unlicensed and unregulated organipage reads: “abortion info: abortion pill, weeks was way too early to tell the sex,” zations posing as comprehensive health care clinics,” she says. “We’re aiming to she says. “It felt weird.” free abortions, free pregnancy tests.” At one point during the examination expose them.” Julie Mullette, a registered nurse and the abortion care coordinator at Blue she remembers the staff member began Mountain Clinic, feels Care Net often does crying and asked if she could pray. “They jrogers@missoulanews.com

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[opinion]

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[10] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

On Dec. 6, a Wyoming hunter killed one of Yellowstone’s most famous wolves, 832F, outside the park’s boundaries. It was a legal kill, yet within 48 hours, news organizations across the country ran stories mourning the wolf ’s death and treating it like, well, the loss of a family friend. Wolf advocate Marc Cooke of the Bitterroot Valley lamented, “She was an amazing mother.” Wolf photographer Barrett Hedges called her “inspirational,” while others declared her to be a “rock star” and a “consummate professional.” The latter referred to her leadership abilities as the alpha female of the Lamar Canyon Pack, which resides mostly in northeastern Yellowstone. As someone who has had the good fortune to watch 832F lead her pack across the Lamar Valley, I, too, felt a pang of sadness when I heard the news. Yet I resisted the urge to denigrate her killer and reminded myself why I supported wolf recovery in the first place. I think we need wolves back in the West because they’re an integral part of the region’s wildlife and wildness. When the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reintroduced wolves to Yellowstone and central Idaho in the mid-1990s, the agency did so because its scientists hoped that their return would enable those ecosystems to function fully and more efficiently. It was not a matter of pure sentimentality, or because they believed that wolves share positive qualities with humans. By assigning 832F human traits, wolf supporters effectively anthropomorphize her and allow other wolves to be judged using human moral standards as well. Although this might seem natural and even good, it is inappropriate. Wolves may share several good traits with humans, but wolves also routinely kill other animals. Of course, human beings also kill animals for food, but the problem with wolves is that we have trouble controlling when or where or how they kill their prey. And wolves can’t read our “no trespassing” or “no hunting” signs.

Wolves’ natural propensity to kill deer, elk and cattle was originally used to justify their eradication from the Rocky Mountain West. Not so many decades ago, newspapers characterized wolves as bandits, criminals and desperadoes, and a threat to human beings as well. Ranchers and other Western settlers denounced the vicious way that wolves attacked and killed their prey as immoral. This helped to make their absolute destruction an honorable task.

“If wolf supporters want to do right by the environment and its wildlife, they need to make their arguments at the species level.” Opponents of wolves’ reintroduction in the 1990s often accused wolf supporters of romanticizing the animals while failing to understand the “savagery” and “cruelty” that wolves exhibit when they gang up on elderly or wounded prey. Now, by anthropomorphizing wolves as exemplary family members, conservationists risk validating this criticism. Bringing wolves back to function as predators in the wild was a smart decision biologically; it had nothing to do with wolves’ moral value. If conservationists try to justify the existence and protection of wolves on sentimental grounds, they will ultimately lose. For as many 832Fs as have roamed Yellowstone and reflected everything good we want to see in ourselves, there have been just as many Bear Paws, Three

Toes, Unaweeps and other wolves that gained notoriety for their ability to kill dozens of livestock in the dead of night, slip away undetected and later avoid the traps set to capture them. If wolf supporters want to do right by the environment and its wildlife, they need to make their arguments at the species level, eschewing the urge to portray wolves as incarnates of human goodwill. Additionally, wolf supporters must not forget that we’ve already debated whether to allow wolves to be killed. During the reintroduction process, the Sierra Club and Audubon Society took a hard-line stance that supported giving wolves full protection under the Endangered Species Act. In the spirit of compromise, groups such as the Defenders of Wildlife and the National Wildlife Foundation supported restoring wolves as experimental populations. This designation, created by the 1982 amendment to the law, gave wildlife managers flexibility in balancing the needs of endangered species and people. In the case of wolves, it also allowed managers to kill them in certain instances. Although the Sierra Club’s Legal Defense Fund sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on this contentious issue, wolves came back to the West without absolute protection. If it weren’t for this concession, I don’t think wolf packs would be roaming the West today. So before you get too riled up about 832F’s death, stop and realize that killing wolves has been part of the deal since the beginning. And if wolf advocates 20 years ago had not been magnanimous enough to recognize that killing a wolf from time to time was the cost of recovering them on land shared with ranchers and farmers, no one would have had the opportunity to watch 832F— or any other wolf—at all. Michael Dax is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He writes about the American West in Missoula.


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[quirks]

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – Wayne Harvey Martell, 68, left without paying for gas after filling his vehicle at the same station 11 times in three months, according to police in Halifax, Nova Scotia, who arrested him when he showed up a 12th time and was promptly recognized. (Halifax’s The Chronicle Herald) Authorities ordered Bridget Coker, 29, to wear an ankle bracelet after employees at a Walmart store in Bellmead, Texas, caught her shoplifting there twice. The same employees recognized her when she returned to the store and tried to shoplift a third time. They refused to let her leave until police arrived. (Waco’s KXXV-TV) HIGH-FI – Boeing engineers used sacks of potatoes to solve the problem of spotty signals with in-flight Wi-Fi. The tubers stood in for human passengers because their water content and chemistry absorb and reflect radio wave signals much the same as the human body does. “They didn’t go in with potatoes as the plan,” Boeing’s Adam Tischler said, explaining that one of the researchers stumbled across an article in a food journal describing the way 15 vegetables and fruits transmit electric force without conduction. The team bought 20,000 pounds of potatoes to fill seats on their test plane for days while collecting data for the project, which they dubbed Synthetic Personnel Using Dialectic Substitution, or SPUDS. Boeing said the research eliminated weak signal spots on its 777, 747-8 and 787 airliners. (Associated Press) PROBLEM SOLVED – Less than a month after the Sandy Hook massacre, the National Rifle Association released its Practice Range app, recommended for citizens as young as four. Described as a “new mobile nerve center” providing access to “the NRA network of news, laws, facts, knowledge, safety tips, educational materials and online resources,” the app also offers a target-practice feature. Users can choose from “nine true-to-life firearms” to aim at coffin-shaped targets with red bulls-eyes at head and heart levels. (Britain’s Daily Mail) A Maryland company began selling bulletproof white boards that teachers can write on with dry-erase markers during lessons or turn into a shield if someone opens fire. Hardwire CEO George Tunis explained the boards are similar to those used by soldiers, police and federal agents, and can repel gunshots from handguns and shotguns, the types of weapons most commonly used in school shootings. Bullets that strike the board don’t ricochet, Tunis added, calling it a “bullet sponge.” He said the 3.75-pound boards are light enough for teachers to carry around while conducting lessons and called the $299 per board price tag “a one-time cost to armor every classroom and every adult, the janitors, the coaches, the lunch ladies.” (New York’s Daily News) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION – Authorities charged Tina Berryhill Rucker, 42, with domestic violence after they said she choked a man sleeping with her in Myrtle Beach, S.C., for taking too much of the bed covers. (Associated Press) Police charged Eric Keith Rice, 52, with assault for slicing a 28-year-old person’s hand with scissors after the two argued over which one won a foot race outside a barbershop in Silver Spring, Md. Employees and customers placed bets on who would win. As the argument escalated, witnesses said Rice grabbed scissors from the shop and attacked the 28-year-old. Police reported they arrived in time to see Rice punch a 40-year-old person in the face. (The Washington Post) Authorities said Frank Louis Reeves, 73, fatally shot a 65-year-old woman at a gas station in Macon, Ga., after her car and his motorized wheelchair bumped into each other at a pump bay. Police official Jami Gaudet indicated there was no argument; Reeves just pulled a .38-caliber handgun and fired, hitting the victim in the chest. “The whole encounter, I can tell you, was very brief,” Gaudet said. (Associated Press) TIMING IS EVERYTHING – Two brothers waited nearly seven years to claim a $5 million lottery jackpot just 11 days before the deadline. Andy Ashkar, 34, bought the ticket at his parents’ convenience store in Syracuse, N.Y., according to a front-page story in Syracuse’s The Post-Standard, explaining he waited so long to claim his prize because he worried the windfall might “negatively influence” his life until he planned how to handle it and because he didn’t want it to influence his engagement and subsequent marriage. He also decided to share the winnings with his brother, Nayel Ashkar, 36. The article said that because the claim involved a ticket sold by a relative, New York Lottery officials conducted an inquiry that determined Andy Ashkar bought the ticket legitimately. Later, however, lottery officials said they planted the story after the brothers offered to take less money if they could avoid a news conference. The investigation actually found the two brothers had tricked the real winner, a customer at their parents’ store, by telling him the ticket was only a $5,000 winner. Onondaga County district attorney William J. Fitzpatrick said the article was intended to “have the real winner come forward,” and he did. (The New York Times) ASKING FOR TROUBLE – Sheriff’s deputies said that while they were checking on a stranded motorist in Maries County, Mo., David L. Williams, 31, pulled up next to them “and asked them if they wanted to race,” according to Sheriff Chris Heitman. Williams sped off, pursued by deputies at speeds exceeding 90 mph. They finally cornered him and had to break out his vehicle’s window to remove him. (Pulaski County Daily) LAWMAKING, VIRGINNY STYLE – Virginia Del. Robert Marshall, R-Prince William, introduced a bill allocating up to $22,560 for a study to see whether the state “should adopt an alternate medium of commerce or currency to serve as an alternative to the currency distributed by the Federal Reserve System in the event of a major breakdown in the Federal Reserve System.” Marshall has introduced similar measures before, declaring them a “creative and savvy” way “to counter the buffoonery that’s been plaguing Washington.” (The Washington Post) While longtime civil rights leader Sen. Henry L. Marsh III, D-Richmond, was absent from the capital attending President Obama’s inauguration on Martin Luther King Day, Republicans found themselves with a one-vote edge in the otherwise evenly divided Senate. They pushed through a redistricting plan that blatantly favors white Republicans. Then Sen. R. Creigh Deeds, D-Bath, moved to adjourn the Martin Luther King Day session in honor of Confederate general Stonewall Jackson. (The Washington Post)

[12] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013


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missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [13]


Photo courtesy of International Bird Rescue

Specialists with International Bird Rescue clean an oiled Coopers hawk from the Yellowstone spill.

R

iverside Park baked under a harsh central Montana sun on Aug. 6, 2010. Wind howled through groves of cottonwoods along the Yellowstone River, swirling eddies of cotton past RV pads, a concrete boat ramp, a playground and a volleyball court. By mid-afternoon, thunderstorms were rolling in across the prairie. A string of officials gathered on the river’s south bank, embroiled in a discussion about the erosion at work that summer. They represented the City of Laurel, the Army Corps of Engineers, the Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline and pipeline subsidiaries of Cenex, ConocoPhillips and ExxonMobil. The flow of the Yellowstone had already dropped 40,000 cubic feet per second from its crest in early June, but the meeting wasn’t exclusive to the 2010 flood season. Erosion on the Yellowstone’s south bank at Riverside Park had locals concerned about the long-term integrity of several oil and natural gas pipelines extending beneath the park and the river. The city asked for help from one or all of the represented companies in fortifying the south bank against additional erosion, to protect the river, the Laurel community and the environment downstream against a potential catastrophe.

[14] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

Laurel had reason to worry about floodwaters. Little more than a year earlier, an 8-inch natural gas pipeline failed when flooding scoured the riverbed and exposed it to the elements. The pipe ruptured at a girth weld, releasing a geyser of natural gas from the surface of the river. Emergency responders evacuated locals along the Yellowstone in Laurel and temporarily shut down nearby roadways. It took several hours for operators at the Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company to close the pipeline’s valves. The company responded to the rupture by replacing the failed line with a 16-inch pipe buried even deeper beneath the riverbed. The public safety and environmental concerns from that incident would eventually pale in comparison to the events of the following year, both in Montana and nationally. In April 2010, BP’s Deepwater Horizon platform off the coast of Louisiana exploded. Oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico from an ocean floor wellhead for months at a rate of nearly 53,000 barrels a day. Eleven platform workers were killed, and in the weeks that followed, curtains of crude washed up on beaches and wetlands all along the coast. Photos of oildrenched birds, skimmer ships and blackened containment booms dominated the public eye throughout the early summer. The incident, now realized as the industry’s largest-ever marine oil spill, highlighted the dangers of oil released into an ecosystem. The ruptured Deepwater wellhead was finally capped July 15. Ten days later, on the evening of July 25, the Midwest experienced its own historic environmen-

tal disaster. Shortly before 6 p.m., a 30-inch pipeline beneath the Kalamazoo River near Marshall, Mich., ruptured, releasing a plume of toxinladen tar sands crude being pumped south from Alberta. The pipeline’s owner, Enbridge Energ y, originally estimated the spill at 877,000 gallons. The impacts were devastating—thousands of turtles, birds and mammals coated in oil, residents forced to drink bottled water for months, numerous lawsuits filed against Enbridge by locals and environmental groups. Environmental Protection Agency crews later stated they recovered 1.1 million gallons of oil. The cleanup cost, originally estimated around $5 million, skyrocketed to $765 million by summer 2012. If any of those incidents came up in conversation on the banks of the Yellowstone in Riverside Park Aug. 6, the exchange isn’t mentioned in a new investigative report released last month by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. The various officials disbanded before the weather turned sour, and the south bank remained unfortified despite repeated pleas to pipeline industry reps from the City of Laurel. The meeting did reveal a key development in the community: Local officials were growing increasingly concerned about how floodwaters could alter the Yellowstone at Riverside Park. The conversations would continue right up to summer 2011, when plumes of oil would come to characterize the nation’s perception of the pristine waterway. But there was little in the hot central Montana air Aug. 6 to indicate that Riverside— once home to German and Japanese prisoners of war—would become ground zero in a chain of events leading to state and federal investigations, congressional hearings and a critical look not just at existing regulations but at the status of pipelines beneath waterways nationwide.


“Everything was black” Alexis Bonogofsky rolled out of bed early July 2, 2011, put on her waders and strolled across her ranch to check on the goats. Her property runs for about a mile along the banks of the Yellowstone River, and the water was raging that morning. The hayfield, the summer pasture, patches of wetland— the flood had pooled in every low spot within a stones-throw of the river. Bonogofsky began wading across the hayfield. That’s when she smelled something peculiar, something putrid, something wholly out of place among the very cattails and cottonwoods she’d known since childhood. She smelled oil. As she edged closer to the adjacent pasture, her legs brushed past gobs of the stuff. Where the water lapped against grass, a line of black film had formed along the vegetation. But the worst was the smell. “It was overwhelming,” Bonogofsky says. Bonogofsky had no idea where the oil had come from. In hindsight, she says, it probably made sense that there were pipelines under the Yellowstone. Billings is home to several refineries, after all, among them ConocoPhillips, Cenex and ExxonMobil. But in all the years she’d lived on the property—childhood, back when her parents owned it, and the intervening years since her move back to Montana—she never gave much thought to any sort of industrial dangers. She pulled out her phone and searched the web for some clue as to why her field was suddenly the site of an apparent environmental disaster. The Billings Gazette had a blurb about a ruptured oil pipeline in Laurel. She knew immediately that was it. Bonogofsky called her partner, environmental activist Mike Scott, and together they herded their goats into a field closer to the house. The Gazette’s writeup included a number for landowners to call if they noticed oil on their property. It was an 800-number belonging to ExxonMobil. Bonogofsky called. “The number was actually for an insurance firm,” she recalls. “You got to this operator and the operator took your information: name, number, what you were calling about. ‘Someone will get back to you right away,’ she tells me. And the person that calls me back is an insurance adjuster. It’s not even someone who says, ‘Hey, we think you should get away from the oil or get your livestock away from the oil.’ Nothing about safety. It was an insurance adjuster asking us what damages we had, and this was the first day. The river was still flooding, oil was still coming onto the property. And there’s this expectation that we were supposed to talk to somebody about what damages we had?”

What came next was a morning of phone tag. First Bonogofsky called Yellowstone County. She got an answering machine. It was Fourth of July weekend. Next she called the Montana Department of Environmental Quality. They told her to call her local emergency services number. Bonogofsky’s frustration began to grow. She and Scott spent the afternoon walking across their property, snapping photos and documenting the damage. That evening, the local news showed footage of cleanup crews near Laurel. Bonogofsky and Scott piled into their truck and drove eight miles west to get answers. The first people they saw were sitting in lawn chairs next to a van on the side of the road, absorbent booms placed in the water near them to soak up the oil. She says they didn’t know much. It didn’t look to Bonogofsky like they even had adequate supplies to launch a sizable cleanup effort. She asked about her animals and whether they were in danger. The men told her, off the record, that she’d be wise to move livestock away from the contamination. That was her first face-to-face encounter with anyone from ExxonMobil, Bonogofsky says. Kit Charter’s story is strikingly similar. She and her husband live in Billings, but they have family property along the Yellowstone. When the news first broke July 2 that ExxonMobil’s Silvertip Pipeline had ruptured next to the south bank of Laurel’s Riverside Park, Charter drove to her spread to investigate. First she stopped off at the home of a close friend, George Nielsen. The smell of oil in his house was so overpowering, it nearly knocked Charter over. Nielsen felt sick, Charter says, so they left the house. Health officials would later release a statement informing people that the fumes from the spill weren’t a major health concern. Shortly after the spill, Mike Scott told Huffington Post that Bonogofsky had been diagnosed with acute hydrocarbon exposure—typically a sign of hydrocarbon inhalation among residents in close proximity to oil spills. Symptoms include dizziness, nausea and trouble breathing. Next Charter made the rounds of her riverside land. She used to let livestock graze the property, which had been in the family for about 100 years, but decided several years ago to restore the acreage to a pristine riparian state. She says they did it “for the birds and deer and fox and fish and bugs and whatever,” and they worked hard doing it too. What they found the morning of July 2 was startling. “Everything was black,” she says.

The situation wasn’t any better at her cousin Kelly Goodman’s place. When the floodwaters finally began to subside, “the fence was black, the grass was black.” Charter still tries not to think about it. “You hate to bring back any of it, because then you’re mad for three days,” she says. Answers weren’t easy to come by for landowners in the days after the Silvertip spill. Bonogofsky drove to ExxonMobil’s command center at the Crowne Plaza in Billings, but security guards turned her away. “We wanted answers, like when is the cleanup going to start, is this dangerous, what are the health impacts, all this stuff,” Bonogofsky says. “So we went and we finally got a meeting with [ExxonMobil Pipeline Company President] Gary Pruessing. Because of that, I think, they sent a crew down to our place earlier than they would have.” Exxon eventually replanted Bonogofsky’s hayfield. Last summer’s drought wiped it out again and now she has a field of dirt and no idea what to do with it. Hay was too expensive this fall. She had to sell some of her goats to get by. Worst of all is the emotional damage. Bonogofsky bought the ranch from her parents when she moved back to Montana. In a lot of ways, the Yellowstone is the very reason Bonogofsky came back home in the first place.

Illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart

missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [15]


“It was bad, and it still is bad, and [for Exxon] to have this mentality of, ‘Oh, we can fix it’—no you can’t,” she says. “You changed the place, and we have to get it back.” Bonogofsky says there are still black rings on the cottonwoods around her ranch, from where the oil soaked into the bark.

“Severe environmental impact” Several weeks after the August 2010 meeting in Riverside Park, city officials in Laurel contacted the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration with concerns that future flood events could undermine the integrity of the pipelines under the Yellowstone. PHMSA promptly contacted the appropriate companies, focusing specifically on ExxonMobil—given that the other pipelines were either laid up or transporting natural gas. According to PHMSA’s new investigation report, the agency believed at the time that a failure in Exxon’s Silvertip line “would cause severe environmental impact.” Exxon responded by conducting a depth-of-cover survey of its pipeline crossing at Riverside Park. The company submitted its findings to PHMSA on Jan. 19, 2011, showing that the pipe was a minimum of 5.3 feet below the riverbed, or 1.3 feet more than the minimum federal requirement. Furthermore, Exxon claimed the bottom of the river hadn’t changed significantly since the company had conducted its last survey. That survey occurred in 2002. PHMSA cautioned Exxon that it should maintain vigilance in monitoring the Silvertip. But by spring 2011, Exxon’s new depth-of-cover data had put most concerns about the riverbed at ease. Attention shifted to the erosion along the south bank at Riverside, which PHMSA notes “was extensive and was continuing.” Heavy rains were causing the Yellowstone and other rivers in the state to swell quickly. On May 25, city officials in Laurel again emailed PHMSA with concerns about the impacts of seasonal flooding. Exxon shut down the Silvertip for five hours and assessed the site, but decided that daily drive-by checks would be adequate to gauge the state of the river. Over the next few days, PHMSA started monitoring all pipeline sites across the state in response to

Illustration by Pumpernickel Stewart

[16] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

rising flow rates. The agency contacted all of the major pipeline operators in an attempt to gather information on any potential problems. Floodwaters had begun to recede, but warmer temperatures were imminent. Snowpack to the west would be melting soon. The primary concern for Laurel throughout the spring and early summer wasn’t necessarily the crossings under the Yellowstone itself. Officials were far more worried about the flood washing over the bank at Riverside Park and threatening the unprotected sections of pipeline there. On June 24, Exxon shut down the Silvertip a second time. Snowmelt had caused the river level to rise again, but Exxon resumed the flow of oil the same day after conducting another site visit. The company placed sand bags around its remote-controlled valve station in Riverside June 25 to protect to the facility. According to PHMSA’s investigation, “Exxon personnel state that they had no indications that the pipeline crossing in the river was exposed.” PHMSA did conclude that Exxon “took reasonable precautions to address the flooding of the Yellowstone River in the spring and early summer of 2011.” The report goes on to state that the company “may not have known that the river bottom could change sufficiently to undermine their pipeline.” Laurel’s concerns in Riverside Park were gradually refined in spring 2011 to the erosion of the south bank and the continued safety of the park itself. But that fear clearly implies floodwaters were radically changing the river immediately downstream of the Highway 212 bridge. Of the four pipelines running under the Yellowstone in the Laurel area, two transport natural gas— a substance that, if released, inflicts little immediate damage to the surrounding environment. A third, which at one time transported crude oil, had been purged with nitrogen and retired in early 2010. The fourth pipeline, ExxonMobil’s Silvertip, was the only active crude oil line at Riverside Park in summer 2011.

A river named Yellowstone Early on July 3, 2011, Tom Livers got a call from his office at the Montana Department of Environmental Quality telling him to get down to Billings as quickly as possible. He was assigned to coordinate the state’s response to the spill on the Yellowstone, a task normally assigned to the Montana Disaster and Emergency Services Division. He didn’t pack much; he thought he’d only be away from Helena for the span of a meeting or two. His wife got into the passenger’s seat. Their dog jumped into the back. “When we first hit the river in Livingston, it was obvious that that thing was moving,” Livers says of the Yellowstone, which was surging at nearly 28,000 cubic feet per second. “It was bigger than I’d ever seen it in several decades of being here.” The temperature in central Montana was working its way toward 100 degrees. More thunderstorms were on the way. Livers spent most of the drive down to Billings on his Bluetooth, trying to figure out what technical expertise DEQ could bring to the table at the spill command center in the Crowne Plaza. His agency wasn’t set up for emergency response. None of its staff had training in the incident command system made standard at most governmental agencies in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. He was going to be a fish out of water, at least for a while.

But that wasn’t the main issue nagging Livers. He was thinking about the torrent he’d seen from the bridge in Livingston, and about the iconic name that river bore. “One thing that kept going through my head on the drive down to Billings the first day was, ‘This river’s named Yellowstone, and it’s going to get a lot of attention—appropriately,’” Livers recalls. “Just given that it’s in Montana, it’s the Yellowstone River, did attract lots of attention both nationally and internationally.” Over the next few weeks, Livers would interact with news crews and reporters from everywhere—The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, even Chinese Central Television. Exxon had already mustered some 300 response personnel by the time Livers arrived at the Crowne Plaza. There were roughly 20 representatives from the EPA too, Livers says. Many of the spill specialists gathered in Billings had worked Deepwater Horizon together the previous year. “I was watching a lot of reunions and old friends being reconnected,” Livers says. “But I think this was Exxon’s first big incident since Valdez, so they were really concerned.” Livers remained in Billings for several days working to “plug” the state into the response operations, but he eventually got out to the actual spill site. First he toured the fringes, where floodwaters had swept pools of oil into oxbows, backwaters, essentially the entire riparian corridor. It had even reached low-lying hayfields and pastures for miles downstream. “The river was running so high you couldn’t get on it,” Livers says. “We got the first fast boats out on the water I think a week into it.” The image that stuck with Livers most, though, came during his first flyover of the Yellowstone. Thick clumps of downed trees, shrubs and other flood debris in the river’s main channel had captured heavy deposits of the oil, and were steadily wicking it off. “You’d see these debris piles dotted throughout the river, with long oil plumes stretching downstream from them,” Livers says. “I’ve never seen something that compared with that.” On the ground, the oil coated scores of reptiles, amphibians and birds. The EPA specifically cautioned cleanup crews not to disturb eagles, as they could be fledging their young. Six specialists with the nonprofit International Bird Rescue, which has led bird rescue efforts in more than 200 oil spills since 1971, arrived in Billings July 3 to lend their expertise cleaning oiled wildlife. The group cared for 131 animals in all, including a Canada goose, a Coopers hawk, six leopard frogs and 109 Woodhouse’s toads. They also continued monitoring several partially oiled bald eagles throughout the summer. Landowners became fed up with the lack of public meetings and information coming from Exxon officials in the first few days. They began descending on Laurel, pressing the city for answers. City Councilwoman Emelie Easton didn’t know what to tell them. Laurel had been worried for some time that flooding on the Yellowstone might result in an incident. But the reality of a pipeline spill came as a surprise nonetheless. “I think the city, we were certainly in over our heads because nobody expected anything like this and there weren’t any local resources to depend on for cleanup let alone stopping the oil spill,” Easton says. “That in itself was overwhelming, and then all the claims of property being damaged way downriver … It was really a challenge to try to focus on the fact that we needed to make friends with the Exxon people who in turn had come into town saying, ‘Okay, we’re taking this over. We’re shutting you down.’” The entire experience still weighs heavily on Livers. Oil spills were a thing that happened elsewhere in the world, not something that happened on the banks of the Yellowstone.


Alexis Bonogofsky and Mike Scott talk with officials on their flooded property in July 2011. Photo courtesy of Alexis Bonogofsky

“We watched what happened in Kalamazoo, and it didn’t hit home,” Livers says. “I didn’t recognize we have similar risks here in Montana at the time.”

Controller A He’s identified only as Controller A in PHMSA’s investigation. He was working console number two—otherwise known as the Montana Crude Pipeline System and Offshore Crude Oil console—at the ExxonMobil Pipeline Company’s operations control center in Houston July 1, 2011. At exactly 10:41 p.m., an alarm notified him that the Edgar Pump Station in Montana had automatically shut down. He pulled up data on pipeline flow rates and pressures, which showed a dramatic drop in suction pressure at the Edgar station. According to PHMSA’s report, the flow rate at Exxon’s refinery in Billings “also dropped from 2,300 barrels per hour to 300.” The data seemed to indicate a leak in the line. At 10:47, Controller A shut down the pumps. At 10:50, he closed the valve at the Silvertip Pump Station that allows the flow of crude oil into the Silvertip Pipeline. At 10:57, he closed the Laurel valve, located on the north side of the Yellowstone River. Controller A didn’t notice that the valve station located in Riverside Park had also experienced a drop in line pressure at 10:40. Nine minutes passed between that alarm and Controller A’s shutdown procedure. According to PHMSA, with 2,300 barrels flowing through the line per hour, the estimated discharge at that point would have been 381 barrels. Controller A turned to a colleague, identified as Controller B, to “check what he was seeing.” At 11 p.m., Controller A contacted his supervisor to alert him of the situation. Seven minutes later, the supervisor instructed Controller A to reopen the Laurel valve and allow the oil in that portion of pipeline to drain into the Billings refinery. By 11:20, the supervisor was on a conference call with additional supervisors and technicians, who PHMSA’s report states felt the low suction alarm could have been triggered by a leak, a faulty transmitter or a number of other factors. At 11:36 p.m.—56 minutes after the first alarm— Exxon finally closed the pipeline valves upstream of all river crossings. Gravity had been draining the Silvertip of oil for 46 minutes and 12 seconds. PHMSA’s calculations show that roughly 1,444 barrels of oil would have been released during that time; Exxon’s final spill volume was 1,509 barrels. Exxon got a call at 11:45 that night from the Laurel Fire Department. City officials reported smelling crude oil in the vicinity of Riverside Park. Exxon immediately notified its refinery strike team, which set out for the riverbank around midnight.

Mayor Ken Olson got a call at home around that time informing him of an emergency in the park. He arrived to find the road a zoo—squad cars from the Yellowstone County Sheriff ’s Office, Laurel Volunteer Fire Department vehicles, even an ambulance. Response teams put out the order to evacuate residents along the river. “Cenex called out their spill response team, so they were out poking around,” Olson recalls. “We could detect it was an unusual odor.” But with the park flooded with water, no one could get close enough to figure out exactly what had happened. PHMSA’s investigation concluded that the line failed due to “excessive abnormal stresses” inflicted on the pipe by “bending forces, vibration, and debris accumulation.” The biggest hit Exxon took in the report was a critique of the company’s emergency shutdown procedures. Had those procedures required the controllers in Houston to immediately close the valves both upstream and downstream of the Yellowstone, PHMSA found that “the crude oil release volume would have been much less and the location of the release would have been identified more quickly.” “The investigative report by PHMSA confirmed the Silvertip pipeline crossing exceeded the federal minimum depth of cover for the installation of a new pipeline in a river,” ExxonMobil Pipeline Company spokesperson Amber Gardner told the Independent by email. “We believe the procedures and training we had in place at the time of the incident complied with federal regulations.” Buried early in PHMSA’s report is one more indication of the powerful forces at work on the bottom of the Yellowstone in summer 2011. The only other hazardous liquid pipeline at Riverside Park—the one that was purged of crude oil in 2010—also failed that year. “No one knew of this failure because the line remained submerged under the flood water,” PHMSA’s investigation states. “This line failure was discovered after the water receded in September.”

“Not good enough” As cleanup crews made their way along the Yellowstone River, Exxon set about securing an easement in Riverside Park to begin pulling the failed Silvertip line out of the waterway and replacing it. The initial agreement, according to Laurel City Council minutes, called for Exxon to pay the city $500 a day to accommodate the work. The amount was later increased to $1,000 a day. The agreement required Riverside Park to remain closed during the work period, originally scheduled for completion by Dec. 1, 2011. Easton says it was irritating, almost insulting, to see Exxon throwing money around as if it could fix the mess the Silvertip had created.

“It was frustrating to have a deep-pocketed company come along and try to buy good will,” Easton says. “There were some people [on the city council] who said, ‘That’s not good enough, that’s not going to satisfy the whole thing.’ Then there were some council members who said, ‘Well, let’s go ahead and milk this for all it’s worth.’” In the months after Silvertip, Exxon made a number of such monetary gestures to local communities. The company even presented the Yellowstone County Sheriff ’s Office a check for $51,000 Aug. 9 to purchase a new boat—a token of appreciation for the department’s quick response time during the spill. Livers feels the spill put Montana on an unfortunate map. Even on scene in Billings, he felt he was witnessing an event with long-term ramifications. “In the wake of Deepwater Horizon and Kallamazoo, I think there was a sense that we were seeing something,” he says. “This is not a particularly old pipeline. That particular trench crossing was laid in ’91. That was concerning because we have no regulatory authority at DEQ over pipelines, but even as a resource agency we didn’t have a good sense how many crossings were out there.” Indeed, in the weeks following the Silvertip rupture, the Indy was contacted by environmental activists on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. A leak in a pipeline belonging to Salt Lake City-based FX Energy Inc. created a milelong crude oil spill that seeped into Cut Bank Creek. The spill, which released as much as 840 gallons, went unreported for nearly a month. The Silvertip incident had lasting implications for Exxon. Spilled oil fouled an estimated 70 miles of pristine river corridor along the country’s longest stretch of undammed waterway. Initial estimates of spilled oil from Exxon personnel ranged from 23,600 gallons to 42,000 gallons; the final total, according to Montana’s 2012 risk assessment report, was around 50,000 gallons. Exxon spent $135 million on its response, and remediation is ongoing. The company faces two separate district court lawsuits. In one complaint, landowners make repeated use of the phrase “oiled, soiled and spoiled” to describe the interruption to their agricultural livelihoods. ExxonMobil Pipeline Company has since revised its remote control valve procedures and its operator training, in keeping with the conclusions contained in PHMSA’s report last month. The company re-drilled pipeline trenches under the Yellowstone at a rough depth of 40 feet and, according to Gardner, “will continue to work cooperatively with PHMSA on any follow up actions.” PHMSA itself is now the center of much discussion about the need to revise federal pipeline regulations. In the wake of the Silvertip spill, U.S. Sens. Jon Tester and Max Baucus pressed the agency to conduct a comprehensive study of all pipeline crossings at inland water-

ways across the country. PHMSA finally presented that report to Congress this January, revealing that loss of cover due to flooding has been a factor in 16 hazardous liquid pipeline spills in eight states since 1991. PHMSA spokesman Damon Hill told the Indy that those results will play heavily in future discussions on what, if any, regulatory changes should be made. Then-Gov. Brian Schweitzer was quick to wag the metaphoric finger at Exxon in 2011 for not shutting the pipe down more quickly. Within a few weeks, he’d created the Montana Oil Pipeline Safety Review Council, under the umbrella of DEQ. Schweitzer created the council to independently analyze the status of pipeline crossings on other bodies of water across the state. The results were troubling; federal and state officials found numerous inadequately buried pipelines crossing Montana streams and rivers—including additional sections of the Silvertip at Rock Creek and the Clark Fork. The Silvertip spill even had a trickle effect with regards to TransCanada’s hotly debated Keystone XL Pipeline. Livers says DEQ revisited the proposal with a close eye to the location of shutoff valves, and found that TransCanada had positioned the valves at river crossings too far apart for comfort. “I don’t know if we would have really appreciated the significance of that had it not been for our experience on the Silvertip,” Livers says. And down in Laurel, where it all began, Easton talks about what could be considered a silver lining in the city’s most tragic event. Laurel woke up in summer 2011, she says. The community’s more aware now of what the oil industry says and does. “It is not so much a friendly handshake agreement situation like it was before,” she says. “Laurel is looking out more for itself and for the potential for accidents again. The City of Laurel grew up a lot...with regard to realizing that the city cannot be taken advantage of again.” Exxon eventually increased its easement payments in Laurel to $1,200 per day. The Silvertip replacement project wound up taking longer than expected; the work bled into early 2012. Laurel received a somewhat unexpected gift on Aug. 16, 2011. During a budget update before the city council, City Clerk Shirley Ewan announced that ExxonMobil had given Laurel an additional $300,000. The company awarded the grant to fund improvements in Riverside Park—specifically, to fortify the south bank of the Yellowstone River against future erosion. Almost a year to the day since the 2010 meeting in Riverside Park, Laurel finally got the oil industry funding it had been seeking all along. asakariassen@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [17]


[arts]

Artist Stephanie Wing joins other designers to celebrate Missoula’s sexual health by Erika Fredrickson

U

nrolling hundreds of condoms in one sitting is a tedious task—but someone’s got to do it. In fact, while there’s no hard data to back this up, Missoula has seen a spike in condom usage just in the last couple of weeks. Is everyone getting lucky? Well, not in the way you might think. Off the Rack, the annual fashion show that celebrates sexual health and benefits Blue Mountain Clinic, hits the Wilma this weekend with clothing designs by local artists that incorporate condoms. This year, the event is called “Sex in the Zoo: Desire, Choice and Exploration.” Serious, provocative questions, such as What is a man or a woman? and How do we move when we love?, will be seen through wild performances, like circus acts, spoken word, a comedy routine and tons of costumes that will be flaunted to the sounds of Macklemore’s “Thrift Shop” and other popular tunes. What better place to unroll a rainbow of colored condoms to match the party atmosphere? In a classroom on the top floor of Willard Alternative School, teacher Stephanie Wing has been working on a peacock bustle made of green and blue condoms. In addition to the condoms, the garment includes felted feathers, wool, silk, cotton and sparkly fabrics. The top of it bursts with blue netting. The hundreds of condoms, unraveled, flow in a shimmery train. “My sister came up with the idea of the peacock tail,” Wing says. “The theme we were driving for was ‘true colors’—showing your true colors—because the whole fundraiser is about raising sexual awareness in the community and about healthy sex.” Wing is a warm, outgoing, funny teacher whose classroom feels like an artist’s attic, full of colored yarn and art supplies, a comfy vintage couch, walls lined with posters of Bob Dylan and other icons. She started working on the peacock costume along with her friend Chris Vance after school and during lunches, and the activity snared the curiosity of her students. “The kids have been coming in to see it, but the initial shock was funny,” she says. “I had a kid come in and he said, ‘There’s a condom on your floor, Steph.’ And I said, ‘Oh yeah, I know.’ And then I held up the whole bag and said, ‘I have a whole bag of condoms here.’” She laughs, recalling their horrified expressions. “And they were like, ‘Oh my gosh!’” A few of Wing’s students have also gotten in on the fashion designing. Sabrina Willis, a senior, was

Photo by Chad Harder

[18] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

originally going to make a bee costume with another student. The first problem was how much time it took to unroll the condoms. Eventually, her whole class pitched in to help. The second problem was how to make the spandex and condoms compatible. “It’s interesting working with the condoms,” Wing says. “We’d been sewing them by hand but they were so heavy they were breaking the thread. And with the spandex dress, whenever it would stretch out, the condoms would fall off.” Willis decided to start over with a new idea: an animal print dress that’s meant to represent a cheetah. On the black part of the dress, she’s sewing black condoms. Instead of unrolling them, she’s sewing them with the tips sticking out to give the dress an almost spiky, armored look. She’ll do the same thing with a pair of go-go boots. “I wanted to use brown ones for the boots,” she says. “But they don’t have [condoms] in brown.” There’s often a little sheepishness when it comest to going to the store and buying condoms. Is the cashier picturing your sexcapades for the evening? Designers for Off the Rack didn’t have to go through the pageantry or money suck of buying hundreds of condoms. “Blue Mountain Clinic provided a huge box of different colored condoms for the participants,” Wing says. “I was telling my friend, I’ve touched more condoms for this project then I ever have my whole life. Probably more than I ever will!” As an artist, Wing’s looking forward to seeing the other designs at the show, including another peacock costume—a female peacock rendered all in white. But the main reason for the project is clear to her. “I really think it’s important for people to be honest about their sexuality, and be proud,” Wing says. “When I was growing up you didn’t talk about sex. “When AIDS came out in the 1980s it totally freaked me out. Nobody was talking about it. Here we’re saying humans have sex and that it’s a natural part of life. It’s not abnormal. It doesn’t need to be taboo.” Off the Rack hits the Wilma Theater Sat., Feb. 9, at 8:30 PM. Doors open at 7:30. VIP reception at 6:30. $25/$15 students/$55 VIP. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


[music]

Big city dreaming Copper Mountain Band on country roots and Nashville ambition by Brooks Johnson

Copper Mountain Band hails from Troy and features, from left, Casey Mann, Nate Norman, Jacque Jolene, Teniya Morelli—recently replaced by Steve Starkey—and Israel David.

As it turns out, Missoula is in Montana after all. Despite the nay-saying bumper stickers and insistence from your uncle in Butte, the Garden City grows and composts cowboys and cowgirls the same as any ranch in Belt. You just have to know where to look. “We’ve been here a couple times so hopefully we’re starting to look familiar,” Jacque Jolene calls to her audience from a stage adorned with wagon wheels. It’s only 10 p.m. on a Friday night and the dimly lit Sunrise Saloon is as packed as any downtown bar at last call. Just off Highway 93, the Sunrise is only two miles from Missoula’s urban center, but inside is as far from city life as possible. Jolene’s group, the Copper Mountain Band, hits its first note with the energy of a Budweiser cracked after an hour in a paint-shaker. They kick out country classics like “Six Days on the Road” and a few originals before rolling out a cover of The Eagles’ “Take it Easy.” The band’s dabbling in different genres doesn’t seem strange, since the twang and hammer-ons keep their sound in the country realm. With each song the floor surges and empties like a middle school dance. Some dancers return to their tables overflowing with Miller Lites and whiskey sours while others find a new dance partner. Daughters dance with their dads. Some people only dance with the partners they showed up with. Some just want to dance with anyone—who cares? These are the neighbors you never see downtown—the guy with a dirty ’93 Chevy parked outside his house. Like a living jukebox, the Copper Mountain Band

sets the mood of the room, playing whatever the hell they feel like, but leaving space for requests. Jolene struts the stage with the same energy as the crowd. She breaks out a no-body guitar—a funky instrument with just the neck and a skeleton frame—and fills the tallceilinged room with her voice, no problem. “Someday I’ll be living in a big ol’ city,” she sings. Unlike so many indie bands and DJs who play tributes with a wink, the band from Troy plays it straight. It’s all heart and no irony. And Jolene, even when she’s not singing, keeps the audience riveted. Jolene married Nate Norman when they moved back to Montana. After living for six months in Nashville trying to make it, they realized it wasn’t their time yet. She was 19 and only knew a few chords on the guitar. It was time to focus on family, they decided. But then P.J. Morrison called. In 2006, Morrison, a bull rider and guitarist, invited the couple into his band, 8 Seconds Flat. Norman’s cousin Israel “Izzi” David joined soon after. The cousins, who grew up on a homestead on Copper Mountain in Troy, quickly realized they were a good fit. Morrison, the elder of the band, eventually stepped aside to pursue other things, and a young drummer, Casey Mann, came on board. They’ve been the Copper Mountain Band since. “My dream was always to be in this bar band,” Jolene says. Six years later they’ve been to France and back— twice—and toured every Western state playing bars,

clubs, rodeos and fairgrounds. Moving from a gear trailer fashioned out of a dilapidated shed to their new motorhome parallels the band’s growth from covers to originals, and the way they’re striving for that dream of “making it.” “We didn’t realize how successful we’d be,” Jolene says. “It turned us into something more.” The Sunrise and other bar gigs are the band’s bread and butter. Aside from a stake in a Libby-based coffee chain, Jolene, like the rest of the band, makes her living as a musician. Without a label to respond to, the independence feels pretty sweet, she says. But if television shows like “American Idol” prove anything, it’s that there’s a staggering overabundance of people who want to bear themselves on a big stage—people who want to be stars, whatever the cost. And it doesn’t just happen on Fox Wednesday nights at 8/7 central. It happens in small bars in small towns every night. Some artists in the right place make it despite their merit, and some artists with merit miss it for lack of proximity. You’d think it would be easier for a country band to make it in Montana where the music is popular. To an extent, it comes down to the golden rule of real estate: location, location, location. “Too many independent artists think they’re too good for Nashville or L.A.,” David says. “Well, just like the government is in D.C., that’s where the big companies are, that’s where there’s the concentration of power.” Like so many bands, Copper Mountain wants to play bigger stages. And so, there comes a time to take

it east to Nashville. Jolene says the band talks every day about going back. It’s not a matter of when but how. “I don’t care if I have to work at Home Depot and play seven nights a week for free, I want to do this,” David says. “But only as the band. Just like anybody else, how do you move 3,000 miles away from your family in a bad economy, especially when you already have gigs lined up? How do you really make that happen?” In the meantime, they’ve found their niche. While they wait for the stars to align, it’s business as usual. And business is good. The Copper Mountain Band takes the stage on yet another Saturday at 9:30 p.m. and thanks the crowd at the Sunrise Saloon for at least the hundredth time. The cousins, David and Norman, both in black cowboy hats, pick up their instruments. They mess with the pedals and Norman, in a plaid shirt, tunes his bass. Jolene gives some hand-fluffed volume to her blonde hair. Despite their desire to go to Nashville, it’s this kind of audience and this modest bar—not the star-studded music halls and diamond-level studios—that makes them feel at home. “People in New York and Nashville aren’t really going to relate, but we really don’t care,” Jolene says later that night. “They should like this because this is real cowboy shit in Montana. That’s really what we do.” The Copper Mountain Band plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1101 Strand, Fri., Feb. 8, and Sat., Feb. 9, at 8 PM nightly. Free. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [19]


[music]

Bare emotion Menzingers prove that feelings are good

The Menzingers

Look, if you consider yourself hip or tasteful, I won’t convince you to like this band. The Menzingers play rock for people who like bare emotion and power chords, and for those who prefer their pop punk a little depressing. This is music for people who used to like Taking Back Sunday, but grew up. A little. That sounds like damning with faint praise, now that I write it. I didn’t originally care much for the Menzingers, until the fall when I was a 21-year-old with a crushed heart, insomnia at 4 a.m. and in possession of a copy of the band’s 2010 Chamberlain Waits. Even if you’re not going through a miserable phase, you could find reasons to like the Menzingers. The Pennsylvania band’s latest release, On the Impos-

sible Past, made several top 10 lists in 2012 with its punchy pop hooks. Lead singer Tom May lends an emo edge with his shouty song delivery, but it’s softening as the band matures. At a concert last October, I came away a bigger fan after seeing the band’s energetic dance-around live quality. Granted, that was at a huge show packed with drunken fans, but my fingers are crossed I get to see a bit of that vibe again, and share the joy with others. Go ahead. Let yourself feel the feelings. (Kate Whittle) The Menzingers play the Palace Tue., Feb. 12, at 9 PM with locals the Whoopass Girls and Buddy Jackson. $8/$13 for ages 18–20.

The Gypsy Lumberjacks: Live At the Sound Gallery The Gypsy Lumberjacks’ “gypsygrass” style embraces jazz, calypso, bluegrass and rock, sometimes giving a nod to groups like John Butler Trio and Rusted Root, but more often taking its own path. “Riversong,” the first track off the Minneapolis sextet’s most recent album, Live At the Sound Gallery, slides into its groove subtly, flowing as effortlessly as its name implies. When you reach what feels like the waterfall, frontman Leif Magnuson lets out his first thunderous bellow, and the song’s momentum takes off from there. No short songs here—the band builds its songs gradually, layering spitfire acoustic guitar over accordion swells, anchored down by sly bass lines and steady percussion. When the

recipe really hits its stride, like on “Road to Antietam” and “Love and Understanding,” the results are colossal. At times the album suffers from the trappings expected of a live recording—distracting flaws that on a studio album would be smoothed out. And some moments, like the haphazard scat singing/tablaspeak in the middle of “What You Wanted Here,” don’t welcome repeated listens. Still, it’s a spirited collection of original material and a satisfying taste of what to expect at their Missoula show this week. Plus, for a $4 download on Bandcamp, it’s a steal. (Jed Nussbaum) The Gypsy Lumberjacks play the VFW Thu., Feb. 14, at 10 PM with locals The Hasslers. $5.

Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite: Get Up Ben Harper has always been music’s rootsy everyman. From quintessential stoner campfire singalongs (“Burn One Down”), to the Prince-approved funk of “Mama’s Trippin,” to his howling rock and roll with the Relentless Seven, the musician has proven his versatility and authenticity countless times over the last two decades. Throughout all his musical meanderings, though, the inherent blues in his voice has always been a staple. If the blues informs Harper’s voice, then it drips off Charlie Musselwhite’s, through his harmonica, seeping into the albums he’s recorded with artists like Tom Waits and Bonnie Raitt, and into his own

[20] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

discography spanning the past 40 years. Harper and Musselwhite share the limelight perfectly on this collaborative effort, which ranges from tasteful acoustic ballads like “You Found Another Lover” to the greasy thump of “Blood Side Out,” where both performers go full throttle like a pair of baying hell hounds. Even the album’s weaker numbers, like the plodding shuffle of the opening track, “Don’t Look Twice,” seem to fit nicely in the setlist, offering nice transitions into more rousing songs. Get Up! is a solid offering from two class-act musicians in a genre often overlooked and under-appreciated, but always relevant.(Jed Nussbaum)


[music] Times Run 2/8/13 - 2/7/14

Jedi power

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater Rust and Bone (R) Nightly at 7

The Whoopass Girls subvert the message by Chris La Tray

Hanging out with Missoula’s The Whoopass Girls, a band composed of three members (all male) and one roadie (also male), it’s immediately clear that as a unit they all march confidently, if somewhat spastically, in the same musical direction. Until you ask them what their image, or band message, might be. “Message?” says drummer CJ Tingler. “I have a message!” He raises a finger, certainty in his eye, and says, “Jedis cannot stop bullets.”

Uhl, who also sings and writes the material, and bass player Forrest Bauer are products of the Frenchtown school system. Initially rivals in high school, Uhl and Bauer shared enough musical interests that they eventually came together in a band. They immediately started writing and recording their own songs, scoring a cassette release overseas of a “very raw” recording called All for Nothing, which they did with a single mic in Uhl’s basement. Soon after its release, they saw Tin-

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This platform is not shared by the rest of the crew. A heated discussion follows over the limits of mystical powers wielded by the warrior monks of the Star Wars franchise, at least as they relate to slung lead. “Bullets travel faster than Star Wars lasers,” Tingler says. “Star Wars lasers travel slowly.” No amount of force fields or mind control acumen can prevent a Jedi from going down in a hail of lead, he explains. “What do you think?” Tingler asks. I’m at a loss, rendered not only speechless but also lacking an opinion, which is a rare thing. I may be the grizzled old rocker among young up-and-comers, but when it comes to dispensing wisdom on this topic, I am clearly no Obi-wan Kenobi. If this exchange seems like a random conversation to have when discussing one’s band or musical image, it’s because it is. The Whoopass Girls are far removed from the traditional. Unlike old-school rockers who had their dreams of musical glory coaxed to life via the pages of slick industry mags like Creem or Hit Parader or Circus, these guys had other stimulants. Like science fiction. And video games. “I originally started playing guitar because I was playing a lot of Guitar Hero,” Uhl says, “and I thought, ‘Hey, I can do that.’ Then I started getting into alternative music and I’m like, ‘Maybe it doesn’t work like that.’ So it was Guitar Hero . . . and this guy named Kievan. He was my arch enemy. He saw me air guitaring and said, ‘You can’t play guitar.’ So I proved him wrong. I guess.”

gler playing in another band at a show and the trio hit it off. He was added to the lineup. Their current release, Headacher, recorded in a day at Club Shmed in Missoula last fall, is a perfect showcase for their sound. The seven throat-blistering tracks swirl with more energy than you might expect from these young dudes who are a bit bleary on a Sunday morning. Like so many recordings these days, the album is available as a free download on Bandcamp, but it will also be released via cassette on an indie label overseas. “According to WikiHow, [the recording] was supposed to take us four days,” Bauer says with a laugh. “But we’re poor, so we did it in one.” “Even with all the mistakes in it it’s still almost too good,” Uhl says. “I think we might not be as good as it sounds like we are.” Tingler says the music is for people who “want to listen to sad songs they can dance to.” This is uptempo stuff that marries the pop punk of the ’90s with screamed, angsty vocals and breakdowns born in the oughts. It doesn’t really square up with the happy-golucky demeanors of the guys making the music, but maybe for the sweaty kids flailing about during their shows, that’s the point. As for guns and Star Wars and magnum stopping power, I still don’t have a clue. The Whoopass Girls open for the Menzingers at the Palace Tue., Feb. 12, at 9 PM with Buddy Jackson. $8/$13 for ages 18–20. arts@missoulanews.com

missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [21]


[film]

Genre bender Soderbergh’s Side Effects offers a fitting end by Scott Renshaw

Steven Soderbergh recently announced his retirement from making feature films, which made it a bleak day for those who think “genre” is a dirty word to movie lovers. If Soderbergh has proven anything over the course of his 20-plus-year filmmaking career, it’s that there’s no broad concept that can’t be executed with professionalism and style. Because while Soderbergh is an Oscar winner who has made plenty of prestige dramas, he’s given it all a shot in his time: caper comedies (Ocean’s Eleven

under his “Peter Andrews” pseudonym) and even sound-design choices like the hollow echoes of the apartment Banks shares with his new wife ( Vinessa Shaw) help build the ominous sense that we’re about to watch corporate malfeasance backfire. Then, Side Effects abruptly turns sideways. The specific nature of that shift veers into spoiler territory, so those specifics are best avoided. Yet it’s fair to say that Side Effects complicates the roles and motivations of its characters in the key plot point, shifting the di-

Warning: Side effects include glamorous parties with beautiful people.

through Thirteen), science fiction (Solaris), tough-guy crime tales (The Limey), procedural thriller (Contagion). He even pulled a rare double-feature in 2012 of bringing a respectable kick to both an actionvengeance tale (Haywire) and a movie about male strippers (Magic Mike). There’s something about the way Soderbergh tells a cinematic story that makes it feel elegant, even when your brain is telling you it should be preposterous. His previous work certainly elevates Side Effects from the kind of thriller we might all be rolling our eyes at if pretty much anyone else had made it. The setup finds Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara) reunited with her husband Martin (Channing Tatum) after he has spent four years in prison for insider trading. But Emily’s history of depression re-emerges during this tumultuous time, and a suicide attempt lands her in the care of psychiatrist Jonathan Banks ( Jude Law). After a variety of medications don’t seem to do the trick, Dr. Banks prescribes a newer pill that seems to have Emily on the road back to normalcy. But one particular side effect of the medication has unexpectedly terrible consequences. For much of Side Effects’ first half, Soderbergh steers viewers deftly toward the tragic event foreshadowed in the opening shot. The structure of the screenplay by Scott Z. Burns (Contagion) makes it unclear whether the focus of the story will ultimately be Emily or Dr. Banks, giving us plenty of time with Emily’s struggles to hold herself together and Banks’ interactions with pharmaceutical company reps ready to pay him for “studies” introducing their new drugs to his patients. Soderbergh’s own cinematography (still

[22] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

rection of the story into something more along the lines of a detective thriller than a morality play. And while it’s initially surprising, it’s also somewhat disappointing to watch the film turn into a narrative almost entirely about untangling the “what really happened” part, rather than digging into deeper questions about the consequences of America’s magic-pill culture. Yet surface-level satisfaction is something Soderbergh rarely has trouble achieving. We may know that there’s an expository flashback sequence on the way, yet the editing is so smooth that you can almost forget you’re simply being spoon-fed what happened. He leads his actors to performances that convey a spiky realism even in the middle of a plot based on an elaborate conspiracy, whether it’s Law’s sinking-ever-deeper doctor or Michael Nathanson in a memorable small part as a district attorney. It’s a kinda-dumb movie that nevertheless feels smart. That’s the upgrade Soderbergh brings to a movie: He’s a director who never treats his material as though he’s slumming it, just because the story isn’t about crusading single moms or complex international politics. Side Effects is the kind of movie you get when a filmmaker respects his audience enough to work his hardest on everything he does, even if plenty of people wouldn’t even notice if he only gave 60 percent effort. We’ll miss it the next time a genre movie is treated just as a “genre movie,” rather than a story that’s worth telling well if it’s worth telling at all. Side Effects opens at the Carmike 12 Fri., Feb. 8. arts@missoulanews.com


[film]

OPENING THIS WEEK A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD John McClane goes looking for his son and trouble over in Russia, only to find that it’s going to take more than a few well-timed burns to prevent a nuclear disaster. In Russia, hard dies you. Starring Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney and Sebastian Koch. Rated R. Opens Thu., Feb. 14. Carmike 12. IDENTITY THIEF This is a revenge comedy gone awry and back and awry again, wherein a mild-mannered fella tries to recover his stolen ID from the woman (gasp!) who is ruining his credit score with lavish spending sprees. Perhaps we shall learn the true meaning of “identity.” Starring Jason Bateman, Melissa McCarthy, John Cho. Rated R. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex. RUST AND BONE In this French film, a single father struggles to raise his young son, but manages to become romantically involved with a killer whale trainer who suffers a horrible accident. Starring Marion Cotillard, Matthias Schoenaerts, Armand Verdure. Rated R. Wilma. SIDE EFFECTS A well-to-do New York couple learns that a drug’s side effects could have unintended consequences. Directed by Steven Soderbergh. Starring Rooney Mara, Channing Tatum, Jude Law. Rated R. Carmike 12.

NOW PLAYING ANNA KARENINA Does the world’s finest literary labor measure up in movie form? Will Anna leave her husband for Count Vronsky? Will you love Keira Knighley’s outfits? Jude Law’s “acting?” Also starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson. Rated R. Wilma. ARGO Based on a true story, crafty CIA dudes try to bust some Americans out of the not-so-hospitable country of Iran circa 1979. Ayatollah rock and rolla! Starring Ben Affleck, Bryan Cranston and John Goodman. Rated R. Village 6. BROKEN CITY Framed by the mayor of NYC, a cop goes off the rails on the crazy train to catch the scoundrel and prove himself innocent. Starring the cast from the past, Mark Wahlberg, Russell Crowe and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Rated R. Carmike 12.

desperate actors such as Dennis Quaid, Greg Kinnear, Common, Seth MacFarlane and, of course, Richard Gere. Rated R. Village 6.

BULLET TO THE HEAD Two unlikely partners form an alliance and visit vengeance upon those who killed their old partners. Also to make puns, innuendos and coy remarks. Starring the excellent Sylvester Stallone, Jason Momoa and Christian Slater. Rated R. Village 6.

PARKER The devastatingly rugged Jason Statham plays a thief who is double-crossed by his crew and left for dead. Will his handsome good looks help him seek out his revenge? Only if a pretty lady helps. Also starring Jennifer Lopez and Michael Chiklis. Rated R. Village 6.

DJANGO UNCHAINED Django, a slave-turnedbounty hunter, seeks out his wife in the antebellum south. It’s about to get real violent up in here. Directed by Quentin Tarantino. Starring Jamie Foxx, Don Johnson and Leonardo DiCaprio. Rated R. Village 6 and Showboat. GANGSTER SQUAD With no love for East Coast mafiosos, a group of LAPD detectives decide that they are going to go to all lengths to keep them out of their town. Starring Sean Penn, Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone. Rated R. Carmike 12. HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS What up now, witches? Hansel and Gretel are now bounty hunters out to track down and damage every witch on the planet. Best watch out for that Blood Moon, though, kids, not to mention a secret from the past. Starring Jeremy Renner, Gemma Arterton and Peter Stormare. Rated R. Carmike12, Village 6, Pharaohplex and Entertainer. THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY Reclaim the treasure stolen by that old dragon Smaug, Bilbo Baggins, and you and your elven friends will be heroes for a millennia! Starring Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen and Richard Armitage. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. HYDE PARK ON HUDSON The story of FDR feeding hot dogs and apple pie to the king and queen of the United Kingdom on the eve of WWII. Oh, and his affair with distant cousin Margaret “Daisy” Suckley. Starring Bill Murray, Laura Linney and Olivia Williams. Rated R. Wilma. LES MISERABLES After a lifetime on the run in 19th century France,

SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN In this documentary, a couple of South Africans seek out the “Latin Bob Dylan,” Sixto Rodriguez, a 70s rocker who blew up in the African nation after a bootleg recording found its way there 20 years after its recording. Starring Rodriguez, Steve Segerman and Dennis Coffey. Rated PG-13. Wilma.

If guns are outlawed, only Bruno will have guns. A Good Day to Die Hard opens Thu., Feb. 14, at Carmike 12 in the the Big D theater.

Jean Valjean agrees to care for a young girl and lives are forever changed. Plus, you know, singing. Starring the enchanting Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12, Pharaohplex and Showboat. LINCOLN Steven Spielberg directs Daniel Day-Lewis in this biopic about the United States’ greatest president as he struggles with the war, emancipation of the slaves, his cabinet and his family. Starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field and David Strathairn. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. MAMA So you’ve got to raise your nieces after they’ve lived alone in the woods for five years. Something is bound to go wrong, very wrong. Starring Jessica Chastain, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Megan Charpentier. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12. MOVIE 43 Some of Hollywood’s biggest stars must have really got on someone’s bad side as they star in this episodic film about three kids plumbing the depths of the Internet for a super-banned film. Starring

SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK Based on the novel by Matthew Quick, this is the story of a former teacher returning home to his wife and parents after a stint in a mental institution. But things aren’t all turkey and stuffing cuz there is a mysterious woman in the picture, too. Starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence and Robert De Niro. Rated R. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex. WARM BODIES Zombie love, y’all. A zombie saves a pretty lady from an attack and love may just change the entire undead world as we know it. Please save your, “Keep the tip,” jokes for later. Starring Nicholas Hoult, Teresa Palmer and John Malkovich. Rated PG-13. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex. ZERO DARK THIRTY Zero Dark Thirty retells the story of the military operation that resulted in Osama bin Laden’s death. If this were a Jerry Bruckheimer film, Navy recruiters would be creaming their jeans, but this one, directed by Kathryn Bigelow (The Hurt Locker), confronts issues of morality in wartime and the demons wrought by interrogation. Rated R. Carmike 12 and Pharaohplex.

Capsule reviews by Jason McMackin. Moviegoers be warned! For show times please visit missoulanews.com or contact the theaters in order to spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 12 and Village 6 at 5417469; Wilma at 728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 961-FILM; Showboat in Polson and Entertainer in Ronan at 883-5603.

missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [23]


[dish]

Photo by Ari LeVaux

Breakfast complex by Ari LeVaux FEBRUARY

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[24] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

The institution of breakfast is rarely challenged. It ranks somewhere between sleep and oxygen in reputed health benefit, and supposedly supplies irreplaceable energy to get you going, primes your metabolic system, keeps your muscles healthy, feeds your brain and generally prepares you for the day to come. But what if the age-old wisdom is an old wives tale? Recent studies suggest that at the very least, the benefits of breakfast are not so simple. For our purposes, breakfast means a meal eaten soon after waking, before going about one’s daily business. Thus, a 2 p.m. meal could be considered breakfast if you’ve just woken up, but not if you’ve been awake since 8 a.m. On Jan. 18, Nutrition Journal presented a study that suggests people will eat the same size meals at lunch and dinner regardless of how much they ate for breakfast. This challenges the conventional wisdom that if you skip breakfast, you’ll gorge later to make up for it. The pro-breakfast camp had earlier found support in an October 2012 study at the Imperial College of London, which compared brain scans and caloric intake of 21 people who either ate or skipped breakfast. As Medical News Today summarized the findings: “Skipping breakfast increased hunger, appeal of highcalorie foods and food intake at lunch.” Implicit in studies like these is the assumption that we want to eat fewer calories, which is understandable given how many people consume more calories than they burn—i.e., they’re overweight. But regardless of the impact, or lack thereof, that breakfast may have on total daily caloric intake, there are other factors to consider regarding breakfast—like how hungry you are, and how a meal makes you feel first thing in the morning. Another recent study looked at the differences between exercising on a full or empty stomach. In late January, the British Journal of Nutrition published a paper that suggests exercise before breakfast burns 20 percent more body fat than the same workout after breakfast. The study also determined that people who exercise before breakfast do not consume additional calories or experience increased appetite during the day. Doctoral student Javier Gonzalez, one of the study’s authors, told Science Daily: “In order to lose body fat we need to use more fat than we consume. Exercise increases the total amount of energy we expend, and a greater proportion of this energy comes from existing fat if the exercise is performed after an overnight fast.” A recent study in the International Journal of Obesity, meanwhile, found that people who eat their first meal before 3 p.m. eat fewer total calories than folks who waited until afterward to break their fast. I’m not sure what that has to do with breakfast, but I guess if you were up until 5 eating tapas, that’s about right. In any case, the researchers speculate that the relationship between the body’s sleep and eating cy-

FLASH IN THE PAN

cles could play a role in how hormones control what the body does with food in its digestive system. Bodybuilder and blogger Martin Berkhan forced himself to eat breakfast for years, buying into the conventional wisdom that one must eat five to eight times a day to preserve muscle mass. Nowadays, he doesn’t break fast until mid-afternoon, following his daily weightlifting routine. Berkhan credits skipping breakfast for helping him not only reach his fat loss goals, but his muscle-building goals too. He calls working out on an empty stomach “Fasted Training,” a practice he writes about in his blog, Leangains. In a recent post called “Why Does Breakfast Make Me Hungry?” Berkhan wonders why different people react so differently to breakfast. “For me and many others out there, skipping breakfast keeps hunger away far better than eating in the morning-paradoxically enough...Why is it that some people are better off not eating anything at all in the morning? How can you be better off with zero calories than hundreds of calories under these specific conditions?” His heavily cited hypothesis is based on a phenomena called the cortisol awakening response, in which levels of the hormone cortisol are elevated in the morning, to help you wake up. Cortisol increases blood sugar. How your body deals with that increased blood sugar, according to Berkhan, determines how well you do on breakfast. I’ve tried skipping breakfast, and I’ve tried fasted training, and I might not ever go back. When exercising, I’m much better running on empty. My gastrointestinal system is not the well-oiled machine it once was, and when my belly is full of food it can get in the way of physical activity. For movement, an empty belly can be liberating. Eating habits change over a lifetime. There’s a big difference between when you’re young, growing and basically hungry all the time, and when you hit the fattening 40s, like I recently have. It would be easy to keep eating like I used to, out of habit and momentum, but if I listen to my gut, I’m less hungry than I used to be, especially in the morning. It took me a while to break through the headwind of breakfast cheerleaders, and the idea that by skipping breakfast I might as well be playing Russian roulette for a living. But I feel great, don’t miss breakfast and the paunch has waned. Hopefully more pieces of the breakfast puzzle will soon be unpacked, and we can move beyond simple dogma. What you eat and how much, and when you sleep, eat and exercise all play roles how your food is digested. Wading through all of the emerging data can be confusing, but your gut is the final arbiter, so listen to it. I’m going to continue skipping breakfast because morning is the one time of day that my belly is completely at peace. No bloating, gurgling, burping, heartburning and aching addiction to breakfast. I’m not eating until I’m hungry.


[dish] Alcan Bar and Grill 16780 Beckwith St. Frenchtown • 626-9930 Tantalize your taste buds with Angus beef burgers, chicken strips, shrimp, and biscuits and gravy from Alcan Bar & Grill. With more than 20 years of experience and 10 years in the business, we have been offering fresh meals and beverages at the area's most competitive prices. Our friendly professionals offer personalized service and make sure you leave our restaurant as one of our friends. We offer have a variety of specials for ladies night and sports events featuring drink specials and free food. Contact us today and enjoy our incredible menu selection. 9 am – 2 am Mon-Sun. $ Bagels On Broadway 223 West Broadway (across from courthouse) • 728-8900 Featuring over 25 sandwich selections, 20 bagel varieties, & 20 cream cheese spreads. Also a wide selection of homemade soups, salads and desserts. Gourmet coffee and espresso drinks, fruit smoothies, and frappes. Ample seating; free wi-fi. Free downtown delivery (weekdays) with $10.00 min. order. Call ahead to have your order ready for you! Open 7 days a week. Voted one of top 20 bagel shops in country by internet survey. $-$$ Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 If you want to get your sweetheart something sweet Bernice's is just the place! Try our new Vintage Valentines box. A passionate combination of treats for you and your valentine. Traditionalist? Bernice's Conversation Heart Cookies are our number one seller. Have you tried Bernice's truffles? This year we are featuring Dark Chocolate Ginger. Those who have enjoyed this truffle loved its aphrodisiac quality. Something to say, "I Love You", to your mother or grandmother? Create your own special message by stopping by and choosing from Bernice's Language of Love cupcake line. Missoula's sweet treat on the Hip Strip yo! xoxo bernice. bernicesbakerymt.com $-$$ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Black Coffee Roasting Co. 1515 Wyoming St., Suite 200 541-3700 Black Coffee Roasting Company is located in the heart of Missoula. Our roastery is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 – 2. In addition to fresh roasted coffee beans we offer a full service espresso bar, drip coffee, pour-overs and more. The suspension of coffee beans in water is our specialty. $ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to 10:30 pm. $-$$ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 40 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cafe Zydeco 2101 Brooks • 406-926-2578 Authentic cajun cuisine, with an upbeat zydeco atmosphere in the heart of Missoula. Accomodates indoor and outdoor seating. Breakfast served all day. Featuring Crawfish omlettes, beignets, and cafe au lait. Open Monday-Wednesday 11am-3pm, Thursday-Saturday 11am8pm, and Sunday 9am-3pm (Beignets available Saturday 11am-2pm, and All Day Sunday) $-$$ Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 • ciaomambo.com The vibrant energy at Ciao Mambo is fantastically accompanied by steaming hot pizzas, delicious assortments of pastas and of course authentic Italian wine. We focus on making sure that whether it be date night, family night, or business dinners we accommodate whatever the need! And do not forget there are always leftovers! Open 5 to close every day, come make us your go to dinner destination! $-$$

$…Under $5

Claim Jumper 3021 Brooks 728-0074 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Come in between 7-8 am for our Early Bird Breakfast Special: Get 50% off any breakfast menu item! Or Join us for Lunch and Dinner. We feature CJ’s Famous Fried Chicken, Delicious Steaks, and your Favorite Pub Classics. Breakfast from 7am-11am on Weekdays and 7am-2pm on Weekends. Lunch and Dinner 11am-9pm Sun-Wed and 11am-10pm Thurs-Sat. Ask your Server about our Players Club! Happy Hour in our lounge M-F 4-6 PM. $-$$ Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. 542-7414 Doc's is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you're heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc's is always an excellent choice. Delivery in the greater Missoula area. We also offer custom catering!...everything from gourmet appetizers to all of our menu items. $-$$

Educate your taste buds! www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 *When school is not in session, we often close at 3pm Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

The Empanada Joint 123 E. Main St. 926-2038 Offering authentic empanadas BAKED FRESH DAILY! 9 different flavors, including vegetarian and gluten-free options. NOW SERVING BREAKFAST Empanadas! Plus Argentine side dishes and desserts. Super quick and super delicious! (Happy Hour 3-6 PM Mon-Sat. 2 Empanadas for $7) Get your healthy hearty lunch or dinner here! Wi-Fi, Soccer on the Big Screen, and a rich sound system featuring music from Argentina and the Caribbean. 9am-5pm Monday-Saturday. Downtown Missoula. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffehouse/Café located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch 7 days a week+dinner 5 nights a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and espresso bar. HUGE Portions and the Best BREAKFAST in town. M-TH 7am-8pm, Fri 7am-4pm, Sat 8am-4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 S. 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$

2101 Brooks • 926-2578 • cafezydeco.com Mon-Wed 11am-3pm, Thur-Sat 11am-8pm & Sun 9am-3pm (Beignets available Sat 11am-2pm & All Day Sun)

GoodieVille Paxson Plaza by Southgate Mall 406-728-0010 www.goodieville.com Missoula’s only Gluten-Free Bakery and Restaurant offers a full line of savories and sweets. We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner including Pancakes, Pizza, American and Indian fare. We also have extensive vegetarian and vegan options. Open Wed-Sat 7am-9pm and Sun 7am2pm. $-$$ Grizzly Liquor 110 W Spruce St 549-7723 www.grizzlyliquor.com Missoula's Tailgate Headquarters! We carry all of the spirits & accessories to make your tailgate party a success! Largest selection of spirits in Montana, including locally made whiskey, vodka, gin, rum and wine. We're located downtown with free customer parking. Grizzly Liquor was voted Missoula's #1 Liquor Store! Open M-F 96:30, Sat 9-6. $-$$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 hobnobonhiggins.com Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula's best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. MC/V $-$$ Holiday Inn Downtown 200 S. Pattee St. • 532-2056 Thursday is Trivia Night! Prizes, food and drink specials! Starting at 7 pm. Also,check our brand new wine menu! Considering a staycation? Check out our packages. Call for more details! Have you discovered Brooks and Browns? Inside the Holiday Inn, Downtown Missoula. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over

missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [25]


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Naughty Moose HAPPIEST HOUR Why you’re here: After a full day of “sendin’ it” on Lost Trail’s Powder Mountain, you head toward Conner on U.S. Highway 93 and notice a white sedan ditched in a snow bank. Recognizing that the temperature just climbed above zero hours ago, you decide now is the time to pull over for a bite to eat and to raise a toast to four-wheel drive. What you’re drinking: Steamy Alpines (Irish cream, Rumple Minze and hot coffee) are a hot commodity here for riders coming down from the mountain, but pitchers of stout from Stevensville’s Blacksmith Brewing Co. are the quickest way for cold visitors to get the blood flowing through their frozen toes. What you’re eating: While the Naughty Moose Burger does not contain actual moose (it’s buffalo), the $9.95 burger is made from scratch—just like the rest of the menu’s bar-food fare, according to co-owner Christy Thompson. The monolithic “Montana-sized” nacho pile ($12.95) can also easily satisfy four people. Happy Hour: You can’t prove nobody ever said, “Life is like the Naughty Moose hors d’oeuvres table. You never know what you’re going to

Photo by Mike Gerrity

get.” A complimentary hors d’oeuvres table is stocked every afternoon, Thursday through Sunday. It features a fluid assortment of potato skins, veggie trays, chicken gizzards and any number of other things. Situated beneath a dramatically stuffed standoff between a wolf and a mountain lion, you can’t miss it. Where to find it: Look to your right after passing mile marker 21 on the way back from Lost Trail Powder Mountain. You’ll see it at 5390 U.S. Highway 93, in Conner. —Mike Gerrity Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, email editor@missoulanews.com.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Stop by & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

Silvertip Casino 680 SW Higgins 728-5643 The Silvertip Casino is Missoula’s premiere casino offering 20 Video gaming machines, best live poker in Missoula, full beverage liquor, 11 flat screen tv’s and great food at great prices. Breakfast Specials starting at $2.99 (7-11am) For a complete menu, go to www.silvertipcasino.com. Open 24/7. $-$$

Iza 529 S. Higgins 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com Contemporary Asian cuisine featuring local, vegan, gluten free and organic options as well as wild caught seafood, Idaho trout and buffalo. Join us for lunch and dinner. Happy Hour 3-6 weekdays with specials on food and drink. Extensive sake, wine and tea menu. Closed Sundays. Open Mon-Fri: Lunch 11:30-3pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm, Dinner 5pm-close. Sat: Dinner 5pm-close. $-$$

Sis's Kitchen 531-5034 sisskitchen.com Wheat, Gluten & Allergen Free Foods. Frozen & Dry Mix Products. Sis's Kitchen plays a part in Best of Missoula "Best Pizza" Winner's for 2008-2012. Find our products at: The Good Food Store • Biga Pizza • Bridge Pizza • Pizza Cafe in Ronan (12"crust). $-$$

Jakers 3515 Brooks St. 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Jimmy John’s 420 N. Higgins 542-1100 jimmyjohns.com Jimmy John’s - America’s Favorite Sandwich Delivery Guys! Unlike any other sub shop, Jimmy John’s is all about the freshest ingredients and fastest service. Freaky Fast, Freaky Good - that’s Jimmy John’s. Order online, call for delivery or visit us on Higgins. $-$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Le Petit Outre 129 S. 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $ Missoula Senior Center 705 S. Higgins Ave. (on the hip strip) 543-7154 Did you know that the Missoula Senior Center serves delicious hearty lunches every week day for only $6? (Ages 60 and over $3). Anyone is welcome to join us for a delicious meal from 11:30-12:30 Monday- Friday for delicious food, great conversation and take some time to find a treasured item or garment in our thrift shop. For a full menu and other activities, visit our website at www.missoulaseniorcenter.org. Pearl Cafe 231 East Front St. 541-0231 pearlcafe.us Serving country French specialties, Montana elk, Berkshire Pork, and delicious seafood dishes. Delectable salads and appetizers, as well as breads and desserts baked in-house. Extensive wine list; 18 wines by the glass and local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the intimate dining areas. Visit our website Pearlcafe.us to check out our nightly specials, make reservations, or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Philly West 134 W. Broadway 493-6204 For an East-coast taste of pizza, stromboli, hoagies, salads, and pasta dishes and CHEESESTEAKS, try Philly West. A taste of the great “fightin’ city of Philadelphia” can be enjoyed Monday - Saturday for lunch and dinner and late on weekends. We create our marinara, meatballs, dough and sauces in-house so if “youse wanna eat,” come to 134 W. Broadway. $-$$

$…Under $5

[26] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

NOT JUST SUSHI We have quick and delicious lunch specials 6 days a week starting at $7, and are open for dinner 7 nights a week. Try our comfort food items like Pork Katsu and Chicken Teriyaki. We also offer party platters to go and catering for all culinary styles. Lunch 11:30-3 Mon-Sat. Dinner 5-9:30 Every Night. Corner of Pine and Higgins. Very Family Friendly. 549-7979. $-$$ Taco Del Sol 422 N. Higgins 327-8929 Stop in when you're in the neighborhood. We'll do our best to treat you right! Crowned Missoula's best lunch for under $6. Mon.-Sat. 1110 Sun 12-9. $-$$ Taco John’s 623 W Broadway 2600 S Reserve West-Mex® is about fresh taste and BOLD flavors. Taco John’s recipes make you smile and yell “OLÉ”. We combine hearty helpings of seasoned meats, crispy Potato Olés®, and flavorful cheeses with fresh-made Mexican specialties like burritos, tacos, and quesadillas. All topped off with bold sauces, spices and salsas. You’ll find West-Mex® cooking makes for an unbeatably satisfying meal. See you soon ... Amigo :) $-$$ Taco Sano 115 1/2 S. 4th Street West Located next to Holiday Store on Hip Strip 541-7570 tacosano.net Once you find us you'll keep coming back. Breakfast Burritos served all day, Quesadillas, Burritos and Tacos. Let us dress up your food with our unique selection of toppings, salsas, and sauces. Open 10am-9am 7 days a week. WE DELIVER. $-$$ Tamarack Brewing Company 231 W. Front Street 406-830-3113 facebook.com/tamarackmissoula Tamarack Brewing Company opened its first Taphouse in Missoula in 2011. Overlooking Caras Park, Tamarack Missoula has two floors -- a sports pub downstairs, and casual dining upstairs. Patrons can find Tamarack’s handcrafted ales and great pub fare on both levels. Enjoy beer-inspired menu items like brew bread wraps, Hat Trick Hop IPA Fish and Chips, and Dock Days Hefeweizen Caesar Salads. Try one of our staple ales like Hat Trick Hop IPA or Yard Sale Amber Ale, or one of our rotating seasonal beers, like, Old 'Stache Whiskey Barrel Porter, Headwall Double IPA, Stoner Kriek and more. Don’t miss $8 growler fills on Wednesday and Sunday, Community Tap Night every Tuesday, Kids Eat Free Mondays, and more. See you at The ‘Rack! $-$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Dr. 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

$$–$$$…$15 and over


Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. Grab a rocket train to Hamilton for the Mark Sexton Band at the Bitter Root Brewery. 6–8:30 PM. Free.

February 7 – February 14, 2013

Hey man, get your pleasure centers ready for the 9th Annual Chocolate Lovers Festival in the Arlee Brown Community Center in Arlee. Enter your items between 1 and 6 PM. Make two identical confections; one for tasting and one for bidding. Or just come by to eat them up at 6:30 PM. This year there is a kid’s category, too. $2 or $5 per gamily. For more information call 726-5550. All proceeds benefit the youth programs of the Arlee Community Development Corporation and the Jocko Valley Library. Learn with your eyes, not with your hands at the Millikan Faculty Lecture Series with UM School of Art prof Elizabeth Dove. Her lecture is titled Yep 3,060: Picturing Meaning: The Visual Accumulation of Knowledge. Liberal Arts Bldg. Rm. 11. 6:30 PM. Free. Eclectic piano popster Mike Strickland performs at Polson High School to benefit the Lake County Youth Homes, at 7:30 PM. $14/$12 advance at Shannon Nunlist Physical Therapy or by e-mailing cmc@usana.com or calling 406-370-1527. Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins. (Enter through back alley door.) 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

Getting bug-eyed. Ashtrobot, above, from L.A., plays the Badlander Fri., Feb. 8, at 9 PM for the West Coast Takeover night of dubstep and other electronica music, also featuring Homage, Konfadense and Keen. $5/$10 for those aged 18-20.

THURSDAYFEB.07 We’re talkin’ ‘bout bonin’ in the boneyard, people, at the Provost’s Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series with professor Ashley McKeown. Her lecture Skeleton Keys: Unlocking Jamestown’s Mysteries with Forensic Osteology and Bioarchaeology is better than a “CSI” rerun anytime. UC Theater. 6 PM. Free.

nightlife Max Hay’s solo show comes back to Missoula for the first time in a long while. Former frontman of local acts Shot in the Foot, 2 Fuggin Guys, and Front St. Guitar Army. Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5 PM. Free. Rad girls alert: K-fifth graders can join Girl Scouts and create stories on the go, paint colors, make bird nests, create animal flip books and design a comic book bracelet. $6 for kids, $2 for adults, includes all activities,

pizza and drinks. First Lutheran Church, 2808 South Ave. W. Non-Scouts pay the annual membership fee of $12 plus the program fee, which lets them attend all GS programs for the membership year. Register at least two weeks in advance at gsmw.org. Call 800-736-5243 ext. 2306. Sirius Black is back in the Ravalli County Museum’s screening of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Check out the film and the Harry Potter exhibit. 705 Bedford St. in Hamilton. 6 PM. Free.

Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. Forget that old-time rock and roll, check out the new-time reggae and rock of the Cali’s kindest band, Iration. Reggae rockers Passafire and Pacific Dub open. $17.50 at tickets300.com. Also includes a $5 surcharge at the door for ages 18-20. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 5421471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up.

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Make it rain. UM School of Theatre and Dance presents the 10th Annual American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert at the Open Space, dowstairs in UM’s PARTV Center Fri., Feb. 8, and Sat., Feb. 9, at 7:30 PM nightly. $5 suggested donation at the door.

Pop the pomp and zipper up them boots, The Cold Hard Cash Show plays the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St., and it’s gonna be a fine old time, y’all. 9 PM. Free.

Honk my hooter! It’s week one of King Elephant’s VFW residency. This week the punking and rawking outfit is joined by Sam Platts and the Kootenai Three’s honky-

tonk country and Con/sequence’s blackened grind pop-ness. 245 W. Main St. 9 PM. $2. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Slide on a blazer (don’t forget to roll up the sleeves) and drop some “In Soviet Russia” jokes at Missoula’s Homegrown Stand-Up Comedy at the Union Club. Signup by 9:30 PM to perform or just sit back and take in the funny. Free.

[28] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013


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FRIDAYFEB.08 All-around rad lady and multi-talented artist Adelaide Gale Every is the featured artist at the ZACC’s Second Friday exhibit opening for Into the Light, a mixed media installation that tackles seasonal affective disorder. 235 N. First St. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free. Learn more about the Salish and Kootenai, Pend d’Orielle and other tribes at Travelers’ Rest State Park’s Winter Storytelling Series. This week Frances Vanderburg shares Salish Wintertime Stories. 11–12:30 PM. Free.

nightlife Britchy brings the acoustical bang, you just bring your hearing ears to Brooks & Browns, 200 S. Pattee St. 6–9 PM. Free. Watch the film, The Quantum Activist, at Red Willow Learning Center, and learn how some believe that mainstream science remains materialistic while others seek to move beyond materialism and explore the primacy of consciousness. 7 PM. Free.

Fans of portmanteaus head to Zoo City Apparel, 139 E. Main St., for an evening of free tuneage by Skurfs, The Trees, Trickshot Johnson and Copilot Eyedrops. 7 PM sharp, y’all. Let local poet Ed Skoog make amends for Richard Blanco’s work during the presidential inauguration when he reads at the Dell Brown Room in UM’s Turner Hall. 7 PM. Free. Howl at the moon and shoot out the lights, middle school rockers the Wolf Pack bring a set of tunes learned in the past week and prepare to rock the eff out at Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St., before heading to a pizza party. Suh-weet. 7 PM. Free.

west Regional American College Dance Festival and this is their chance to raise money for travel expenses. The Open Space, downstairs in the UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $5 suggested donation, but you are going to give $10.

those 18-20. Includes dancing from Soulkandi GoGo.

The Soul City Cowboys play music at the Eagles Lodge in MIssoula, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free.

It’s Joan Zen again at the Union Club, and this time you best grab Merle from the hardware store for an evening of music and closetalking. 9 PM. Free.

Grab your best cardigan and check out Won’t You Be My Neighbor? a Mr. Rogers Tribute led by Jeff Medley on vocals, Josh Farmer on piano and the art of Jack Metcalf. These dudes are doing a note-for-note cover of the album. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. 8 PM. $10/$5 for 18 and under.

Get off your backside and shake them winter blues off with some Swing Dance Lessons at the Missoula Winer, 5646 Harrier Way. Classes and tips from experts from 7:30–8:30 PM, dance party from 8:30–10 PM. $5 for each.

Zoo Music Awards: Vote for your favorite at missoulanews.com

Watch some of the area’s best dancers (not, Richie, not that kind) at the UM School of Theatre & Dance event, the 10th annual American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert. The concert features dancers and choreographers who will be attending the North-

I dub thee “Dance Commander,” so get to the Badlander for West Coast Takeover, a night of dubstep and bass-heavy electronical music featuring L.A.’s Ashtrobot, Homage, and Konfadense, plus local support from Keen. 9 PM. $5/$10 for

Bring your fave dance pal to the VFW, 245 W. Main St., for an evening of fine ass country music with Sam Platts and the Kootenai Three. 9 PM. $4.

Get your boogie on you old codgers! The Copper Mountain Band is in the house down at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St., and you best get to steppin’. 9 PM. Free. (See Music) The high powered groove of MudSlide Charley’s gutbucket blues and the jump swing of Full Grown Men makes folks grind that backside, ooh-yeah! Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. 9 PM. Free. John “Poncho” Dobson hosts open mic at Fergie’s Pub every Fri., where you’re bound to mingle with a mix of resort celebs, odd locals and dizzy soakers. You never know who’ll show up and play. It could be you. Starts at 3 PM. 213 Main Street in Hot Springs. Sign up ahead at 406-721-2416 or just show up.

SATURDAYFEB.09 My high school Journalism teacher was Ms. Frederico. She hated her job more than anyone. But The Frederico Brothers are the yin to her yang and they bring PMA and good time tunes to the Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 6–8 PM. Free. Get your taxes organizado by UM student volunteers who are certified to do taxes at the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, for anyone making less than $50,000. Gallagher Business Building Rm. L26. 9 AM– 5 PM. Free. The Missoula Winter Market is a family-friendly market much like the Saturday markets, but indoors and during wintertime! Come and enjoy local crafts, artisans, food and entertainment every weekend at 10 AM. 2036 Mullan Rd. Visit missoulawintermarket.com. Celebrate artist Walter Hook and gander at some beautiful works at HOOKed on Art, where 30 area and regional artists fill the art market at the Bonner School

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fish tale Back in 1998 or so, I found myself in the middle of Alice Cooper’s Phoenix bar, marching in a Mardi Gras-style processional to the tribal rhythms of Leftover Salmon. There were elaborate masks and flying beads and super-sized cups of beers and whirling dervishes and too many people for even the most forgiving fire marshal and it was such a scene that, before the show ended, I ended up having to help a claustrophobic friend to calmer confines and a super-sized cup of ice water. On the way home, I remember stepping over at least two different passed-out revelers from the show; they were still wearing their beads.

Photo courtesy of Alicia J. Rose

A lot has changed since that night in the desert, but Leftover Salmon continues to do its thing. There’s still Vince Herman on vocals and guitar, and Drew Emmitt

WHO: Leftover Salmon WHEN: Wed., Feb. 13, 9 PM WHERE: Wilma Theatre HOW MUCH: $21 at ticketweb.com

on vocals, guitar, fiddle and mandolin—the band’s two surviving original members since 1989—and still throngs of sweaty LOS devotees cramming venues to hear the band’s signature “polyethnic Cajun slamgrass.” Missoula has a soft spot for venerable jam bands like this one, and the feeling must be mutual. Leftover Salmon, which headlined the River City Roots Festival in 2011, kicks off its 30-date winter tour at the historic Wilma Theatre. There may not be a Mardi Gras-style processional into the theater’s lobby, but the energy from both the stage and the crowd should be similar to … well, how it’s always been for this band. Just watch your step on the way home. —Skylar Browning

and tunes are played by local faves such as John Floridis, the Blue Mountain Music Makers, Black Tie Quartet and many more. 10–4 PM. Free to gander. Kids 3 to 5 years of age and their parents are welcome to scope out the fun palace of flips

and dancing that is the Roots Preschool and Kindergarten Open House at the Roots Sports & Learning Center, 216 Commerce St., home of Bitterroot Gymnastics, Roots Preschool, Roots Dance Studio. Try a free trial class. 10–1 PM. Free.

Spend reality with your man on Feb 14.

Live out your fantasy on Feb 15! Male Amateur Lap Dances Available. 5$ cover. 21+. $20 sign-up fee Doors at 6 pm. 9 PM Main Event.

Loretta Vizzutti returns for Artist Trading Cards at Living Art of Montana. Create miniature works of art to trade. For anyone facing illness and loss, including care providers and family members. 725 W. Alder St. #17 (Warehouse Mall). 10:30– 12:30 PM. Free. Visit livingartofmontana.org or call 549-5329. Never fear lovers of fresh, local vittles, the Heirloom Winter Market at the Missoula County Fairgrounds in the Floriculture Building offers you remedies of local produce, meat, baked goods, jam, honey and so much more. 11 AM–2 PM. Grab your best cardigan and check out Won’t You Be My Neighbor? a Mr. Rogers Tribute led by Jeff Medley on vocals, Josh Farmer on piano and the art of Jack Metcalf. These dudes are doing a note-for-note cover of the album. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. 2 PM. $10/$5 for 18 and under. Dudes, welcome in the Year of the Water Snake at the Chinese New Year Party at Mountain Sage Acupuncture, 725 W. Alder St. Ste. 1. Refreshments, door prizes and a musical performance of the Chinese GuZheng by Aaron Jennings. 2–5 PM. Free.

[30] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013


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nightlife Grab your best cardigan and check out Won’t You Be My Neighbor? a Mr. Rogers Tribute led by Jeff Medley on vocals, Josh Farmer on piano and the art of Jack Metcalf. These dudes are doing a note-for-note cover of the album. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. 8 PM. $10/$5 for 18 and under. Charla Bauman charms even the dirtiest ol’ snake when she performs tunes for you and yours at the Ten Spoon Vineyard, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr., from 6–8 PM. Free. Get your Mardi Gras on up in the Swan during the Mardi Gras Dinner, Dance and Costume Ball, with music by Red Hot Blue Chips and The Can’t Hardly Playboys who open the show. Louisiana /Cajun fare by the Tamarack Grill and Ale House. The Rack Event Center, 5480 Hwy 93 S., in Somers. 6–11 PM. $30/$25 advance. Call 857-3119. It’s back y’all, so get to steppin’ at the Bitterroot Contra Dance which takes place at the Church of the Nazarene gym, 150 A St. South in Victor. Vicki Watson has the call and the Celtic Knots play

the tunes. Leave the cologne and hairspray at home, hombres. Lessons at 6:30 PM, dance 7–9:30 PM. $5/$10 per family. Need another reason to visit P-burg besides delicious candy num-nums? How about a new documentary by Jim Jenner called The Queen’s Wings, which uncovers a little known pastime of England’s Royal Family. Hint: It’s pigeon racing. Plus the proceeds help get some high school students to Australia. Granite County Museum in Philipsburg. 7 PM. Donations encouraged. The Heart to Heart Duo plays the Missoula Senior Center’s Saturday Night Dance, so slide into those glad rags and show the youngsters how it’s done. 705 S. Higgins. 7–10 PM. $5. Giddiyup to the Rocky Mountain Grange Hall, 1436 Hwy. 93, for this installment of the Good Time Jamboree Concert featuring troubadour Chris Kingsley, duo Gary Jensen and John Schiever, a Baroque music presentation and much more old-timey tuneage. 7 PM. $3 suggested donation. If you love sex and talking sex and re-imagining sex then Blue

Mountain Clinic’s fashion show/ party/art attack Off the Rock is for you. This year’s theme is Sex in the Zoo: Desire, Choice and Freedom. Wilma Theatre. 7:30 PM. $55 VIP/$25/ $14 student. Visit bluemountainclinic.org. (See Arts.)

Zoo Music Awards: Vote for your favorite at missoulanews.com Hey lovers, Bigfork Center’s 4th Annual Valentine’s Day Event features the Ashlee Hewitt Band with special guest Jesse Keith Whitley. Ashlee’s been on the TV, including “The Voice” and “Nashville Star.” Champagne, cookies and chocolates available for purchase. Bigfork Center for the Performing Arts. 7:30 PM. $21. Watch some of the area’s best dancers (no, Richie, no that kind) at the UM School of Theatre & Dance event, the 10th annual American College Dance Festival Benefit Concert. The concert features dancers and choreographers who will be attending the Northwest Regional American College

Dance Festival and this is their chance to raise money for travel expenses. The Open Space, downstairs in the UM PARTV Center. 7:30 PM. $5 suggested donation, but you are going to give $10. The Soul City Cowboys play music at the Eagles Lodge in MIssoula, 2420 South Ave. 8 PM. Free. Dance like a nostalgic man named Reyes Aldonavo or a woman called simply Pilar at Argentinian Tango Night at the Brick Room. Lessons at 8 PM. Milonga at 9 PM. This month’s event benefits Eleanore’s Project, which provides wheelchairs to people in Peru. Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/$16 per couple. Acoustic guitar virtuosos play like champions at International Guitar Night, which features such greats as Brian Gore, Martin Taylor, Solorazaf and Guinga, as part of the Bitterroot Performing Arts Series. Hamilton Performing Arts Center. 8 PM. For tickets visit bitterrootperformingarts.org. Absolutely with DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo is the de facto dopest DJ duo in town. Get hip to

their jamz, hippies. Badlander. Doors at 9 PM. 2-for-1 Absolut drinks until 11 PM. $2. Get your boogie on you old codgers! The Copper Mountain Band is in the house down at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St., and you best get to steppin’. 9 PM. Free. (See Music) Gambling’s for fools, but that’s the way Aces Up likes it, baby. They’re not gonna live forever, so there playing the Lumberjack Saloon up Graves Creek Rd. 16 miles up HWy. 12. 9 PM. Free. Get tight, cream that hair and celebrate a fine (re: “foin”) manabout-town at Cyrus Ulmer’s Birthday Party which features tunes by Big Quinn, “street scum folk” band The Whiskey Hooves, plus Frederick Kruger and The Sweet Dreamers. Palace. 9 PM. Free. Countdown to party down with bluesinators Three-Eared Dog at the Union Club. 9 PM. Free. San Francisco’s Tracorum play, umm, I’ll let them tell you: “original rock n soul cosmic gospel thunder funk,” at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., with locals The Josh Farmer Band. 9:30 PM. $5.

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Presidents’ Day

SALE Everything in the Store 10% Off Dansko - Keen Alegria - Merrell

20% Off Birkenstock - Bogs Haflinger - Chaco

20% Off Five Fingers - Rieker Oboz - Superfeet

20% Off Belts - Purses Wallets - Hats

20% Off Sheepskin Slippers Sheepskin Boots

Five shades of gray. International Guitar Night, an acoustic guitar extravaganza, showcases Solorazaf from Madagascar, pictured above, IGN founder Brian Gore, Scotland’s Martin Taylor and Celso Machado from Canada, via Brazil, playing their original compositions Sat., Feb. 9, at 8 PM at the Hamilton Performing Arts Center as part of the Bitterroot Performing Arts Series. $20–$29.50. Go to bartc.org for tickets.

SUNDAYFEB.10 Hear the words of UM MFA Creative Writing students as well as their profs and special guests at the Second Wind Reading Series, at the Badlander. This weeks’ readers are Kaylen Mallard & Elizabeth Robinson. 5 PM. Free.

30% Off Crocs - Earth Jambu - Taos

40% Off Born & Dansko Boots Keen & Merrell Boots

20% - 50% Off Clearance Footwear SALE Ends Feb 28th

The Missoula Winter Market is a family-friendly market much like the Saturday markets, but indoors and during wintertime! Come and enjoy local crafts, artisans, food and entertainment every weekend at 10 AM. 2036 Mullan Rd. Visit missoulawintermarket.com. Dance your way to a free mind and an open body at Turning the Wheel Missoula’s Ecstatic Dance.

Headwaters Dance Studio, 1042 Monroe St. 11-12:30 PM. $10/$75 for eight classes. Visit turningthewheel.org. Fred Boner and the Walk of Shame pack up their underpants and perform at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 4–6 PM. Free.

nightlife The Ed Norton Big Band put some swing in the month’s second Sunday when it plays the Missoula Winery, 5646 Harrier Way, from 6–8 PM. $5. Visit missoulawinery.com. Kenny Wait and Skye Robert Burns are hanging and banging out tunes at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs from 6–10 PM. Pass the hat. Close out the weekend in style at the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night, with $4 martinis from 7:30 PM to midnight, plus live jazz and DJs. Live jazz starts at 8 PM with Josh Farmer, The Vanguard Combo and Front Street Jazz. Free.

MONDAYFEB.11 Downtown since 1972

543-1128 236 N. Higgins www.hideandsole.com

[32] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

The nice and talented tomatoes Whipple Tree with Amy Martin & Caroline Keys perform at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. 7–10 PM. Free.

Music makers, get your gig on by signing up to perform at the Missoula Farmers Market. Applications accepted through April 1. A $40 stipend is provided. For more information and an application, see the Market website missoulafarmersmarket.com. Salish Kootenai College hosts a career fair where eager folks can learn about opportunities by visiting with representatives from instate and out-of-state colleges and universities, technical and trade schools, military branches, agencies and career representatives. Joe McDonald Health and Fitness Center’s Gymnasium on SKC campus. 9 AM. Free. The Rough Cut Science Seminar Series shows off the brainiacs of Montana’s scientific community, with presentations on current research each week at 4 PM in the University Center Theater. Visit montanaioe.org/rough-cut-series for the schedule.

nightlife Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM.


[calendar] Bingo at the VFW: the easiest way to make rent since keno. 245 W. Main. 6:45 PM. $12 buy-in. The Bonner Milltown Community Council meeting hosts Mike Kustudia of the FWP as he discusses open uses, closures, and safety concerns this coming season for the Blackfoot River and Clark Fork River near Milltown. Bonner School library. 7 PM. Also, the filing deadline for council positions is Feb. 21. Contact the County Elections Office for filing forms or Gary at 370-6584. Open Mic with Joey Running Crane at the VFW, 245 W. Main, seems like a fine idea, especially with 2-for-1 drink specials for musicians and the working class. 10 PM. Free. Call him up and get yourself a slot at 229-0488. You know it’s gotta be a real party when DJ Super Steve rocks the karaoke with the hottest Kamikaze tuneage this side of the hemisphere at the Dark Horse. Are you brave enough to let the computer pick your songs? 9 PM. Free. Don’t dump them cats in the ditch, Scooter, instead grab your boots and scoot to Milkcrate Monday which hosts Hip Hop Night: Winter Edition, with sets by locals Lootcakes, Linkletter, Tigerlilly and Dar. Badlander. 9 PM. Free, with $5 pitchers of PBR on tap.

TUESDAYFEB.12 Pedal on over to Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., and learn how to make cycling better in Los Estados Unidos from Randy Neufeld, director of the SRAM Cycling Fund, at his talk, Bicycling’s Big Picture: National and Global Trends. Refreshments provided. 6:30–8:30 PM. Free.

Fun with Yoga at the Families First Children’s Museum might work for you and the kids. It might make you cry, too. 11 AM. 225 W. Front. $4.25. Hey hunters and other liars, come on down to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation conference room for Shootin’ the Bull Toastmasters, at 5205 Grant Creek Dr., and work on your elk-camp locution with the best. All are invited. Noon–1 PM. Free. Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free. Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955.

nightlife It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Boys Bluegrass from 5:30 to 8 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Are you ready to laugh? No? Well “improv” your mood by attending the Upright Citizen’s Brigade comedy show. The troupe has been around since before “90210” was a thing. UC Theater. 7 PM. $5/$3 with a Griz card. The 2013 Wilderness Institute’s Lecture Series, Wilderness on the Edge: The Emerging Roles of Wild Lands in Changing Landscapes features various speakers who explore our definitions of wilderness across landscapes, communities, political frameworks, and scientific investigations. This

week Nature Conservancy Western Montana Program Director Caroline Byrd presents a lecture titled Montana Legacy Project: Landscape-Scale, Community-Based Conservation. Gallagher Business Bldg, Rm. 122. 7:10 PM. Free. The Student Involvement Network at The University of Montana is partnering with UM’s Black Student Union to honor Black History Month with a film series. this week’s film is Cinderella. UC Theater. 7 PM. Free. (See Agenda.) Oh my, Wild Mercy, a community reading series sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program and UM FLAT, features environmental and nature writing from EVST Graduate writing students, visiting writers, alumni and others. This week Mr. Jeff Gailus is joined by Ms. Melissa Wardlow, at the UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 7 PM. Free. Dr. Brian Sippy informs folks at his talk, Affordable Health Care Act & You, which is part of the Missoula Patriots Meeting. Valley Christian School Auditorium, 2526 Sunset Ln. 7 PM. Computer music and video maven Marko Ciciliani of the Graz University of Music and Performing Arts is the dance commander in this edition of the Faculty and Guest Artist Series. Music Recital Hall. 7:30 PM. $12/$8 seniors and students. Find your dance and yourself at Turning the Wheel’s Tapestry class, which is a self-expression-filled improvisational dance bonanza. Headwaters Dance Company studio, 1042 Monroe St. 7:30-9 PM. $10. Proceeds benefit Turning the Wheel’s school programs.

missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [33]


[calendar]

The Montana Musicians and Artists Coalition hosts the Musician Showcase at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St., an evening of tuneful live tuneage made by locals for locals. 8–11 PM. Free. 18 plus. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free pub trivia, which takes place every Tuesday at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with: Approximately how many U.S. women send themselves flowers on Valentine’s Day? (See answer in tomorrow’s nightlife.) Skip the shrimp feed and strip club sass and hit up Epitaph Records’ punk and roll outfit The Menzingers, with local smell maestros Buddy Jackson and cutie pies Whoopass Girls. Palace. 9 PM. $8/$13 for those 18-20. (See Music.) Grab a bag of awesome at the Badlander’s Live and Local Night featuring solo acoustic music by Larry Hirshberg and Britt Arnesen and other TBA guests. Tunes at 10 PM. Free.

Wood pickers. The Gyspy Lumberjacks play that bluegrass down the VFW way, 245 W. Main St., on Thu., Feb. 14, at 9 PM. $5. 18 plus.

WEDNESDAYFEB.13 Keep the stinking party going at the Unofficial Leftover Salmon After Party with Bozeman bluegrasserinos Kitchen Dwellers at Monk’s Bar, 225 Ryman St. $3.

[34] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

nightlife Tasty times abide at the Unofficial Leftover Salmon Pre-Party, with Kenny Wait & Friends (featuring Kenny, Skye Robert Berns and Torrin Daniels of the Kitchen Dwellers. Blue Bison Grill, 123 W. Front St. 5:30–8:30 PM. Free.

Enjoy the photography of Jocelyn Catterson in her series, You Can’t Fall Off a Mountain. Her work includes images from wild places across the west. Montana Natura History Center, 121 Hickory St. 6 PM. Free. (Pub trivia answer: 15 percent.)

Show the Man how big your gray matter can get at Super Trivia Freakout. Win a bar tab, shots, and other mystery prizes during the five rounds of trivia. Badlander. 6:30 PM. Free. Hey, winter is here and TV ain’t exactly pumping out the good stuff


[calendar]

these days, so get off your bum for a few and take Cathy Clark’s West Coast Swing Class at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent Ave. 7 PM. $5. Kraptastic Karaoke welcomes Black Eyed Peas fanatics to belt out their fave jamz at the Badlander, beginning at 9 PM. Featuring $5 pitchers of Budweiser and PBR, plus $1 selected shots. Free. Much like day-old burritos, Leftover Salmon has a way of being very popular in this town among a certain crowd. See what we’re talking about at 9 PM at the Wilma. $21. Tickets at ticketfly.com. (See Spotlight.)

THURSDAYFEB.14 Get a taste of forbidden fruit and nosh on inner desires as sirens sing their songs at The Cigarette Girls Burlesque presentation of Luxuria: Theatre of The Forbidden, an evening of burlesque performances and hidden delights. Wilma. 8 PM. Floor seats $30/ $25 advance, balcony $25 door/$20 advance at GrizTix outlets. People who have Parkinson’s disease, as well as caregivers and professionals who work with the disease, can meet for the Missoula Parkinson’s Disease Support Group the second Thursday of each month at the Montana First Credit Union, 3708 N. Reserve St. Call Cindy Cone at 728-8283 or Ann Houston at 543-8939 for more info. Free.

nightlife Throw on a Stone Temple Pilots record or come to the ZACC’s Alternative Valentines Day Date Night where you can paint a canvas with your sweetie. Learn to draw and paint one another’s portrait or have fun painting abstractly on your personal canvas. If you have a design in mind bring photos. 235 N. First St. 5-7 PM. $45 per couple, which includes music, two glasses of wine, chocolate dipped strawberries and other snacks. He is not the overweight lover Heavy D; he is Tom Catmull and he plays lovelorn musics for beer drinkers at Draught Works Brewery, 915 Toole Ave. 5–8 PM. Free. Learn just how the radsters at the YWCA help kids and women in times of need at the YWConnects Program Tour. Cupcakes, too. 5:30–6:30 PM. 1130 W. Broadway. RSVP at eharrison@ywcaofmissoula.org or 543-6691.

Treasure State Toastmasters invites you to get your locution on and become fixated oratorically at their weekly meeting. Community Medical Center meeting rooms, 2827 Ft. Missoula Road. 6–7 PM. Free. The Bitterroot Public Library’s Fellowship Club discusses Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of A Buddha by Dr. Tara Brach. Learn how to leave perfectionism behind, enjoy life and find fulfillment. 6–7:30 PM. Free.

Zoo Music Awards: Vote for your favorite at missoulanews.com Unleash your cogent understanding of the trivium at Brooks and Browns Big Brains Trivia Night. $50 bar tab for first place. $7 Bayern pitchers. 200 S. Pattee St. in the Holiday Inn Downtown. 7:30–10 PM. During Open Mic Night at Sean Kelly’s, amazing musicians could play some great jams. Just don’t tell your cousin Rapping Timmy about it. That guy’s version of “Santeria” is terrible. 8:30 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM Thursday to sign up. Hey lovers, Twin Cities’ Gypsy Lumberjacks bring a bunk of bluegrass to the VFW, 245 W. Main St., with Missoula’s The Hasslers. 9 PM. $5. 18 plus. (See Music.) Make love out of nothing at all (just stay out them bathrooms, yo) during Archaic Revival, a night of electronic stuff with

local DJs Rockstocki, SpecialK, and Puz.z π. Palace. 9 PM. Free, with 2 for 1 well drinks all night, plus free pool. Hollar at your freaky Aunt Bessie and let her teach Cousin Skooch how to French while country dance music makers Blue Collar do work at the Sunrise Saloon, 1805 Regent St. 9 PM. Free. The Dead Hipster Dance Party is all kinds of sweaty, but ‘tis the droplets of the beautiful people. Get a taste in the place where love and funk is in the air (sometimes they are the same scent). Badlander, 208 Ryman St., $3, with $1 well drinks from 9 PM to midnight. Show up the rest of the room with your version of “Ninja Survive” when you hit the Dark Horse for Combat Karaoke hosted by Aaron B. and accompanied with drink specials. 1805 Regent Street. 9 PM. Free. Hey there lovers of love and loving. Here is your St. Valentine’s Day warning, you have been officially warned/reminded, so get something together no matter what he or she says. Send your event info to me by 5 PM on Fri., Feb. 8 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to The Calemandar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

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spectr t UM missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [35]


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[36] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

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Costume contest, live music, arts & crafts, sumo wrestling & so much more! 11AM-4:30PM on the Base Lodge patio. Full details online.


[outdoors]

MOUNTAIN HIGH

E

ven if you’re not a peakbagging junkie, even if you’ve just driven Going to the Sun Road and walked around the parking lot at the top, you’ll get sucked into the photo presentation by climbers Brian Kennedy and Don Arthur. Kennedy, editor of Going To The Sun Journal, has summited nearly every peak in Glacier and he’s taken photos and written about his journeys since the 1970s. Also, no big deal or anything, but he’s received Alpine Awards for climbing Glacier’s 10,000-foot peaks and technical peaks, plus the J. Gordon Edwards award for lifetime achievement. (What have you done lately?) Arthur, a climber and hiker in Glacier since 1974 has also received the Alpine Award. The presentation includes narratives that

will make you feel like you were there, right up on the windy edges overlooking the entire park. Live vicariously, and maybe be inspired enough to put down that beer, get out of your armchair and see what kind of wildlands we have just under our noses. –Erika Fredrickson Brian Kennedy and Don Arthur of the Glacier Mountaineering Society present “Mountaineering in Glacier National Park— Peaks, Routes and Challenges” at The Trail Head Tue., Feb. 12, at 7 PM. Free.

‘RACK FLATBREAD Baked flatbread with pesto sauce, feta cheese, sun-dried tomatoes, caramelized onions and portabella mushrooms. $6.95

TAMARACK WINGS Jumbo wings tossed in your choice of Buffalo, Switchback Stout BBQ, or Pacific Rim sauce served on a bed of beer battered fries with a side of bleu cheese. $9.95

BABY BACK RIBS AND FRIES A half rack of tender pork ribs smothered in our Stout barbeque sauce on a bed of beer battered fries. $9.95

VEGGIE QUESADILLA Filled with diced tomatoes, olives, bell peppers and green onion, served with sour cream and house made salsa. $7.95

CHICKEN STRIPS Beer battered chicken breast strips served atop beer battered fries. Served with a side of our house made Ranch. $8.95

THE HELL GATE PIZZA Pepperoni spicy Italian sausage, mushrooms, jalapeños, black olives and fresh garlic with marinara and mozzarella. $13.95 & $20.95

Photo by Chad Harder

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 8 Mush on, lads! And have a doggone good time at Montana’s finest sled dog race, the Race to the Sky. This year’s event marks 28 years of teams running from Helena to Lincoln by way of Butte, America. There are 100- and 350-mile races for adults and juniors, and plenty of spots along the route to cheer on the intrepid racers. Head to racetothesky.org. Active outdoor lovers are invited to the Mountain Sports Club’s weekly meeting to talk about past glories and upcoming activities at Bigfork’s Swan River Inn. 6–8 PM. Free.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 9 Just don’t run on a full stomach during Run Wild Missoula’s Saturday Breakfast Club Runs, which occurs every Sat. at 8 AM at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. After the run/walk, you’ll grab breakfast with other participants. Free to run. Visit runwildmissoula.org. Come see a big old mess of raptors during the Five Valleys Audubon Mission Valley Raptor Viewing. Meet at the UM Field House parking lot at 8 AM to car pool or at the Cenex station in Ronan at 9 AM. Pack a lunch and spy scope. Free. For more info call Terry at 2141194 after 9 AM. Say it with me, “Sunlight!” Go and get some at the UM Outdoor Program’s Cross-Country Ski Outing. Get a review of the basics and borrow their gear, plus catch a ride. 8–4 PM. $30. Call 243-5172. Some day, a smart Gender Studies student will write about the Catch ‘Em If You Can 5K, a race where the ladies start before the men and the men try and catch up to them. Will they or won’t they? What if Sam and Diane ran this race in 1987? Race begins at the Madison St. footbridge and follows the Riverfront trail. 9:30 AM. For a full schedule of fees visit runwildmissoula.org. Uncover the nature in the heart of Missoula at the Winter Ecology Walk for Families held by the Montana Natural History Center. Search for birds, identify plants, look for a beaver lodge and play games along the Kim Williams trail. 2–3 PM. $3/$1 members. Visit montananaturalist.org.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 11 Run Wild Missoula is here to help at their Missoula Marathon Seminar Series: How to Prevent Injury While Training for the Missoula Marathon. Step one: Don’t do it! Jokes. Train for the marathon. Lie to your friends about how great it was. Good Food Store, 1600 S. Third St W. 7 PM. Free. Head south this winter without leaving town during the Valley Audubon’s program Patagonia: In search of Gauchos and Andean Condors, with Terry McE-

neaney, retired ornithologist of Yellowstone National Park, who describes his search for Andean Condors and other Patagonian birds. Gallagher Business Bldg. Rm. L14. 7:30 PM. Free.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 12 Hear the inspirational story of Joe Stone at Wings to Wheels: Inspiring Others to Safely Enjoy the Outdoors. Stone is quadriplegic due to an accident, yet he has handcycled the Going to the Sun Road in Glacier National Park. Dang. REI, 3275 N. Reserve St. 6:30 PM. Free. Oh my, Wild Mercy, a community reading series sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program and UM FLAT, features environmental and nature writing from EVST Graduate writing students, visiting writers, alumni and others. This week Mr. Jeff Gailus is joined by Ms. Melissa Wardlow, at the UM FLAT, 633 5th St. E. 7 PM. Free. The 2013 Wilderness Institute’s Lecture Series, Wilderness on the Edge: The Emerging Roles of Wild Lands in Changing Landscapes features various speakers who explore our definitions of wilderness across landscapes, communities, political frameworks, and scientific investigations. This week Nature Conservancy Western Montana Program Director Caroline Byrd presents a lecture titled Montana Legacy Project: Landscape-Scale, Community-Based Conservation. Gallagher Business Bldg, Rm. 122. 7:10 PM. Free.

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 13 Wax your boards and keep your tips up for Snowbowl’s Alpine Evening Race Series. The races take place each Wednesday through March 7, with the last race and a big old party taking place on Fri., March 9. Become the queen of the mountain or the king of the hill—either way, rule your opponents. Contact Deb at (406) 258-5260 or debdem@optimum.net. Hit the K-12 and do it for your brother who died trying to break that record back in ‘78 at Whitefish Mountain Resort’s Wednesday Night Race League. Alpine racing y’all at 6:30 PM, partying afterward. Visit skiwhitefish.com. Don’t eat the daisies. At least not until you hear UM’s Dr. Rustem Medora discuss a variety of Montana plant species and their potential medicinal use. Find some new tools for your medicine kit. Montana Natural History Center, 121 Hickory St. 7 PM. $4 suggested donation.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 14 Rachel Potter, who has been hiking Glacier Park for over 30 years, shares the stories of the Park’s most famous botanists in Botanical Expeditions of Elrod and Jones in Glacier National Park 1909 and 1910. Gallagher Business Bldg. Rm. L09. 7:30 PM. Free.

missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [37]


[community]

More than 60 million viewers tuned in to ABC on Nov. 2, 1997, to watch Whitney Houston, Brandy and Whoopi Goldberg star in a remake of the famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, Cinderella. If you didn’t catch that record-breaking debut—or the best-selling DVD release—you may have missed some of the more subtle risks taken in that modern version of an age-old classic. The New York Times noted that, in addition to Brandy being the first African-American to play the title role, the cast was “blissfully multiethnic.” There was a black queen (Goldberg) and a white king (Victor Garber), one white stepsister (Veanne Cox) and one black (Natalie Desselle), and Cinderella’s stepmother was white (Bernadette Peters). This re-imagined “racial utopia,” as the Times called it, is perhaps one of the reasons Cinderella will be featured in the University of Montana’s Black History Month Film Series. “It’s an opportunity to highlight black history through film, and to do so in a diverse way,” says Jamar Galbreath, UM’s diversity programs coordina-

tor. “With Cinderella, I think it was selected because you get an interesting, modern spin on a traditional story.” The series is being hosted by the Student Involvement Center and Black Student Union, and runs every Tuesday of the month. After Cinderella on Feb. 12, the series features Night Catches Us, a small-budget drama based on the aftermath of the Black Power movement, on Feb. 19, and Red Tails, the big-budget story of black pilots in the Tuskegee training program, on Feb. 26. Galbreath says the breadth of selections is intentional. “You get a wide range of films,” he says, “and that introduces a wide range of issues.” —Skylar Browning Cinderella screens Tue., Feb. 12, at 7 PM in the University Center, room 326. Free. For more information on the full schedule, visit the Student Involvement Network at life.umt.edu/uc/ucsi/SIN.

[AGENDA LISTINGS] THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7 Children of the Earth Tribe Song and Chant Circle at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center is for all those ready to sing in honor of our connection to one another and the earth. 519 S. Higgins (Enter through back alley door.). 7:30 PM. Free will offering.

Friday, February 15th @ University Theatre 8pm Rockin Rudy’s is proud to be a participant in the V-Day 2013 campaign to raise money and awareness for local organizations that work to stop violence against women and girls.

For More info: www.vday.org

MONDAY FEBRUARY 11 Occupy Missoula General Assembly meets at the Union Hall above the Union Club at 6 PM. Visit occupymissoula.org. The UM Climate Action Now Meeting is out to save the day, promoting sustainability and environmental action. UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 6:30 PM. The Bonner Milltown Community Council meeting hosts Mike Kustudia of the FWP as he discusses open uses, closures, and safety concerns this coming season for the Blackfoot River and Clark Fork River near Milltown. Bonner School library. 7 PM. Also, the filing deadline for council positions is Feb. 21. Contact the County Elections Office for filing forms or Gary at 370-6584.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 12 Learn how to give and receive empathy with Patrick Marsolek during Compassionate Communication, a non-violent communication weekly practice group, at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center. 519 S. Higgins. Noon–1 PM. Free.

Knitting For Peace meets at Joseph’s Coat, 115 S. Third St. W. All knitters of all skill levels are welcome. 1–3 PM. For information, call 543-3955. Pedal on over to Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., and learn how to make cycling better in Los Estados Unidos from Randy Neufeld, director of the SRAM Cycling Fund, at his talk, Bicycling’s Big Picture: National and Global Trends. Refreshments provided. 6:30– 8:30 PM. Free. Oh my, Wild Mercy, a community reading series sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program and UM FLAT, features environmental and nature writing from EVST Graduate writing students, visiting writers, alumni and others. This week Jeff Gailus is joined by Melissa Wardlow, at the UM FLAT, 633 Fifth St. E. 7 PM. Free. Dr. Brian Sippy informs folks at his talk, Affordable Health Care Act & You, which is part of the Missoula Patriots Meeting. Valley Christian School Auditorium, 2526 Sunset Ln. 7 PM. The 2013 Wilderness Institute’s Lecture Series, Wilderness on the Edge: The Emerging Roles of Wild Lands in Changing Landscapes features various speakers who explore our definitions of wilderness across landscapes, communities, political frameworks, and scientific investigations. This week Nature Conservancy Western Montana Program Director Caroline Byrd presents a lecture titled Montana Legacy Project: Landscape-Scale, Community-Based Conservation. Gallagher Business Bldg, Rm. 122. 7:10 PM. Free.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also email entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

[38] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013


missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [39]


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

February 7 - February 14, 2013

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Bring your preschooler to the Missoula Family YMCA on Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:45am starting February 11th for Discovery Music Class. Your preschooler will have a great time making music with the other kids. For more information and to sign up call 721-YMCA Come climb with your friends every Wednesday from 4pm-6pm. Join the YMCA climbing team today, make new friends and improve your climbing skills. Climbing team is for youth ages 7 and up and starts Feb 13th. Call 721-YMCA for more information.

Dads and Daughters don’t miss the YMCA sweetheart dance on February 9th from 6pm-8:30pm. Come dance and get you photo taken at this semi formal event. Register in advance and save $5. Call 721-YMCA for more information. Enjoy a night out on Friday, February 8th while your kids swim, climb, and play at the YMCA. Parents Night Out is for kids age 6 weeks to 11 years old and goes from 6:30pm-10pm. Call 721-YMCA for more information. Grout Rite Your tile & grout specialists. Free Estimates. Over 31 yrs exp. 406-273-9938. www.groutrite.com

NEED CLEANING? Students - Bachelors - Builders - Move-in - Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-4413323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. SOCIAL SECURITY DENIED? Call Bulman Law Associates 721-7744 www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com SONGWRITERS Share your original songs Classic Country Western and Folk ONLY For information call Jay: 406-552-9363

TO GIVE AWAY FREE Clothing!! Pass It On Missoula is a community supported service offering FREE infant, toddler and maternity clothing to ALL Missoula area families! There are NO eligibility guidelines, simply reduce, reuse, and Pass It On locally! Community donations are accepted on location PIOM offers FREE clothing to those in need, and affordable for all at 3/$5! Located at 105 S. 3rd St. W. and open Monday-Saturday 12-5PM

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . . . .C2

“I found a brighter world, I found Unity”

Free Will Astrology . . .C4 Public Notices . . . . . . . .C5

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Crossword . . . . . . . . . .C5 Sustainafieds . . . . . . . .C9

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“We are all here for a spell; get all the good laughs you can.” - Will Rogers


ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

ANNOUNCEMENTS 100 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY ????’s & ANSWERS www.themontanadisabilitylawyer.com 721-7744

NOBODY TO CODEPEND ON My boyfriend and I were invited to dinner at our friends’ house. An hour after the appointed time, another friend of theirs, a woman who's been single for at least a decade, still hadn't left her house. She called with a crisis about what she was bringing, wearing, etc. (She always seems to have some crisis.) The hostess calmed her down, telling her to just come. Upon hanging up, she said that she thinks marriage both requires sanity and helps keep people sane and that people who are unmarried and living alone for an extended time seem to get increasingly neurotic. That seems a bit unfair, but I can see her point. —Unhitched It can be harder to indulge one's eccentricities in a marriage. Before you even turn the front door knob to head off to work in the morning, there's your spouse blurting out, "You know, that tie really clashes with the Kleenex boxes on your feet." In other words, no, a wedding isn't a rose-petal-scattered transporter beam out of neurosis or more serious psych problems, and we shouldn't be quick to assume people who get married are more well-adjusted than people who don't. Some states require a blood test before you marry; none tests to make sure you aren't cuckoo for more than Cocoa Puffs. Psychologist Dr. Bella DePaulo, in Singled Out, shows that many studies claiming married people are much better off than singles have serious flaws in methodology, and the modest claims of solid studies are frequently distorted, exaggerated, and turned into media catnip by the agenda-driven. As a result, "single" is so automatically viewed as the companion to "miserable" (and the prelude to getting your face eaten off by your cat) that even respected researcher Dr. E. Mavis Hetherington can't see her faulty reasoning in concluding, "Happily married couples are healthier, happier, wealthier, and sexier than are singles." Note that she's comparing HAPPILY MARRIED people with ALL single people. Yes, shockingly, happily married people are happier than clinically depressed single people and all the married people who just couldn't stand the nonstop joy and are getting divorced. Your friend makes a mistake in throwing all the single eggs in one basket. Some people are single and living alone because they have unresolved issues, and some are because a whole lot of other people do. Others simply prefer living alone. (Why have a mancave when you can have a manhome?)

Studies do show definite benefits to being (happily) married, such as having a sounding board, a ready source of sex and hugs, and someone to help you pick up the pieces when you drop them. If you're single, these benefits aren't unavailable to you; they just take more thought and effort to obtain. For example, you can share a house or duplex with a friend, create a community of friends, and have at least one close friend who knows just about everything about you and is allowed and even encouraged to tell you when you're being an idiot. Whatever you do, don't let that "dying alone!" business get to you. Somebody can tough it out for 30 years with a person and, wouldn't you know it, have that final heart attack just moments after their spouse runs out to the store with a coupon for 40 cents off cottage cheese.

CURB FEELINGS Does approaching a woman on the street and asking her out ever work? —On The Prowl Sites with dating tips for men encourage them to approach women on the street: "Just walk up and say hello! All you have to do is be confident!" That second part is very good advice, because then you'll look less like you're dying inside when the woman treats you like you just walked up and said, "Hi, my name is Rapist!" Instead, use what social scientists call the "foot-in-the-door technique." Various studies show that when you get a person to agree to a trivial first request (like signing a petition), they're more likely to say yes to a more substantial request that follows (like donating money to the cause). In France, psychologist Nicolas Gueguen sent three men, ages 1921, out on the street to approach 360 women, about the same age, and ask them for a drink. When the men asked straight-out for a date, only 3.3 percent of the women said yes. When they first asked women for a light (for a cigarette) or directions and then the drink, 15 percent and 15.8 percent, respectively, agreed to go for a drink. Researchers are unsure why this works, but it seems that preoccupying a woman with helping you at least gives you a shot at distracting her from the directions you really want: "Could you tell me the best route into your pants?"

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).

[C2] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

WORN OUT BY YOUR JOB? NO HEALTH INSURANCE? Call Bulman Law Associates 721-7744

VOLUNTEERS

Women’s Opportunity & Resource Development (WORD) is seeking college students and community members to work with children in transition in the Missoula public schools. • give just 1 to 2 hours per week • provide academic support • provide mentoring. Tutoring is offered during the school day. Placements are available in both the Middle and Elementary Schools depending on your preference. Ben Brewster, Volunteer Coordinator, bbrewster@wordinc.org, 406-5433550 x 218. Changing the World, One Child at a Time

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 273-0368. www.aniysa.com

Valentine Spruce-Up Full House Up To 1500 Sq.Ft. $80

Piano Lessons At YOUR Home All Ages, All Levels

RC SERVICES Call For Details 241-0101

www.rcservices.info

Volunteer Tutors Needed.

Montana School of Massage & Massage Clinic- Professional Massage Therapy Training MontanaMassage.com 549-9244

Bruce- 546-5541

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NOT ARTISTIC? Come have some fun painting. Instruction & art supplies furnished. Complimentary wine or tea. 327-8757

Art Hang up • 839 S. Higgins

MARKETPLACE MISC. GOODS Montana Bumper Stickers Original Montana “Native” Bumper Sticker business for sale; 6,500 stickers inventory plus extras. $8,500. Call 406-370-4746.

COMPUTERS RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway 543-8287

FURNITURE Memory Foam King Mattress New in wrap; quality comparable to Tempurpedic. $950... Call 406-370-4746

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS In-house lessons on guitar, ukelele and piano. Sign up now! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 5490013. www.montanamusic.com

Outlaw Music Got Gear? We Do! Missoula’s Pro Guitar Shop specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, Tuesday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533. Outlawmusicguitarshop.com Turn off your PC & turn on your life! Guitar, banjo, mandolin, and bass lessons. Rentals available. Bennett’s Music Studio 7 2 1 - 0 1 9 0 BennettsMusicStudio.com

PETS & ANIMALS 3 month old lab puppies, AKC. Yellow and Chocolate. All vaccinations given. Will deliver. $600. Leave message or call after 4pm 208512-3107 Basset Rescue of Montana www.bassetrescueofmontana.org 406-207-0765 CATS: #2162 Grey Torbi, British Shorthair, SF, 7yrs; #2305 Torti, DSH, SF, 4yrs; #2312 Grey/white, DMH, SF, 10yrs; #2334 Blk/wht, DMH, NM, 15yrs; #2391 Wht/Orange, DSH, SF, 9mo; #2445 Grey/white, DSH, NM, 3yrs; #2455 Black, ASH/Bombay X, SF,

Turn off your PC & turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Missoula's Stringed Instrument Pro Shop!

Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

724 Burlington Ave. outlawmusicguitarshop.com

Gallery of Local Artists

Custom Framing Shrink-wrapping 709 Ronan Street

Missoula•541-7100

6yrs; #2499 Black, DSH, SF, 1.5yrs;#2508-2509 Black, KITTENS 9wks; #2510 Black, DMH, SF, 9wks;#2520 Grey Torti, DMH, SF, 2yrs; #2521 Orange, DSH, NM, 8wks; #2523 Orange/Buff, DSH, NM, 9wks; #2534 Grey Tabby, DSH, NM, 7rs; #2535 White/Blk Calico, DSH, SF, 6yr; #2561 Black, DSH, NM, 7 1/2yrs; #2569 Black, Siamese/DSH, NM, 10yrs; #2573 Blk/white, DSH, SF, 2.5yrs; #2587 Black, DSH, SF 9 mo; #2599 Grey Torti, DMH, F, 2yrs; #2602 Brn Torti, DSH, F, 8wks; #2615 Grey/Blk, Maine Coon X, F, 9wks; #2663 Blk, DSH, NM, 12wks; #2666 Blk/tan Tabby, ASH, SF, 9wks; #2668 Orange/wht, DSH, NM, 3yrs; $2670 Dilute Torti, Persian, SF, 9yrs; #2676 Blk, DSH, NM, 1yr; #2683 Blk/white, ASH, SF 9wks; #2695 Grey/brown, Russian Blue, NM, 3yrs; #2697 Buff, DSH, NM, 2yrs; #2698 Black, ASH, NM, 1yr; #2706 Buff, ASH, SF, 2yrs; #2708 Flame Point, Siamese X, NM, 12wks; #2722 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 10yrs; #2723 Grey, Russian Blue, SF, 5yrs; #2724 Buff, ASH, SF, 10yrs; #2726 Tan/Blk Tips, Maine Coon X, NM, 3yrs; #2727 Blk/white, Maine Coon X, SF, 8mo; #2728 Creme/Blk, Siamese, NM, 6yrs For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 363-5311 www.mon-

tanapets.org/hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840. DOGS: #2169 White/grey, Border/Heeler X, SF, 3 1/2yrs; #2285 Red/Tan, Boxer X, SF, 6yr; #2396 Yellow, Chow/Lab x, SF, 1yr; #2467 Brown, German Shep X, NM, 2yrs; #2564 Brindle, Catahoula, NM, 2yrs; #2575 Brn/white, Husky X, NM, 1yr; #2595 Blk/white, Heeler X, SF, 1yr; #2702 White/brindle, Boxer, NM, 1yr; #2705 Tan, Pit X, NM, 5yrs; #2712 Yellow, Lab/Retriever, NM, 4yrs; #2716 Blk/rust, Dobie/Hound X, NM, 2yrs; #2717 Fawn/white, Pit/Terrier, SF, 3yrs; #2736 Blk/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, SF, 1yr; #2737 Blk/white, F, Boxer/Lab/BC, 2wks; #2738 Brown/white, Boxer/Lab/BC, M, 2wks; #2740 Heeler X, F, 1yr; #2741-2746 BOXER/Lab/BC PUPPIES; For photo listings see our web page at www.montanapets.org Bitterroot Humane Assoc. in Hamilton 3635311 www.montanapets.org/ hamilton or www.petango.com, use 59840.

Welcome Back Students SALE 111 S. 3rd W. 721-6056 Buy/Sell/Trade Consignments


EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

PROFESSIONAL

TRAINING

HEALTH CAREERS

BARTENDING $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training available. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278

Reporter wanted Entry level position FT benefited position available for reporter/photographer in Polson. Resume and clips to ddrewry@hagadone.com

Annual Wildland Fire Refresher Training 406-543-0013 www.blackbull-wildfire.com

Full Time Receptionist Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a full time front office receptionist. Must be highly motivated for a

Now Hiring! Start tomorrow. Days only. 273-2266

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Retail Remodel Merchandisers Needed – Missoula. Temp. F/T Only Experienced Reset Merch Reps Only! Apply at http://bit.ly/Vc0j8E or call Steve 877-747-4071 x1263N

We are seeking an experienced Senior Web Developer that can work comfortably in a fast paced environment. This position will be involved in full life-cycle development of web applications written ASP.NET using SQL server, Transact-SQL, and stored procedures, Strong .Net Framework experience and database design skills a must. Strong HTML/CSS skills desired. Successful candidate must be a fast learner who is self-motivated and willing to tackle any task assigned. This is initially a projectbased contract position, with the potential to go full time depending on its success. Pay depends on experience. The position is available immediately in our Missoula, Montana office. Essential Duties and Responsibilities include the following, other duties may be assigned. * Technical lead for web development projects including information architecture, code creation and testing. * Full life-cycle development of web-based applications and websites.

This is an independent contractor position -

Valid MT driver license No history of abuse, neglect or exploitation Applications available at: OPPORTUNITY RESOURCES, INC., 2821 S. Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 Extensive background checks will be completed. NO RESUMES. EOE

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Nec-

essary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com

available at LienShield

Send your resume to Lynne Foland, Independent Publishing, 317 S. Orange, Missoula MT 59808, or via email: Lfoland@missoulanews.com

HAB TECH I

OPPORTUNITIES

Programming Job

We're looking for a part-time commissionbased salesperson to sell event sponsorships and advertising for Montana Headwall, our quarterly outdoor publication. If you're a sales specialist who is self-motivated, organized and well connected in the outdoor community, and have three or more years of experience in print media sales, then we want to hear from you!

FT position providing services to adults w/disabilities in a res/com setting. Supervisory experience preferred. Tu-F: 2:30p-9p, Sa: 10a-10p. $9.45/hr. Closes: 2/12/13, 5pm.

busy Family Practice Clinic, and possess excellent customer service skills. Please e-mail resume and cover letter to annie@bluemountainclinic.org, or snail mail to Blue Mountain Clinic, 610 N California, Missoula, MT 59802 Attn: Annie Hansen

CUSTOMER SUPPORT SPECIALIST Learn to use our specialty software products to assist and educate our local government clients in our high volume support services office. We are seeking candidates with experience and/or education pertaining to common processes used in business or by local governments to manage accounting functions such as accounts payable, payroll, budgeting and financial reporting. We will consider other experience and/or education. Salary, dependent on qualifications, is between $25,000 and $40,000. This is an in office position in our Polson, MT office. Benefits include vacation and sick leave, Simple IRA, health insurance, flexible benefit plan and the potential for profit sharing. Applicants must submit a cover letter and a resume to be considered.

Qualifications: * HS Diploma or equivalent required: B.S. Computer Science or equivalent experience preferred. * Solid experience using Microsoft software. * Familiarity with web production issues including browser and platform compatibility, size and speed issues. * All candidates must have legal authorization to permanently live and work in the US. Mail Your Resume to: HR LienShield, LLC 6070 Industrial Road Missoula, MT 59808

The cover letter and resume should be emailed to hiring@blackmountainsoftware.com Application deadline is February 8, 2013.

SERVICES CHILDCARE Iddy Biddies preschool Openings for 2-6yr olds. M-F 7am6pm. Celebrating 14 years of nur-

turing and inspiring school readiness to small groups of Missoula’s children. Encouraging a love for nature, adventure and the arts. 406-728-5055 2901 Eaton Missoula, MT

CLEANING NEED CLEANING? Students Bachelors - Builders - Move-in Move-out. Call Tasha @ RC Services 888-441-3323 ext 101. Locally Owed & Operated. Licensed & Insured. Visit our website www.rcservices.info. THOMAS CLEANING Residential/Commercial. 8+ years experience. Licensed/Insured. Free estimates. Fast, friendly, and professional. References. (406) 396-4847

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [C3]


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): "What we need is more people who specialize in the impossible," said poet Theodore Roethke. For the foreseeable future, Aries, you could and should be a person like that. I'm not saying that you will forevermore be a connoisseur of amazements and a massager of miracles and a magnet for unexpected beauty. But if you want to, you can play those roles for the next few weeks. How many exotic explorations and unlikely discoveries can you cram into your life between now and March 1? How many unimaginable transformations can you imagine? TAURUS (April 20-May 20): North America's most powerful and iconic waterfall is Niagara Falls, which straddles the border between the U.S. and Canada. In 1969, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers managed to shut down the American side of this elemental surge for a few months. They performed their monumental magic by building a dam made with 27,800 tons of rocks. Their purpose was to do research and maintenance on the stony foundation that lies beneath the water. I'm thinking that you Tauruses could accomplish a metaphorical version of that feat in the coming weeks: some awesome task that allows you to peer beneath the surface and make refinements that enhance your stability for a long time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): National Geographic reports that dung beetles have an intimate relationship not only with the earth but also with the stars. Scientists in South Africa found that the bugs use the Milky Way Galaxy to orient themselves while rolling their precious balls of dung to the right spot for safekeeping. The bright band of starlight in the sky serves as a navigational aid. I nominate the dung beetle to be your power animal in the coming weeks, Gemini. It will be prime time for you, too, to align your movements and decisions with a bigger picture and a higher power. (Read about the research here: http://tinyurl.com/GalacticBeetles.)

a

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You should go right ahead and compare oranges and apples in the coming week, Cancerian. Honey and butter, too: It's fine to compare and contrast them. Science and religion. Bulldogs and Siamese cats. Dew and thunderclaps. Your assignment is to create connections that no one else would be able to make . . . to seek out seemingly improbable harmonies between unlikely partners . . . to dream up interesting juxtapositions that generate fertile ideas. Your soul needs the delight and challenge of unexpected blending.

b

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The collection called Grimm's Fairy Tales includes the story "The Devil and His Grandmother." In one scene, the devil's grandmother is petting and rubbing her grandson's head. Or at least that's what the English translations say. But the authors wrote in German, and in their original version of the text, grandma is in fact plucking lice from the devil's hair. Your job in the coming week, Leo, is to ensure that no one sanitizes earthy details like that. Be vigilant for subtle censorship. Keep watch for bits of truth that have been suppressed. You need the raw feed that comes straight from the source.

c

SERVICES GARDEN/ LANDSCAPING Able Garden Design & Services LLC Garden growing all year with custom indoor microgardens. Other household maintenance services available. Call Rik 406-549-3667

HANDYMAN Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

Escape with MassageSwedish, Deep Tissue and Reiki. Open days, evenings and weekends. Janit Bishop, LMT • 2077358

h i

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Before any system can leap to a higher level of organization, says poet Susan Goldsmith Wooldridge, it has to undergo dissolution. "Unraveling or disintegrating is a vital, creative event making room for the new," she declares. Guess what time it is for the system we all know and love as YOU, Pisces? That's right: It's a perfect moment to undo, dismantle, and disperse . . . as well as to unscramble, disentangle, and disencumber. Be of good cheer! Have faith that you will be generating the conditions necessary for the rebirth that will follow. "To change from one reality to another," writes Wooldridge, "a thing first must turn into nothing." (Her book is Poemcrazy.) Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

[C4] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

MSW, CHT, GIS

Piano Lessons! Mrs. M’s Piano Magic is accepting Beginner to Lower Intermediate students for Mon./Fri. piano lessons in Missoula! $20/$40 for 30/60 minutes, 1 lesson/wk. B.A. in Music, member MSMTA/MTNA. 2403149 for more info!

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

MASSAGE THERAPY Women Only Swedish • Deep Tissue Stacy Solberg 274-6257

Experience Vibrational Healing! Energy work naturally helps heal aches/pains & emotional trauma. Whitney Fisher ~ 531-7800 Healer · Life Path Coach · Ascension Guide

e

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Young art student Andrzej Sobiepan sneaked into Poland's National Museum with a painting he had done himself and managed to surreptitiously mount it on one of the walls. It hung there for a while before authorities noticed it and took it down. "I decided that I will not wait 30 or 40 years for my works to appear at a place like this," he said. "I want to benefit from them in the here and now." This is the kind of aggressive self-expression I'd like to see you summon in the coming weeks, Aquarius. Don't wait for the world to come and invite you to do what you want to do. Invite yourself. P.S. The English translation of Sobiepan's Polish last name means "his own master." What can you do to be more of your own master?

Hypnosis & Imagery

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): While trekking up Mount Katahdin in Maine, naturalist Henry David Thoreau had a "mountain-top experience" that moved him to observe, "I stand in awe of my body." You're due for a similar splash of illumination, Scorpio. The time is right for you to arrive at a reverent new appreciation for the prodigious feats that your physical organism endlessly performs for you. What could you do to encourage such a breakthrough? How can you elevate your love for the flesh and blood that houses your divine spark?

g

Tile, Interior Stone. 35 years experience. References & Photos. Quality work at a fair price. 360-4398

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

d

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): "Dear Astrology Guy: I have been reading your horoscopes since I was 19. For a while, I liked them. They were fun riddles that made me think. But now I've soured on them. I'm sick and tired of you asking me to transform myself. You just keep pushing and pushing, never satisfied, always saying it's time to improve myself or get smarter or fix one of my bad habits. It's too much! I can't take it any more! Sometimes I just want to be idle and lazy. Your horoscopes piss me off! - Crabby Capricorn." Dear Crabby: I've got some good news. In the coming week, you are completely excused from having to change anything about yourself or your life. Stay exactly the same! Be frozen in time. Resist the urge to tinker. Take a vacation from life's relentless command to evolve.

SBS Solar offers design and installation services for Solar Systems: residential, commercial, on- and off-grid. We also specialize in Energy Audits for home or business. www.SBSlink.com

MISCELLANEOUS

Natural Housebuilders, Inc., *ENERGY EFFICIENT, smaller homes* Additions/Remodels* HIGHER-

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Years ago, "bastard" was a derisive term for a child born to unmarried parents. It reflected the conventional moral code, which regarded a "birth out of wedlock" as scandalous. But I think we can safely say that this old dogma has been officially retired. According to recent statistics compiled by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), over 40 percent of the kids born in the U.S. are to unmarried mothers. Just goes to show you that not all forbidden acts remain forbidden forever. What was unthinkable or out of bounds or not allowed at one time may evolve into what's normal. I bring this up, Libra, because it's an excellent time for you to divest yourself of a certain taboo that's no longer necessary or meaningful.

f

Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator. Ttestimonials Available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

MASONRY

HOME IMPROVEMENT

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In her book Jung and Tarot, Sallie Nichols notes that the sixteenth card in most Tarot decks portrays lightning as a hostile force: "jagged, zigzag strokes that slash across the sky like angry teeth." But there's one deck, the Marseilles Tarot, that suggests a kinder, gentler lightning. The yellow and red phenomenon descending from the heavens resembles a giant feather duster; it looks like it would tickle and clean rather than burn. I suspect you'll be visited by a metaphorical version of this second kind of lightning sometime soon, Virgo. Prepare to be tickled and cleaned!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): How do you like your caviar? Do you prefer it to be velvety and smooth, or would you rather have it be full of strong, fishy taste? If it's the first option, beluga caviar is your best option. If the second, sevruga should be your favorite. What? You say you never eat caviar? Well, even if you don't, you should regard the choice between types of caviar as an apt metaphor for the coming week. You can either have velvety smoothness or a strong taste, but not both. Which will it be? Set your intention.

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WILL TRAVEL

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Two office visits and hormone testing for $289 Two hours with the doctor and 11 different hormones! Call for more information.

2204 Dixon, Missoula • 542-2147 • blackbearnaturopaths.com

AUTO GENERAL CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Voting closes February 10


PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT 59802 until 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, January 19th, 2013 and will be opened and publicly read in the Hal Fraser Conference Room, 140 W. Pine at that time. As soon thereafter as is possible, a contract will be made for the following: Purchase and delivery of two culverts and associated appurtenances: 1) 112 lineal feet of Class II, 10-gage aluminized Type 2 CMP, 66” x 51”. 2) 192 lineal feet of 12-gage galvanized CMP, 66” x 51”. Bidders shall bid by City bid proposal forms, addressed to the City Clerk’s Office, City of Missoula, enclosed in separate, sealed envelopes marked plainly on the outside, “Bid for Wyoming Street Culverts, Closing, 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 19, 2013”. Pursuant to Section 18-1-102 Montana Code Annotated, the City is required to provide purchasing preferences to resident Montana vendors and/or for products made in Montana equal to the preference provided in the state of the competitor. Each and every bid must be accompanied by cash, a certified check, bid bond, cashier’s check, bank money order or bank draft payable to the City Treasurer, Missoula, Montana, and drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Montana for an amount which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, as a good faith deposit. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. No bid will be considered which includes Federal excise tax, since the City is exempt there from and will furnish to the successful bidder certificates of exemption. The City reserves the right to determine the significance of all exceptions to bid specifications. Products or services that do not meet bid specifications must be clearly marked as an exception to the specifications. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the City’s requirements. The City reserves the right to waive any technicality in the bidding which is not of substantial nature. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, February 19, 2013. Bidders may obtain further information and specifications from WGM Group, Inc., 1111 East Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, with questions addressed to Melissa Matassa-Stone (406) 7284611.Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the City’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA INVITATION TO BID Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, until 2:00 p.m. local time on Monday, February 25, 2013, and will then be opened and publicly read immediately thereafter at Missoula Redevelopment Agency’s (MRA) Hal Fraser Conference Room located at 140 West Pine for the furnishing of all labor, equipment and materials for construction of the Wyoming Street Improvements Project. The work includes construction of four blocks (approximately 1,975 linear feet) of Wyoming Street including general clearing and grubbing and roadway excavation, concrete curb and gutter, adjacent sidewalk and concrete crosswalks; new storm drainage and irrigation ditch piping; sewer and water main installation; installation of dry utilities; planting street trees; decorative street lighting; signing; striping; completion of trail connections with asphalt trail and a pedestrian bridge, and related construction. The project is located between California Street on the west and Cregg Lane/Hickory Street on the east, and crosses the former Champion Millsite, in Missoula, Missoula County, Montana. All work shall be substantially complete within 120 calendar days after the commencement date stated in the notice to proceed. Additional contract time will not be allowed for any accepted bid alternatives. A complete set of the Contract Documents and Project Manual will be furnished the Contractors making application therefore from WGM

Group, Inc., 1111 East Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59802, upon nonrefundable payment of $50.00 (plus shipping) by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). The following locations will have plans available for review only (not for bidding): Missoula Plan Exchange 201 N Russell, Msla 59801 mpe@vemcoinc.com MT Contractors Accn. 1717 11th Ave. Helena 59604 kathy@mtagc.org Each bid shall be accompanied by bid security made payable to the city of Missoula in an amount of ten percent (10%) of the bidder’s maximum bid price and in the form of cash, a cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in Montana or by any banking corporation incorporated under the laws of Montana; or a bid bond (on form attached if a form is prescribed) issued by a surety authorized to do business in Montana meeting the requirements of Paragraph 5.01 of the general conditions. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal forms. The bid bond shall act as a guarantee that the bidder, if his bid is accepted, will promptly execute the contract, secure payment of worker’s compensation insurance, and furnish a satisfactory faithful performance bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract price and a payment bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract price. Montana law requires all contractors to register with the Department of Labor prior to execution of the contract agreement. Forms for registration are available from the Department of Labor and Industry, P.O. Box 8011, 1805 Prospect Ave., Helena, Montana 59604-8011. Information on registration can be obtained by calling 1-406-444-7734. All laborers and mechanics employed by the contractor or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated on the basis of race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The bidder shall guarantee the total bid price for a period of 60 calendar days from the date of bid opening. Proposals must be sealed and marked “Wyoming Street Improvements, opening February 25, 2013” and marked “Sealed Bid” with the contractor’s name and address, and be addressed to: City of Missoula Clerk’s Office 435 Ryman Street Missoula, MT 59802 Facsimile bids will not be accepted. The Contractor shall not pay less than the latest Montana labor standards provisions minimum wage rates as determined by the Department of Labor and Industry. A copy of the applicable wage rates are attached as part of the specifications in Section 00910. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine St, Missoula, MT, on Friday, February 15, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. local time. The bidding General Contractor is required to attend while interested subcontractors are invited. This pre-bid conference will be a joint meeting with the Trestle Reconstruction and Silver Park – Phase IV projects. All questions relative to this project prior to the opening of bids shall be directed to the engineer. It shall be understood, however, that no specification interpretation will be made by telephone, nor will any “or equal” products be considered for approval prior to award of contract. The engineer for this project is: WGM Group, Inc., 1111 East Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, with questions addressed to Melissa Matassa-Stone (406) 728-4611. The Missoula Redevelopment Agency reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in a bid, or to accept the lowest responsive and responsible bid and bidder, and to make awards in the interest of the city. The low bid shall be determined on the basis of the lowest base bid, or lowest combination of base bid and accepted alternative bids. The Missoula Redevelopment Agency may accept in any order; any, all, or none of the alternative bids. Without limiting the foregoing, it is expressly stated that final award of the Contract is contingent upon securing appropriate financing.

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r d s Owner: City of Missoula By: /s/ Martha L. Rehbein City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids for the construction of: MRA – MRL Trestle Replacement, Project, will be received by the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802 until 2:00 p.m., local time, on Monday February 25, 2013. The bids will then be publicly opened and read aloud at the: Hal Fraser Conference Room at the Missoula Redevelopment agency 140 West Pine Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802 Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT, 59802, enclosed in a sealed envelope plainly marked on the outside "Proposal for MRA – MRL Trestle Replacement.” The envelope shall also be marked with the bidder’s name, address and Montana contractor's registration number. Facsimile bids will not be accepted. Overall completion of the project includes but is not limited to: Clearing and grubbing; removal of a portion of Montana Rail Link’s, MRL, Railroad Bridge 0.1, salvaging some components for MRL’s reuse and properly disposing of the remaining treated timber; installation of an irrigation culvert; excavation of embankment and construction of embankment using borrow material with a precast concrete block retaining wall and subballast; furnishing and driving steel H-piling and placing steel cross bracing; furnishing and placement of precast concrete and precast, prestressed concrete railroad bridge components for a three span railroad bridge; furnishing and placement of a bridge walkway; placement of waterproofing; placement of temporary and permanent erosion control; placement of cast-in-place concrete barrier rail protection at bridge bents; and coordination with MRL and MRA’s Silver Park Phase IV and Wyoming Street Extension Contractors including all work necessary to complete the Project in accordance with the Plans, Specifications and Project Special Provisions, miscellaneous work and mobilization. All work must be substantially completed within 60 calendar days of the commencement date stated in the notice to proceed. A complete set of the project manual, drawings and specifications may be obtained from HDR Engineering, Inc.; 1715 S. Reserve St., Ste C; Missoula, MT 59801. (406 532-2200) upon a non-refundable payment of $50.00 (plus shipping) by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). In addition, the project manual, drawings and specifications may also be examined, for review only, at the Missoula Plans Exchange, Exchange 201 N Russell, Missoula, MT 59801 (406) 549-5002, mpe@vemcoinc.com, and MT Contractors Assn., 1717 11th Ave. Helena, MT 59604 kathy@mtagc.org. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine St, Missoula, Montana, Friday, February 15, 2013 at 12:30 PM. The bidding General Contractor is required to attend while interested Subcontractors are invited. This pre-bid conference will be a joint meeting with the Wyoming Street Extension and Silver Park Phase IV projects. Questions regarding the project manual, drawings and specifications shall be directed to the Engineer HDR Engineering, Inc.; 1715 S. Reserve St., Ste C; Missoula, MT 59801. (406) 532-2200. Proposals must be accompanied by cashier's check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula and Missoula Redevelopment Agency against liability. The bidder shall guarantee the total bid price for a period of 60 calendar days from the date of bid

"Follow My Lead"–it's a symbolic gesture. by Matt Jones

opening. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula business licensing requirements. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractors or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at Montana Prevailing Rates as set out in the bid proposal. The contractor and subcontractors performing works on this project shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage rate. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated on the basis of race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The Missoula Redevelopment Agency reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids received , and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the Agency's requirements. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is specified above. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at 406-552-6080. City of Missoula is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city's website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. Any objections to pub-

lished specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at Monday February 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Owner: Missoula Redevelopment Agency By: Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF JOINT CITY/COUNTY PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council and the Missoula County Commissioners will hold a joint public hearing on Monday, February 25, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider a resolution on proposed changes to the Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Program. The proposed rule changes are in Chapter 4 “Missoula County Air Stagnation and Emergency Episode Avoidance Plan”; Chapter 6 “Standards for Stationary Sources”; Chapter 7 “Outdoor Burning”; Chapter 8 “Fugitive Particulate”; Chapter 9 “Solid Fuel Burning Devices”; and Chapter 14 “Enforcement and Administrative Procedures.” Some of the proposed rule changes include clarifying the wildfire smoke emergency episode avoidance plan in Chapter 4; adding a temporary permitting process for portable industrial sources in Chapter 6; clarifying general outdoor burning procedure and the bonfire definition in Chapter 7; modifying the paving rules in Chapter 8; clarifying rules and the adding solid fuel burning

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 20, 2013 in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1. A request by Joel and Brenda Cusker for a variance to allow an accessory structure on the property addressed as 9499 Cusker Lane without a primary structure, zoned C-A3. See map A.

CLARK FORK STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 20, 24, 25, 95, 195, 235, 247, 267 and 286. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting 2/18/2013 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to 2/21/2013 at 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All Sales final.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling Missoula County Community and Planning Services (formerly Office of Planning and Grants) at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the variance request you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co.missoula.mt.us.

ACROSS

1 Dirk Benedict co-star 4 "Well, aren't you the fancy one?" 10 Maidenform competitor 14 "Positively," to Pierre 15 "Let me handle the situation" 16 Stratford-___-Avon 17 Mail-order publications for those who make kids' sandwiches? 20 Migraine sensation 21 "The Iceman Cometh" playwright 22 "There will come ___..." 23 Easter or Christmas 25 Hockey legend Bobby 28 Stint on Broadway 29 "The way I see it," online 30 "Consarn it, ye varmint!" 32 "I Spent My Summer Vacation Rolling a 300" and such? 35 Deli loaves 36 "Do this or ___" 37 "Laters" 40 New York Shakespeare Festival founder Joseph 43 About 2 stars for canned hipster beer? 48 Musical sequence 51 Wheels 52 Signal 53 India Pale ___ 54 Passes into law 56 Early late show host Jack 57 Hyundai model 59 Helsinkian, e.g. 60 Reason to watch "Sesame Street" and "Nova" on mute? 65 Just around the corner 66 Kind of off-road motorcycle racing 67 "The Star-Spangled Banner" contraction 68 Pull on a tooth 69 N.Y congressman Anthony taken down by a sexting scandal in 2011

Last week’s solution

70 The Ravens got four in Super Bowl XLVII: abbr.

DOWN

1 Floor cleaner 2 Bathtime sounds 3 San Diego neighbor 4 Cremona currency, once 5 Wilberforce University's affiliated denom. 6 Part of DJIA 7 How more and more old movies can be viewed 8 Jazz pianist Krall 9 Show up to 10 He-cow 11 Words of regret 12 Captain's journal 13 Plug-___ 18 Yell out 19 Opera set in Egypt 22 1970s synthesizer brand 23 Rapscallions 24 Flockmates 26 Parisian street 27 Apt. ad stat 29 Different ending? 31 "Blast!" 33 Cartoon skunk ___ LePew 34 Walk like you're cool 38 Sciences' counterpart 39 "___ Te Ching" 40 Handheld device, for short 41 Big ISP, once 42 Keep slogging 44 Rum from Puerto Rico 45 "Sorry, you're on your own" 46 Full of subtlety 47 Bayer Leverkusen's country: abbr. 49 Department store section 50 When someone will be back, often 55 Be penitent 56 Epitome of easiness 58 Pen sound 59 Flower: Sp. 60 He had the first billion-view YouTube video 61 Squeezing serpent 62 Closest star to you 63 Wrath 64 Hosp. areas

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [C5]


PUBLIC NOTICES devices for licensed mobile food vendors in Chapter 9; and removing the administrative review process for permitting actions in Chapter 14. A copy of the resolution is available in the City Clerk Office, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. For further information, contact Jim Carlson, City/County Health Department at 258-4996. Citizens are encouraged to attend the meeting and comment on the proposal. If you cannot attend, you may e-mail your comments to the City Council at council@ci.missoula.mt.us and the Board of County Commissioners at bcc@co.missoula.mt.us. You can also mail them to the City Clerk at the address listed above. /s/ Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Missoula City Council will hold a public hearing on February 11, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 140 West Pine, Missoula, Montana, to consider an ordinance generally amending Missoula Municipal Code Titles 1 through 20 to change the composition of the Public Works Department and to change references to personnel through Municipal Code to reflect the reassignment of certain duties and functions formerly performed in the Public Works Department to Development Services beginning January 1, 2013. For further information contact Martha Rehbein, City Clerk at 552-6078. If you have comments, please mail them to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802. /s) Martha L. Rehbein, CMC City Clerk CITY OF MISSOULA PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula City Council will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Monday, February 25, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana: 714 & 714-1/2 Cooley St – City Subdivision Exemption Request Request from Norman Joseph Rock, Jr., represented by Tanner Wilson of Granite Creek Engineering, for approval of the entitlement to a boundary line relocation resulting in a rearrangement/redesign that eliminates an existing fee simple access to a public roadway pursuant to Section 8.040.4E(2)(d) of the Missoula City Subdivision Regulations. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request and case file are available for public inspection at the Development Services Office, 435 Ryman Street. Call 552-6630 for further assistance. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 552-6630. The Development Serices Office will provide auxiliary aids and services. CITY OF MISSOULA SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids for the construction of: MRA – Silver Park– Phase IV will be received by the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802 until 2:00 p.m., local time, on Monday February 25, 2013. The bids will then be publicly opened and read aloud at 2:00 Monday February 25, 2013 at the: Hal Fraser Conference Room, MRA Building, 140 West Pine Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802 Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT, 59802, enclosed in a sealed envelope plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for MRA – Silver Park– Phase IV.” The envelope shall also be marked with the bidder’s name, address and Montana contractor’s registration number. Overall completion of Silver Park including grading, drainage, landscaping, electrical, irrigation, and structural components. A complete set of the project manual, drawings and specifications may be furnished or reviewed at Territorial Landworks, Inc. 620 Addison Missoula, Montana (406-721-0142) upon a nonrefundable payment of $50.00 (plus shipping) by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). In addition, the project manual, drawings and specifications may also be examined at the Missoula Plans Exchange, (406) 549-5002 and iSqFt® website: http://www.isqft.com. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference at the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140

West Pine St, Missoula, Montana, Friday, February 15, 2013 at 12:30 PM. The bidding General Contractor is required to attend while interested Subcontractors are invited. This pre-bid conference will be a joint meeting with the Wyoming Street and Trestle Reconstruction projects. Questions regarding the project manual, drawings and specifications shall be directed to the Engineer Territorial-Landworks, Inc.; 620 Addison, PO Box 3851; Missoula, MT 59806. (406) 721-0142 Proposals must be accompanied by cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the City of Missoula and Missoula Redevelopment Agency against liability. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 399-211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-444-7734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula business licensing requirements. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractors or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as set out in the bid proposal. The contractor and subcontractors performing works on this project shall not pay less than the latest Montana Labor Standard Provisions minimum wage rate. A copy of said wage rate is attached as part of the contract documents. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated on the basis of race, ancestry, color, physical or mental disability, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital or familial status, creed, ex-offender status, physical condition, political belief, public assistance status or sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, except where these criteria are reasonable bona fide occupational qualifications. The Missoula Redevelopment Agency reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids received , and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the Agency’s requirements. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is specified above. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at 406-552-6080. City of Missoula is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at Monday February 25, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARING The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on the proposed expenditure of Open Space Bond proceeds on the following project: 1. Grant CreekNWF Project A hearing on a proposal to expend $54,000 from the City’s portion of 2006 Open Space Bond funds to purchase a 27 acre parcel and grant a conservation easement on the property to the Five Valleys Land Trust in order to extend the Grant Creek Bicycle/Pedestrian Trail parallel to Grant Creek Road. The City Council held a public hearing on the project on January 14, 2013 and voted to approve the project. The Commissioners will conduct their hearing at 1:30 p.m.,

Wednesday, February 13, 2013, in Room B14 of the County Administration Building, 199 West Pine, Missoula, Montana. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners. Offices: 199 West Pine. Mail: 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. FAX: (406) 721-4043. Copies of the proposed project are available for public inspection at the Missoula County Office of Rural Initiatives, 317 Woody, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 2583432; or you may contact Pat O’Herren in Missoula County Community and Planning Services at 258-4981. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-3422. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. MISSOULA COUNTY REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR MARKETING SERVICES FOR THE MISSOULA COUNTY SEELEY LAKE WOOD-BURNING APPLIANCE CHANGEOUT PROGRAM The Missoula County Department of Grants and Community Programs (DGCP), an entity of Missoula County, seeks a qualified licensed design firm to develop a multimedia marketing campaign intended to creatively and effectively “tell the story” of the ongoing Seeley Lake Wood-Burning Appliance Changeout Program. Statements of qualifications will be accepted until 5:00 PM, Wednesday, February 20, 2013. Interested firms may obtain a complete project description on Missoula County’s website at http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals or by contacting Barbara Berens, 406-258-3227 or bberens@co.missoula.mt.us MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-12-1517 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. BOOMTOWNE CENTER, LLC, Plaintiff, v. VINCENT L. FARNUM, FREDA A. FARNUM, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, UNKNOWN HEIRS, OR ANY UNKNOWN DEVISEES OF ANY DECEASED PERSON, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS, UNKNOWN, CLAIMING OR WHO MIGHT CLAIM ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE OR INTEREST IN OR LIEN OR ENCUMBRANCE UPON THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S OWNERSHIP OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO, WHETHER SUCH CLAIM OR POSSIBLE CLAIM BE PRESENT OR CONTINGENT, Defendants. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS, GREETINGS: You are hereby SUMMONED to answer the Complaint to Quiet Title in this Action which is filed with the above-named Court, a copy of which is served upon you, and to file your written answer with the Court and serve a copy thereof upon Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty-one (21) days after service of this SUMMONS, or such other period as may be specified by law, exclusive of the day of service. Your failure to appear or answer will result in judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. A filing fee must accompany the answer. This action is brought for the purpose of Quieting Title to the following-described real properties located in Missoula County, Montana: That portion of Block 19, Homevale Addition, lying Northwesterly of U.S. Highway 93, according to the official plat thereof on file in the office of the Clerk and Recorder, Missoula County, Montana. TOGETHER WITH that portion of the vacated alley located therein, as vacated by Resolution recorded on November 27, 1963, in Book ‘V’ of Miscellaneous at Page 158, records of Missoula County, Montana. Recording Reference: Book 265 of Micro at page 1726. This real property includes the real property previously identified as Lots 5, 6, 7 and 8 in Block 19 of Homevale Addition to Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof and on file in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder of said County. Dated this 14th day of January, 2013. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust By: /s/ Cady Sowre, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DN-12-101 Dept. No. 1 Judge Edward P. McLean SUMMONS AND CITATION IN THE MATTER OF DECLARING J.L., A YOUTH IN NEED OF CARE. TO: TRISHA BREUER AND GRANT LAFROMBOISE Re: J.L., born August 17, 1998 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Child and Family Services Division (CFS), 2677 Palmer, Suite 300, Missoula, Montana, 59808, has filed a Petition for Emergency Protective Services, Adjudication as a Youth in Need of Care and Temporary Legal Custody or for said youth to be otherwise cared for; Now, Therefore, YOU ARE

[C6] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

HEREBY CITED AND DIRECTED to appear on the 20th day of February, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. at the Courtroom of the above entitled Court at the Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, then and there to show cause, if any you may have, why the Order to Show Cause, Order Granting Emergency Protective Services and Notice of Show Cause Hearing should not also remain in effect; why the youth should not be adjudicated a youth in need of care; why CFS should not be awarded temporary legal custody of the youth for six months, or until further order of the Court; why the Petition should not be granted or why said youth should not be otherwise cared for. Trisha Breuer is represented by the Office of Public Defender, 610 Woody St., Missoula, Montana 59802, (406) 523-5140. Grant Lafromboise is represented by the Office of Public Defender, 610 Woody St., Missoula, Montana 59802, (406) 523-5140. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a denial of your interest in custody of the youth, which denial will result, without further notice of this proceeding or any subsequent proceeding, in judgment by default being entered for the relief requested in the Petition. A copy of the Petition hereinbefore referred to is filed with the Clerk of District Court for Missoula County, telephone: (406) 258-4780. WITNESS the Honorable Edward P. McLean, Judge of the above-entitled Court and the Seal of this Court, this 16th day of January, 2013. /s/ EDWARD P. MCLEAN District Judge MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-13-14 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MAURICE M. MEIER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Christina M. Anderson has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christina M. Anderson, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Dan Cederberg, PO Box 8234, Missoula, Montana 59807-8234, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of January, 2013. CEDERBERG LAW OFFICES, P.C., 269 West Front Street, PO Box 8234, Missoula, MT 59807-8234 /s/ Dan G. Cederberg, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Probate No. DP-13-15 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SCALLY, Deceased. NOTICE IS GIVEN that the undersigned was appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Sean W. Scally, the personal representative, return receipt requested, care of Geranios Law, PLLC, 120 Hickory Street, Suite B, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the clerk of the above-entitled court. Dated: January 24, 2013. /s/ Sean W. Scally, Personal Representative Personal Representative’s Attorney: Nik Geranios Law, PLLC, 120 Hickory Street, Suite B, Missoula, Montana 59801 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-13-17 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT P. YOST, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Norita Yost has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the Deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Christian, Samson & Jones, PLLC, Attorneys for the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 310 West Spruce, Missoula, MT 59802 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 16th day of January, 2013 /s/ Norita Yost, Personal Representative of the Estate of Robert P. Yost /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-13-9 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF JANET ELLEN MILLER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Robert E. Miller has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be mailed to Robert E. Miller, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC, 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 11th day of January, 2013. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the state of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. DATED this 16th day of January, 2013 /s/ Robert E. Miller, Personal Representative

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-13-22 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARLYS L. ENGLUND, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nancy L. Wolf, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane PC, PO Box 4747, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 30th day of January, 2013. /s/ Nancy L. Wolf, Personal Representative. I declare under penalty of perjury and under the laws of the State of Montana that the foregoing is true and correct. /s/ Nancy L. Wolf WORDEN THANE, P.C. Attorneys for Personal Representative /s/ William E. McCarthy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF FATHER’S PARENTAL RIGHTS Cause No.: DA-13-1 In the Matter of the Adoption of Braiden Austin Gilliam, A Minor Child By: David James Adams, Petitioner TO: Fillepe “Miguel” Pasqual Garcia who has been named father of minor child, Braiden Austin Gilliam, born to Brandy Lynn Adams on June 4, 2005 in Missoula, Montana. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed for termination of your parental rights to Braiden Austin Gilliam in the Montana Fourth Judicial District Court, Missoula County, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802. The Court has scheduled a hearing for determination of your parental rights at 9:00 A.M. Mountain time on the 28th day of February, 2013. Pursuant to Montana Code Annotated § 42-2-605(2), your failure to appear at the hearing will constitute a waiver of your interest in parental rights to the child, and will result in the Court’s termination of your parental rights. Pursuant to Montana Code Annotated § 42-2-616(1), if you appear at the hearing and object to the termination of your parental rights, the Court will then order proceedings necessary to determination of your parental rights to the child. Dated this 30th day of January, 2013. /s/ Gregory S. Munro Attorney for the Petitioner MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate Case No. DP-11-203 Dept. No. 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of NORMAN JAMES NICKMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, John Nickman, at 2207 Benton, Avenue B, Missoula, MT 59801, return receipt requested, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 29th day of November, 2012. /s/ Mark McLaverty /s/ John Nickman, Personal Representative, 2207 Benton, Avenue B, Missoula, MT 59801 MONTANA JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-12-228 NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of MARY AGNES THOLT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Michael H. Tholt, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at P. Mars Scott Law Offices, PO Box 5988, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of January, 2013. /s/ Michael H. Tholt, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL PROPERTY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by BENJAMIN T. CORY, as successor Trustee, of the public sale of the real property hereinafter described pursuant to the “Small Tract Financing Act of Montana” (Section 711-301, et seq., MCA). The following information is provided: THE NAMES OF THE GRANTOR, ORIGINAL TRUSTEE, THE BENEFICIARY IN THE TRUST INDENTURE, ANY SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO THE BENEFICIARY OR GRANTOR, ANY SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE, AND THE PRESENT RECORD OWNER ARE: Grantor: CRIS IVERSON and AMBER IVERSON (the “Grantor”) Original Trustee: STEWART TITLE OF MISSOULA COUNTY Successor Trustee: BENJAMIN T. CORY, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Montana (the “Trustee”) Beneficiary: TREASURE STATE BANK (the “Beneficiary”) Present Record Owner: CRIS IVERSON and AMBER IVERSON THE DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY COVERED BY THE TRUST INDENTURE IS: The real property and its appurtenances in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: LOT 2-A OF SELLE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT

THEREOF. RECORDING DATA: The following instruments and documents have been recorded in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office in Missoula County, Montana. Deed of Trust dated September 2, 2008, and recorded September 10, 2008, in Book 826, Page 191, under Document No. 200821007; and Substitution of Trustee dated December 3, 2012 and recorded December 7, 2012, in Book 904, Page 1259, under Document No. 201224182. THE DEFAULT FOR WHICH THE FORECLOSURE IS MADE IS: Nonpayment of monthly installments of $1,308.00 due under the Promissory Note dated September 2, 2008, which is secured by the Deed of Trust. The borrower is due for the September 8, 2012 payment and for each subsequent monthly payment. THE SUMS OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST INDENTURES AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 2012 ARE: Principal: $210,262.52 Interest: Interest continues to accrue at a rate of 6.0% per annum. As of November 30, 2012 the interest balance is $3,456.37 and interest accrues at the rate of $34.5637 per day. Late fees: $261.60 The Beneficiary anticipates and intends to disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the real property, and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts or taxes are paid by the Grantors or successor in interest to the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligation secured by the Trust Indenture. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of the sale include the Trustee’s and attorney’s fees, and costs and expenses of sale. THE TRUSTEE, AT THE DIRECTION OF THE BENEFICIARY, HEREBY ELECTS TO SELL THE PROPERTY TO SATISFY THE AFORESAID OBLIGATIONS. THE DATE, TIME, PLACE AND TERMS OF SALE ARE: Date: May 1, 2013 Time: 11:00 a.m., Mountain Standard Time or Mountain Daylight Time, whichever is in effect. Place: Crowley Fleck PLLP, 305 S. 4th St. E., Ste. 100, Missoula, MT 59801 Terms: This sale is a public sale and any person, including the Beneficiary, and excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. DATED: December 11, 2012. /s/ Benjamin T. Cory BENJAMIN T. CORY, Trustee STATE OF MONTANA ) ss County of Missoula) This instrument was acknowledged before me on December 11, 2012, by BENJAMIN T. CORY, as Trustee. /s/ Christa Shaw Christa Shaw (SEAL) Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My commission expires: 04/18/2015 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/29/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200516250, BK755, PG-298, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kelly J. Keintz, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: Lot 23A of Daly’s Addition, Block 64, Lots 23A and 24A, a Platted Subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official recorded Plat thereof. Parcel II: Together with a 15 foot permanent water and private utility service easement across Lot 24A as delineated on the Plat of said Subdivision. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/12 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 29, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $139,775.37. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $134,612.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 12, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred

and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.103504) 1002.236401File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Book 791, Page 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 5, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $934,559.06. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 17, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/11/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200701747, Bk 790, Pg 1285, and Modified February 24, 2011 as Instrument No. 201103461, Bk 874, Pg 476, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Randie M. Pringle was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the SE1/4 of Section 7, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as Tract D of Certificate of Survey No. 1816. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/11 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 10, 2012, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was


PUBLIC NOTICES $398,636.54. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $381,526.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 16, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7023.93790) 1002.236945-File No. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 11, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 10 IN BLOCK 2 OF REHDER HOMESITES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF John S. Knutson and Sandi Knutson, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 27, 2007 and recorded April 30, 2007 at 12:44 o’clock P.M. in Book 796, Page 330 as Document No. 200710288. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,021.27, beginning June 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 26, 2012 is $238,451.38 principal, interest at the rate of 3.87500% now totaling $5,252.88, late charges in the amount of $408.48, escrow advances of $4,556.56, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,050.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $25.31 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and

in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by thetrustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 5, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho )ss. County of Bingham ) On this 5th day of November, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shauna Romrell Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 06/04/2016 GMAC vs. Knutson 41207.791 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 15, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 1 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3643 A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 21 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. A.P.N.: 1194200 Charles L. Harnist Jr. and Kirstie Jo Harnist, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated February 09, 2006 and Recorded on February 22, 2006 in Book 769, Page 559 under Document # 200604097. The beneficial interest is currently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Certificate holders of Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I LLC, Asset Backed-Certificates, Series 2006-HE5. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,943.50, beginning November 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 01, 2012 is $234,875.52 principal, interest at the rate of 9.0% now totaling $63,838.98, late charges in the amount of $1,323.32, escrow advances of $7,418.23, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2,883.55, plus accruing interest at the rate of $55.50 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 6, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 6th day of November, 2012, before me, a notary public in and

for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shannon Gavin Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 01/19/2018 Chase Vs. Harnist 41206.438 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 18, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 20, 21 and the West 4 feet of Lot 22 of Block 36 of the Amended Plat of a portion of Car Line Addition, located in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 129 of Micro Records at Page 605 Gary A Linton II and Tammy K Linton, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank-Missoula, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 30, 2004 and recorded February 4, 2004 in Book 725, Page 1880 under Document No 200403051. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger Principal Residential Mortgage, Inc. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $831.30, beginning May 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 1, 2012 is $80,469.63 principal, interest at the rate of 7.0% now totaling $8,918.79, late charges in the amount of $748.25, escrow advances of $3,795.71, suspense balance of $38.74 and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,220.61, plus accruing interest at the rate of $15.43 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 6, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 6th day of November, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Citimortgage V Linton 42011.536 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 18, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula

County, Montana: A tract of land located in and being a portion of the Northwest one-quarter of the Southeast one-quarter (NW1/4SE1/4) of Section 11, Township 13 North, Range 19 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said NW1/4SE1/4 of Section 11, thence N.00°00’15” E., along the mid-section line, being the centerline of Brayton Avenue, a distance of 174.90 feet; thence S.89°14’E., 30.00 feet to a point on the Easterly right-ofway line of Brayton Avenue, said point being the true point of beginning; thence N.00°00’15”E., along said right-of-way line, a distance of 188.10 feet; thence S.89°14’E., 187.35 feet; thence S.00°00’15” W., 188.10 feet; thence N.89°14’W., 187.35 feet to the true point of beginning. Recording Reference: Book 683 Micro Records, Page 357 Matthew G. Kelley and Michael A. Kelley, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated on November 18, 2002 and recorded on November 21, 2002 in Bk-693, Pg-539, under Document No. 200234428. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $882.84, beginning January 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 24, 2012 is $131,919.01 principal, interest at the rate of 6.00000% now totaling $22,287.25, late charges in the amount of $169.70, escrow advances of $10,941.44, suspense balance of $-42.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $324.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $21.69 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 6, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 6th day of November, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Dalia Martinez Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 2/18/2014 Chase Vs. Kelley 41954.076 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 25, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 7 OF SKYVIEW ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, AS

RECORDED IN BOOK 11 OF PLATS AT PAGE 77 Kalli McCarthy, and Michael J. Hyde, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on June 29, 2007 and recorded on July 2, 2007 on Book 800 and Page 1001 as Document No. 200716796. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,222.93, beginning June 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 14, 2012 is $223,720.31 principal, interest at the rate of 2.000% now totaling $2,023.71, escrow advances of $2,617.95, suspense balance of $-408.07 and other fees and expenses advanced of $19,918.30, plus accruing interest at the rate of $12.26 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 19, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 19th day of November, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: Nov 6, 2018 Nationstar Vs. McCarthy 41706.622 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 8, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5236 Amber Armitage and Erik Armitage, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co. of MT, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Montana First Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 22, 2007 and Recorded May 29, 2007 in Book 798, Page 184 under Document Number 200713098. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,387.87, beginning November 1, 2011, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would

have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 19, 2012 is $195,645.80 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $13,434.29, late charges in the amount of $138.76, escrow advances of $3,359.53, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,723.98, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.10 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 30, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 30th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 5/26/2015 PHH V. Armitage 41392.532 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 8, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 8 of Montana Vista Phase I, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat thereof. Michael R. Vandam, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated February 16, 2006 and recorded on February 16, 2006 at 04:29P, under Document No. 200603660, in Bk-769, Pg-122.. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $732.34, beginning July 1, 2012, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 1, 2012 is $115,503.23 principal, interest at the rate of 5.5000% now totaling $2,646.95, late charges in the amount of $409.67, escrow advances of $324.81, and other fees and expenses advanced of $956.64, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.40 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has

elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 1, 2012 /s/ Lisa J Tornabene Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 1st day of November, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Lisa J Tornabene, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Shauna Romrell Notary Public Bingham County, Idaho Commission expires: 06/04/2016 Phh/vandam 41392.802 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on May 31, 2013, at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: The West 20 feet of Lot 19 and all of Lot 20 in Block 22 of Hammond Addition, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 398 of Micro Records at Page 1422. Tanna E. Clews and Christiana E. Clews, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Missoula Federal Credit Union, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated July 12, 2007, and recorded that same date in Book 801 of Micro Records at Page 573, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded January 11, 2013, in Book 906, Page 1129, Document No. 201300763, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $284,028.61, plus interest at a rate of 7.5% totaling $11,360.64 and late fees of $3,662.23, for a total amount due of $299,051.48, as of January 8, 2013, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the above-described property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 14th day of January, 2013. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 14th day of January, 2013 before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/14/2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, to-

montanaheadwall.commissoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [C7]


PUBLIC NOTICES gether with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which DAVID M KNAPP, AND KAREN E KNAPP, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/30/2010 and recorded 09/03/2010, in document No. 201017002 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 865 at Page Number 495 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: TRACT 37-A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3358, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SE1/4NW1/4 AND NE1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 13 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 1620 CAMAS RD, Potomac, MT 59823. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 02/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $188,008.62 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 4.50% per annum from 02/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/28/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0077336 FEI NO. 1006.168183 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/14/2013, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which PATRICK LANDELLS & AMY HOUSE, AS JOINT TENANTS WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES, LLC as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 10/06/2006 and recorded 10/12/2006, in document No. 200626539 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 785 at Page Number 153 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS B AND C OF CAR LINE ADDITION, BLOCK 55, LOTS 25 THRU 28, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A 15 FOOT WIDE PRIVATE SEWER SERVICE LINE EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS LOT A AS SET FORTH ON SAID PLAT. Property Address: 3114 SOUTH CLARK STREET, MISSOULA, MT 59801. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed

and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 01/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $208,201.89 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.625% per annum from 01/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 12/28/2012, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0042687 FEI NO. 1006.159286 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/28/2013, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which CATHY JO KAHNLE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to INSURED TITLES LLC as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 08/02/2010 and recorded 08/06/2010, in document No. 201014998 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 863 at Page Number 1289 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 3 OF WASHOE ESTATES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEROF MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: LOT 3 OF WASHOE ESTATES, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 808 MECATE LANE, Bonner, MT 59823. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $315,171.72 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 4.875% per annum from 05/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes

that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/10/2013, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0069661 FEI NO. 1006.165117 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/28/2013, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which GREGORY D ZIMMERMAN AND BECKY JO ZIMMERMAN, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES, INC. as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 03/27/2009 and recorded 04/01/2009, in document No. 200907164 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 836 at Page Number 599 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 117 OF PINEY MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 32900 PINEY MEADOWS LANE, HUSON, MT 59846. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 12/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $221,026.02 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.00% per annum from 12/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/10/2013, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0063075 FEI NO. 1006.163386 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/28/2013, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which HEATHER HALTER

[C8] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

AND CASEY HALTER, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES, INC as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/30/2008 and recorded 07/07/2008, in document No. 200815839 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 822 at Page Number 619 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 72 OF HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 2320 WEST CRESCENT DRIVE, MISSOULA, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 11/01/2011, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $195,346.62 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.00% per annum from 10/01/2011 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/11/2013, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0062139 FEI NO. 1006.163240 Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/28/2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which BRET BALDASSIN, AND JODY BALDASSIN HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to GENUINE TITLE as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/12/2009 and recorded 07/09/2009, in document No. 200916839 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 843 at Page Number 481 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TOWIT: LOT 13 OF VALLEY VISTA, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF PARCEL ID: 5802717 Property Address: 6050 APRIL LANE, Missoula, MT 59803. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclo-

sure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 04/01/2012, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $244,994.79 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 4.75% per annum from 03/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charges against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 01/11/2013, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO. 12-0076045 FEI NO. 1006.167340 NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 8, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Entrance of the First American Title Company of Montana located at 1006 West Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 1 OF WEBBER ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF Eugene Karl Schafer and Janet Lindquist Schafer, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Equity Direct Mortgage Corp., A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 8, 1998 and recorded May 13, 1998 in Book 541, Page 296, as Document No. 9812132. The beneficial interest is currently held by Nationstar Mortgage LLC. First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,109.48, beginning January 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 15, 2012 is $97,135.05 principal, interest at the rate of 10.00% now totaling $38,417.19, late charges in the amount of $567.00, escrow advances of $10,382.16, and other fees and expenses advanced of $10,531.11, plus accruing interest at the rate of $26.61 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale Is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Dated: October 30, 2012 /s/ Dalia Martinez Assistant Secretary, First American Title Company of Montana, Inc. Successor Trustee Title Financial Specialty Services P.O. Box 339 Blackfoot ID 83221 STATE OF Idaho ))ss. County of Bingham ) On this 30th day of October, 2012, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Dalia Martinez, know to me to be the Assistant Secretary of First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Amy Gough Notary Public Bingham County, ID Commission expires: 5/26/2015 Nationstar V Schafer 41706.582 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of intent to Transfer Air Quality Permit pursuant to the Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Program. Far West Rock Products will file on or about February 7, 2013 an intent to transfer an air quality permit with the Environmental Health Division of the Missoula City-County Health Department. The applicant seeks approval for operation of Gravel Production at 13272 Frontage Road, Section 6 & 7 T14N R20W. The transferred permit is valid only for the calendar year in which transfer is granted. Any member of the public who wishes to review the application, obtain a copy of the permit that is transferred, or who wishes to submit comments, should contact the Health Department as 301 West Alder, Missoula, MT 59802-4123 or phone 248-4755 prior to February 22, 2013 Trustee Sale Number: 12-03253-3 Loan Number: 1127137821 APN: 1758557 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE`S SALE TO BE SOLD for cash at Trustee’s Sale on May 22, 2013 at the hour of 11:00 AM, recognized local time, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 WEST BROADWAY, MISSOULA, MT following described real property in Missoula County, Montana, to-wit: LOT 6 IN BLOCK 2 OF MEADOWLARK ADDITION NO.2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. More commonly known as: 3516 WASHBURN ST , MISSOULA, MT TREVOR DELANEY, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to TITLE SERVICES, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST INDEPENDENT MORTGAGE COMPANY as Beneficiary, by a Trust Indenture dated 8/16/2006, and recorded on 08/18/2006 in Film No. 781 at Page 512 under Document No. 200621098, in the Official Recordds of the Office of the Record of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). The current beneficiary is: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association, as Trustee, successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Morgan

Stanley Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-15XS (the “Beneficiary”). FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY was named as Successor Trustee (the “Trustee”) by virtue of a Substitution of Trustee dated May 2, 2011 and recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana. There has been a default in the performance of said Deed of Trust: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears as of December 23, 2012: Balance due on monthly payment from September 1, 2012 and which payments total: $1,681.28: Late charges: $140.08 : Late Charge Forecasted: $0.00 Bad Check: $0.00 Net Other Fees: $30.00 Advances: $0.00 There is presently due on the obligation the principal sum of $189,123.37 plus accrued interest thereon at the rate of 7.37500% per annum from August 1, 2012, plus late charges. Interest and late charges continue to accrue. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds include the trustee’s or attorney’s fees and costs and expenses of sale. The beneficiary has elected to sell the property to satisfy the obligation and has directed the trustee to commence such sale proceedings. The beneficiary declares that the grantor is in default as described above and has directed the Trustee to commence proceedings to sell the property described above at public sale in accordance with the terms and provisions of this notice. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the aforesaid property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default theretofore existing. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 DATED: January 7, 2013 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee 135 Main St. Ste.1900 San Francisco, CA 94105 By: Stephanie Alonzo, Authorized Signature P1016012 1/24, 1/31, 02/07/2013

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These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control 541-7387 RAIDER• We've had lots of people inter-

ested is this pretty lady, but none that actually followed through and took her home. She's a happy, lively young dog who's more than ready to have a new family; all she needs is one that will commit wholeheartedly to her.

CASH•Cash is a big, shy fellow who needs a family filled with people who will give him enough attention and affection to boost his self-confidence. He'd do best in a home where someone was home most of the time, and that person would have a wonderful companion in Cash.

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DAISY•Whether she's peeking over the side of her litter box or standing at the front of her cage talking to you, Daisy is one special cat. She's not particularly fond of other cats, but if you had one as nice as she is, you wouldn't want others anyway! Daisy is definitely a keeper.

MINNIE•Minnie is a petite young cat who loves to play, but who also enjoys just hanging out and lounging around. What she'd really like is to have a nice home to make lounging even more fun and a family that would indulge her with lots of play time.

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DIDA•Dida's owners gave her away, and

JOY•We admit that Joy isn't a very pretty dog, but we know that appearance isn't everything. She's smart, lively, and so full of energy that she'd be a great addition to an active family. She's lonely at the shelter and longs for people who will love her and strive to make her happy.

she got lost from her new home almost immediately. She was on hr own for three months before being rescued, and then it turned out that her family didn't want her back. How sad is that?!?! This sweet lady is ready for some good luck for a change.

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana 549-3934 WILDER•Meet Wilder. He is inquisitive, intelligent, friendly, playful and easygoing. Wilder will bring a smile to your face every day with his catty antics! He is available for adoption, but he is being fostered by one of our HOPE foster families. Contact the shelter to arrange a time to meet Wilder or to learn more about our invaluable HOPE Foster Program. BABY•Baby is a beautiful 9-year-old lap cat.

She's a couch potato who has lived with dogs and cats in the past. She's friendly yet independent and very gentle. And Baby is eligible for the shelter’s Seniors for Seniors adoption program which waives her adoption fee for a senior adopter.

CONNIE• Connie is ready to stretch her legs and strut her stuff. This young and gregarious feline is looking for a job, preferably with mice involved. Do you have a barn or garage that would benefit from Connie’s vivaciousness?

BEAU•This Pointer/Hound mix is the complete package. Beau likes to fetch and go for wilderness walks, lived with dogs and cats in his previous home and is housetrained. Every once in a while Beau may chase a squirrel, but he is a Pointer after all. Adopt Beau and receive $15 off a 6-week Basic Manners at the Humane Society.

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SISSY•Sweet Sissy is hoping people won't

be fooled by her age. She is in the prime of life and loves to hike and go swimming in warmer weather. She has lived with cats and would love a home with older children snuggle with. Sissy also enjoys telling stories about her past. Come listen to some of Sissy's stories and you are sure to fall in love!

QUEEN LATIFAH•Queen Latifah is a tiny little dog - all 6.5 pounds of her - with a big personality. At 5 years old, she knows who she is, so you know what she's like. Is she the perfect fit for your household?

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RENTAL APARTMENTS 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $550 across from Public Library, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 7287333 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom $575 quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 7287333 1024 Stephens #2. 2bed/1bath ground level apartment, shared yard, coin-ops, cat? $675. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 115 TURNER COURT: 1 BEDROOM, BORDERS PARK, STORAGE BREAKFAST BAR-AREA, MAIN FLOOR, $525 Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP 1260 S. 1ST ST. W. 2 BEDROOM, BRAND NEW, WASHER & DRYER, A/C, PRIVATE DECK/PATIO, GREEN CONSTRUCTION!, FREE CABLE, $895, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 1502 Ernest #4. 1bed/1bath, W/D hookups, central location. $575. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1801 Howell #3. 2 bed/1 bath, W/D hookups, storage, shared yard, pet okay. RENT INCENTIVE $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 1826 S. 4TH ST. West. 2 BEDROOM, CARPORT & STORAGE, ON-SITE LAUNDRY, FREE CABLE, CENTRAL, HEAT PAID, $725. 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP. Garden City Property Management 549-6106 2 bedroom, 1 bath $795 W/S/G paid, newly renovated, Southside location, DW, W/D hookups, carport. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $615 coin-op laundry, off street parking, storage, H/W/S/G paid, No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $650 across from Public Library, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 7287333 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom $695 quiet cul-de-sac, DW, coin-op laundry, off street parking, H/W/S/G paid, No

pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 7287333 2 bedroom, 1.5 bathroom. $750 on West Railroad, townhouse condo, DW, W/D in unit, S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 3901 O’LEARY: 2 BEDROOM, 1 1/2 BATHS, 2 STORY, PRIVATE DECK, FREE CABLE, CARPORT, STORAGE, HEAT PAID, 1-YEAR COSTCO MEMBERSHIP.. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

New Complex, 1 & 2 bedroom units, $625-$795 DW, A/C, deck, storage, coin-op laundry, limited off-street parking, W/S/G paid, 2 bedroom units have W/D hookups or 2nd bath. No pets. No smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333 Orchard Gardens. 1 bed: $572. 2 bed: $691. All utilities paid. Waive application fees. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113

Palace Apartments. Studio: $490. 1 bed: $480-$525. 2 bed: $600-$700. Heat paid. Waive application fees. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113 Russell Square Family Building. 2 bedroom: $629. Heat paid. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113 Russell Square West. 55+/Disabled Complex. 1 bed: $525. Heat paid. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113 Solstice Apartments. 1 bed: $587. 2 bed: $751. W/S/G paid. Missoula Housing Authority 549-4113

Gold Dust Apartments. 2 bed: $691 includes all utilities. Waive application fees. Missoula Housing Authority 5494113

Lolo RV Park Spaces available to rent w/s/g/elec included $425/month 406-273-6034

Professional Property Management 1511 S Russell • 721-8990

510 E. FRONT: DOWNTOWN BY THE U!, 1+1 BEDROOM, HARDWOOD FLOORS, PORCH, LAUNDRY, CAT OK $840. $300 Costco Gift Card. Garden City Property Management 549-6106

825 SW Higgins Ave. B3. 2 bed/1 bath HEAT PAID, patio, single garage, gas fireplace. $800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

MOBILE HOMES

DUPLEXES

HOUSES

3915 Buckley Place. 2bed/1bath, shared yard, W/D hookups, near 39th Street. $725. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

640 RIVER: Near Vibrant Downtown Missoula. 2bed Apt. FREE CABLE, HEAT PAID. $660 & $760. Highland Property Management 4939136

407 S. 5th St. E. “B” 2bed/1bath, W/D hookups, close to University, all utilities paid. RENT INCENTIVE. $800. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

1&2

Find your new home with

446 Washington 1bed/1bath, downtown, HEAT PAID, coin-ops. $700. Grizzly Property Management 5422060

731 W. Sussex #4. 2bed/1bath HEAT PAID, carport, coin-ops. $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

Studio. $495, quiet cul-de-sac, separate room for bedroom, DW, coin-op laundry, off-street parking, H/W/S/G paid. No pets, no smoking. 2 WEEKS FREE With 6 Month Lease (Limited Time to Qualified Applicants) GATEWEST 728-7333

professionalproperty.com

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

Property Management

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

OUT OF TOWN

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com

MHA Management manages 10 properties throughout Missoula.

GardenCity

ROOMMATES

11270 Napton Way 1C. 3bed/1bath, shared yard, coin-ops, central location in Lolo.$800. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 9850 Anderson Road. 4bed/1bath house in Bonner. Spacious yard, basement, W/D hookups. $1050. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

FIDELITY

All properties are part of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program.

422 Madison • 549-6106

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251-4707 Rent Incentive

For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

The Missoula Housing Authority complies with the Fair Housing Act and offers Reasonable Accommodations to persons with Disabilities.

1235 34th St. • Missoula (406) 549-4113 missoulahousing.org

1409 2nd Street 1 Bed Apt. $460/month 4265 Birdie Court 2 Bed Apt. $685/month

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals Professional Office & Retail Leasing 30 years in Call for Current Listings & Services Missoula Email: gatewest@montana.com

www.gatewestrentals.com

117 North Johnson 1 Bed Apt. + Storage $485/month

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

715 Kensington Ave., Suite 25B 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Finalist

Uncle Robert Lane 2 Bed Apt. $645/month

Finalist

fidelityproperty.com

Visit our website at

Did you know? Posting a classified ad ONLINE is FREE!

www.missoulanews.com

REAL ESTATE HOMES 108 North Davis. 3 bed, 1.5 bath with 2 car garage near Milwaukee Bike Path. Lots of upgrades and a great front porch. $180,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 1136 & 1136 1/2 Howell. 3 UNITS. 3 bed house & two 2 bed apartments on corner lot. $380,000. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com

Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net 1315 Kelly Island Court. 5 bed, 3 bath on cul-de-sac with sports court, pool & 3 car garage. $559,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 1360 Starwood Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath in Grant Creek backing open space. 3 car heated garage, garden shed & deck. $449,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

11689 Stolen Rock Court. 5 bed, 3 bath, 2 car garage on 3.15 acres. $319,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

1480 Cresthaven. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on over one private acre. Open floor plan, dream master bathroom and double garage. $350,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

12791 Junegrass. Newly built 3 bed, 2 bath with 2 car garage on 1 acre lot with 10 year building warranty. $224,900.

1623 Wild Turkey Lane, Stevensville. Over 200 acre private ranch with creek surrounded by conservation easement land.

$949,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com

yard work, sewer & garbage. $106,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net

Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoulaproperties.com

1700 Madeline. 5 bed, 3 bath at foot of Mount Sentinel. Vintage architecture, paned glass, wood floors. $685,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

2905 Larch Camp Road. 3 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.5 acres in Pattee Canyon. Fully furnished. $639,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406-531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

3455 Jack Drive. 4 bed, 3 bath Linda Vista home with large kitchen, double garage & park-like landscaping. $295,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $205,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 1 Bath South Hills home. $179,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

2 Bdr, 1 Bath single-level Windsor Park home. $170,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 229 Mansion Heights. 4 bed, 4 bath Prairie Style with deck, patio, floor to ceiling windows and amazing views. $895,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 2441 McIntosh. 2 bed, 2 bath in 55+ community. HOA fees include club house,

[C10] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

3 Bdr, 2 Bath Pleasant View home. $239,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

4227 South 7th West. Beautiful sample home to be built. 4 bed, 2.5 bath with covered porch and 2 car garage. Lot available separately for $125,000. MLS #20121798, $325,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com

322 David Court. 3 bed, 1 bath on 1/4 fenced acre near river trail. 3 car garage & many great upgrades. $200,000.

5209 Dutton Court. 5 bed, 3 bath with fantastic kitchen, laundry room and 3 car garage. Near city park. $339,900. Anne

Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816 annierealtor@gmail.com 5222 Forest Hill. 4 bed, 4 bath on over 3.5 acres near Bitterroot River adjacent to USFS land. $1,095,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estae 532-9229. tory@montana.com 5501 Prospect. 4 bed, 4 bath adjacent to common area in Grant Creek. Sun room, hot tub and many upgrades. $385,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 6544 McArthur. 3 bed, 2.5 bath with gas fireplace and 2 car garage. $240,000. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net 7452 Peregrine Court. 4 bed, 3.5 bath Stratford Munufactured on 1/2 acre bordering Flynn Ranch. $329,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

8693 Snapdragon. 3 bed, 2 bath on 1/4 acre outside Missoula. $204,900. No money down! Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 541-7355. montpref@bigsky.net 955 Clements. 3 bed, 2.5 bath in Target Range with gas fireplace, wood floors, deck and large heated shop. $463,500. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 5446114. jbooher@montana.com Call me, Jon Freeland, for a free comparative market analysis. 360-8234 Cash Flow Cabin Georgetown Lake Vacation Rental Fully furnished, turn-key, website with online booking www.cabinmt.com, 9 years rental history, 6 miles to Discovery Ski Area, $20,000 annual income, recent income: Dec 2012 $2456, Jan 2013 $2376, Feb 2013 $1958. Great value at $189,900; 546-4797; www.postlets.com/7162638


REAL ESTATE Fantastic Home With View 6305 St. Thomas. 4 bed, 3 bath, updated and gorgeous setting with large private lot, double garage, landscaped and ready to move into! $310,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Huge Lot Bungalow Style Home Middle of Missoula, close to Good Food Store, 1/2 acre + lot, enormous shop, great home. 203 Curtis. $217,000. KD 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Linda Vista Home to be built at top of Linda Vista with amazing views! One level living, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on corner lot on Jeff Drive. $279,900. KD 2405227. porticorealestate.com Lot 16A McArthur. 3 bed, 2 bath with great views. Budget for improvements. $184,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net Lower Miller Creek. 4 bed, 3 bath with daylight walkout basement, large fenced yard & 3 car garage. $309,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com Rattlesnake View Home Great home across the street from open space and miles of trails. Daylight basement, guest suite with granite and slate bath, hardwood and tile flooring, corian counters and new stainless steel appliances in kitchen, master suite with 3 closets and private tiled bath, 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2 car garage, hot water baseboard heat and central air conditioning. Call Sally for appt 5 4 6 - 4 7 9 7 . http://www.postlets.com/8719026

3100 Washburn #31. 2 bed, 1 bath fully remodeled with all appliances & gas fireplace. $100 HOA dues. $115,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com

Call KD to find out more about this 2 bedroom 1.5 bath condo with the balcony facing the river and right next to the river trail and close to downtown. $135,000. 2405227 porticorealestate.com

4100 Mullan #102. Super-efficient studio with gas fireplace, laundry, storage & AC. $100/month HOA fee. $124,900. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

Uptown Flats. From $149,900. Upscale gated community near downtown. All SS appliances, car port, storage and access to community room and exercise room plus more. Anne Jablonski, Portico Real Estate 546-5816. annierealtor@gmail.com www.movemontana.com

5108 Village View #6. 2 bed, 2 bath with private deck, patio and single garage. $165,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com 6614 MacArthur. 2 bed, 2.5 bath townhome with amazing views. $194,500. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properites. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 723 North 5th West. 2 bed, 1.5 bath with maple floors, open kitchen, fenced backyard & lots of light. $179,500. Rochelle Glasgow, Prudential Missoula 728-8270. glasgow@montana.com 8 Catrina Lane. 2 bed, 1 bath single level townhome with large fenced yard, patio & garage. $132,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com

1825 Burlington. Two central Missoula lots with 3 bed, 2 bath mobile. Great investment or first time buy. $89,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com

23645 Mullan. Beautiful 14 acre treed meadow west of Huson. Modulars on permanent foundation allowed. $169,900. Robin Rice, Montana Preferred Properties. 240-6503 riceteam@bigsky.net 3.2 Acres in the Wye area. Gorgeous mountain and valley views. $65,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 3010 West Central. Nearly 5 acres in Target Range with 3 bed, 1 bath home. Rural living in town. $499,900. Pat McCormick, Properties 2000. 240-7653. pat@properties2000.com 5980 Greg’s Way. Commercial building lot in Missoula development park allows for 12,000 sq.ft. building. $212,550. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com

Bear Gulch, Garnet Ghost Town. 40 acres bordering BLM land. Great recreational property. $55,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana, 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com Bruin Lane Lots. Near Council Groves & The Ranch Golf Course. From $85,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana. 5446114. jbooher@montana.com

COMMERCIAL

OUT OF TOWN

110 Main Street, Stevensville. Restaurant in heart of Stevensville next to Blacksmith Brewery. $149,000. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

11027 Stella Blue, Lolo. Gorgeous 4 bed, 4 bath two story custom home. Gourmet kitchen, spa-like master bath. $425,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 5329229. tory@montana.com

Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Klakken, Noxon. Motel with 9 units, laundromat & 2 rentals on 1/2 acre. $259,000. Robin Rice @ 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties.

Rattlesnake Acreage Rattlesnake 1/4 acre lot at the base of Mt. Jumbo with all utilities stubbed to the site and ready to build on. $160,000. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com

For Sale: 1.5 acres of beautiful property with a 3800 sq ft building. Huge corner lot. Commercial property. 3 garages. In downtown Salmon. $625,000. Call 208303-7533 anytime.

Rochelle Glasgow

RICE TEAM

Cell:(406) 544-7507 glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

Robin Rice • 240-6503

Missoula Properties 728-8270

Affordable Townhomes Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet new, green-built development may be your ticket. STARTING AT $79,000. 1400 Burns. 240-5227 porticorealestate.com Beautiful Downtown Triplex Two 2 bedroom units and one 1 bedroom; great rental history; great building on Historic Register with tons of character and in great shape! $359,500. 518 Alder porticorealestate.com 240-5227

Remarkably Cute 2039 South 10th West. 2 bedroom home on large lot very centrally located near Good Food Store, bike trails and schools. Full basement and single garage. $185,000. KD, Portico Real Estate, 240-5227 www.porticorealestate.com

Open & Light & Green & Clean Efficiency abounds in this 3 bed, 2.5 bath stand-alone super-insulated condo with heated floors and so much more. $250,000. 1530 S 12th W. Near Good Food Store and bike trails. 2405227. porticorealestate.com

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES

Townhome On The River Land Stewardship Program buyers must qualify.

1641 Stoddard To-be-built 6-plex on Northside. $650,500 Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties

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1847 West Central. 3 bed, 1.5 bath townhome with 2 car garage. No HOA fees. MLS #20121385. $158,500. Jake Booher, Prudential Missoula 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com 2025 Mullan Road. Mullan Heights Riverfront Condos. Large secure units with affordable HOA dues. Starting at $144,900. Betsy Milyard, Montana Preferred Properties. 880-4749. montpref@bigsky.net

MANUFACTURED HOMES

LAND FOR SALE

21079-

Rita Gray Lambros Real Estate ERA 406-544-4226 www.ritagray.com

26IWIVZI7X` XEQE]E$JWFQWPEGSQ

Chris & Vickie Honzel Partners For Life! Partners For You! Chris Honzel ABR GRI 11689 Stolen Rock Court, Frenchtown • $319,000

• 5 bed, 3 bath on over 3 acres • Great valley & mountain views

Mullan Heights Riverside Condos Starting at $144,900 • Large secure units with affordable HOA dues

406-544-8700 chrishonzel@lambrosera.com Vickie Honzel GRI CRS 406-531-2605

Over 19 Years Combined Real Estate Experience.

f i n d mi ssou l ah omes. com missoulanews.com • February 7 – February 14, 2013 [C11]


REAL ESTATE ANNIVERSARY 2 YEAR CELEBRATION!

FUELING-UP FOR THE FUTURE!

• Bring in ad with a pre-approval letter from a local lender. • Sign a buyer broker agreement. (3 Mo.) • You’ll receive a $20 gas card. Offer Expires 3/1/13

Jodie L Hooker, Owner • 406.721.1002 Representing Buyers Only MT@ZootownRE.com • ZootownRE.com

14205 Cambridge Road, Bonner. 4 bed, 4 bath on over 4 acres on Blackfoot River. Completely furnished. $695,000. Vickie & Chris Honzel, Lambros Real Estate 406531-2605. vickiehonzel@lambrosera.com 15305 Spring Hill Road, Frenchtown. Beautiful cedar 4 bed, 2.5 bath with 3 car garage & deck on acreage bordering Forest Service. $500,000. Robin Rice @ 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. 1978 Waters Edge, Bonner. 4 bed, 2.5 bath on 2.3 Blackfoot River acres. $444,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula 239-8350. shannon@prudentialmissoula.com 2351 Highway 83 West, Seeley Lake. 2 bed, 2 bath with basement & 2 car garage on 2.4 lakefront acres. $583,000. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula. 239-

8350. shannon@prudential missoulaproperties.com 3 Bdr, 2 Bath, Stevensville area home on 6+ acres. $339,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com 4 Bdr, 2 Bath Central Missoula home. $240,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

4 Bdr, 3 Bath Stevensville area home on 13 acres. $575,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, or visit www.mindypalmer.com

5340 Centauria, Florence. 4 bed, 3 bath tri-level on 5 acres. Fenced for horses, 2 car garage & fruit trees. $319,000. Tory Dailey, Lambros Real Estate 532-9229. tory@montana.com

45822 Meadowlark, Polson. 5 bed, 3 bath Lindal Cedar home on over 3 acres on 250 feet of Flathead Lake frontage. $1,600,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.com

Big Arm On Flathead Lake. 45765 Meadow Lake Lane. 6 bed, 4 bath with 3 car garage on lakefront acreage. Two additional homes included. MLS #20120312. $1,200,000. Jake Booher, Prudential Montana 544-6114. jbooher@montana.co

4100 Mullan Road #102 $124,900

THE UPTOWN FLATS 1 and 2 bedroom condos available

Efficiently designed main floor studio. Convenient location. Covered carport. Maintenance-free living. Clubhouse.

Units starting at

$149,900 Call Anne for more details

546-5816

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

Anne Jablonski annierealtor@gmail.com movemontana.com

theuptownflatsmissoula.com

"Pat was great. He made the whole process so easy and definitely looked out for our best interests when selling our home."

Pat McCormick Real Estate Broker Real Estate With Real Experience

–Kelsey & Kale

pat@properties2000.com 406-240-SOLD (7653)

Properties2000.com [C12] Missoula Independent • February 7 – February 14, 2013

For Sale: 3 bedroom home in Challis, ID. Huge lot, 3 car garage. Great hunting, fishing, skiing. $82,000. Call 208-3037533 anytime. Home On the River Stevensville River Road home on 1.87 acres. 4 bedrooms, views of the Bitterroot Mountains and right on the Bitterroot River. This is awesome! Attached garage plus detached RV garage. $340,000. KD 240-5227. porticorealestate.com


Missoula Independent  

Western Montana's weekly journal of people, politics and culture