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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 38 • Sept. 17–Sept. 24, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Wet weather washes out wildfire businesses Up Front: Local Lutherans wrestle with welcoming gay clergy Ochenski: PEER blasts Obama’s environmental record


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 38 • Sept. 17–Sept. 24, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Wet weather washes out wildfire businesses Up Front: Local Lutherans wrestle with welcoming gay clergy Ochenski: PEER blasts Obama’s environmental record


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Missoula Independent

Page 2 September 17–September 24, 2009


nside Cover Story

Cover by Kou Moua

Every year, traditional burials put an estimated 30 million board feet of casket wood, 1.6 million tons of concrete from burial vaults, more than 800,000 gallons of embalming fluid and 90,000 tons of steel from caskets into the ground. Whatever happened to just naturally returning to the earth?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Friday 9/18 9pm

Monkey Dance Real American Music

News

Letters Trapping, Tester and wilderness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Week in Review Griz win, Osprey win and Frost transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Briefs Sex help, courthouse help and farm land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Etc. Straight talk in short supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Up Front Local Lutherans wrestle with welcoming gay clergy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Up Front Unseasonable weather washes out wildfire businesses. . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ochenski PEER blasts Obama on environmental record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Writers on the Range New doc captures national parks’ natural beauty . . . . 11 Agenda Singing along with The Songs of Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Saturday 9/19 9pm

Tom Catmull & the Clerics Wednesday 9/23 8pm

Arts & Entertainment

Flash in the Pan Hen husbandry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 8 Days a Week Don’t forget to put roses on our (natural) grave . . . . . . . . . . 20 Mountain High Preparing for PEDal Fest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Scope Andrea Harsell finds her way with Rock & Roll Love Child . . . . . . . . . . 30 Noise The Moore Brothers, Jessica Kilroy, Fuzz Huzzi and Patrick Bloom . . . 31 Arts South African artist focuses on Helmville, Mont. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Film Clever animation can’t hide 9’s clichés . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Exclusives Street Talk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In Other News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Independent Personals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 The Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Free Will Astrolog y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

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PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold ADVERTISING & ADMIN COORDINATOR Hannah Smith CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

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Page 3 September 17–September 24, 2009


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Alex Sakariassen

Asked Tuesday afternoon near Nasir Abbas Jaffery’s jewelry stand on Higgins Avenue.

Q:

This week the Indy examines the trend of ecofriendly burial practices. What would you like done with your body when you die? Follow-up: Lightening things up a bit, what’s your favorite death-centric television show or movie?

Martha Buser: I’d like to be cremated and my ashes spread in the Pintler Mountains where I backpack. And if someone wants to hang on to part of me on a mantel, that’s fine. Morbid laughter: I’ve seen “Pushing Daisies.” I saw “Six Feet Under” in the first season and that was good. We’re all going to go, so we might as well have a good sense of humor about it.

Tyler Potts: I haven’t really given it a lot of thought, but I would say I’m definitely not opposed to cremation or some other noncasket type thing. Seems like a waste of space. Un-dead works, too: Shaun of the Dead. It’s great comedy. Blood and gore in a comedic sense is always good.

Erich Cervantes: To be completely honest with you, I think it’d be awesome if when I die my body was burned. No-nonsense TV: “Dead Like Me.” That is possibly one of the best shows out there, not because of it’s bleak outlook on life, but for it’s view that if you’re going to die from a falling piano today, you’re going to die.

A response to Tom Woodbury’s recent Writers on the Range column is in order (see “Unfair and outdated,” Sept. 10, 2009). You just have to love a person who is willing to spend other peoples’ money or stop other peoples’ activities, especially when they use shadows, halftruths (or less) and emotion instead of clarity or fact. With this in mind, let us examine the column. It says a hunting group, Montana Public Wildlife, Lands and Water is against trapping. Who is this group? The first 10 pages of a Google search fail to reveal the organization. The column also says many independent wildlife biologists agree that trapping threatens the survival of several species. Name “many” for me, please. Let me see their research. Let me read their conclusions. I could go on, but instead I would like to invite all who have not made up their minds and who like to use real information in their decision making to go to the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks website at fwp.mt.gov/trapping. Once there, go to the management heading and read “Trapping and Fur Bearer Management in North American Wildlife Conservation.” Please take note of the qualifications of the authors and reviewers, and weigh science and fact against the (non) information provided in the above noted article. Then please also weigh and question the statements from Footloose Montana. Lastly, do a little research into areas that have outlawed trapping. See for yourselves if there were any unintended consequences. I could tell you about some, like the man who was attacked by a raccoon in Seattle, but I think it would mean more if you found the truth for yourself. Rick Hawk Kalispell

Don’t sweat small stuff

Diane Delong: I guess I’ve never thought too much about it. Probably just a basic burial. Touchdowns over tragedy: I’d probably prefer something more comedic, but I usually just watch sports.

Missoula Independent

Trappers fight back

While walking by a newsstand on campus last week, a headline jumped off the page at me from the Sept. 3 issue of the Independent, “Tester bill may rewrite the book on wilderness.” I wasn’t sure what it was getting at, so I flipped to page eight. I found a piece dwelling on minuscule suggestions from the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act concerning sheep grazing and infrequent helicopter uses. What about the bigger picture? The Wilderness Act was passed in 1964, which lead to the RARE (Roadless Area Review and Evaluation) process to

recommend public lands for Wilderness designation. Following on the heels of RARE II starting in 1979, former Rep. Pat Williams worked to pass multiple wilderness bills for Montana, one of which was passed by both the House and Senate and then vetoed by President Reagan in 1988. This was the last time that a Montana wilderness bill was proposed by Congress. Twenty-one years ago! In the past, Montanans have led the way with wildland protection. America’s first Wilderness was “The Bob” in our own backyard. “The Rattlesnake” was a model for community designated wilder-

“ I could tell

you about some,

like the man that was attacked by a raccoon in Seattle, but I think it would mean more if you found the truth for

yourself.

ness as well as cooperative multi-use areas. Now is the time for Montana to once again show the nation how it’s done! Tester’s bill aims to work as a community collaborative. This bill truly reaches across the proverbial aisle designating large tracts of permanent wilderness, as well as releasing some areas (tied up in bureaucracy since RARE II) to timber harvest (creating important jobs), and designating funds from stewardship contracts back to much needed restoration projects. “War of words” seems to imply that there is a fissure between the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act and environmentalists like myself. With support from conservation groups such as Trout Unlimited, the National Wildlife Federation, the Montana Wilderness Association and the Wilderness Society, I beg to differ. If anything, this bill is a

solution to many of the fissures that have kept Montanans from working together on public lands management for far too long. I fully support Tester’s efforts, and encourage other Missoulians to do the same. Sarah Red-Laird Missoula

Happy anniversary On Thursday, Sept. 3, the Independent published an article on the first wilderness bill to be introduced in Montana in 15 years (see “War of words”). The article focused on allowances for military training and motorized use for sheep grazing in two proposed areas. What the article failed to mention is that September 3 was the 45th anniversary of the day that President Lyndon Johnson signed the Wilderness Act into law. When that extraordinary piece of legislation arrived on President Johnson’s desk, it had already been through an 8-year legislative process that produced 66 drafts of the original bill. The first sponsor of the Wilderness Act in the Senate was Hubert Humphrey, a Democrat from Minnesota. The man who finally carried the bill through the House was Pennsylvania Republican John Saylor. After many compromises on all sides, a final version of the bill passed the House 374–1 and was eventually approved by a unanimous voice vote in the Senate. All told, more than a decade of collaboration between diverse interests was required to pass the original Wilderness Act. While this part of the wilderness story is rarely told, Montanans have not forgotten that it takes years of cooperation and creativity to make our forests work for everyone. Sen. Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act represents years of grassroots organizing and countless kitchen table conversations. It puts all the pieces together: harvesting timber at sustainable levels and funding habitat restoration through timber sales, while conserving wild country for our children and grandchildren. For these reasons, the forest bill is supported by statewide and national wilderness groups, Montana timber mills and local snowmobile clubs right here in Missoula County. In fact, new polling shows that 70 percent of Montanans are backing the bill. This kind of broad support is hard to conjure, but the Wilderness Act had it 45 years ago and Tester’s forest bill has it today. Gabriel Furshong Missoula

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L

Page 4 September 17–September 24, 2009


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Missoula Independent

Page 5 September 17–September 24, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

• Wednesday, September 9

News Quirks by Anne Medley

Frenchtown’s Shannon L. Lange, 31, rams his truck into Brian Doty’s truck at the Alcan Bar & Grill, then shoots a round into Doty’s hood. Lange, who was upset about Doty dating Lange’s stepsister, is later arrested and charged with criminal mischief and two counts of assault with a weapon.

• Thursday, September 10 UM grad and Rep. Denny Rehberg staffer Dustin Frost transfers from Kalispell Regional Medical Center to Community Medical Center in Missoula to begin rehabilitation. Frost sustained a severe head injury in an Aug. 27 motorboat crash on Flathead Lake that sent all five passengers—including Rehberg—to the hospital.

• Friday, September 11 Butte, America, the story of the hard rock mining town, debuts at Missoula’s Wilma Theatre. The film, produced and directed by Missoula filmmaker Pamela Roberts, sells out and includes an intro and outro by former congressman—and former Butte resident—Pat Williams.

• Saturday, September 12 The Montana Grizzlies secure a 17–10 victory over the UC Davis Aggies at Aggie Stadium when, in the waning seconds, Griz cornerback Trumaine Johnson out-jumps Davis receiver Chris Carter in the end zone to grab his second interception of the game. The Griz return home to face Portland State on Saturday.

• Sunday, September 13 Missoula’s ultimate Ultimate team, the Mental Toss Flycoons, wins the 2009 Big Sky Club Mixed Sectionals at Fort Missoula Fields, qualifying the team for the regional tournament in Salt Lake City, Utah, which begins Oct. 3.

• Monday, September 14 The Missoula Osprey rally back from deficits of 5–0 and 7–2 to win the deciding divisional playoff game against the Great Falls Voyagers, 16-7. The victory puts the Osprey in the Pioneer League Championship against the Orem Owlz later this week.

• Tuesday, September 15 Montana’s first-ever fair-chase wolf hunting season opens at sunrise in three districts in the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex and in the Beartooth Wilderness bordering Yellowstone National Park. Wolf hunting in the rest of the state opens Oct. 25.

Eileen Rouns, a nurse at St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, pays tribute to her sister during the Sept. 12 Out of the Darkness community walk. The inaugural event benefits the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Sex

The birds and the bees A whip hangs from a slab of brown bark, its tassels pointing toward the floor, at Missoula’s new sexual health collaborative, Birds & Bees. It’s just one example of how this business is a little different. “It’s a workout facility for your sexuality,” says Lindsey Doe, a clinically trained sexologist, of her East Broadway office overlooking the Clark Fork River. A giant stuffed pink vulva with sparkly satin lips sits in another room slated for support groups and workshops on intimacy, fellatio and even celibacy. “We want to have things for people who don’t want to have sex, and for people who want to have outrageous sex,” says Birds & Bees Manager Rachel Wanderscheid. Doe says it’s easy to get mixed up in a culture that sends confusing messages about sex. The collaborative aims to provide a safe space to explore that culture, offering counseling as well as sex toys for sale. Sample items: body friendly

wooden dildos shellacked and sanded for safety, and locally made harnesses. As one wanders through the collaborative, a black high-heeled shoe shines atop a bookshelf next to a stack of handkerchiefs. The handkerchiefs are used for a “hanky code,” which signals, depending on color and pocket selection, one’s sexual taste. For instance, light blue in the right back pocket implies the person is an expert in oral sex, says Doe. On Wednesdays, the collaborative will host “Hump Date with Dr. Doe.” Cuddling, aphrodisiacs and intimacy are all slated for discussion. Birds & Bees will also offer a men’s talk group, a book-lending library and “sex-positive” massage therapy, which doesn’t include actual sex. “They don’t have to worry about having an erection in a session,” Doe explains. Birds & Bees officially launches with a Sept. 24 open house, and Doe’s hoping the collaborative will enlighten more than a few locals. “Most people don’t even realize that [sex] could be better,” she says, “or it could be different.” Jessica Mayrer

Wilderness

Montana’s place in “Big W” As debate over Sen. Jon Tester’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act continues, acclaimed environmental author Rod Nash–set to speak on the definition of wilderness in Hamilton Sept. 19–sits more or less in the bleachers, not fully engaged in the discussion. Yet he offers helpful insight on Montana’s place in the broader context of “Big W.” “Wilderness and national parks aren’t about beauty in the sense that a garden is or a park is,” Nash says from his home in Crested Butte, Colo., which he’s quick to mention lies within eight miles of five wilderness areas. “They’re about wildness, they’re about self-willed places and self-willed processes and species that should be left alone by human beings out of the interest of sharing the planet with other inhabitants of spaceship Earth.” Nash’s credentials lend him a certain authority on matters of the wild. Outside magazine hailed his 1967 book Wilderness and the American Mind as one of the “ten books that

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 September 17–September 24, 2009

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

changed our world.” The avid outdoorsman is also an active member of the advisory board for nonprofit Wilderness Watch. While avoiding specifics, Nash did speak generally about the Tester bill, mentioning the historic weight of vague and misleading language. Sloppy phrasing, Nash says, can undermine the proposal’s goals. “If language creates some loopholes that people think permit them to go in and do some things in [wilderness], it violates the basic concept of wilderness, which is to leave the land self-willed,” Nash says. As for logging mandates requiring the harvest of 70,000 designated acres over a decade, Nash says such language is “rare” in wilderness legislation, especially if drafters seek to “toe the line” from the 1964 Wilderness Act. As the debate continues, Nash boils his advice for Montana’s wilderness legislation down to one word: restraint. “Have the courage to say that there should be places in Montana that are not about us, that are not about our economy, that are not about our recreation, that are not about our pleasure, that are not about our scenic values,” he says. “Have the courage to back off and let some parts of the wild world be unmodified and do their own thing.” Alex Sakariassen

Bitterroot

Emergency renovations Two different renovation projects in the Ravalli County Courthouse basement have soothed a number of concerns in the county seat, including wasted tax dollars and a dangerously cramped 911 Dispatch Center. Joanna Hamilton, 911 dispatch director, says her staff is preparing to move into a newly remodeled corner of the basement by early October. The $831,500 project increased the dispatch center’s space from 454 square feet to nearly 2,000 square feet. “One thing I like is the fact that we’ll have natural lighting in there,” Hamilton says. As contentious as the center’s lack of windows was in the past, the lack of a security system until now remains a larger point of concern. Hamilton says the center has always operated without a security system, opening the door for potentially dangerous situations. “Sometimes we didn’t know who we were

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

letting into the building,” Hamilton says. “Even though they told us who they were and where they work, we had no way to verify that.” Elsewhere in the courthouse basement, maintenance supervisor Brian Jameson received the green light to repair a worn pump system and leaking sewage line, solving longstanding concerns over potential flooding. First on Jameson’s list is a cracked sewage line. Overactive pumping in the sewage system has driven energy expenses up throughout the summer. Jameson says Pioneer Sewer and Drain

Cleaning of Missoula will repair the line this week. The bigger issue lies in a stock of worn sump tanks that pump unnecessary amounts of water at all hours during peak groundwater elevation. “I’m estimating [savings of] $3,000 to $5,000 a year in not having to pump those pumps as often as we have,” Jameson says. The spacious new dispatch and preventative flood improvements have smoothed almost all the ruffled feathers in the courthouse. Almost. “Of course, it would have been nice to have our own building,” Hamilton says. “But…” Alex Sakariassen

Development

Builders belly up Over the last couple years, as local policymakers have emphasized the importance of preserving agricultural land in the Missoula Valley in the face of rapid development, a fundamen-

Agenda

News Quirks

tal question keeps stumping them: What does it mean to mitigate for the loss of ag land? The Missoula Building Industry Association (MBIA) and the Missoula Organization of Realtors (MOR), two groups that have pushed back as agricultural values have come to influence the subdivision review process, hope to find an answer. In June they put out a Request for Proposal (RFP) to consultants to complete a study on the “legal, scientific, and economic issues surrounding the preservation of agricultural land, land-use planning, and local food production.” The groups have raised about $30,000 for the study so far, and according to MBIA Executive Officer Tiffany Williams, they’re close to hiring Bill VanCanagan of the Missoula law firm Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind. “We want to start seeing policymakers make decisions based on facts, and not on assumptions,” says Williams. She expects the report to be finalized by the end of the year. But the RFP includes a stipulation that casts doubt over the groups’ objectivity. It says they “reserve the right to accept a proposal that they deem is in the best interests of the named organizations and to reject any proposals that they deem not in the best interests of the named organizations.” “Hopefully what they mean by that,” says Paul Hubbard of the Community Food & Agriculture Coalition, “is, ‘Boy, we better protect real estate values and start looking at the way residential sprawl is not just decimating our farm and ranch land, but potentially compromising property values and the reasons why people want to live here.’” Hubbard, however, isn’t banking on it. “Whether or not this report will be just one more way to prop up the status quo development patterns that are plowing through rural communities and plowing through our longterm food security,” he continues, “I think we have yet to see.” Williams says the MBIA and MOR will stand by whatever the study determines. “If whatever comes back from the study is something that may not on the surface seem friendly toward the development community, we’re not going to reject that,” she says. “We want to know answers.” Matthew Frank

BY THE NUMBERS

40,700

Rounds of ammunition former Ravalli County Sheriff ’s Sgt. Jeff Fowler stole from the department this spring. According to charging documents released last Friday, Fowler sold or traded much of the ammo, making more than $8,090.

etc.

Straight answers can be hard to come by these days. Conjecture, bullish commentary and spin appear in spades, but unadorned facts? Not so much. Take the maddeningly slow investigation of state Sen. Greg Barkus’ Aug. 27 motorboat crash on Flathead Lake. The incident—which sent Barkus, U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg and three other passengers to the hospital—has yet to be fully explained by authorities. Flathead County Attorney Ed Corrigan said he has reason to believe Barkus was drinking before operating the boat, but didn’t elaborate. Rehberg said he never saw Barkus take a sip of alcohol, but he wasn’t exactly eyeing Barkus’ every move. Just this week, Flathead County District Judge Katherine Curtis said records of the investigation must remain sealed, meaning rampant speculation will only continue. Other examples abound. Sen. Max Baucus’ long slog through health care reform has included so many conflicting messages about what would and wouldn’t be included—and why or why not—that hardly anyone knows what’s even being reformed. When Baucus finally revealed his plan Wednesday morning, the White House could only muster a lukewarm response, calling the 223-page proposal “positive.” Even Sen. Jon Tester’s recent Forest Jobs and Recreation Act has opened itself to criticism following a lack of clear answers. In the back and forth between those who are proud of its long-awaited wilderness designations and commitment to forest jobs, and those angered by its unprecedented provisions and lack of public input, little actual constructive dialogue has occurred. One side only hears whiney complaints, while the other tires of echoed talking points. It’d be easy to sit back and call this politics as usual. Perhaps we should expect such nebulous arguments and doublespeak. But that fallback becomes harder to lean on when better examples emerge. Last week we were introduced to a new website created by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes for the sole purpose of dispelling untruths about life on the reservation. TheRezWeLiveOn.org doesn’t just refute common misperceptions, but does so with plainspoken, concise and often entertaining animated video responses. Do American Indians receive free health care? Do the federal and state government hand each tribal member a huge check every month? The answers couldn’t be clearer. “Things are so casually repeated and people hear them often enough that they start to believe that these mistruths must be true,” says Communications Director Rob McDonald, who hatched the idea for the site. “I figured all we needed was a way to present the facts and engage everyone in a dialogue.” Those are two simple lessons that today’s politicians should learn to follow.

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Page 7 September 17–September 24, 2009


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Questions of faith Local Lutherans wrestle with welcoming gay clergy by Jessica Mayrer

Featured Artist: Before graduating from divinity school in 1983, Dan Spencer wanted to be a pastor. But as a gay man, he decided to choose a different path. “The only option would have been to go back in the closet and lie,” says Spencer, who now works as an assistant professor in the University of Montana’s environmental studies program.

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Missoula Independent

And Crist reminds conservative Lutherans that women used to be prohibited from speaking in church. Now, women have assumed leadership roles. “Low and behold, there’s one that’s a bishop,” Crist says. She’s the first female to assume the role in the state. John Lund from the Emmaus Campus Ministry in Missoula says the debate among Lutherans will only make the church stronger. The important thing is that congregations don’t fracture and continue to work together. “We continue to listen to each other and to share a pew next to each other,” Lund says. “I see that as a strength of ours.” The struggles within the Lutheran church are not uncommon. The Episcopal Church ruled a few weeks prior to the ELCA to allow gays in comPhoto by Anne Medley mitted relationships to serve as clergy, a move that University of Montana assistant professor Dan Spencer says the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America’s recent decision to allow gays and lesbians in com- angered more conservative Anglicans. The Presbyterian mitted relationships to serve as clergy will ease homophobia. Church has also discussed During his time at Union Theological Lutheran Church. “For us, it is clear in the a similar policy. The United Methodist Seminary in New York, Spencer says he scriptures that homosexuality is a sin.” Church, meanwhile, has moved in the Hasselbrook’s church is part of the opposite direction, reinforcing its oppoencountered a large number of gay classmates. But despite he and his colleague’s 2.4-million member Missouri synod, sition to gay clergy. “This seems to be an interesting devotion to their faith, Christianity’s which is not a part of the ELCA. The long-held stance against same-sex cou- Lutheran Church’s second largest body, border crossing,” says Casey Charles, a ples kept them alienated as “second-hand the Missouri synod sticks to a literal inter- UM English professor who teaches courses in gay and lesbian studies. “The pretation of the Bible. citizens” who were “sick.” “Basically, we believe the Bible is the church is one of the last great bastions “Our straight friends could go on and serve the church, whereas gay folks word of God,” Hasselbrook said. “It does- of homophobia.” Charles believes that as more churchcouldn’t” says Spencer, who now attends n’t contain any errors.” Pastor Justin Cloute from Missoula’s es continue to recalibrate their moral Our Savior’s Lutheran Church in Bonner. Mt. Zion Church, part of the Wisconsin compass, and more gay leaders emerge “The churches have lagged behind.” evangelical synod, also sticks to a literal within congregations, those borders will But those old views are changing. In late August, the 4.7-million mem- interpretation of the Bible. While he fall. “That kind of contact and exposure ber Evangelical Lutheran Church in expresses worry about his views being America (ELCA) voted to allow gays and labeled as hateful, he says the “true becomes a way to break down prejulesbians in committed relationships to church” has often stood against prevail- dice,” he says. Spencer couldn’t agree more. serve as clergy. The ECLA—the nation’s ing social forces and defended its beliefs. “I think that I can say something is Although he didn’t pursue a career seventh largest Christian church— reached the decision after seven years of not right but still love the person,” Cloute within the ELCA, he was eventually study and deliberations. Despite the says. “I think that is a way of actually lov- ordained by the United Church of Christ, a socially liberal institution wellengthy debate, local Lutherans say the ing the person.” The literal interpretation of the Bible coming gay and lesbian clergy. As switch is causing some consternation doesn’t hold water for Lutherans who Spencer sees more mainline religions among congregations. “The emotions are running really agree with the ELCA decision. Pastor accept non-traditional unions, he high,” says Rev. Jessica Crist, bishop of Chris Flohr from Missoula’s St. Paul believes society will have fewer excuses Lutheran Church points out that the Old to bar equality. Montana’s ELCA synod. The Montana synod comprises 149 Testament says adulterers should be “I’m delighted,” he says. “I think it congregations (including four in stoned by mobs. will really help.” Wyoming) and 181 pastors. Following the “Well, who does that anymore?” he jmayrer@missoulanews.com ELCA’s vote, individual congregations will asks.

Page 8 September 17–September 24, 2009

decide if they want gay or lesbian pastors. Crist is currently meeting at churches across the state to air out concerns and says, so far, many pastors are on board with the new policy. Conservative Lutherans are a different story. “They are disregarding God’s word,” says Pastor David Hasselbrook from Missoula’s 120-member Messiah


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Snuffed out Wet weather washes away wildfire business by Matthew Frank

A recent post from Columbia Falls popped up on Craigslist.org, offering to sell $12,000 worth of firefighting gear: a 225-gallon tank with an engine and pump, plus all the hoses, nozzles, increasers, reducers, adaptors, Pulaskis, hard hats and Nomex clothing you’d need to snuff out a blaze. “I just realized it’s not worth hanging on to this stuff if no fires were going to happen,” says Ryan Wickland, who’s

“I’ve been working in the woods since ’95,” Wickland says, “and with fire—with not knowing if it’s going to happen and with the way the business was with forestry work and how that slowed down to a dead stop—I went to my backup career, which has been a mechanic. So I started an all-Subaru repair shop. And I’m busy as all get-out.” Others haven’t been able to keep so busy. Missoula-based Big Sky Mobile

tracts with the Forest Service. Over the last three years it’s received nothing, according to USAspending.gov. Missoula’s Crown Beverage supplies fire camps with bottles of water. In 2006 and 2007, it had Forest Service contracts worth $57,026. The last two years, not a dime, says owner Clancy Kenck. And then there are the firefighters themselves. Smokejumper Seth Hansen says he and his colleagues rely heavily on overtime pay. “And that ends up being a lot of work and a lot of extra money,” he says. But this year Hansen expects to earn about 250—300 hours’ worth of overtime pay, compared to the 900—1000 hours’ worth he’s pocketed in the past. One of the few fire-dependent businesses that appears to have weathered Montana’s rainy weather is Missoula’s Neptune Aviation Services. The company, which has earned almost $96 million in Forest Service contracts over the last 10 years, Photo by Anne Medley counted all nine of its air tankers in action last week, Missoula-based smokejumper Dan Cottrell peers into the fuselage of a plane including six fighting fires in that’s been largely idle this summer. “I’ve been fighting fires since ’95, and this California. is the slowest season I’ve been around,” he says. “It’s business as usual,” says fought fires for more than a decade but Catering, which dispatches mobile information officer Mike Pfau. State agencies are also breathing counts this past fire season as his last. kitchens to fire camps around Montana “Might as well just get rid of it and get and the West, saw a significant drop in easy. Montana State Forester Bob Harrington says the Department of out of it. But it sounds like a lot of peo- business this summer. ple are going to be getting out of it, too.” “We have three kitchens,” says co- Natural Resources and Conservation will Wickland, 35, started Glacier owner Greg Watkiss, “and typically we likely spend no more than $4 million this Forestry in 2005. He bought the equip- may be out on average anywhere from season, well below the average over the ment and hired six employees to fight 50 to 75 days a year. And this year we’ve last 10 years of about $20 million. It the increasingly intense forest fires and had only two kitchens go out, both of means there’ll be plenty left in the $40 reduce fuels around the scores of resi- which were out for about seven days. million fire suppression account the Legislature created in 2007. dences sprouting up in the Flathead That kind of gives you an idea.” “There was every likelihood when Valley ’s wildland-urban interface. Watkiss’ company relies on conNeither trend, it seemed, would stop. tracts with the U.S. Forest Service. Since that account was created that if we had But then Wickland’s business plan, like 2000 it’s done more than $53 million another season like ’06 or ’07 that we that of so many other western Montana worth of work for the agency, including could’ve burned through that money in entrepreneurs who over the last several more than $23 million during the his- one fire season,” Harrington says. “But years saw opportunity in wildfire, was toric summer of 2003, according to fig- as it is now…we’re going to be able to washed out with unseasonably wet ures from USAspending.gov. But those go into next season with a fair amount of weather. contracts only get paid when the work reserves.” But, as Montanans well know, the In Missoula, for example, more than is performed. three inches of rain fell in August, the “We get no stand-by wage, no subsis- landscape could change as quickly as the second wettest August on record. As of tence—whatever you want to call it— local weather. “It’s a natural cycle,” Wickland says. September 15, only 33,303 acres have from the federal government at all,” “People got all hot and heavy after the burned in the state, according to the Watkiss says. Northern Rockies Coordination Center. Boom and bust, he says, is the ’03 fires, they all put their contracts in and everybody and their brother got That’s compared to an average of nature of the business. 417,865 acres over the last 10 years. “You just have to look at the aver- involved with it. And now there’s nothMost western Montanans welcome the ages, look at the numbers, and go from ing for anybody. So it’s really going to be a huge year to see what happens. occasional shower during summer’s there,” he says. swelter—and the lack of smoke. But for a W h i t e f i s h ’ s R o c k y M o u n t a i n Everybody’s telling me they’re just going number of people whose livelihoods Transportation often supplies buses to to get out.” depend on fire season, the rain means transport firefighters. Since 2000, the mfrank@missoulanews.com earnings quickly dry up. business earned $508,335 worth of con-

Missoula Independent

Page 9 September 17–September 24, 2009


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Natural disaster PEER blasts Obama for neglecting the environment

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When Republican Congressman Joe Wilson yelled out, “You lie!” during President Obama’s speech last week, Democrats were outraged at the insult and the break from congressional protocol. Wilson was referring to Obama’s remark that no illegal aliens would be covered under the health care reform measures now moving through Congress. But this week, Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) launched a campaign called “Obama Watch—Change We Still Need” to track Obama’s actions, or lack thereof, on protecting the environment. And while they’re not saying the president lied about his commitment to the environment, the record so far is not encouraging. No one would deny it’s been a tough couple months for President Obama. The August congressional recess saw throngs of harsh critics storm town hall meetings to protest his efforts to reform the nation’s health care system. Then came the bad news from the top generals on the war in Afghanistan, putting the president in a tough spot trying to decide if continuing George Bush’s war is worth it or not—and so far, he hasn’t made that call. This week his speech on banking and investment regulatory reform was laughed at by financial experts when Obama threatened no more taxpayer bail-outs for Wall Street—a threat they say he will never be able to carry out. It would be nice to predict that Obama’s stormy waters will calm in the near future, but that doesn’t look like it’s in the cards, either. Sen. Max Baucus’ health reform bill looks to be a loser that will anger the president’s supporters while doing little to mollify his critics. To make matters even worse on the international war front, United States forces launched a helicopter and special forces attack in Somalia this week, bringing the U.S. into yet another sphere of deadly conflict and sparking grim memories of our last major effort there—the tragedy of Mogadishu so vividly portrayed in the movie Black Hawk Down. The attack, which killed a leader of the al-Shabab group, has already been met with vows of harsh retaliation from its members. Now, with a plate overflowing with problems and nearly empty of solutions, the Obama administration faces criticism from a credible group of retired and current federal employees who say the president is failing to address serious environmental issues that threaten the longterm health of the nation. The opening paragraph to the Obama Watch site (www.peer.org) is pretty damning: “A visitor to the White House website for information about

Page 10 September 17–September 24, 2009

eco-policies will not find an ‘agenda’ for the environment. Instead, the category is ‘Energy & Environment’ and that ordering appears intentional. Other than curbing greenhouse gases, there is no mention of environmental priorities such as safeguarding clean water, reducing pollution threats to public health, conserving wildlife and protecting vital habitat, averting collapse of marine fisheries, or ending abuse of public lands through practices ranging from mountaintop removal to overgrazing.”

The group “ goes on to list a number of areas of concern, including coal, climate change, oil and gas, mining, oceans, forestry, endangered species, parks and refuges, toxics, appointees and

whistleblowers.

Indeed, the group goes on to list a number of areas of concern, including coal, climate change, oil and gas, mining, oceans, forestry, endangered species, parks and refuges, toxics, appointees and whistleblowers. Each section contains examples of what is or isn’t happening in regards to both environmental urgency and promises Obama made while campaigning. The coal section, for instance, notes “central to the Obama energy program is an embrace of more coal” and continues “the Obama team has backed away from promises to restrain the environmental damage wreaked by mountaintop removal coal mining” and “delays taking action to address toxic coal combustion wastes.” On climate change, PEER says, “Obama has embraced a watered-down climate change bill that Dr. Jim Hansen and other experts warn will do too little too late” by using what they call an “unworkable and unenforceable” cap-

and-trade approach. Their contention is bolstered by two German ships that, just last week, made the first historic passage through the Northeast Passage from South Korea along Russia’s Arctic coast to Siberia—a route now possible only due to severe melting of the Arctic ice cap. The group outlines a number of concerns with oil and gas development, including approval of a pipeline to bring Canadian oil sands, what they call “the most environmentally destructive petroleum extraction sources,” to U.S. refineries. There’s also the administration’s defense of a Bush plan to lease Colorado’s Roan Plateau for drilling and the “drill, baby, drill” plan that leaves “no part of the Outer Continental Shelf or the domestic U.S. off-limits to petroleum production.” Nor did the administration object to an Army Corps of Engineers permit that “allows a gold mine to dump its wastes into Alaska’s Lower Slate Lake, killing all its aquatic life” while “allowing Bush permits for destructive fish farming in the Gulf of Mexico to go into effect.” Add to that the administration’s approval of the “first ever timber sale in a roadless area of Alaska’s Tongass National Forest,” issuing rules forbidding use of the Endangered Species Act to address habitat loss, “like the shrinking ice shelves on which polar bears depend.” There’s also the planting of genetically modified crops on National Wildlife Refuges, and “ducking the problem of growing water pollution from oil fracking chemicals and coal-bed methane gas operations.” The group also nails a handful of top level Obama environmental appointees for their “horrid records” and, on an issue near and dear to PEER’s heart, outlines a number of Obama’s failures to keep his campaign promises to strengthen whistleblower protections when politics trumps policy in government agencies. All in all, it’s a bleak assessment of what we had hoped would be a new era of environmental awareness from the young Obama presidency. Even worse, this is just the start of the “Obama Watch” on the environment. There’s no doubt President Obama has his plate full of thorny issues. But neither this country nor its citizens can survive without the healthy environment he promised us. Holding him accountable to those promises, as PEER is doing, is absolutely the right thing to do. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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Still our best idea New doc captures our national parks’ natural beauty by Ray Ring

Dayton Duncan was an impressionable 9-year-old when he made his first journey into the West’s national parks. There, he had the kind of life-changing experience that many people have enjoyed in the parks. Beginning Sept. 27, his fascination will pay off in 12 hours of evocative public television, exploring how land conservation is often inspired by personal passion. Duncan’s adventure began in 1959, when he went on a family car trip from his Iowa home. He and his parents and 12-year-old sister roamed the Badlands of South Dakota and saw the beautiful Grand Teton and Rocky Mountain parks. In a desert canyon in Dinosaur National Monument, part of the parks system, he slept on a Green River sandbar. Arriving in Yellowstone a couple of days after an earthquake killed 28 people, he saw how the lethal mudslides had created a shimmering new lake. It was the only significant vacation Duncan had while growing up—his family wasn’t well off—and he says it forged “a very powerful emotional connection” between him and the parks. The memories lingered even as he went east for college, settled in New Hampshire and worked as a staffer for Democratic Party leaders. Eventually he shifted to writing books and documentary films, often working with a neighbor, Ken Burns, the leading public-TV investigator of our national history. Duncan has collaborated with Burns on wide-ranging documentaries whose subjects include the Civil War, baseball and jazz. But Duncan remained fascinated with the West. He wrote at least six books on the region as well as the script for Burns’ blow-by-blow account of the Lewis and Clark expedition. And he was co-writer of “The West,” Burns’ sweeping 12-hour series on the Europeanimmigrant takeover and its toll on Native Americans.

For the last 11 years, off and on, Duncan has been working on a documentary series on the history of the park system, or as Duncan describes it, “the arc of the national park idea, which began in the West.” He enlisted Burns and, for six years, they’ve been filming “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea,” ranging from Florida to Alaska with major stops in the iconic Western parks. They highlight many historical photos and figures, including Wallace Stegner, the Western writer who coined the “best idea” phrase. Yet their findings about the West’s conservation politics are still relevant these days. As Duncan says in an interview, this “uniquely American idea” took

“Europe may

have had the

Parthenon and the Louvre, but our nation specializes in spectacular

natural scenery.

hold first in the West, with the establishment of Yellowstone in 1872, because our region had the wildest remaining landscapes. It came from a combination of early enthusiasts such as John Muir in Yosemite, crass business interests including railroads hoping to benefit from tourist traffic, and national pride: Europe may have had

the Parthenon and the Louvre, but our nation specializes in spectacular natural scenery. The idea behind it all was democratic: Congress and presidents would preserve the parks for the general public. Even so, locals often objected, fearing the parks meant too much federal control. Duncan sums up the stages: “Local resistance at first, then grudging acceptance, then, as Arizona did with the Grand Canyon, they put it on the license plates.” “People from all walks of life fought long, lonely and difficult battles” to establish parks, Duncan says. They include George Melendez Wright, a Hispanic naturalist who spent four years in the 1930s driving 11,000 miles assessing wildlife in Western parks. He pushed park managers to stop killing predators and feeding garbage to bears, to “preserve wildlife in (a) natural state.” The park idea has become popular: Yellowstone set a record with 900,515 visitors in July alone. Modern threats include uranium mining in Grand Canyon’s watershed and the slaughter of Yellowstone bison that stray onto national forest land. Duncan says he revisits Western parks frequently with his wife, Dianne, and their two children, repeating the “formative experience” he had as a kid. Many families do the same intergenerational handoff, he says. Parks are a touchstone, landscapes preserved as well as possible even as the rest of the world is wrenched by all kinds of changes. But conservation doesn’t just happen, Duncan concludes; it requires advocacy year after year. Ray Ring is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). He is the magazine’s senior editor in Missoula.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 September 17–September 24, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

It’s no joke that sprawl, energy development and climate change could radically alter the pristine landscape we call home. That’s not a good thing, and the members of the Montana Wildlife Federation and International Wildlife Film Festival and Media Center have decided to take action. With an eye toward preservation of the land, they recently teamed up for Montana Matters, a fundraising campaign intended to raise awareness about the importance of protecting state wildlands from decimation. They aim to do this through education and advocacy, among other avenues. The inaugural effort recently kicked off with a benefit CD compilation titled Songs of Montana. Now the groups bring those tunes—and the people who perform them—to the Wilma Theatre with the “Songs of Montana: Benefit Concert and Jam

The Songs of Montana: Benefit Concert and Jam Session is Fri., Sept. 18, at 7 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $15 general/$10 students/$50 for a reserved seat and access to the pre-show reception. Tickets available at the Roxy Theatre, Rockin Rudy’s and www.griztix.com. Call 728-9380

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 17

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 21

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. The hospice utilizes health care professionals and trained volunteers to provide care. Call Lois at 642-3010.

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

Don't get caught with the flu, especially the swine flu. Take some preventative measures by getting a flu shot at the Missoula City-County Health Department, 301 W. Alder St., from 10 AM–4:30 PM Mon.–Fri. $25 adults/$14 children, 6 months through 18 years. Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP insurance accepted with appropriate cards. Call 258-3600. You think you have what it takes to start your own nonprofit organization, even though Missoula has over 1,200 of them? See if you have the muster during Nonprofit Basics, a discussion by consultant Peter Bensen from 11:30 AM–1 PM at Mountain West Bank, 3301 Great Northern Ave. $10/free for members of Missoula Nonprofit Network. If you'd like to lend a hand in offering support to victims of domestic and sexual violence, you might want to head over to a volunteer orientation for Missoula's YWCA, which occurs from 5:30–7 PM and again on Sat., Sept. 19, from 10 AM–noon at the YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free. Call 543-6691.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 18 Help keep babies healthy by "doing time" in a mock jail during the Missoula Jail and Bail for Healthy Babies, a March of Dimes Fundraiser at Jakers Bar & Grill, 3515 Brooks St., starting at 11 AM. Free. Call 252-7480 or e-mail kruff@marchofdimes.com.

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 19 Those suffering from long-term illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana's Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Simple Writing, Creative Phrases” with Amy Kalil and Lori Mitchell. Donations appreciated, as is registration. Call 5495329 or visit www.livingartofmontana.org. Summer in Missoula is probably the best time to travel around on a bike. If you don't have one already, you'll be able to make your own recycled bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Saturdays at 2:30 PM. Call 800-809-0112.

Session” on Friday night. The lineup features a who’s-who of local singer-songwriters, with pitch-perfect nature lovers like Shane Clouse, Tom Catmull, John Floridis, Jack Gladstone, Jessica Kilroy and Bob Wire. Certainly other fundraisers in Missoula benefit the environment, but few work in concert with such a top-shelf collection of musical talent. —Ira Sather-Olson

If you're a woman and you'd like to help empower other women ages 9–18, and create positive change in their lives, consider becoming a volunteer for GUTS! during a training session tonight or Sept. 23 from 6–9 PM at Missoula's YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-6691 or download an app at www.ywcaofmissoula.org. If you've recently had a brain injury, join others with the Missoula Brain Injury Support Group which meets at a new location this month, Room 113 of UM's Skaggs Building, at 6:30 PM in order to tour UM's New Directions Wellness facility. Free. Call Jim Mickelson at 544-6629. Make your impassioned point in whatever rented costume most fits the bill when the Missoula City Council meets—as they do the first four Mondays of every month, holidays excluded—at 7 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Call 552-6080.

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 22 If you've been stricken with a bout of upper or lower extremity paralysis, and you're a senior, head down to the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., from 9–11:30 AM for a rehab workshop hosted by St. Patrick Hospital and UM's New Directions Wellness Center. Free. Call 543-7154. While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 25 years of age, their Meals on Wheels program serves a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you'd like—and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement—from Mon.–Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Missoula's YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 September 17–September 24, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Max D. Hinton, 21, was interviewing for a job with the Montgomery, Ala., police when he volunteered that he possessed child pornography and had sex with an underage girl. An investigation led to a trial, a conviction and a 30-year prison sentence but no explanation why Hinton mentioned the pornography. When a sheriff’s deputy in Dodge County, Neb., tried to pull over a drunk-driving suspect, the car sped up. Then the driver lost control, drove into a ditch and wound up on train tracks. The Fremont Tribune reported that when the 21-year-old driver abandoned the car and hid from the deputy, a passing train rammed his car. Mitchell Deslatte, 25, drove up to a state trooper station in Baton Rouge, La., and asked the trooper at the front desk if he was in a hotel. WAFB-TV News said Deslatte was promptly booked for DWI. HOMELAND INSECURITY - U.S. border authorities ordered the removal of a glossy yellow sign spelling out “United States” in 21-foot-high letters on the side facing Canada at a new border station in Massena, N.Y. “There were security concerns,” Customs and Border Protection Agency official Kelly Ivahnenko told the New York Times. “The sign could be a huge target and attract undue attention.” The agency approved the sign, proposed four years ago by the federal General Services Administration as part of that agency’s campaign to raise the standards of government architecture but, less than a month after the new station opened, began dismantling it. “At the end of the day, I think they were somewhat surprised at how bold and how bright it was,” said Les Shepherd, the GSA’s chief architect. RENDER UNTO CAESAR - After Chicago banker George Michael claimed his $3 million mansion was really a church, the Illinois Department of Revenue exempted him from his $80,000 yearly property-tax bill. The Chicago Tribune reported that Michael’s evidence for tax-exempt status consisted of a copy of the identification card he received from the Internet-based Church of Spiritual Humanism by clicking a button on the outfit’s web site that read “ORDAIN ME” and a photograph of his church home depicting a cross on the exterior wall. The village of Lake Bluff, where Michael’s mansion is located, contested the exemption. Kenneth Galvin, an independent state administrative law judge working for the revenue department, reversed the exemption, calling Michael’s application “a sham.” He observed that the cross “was drawn on the photograph with a marker and did not physically exist.” Hawaii’s new law requires residents to pay taxes on any gambling winnings without being able to deduct losses. Even gamblers who wind up net losers will still be taxed on any pre-loss winnings, according to State Rep. Pono Chong, who sponsored the measure to bring in additional revenue during “a significant and possibly protracted economic downturn.” According to the Honolulu Advertiser, the Department of Taxation, which supported the bill, estimated the yearly revenue gain at $300,000. After Jeanette Jamieson of Toccoa, Ga., paid off a lien for $45,000 in state taxes owed for 1998 to 2005, Georgia authorities filed charges of tax evasion for the years 2006 and 2007. During all those years, Jamieson served in the state House of Representatives and, the Toccoa Record reported, ran a tax return preparation business. MENSA REJECTS OF THE WEEK - Two people declined to evacuate Big Tujunga Canyon during the wildfire in the mountains north of Los Angeles and decided to ride out the firestorm in a backyard hot tub. They wound up critically burned and had to be airlifted for treatment, according to Los Angeles County Sheriff’s official Steve Whitmore, who told the Associated Press the pair “completely underestimated the fire” and that the hot tub provided “no protection whatsoever.” Police in Charleston, W.Va., told WSAZ News that a 57-year-old man seriously injured his left hand when he tried to drill through a live round to make a keychain ornament, and the ammunition exploded. AVOIRDUPOIS FOLLIES - Texas authorities charged George Vera, 25, with possession of a firearm in a correctional facility after the nearly 600-pound inmate told a guard at the Harris County jail that he had an unloaded 9mm pistol. The gun and two clips were hidden under folds of fat and overlooked by police officers who searched him during his arrest and guards who searched him when he entered the jail. “Obviously, the system broke down,” former Detention Maj. Mark Kellar told KPRC News, which reported Vera hid the weapon for more than a day while in custody. An increasing number of British soldiers have become so fat that they cannot be deployed to conflict zones because doing so puts lives at risk, according to an emergency memo sent to all army units. The Sunday Observer quoted the memo as saying the army needs to “reinvigorate a warrior ethos and a culture of being fit.” Churches should try harder to make overweight people welcome, according to a new Church of England book that says they should be regarded as “special needs” worshippers, alongside the blind, the deaf, the bald, breast-feeding mothers, very short people and readers of tabloid newspapers. “Some pew spaces and chairs are embarrassingly inadequate for what is known in church circles as ‘the wider community,’” says the book, which is titled Everybody Welcome. THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT - A new website recommends convenient points in movies currently showing in theaters to go to the bathroom without missing anything substantial. Dan Florio, the creator of the site, runpee.com, told the Los Angeles Times he has also developed a Runpee application for iPhones. Hong Kong’s largest political party has compiled a list of escalators where women are vulnerable to unwittingly exposing themselves to peeping Toms. The South China Morning Post reported the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong released the study in response to the sharp increase in people using cell phones to take indecent photos of women. Party members went to the locations and took wide-angle pictures of escalators with glass walls, reflective floors and railings with glass walls. Elizabeth Quat, chair of the committee that led the research, told reporters she wasn’t concerned the list would turn the areas into hot spots for phone snappers because “those who want to peep would have discovered them already.”

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R.

C. Hooker’s letter arrived at the Independent among the usual stack of press releases, letters to the editor and junk mail. In it, the Somers resident suggested a story idea that he thought might interest readers: a look at the current eco-trend toward green burials. In other words, burials that avoid the traditional metal casket, tombstone, vault and chemical-laden embalming process, and instead allow people to transition naturally back to the earth. “Nearly everyone has a set of principles by which they live, but how

cemetery’s first customer,” he wrote. “My biodegradable pine box is already on order.”

A

bout 90 minutes north of Missoula, just past Lion Creek Road on Route 83, there’s a turnoff for Natural Cemeteries. A long dirt road travels east into the woods, crosses a small wooden bridge and ends at the log home belonging to Henry and Joan Meyer. In 1951, the Meyers decided to leave their native New Jersey, elope, and seek out “the wildest and woolliest

by Skylar Browning and R.C. Hooker illustrations by John Overmyer

many would be willing to die with them?” his letter started. “Natural interment, it would appear, represents the epitome of personal conviction: You live green; you die green. But is such an alternative possible in Montana?” Hooker’s letter went on to answer its own question. In June, a family living in the Swan Valley had opened the state’s first all-natural cemetery. The bucolic “corpse garden” encompasses 120 acres of prime wildlife habitat just west of the Bob Marshall Wilderness and is surrounded by U.S. Forest Service land. After researching the various legal ramifications, the family decided the best way to preserve its land for future generations was to create a natural cemetery. Hooker thought people should know about it. He thought the Independent was the best outlet to tell them. Then he offered a slight twist. “Three weeks ago I discovered that I have pancreatic cancer and have less than six months to live. In fact, I recently visited the land to pick out my own personal site. I will be the

Missoula Independent

place there was.” Their first inclination was to head to Alaska, but the Korean War was in full swing and the draft board nixed the idea; Alaska wasn’t yet a state. The young couple chose the Swan Valley instead, and purchased 200 acres from the local sawmill owner for $25 an acre. “When we first bought it, the guys at the sawmill all told us we was robbed,” says Henry, now 79. “Can you believe that? I didn’t know. I thought they might be right.” Henry recalls the family history with verve, as if he’s told these stories before and never gets tired of hitting the inflections—“we was robbed”—just right. His short gray hair and beard belie his infectious enthusiasm and smile. He’s clearly proud to talk about his life and how he and Joan literally built it off the land. “When I first came here, I couldn’t tell one tree from another,” he says. “I didn’t even know anything about building, and I had to build a house, you know. It was all timber and lodge pole, and I just selected the best trees I could. I drug ’em in with a block and tackle. I

Page 14 September 17–September 24, 2009

packed the sand and the gravel for the concrete piers out of the creek and mixed it in the washtub. Slowly but surely, we figured it out and built it up.” The Meyers’ home hasn’t changed much since the ’50s. They added electricity when it reached the Swan, and indoor plumbing only after their four children moved out. They logged the land selectively, using real horsepower, and replanted the forest for sustainability. They continue to drink directly from Lion Creek, which runs past the back of the cabin, and they hunt in their own front yard. With the exception of a brief stint in the Army—Henry,

sure enough, was drafted right after reaching Montana—and the couple’s annual winter camping trips to an unnamed beach in Baja, they’ve lived off the property and learned to be good stewards of the land. “We never got rich and we were never going to be rich,” Henry says. “The land was our wealth.” In fact, land in the Swan Valley became incredibly valuable. Among the changes the Meyers have witnessed over the years, none compares to the region’s sprawling development. “It started when they put in the road,” says Joan, also 79, referring to


Route 83. “That changed everything, and in a good way. We like it. But it also opened up the area to more people.” “More recently, a whole heck of a lot of those people have been moving in from all over” adds Henry, “and I guess some of them have some money, so that makes a big difference.” The constant threat of more development in the Swan is part of the reason Henry and Joan, with the help of their son, Peter, decided to create Natural Cemeteries. The family explored conservation easements and other traditional avenues of preserving the land, but was skeptical of loopholes and wanted more personal control. By creating a nonprofit natural cemetery, they could make the property untouchable forever—and ensure that Henry and Joan were buried on the land in which they’ve lived for nearly 60 years. “I belong here,” says Henry. “I don’t want to be buried in town. I want to be buried right here on my own land. I looked into that and found that most anybody can be buried on their own land without much restrictions, but there’s no assurance that you’ll stay there. There’s no guarantee that someone won’t come along and build a septic tank right there on top of you. They can dig you up at any time. I thought about that and, with all the development happening now, I thought, ‘Gee, well that don’t sound real good.’ “So I looked into it a little deeper,” he continues, “and found that if you want to be protected, you have to establish your own official cemetery. We decided to give it a try.”

O

nce R.C. Hooker received his terminal diagnosis, the selfdescribed “consummate nihilist” started to research his own burial options. He didn’t find many. Since the late 19th century, most people have chosen to be buried in a traditional ceremony that requires many costly, resource-intensive components. Coffins are usually made of steel or exotic wood. Most cemeteries require coffins be placed in a concrete vault, which ensures that the carefully manicured grounds don’t collapse. Elaborate headstones, statues and mausoleums help decorate those manicured grounds. And before a body even reaches the ground, embalming fluid, which is mostly carcinogenic formaldehyde, helps preserve the body. The Green Burial Council, an independent nonprofit organization based in New Mexico, estimates traditional burials in the United States contribute to a staggering amount of waste. Specifically, 30 million board feet of casket wood, 1.6 million tons of concrete in burial vaults, more than 800,000 gallons of embalming fluid—or enough to fill an Olympicsized pool—and 90,000 tons of steel from caskets end up in the ground every year.

The waste doesn’t even begin to address the immense cost of burying it all. According to the National Funeral Directors Association, the average funeral runs $7,323. That price includes a basic service fee ($1,595), removal/transfer of the body ($233), embalming and other body preparations ($753), a view-

freelancer mostly about the outdoors and the environment. He figured there had to be a more natural burial option. Wasn’t death, after all, a natural thing? His search led to a lot of information on the history of burials. There was the introduction of the term “ritual burial,” during the Upper

ing and ceremony ($869), use of a hearse ($251), a metal casket ($2,255) and a vault ($1,128), as well as other small charges. That cost, of course, can rise exponentially for more elegant accommodations like a hardwood coffin, especially if it’s made of an exotic wood from a tropical location.

Paleolithic times, when artifacts were first placed with the deceased for use in the afterlife. There was the Dark Age, when the ecclesiastical elite, motivated by fear of eternal damnation, wanted to plant themselves in a consecrated cemetery. Then there were those who wanted to separate

“Death is the last taboo, really. But green burial is something people can actually wrap their head around.” —Joe Sehee, Green Burial Council

“Sorry, but hardwood or soft, exotic or common, it is an absolute travesty to see it all end up buried in the ground,” says Hooker, 64. “It is a senseless waste.” Hooker then looked into cremation, but that popular alternative to traditional burial still creates a sizable carbon footprint. According to Slate.com, a typical incinerator requires about 2,000 cubic feet of natural gas and 4 kilowatt-hours electricity per body. That means the average cremation produces roughly 250 pounds of CO2 equivalent, or about as much as a typical American home generates in six days. Hooker wasn’t sold and kept looking. He wanted something that made sense and fit his lifestyle. Before moving west, Hooker worked as the editor of an outdoor magazine in Pennsylvania and often gave lectures about the importance of conservation. In Montana, he continued to write as a

themselves from the riffraff within those consecrated cemeteries, and built lavish vaults and sepulchers. Other cultures followed different rituals. The Parsi, who live primarily in Mumbai, India, believed that the proper way to deal with the dead was to expose them on specially built towers called dokhmas, or “Towers of Silence.” Vultures were then free to eat away. Interestingly, problems started

when the vultures themselves began dying. Forensics showed the dead birds contained lethal levels of Diclofenac, an arthritis drug used by humans that remained in the system and caused kidney failure in the birds. “What happened to the Parsi is happening to the modern cemetery of today,” Hooker says, referring to the waste being buried and its impact on the environment. Hooker eventually found Natural Cemeteries through “the green grapevine,” an informal assembly of Montana friends whose part-time avocation is de-carbonizing the size of their footprint. The idea of naturally returning to the earth—no chemicals, no fancy casket, no excess waste— immediately appealed to him. “The woods have always been my own personal salutarium, especially when I was young,” he says. “I was happiest alone, too, because the woods represented not an escape from, but rather an escape to a better world.” Hooker’s not alone in shunning a traditional burial. Funeral homes across the country are beginning to embrace eco-friendly alternatives. The Green Burial Council, which helps certify businesses that meet certain green standards, approved of just 12 businesses a year ago. Now, more than 300 green burial providers are listed through the council. “Death is the last taboo, really,” says Joe Sehee, founder and executive director of the Green Burial Council. “But green burial is something people can actually wrap their head around. It’s a concept—returning to the earth, naturally—that they understand and are willing to talk about. It’s moving into the mainstream quicker than anyone thought.” Bozeman’s Dahl Funeral Home applied for certification with the Green Burial Council less than a year ago and is the only approved Montana provider. (Natural Cemeteries has consulted with the council, according to Sehee, but has not applied for certification.) Irene Dahl, a third generation funeral director, explored green burials because she wanted to offer families a new alternative. “It’s sort of an educational tool at this point,” she says. “A lot of people are curious. Some people will come in and say that they want cremation because it’s the most natural way to go, and I can point out that, actually, there’s another option.”

Six feet under A body isn’t the only thing that ends up underground during a traditional burial. According to the Green Burial Council, the following materials also end up in the earth every year. 30 million board feet of casket wood, including tropical hardwoods 90,000 tons of steel, or enough to build the Golden Gate Bridge 1.6 million tons of concrete, or enought to build a two-lane highway from New York to Detroit 800,000-plus gallons of embalming fluid, or enough to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool

Missoula Independent

Page 15 September 17–September 24, 2009


Dahl can offer green burials because her funeral home uses Sunset Hill Cemetery, which is owned by the city of Bozeman and is one of the few public cemeteries that don’t require the use of a vault. A local store provides biodegradable caskets. Embalming, Dahl adds, is also not required by law; bodies are simply refrigerated before

their attempt to bury people in it. On a ridge that overlooks the Meyers’ log cabin and two neighboring barns, as well as the surrounding valley, Henry points to his gravesite, marked by a simple metal corner stake. “I can see the mess I made just perfectly from here,” he jokes. “This was always my spot.”

start from scratch—and had no model to follow. Peter jokes that he couldn’t even find a copy of Building Cemeteries for Dummies at the bookstore. “We pretty much wrote the rules for natural cemeteries in Montana,” says Peter, 49, who handles most of the nonprofit’s logistics. “We didn’t really have a choice.”

“We pretty much wrote the rules for natural cemeteries in Montana. We didn’t really have a choice.” —Peter Meyer, Natural Cemeteries

burial. She estimates that a bare-bones natural burial could cost, roughly, between $2,500 and $5,000, depending on the type of service and casket. “It’s progress, not perfection,” says Dahl of the green burial she offers. “If it were perfection, you wouldn’t have

Joan’s site is directly next to Henry’s. Federal law requires that both she and Henry pay for their own sites, just as anyone else would. Stakes for two other customers—the Meyers say 10 people, so far, have signed up to be buried at Natural Cemeteries—have

Peter says the family worked through county, state and federal agencies for nearly four years to gain the necessary approvals. They achieved official nonprofit status from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in 2006. Peter says he checked with the state’s Board of Funeral Service on state regulations. (The cemetery isn’t licensed with the state, but according to annotated code 37-19-803, private nonprofit cemeteries are exempt.) Peter also presented the cemetery’s mission and goals to the Board of Lake County Commissioners, which is responsible for maintaining records of burials on the site. “Everything was fine,” says Commissioner Paddy Trussler. “Other than the records, there’s not much we’re involved in.” The only hang-up, according to Peter, was that nobody knew how to define a natural cemetery. In one comical go-around, the IRS needed to know what criteria Natural Cemeteries had to be compliant about so that it could ensure compliance—and it was up to Natural Cemeteries to provide the criteria.

“Everyone who asked,” says Peter, “we just repeated our mission statement: ‘Live and die in harmony with nature. A green burial takes place in a forest environment using earth’s natural process to recycle human remains in a way that harmonizes with nature. A multiple use concept will be used to provide a restful place to meditate and observe nature. A green burial encourages biodegradable materials and encourages the planting of trees and shrubs’…We got a lot of ‘yeses’ and a lot of ‘nos’ and we just kept at it until we figured it out.” Since the cemetery is a nonprofit organization, customers are considered “members” and payments for “sites”—not plots—are considered “donations.” The sites, which can be reserved for $500, are confirmed with specific GPS coordinates. Burial costs— known as “opening and closing”—add an additional $1,000. By law, 15 percent of every donation goes into a perpetual trust fund, which ensures the future maintenance of the cemetery. The cemetery’s bylaws map out the long-term stewardship of the site. A board of directors, which is comprised of Henry, Joan, Peter and Peter’s son, Mike Matola, runs the operation. “We’ll keep it in the family for as many generations as possible,” says Peter. “If, for some reason, that’s no longer possible, it’ll go to the community, or the state of Montana, or the federal government. But no matter what, it’ll always remain as a natural cemetery.” Natural Cemeteries encourages its members to enhance the surroundings by planting a tree or natural shrub near the grave. Natural rocks can also mark a site. The idea is not only to maintain the land’s current character, but to make it even more wild. “We don’t just want it to look like it does today forever,” says Peter. “We want it to look like it did 100 years ago, before anyone even knew it was here.” The Meyers don’t refer to themselves as religious. Peter prefers to say

The cost of dying Traditional burials can hit the wallet particularly hard. While costs vary depending on the particular service, casket, cemetery and funeral home, the National Funeral Directors Association says the average funeral runs $7,323. A breakdown of those costs appears below.

to drive a hearse to the cemetery, there would be a pesticide-free section of the grounds and the gravestones would be natural rocks. It’s a positive step, but we’re hoping to offer even more in the future. All of this is still in the beginning stages.”

T

he Meyers understand growing pains. As Peter and Henry walk the grounds of Natural Cemeteries, they tell more stories of the land and

Missoula Independent

been set up farther down the ridge. R.C. Hooker is still expected to be the first person actually placed into the ground. “It’s nice to finally see it taking shape,” says Henry. “It was a hell of a mess setting the thing up, but we made it.” The mess came from the fact that no other natural cemetery exists in the state. Unlike Dahl Funeral Home, which simply added natural burials to its established offerings, the Meyers needed to

Page 16 September 17–September 24, 2009

Non-declinable basic services fee ................$1,595 Removal/transfer of remains to funeral home ...$233 Embalming ......................................................$550 Other preparation of the body ........................$203 Use of facilities/staff for viewing .....................$406 Use of facilities/staff for funeral ceremony .......$463 Use of a hearse ...............................................$251 Use of a service car/van ..................................$120 Basic memorial printed package .....................$119 Metal casket .................................................$2,255 Vault ............................................................$1,128 Total Cost ....................................................$7,323


they’re “spiritual.” But Henry admits that he’s been reading about religion more recently, mostly because he expects to be asked about it. Standing at his future gravesite, he articulates how the cemetery lines up with his personal beliefs. “I read that one of God’s purposes for the earth was to create a paradise for man to live in,” he says. “We want to have this place be part of that. We don’t want to do something that’s contrary to that concept. When you live in the Swan, you already live closer to nature than the people who live in the city. You get a feeling of what nature wants and what nature has, and how to live within that. All we want is for nature to do her own thing.”

structed with white birch and Wingard didn’t use any stain, oil or polyurethane coating, which gives it a high coefficient of degradability. Wingard also used a simple white glue and, where reinforcement was needed, he chose uncoated steel nails that will rust quickly. He wove the handles with hemp rope, leaving the bore holes open to enhance and accelerate the breakdown of cell tissue

rock. Including his membership, opening and closing costs, natural rock headstone and the casket, Hooker paid a total of $1,960 for his burial—a steal compared to a traditional burial, but not an insignificant sum for a “rural rube.” “This money represented my entire financial estate, my life savings,” he says. “That it should speak volumes

post-mortem. All together, Wingard spent $110 on materials and approximately 11 hours of labor to make it. He only charged Hooker for the materials. Hooker also paid Natural Cemeteries for his site, in cash. The spot overlooks an open meadow on the south side of the cemetery and is situated next to an enormous natural

about my life is apparent—if I die with a dollar in my pocket, it’s a dollar I wasted. Money was never a means nor an end. I had the freedom that only poverty could afford and my most important possession no matter where I lived was my library card. So from a purely nickel-and-dime point of view, my burial made sense.”

W

hen R.C. Hooker first wrote to the Independent, he weighed 170 pounds. Now, he’s under 130 and refers to himself as “the anatomy lesson.” His once-healthy complexion has turned a mossy green and he tires quickly. Talking on the phone is difficult. Nevertheless, he still expresses excitement about his decision to go with a green burial. Earlier this summer, he received his custom-made casket. A friend, Steve Wingard, who is known for his traditional Ojibwa and Cree berry baskets, agreed to make the box. It was con-

His reasoning, of course, goes beyond just money. Hooker talks openly about dying a heroic death— defending a fair maiden, fighting for justice or “maybe just the everyday slaying of windmills.” This isn’t that; not exactly. “My degree in philosophy, of course, has helped immeasurably, having been a personal asset, yet a social liability,” he says. “In this, the end, it provides the necessary solace to finish the journey with more than a sense of dignity, but also with a sense of triumph.” That triumph comes in the form of reincarnation. He’ll return to the earth, give something back, not just die. “The point is that I am, at this very late stage of the game, willing to grow on spiritual lines, ready to reconsider all avenues, even reincarnation,” he says. “Too late? Maybe. But as an active participant in the natural burial movement, I have made a lasting commitment to principle. If I am lucky, my carbon footprint may even disappear all together.” R.C. Hooker and Skylar Browning collaborated on the final draft of this article. Hooker can be reached directly at rc_hooker@yahoo.com. He invites those curious about natural burial to attend his service at Natural Cemeteries. Browning can be reached at sbrowing@missoulanews.com.

the $$–$$$...$15 and over Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list makes Ciao Mambo a hit for any occasion. Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. • 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$

Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner 7 days a week 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch & dinner. Beer & Wine. Mon-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Catalyst Cafe and Espresso Bar 111 N Higgins • 542-1337 Open daily from 7 am to 3 pm. Breakfast and lunch served all day, everyday. Huevos Rancheros, Omelets, Tomato

Lime and Tortilla Soup, Bing Cherry Salads, Fried Egg Sandwiches. Locally owned and operated since 1991. Daily specials from our local farmers and ranchers. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly,

Missoula Independent

dish

attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. 830-3237 All of our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Open Mon-Sat, lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$. Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Page 17 September 17–September 24, 2009


COFFEE FOR FREE THINKERS

September

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic Peru Shade Grown $9.75 lb.

Missoula’s 2nd Annual Bicycle & Pedestrian Celebration

Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS • DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

Caras Park

COFFEE, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL

Live Music Dead Me Downs Lil’ Smokies Wartime Blues Red States Beyond The Pale

Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 406.830.3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the HUB of the LOOP! Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Traditional Irish fare combined with tasty specials from around the globe! FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich - unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. Now featuring a special summer menu. Call in your order and pick it up on your way to play $-$$

Missoula Independent

The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. • 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$

Ten Spoon Winery Big Sky Kettlehouse Bayern

Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $

Page 18 September 17–September 24, 2009

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors - Russian teacakes, pizzelles, baci di dama, as well as cupcakes, scones, specialty breads, with new specialties added daily. Get bread fresh from the oven between 3 & 5PM. Open M-F 7AM to 6:30PM, Sat 7AM-4PM. We're just around the corner from Bamboo Chopsticks. Stop in today. $ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European handcrafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $

TH

Face & Helmet Painting Pixie Bike Jousting & More!!!

Local Bevs

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Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$

SATURDAY

Sept 19

Costume Parade 11:00 am

the

11-6pm

Fundraiser for Bike Walk Alliance For Missoula (BWAM) Free Cycles Missoula In Motion MTB Missoula


by Ari LeVaux

Hen husbandry Two of our hens recently got broody. While the other two kept up their standard schedules of scratching around, chasing bugs and rolling in the dust, Black ’n Blue, a sweet little bantam, and Annabelle, a tough orange Buff Orpington, stopped laying eggs and glued themselves to their nesting box. Once in a while Baldy or Chicken Hawk came in to lay an egg, and forfeited their creation to the broody girls, who used their beaks and claws to roll the new egg onto their pile. They shared this pile, sitting side by side, sometimes with their wings wrapped around each other. They wouldn’t leave the nest to eat or drink, so I put food and water dishes next to the nesting box. With no cock in the flock to fertilize the eggs, they weren’t going to hatch. So despite the broody girls’ protests, I collected the eggs as usual. Annabelle, who’s normally skittish, grew ballsy in her broodishness, and not only sat her ground but pecked at my hand and clucked bloody murder as I took her eggs. I left them a golf ball, which they willingly incubated. Our neighbor, Dick, who has a cock in his flock, took care of our hens for a few days while we went camping. “You got some broody hens,” he said when we returned. “Want some fertile eggs for them to sit on?” A few days later Dick brought over 18 eggs. It seemed like too many, but he says some won’t hatch, some will die trying, some will die young, and some will be roosters—and all roosters, except perhaps one, will be destined for the pot. “The eggs will hatch exactly three weeks after you put them out,” he said. “If you put them out in the morning, they’ll hatch in the morning.” We decided on a morning hatching. Since baby chicks are sensitive to cold, hatching around 10 a.m. would give them a whole day to warm up. I marked the fertilized eggs with a Sharpie so I could distinguish them from the unfertilized eggs Chicken Hawk and Baldy would lay, which I would continue to collect. Eighteen eggs made quite a pile, even for these dedicated hens. For three weeks they sat with gritty determination, diligently rotating their charges. One egg broke after two weeks. There was a baby chick inside.

Ask Ari:

Photo by Ari LeVaux

Three chicks hatched successfully. Three died while hatching, perhaps stepped on by the confused hens. The rest never hatched, and when I broke them open the next day there was nothing inside but normal egg, quite stinky. Dick, apparently, has a lazy cock. Tragedy struck later on hatching day. I found one of the peepers floating in the water dish I’d put in the coop. Cursing my idiocy, I examined the chick. It was the bright yellow one, the same color as Annabelle. It was limp, soggy and motionless. Since there was no trace of rigor mortis, I figured it hadn’t been dead long, and commenced CPR. This being my first attempt at CPR on a chicken, I was kind of winging it. Sometimes my compressions forced air through the chick’s vocal

chords, causing it to peep, which got my hopes up, but the chick stayed dead. Then there were two—one for each broody hen. Contrary to what I’d heard might happen, neither got jealous. As long as each one had a peep under her belly, both hens seemed content. I kept the coop closed so the peepers would stay inside. Chicken Hawk and Baldy were doting aunts, sitting on the ground just outside the coop walls. At night, all six birds—four hens and two chicks—piled into one nesting box. The co-parenting seems to be working. Annabelle is a bit spastic, sometimes stepping on the peepers, and she can be aggressive in defending the chicks. Black ’n Blue is as peaceful and sweet as ever, but a little spacey. As per Dick’s advice I’ve been feeding them ground oats, and I made a trip to the feed store to buy a chick-safe water dispenser. At the store, there was a single chick for sale in a bin that earlier in the summer was full of them. The chick was yellow/orange, Annabelle’s color, like the one that died. I made the impulse purchase for $2. At home, I removed the two recent hatchlings. My plan was to get the mamas in a panic over their missing chicks, and then return the two chicks plus the new one, in hopes they wouldn’t notice the addition. They noticed. Black ’n Blue was cool with the new chick, but Annabelle went after the intruder. The new chick was terrified of Annabelle, rightly so, and wouldn’t have lasted long, so I kicked Annabelle out of the coop. Then the coop became peaceful, with the three chicks snuggling under Black ’n Blue, who puffed and preened her feathers and clucked with contentment. Annabelle stalked the coop’s perimeter, clucking angrily. A few hours later I attempted a trial re-introduction. As Annabelle entered the coop, the new girl burrowed deep under Black ’n Blue’s belly. The other chicks remained unconcerned. Annabelle settled down in the nesting box. There was uneasy peace in the coop, but the new chick stayed hidden. An hour later, I saw the new chick poking her face out from under Annabelle, their feathers matching perfectly. The new chick on the block was in.

Sit, Sip, Meet And Eat www.thinkfft.com Sun-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

Great Food No Attitude.

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

Basking in beets

I planted a big load of beets this year and now I don’t know what to do with them all. I’ve been steaming little beet cubes to be used in salads and veggie medleys, or for my 8-month-old to eat. What else is there? —Beets me

Q

This time of year my thoughts unavoidably turn to pickles, and it’s difficult to imagine having too many pickled beets. They’re highly edible as a snack or condiment, and consequently have high trade value. They’re easily bartered for someone else’s jelly, juice, salsa, sausage, etc.

A

On the morning of the appointed day, I went to the coop and, sure enough, heard a chorus of little peeps. Annabelle and Black ’n Blue were making clucking sounds, which Dick says give encouragement to hatching chicks. The new moms looked bewildered, constantly standing up to check on the remaining eggs, poking around with their beaks to keep track of the darting peepers, who at times were under them, at times walked on top of them, and sometimes hid in the coop’s hard-to-reach nooks and crannies.

There are many pickled beet recipes online, but here’s what I do: Clean the beets, leaving the taproot and two inches of stem, and boil them until a fork can pierce the skin easily. When tender, drain the beets and let them cool. Slip the skins off, clip the taproots, and cut the beets into the shape you want. Slices are nice for large beets, quarters work for medium-sized beets. Small beets can be left whole. Before you pack your beets, add a teaspoon of salt to each pint. Then pack the beets into sterile jars, making sure to leave at least a halfinch of “head space” between the top of the beets and the rim of the jar.

In a pot, mix a brine of equal parts water and cider vinegar, with 1 cup of sugar for every 3 cups of brine. (The amount of sugar is totally up to your taste; adjust accordingly). You may wish to add pickling spices, or a mixture of equal parts allspice, cloves and cinnamon—good pickled beet spices. As with the sugar, spice levels are up to you. Heat the brine until it just starts to boil, then remove from heat. Pour into the packed jars and process 15 minutes in a boiling water bath. Wait at least 8 weeks before opening. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

Now Open featuring traditional Asian cuisine and Teas (we have bubble tea, too!) 529 S. Higgins Hip Strip Missoula 830.3237 Mon- Sat Lunch & Dinner www.izarestaurant.com

Page 19 September 17–September 24, 2009


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings September 17–September 24, 2009

THURSDAY

17

September

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. Call Lois at 642-3010. Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. Don’t get swine flu. Take some preventative measures by getting a flu shot at the Missoula City-County Health Department, 301 W. Alder St., from 10 AM–4:30 PM Mon.–Fri. $25 adults/$14 children, 6 months through 18 years. Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP insurance accepted with appropriate cards. Call 258-3600. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. You think you have what it takes to start your own nonprofit organization? See if you have the muster during Nonprofit Basics, a discussion by consultant Peter Bensen from 11:30 AM–1 PM at Mountain West Bank, 3301 Great Northern Ave. $10/free for members of Missoula Nonprofit Network. Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. Call 5417240 for pricing. Create something open to interpretation when the Clay Studio of Missoula presents an eight-week open instructed class from 1–4 PM every Thu. until Nov. 5 at the studio, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/eight-week class. Call 543-0509 or visit www.theclaystudioofmissoula.org. Instruments will rattle and kids are bound to explore frequencies with frequency when the Children’s Museum of Missoula presents Afterschool Adventures: Playdate with an Artist which this week features members of Tangled Tones Music Studio at 3 PM at the

Back to School

Sale

20% Off Select trees & shrubs

Just Arrived: Bulbs, Asters, Mums, Straw, Flowering Cabbage & Kale

1845 S. 3rd W. 542-2544

Missoula Independent

M-Sat 9-5:30 Sun 10:30-4:30

Page 20 September 17–September 24, 2009

Greg Brown struggles to remember the chord structure of Black Sabbath’s “Paranoia” when he plays UM’s University Theatre Thu., Sept. 17, at 8 PM. $28/$25 advance plus fees at www.griztix.com.

museum, 225 W. Front St. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-PLAY to register. If your toddler’s movement seems kind of, well, stale, bring them to Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 3:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing. Even if your toddler makes some smooth dance moves, your 5–6 year old might need some work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Breakdance, slamdance or just inventively dance when your 7- to 8-year-old checks out Creative and Modern Movement, a dance class at 4:15 PM this and every Thu. in the ballet studio of UM’s PARTV building, until Dec. 3. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. It’s time to meld those abstract dance moves into specific form, especially if you’re between

the ages of 9–12, at Dance and Choreography, this and every Thu. until Dec. 3 at 5 PM in the ballet studio of UM’s PARTV building. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, reggaeton—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. If you’d like to lend a hand in offering support to victims of domestic and sexual violence, you might want to head over to a volunteer orientation for Missoula’s YWCA, which occurs from 5:30–7 PM and again on Sat., Sept. 19, from 10 AM–noon at the YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free. Call 543-6691. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Sept. 18 , t o c a l e n d a r @ m i s s o u l a n e w s . c o m . Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

TINCTURE

SALE 20% Off All Herbal Tinctures Monday, 9.21 thru Saturday, 9.26 Stock up on your favorite tinctures. Prepare for cold & flu season.

180 S. 3rd W. next to Bernice's 728.0543 M-F 10-6 Sat 11-5


tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Helmville might literally be in the boondocks of Montucky, not even recognized by the U.S. Census, but Alexia Beckerling found some sense of community with her series of photographs, and she discuss her work during Artini: Highway to Helmville (Hwy. 141) at the Missoula Art Musuem, 335 N. Pattee St., at 6 PM. Free. Music by Caseyjo. Call 728-0447. (See Arts in this issue.) Apple pie, apple crisp, sausage with apples. It’s an apple party of sorts during this month’s MUD Mingle at the Missoula Urban Demonstration Project, 629 Phillips St., from 6–9 PM where you bring an apple-themed dish, a beverage, plate and utensils and share with others during this community potluck. Includes music by the Mason Jar String Band. Free. Call 721-7513. He’ll slap, strike and whallop his guitar, while you stand in awe. Catch guitar abuser Dan Dubuque when he plays his rhythmic oneman blues at the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Your eyes aren’t likely to glaze over under the light of glass during a glass fusing class from 6–8 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $25. Call 549-7555 or visit www.zootownarts.com. All signs point to a blessing: peep the world of marketing during Jakki Mohr’s lecture “A World Without Marketing: Blessing or Curse?” at the University Center Ballroom at 6 PM. Free. Call 243-4689. She’ll make you lull and she’ll make you scream, but in a beautiful way: join Angela Andersen as she leads a singing technique course this and every Thu. at 6:30 PM for five weeks as part of YMusic’s adult music courses at the YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St. $45/$40 members. Call 721-YMCA. Bees offer more than just stings and honey when the Missoula Sustainable Business Council presents the discussion “The Buzz on Bees & Sustainability: How the Bee Sustains Its Community and Helps Ours” on the third floor of the Missoula Children’s Theatre, 200 N. Adams St., at 6:45 PM. Free. Call 543-5323. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven doublespaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. See how crime intersects with the the life of an ex-journalist turned carpenter in Helena when Neil McMahon reads and signs copies of his novel Dead Silver at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins, at 7 PM. Free. Call 721-2881. Let’s hope some sort of public option is in store when James Corless, a transportation expert and director of the Transportation for America Campaign discusses nationwide efforts to update federal transportation policy, plus why it matters to our city, in Room 331 of UM’s University Center at 7 PM. Free. Relish the vastness of nature when environmental journalist Josh Mahan discusses his adventure retracing the journey of explorer

John Weseley Powell during the talk “106 Days and 1,400 miles on the Green and Colorado Rivers”, which starts at 7 PM in Room 210 of UM’s McGill Hall. Free. Call 243-5172. Celebrate the almost-end-of-your-week with some hot jazzy sax licks courtesy of Grace Kelly when she plays with David Morgenroth on piano, Craig Hall on bass and Brad Edwards on drums for this month’s installment of Daly Jazz, a monthly jazz concert at 240 Daly Ave. at 7 PM. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP at dalyjazz@gmail.com. I’m guessing a free press isn’t so free in parts of South Asia and China. Find out more during the panel discussion “Journalism and Human Rights in South Asia and China” in Room 210 of the UM’s Don Anderson Hall (aka the new Journalism Building) at 7 PM. Free. Call 243-6865.

Lolo Square and Round Dance Center, 9955 Highway 12, from 7:30–9:30 PM. Free, with a root beer social to follow. Call 273-0141. Harmonize those vocal cords into chords when Lila Cleminshaw leads a Singing Harmony I course this and every Thu. at 7:45 PM for five weeks as part of YMusic’s adult music courses at the YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St. $45/$40 members. Call 721-YMCA. Expect folk to brownout your vision when Iowan and Missoula fav Greg Brown strokes some strings at UM’s University Theatre at 8 PM. $28/$25 advance plus fees at all GrizTix outlets or www.griztix.com. Call 243-2853. Two physicists that helped revolutionize atomic science ponder the merits of their work during the Hamilton Players’ rendition of the Tony Award winning play Copenhagen, with performances at 8 PM through Sept. 19, and a 2 PM performance Sept. 20 at the Hamilton

FRIDAY

18

September

Self-reliance is the name of the game when farmers, gardeners, musicians and others gather just outside of Hot Springs for the third annual Big Sky Country Harvest Festival, an exchange of goods, services and info which starts on Friday morning with kids’ art projects and runs through Sept. 20 with live music, yoga, camping and more. $5 adults/free children. $20/camping and attendance fee for whole weekend. Visit www.bigskyharvestfestival.com or call 741-5399.

Do your part to help those who haven’t yet learned the intricacies of English during an intro training session for Literacy Volunteers of Flathead County, with an orientation sesh at 35 Fourth St. W. in Kalispell, scheduled for 10 AM and 5:30 PM today, as well as 5:30 PM on Sept. 21. Free. Call 257-READ. Toddlers sway to a different beat when Grace Decker leads the class Toddler Tunes, for kids ages 2–3 this and every Fri. at 10 AM until Oct. 16 at Missoula’s YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St. $45/$40 members. Call 721-YMCA. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, Candide by Voltaire. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Even the amps are possessed when Athens, Ga. metal duo Jucifer takes the Palace stage Sun., Sept. 20, at 9 PM with openers Horse Nozzle. $5.

The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Harper Lee’s classic story of racism and human values hits UM when the Montana Repertory Theatre kicks off its fall national tour with performances of To Kill A Mockingbird at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV center, at 7:30 PM. $18. Call 243-6809 or visit www.montanarep.org. Watch as two parents crumble into uncivilized behavior brought about by a dinner party that features only alcohol, as well as obsessive hopes of job promotion, and more during the Montana Actors Theatre production of Life x 3 at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave., at 7:30 PM. $10 person. (See Theater in this issue.) See if you can get more krunk than Nashville country star Trent Tomlinson as he croons hits like “Drunker Than Me” when he plays the Wilma Theatre at 7:30 PM. County Line opens. $25, available at all Griztix locations and www.griztix.com. If you missed out on hearing the highest range of human vocal pitches a few nights ago, you can still get your fix when UM student Maya Morales, a soprano, performs during the Student Recital Series at the Music Recital Hall, in UM’s Music Building, at 7:30 PM. Free. Transcend the horrors of modern day living with an introductory lecture on Transcendental Meditation at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 207-7496 or visit www.tm.org. Pops, locks and windmills aren’t on tap, but getting square wit it is, so head down to a onetime beginner square dance lesson at the

Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/adults, $8/under age 18. Call 375-9050. Bowling and karaoke go together like the late GG Allin and a sane mind during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Get your fix of improvised music with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace Lounge at 9 PM every Thu. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, and muster up the courage to belt out some classics too, and perhaps win a prize, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue.–Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others under the influence of that music box you sing along to during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free.

Missoula Independent

If you’ve never taken a course in the subject, trust me, it’s eye opening. Celebrate the creation of UM’s Black Studies and African American Studies programs with a keynote address by Ulysses Doss–who founded the program in 1968 and who worked with Martin Luther King Jr. back in the day—as well as comments from UM’s first black student union prez, starting at 10:30 AM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 543-4855. Toddlers always learn a thing or two from books like True Compass: A Memoir by Edward Kennedy at Toddler Story Time, which includes age appropriate stories (of course), from 10:30–11:15 AM in the downstairs meeting room of the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Invigorate that spine of yours during a Classical Pilates Mat Class taught by Alison Laundrie every Fri. at Main Street Pilates, 214 E. Main St., at 11 AM. $12. RSVP 541-2673. Help keep babies healthy by “doing time” in a mock jail during the Missoula Jail and Bail for Healthy Babies, a March of Dimes Fundraiser at Jakers Bar & Grill, 3515 Brooks St., starting at 11 AM. Free. Call 252-7480 or email kruff@marchofdimes.com. Kids learn covers by The Clash and Motörhead, or probably something more fitting, when Grace Decker leads the class Pre-Schoolers Rock for kids ages 4–5 every Fri. at 11 AM until Oct. 16 at Missoula’s YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St. $45/$40 members. Call 721-YMCA. Parenting and pizza is the name of the game when the Children’s Museum of Missoula presents Pizza for Parents: Art of Encouragement, a parenting chat with pizza at the family resource center of Lewis and Clark Elementary School, 2901 Park St., at 11:30 AM. Free. Call 541-PLAY to register. The party hasn’t stopped yet, so get your full fill of the UM’s African American studies program reunion with a presentation on the 1974 reenactment of the 1897 25th Infantry

Page 21 September 17–September 24, 2009


Bicycle Corps Expedition which took cyclists from Missoula to St. Louis, at 1 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 543-4855.

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Rock to the sounds of bands like Reptile Dysfunction, Birds Mile Home, Issac M, Celestial Chaos, Train Song and more, and pick up some lit on combating all types of discrimination, when the YWCA of Missoula presents its Rock Against Racism concert at Caras Park from 5–10 PM. Free. Call 5436691. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Get your buzz on just after work with a varied selection of vino when The Loft, 119 W. Main St., presents a weekly wine tasting every Fri. at 5:15 PM. $10. Expect a high-class time when jazz and wine mingle during the Real Book Jazz Jam and Wine Tasting, which occurs the first and third Fri. of each month from 5:30–8:30 PM at the Loft, 119 W. Main St. Free, but wine tasting is $10. Call Carla at 360-8746. War sucks and so does the stress and toll it takes on veterans. So find out more about the “Impact of Combat Stress on Veterans, Families and Communities” when Dr. Lynne Jacobs leads a talk on the subject at the University Village Community Center, 2595 Maurice Ave., at 6:30 PM. Free. Main Street gets a little seductive when Patrick Marsolek and Grace Hodges offer beginning Tango lessons at 7 PM, followed by intermediate at 8 and Milonga at 9 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $15 evening/$7 per class/$5 Milonga. Call 541-7240. If you missed it last night, you’ve another chance to enjoy hot jazzy sax licks courtesy of Grace Kelly when she plays with David Morgenroth on piano, Craig Hall on bass and Brad Edwards on drums for this month’s installment of Daly Jazz, a monthly jazz concert at 240 Daly Ave. at 7 PM. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP at dalyjazz@gmail.com. Writers are underpaid and unappreciated, so help the next generation of literary geniuses with the Writers’ Fall Opus, a fundraiser for UM’s undergraduate writing program, including events and their literary mag The Oval at the Dana Gallery, 248 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. $50 couple/$35 single. Call 243-5267. Two sexy spies might make great fodder for post-date discussions when the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., presents its Cheap Date Night screening of Duplicity at 7 PM. Free. Enter from the parking lot side of the building. Call 721-BOOK. Information is a little vague, but the Flathead Valley Blues Society wants to rock out with an end of the summer party featuring an acoustic jam at a TBA time on Sept. 18, along with music at 3 PM on Sept. 19 by Mike Bader, Ron Darlington and others, all at the Lake Mary Ronan Lodge and Resort, 52012 Lake Mary Ronan Road, near Proctor. Cover TBA. Call 849-5483. Sway to the sounds of Shane Clouse, Tom Catmull, John Floridis, Jack Gladstone, Jess Kilroy and Bob Wire as you help support efforts to keep the beauty of Montana intact at the Songs of Montana: Benefit Concert and Jam Session at the Wilma Theatre at 7 PM. $15 general/$10 students/$50 for a reserved seat and access to the pre-show reception. Tickets available at the Roxy Theatre, Rockin Rudy’s and www.griztix.com. Call 728-9380. (See Agenda and Noise in this issue.) If Greg Brown only partially satiated your desire to rawk with the acoustic gods, make sure to check Iowa’s Patrick Bloom, who plays a set of warming Americana at The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. $5, with wine tasting available and barbecue food for purchase. Call 541-8463. (See Noise in this issue.)

Missoula Independent

Page 22 September 17–September 24, 2009

I doubt he’ll be shredding, but he’ll probably be plucking some graceful notes. So head over and see UM music prof Luis Millán as he strums the guitar during a concert in the Recital Hall of UM’s Music Building at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 students. Call 243-6880. Watch as two parents crumble into uncivilized behavior brought about by a dinner party that features only alcohol, as well as obsessive hopes of job promotion, and more during the Montana Actors’ Theatre production of Life x 3 at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave., at 7:30 PM. $12 person. Harper Lee’s classic story of racism and human values hits Whitefish when the Montana Repertory Theatre rocks its fall national tour with performances of To Kill A Mockingbird at the Whitefish Middle School Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St., at 7:30 PM. $20 adults/$18 seniors/$6 students. Call 8625371 or visit www.whitefishtheatreco.org. Two physicists that helped revolutionize atomic science ponder the merits of their work during the Hamilton Players’ rendition of the Tony Award winning play Copenhagen, with performances at 8 PM through Sept. 19, and a 2 PM performance Sept. 20 at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/adults, $8/under age 18. Call 375-9050. Missoula’s favorite songster Tom Catmull always lights up a room when he plays, especially at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. N. in Hot Springs, when he rocks licks at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 1-888-305-3106. They’ll put a shotgun of aural awesomeness to your head: Catch Son of a Gun when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip-hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Feel free to shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” backwards and forwards like the star that you aspire to be when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Dive into a bucket of degenerative slime when Reno, Nev.’s self-described “country scum” band Hellbound Glory mucks up the Badlander with a show at 9 PM. $5. Birds Mile Home and Vera open. Ambedext spits verbal daggers at all the haters when the local hip-hopper plays the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 9 PM. Cover TBA. Call 549-0542. Hippies and rednecks come together in peace for a beer summit of sorts when Whitefish’s Americana pickers the Canyon Creek Ramblers play the Raven in Bigfork, 39 Orchard Road, at a TBA time. Free. Call 837-2836. A “one man jam band” straight outta Portland aims to bring da funk and some electronic beats straight to your dome when Afro Q Ben plays the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Openers TBA. Roadhouse rocks an unnamed genre when they play the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers


St. in Frenchtown, but my best guess is rock, country or something in between when they take the stage at 9 PM. Free. Call 626-5720. I predict a night of fury on the dance floor when the Full Moon Prophets blues up the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Start your weekend with a few shots of what’s likely to be Americana and bluegrass when Andrea Harsell and the Night Lights hold a CD release party at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Secret Powers opens. (See Scope in this issue.)

SATURDAY

19

September

Women of all ages, take notice of a Women’s Health Expo which runs from 7 AM–noon at St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center, 500 W. Broadway St., and features lab screenings, heel scans and lectures on women and heart disease, finding peace and more. Free. Call 543-7271. Your heart, the planet and your farmer-neighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM–noon as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. And if it’s non-edibles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. Certify your allegiance to sustainability during a Bitterroot Green Home Tour, a guided tour of five valley homes featuring solar power, composting toilets and more eco-friendly features from 9–4 PM. $10. Shuttle buses meet at Super 1 Foods in Stevensville and Hamilton at 9 AM. Tickets available at Cottonwood Market in Stevensville or Chapter One Bookstore in Hamilton. Call 207-3738. Historian Allan Mathews guides you through Northside Missoula of yore, and shows you what affordable housing used to look like, during a historic walk at 10 AM as part of Habitat for Humanity of Missoula’s Habitat Week. Meet at the Antique Mall, 331 Railroad St., at 10 AM. Free. Call 549-8210. Those suffering long-term illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program Simple Writing, Creative Phrases with Amy Kalil and Lori Mitchell. Donations appreciated, as is registration. Call 549-5329 or visit www.livingartofmontana.org. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Brush up on your skills as an art guide when the Missoula Art Museum presents Art Guide Training from 11 AM–1 PM, which includes an overview of the fifth grade art experience, MAM Art Guide policies and touring strategies, all at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Call Renee Taafee at 728-0447 for pricing. Get caught in the wave of Made in Montana food stuffs when members of the Montana Organic Association and Good Food Store demo staff take your questions, while you sample the fruits of organically grown food, during an organic Made in Montana food event from 11–3 PM at the Good Food Store. Free. Call 542-9211.

Your kid is likely to oscillate on the dance floor, and pluck an instrument or two, when Matthew Nord from Tangled Tones offers Kids’ Vibrations at 11 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call him for pricing at 396-3352 or e-mail mattnord@tangledtones.com. Kick around some balls for a good cause during Hammer Time, a kickball benefit for Habitat for Humanity of Missoula that starts at 11 AM at the McCormick Park fields. $50 entry fee, limited field of 16 teams. Call The Rhinoceros at 721-6061 to register. Dr. Seuss’ stories jump out of the page and into your child’s imagination during Seuss Saturday, an interactive story time for kids ages 3–6 which this week features The Cat in the Hat at 11 AM at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-PLAY.

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Get a 20 minute shot of artistic pleasure when you take a tour of the Missoula Art Museum’s latest exhibition from the late Freeman Butts titled Family Gifts:Works By Freeman Butts at noon at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call 728-0447. Concert master Darko Butorac conducts you through Claude Debussy’s Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun and Igor Stravinsky’s Firebird using all matter of digital media including DVD snippits, CD cuts as well as droppin’ some serious knowledge on the history and backgrounds of those compositions during Symphony Saturday at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., at 1 PM. Free. Call 728-0447. Unless you’re a cider hater, I suggest you take the plunge during a cider pressing workshop with Violet Hopkins at 1 PM at the headquarters of MUD, 629 Phillips St. $15/$10 members. Call 721-7513 to register and be sure to bring your own container. Kids grind their minds with sleek writing skills during a writers workshop for ages 10–14 at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St., from 1–3 PM. Free. Call 363-1670. Wander through Missoula’s very own DIY art hotspot when the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W., holds a tour from 1–2 PM. Cost TBA. Call 549-7555 or RSVP at erin@zootownarts.com. Contour, gesture and modeled drawing techniques keep the fingers of your child busy with a variety of drawing media like charcoal and pen as Feather Sherman leads Kids’ Saturday Drawing Club this and every Sat. for four weeks from 1–3 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $50/$45 members. Call 728-0447. Chili cook-offs, zucchini races, a farmers’ market and more comprise Ronan’s First Annual Ronan Area Harvest Fest, which kicks off with some chili simmer action at 2 PM and culminates with a set of what I’m guessing is old timey music by Goin-Concern at 7 PM, all at the Ronan Community Fairgrounds. Free, for most events. Check pricing and more at www.ronanchamber.com or call 253-8611.

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Summer in Missoula is probably the best time to travel around on a bike. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to make your own recycled bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Saturdays at 2:30 PM. Call 800809-0112. Improvisational movement with others takes on a jammy vibe during contact dance improv, this and every Sat. from 3–5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5. Musicians are welcome and encouraged. Email missoulacontactimprov@gmail.com. Cash in your ears for an aurally pleasing rebate when Cash for Junkers plays the Holiday Inn Parkside, 200 S. Pattee St., from 4–7 PM, either on the patio or in the lounge. Free.

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Missoula Independent

Page 23 September 17–September 24, 2009


Leaves become the seeds of your fourth to sixth-graders’ artistic inspiration during the activity “Find Something to Do” at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 4 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

nightlife Gutsy blues with “gusto and humor” simmers in your pint of microbrew when Mudslide Charley plays the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Crack open your thought pipe with some stewardship knowledge when renowned outdoorsman and author Roderick Nash discusses “The Meaning of Wilderness and the Rights of Nature” at Hamilton’s Civic Auditorium, 223 S. Second St., at 7 PM. Free. Call 542-2048. Watch as two parents crumble into uncivilized behavior brought about by a dinner party that features only alcohol, as well as obsessive hopes of job promotion, and more during the Montana Actors’ Theatre production of Life x 3 at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave., at 7:30 PM. $12 person. Harper Lee’s classic story of racism and human values hits Whitefish when the Montana Repertory Theatre rocks its fall national tour with performances of To Kill A Mockingbird at the Whitefish Middle School Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St., at 7:30 PM. $20 adults/$18 seniors/$6 students. Call 862-5371 or visit www.whitefishtheatreco.org. Two physicists that helped revolutionize atomic science ponder the merits of their work during the Hamilton Players’ rendition of the To n y A w a r d w i n n i n g p l a y Copenhagen, with performances at 8 PM through Sept. 19, and a 2 PM performance Sept. 20 at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/adults, $8/under age 18. Call 375-9050. He’s bound to get a little loopy, digitally that is, in order to get the jam out: Catch Virginian Keller Williams as he sways your inner hippie over to the Wilma Theatre for a show at 8 PM. $24/$19 advance at Rockin Rudy’s and www.ticketweb.com. British Thermal Units shoot through the roof of spiciness when Hot Salsa Nights overtakes the Elks Lodge at 8 PM. $7. They may not have the most inventive stage names, but Jessie & Rick are bound to belt out some serious variety vocals when they play the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. N. in Hot Springs, at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 1-888-305-3106. Son of A Gun shows you the importance of bearing musical arms during a night of undefined music, probably rock, when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra dur-

Missoula Independent

ing karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Have one too many drinks and you just might start singing pop tunes backwards during Bassackwards Karaoke at Larry’s Six Mile Bar & Grill in Huson, 23384 Huson Road, every other Sat. at 9 PM. Free. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, elec-

fiyah to the stage of the Top Hat when they play a show at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SUNDAY

20

September

Save a basset hound when Frenchtown’s nonprofit org Basset Rescue of Montana holds a fundraiser with a yard sale/drawing from 10 AM–4 PM at the corner of Russell and 34th streets. Free, but the drawing costs various prices for tickets. Call 239-4748. Catch some new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the Internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message from Seattle’s Center for Spiritual Living, while you

Party, featuring music by The Shenanigans, local food, prizes and more from 4–9 PM at Caras Park. $25/$20 members, $35 for 2/$30 members, $50 family/$45 members, $20 living lightly rate/$15 members. Call 543-3955.

nightlife Clark Fork School apparently needs some help with its general fund, so if you dig gorging on pizza and wanna lend a hand, head to the Clark Fork School Pizza night at Biga Pizza, 214 E. Main St. All proceeds go toward the school’s general fund. $10 adults/$5 kids age 3–10/Free kids under age 3. I doubt black metal is on tap when Christian song slinger Darrell Evans calls forth a higher power from inside with a free concert at Clark Fork City Church, 2811 Latimer St., at 6 PM. Free.

The weekend isn’t over until you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, where Landslide hosts at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke night, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when happy hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free. Let the sludge ooze into your ears when Athens, Ga. metal duo Jucifer blasts the Palace Lounge with a show at 9 PM. $5. Opening support from Horse Nozzle. These boys from Illinois know how to get irie: see reggae rawkers E3PO when they ragga up the stage of the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

MONDAY

21

September

SPOTLIGHT equality rockers You probably consider Missoula a progressive bastion of Montana, filled with people open to all cultures, races, ethnicities and sexual orientations. I hate to call you naïve, but I will. There is, in fact, an underbelly of intolerance here that sometimes bubbles to the surface. Local musician and UM student Tim Arrowtop knows this all too well. He’s a member of the Blackfeet Tribe and he moved to Missoula nine years ago. He says that while Missoula is undoubtedly liberal, he’s noticed many subtle instances of prejudice, like off-the-cuff racist remarks. He’s also witnessed more egregious examples, including what he considers racial profiling by various authority figures.

What: YWCA’s Rock Against Racism concert When: Fri., Sept. 18, 5–10 PM Where: Caras Park How Much: Free Arrowtop’s convinced that education is key, and that the YWCA’s Rock Against Racism concert on Friday should offer locals the tools to help allay

tronic and other bass-heavy, bootybusting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. I suggest you drink some California poppy tea to get in the mood for the relaxed indie pop of California’s The Moore Brothers, who play the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Secret Powers and Cottonwood Draw open. (See Noise in this issue.) The Duke of Mizzou spins hot dance trax for you and your rainbow friendly friends when he rocks Club Q, in the basement of the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 9 PM. $5. Revelations of smokin’ rockabilly licks await you when Russ Nasset and the Revelators take the stage of the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Lil’ Smokies bring signature Montucky bluegrass and Americana

Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

this menace. He’s doing his part by shredding onstage as bass player for two bands: Reptile Dysfunction and Birds Mile Home. As a nod to musical diversity, eight other artists are booked to play the free show, including local folk guitarist Isaac M, pictured above. Between sets, count on social justice groups like the Montana Human Rights Network and The Abolition Coalition to spread the word on how we can get involved by offering tips on battling all types of discrimination. Rock out for a good cause, give your assumptions a kick in the ass and be there.

watch the proceedings at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM. this and every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. Two physicists that helped revolutionize atomic science ponder the merits of their work during the Hamilton Players’ rendition of the To n y - a w a r d w i n n i n g p l a y Copenhagen, at 2 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/adults, $8/under age 18. Call 375-9050. Latch onto an inspirational talk by Clive Rainey, the first volunteer for Habitat for Humanity, when he discusses “A Community Celebration of Homes and Hope” at Blessed Trinity Catholic Community Church, 1475 Easton St., at 3 PM. Free. Call 549-8210. It’s time to party for peace with hundreds of your fellow peaceniks when the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center hosts its annual Peace

Page 24 September 17–September 24, 2009

If lunchtime just doesn’t have the intellectual kick it once did, perhaps you’ll find some brain food when Benjamin Wilfond, a medical professor and researcher, gives a talk on applying medical findings to patients’ care in Room 332 of the University Center at 12 PM. Free. Call 243-4685.

–Ira Sather-Olson Check one of “the world’s great concertmasters and violinists” when Cleveland, Ohio’s William Preucil bows and strings his way to Missoula to play with the String Orchestra of the Rockies for a concert at 7:30 PM at UM’s University Theatre. $20/$10 students at Rockin Rudy’s, Morgenroth Music, Fact & Fiction or www.sormt.org. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: live Jazz from the Donna Smith Trio, the Sam White Quartet and DJ Gary Stein. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free.

After school activities for your kid aged 8–12 get a little wild and primal during the Roxy Theatre’s After School Wildlife Film Safari which runs Mon.–Fri. from 3–5:30 PM, except for holiday’s, at the theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $6/hour. Call 728-9380 to register. You work long hours, but your kid doesn’t, so keep them busy after their studies during an after school program for kindergartners through sixth grade Mon.–Fri. at Elrod School, 412 Third Ave. W. in Kalispell, from 3:15–5:45 PM. $10 early out days/$6 regular days. Call 758-7975. Volunteerism rules the day when Clive Rainey, the first volunteer for Habitat for Humanity, discusses “Making a Difference Through Service” at the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall at 3:15 PM. Free. Call 549-8210. Your kid ages 6–11 finds good company, and excellent singing skills, with others when Amy Martin leads the class Meadowlark Singers which runs every Mon. at 4 PM until June 4 at the Missoula YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St. $225/$200 members. Call 721-YMCA. Two sessions of the popular World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class take place at the Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon.: At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5. $30/month, drum rental available. RSVP 396-3352 or visit tangledtones.com.


nightlife If you devote 5:30 to 8:30 PM on Monday or Wednesday nights to silent meditation, political drinking or other non-kid-friendly endeavors, the Parenting Place offers free child care and dinner at 1644 S. Eighth St. Call 728-KIDS to reserve a spot. Learn to mix and match your bellydance styles during Beginner World Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Mon. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for as many classes as you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Fire up the kiln and make some pipes, cups or other functional wares, or perhaps just something pretty (and skip the pipe), during an eight-week beginning pottery class which runs this and every Mon. from 6–9 PM until Nov. 2 at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/eightweek course. Call 543-0509. If you’re a woman and you’d like to help empower other women ages 9–18, and create positive change in their lives, consider becoming a volunteer for GUTS! during a training session tonight or Sept. 23 from 6–9 PM at Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway. Free. Call 5436691 or download an app at www.ywcaofmissoula.org.

Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Hwy. 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. Make your impassioned point in whatever rented costume most fits the bill when the Missoula City Council meets—as they do the first four Mondays of every month, holidays excluded—at 7 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Call 552-6080. Take a snapshot from a pro when Pulitzer Prize winning photographer David “Combat Dave” Leeson talks about “Photos that Move and Speak: The Decisive Moment Extended” and probably touches on his work as a photog in combat zones, at 7 PM in the University Center Theatre. Free. Call 243-2019. He plays honky tonk blues while you whet your palette with wine: Russ Nasset performs a solo set at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste 100, at 7 PM. Free. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Habitat for Humanity’s first volunteer, Clive Rainey, shares his experience and ideas with Missoulians during his discussion “Building a Community

for Humanity” at the University Center North Ballroom at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 549-8210. Bingo is no longer in the domain of the geriatric when Colin Hickey leads Colin Bingo at 8:30 PM at the Badlander with the first bingo card for free, subsequent cards for $1. Free. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Wash down your queasiness with a shot of sickly indie rock bluegrass from Bigfork when Sick Pony plays the Raven Restaurant, 39 Orchard Lane in Bigfork, at a TBA time. Free. Call 837-2836. Kick off your week with a drink and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during the Palace’s Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week. Free. Bring a bicycle with a big hook in it to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and see if you can troll for cars from the bar while you watch the show. Free. Heady vibes, skanktastic off-beat riddims and more await you when Jamaica’s Richie Spice and Stanner Banner rock Zootown with some reggae at the Top Hat at 10 PM. $20/$15 presale at Rockin Rudy’s and Atmosphere Smoke Shop.

TUESDAY

22

September

If you’ve been stricken with a bout of upper or lower extremity paralysis, and you’re a senior, head down to the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., from 9–11:30 AM for a rehab workshop hosted by St. Patrick Hospital and UM’s New Directions Wellness Center. Free. Call 543-7154. Cancer seems to be much more prevalent these days, so gain some enlightenment on prevention strategies when the Missoula City-County Health Department holds its inaugural Comprehensive Cancer Control Alliance meeting in Room 210 of the department, 301 W. Alder St., at 10 AM. Free. RSVP with Terry Egan at 258-3684 or e-mail egant@ho.missoula.mt.us. While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 25 years of age, their Meals on Wheels program serves a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you’d like—and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement— from Mon.–Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Moms who breastfeed or are considering breastfeeding ought to note that La Leche League of Missoula, a

Missoula Independent

support group for ye, meets this week to discuss “What Moms of More Than One Wish They Had Known” at 11:30 AM in the large meeting room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 549-1779. If you’ve ever wanted to brush up on the Missoula of yore, the time is now as the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula has just changed its hours and has three exhibits on display, including The Road to Today: 250 Years of Missoula County History every Tue.–Sun. from noon–5 PM at the museum, building 322 at Fort Missoula. $10 family/$3 adults/$2 seniors/$1 students. Call 728-3476. Shaving cream, tempera, chalk and more become the creative fire to ignite artistic passion in your 3.5–5 year old when Alli DePuy teaches Preschool Art Start at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., this and every Tue. until Oct. 13 from 1–2:30 PM. $55/$49.50 members. Call 728-0447. Toss out your 3.5–4-year-old’s antiquated dance moves and keep it fresh during Creative Movement at the ballet studio in UM’s PARTV building from 3:30–4 PM, this and every Tue. until Dec. 3. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849 Wow, here’s a mouthful for all you forestry freaks: Check out the Plum Creek Conference on Forests and Energ y: The Economic and Ecological Implications of Biomass Utilization from Rocky Mountain Forests, a series of presentations and panel discussions running today through Sept. 24, starting with a presentation at 3:30 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. Call 243-5245 or visit www.cfc.umt.edu/PlumCreekConf.

Page 25 September 17–September 24, 2009


Your pre-teens’ after school activities can be more productive (and cooler, I might add) than homework or the boob tube: Shove them off to the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., for After School Art Adventure with Bev Glueckert, where kids ages 7–12 work on printmaking and drawing projects inspired by current museum exhibits this and every Tue. from 4–5:30 PM until Oct. 13. $55/$49.50 members. Call 728-0447.

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Page 26 September 17–September 24, 2009

Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200. Get your fresh fruits and veggies from local farmers in the Flathead while listening to the guitar, trumpet and lap steel guitar genius that is The Stringlers during the Whitefish Downtown Farmer’s Market, at Depot Park on the north end of Central Avenue, from 5–7:30 PM. Free. Call 862-2043. Engage your eyes with art, your ears with music and your taste buds with drinks during the Missoula Art Museum’s Annual Fund Kick Off Party from 5–7 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. RSVP by Sept. 17. Call 728-0447. Hey, we all overindulge a little sometimes, but when you feel you’ve had enough, head down to Take off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), a meeting which starts with a weigh-in between 5 and 5:30 PM, followed by a meeting at 5:30, this and every Tue. at the Rocky Mountain Lodge in Whitefish, 6510 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call Tobacco 862-1233. & It’s always a glutenous Accessories good time when Wheat Smoking Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Beginners can try, but those more experienced might catch on quicker during Intermediate World Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Tue. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. Find your flow, and the will to practice Pranayama, during Ashtanga Yoga on the river with Evan Lovely, this and every Tue. in Sept. at Birds & Bee’s LLC, 1515 E. Broadway, from 5:30–7 PM. Donations requested. Call 544-1271. Skirt your chances of getting the swine flu when Les Whitney and Pam Goldberg discuss “H1N1–the Swine Flu” at 5:30 PM in the Gallagher Day Room at the Rehabilitation Institute of Montana at Community Medical Center, 2827 Fort Missoula Road. Free. Call 327-4141. Dijon-rubbed beef loin, creamy mashed taters and veggies become the meal of champions when the Elk’s Lodge holds a dinner from 5:30–7 PM. $9. Call 549-0542. Become Missoula’s next breakthrough cubistsurrealist oil painter when you attend the Missoula Art Museum’s Oil Painting Fundamentals with Stephanie J. Frostad, a five-week course at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St., this and every Tue. until Oct. 6 where you learn the basics by using still life subject matter. $105/$94.50 members. Call 728-0447. Beginners can try, but those more advanced in the ways of clay should check an intermediate throwing class, which runs this and every Tue. from 6–9 PM until Nov. 3 at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/eight-week course. Call 543-0509. Nurturing your kid doesn’t mean giving them candy and plopping them in front of the television while you go off to the bar, so head over to a nurturing parenting class at the

Parenting Place, 1644 S. Eighth St. W., from 6–7:30 PM every Tue. until Nov. 17. $60 couples/$40 individuals. Call 728-KIDS. Learn how to become more alert, without stimulants like coffee (or meth, for a few of you out there), but rather with your thoughts when Dr. Shelby Smith presents the program “Think Well” at the Vitality Chiropractic Clinic, 410 W. Spruce St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 549-0119. A single bracelet does not jingle: Unity Dance and Drum’s all-levels West African Dance Class meets every Tue. evening at 6:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10 per class/$35 for four classes. Call 549-7933. Are you feeling lonelier than normal? Remedy that when Singles of Missoula, a group for singles age 45 and over, meets Tue. at 6:30 PM at the bicycle trail head behind Conlin’s Furniture, 1600 North Ave. W., for a bike ride. Free. Call Cletius at 541-2333. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Stop playing games with yourself–Game Night featuring “mostly Scrabble” takes place at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Missoula, 102 McLeod Ave. 6:45 PM. Free. You never know what you’ll find—except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Grab the rooster sauce and get spicy when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at a new time of 7 PM followed by intermediate/advanced at 8, every Tue. at the Badlander. $7/per class per person. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buy-one-get-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn Parkside, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej@yahoo.com. Poetry is in store for you when Vic Charlo and Zan Agzigian hold a poetry reading at Shakespeare and Co., 103 S. Third St. W., at 7 PM. Free. Call 549-9010. Nashville Songwriters Association will be at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave., from 7–9 PM. All genres welcome. Cost TBA. Call 542-9258. Labor loving brothers and sisters unite for a glimpse into the history of your struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’ Waiting For Lefty at the Crystal Theatre at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What was the last novel published by author William S. Burroughs before he passed away? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Whitefish musicians trade their skills for free drinks as the Great Northern Bar hosts Open Mic Night, which begins at 8 PM with an acoustic jam circle, heads into an electric set at 9:30 and features fine hosting by members of the Canyon Creek Ramblers. Free. Call 862-2816. You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 273-9992 to reserve your spot.


Music and the outdoors do make for a happy marriage. I found this to be particularly true last Friday night, while taking in the maddeningly awesome sounds of the Mountain Computer Music Festival, a showcase of avant-garde electronic music, nestled just near the base of Mount Sentinel. It was the perfect mix of sunny weather, good acoustics, great performers and a beauteous view of the M. So before the weather dips south, I urge you to check out any remaining outdoor concerts while you can. And while we’re on the subject of stimulating your senses, I found something titillating for your eyes, hands and feet as we begin this week. Specifically, those with a compulsion to cycle ought to head out with members of Mountain Bike Missoula tonight at 6 PM for a ride on Hidden Treasure Trail, up to the top of Mount Sentinel, and then to Crazy Canyon Road and back to the trail. Free. Plan to meet at the corner of Maurice and South streets at the aforementioned time. E-mail Alden Wright at thurs@ftml.net or give him a ring at 243-4790 or 542-1966. Also check www.thursdaynightmtbr.org for updates. As Friday hits, I must bring you some unfortunate news, especially if you like stargazing. It’s the last time this year you’ll be able to focus your eyes up into the surrounding stars and nebulae with a powerful telescope as part of Blue Mountain Observatory’s Public Observing Nights, which finishes this year’s run with an observation starting time of 8:55 PM. Free. Call 243-5179 and visit www.physics.umt.edu/BlueMountain\index.html. After snoozing the night away with stars on your mind, start Saturday with a cup of coffee and some benevolent slogging with those crazy workhorses of the Rattlesnake Creek Watershed Group, who head up a creek cleanup at 10 AM in the group area of Greenough Park. If you’re dressed to sweat, bring gloves, boots, waders (if you have them) and a walking stick for balance. Your studious stewardship will be kindly rewarded later that day with a pizza party at the Double Tree (I’m guessing that means Finn & Porter). Give

Maybe you’re not as interested in biking this week. If so, join up with another crew of Rocky Mountaineers for a 10-mile, 5,000 foot elevation-gain climb up Holland Peak in the Swan Range on Saturday at 6:30 AM. It’s a rough trail, apparently, and you’ll pass Rumble Creek Lakes before you gain on a ridge with some exposed spots you should be able to navigate. If that piques your hiking boots, call Paul Jensen at 728-6881 on Fri., Sept. 18. If you’re really feeling physically or mentally sluggish, jolt your intellect with Roderick Nash, the renowned outdoorsman and author, when he gives the talk “The Meaning of Wilderness and the Rights of Nature” at Hamilton’s Civic Auditorium, 223 South Second St. in Hamilton, at 7 PM. Free. Call Dawn Serra at 542-2048 or visit www.wildernesswatch.org. If kids are an issue concerning this weekend’s outings, you’ll be glad to know there’s a free camping activity in store for them when the Missoula Children and Nature Network present its “Got Nature?” campout at Fort Missoula, starting at 2 PM on Saturday and ending at 10 AM on Sunday where kids participate in activities like games, apple pressings, fire tower tours and more. It’s free and all food is provided, as are limited amounts of camping gear. RSVP by visiting www.missoulachildrenandnature.org, or calling Maria at 531-9959. As you trudge back to your work week, here’s a quick reminder about another Rocky Mountaineers trip coming up on Wed., Sept. 23: It’s a Smith River floating and camping trip that runs until Sun., Sept. 26. There’s limited room for the outing, so quickly contact permit holder Steve Schombel at 721-4686. Also, I recently got a glut of e-mails from UM’s Campus Photo by Alex Sakariassen Recreation Department about several outdoor items of interest, but I can’t list ‘em all. Among them include a two-day Cycles, Mountain Bike Missoula and Missoula in Motion. Call Marlana Whitewater Rescue 3 Technician Course which costs $295, as well as a bike maintenance program that costs $50. You need to at 721-5357 or e-mail at marluna3@qwestoffice.net. Perhaps you’d rather spend your Saturday doing some seriously register for both by Sept. 21, so visit life.umt.edu/crec/Outdoor/classass kicking hiking. Well, you’ve that option as the Rocky es.php for a full rundown of courses and call 243-2804 to register. Now, head onward reader. I’ll be eagerly awaiting your return, as Mountaineers venture out with two trips today. The first was mentioned last week; it’s a 70-mile cycling and 26-mile trail run from well as your next round of event information. So be sure to send Missoula up to Lolo Pass and through the Elk Summit Turnoff. Word it to me by 5 PM on Fri., Sept. 18. Also, as an extra nod to your on the street is that the trip is going to start early, and you’ll definitely appreciation for nature, be sure to peep the Montana Matters benefit need a mountain bike or cyclocross bike for this jaunt. Let Joshua if you can (see Agenda in this issue for more details). Phillips know you’re down for realz and call him at 543-0898 or email him at mtsurveyor@gmail.com. calendar@missoulanews.com Greg Peters a ring at 471-3363 or e-mail him at peters.gregorym@gmail.com for more. Once you’ve worked ‘til you’ve bled, take a few hours to relax by heading down to the Second Annual PEDal Festival, a celebration of pedestrians and bicyclists which rocks Caras Park from 11–6 PM and features a parade, music by bands like the Dead Me Downs, Wartime Blues and Lil’ Smokies, as well as “cycling craziness,��� games and libations. Proceeds from the fest go to local cycling groups like the Bike/Walk Alliance of Missoula, Free

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Page 27 September 17–September 24, 2009


Great Music doesn’t care what you drive.

Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real for those in the know every Tue. at 8:30 PM, when Intermediate Hip-Hop Class puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Be your own American Idol during “Jheryoake”—that’s karaoke with Jerry Reeb—every Tue. at 9 PM with Happy Hour until 10 at the AmVets Club. Free. Metal and punk rules the night when Stevensville’s Zebulon Kosted gets metallic and Zootown’s Train Song rocks three chords for ye at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Get dirty in the face of aural rebellion when Unwashed Promotions presents DJs Harvey and Heyska, playing an array of punk and ska tunes at 9 PM. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, and muster up the courage to belt out some classics too, and perhaps win a prize, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue.–Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Fuzz Huzzi and Vonzeles aim to get fists pumping and establish power pop and hard rock as genres still relevant to the music game when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. (See Noise in this issue.)

WEDNESDAY

23

September

The program, featuring Stewart Goodyear, pianist Coriolan Overture – Beethoven Piano Concerto No.20 – Mozart Prelude to The Afternoon of a Faun– Debussy Firebird Suite (1919) – Stravinsky

SAT., SEPT. 26, 7:30 P.M. SUN., SEPT. 27, 3:00 P.M. The University Theatre Tickets: $8 to $35 Visit missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 E. Main St. Sponsored by

Missoula Independent

Morning Melodies, a free, funfilled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free. Curiosity doesn’t quite kill the cat when storyteller Star Jameson leads a preschool story time titled “Cats, Curious Cats” at 10:30 AM at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Brush up on your skills as an art guide when the Missoula Art Museum presents an Art Guide Training from 11 AM–1 PM, which includes an overview of the fifth grade art experience, MAM Art Guide policies and touring strategies, all at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Call Renee Taafee at 728-0447 for pricing. Mail order brides from Ukraine mix with hopes of true love, and your lunch, when Fact & Fiction presents a book club luncheon with Janet Skeslien Charles, author of Moonlight in Odessa, at noon in Room 332 of UM’s University Center. $16 paid reservation, due on Sept. 19. Call 243-1234 or 721-2881. Runners, get working on your core during a core strength training class this and every Wed. for 11 weeks from 12:15–1 PM upstairs at the Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. $75/$68 Run Wild Missoula

Page 28 September 17–September 24, 2009

Members. RSVP with Alison Laundrie at alison@thepilatesplayground.com. Forget treadmills, burn that excess fat, and look stylish too, during Dancercise Around the World with Elenita Brown, a low-impact class designed to stregthen and stretch, this and every Wed. at 2:30 PM until Nov. 4 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Rock those hips to classical and regional Spanish dance styles, as well as Flamenco, when Elenita Brown leads a Flamenco dance class this and every Wed. at 3:45 PM until Nov. 4 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $75, eight-week course. Call 541-7240. Boys move to an entirely different groove at Boys Movin’, a dance class for boys ages 5–9 every Wed. at 4:15 PM for 12 weeks in the ballet studio at UM’s PARTV building. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849.

nightlife Dudes and duderinos, it’s your time to imbibe all day with drink specials this and every Wed. when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Men’s Day. Free. Call 370-3200. Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Blue Argon plays “eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn” every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Red Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. It’s once again time to render flesh, muscles and an assortment of body parts into a work of artistic genius during the Missoula Art Museum’s non-instructed figure drawing classes, which run from 6–8 PM this and every Wed. at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $7/$5 members. Participants must be 18 and over. Call 728-0447. Should your pottery be functional, or aesthetically pleasing? I’m not sure either, but take your pick during an eight-week beginning pottery class which runs this and every Wed. from 6–9 PM until Nov. 4 at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/eightweek course. Call 543-0509. Gillian Kessler asks only that you embrace your inner diva as she fuses slick Brazilian moves with modern techniques for her AfroBrazilian Dance Class, which takes place every Wed. at 6:10 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Find out the difference between regular pilates and pilates from the Big Apple when Alison Laundrie leads a New York Style Pilates class every Wed. at Main Street Pilates, 214 E. Main St., at 6:30 PM. $12. RSVP 541-2673. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula

Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. He may be getting older, but he’s still a radical at heart: Drench your ears with a night of soul, funk and maybe hiphop when Michael Franti and Spearhead play a show with opener Trevor Hall at Ryan Creek Meadows, 15886 Willis Ranch Lane, near Clinton, at 7 PM. $35 at Rockin Rudy’s and www.ticketweb.com. Visit www.ryancreekmeadows.com for directions. Grab that tutu and slap on some ballet shoes every Wed. at 7:20 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Beginning Ballet. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Labor loving brothers and sisters unite for a glimpse into the history of your struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’ Waiting For Lefty at the Crystal Theatre at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. Those of the “silver tsunami” generation, aka peeps age 65 or older, are apparently the largest growing population in the U.S. and Asia, so kick some knowledge about their future impact on health, housing and more when Nicholas Eberstadt, a demographer with the American Enterprise Institute, discusses “How Aging is Changing America, Asia and the World” at UM’s University Center Theatre at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 243-2998 or visit www.umt.edu/mansfield. Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other likeminded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. Extend yourself beyond regular ballet using emotion through movement to tell stories and interpret music when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Lyrical Class every Wed. at 8:30 PM. Call 541-7240 for pricing. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: William S. Burrough’s last novel before he died in 1997 was My Education: A Book of Dreams. The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts ladies’ night this and every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Six Pack” by Black Flag, or some similarly badass tune, during Living Squares Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. An unnamed cast of DJs play music to ease you over the hump of Hump Day at the Palace at 9 PM. Free.


He gets his lean on like a true gangsta. Get caught in the crossfire of some beefy rhymes when the Bronx’s Fat Joe slams the mic at the Elks Lodge at 9 PM. $17. Call 549-0542. Fight for the right to belt out a semicoherent version of The Darkness’ “I Believe in a Thing Called Love” every Wed. during Combat Karaoke at Rowdy’s Cabin, 4880 N. Reserve St., at 10 PM. Free. Call 543-8001. A cover tune and more might be in store when M-Group plays the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY

24

September

Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. The Mansfield Center presents a series of discussions as part of its conference titled “Methuselah’s Challenge: Aging in America and Asia” starting with a talk at 10:15 AM in the University Center Ballroom and continuing through the day. Free. Call 243-2998 or visit www.umt.edu/mansfield. Although they had the reception in late August, you can still see the ethereal silk images of Gail Cluff and unconventional collage of Steve Thomas through Oct. 17 at Hamilton’s Art City Gallery, 407 W. Main St. Gallery hours are Tue.–Sat. 11 AM–5 PM. Free. Call 363-4764. Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Potato chips and Reese’s Pieces fall short of a nutritious lunch for your child. If you didn’t already know that, go grab some tips on packing your kid a healthy lunch when the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., presents the discussion “Healthy Sack Lunches” at 1 PM. Free. Even if your toddler makes some smooth dance moves, your 5–6 year old might need some work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Get your fresh produce up near Glacier, if you choose, every Thu. from 4–8 PM, as the Columbia Falls Farmers’ Market overtakes Nucleus Ave. and offers live music from 5–7:30 PM. Breakdance, slamdance or just inventively dance when your 7- to 8year-old checks out Creative and Modern Movement, a dance class at 4:15 PM this and every Thu. in the ballet studio of UM’s PARTV building, until Dec. 3. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849. Love and humility mix with acclaimed cinematography when UM’s Mansfield Center continues its “Aging in America and Asia” conference with a screening of the South Korean movie The Way Home at the University Center Ballroom at 4:30 PM. Free. Call 243-2998 or visit www.umt.edu/mansfield.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. It’s time to meld those abstract dance moves into specific form, especially if you’re between the ages of 9–12, at Dance and Choreography, this and every Thu. until Dec. 3 at 5 PM in the ballet studio of UM’s PARTV building. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, reggaeton—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful

Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. Explore the concept of socio-sexual inequity in 1930s China when UM’s Mansfield Center continues its “Aging in America and Asia” conference with a screening of the Chinese film The King of Masks at 7 PM in the University Center Ballroom. Free. Call 243-2998 or visit www.umt.edu/mansfield. The event is free, but don’t count on a complimentary sensual massage: Missoula’s newest sexology clinic (that’s the scientific study of sex for all you plebeians), Birds and Bees LLC, kicks open its doors with a grand opening party featuring a DJ and light food, as well as info on classes and an opportunity to meet with therapist Dr. Lindsay Doe, at its headquarters, 1515 E. Broadway St.,

Photo by Anne Medley

Howard Kingston screams with conviction about labor struggles in the 1930s during Montana Rep Missoula’s production of Waiting For Lefty at the Crystal Theatre Tue., Sept. 22 through Sat., Sept. 26, at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809.

sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Gypsies come out during Troupe Night class every Thu. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Sax, geetar licks and sultry vocals waft in the air along with the pungent odor of beer when the Joan Zen Duo plays the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven double-spaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and

at 7 PM. Free. Call 544-1019 or visit www.doctordoe.com. Socrates might have supported a single-payer health care system, or maybe not. Hash out your philosophical thoughts about such subjects with others during Socrates Cafe at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 7 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Poet Annie Finch is likely to bust out some wicked stanzas when she reads from her recent work, and talks about her poetry fieldwork with Glacier National Park, at the poetry corner on the fifth floor of UM’s Mansfield Library at 7 PM. Free. The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate HipHop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Labor loving brothers and sisters unite for a glimpse into the history of your struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’ Waiting For Lefty at the Crystal Theatre at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. Your cochlea might ring, but it surely won’t bleed, during a night of melodic leaning metalcore when Orlando, Fla.’s Trivium plays the Wilma Theatre at 7:30 PM with White Chapel, Darkest Hour and Dirge Within. $21.50 plus fees/$20 advance plus fees at Rockin Rudy’s, Ear Candy and www.ticketswest.com. Rock some sweet fiddle solos and bust a move while others shred with-

out use of an amp during Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., at 7:30 PM this and every Thu. through Oct. Free. Call 726-3765. Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists’ showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should Call 541-8463. Bowling and karaoke go together like the late GG Allin and a sane mind during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosteronefueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Get your fix of improvised music with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace Lounge at 9 PM every Thu. Free. See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, and muster up the courage to belt out some classics too, and perhaps win a prize, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue.–Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others under the influence of that music box you sing along to during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free.

Seattle-ites The Staxx Brothers celebrate blues rock worship when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Russ Nasset twangs it solo tonight when the country king plays the Old Post Pub, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free. Space is super short this week, so I’ll make it quick. I try to squeeze in everything I can, but sometimes the calendar gods and goddesses put a halt on my artistic canvas. Don’t give up. As we run into next week, please Send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Sept. 18, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

WRITE NOW IN MISSOULA

:ZZ:ULWHUV:RUNVKRSFRP Six-Week Salon-Style Workshops Begin: 10/7 Short Fiction w/ Brian Buckbee 10/7 Non-Fiction w/ Andy Smetanka 10/13 Screenwriting 101 w/ Catherine Jones 10/21 First Chapters w/ David Cates 11/3 Poetry w/ Chris Dombrowski 11/4 Imitations w/ Elizabeth Urschel 1/4 Non-Fiction w/ Bryan Di Salvatore

Missoula Independent

Page 29 September 17–September 24, 2009


scope

Born to play Andrea Harsell finds her way with Rock & Roll Love Child by Erika Fredrickson

For several months, Andrea Harsell had only a chorus. She’d sing, “Ooooh, lemonade, I gotta find my way home,” but she couldn’t get past that one bluesy minor key line, couldn’t turn it into a full-fledged song with verses. The local singer/songwriter let it simmer. She’d sit down to write other tracks, settling into a guitar riff, letting the words spill out. But the lemonade song haunted her. “I’m like, ‘What in the heck does this mean? Lemonade? Why are no other words coming?,’” she says. One night, she ended up at a party and someone suggested that she write about a relationship gone sour. “It was a tortured way to look at it,” she says. “But the next day I sat down and all the rest of it came out.”

Bond, and she’s traveled solo to various festivals, including Telluride. But Harsell says she’s been stuck in a rut for the last three years. Busy raising two kids and with a husband often working on the road, sometimes gone for 30 days at a time, Harsell says she stayed home and rarely played live. She wrote a lot, but most of the songs were “the tortured kind.” That’s kind of her style anyway, she admits, but it was still hard for her to completely sacrifice her music. “I always knew I was going to do music since I was really little,” she says. “When you’re young and you dream of it, you really don’t understand how it happens that somebody gets on the radio. But it’s just never been an option to stop playing or stop writing. It would be really weird. It would be like sitting on your hands.”

Rattlesnake Creek, cars driving through the Orange Street underpass, a squeaky bicycle wheel and raucous street conversations during Maggot Fest weekend. You can also hear the sound of beers popping open and the laugh of the pastor’s wife at All Souls. The last song of the album jumps to something completely different. “Waterside” features Harsell’s 12-person pick-up choir, which includes the likes of Jay Straw, Kevin Van Dort, Mike Avery and singers from the Mason Jar String Band and Zeppo. “That was kind of a struggle with this CD,” Harsell says of fitting in all the different styles. “I want to do rock, I want to do gospel, but then I want to do the bluegrass, a little bit of country, a little bit of rock ’n’ roll. People say, ‘Stick to one genre.’ But I don’t want to do that. I asked advice and I got

Photo courtesy of Charles Martin

Andrea Harsell’s new album combines gospel, rock ’n’ roll and a decade’s worth of songwriting. “What everybody loves about Janis [Joplin] is she didn’t care what other people thought,” says Harsell. “She just felt the music so internally with every cell of her body and let it out in that way. I’ve had times playing onstage where I am so in the moment that I’m not thinking, and it’s just bliss.”

The now-finished “Lemonade” tells the story of a woman who follows her lover from Tennessee to Baton Rouge, working dead end jobs and leading a life she never wanted to lead, but intent on finding a better path. It’s a salty, strutting country blues song with Harsell’s smoky vocals searing through each line. And it’s the second track on Harsell’s new album, Rock & Roll Love Child, a collection of songs she’s releasing this week but that has been in the works for the past 10 years. Harsell’s a well-known musician in Missoula, born and raised on the Northside. She was the lead singer of the bluegrass band Nine Pound Hammer, which put out an album in 2000 before breaking up. In 2003, she formed the Andrea Harsell Experiment, a 1960s- and 1970s-styled rock band covering Janis Joplin and Jefferson Airplane, as well as doing originals that fused blues, country, folk and jazz. The band dispersed later that year after releasing a live album. Harsell has also opened for numerous touring bands as a duo with her lead guitarist, Louie

Missoula Independent

Page 30 September 17–September 24, 2009

Harsell decided that she would do whatever it took to include her music in her life. She began jamming whenever she could with other musicians. She joined her congregation’s music group at All Souls church. And she decided, come hell or high water, she’d record an album. Diversity is key to Rock & Roll Love Child. The first track, “Gotta Find,” is a cross between Joan Jett’s growl and Joplin’s grit. Harsell sings, “Sittin’ here wastin’ my sweet time, gonna find me a woman gonna make her mine/Sittin here wastin’ my sweet time, gonna find me a man gonna make him mine, now.” And she shows her penchant for aggressive one-liners à la ZZ Top or Guns n’ Roses when she adds, “We can stay the night, we’ll roll around in the grass/Come on baby, baby gonna tap that ass.” Blues, folk and rock songs fill the album, interspersed with field recordings from around Missoula that Harsell’s been collecting over the past five years. You can hear the sound of

advice, and then I just went with my gut and just did it the way it is.” Harsell’s giddy about the long-awaited release. The recording time helped form a new band, Andrea Harsell and the Night Lights, which includes power keyboardist Ryan “Shmed” Maynes of recording studio fame. And she’s already set her mind to never let five years go by again before she makes another album. “I’m trying to live a life as a musician and also the reality of paying the bills and having kids,” she says. “And I just want it all. With music, it’s kind of like now or never. You can sit there and think about it, but you have to actually make it happen.” Andrea Harsell and the Night Lights play a CD release party at the Top Hat Friday, Sept. 18, at 9 PM with Jaymi White, Wolf Redboy and the Mason Jar String Band. $5. $1 off cover with every donated food item. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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The Moore Brothers Aptos

American Dust

It’s almost impossible not to compare the Moore Brothers to Simon & Garfunkle, especially with the way both duos combine 1960s rock rhythms with sugar sweet folk and half-step jazz harmonies. When The Moore Brothers get especially breezy, their layered voices evoke choral soundtracks to old children’s records, like “Little April Showers” in Bambi. That’s not to say they reek of Disney blandness—on the contrary— but they do meander into fairytale soundscapes. On Aptos, the California-based brothers use

Jessica Kilroy Before Dawn self-released

The best thing a singer/songwriter brings to the table—the stripped-down nature of a single voice paired with an instrument, in this case the acoustic guitar—can also be its biggest hurdle. With a full band, it is much easier to work a little variety into the performance. If an artist doesn’t go that route, every aspect of their work needs to be top notch simply by nature of the extra attention focused on it. It’s a bold move to make, if you ask me. Montana native Jessica Kilroy doesn’t hide behind a posse of guests and bandmates. Her voice is quietly compelling, and she doesn’t distract from the songs with vocal gymnastics that I suspect she is more than capable of pulling off. Her guitar playing

Fuzz Huzzi

Smell the Streets of Hollywood self-released

Fuzz Huzzi are working the L.A./Hollywood angle for their debut EP, which seems a little weird since they call San Diego home, but whatever. They don’t have a sound that comes to mind when I think of the infamous Whisky a Go Go on the Sunset Strip, but I’m probably too nostalgic for the vintage dirty SoCal rock that got me into music in the first place. Times change, and for all I know this foursome has their collective finger on the pulse of the L.A. music sound and scene.

Patrick Bloom Ghosts of Radio Mud Dauber Record

Perhaps it’s his Americana roots sound or track titles that reference Midwestern states, but Patrick Bloom appears clearly influenced by the heartland. He does, after all, call Iowa City, Iowa, home. Yet this Hawkeye knows how to please listeners outside of corn country. With smart lyrics like “Fortune is a tricky high/slick and silver as a spoon,” and his Jeff Tweedy-styled vocals, Bloom hits an easygoing rhythm that’s pleasant on the ears. In some ways, however, that style haunts Ghosts of Radio. The repertoire, as a whole, never fully explores any edgy or inspirational instrumentation.

those layered “oohs” and “ahhs” to fatten up otherwise grounded folk pop, and the outcome is enchanting. “Little Blue” sounds like a dawn processional through the hills of an ancient countryside. “Heard About You” is sunny-day R & B. And the thunderstorm intro in “You and Me and Razor Dan” makes way for lyrics about a mystical character who literally carves his way through the world in an unpredictable manner. Actually, there’s a bit of Ween’s deadpan in here, like in the line, “I was sure it was you, Buddha belly baby holdin’ my breath. Misty morning train.” But the Moore Brothers don’t let on, whatever their intent. And for that, it’s easy to embrace Aptos with complete sincerity, whether they’re being ironic or not. (Erika Fredrickson) The Moore Brothers play the Palace Saturday, Sept. 19, at 9 PM with Cottonwood Draw and Secret Powers. $5. is subtle and understated. The focus, then, becomes the songs themselves, and there isn’t a dud among the nine tracks of her recently rereleased debut, Before Dawn. I’ve always thought to be successful, singers/songwriters need to get out of the coffee shop and travel and take risks in order to make their music interesting. Kilroy has taken that route, and it shows in the haunting melodies of her songs. It is good music for reflective days. (Chris La Tray) Jessica Kilroy plays the Montana Matters Benefit Concert at the Wilma Friday, Sept. 18, at 7 PM with Shane Clouse and other guests. $15/$10 students. Fuzz Huzzi is an indie band that certainly sounds like they could be snapped up by a major label; their music would be far more at home on any corporate radio station than one blasting out of a liberal arts college. All the modern rock lynchpins are here—layered guitar riffs, funk-influenced bass and drum patterns, and alternate singing/screaming vocals. Opener “Hollywood” is, for the most part, a straight-ahead rocker. “State of Confusion,” my favorite track, strays more into a funk-based theme, while “Dying Day” is the modern equivalent of the power ballad. “Love” wraps things up with moody, almost-psychedelia alternating with near-metal riffage. If music didn’t get good for you until 1995, this is your ticket. (Chris La Tray) Fuzz Huzzi plays the Top Hat Tuesday, Sept. 22, at 9 PM. Cover TBA. Somewhere in the background, a keyboard is dying to ring out, but even astute ears can never quite make out the harmonies. And when the brass and horns come in on “Rosalie,” they sound muted and muddy. No matter—I’m guessing Bloom would prefer listeners focus on his vocals. His simple and understated songs are sung with vigor and pair nicely with his acoustic strumming. His voice and writing alone are enough to earn him fans from across the country. (Kelsey Bernius) Patrick Bloom plays The Cellars Friday, Sept. 18, at 7:30 PM. $5.

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• Bubblers • Hookahs • Herbal Cleansers

(406) 728 - 4420 115 West Main, Missoula Open at 10am 7 days a week Missoula Independent

Page 31 September 17–September 24, 2009


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Outsider’s lens

Times Run 9/18 - 9/24 Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

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“Black out the Owlz!” Show your support for the Osprey by wearing black to the games!

Missoula Independent

Page 32 September 17–September 24, 2009

In one of Alexia Beckerling’s photographs, the profile of a beaverslide rears up into the sky like some medieval machine Terry Gilliam might have dreamed up. Another photo captures tire tracks in the snow following the sweep of the blue sky; the perfect backdrop for a flame-red winter tree. In a third photo, winter light floods the windows of a darkened bar, silhouetting a lone drinker and a deer head mounted on the wall. Beckerling’s visual take on the small Montana town of Helmville is both familiar and refreshingly

same last names can be traced back through five or six generations. A community this close-knit can be daunting to outsiders. So many citizens hail from the same IrishCatholic stock that the alternative to Helmville’s well-maintained Catholic cemetery is a weedy patch unofficially known as “the other cemetery.” Through Geary, whom she calls her “gatekeeper,” Beckerling was able to gain acceptance and made herself a kind of fixture in the town over the course of the next two years. She often stayed at the Geary Brothers Ranch, made friends with the locals, and attended as many public occasions as possible, including the locally famed Labor Day Rodeo. “People were very welcoming,” she says. “I felt like I had great access, going into homes, being there for the day-to-day [life].” As locals we often take our particular culture and heritage for granted, and the little towns off of the main highway remain nameless features of the landscape. It may take an outsider’s curiosity to reveal Alexia Beckerling’s “Entrance to Bill Geary’s Home” is part of her just how rich the day-to-day new photography exhibit, Helmville, which documents the small life in a small town can be. Montana town. In one of Beckerling’s foreign. Her landscapes perfectly capture small-town photos, joyful children hunt Easter eggs among the Montana in passing—the gold fields under sparkling gravestones in Helmville’s Catholic cemetery. snow, the old wooden buildings, the stately moun- According to Beckerling, the local schoolteacher tains, and the great, big sky—but her portraits of reg- had heard that in Europe, people often picnicked ular people in remarkably unguarded moments tell in the old cemeteries. Setting the annual Easter egg a much more intimate story. hunt there seemed somehow fitting. Of the town as a whole Beckerling says fondly, Born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa, Beckerling was working in a photo gallery in New “There’s a slight eccentricity to it.” To the people of York City when she decided she wanted to concen- Helmville, there is nothing sacrilegious or disretrate on her own career. A New York friend had spectful about hunting Easter eggs in the graveyard. recently learned (in South Africa, of all places) In fact, there’s something typically Irish-Catholic about our own Rocky Mountain School of about living so comfortably with the ghosts of many Photography, and thought the program might generations. “I see it as a celebration of the past in a way,” interest Beckerling, who until then had “never says Beckerling. heard of Montana,” she says. Beckerling currently resides in Capetown while In 2004, Beckerling took a chance on an unknown place, and once in Missoula she found she pursues another long-term documentary projherself intrigued by a culture and landscape “all very ect, but she’s still attached to Missoula. The feeling is mutual. In between her studies and visits to new” to her. “I ended up enrolling in the university, and a Helmville, she also found time to write for couple of months turned into…years,” Beckerling NewWest.net and volunteer at the Missoula Art recalls. Museum (MAM). By 2008, Beckerling had earned her masters in This week’s Artini at MAM will feature multimephotojournalism and completed an ambitious photo dia profiles of other local artists that Beckerling prodocumentary project focusing on life in Helmville, a duced during her time in Missoula, as well as a preshidden hamlet in the Blackfoot Valley situated entation on Helmville by Beckerling herself. The roughly between Ovando and Lincoln. Helmville photographs speak volumes, but they also Beckerling’s fascination with the town began leave viewers wanting more of the story. With soon after she arrived in Montana, when she met Beckerling briefly back in town, now is the time to and befriended Helmville native Daniel Geary. While hear it. Missoula was a new experience for Beckerling, Alexia Beckerling talks about her exhibit Helmville was an entirely different universe. In this Helmville at the Missoula Art Musuem for Artini isolated yet thriving community, the descendants of Thursday, Sept. 17, at 7 PM. Free. Irish immigrants still live in the houses and work the arts@missoulanews.com cattle ranches built by their great-grandparents. The


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Skin deep

Where does it hurt?

Clever animation canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hide 9â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clichĂŠs by Andy Smetanka

 

    

Hair and fur have long posed a challenge to The premise is the same: Machines turn on their stop-motion animators. Fire and smoke, too, and masters and proceed to mop the floor with humanwaterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just for animators, but for special effects ity. Though the context makes the back-story almost technicians struggling to recreate realistic sea bat- superfluous, we do learn it a bit at a time in the tles between 1:10 scale model ships, filmed at half- form of simulated newsreelsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The speed for best effect but still heaving cheesily Terminator as imagined by Leni Riefenstahlâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and between giveaway water droplets in studio tanks. the stupefyingly cool use of simulated still photos No such stumbling blocks beset digital anima- from this final combat. Imagine vintage photos of tors. The technology has advanced to the point the London Blitz or the battle for Stalingrad only where if the production artists can dream it up, the with mechanical kill-bots from this 1936 Terminator animators can make it happen, and with ever more crashing through the ruins. Shane Acker did, and stunning results. Smoke, flames, haze, hair, furâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;by boy is it marvelous. any measure the inanimate has never looked more I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say this enough: 9 is visually astonishing. animate in animation. The problem for animation Which is why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a shame that everything else auteurs these days seems to be one of creating about it is shoddy retread, clichĂŠ piled upon clichĂŠ story, plot, characterizationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all things that seem â&#x20AC;&#x153;borrowedâ&#x20AC;? from something that was originally borincreasingly irrelevant to feature animation. rowed from Star Wars, which was borrowed from Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not talking about creating hyper-real animat- Akira Kurosawa in the first place. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine to encode ed objects ready for mass-marketing in toy and a movie with references to other moviesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Happy Meal form to young audiences. I mean creating characters and stories to interest older and moreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just say itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;sophisticated viewers, savvy to the language of movies, who expect more than just visual bedazzlement. I certainly expect more than bedazzling hyperrealism from feature animation, and in this respect I sometimes feel part of a shrinking minority. Even as a kid, waiting for the next A little off the top? Ray Harryhausen creation to lurch from behind a rock in some Saturday afternoon decide if the scissor-lipped beastie with the porceSinbad matinee, I never expected them to look real- lain baby-head is a tribute to Hellraiser or the Quay istic. They just looked cool. Brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but when everything else in your movie You could argue that Harryhausenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s animation is borrowed from other movies, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in trouble. was generally the best part of the movies in which it Give us ideas to match this technology, damn it! appeared. At least it was an added attraction. Granted, this has always been the problem with Nowadays the animation is the attraction, is the technology as it concerns the movies: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always racmovie, the entire reason for going. 9, produced by ing ahead while new ideas tend to languish in the Tim Burton and directed by protĂŠgĂŠ Shane Acker, rear. Technology is simply used up, improved on who adapted it from his Oscar-nominated 2005 and abandoned before its full artistic potentialâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or short, is a visually amazing movie, no doubt about rather the innovative potential of limitationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is it. Almost as though channeling his mentor, the fully realized. enthusiastic director has packed his animated Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth mentioning that the vocal talent of 9 dĂŠcors with familiar Burtonian touches, down to is both asset and weakness. Elijah Wood would the last shelf of antiquated miniature tomes and styl- have been perfect in the voice part of the protagoized wood-grain in old floorboards. His creations nistâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if there had never been a Lord of the Rings. are every bit as creaky and clattery as anything the His voice even drifts in and out of his old Middle Quay Brothers have come up with, and the movieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Earth accent. By the third piping â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alive!â&#x20AC;? or whole grand retro-Edwardian production design â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m over here!â&#x20AC;? you simply start seeing Frodo, so comes as close as anything Pixar has produced to little does Woodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character in 9 offer to hold our being a fully imagined alternate world. attention. Same with the burlap mini-man voiced The visual possibilities are endless, and Acker by John C. Reillyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you immediately just start seeunquestionably seizes more than a few brilliant ing John C. Reilly. ones. In short, 9 is about a group of tiny homunculi So this is, as they say, the world weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re living in. stitched out of burlap and clockwork innards and Digital animators can breathe life into burlap dolls set free on Earth just as humanity was drawing its and coax from them human-like movement and a last breath. Their worldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a kind of steampunk post- whole suite of nuanced human facial expressions, apocalypse, barren and crawling with killer automa- but with only ersatz emotions and nothing new to ta cobbled together from bones and brass fittings, is say. the one Jules Verne would have pictured if Acker 9 continues at the Carmike 10. had time-traveled back to 1880 and told the increasingly misanthropic futurist about The Terminator. arts@missoulanews.com

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Scope Noise Art Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology OPENING THIS WEEK CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS Food falls from the sky and Bruce Campbell hacks away at a vocal cameo in this 3-D animated flick. Carmike 10: 5:30, 7:40 and 9:50 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 2:20, 4:45, 7 and 9:15 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 3:45, 6:05 and 8:20. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45. THE INFORMANT! Matt Damon plays a nerdish whistleblower who realizes his story doesn’t quite hold water when the FBI finds some skeletons in his closet. Village 6: 7:15 and 9:55 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:45 and 4:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:05, 4:05, 7:10 and 9:40 with Sun. show at 7:50 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:55, 4:55 and 7:50. JENNIFER’S BODY A stuck-up teen turns into a blood lusting, nympho demon. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. shows at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:30, 6 and 8:15. LOVE HAPPENS Jennifer Aniston slings flowers and is bitter about love, but a chance encounter with a self-help guru just might help her score. Village 6: 7:05 and 9:40, with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:40 and 4:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1, 4, 7:05 and 9:35 with Sun. show at 7:55 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 2, 5 and 7:55. LYNCH MOB Flesh eating Southerners trap travelers and indulge in their meaty bodies, only to have mobsters spoil their appetites. Village 6: 7:10 and 9:45 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:50 and 4:25. THE SECRETS OF JONATHAN SPERRY Christian themes saturate a story about a 12-yearold boy who develops a “unique friendship” with a septuagenarian man after mowing his lawn. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. SOUL POWER Sweaty footage of James Brown and others from the Zaire ‘74 music fest gets interspersed with cuts from Muhammad Ali and George Foreman’s fight of that summer. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9, with 9 shows only on Fri., Sat. and Thu. and Sun. matinees at 1 and 3.

NOW PLAYING 500 DAYS OF SUMMER See what happens when a lovestruck sap woos Zooey Deschanel while holding onto the notion

that love cures all. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30. 9 Tim Burton helps create a rad, post-apocalyptic hell where little mutants called stitchpunks fight for survival against menacing machines. Carmike 10: 5, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:30,

Village 6: 7 and 9:45 with and additional Sat.–Sun shows at 1 and 4. THE FINAL DESTINATION Hillbilly pastimes careen with the grim reaper in this 3-D horrorshow that reeks of overproduced cheese. Village 6 in 2D: 9:50 and additional Sat.–Sun. show at 4:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 7:15 and 9:30 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 6:20 and 8:10. G-FORCE Guinea pigs take up spy work for the U.S. government in order to take down a billionaire b e n t o n w o r l d t a k e o v e r. S t a d i u m 14 i n K a l i s p e l l : Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 2:25 and 4:35 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35 and 3:50. GAMER Humans control each other not by wealth or political prestige, like in the real world, but through multi-player online games. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:20, 4:55, 7:15 and 9:45 with midnight show Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 3:55, 6:10 and 8:20. GI JOE: THE RISE OF COBRA Blatant militarism gets championed as Dennis Quaid and Marlon Wayans, along with other members of G.I. JOE work to Matt Damon shares fashion tips in The Informant! which crush a corrupt Scottish arms opens at the Village 6 on Friday. dealer named Destro and his esoteric Cobra organization. 4:45, 6:50 and 9 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:50, 3:50, Mon.–Thu. at 1:50, 4, 6:05 and 8:05. 6:40, 9:35 with midnight show Fri.–Sat. and ALL ABOUT STEVE Mon.–Thu. at 1:40, 4:25 and 7:40. Sandra Bullock plays a socially awkward, obses- I CAN DO BAD ALL BY MYSELF sive wordsmith who follows television camera A sousing nightclub singer gets a wake up call slinger Bradley Cooper around on his beat, trying when her niece and nephews land on her to snare his heart in this cornball rom-com. doorstep, but a Mexican immigrant just might Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:25 with additional help change her boozing ways. Village 6: 7 and Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 9:45 with additional Sat.–Sun shows at 1:30 Fri.–Sun. at 1:40, 4:10, 6:50 and 9:10 and mid- and 4:10. night on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 3:25, IN THE LOOP The War in Iraq gets a belly-laugh in this stinging 5:40 and 8. DISTRICT 9 satire about a British official who tries to stop Bush Peter Jackson produces a film about refugee and Blair-like presidents from plunging the Middle aliens controlled by a multi-national corporation East into its current chaotic state. Wilma Theatre: that cares only about making profits. Carmike 10: 7 and 9, and 7 only on Fri., Sat. and Thu. and Sun. 4:20, 7:10 and 9:45 with additional Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 3. show at 1:45. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS 1:25, 4:15, 6:55 and 9:25 and midnight on Brad Pitt aims to kick some serious Nazi ass with his Jewish war buddies in this latest offering from Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:40, 4:30 and 7:45. EXTRACT Quentin Tarantino. Carmike 10: 4:10 and 7:20 Jason Batemen wants to sell his plant extract busi- with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Pharaohplex in ness but his plans get thwarted when his wife Hamilton: 7 with Sat. and Sun. matinees at 3 and cavorts naughtily with a manslut. Includes sweet no Sun. show at 9. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: cameos from Gene Simmons and Ben Affleck. Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, 4 and 7:35 and midnight

Bitterroot

Even the sun hasn't been enough to keep this river down. While the fishing hasn't been consistently gangbusters, it's been VERY good on some days and pretty solid on most. The lower river from Stevensville to Missoula has been fishing well with tricos and then hoppers thereafter from about 1 p.m. The upper sections, particularly around Darby and Hamilton have been more predictable for midday dryfly action on a variety of patterns. Ants, beetles, hoppers are still reigning supreme, but the purple haze is creating a world for itself no matter where it goes these days. Gotta give it up to Andy on this one! The upper 'root is flowing higher than it was on this day last year while the lower river near Missoula is about 400 cfs less.

Blackfoot

Missoula Independent

Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson and Jonas Ehudin. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Sept. 18. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton–363-5141. Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.

The Kingfisher’s Weekly Fishing Report: Week of Sept 17th.

This fishing report brought to you by

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Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 4:30 and 7:30. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15 and 7:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4 and 7:15. JULIE & JULIA This adaptation of two memoirs revolve around cooking, blogging about cooking and the quest to become a culinary master, all thanks to cookbooks by Julia Child. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:40, 3:40, 6:45, 9:25 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4:30 and 7:35. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinee at 3 and no 9:10 show Sun. Showboat in Polson: 4:15, 6:50 and 9:10. PUBLIC ENEMIES Jump on the bank-hatin’ bandwagon with this tale of 1930s gangster John Dillinger (Johnny Depp), hunted by the newly formed FBI’s top agent (Christian Bale) and his cohorts in a wild ride complete with betrayals, slick gunfights, car chases and the aspirations for power of J. Edgar Hoover. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 6:50 and 9:20. SORORITY ROW Reignite your dislike for sororities in this hackneyed flick about sorority girls who accidentally kill one of their own, only to be faced with a mysterious killer bent on retribution. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:15 and 9:45 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun. at 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 and 9:40 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 3:30, 6 and 8:15. THE TIME TRAVELER’S WIFE Your heart strings are bound to be tugged in this flick about a time traveling man and the woman who tries desperately to keep him grounded. Village 6: 7:20 with additional Sat.–Sun show at 1. WHITEOUT A badass female U.S. Marshal stationed in Antarctica tries to solve the continent’s first murder, while also fending off a killer in the process. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Mon.–Sun. at 1:35, 4:25, 7 and 9:30 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu at 1:05, 3:25, 5:50 and 8:10. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45.

**Read the other info section @ www.kingfisherflyshop.com/missoula-hatch-reports to lean how you could win a $3,000 shopping spree from The Kingfisher** The mid river section continues to pro-

duce big on hoppers and ant patterns. The upper river remains ok but seemingly much more of a hot spot to hot spot affair. Down below Johnsrud, the fishing has been good but you're having to wade through lots of little fish for the occasional fatty. Putting a dropper deep underneath your hopper will help motivate some good fish you'd otherwise miss with a solitary dry. Prince nymphs and smaller p-tails have been the best. The October caddis have also begun to be MUCH more effective throughout this midriver pocket water. Anything from large orange stimis to para madam X junk will work if you give it LOTS of motion. The entire river up here is at the perfect level for wading right now. Today's flow is 535 cfs compared with a flow of 647 on this day last year.

Clark Fork

**Read below to learn how you can win a $3,000 Kingfisher shopping spree!** Patiently fishing the seams, current lines and diamond chop will yield fish for you, but it's not red hot for the most part. Mid river riffles where shallower gravel mounts

produce surface disturbance have been the most consistently productive lies for us recently. On fish that you do see rising, trico stuff in the mornings then a cripple in a size 14 after about noon will get it done for you. Midday, the hopper/dropper rig is about as productive as anything. The caddis are still a factor too, but it's a much shorter widow of effectiveness these days with the best of it lasting from around 5 until 7. The Clark Fork is carrying considerably less water at this point than it was on the same week last year, but the cooler water temperatures are keeping the fish healthy and active..

Rock Creek

There are lots of fly alternatives up here these days. The variety of terrestrials, mayflies, caddis and stones means most of what's already in your box will work well if presented quietly and drag-free (unless it's a hopper, October caddis or spruce moth when motion becomes a good thing). We'd suggest a basic parachute adams or purple haze in a 14. Smaller mayfly profile nymphs such as P-tails, copper Johns and princes in about a 14 to 18 should also be effective

Ko r k e r s To r r e n t s h o e s o n s a l e n o w

Page 34 September 17–September 24, 2009

underneath today. Terrestrials and general attractor patterns have also been working well in medium to smaller sizes (12s to 14s) and should stay relevant as long as the sun stays out. The indicator nymphing has also been productive with a variety of patterns ranging from size 8 stonefly nymphs to more refined #16 mayfly junk. Rock Creek is running 296 cfs compared with 364 on this day last year.

Missouri

Fairly anti-climactic right now on the Mo with the weather hanging squarely in between summer and fall. The weeds have begun to break loose now and are making for less than stellar nymphing and streamer fishing. We need the cool down to happen over here to bring on the serious fall fishing. Smaller cripples and comparaduns in 16s to 20s will be the goods early but smaller ants and beetles will hold their own for awhile longer too. Midday, it'll be patient prospecting with hopper/dropper rigs for the occasional fatty. There is still some caddis activity late afternoon and early evening, but the best fishing remains early in the day now with tricos. The nymphing is still the best way to get numbers, but it's not like it was a month ago. Today's flow below Holter is 4180 cfs.


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AGE: 58 HEIGHT: 5’7” HAIR COLOR: BROWN EYE COLOR: BLUE

Missoula Independent page 36 September 17–September 24, 2009

BULLETIN BOARD “Basic Self Help EFT Acupressure” Thursdays & Fridays from 6:30pm-8:30pm WEEKLY. Starting on June 18th & 19th. FREE in Missoula. For more inform a t i o n : dianne.getbetternow@gmail.com 406-225-8504 Call for Artist. Bernice’s Bakery for 2011. Submission fee $15. Due September 30th. Other submission requirements and info call 728-1358 Clearwater River Steelhead Fishing. Book now for prime dates. 509-751-0410. www.snakeriverguides.com FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation NonDenominational 1-800-4750876 GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call 543-6609 x121 or x115. HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888583-2101. www.continentalacademy.com MONTANA BIG SKY DRAFT HORSE EXPO, September 19-20. See old-fashioned horsepower in action! Antique quilt & carriage show, vendors, teamster events, trade show, Hall of Fame, more! Powell County Fairgrounds. www.DraftHorseExpo.com and www.AcademyOfLivingHistory.co m for more information PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these crea-

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Destination Unknown Saw you outside while we were waiting for the bus. You: Brunette in red shirt. Me: Nervous guy only 20 feet away. I would love to see you again; let’s have coffee! Man saw Woman on September 11th

See You Next Fall I was waiting to let you cross University St. by campus; you were riding your skateboard. It flew out from under you, and you ate it on the curb. Pretty funny. Man saw Man on September 13th

Call The Riot Police...

A grassy field...

... 'Cause you are hilarious! You were at the movies last night, and laughed harder than anyone else in the theater. Your laugh is contagious and I want to take you to a comedy show. Man saw Woman on September 12th

We "met" on the 50-yard line many moons ago. You: wearing your beat-up Chucks. Me: Nothin' but a smile. Race you to the goal line! Woman to Man on September 13th

Post your own I Saw U or Shout Out online at

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tures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825. Recycled Recumbent Bike Building Build your own for FREE when you Volunteer for 2 hrs at local free cycles. HAPPENING @ Missoula Free Cycles SATDURDAYS 2:30pm For More Info. Contact “BobSquatch” @ 800809-0112 or see http://missoulaareaevents.ning.com

LOST & FOUND FOUND: Bike bike and other items found on spruce downtown. call 531-4800 or 531-6119 to claim LOST: Schwinn Sport Road Bike. 24 speed near Curtis, Kemp & 3rd Streets. Sentimental. Reward. 531-8520

TO GIVE AWAY LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889 Wanted Free Apples Please call 274-0378

NOTICE Free Reverse Mortgage Workshop 9:30 AM Tuesday 09/29/2009. Hilton Garden Inn & Conference Center. Learn more about the benefits of a Reverse Mortgage for homeowners age 62 and above. Ample time for your questions. Call 642-2228 to reserve for this FREE workshop presented by Farmers State Bank. I will pay someone $1,000 if they give me a job for the next 10-15 years. No reading or spelling though. OM 327-7859

Help find Bandito Chihuahua/Corgi, blk/whte/brwn, 16 lbs.,has red collar, lost Sept 1, skittish/frightened..must be patient to capture...If found call 546-7716 or 626-4756

Did you know?  Posting a classified ad is FREE!  www.missoulanews.com


COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD VOLUNTEERS Humane Society Volunteer Orientation Do you love animals and have a few hours to help improve the lives of homeless pets? If so, come to the Humane Society of NW Montana Volunteer Orientation meeting on Saturday, September 19, at 11 am. Volunteers assist in animal care, community education, reception area/ client relations, foster care, fundraising, mobile adoptions, dog walking, and many other capacities. For more information, please call 752PAWS (7297). The Humane

Society Animal Adoption Center is located at 3499 Hwy 93 N in Kalispell Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area. McIntosh Apple Day Festival is coming Saturday, Oct. 10th!! We need volunteers to for the following days: Saturday, September 19th. – apple picking. Thursday, October 1st – Frozen pie making – Bring your rolling pin! Wednesday, October 7th – Apple

peeling and baking prep Thursday, October 8th – Apple pie assembly, baking and moving pies Saturday, October 10th – Apple day booths We are also in need of pint size, commercial mason jars with lids that are in good condition. Donations will be greatly appreciated. For more information, please call Ravalli County Museum at 363- -3338 Volunteer Tutors Needed! Do you want to make a difference in a child’s life? Become a McKinney tutor! WORD is currently seeking volunteers to work with homeless and at-risk children, K-8th grade. McKinney tutors are changing the

world, one child at a time. Be a part of that change and call today! Contact Kimberly Apryle for further information (406)5433550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL 9-1-1 DISPATCHER 1, F/T, Msla. Missoula County is seeking 9-1-1 DISPATCHER 1. This position performs work involved with 9-1-1 call taking and emergency service dispatching from a communications center. This is the entry level position for the 9-1-1 Center and is used to train employees for assignment to take emergency & non-emergency phone calls and to dispatch emergency medical and fire services. Must attain and maintain CJIN/NCIC and CPR/EMD certifications and be able to be reached by telephone as a message phone number is required. Employment is subject to a criminal background investigation which is conducted by the Sheriff’s Department. Requires passing a hearing test provided by the County, with a hearing reassessment every two (2) years. Requires the ability to maintain confidentiality. Requires one (1) year experience working in a stressful environment with basic keyboarding skill demonstrated by a minimum typing speed of 45 WPM & Alpha-Numerical Data Entry Test (both current within the last six months) which are taken at Job Service. Variable schedule, must be able to work rotating shifts, nights, weekends and holidays. Pay starts at $13.33/hr. #2976308 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 ACTIVITIES AIDE, P/T, Msla. Small skilled nursing center is seeking a part time Activities Aide. Need to be reliable, pleasant and empathetic, and enjoy working with the elderly. Requires considerable patience, creativity and ability to maintain an upbeat and cheerful attitude. Will work about 25 hours per week, generally Monday - Friday 9 am to 3 pm, some weekend work will be required. Pay is $7.25 to $8.50 to start depending on experience. Business is on bus line. #2976301 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1-800-965-6520 ext. 278 BODYGUARDS WANTED. FREE Training for members. No Experience OK. Excellent $$$. Full & Part Time. Expenses Paid When you Travel. 1-615-2281701. www.psubodyguards.com

BRANCH MANAGER, F/T, Msla. National cleaning service is seeking a full-time BRANCH MANAGER. Will be working varying days and shifts. Schedule to be discussed at interview. Must have at least 6 months previous commercial cleaning experience, be willing to travel 10-15 days per month. Pay is $35,000$40,000/year, depending on experience. Full benefits, car/mileage allowance and bonus program available. #2976299 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 BREAKFAST BAR ATTENDANT, P/T, Msla. Missoula hotel needs a part-time BREAKFAST BAR ATTENDANT to work Saturdays & Sunday’s. Work days and hours will be: Saturday and Sunday from 5am-11am. Pay is $7.50/hour. #2976309 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 CENTER PRODUCTION COORDINATOR F/T, Msla. Full-time CENTER PRODUCTION COORDINATOR needed! Will predominantly manage the production queue and glue table and produce the copying output stages of orders according to customer specifications. Will also maintain the production area and equipment, drive a motor vehicle, order products from catalogs, learn advanced computer software applications and perform various administrative functions. Must have a High School Diploma or equivalent plus 6-12 months previous related experience. Requires good verbal and written communication skills. Valid Montana Driver’s license required. Pay will be depending on experience. Shift will vary. #2976296 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

No experience needed

TRAVEL AGENTS WANTED

Joanne Fryer Referring Travel Agent

406-239-6245

PET OF THE WEEK Skitten Okay dog lovers this is the CAT for you! Skitten was raised with three giant Ridgeback’s and as far as he knows he is the fourth. Although he did use his size to his advantage during play, leaping from hiding places directly unto the dogs’ backs! He loves to play and if you think you can tire him out, think again! He would love a home with LOTS OF playmates to keep him busy. Come visit this unique kitten at the Humane Society, 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Fri. 16p.m. and Sat. 11a.m.-4p.m. or call us at 549-HSWM

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Do you love the Missoula Independent? Are you an enthusiastic, motivated, self-starter? Then we want to talk to you! The Missoula Independent is looking for an Account Executive for magazine, newspaper and online ad sales. Requires strong organization and communication skills. Media sales experience preferred, BUT NOT REQUIRED. Great benefits and work environment.

Send resume and a cover letter SELLING YOURSELF to: pkearns@missoulanews.com or to PO Box 8275, Missoula 59807

ADVICE GODDESS By Amy Alkon

GETTING TO NO HIM This man I “met” on a dating website had issues with my refusing to give him my number. Initially, we had nice rapport via e-mail, despite his failing to pay attention (asking if I’d been married when I’d already mentioned my divorce lawyer). He apologized and gave me his number, hoping to talk and meet. I told him I’d call, but kept getting busy. Several days later, I called but missed him. He again requested my number so he could call me back (he’d already asked several times), and I told him it takes me time to get comfortable enough to share it. He was “disappointed,” and said if we were going to talk, it should be “right away,” maybe even that day, so he wouldn’t be waiting around. I wrote that he hadn’t been listening again, as I’d said I work days and can’t chat then. I told him to look up Internet dating guidelines, which always advise against dispensing personal contact information until meeting, and said we weren’t a good match. He wrote that my actions indicate I’m not open to a relationship. I asked him to stop emailing me. He then e-mailed me twice more, speculating about my psychology. —Tell Me This Isn’t Creepy Some of the logic I hear from Internet daters is seriously puzzling: “I won’t give you my number, but I’d be happy to meet you in a darkened canyon, late at night, next to a shallow grave.” And, sure enough, at the appointed time and place, they see old HillsideStrangler27 waiting for them, and wonder aloud, “Do you always accessorize with a shovel?” If you’re like many people, you see a serial killer behind every Internet dating profile, but you’ll trust a guy you sometimes see at the coffee shop or around the neighborhood. Well, John Wayne Gacy and Jeffrey Dahmer were people’s neighbors, too. (Everybody has to live somewhere.) On the Internet or off, you protect yourself by paying attention to any troubling things a guy says or does instead of focusing on who you want him to be. As for what Internet dating guidelines actually say, it’s generally that you shouldn’t put identifying information in your profile (real name, address, and the best time to rob you). Other precautionary tactics include creating a special email address, vetting people by phone before meeting, and calling from Skype.com or a blocked number—ideally, when you say you will, so a guy isn’t sitting by the phone like the only 16-year-old girl who has yet

to be asked to prom. So, this man had to have the last word, the last word, and the last word. If he keeps e-mailing, yeah, that’s a problem. But, what did you expect? You strung him along just long enough to dump him. He actually should’ve been wary of you from the start, considering how you came on like a mean schoolmarm, reprimanding him for failing to commit to memory every detail you ever e-mailed him. My guess is, he’s right—that the last thing you want is to get close to anybody. If that’s the truth, work on changing it—don’t seek a relationship then sabotage any chance of it by making your interactions about as fun as a staged reading of a wireless phone contract. If you continue Internet dating, you should recognize that a guy you meet for drinks actually doesn’t need your phone number; he’ll just break in through your back window, tie you up, and talk to you for as long as he pleases after he follows you home from the bar.

A Wench In The Plans I’m a 59-year-old married man who really clicks with a new co-worker. We even share the same goofy sense of humor. The problem is, she’s 30, single, and attractive. My wife got seriously jealous upon meeting her at a company function. I reassured her we’re just friends. She apologized, but still seems jealous. Am I wrong for trying to nurture this friendship? I’d like to invite this woman to our house for dinner, but I’m not sure how my wife would react. —Congenial Maybe you want nothing more from her than friendship (or maybe you’re just too old and hairy in the wrong places to have anything more). Can’t you make do with sharing “the same goofy sense of humor” on lunch breaks? Or, is your actual goal getting your “friendship” out in the open so you’ll feel less guilt about nurturing something a little friendlier? You have to know that bringing this chickie home will hurt your wife. I mean, come on. Oh, the great mysteries of our world: Stonehenge, Loch Ness, cold fusion, and how ever will your wife react to “Honey, that pretty woman half your age wants to know what she can bring to dinner. I mean, besides her hot self.”” Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r Av e , # 28 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent page 37 September 17–September 24, 2009


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): To the thug who stole my Chevy Malibu from its parking place while I was recording an album in San Francisco back in 1991: I forgive you. To the lovely and talented Artemisia, who couldn’t bring herself to fall in love with me as we partied at the Burning Man festival back in 2001: I forgive you. To the agent who helped my writing career so much but also cheated me out of thousands of dollars: I forgive you. To any Aries readers who hate it when I refer to my personal life in their horoscopes, and would much rather I confine myself to talking about them: I forgive you, and recommend that you engage in a more thorough and profound version of the cleansing I just illustrated. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The old saying “You can’t have your cake and eat it too” suggests that maybe it’s not a good idea to go out on dates with a variety of lovers while you’re engaged to be married. Nostradamus scholar John Hogue has taken the spirit of this idea and created a variation that I think applies to you right now, Taurus. “You can’t have your past and your future, too,” he says. In other words, you cannot fully embrace the exciting and daunting possibilities that loom ahead of you if you also insist on immersing yourself in the pleasures of the past. You can either have the old ways or the new ways, but not both. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): According to my astrological analysis, you currently have a certain resemblance to a vacuum cleaner or a hungry baby or a min-black hole. Every time I’ve turned my meditations to the Gemini tribe, I’ve been hearing a psychic version of a giant sucking sound. What does it all mean? I sense that you’re especially voracious right now, almost insatiable—as if you’re inclined to engorge and absorb any old thing that you happen to find in front of you. Are my speculations true? If so, I hope and pray that all the things you’re finding in front of you are healthy for you. But just in case some of them are not: Would you consider exercising some discrimination about what you allow to enter into the sacred temple of your body and mind?



CANCER (June 21-July 22): These days, your gods can kick the butts of everyone else’s gods. Likewise, your lawyers and agents and sidekicks can most likely outwit, outdo, and out-wrestle everyone else’s. But it’s crucial to note that if you try to work alone, you will not be able to kick other people’s butts, let alone the butts of their gods, lawyers, agents, and sidekicks. The skills of your allies will be indispensable. The way I see it, your test in the coming days will be to overcome any tendency you might have to indulge in pathological levels of self-sufficiency as you cultivate a greater capacity to ask for and receive help.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “We’re all mutants,” read the headline of a report on the latest genetic research. It turns out that like everyone else, you have between 100 and 200 mutations in your DNA—absolutely new characteristics that were not passed down to you by your parents. To gather the evidence for this revelation, scientists had to sort through huge amounts of data; there are thousands of genes but only a few mutations. A Chinese scientist who was a member of the research team said that “finding this tiny number of mutations was more difficult than finding an ant’s egg in an emperor’s rice store.” I predict that you will soon have a comparable experience, Leo: From an overwhelming array of choices, you’ll be able to locate the rare catalysts you need.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There’s a device on the market that claims to age wine very quickly. The makers of “Clef du Vin” say that by using their simple technology, you can “accelerate the aromatic development of the wine’s flavor and soften its structure.” So dramatic is the supposed effect that “one second of the device in the wine is equal to one year’s age.” I believe that you now have the metaphorical equivalent of this marvel, Virgo. This temporary talent won’t work on wine, but it could perform wonders with other processes that would benefit from having their evolution expedited.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The soft-minded person always fears change,” said one of my favorite transformers, Martin Luther King Jr. “For him, the greatest pain is the pain of a new idea.” The corollary to King’s pronouncement is that changes are less likely to be painful if you’re not afraid of them. According to my astrological analysis, Libra, none of that stuff will be an issue for you in the coming weeks. As you slip into a phase of riotous growth, I expect you will have abundant access to previously dormant reserves of courage and tough-mindedness.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Studies show that many people believe their attendance at a sports event impacts the outcome of the game. They are obviously suffering from a ridiculous delusion, right? They’re enthralled by the kind of magical thinking that our primitive ancestors engaged in, right? Normally I’d say yes, but not right now, not for you Scorpios. For a limited time only, your presence at events where people congregate may exert an uncanny influence far beyond the power of logic to explain. Your opinions will carry more weight than usual, and your power to shape group dynamics will be at a peak.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If I’m reading the astrological omens correctly, you’re now ensconced in a smooth groove and not even close to being stuck in a cluttered rut. You’re making the right moves for the best reasons, and never trying to get ahead at the expense of others. During a grace period like this, I think you’d be wise to convene what I call a problem team. A problem team is a posse of smart allies whose task it is to dream up every possible glitch that could threaten to undermine your efforts in the coming weeks. They lead you through dry runs that test your reflexes and prime your resourcefulness, thereby making those glitches unlikely to occur.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): While I’m pretty much a genius when it comes to the meaning of Kurt Cobain’s lyrics, the art of cooking perfect scrambled eggs, and the secrets of being a good listener, I’m an absolute idiot about how a car engine works, how to make money on eBay, and how to craft a foreign policy that would deal effectively with Pakistan. What about you, Capricorn? What are dumb about? This is an excellent time to cure your ignorance about any subject that will be important for you to be smarter about in the future.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The following projects would be excellent ways for you to spend your time in the coming weeks: 1. Attend a fantasy camp where you learn rodeo tricks. (They might come in handy during committee meetings and collaborative efforts in the next six months.) 2. Teach a worthy candidate the intricacies of licking your nuzzle spots. (It no longer makes sense to expect people to read your mind). 3. Scratch an itch that has been subliminally bugging you. (Unless of course you find some value in being subliminally bugged.) 4. Solicit lively information from a devil’s advocate, a sexy mother, and a world traveler. (You need exposure to people whose perspectives will pry open a couple of the closed areas of your mind).



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your quest has come to a fork, Pisces. Down one path lies a tumultuous obsession—a compulsive, tormented hunt like Captain Ahab’s pursuit of Moby Dick. In the other direction, a graceful chase beckons, more in the manner of Sir Galahad’s pure-hearted search for the Holy Grail. Choose one fork and your quarry will be beastly, impossible, and frustrating. If you choose the other fork, your quarry will be magical, earthy, and transformative. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

EMPLOYMENT COOK, F/T, Msla. Fine Dining establishment needs a full-time COOK. Will prepare meals in accordance with restaurant recipes, monitor food quality and consistency of all food served from the line. Meet company guidelines for excellence, quality and safety. Work days will vary, and will work flexible shifts. Wage is $7.25 per hour. #2976302 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 HOTEL NIGHT AUDITOR, P/T, Msla. Missoula hotel needs friendly Night Auditor to provide excellent customer service. Duties include checking guests in and out, handling multiline phone, taking accurate messages, making reservations, assisting guests with needs and questions and completing light bookkeeping tasks. Shift is 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., varied days of the week, for 24 to 32 hours per week. Must be available to work weekends. Schedule to be discussed at interview. Wage is $7.75. #2976312 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 JANITORIAL CREW WORKER, P/T, Msla. Responsible, motivated, detail-oriented JANITORIAL CREW WORKER needed to work in a team environment performing janitorial & housekeeping services for a local Missoula department store. Duties include basic, cleaning, dusting, mopping, sweeping, vacuuming, etc. A positive “can do” attitude is essential. Complete training program. Hours are 6 am to 9 am; 5 or 6 days per week. Wages are $9.00 or more, DOE, per hour. Benefits to be discussed at interview. #2976298 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 MANAGER TRAINING PROGRAM. Want to learn business from the best? Come be a part of a Montana business success story! We are looking for energetic, business minded professionals with previous management and bookkeeping experience for our Casino Manager Training Program. Training begins on October 20, 2009 and lasts for approx. 3-4 months. Applicants must be moveable within Montana. Benefits include: Competitive salary. Performance bonuses. Health insurance. Vacation/sick leave. 401K. Please apply online at www.townpump.jobs Click on “apply on-line now” then select area “Statewide/Management Opportunities.” EOE. Come work with us. We’ll make it work for you! Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining

establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 NOW HIRING! Preschool & Recreational Gymnastic Coaches & PT Office Staff. Call 728-0908 SCHOOL AIDES, P/T, Msla. Local employer seeking part-time, SCHOOL AIDES. Will be monitoring playground area, assisting with lunchroom activities, possible kitchen help. Several positions available. Shifts will be split between morning and afternoon hours, Monday-Friday. Pay will be $7.25 per hour. #2976267 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

PROFESSIONAL Physics Teacher Wanted SpectrUM Discovery Area is hiring a certified science teacher for it’s traveling science program. MosSE (Montana spectrUM Science Experience), the mobile science center of the University of Motana is touring Montana and Idaho in October and November with the popular Motion exhibition. Applicant must be a physics teacher and have experience providing teacher professional development. We’ll be visiting 6-8 sites this fall which span approximately 4-5 weeks, with potential for more opportunities in the future. This is a contracted position with spectrUM Discovery Area and the University of Montana and pays $600/week. Contact Holly Truitt for more details, (406) 2434323, holly.truitt@mso.umt.edu

SKILLED LABOR A LIFE WITH A CAREER! Auto Transport Company seeking motivated drivers. Clean CDL, 100K verifiable miles. Car hauling experience necessary. Sign-On and Longevity Bonus! Call Brad 406-855-3625 LOADER/OPERATOR AND FELLER BUNCHER OPER., F/T, Msla. Logging operation has 2 positions: 1)Loader Operator. This is NOT a front end loader position. This is specific to logging. 2)Feller/buncher Operator. BOTH of these positions are full time.

BOTH REQUIRE MINIMUM OF 5 YEARS EXPERIENCE. Competive wage based on skills/experience. Applicant MUST be able to travel out of area.(Currently working Idaho Falls.) Health insurance is provided. #2976273 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 LUMBER GRADER, F/T, Msla. Lumber Mill in Seeley Lake is seeking an experience lumber grader. Duties include examining lumber, making decisions on lumber grade and mark trim to get the highest possible value from each piece. Requires a WWPA certification for commons. Must be willing to work day or swing shift and some Saturdays. This is a full-time position. Wage range is $13$14.50/hr. Benefits after probation period. Pre-employment drug screen required. #2976276 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 SECURITY OFFICER, F/T, Msla. Seeking a full-time SECURITY OFFICER. DUTIES INCLUDE: Maintain security of facility; conduct room searches; keep appropriate areas locked to unauthorized clientele; issue incident reports; performing hourly head counts; and other duties as outlined in the full job description. Requires at least one year of post high school education and 2 years of correctional/law officer experience. Equivalent combination of experience and education will be considered. Must have valid driver’s license and insurable per the MVR records. The successful candidate must pass a thorough background investigation. Work schedule is Sunday, Monday, hours 2pm-10pm, and Thursday, Friday, Saturday, hours 3pm-11pm with Tuesday and Wednesday off. More details will be discussed at time of interview. However, due to the nature and functions of the center, you must be flexible in occasionally working various hours and schedules. Insurance starts right away, other benefits available after probation. FULL JOB DESCRIPTION AVAILABLE at Missoula Job Service. #2976281. 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1800-545-4546

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION AIRCRAFT MECHANIC appren-

ticeships. Medical/dental, vacation, raises, $ for school. Great career! HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044 CONSTRUCTION No exp needed. Paid training, good salary & benefits, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call MonFri 800-437-6044 FIREFIGHTER Paid training to join elite U.S. Navy team. Good pay, medical/dental, promotions, vacation. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 GOVT JOBS HS grads ages 1734. Financial security, great benefits, paid training, 30 days vacation/yr, travel. Call Mon-Fri 877475-6289 PAID APPRENTICE HS grads ages 17-34. Electronics, engineering, communications, etc. Great benefits. Relocation avail. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 TRAINEE Good pay, regular raises, great benefits, $ for school, vacation. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289

HEALTH CAREERS ADVANCED PRACTICE RN OR PHYSICIAN ASSIST, F/T, Msla. Advanced Practice RN or Physician Assistant-Requires current licensure to practice in Montana as a Physician Assistant. Bachelor’s degree in field related to allied health sciences preferred. Requires one year independently performing duties of Physician Assistant in a primary care setting. Half-time position. Requires some physical exertion such as bending, walking, lifting boxes of files and small children(up to 40 lbs). Position closes: 09/30/09. #2976314 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNTIES ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 h t t p : / / w w w. e a s y w o r k greatpay.com

Attention Employers!

Could Your Company use Some Help? Do you want to hire someone but can’t afford to during these difficult economic times?

WE CAN HELP! The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Can pay 100% of a new employee’s wages, payroll taxes and workers’ compensation for up to 6 months.

NO STRINGS ATTACHED! The Subsidized Training Employment Program (STEP) has employees who are looking for training. So take the first STEP and contact us today.

Call 329-1293 or 329-1279 Missoula Job Service WoRC Program Ad sponsored by:

Missoula Independent Page 38 September 17–September 24, 2009


BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 543-2220 BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 http:// astrologymontana.webs.com

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220 MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629 Montana Pain Management A Missoulabased company offering relief resources with full range cannabis therapeutics. 9 medicinal cannabis strains AVAILABLE NOW. (406) 529-2980

PENIS ENLARGEMENT. FDA Medical Vacuum Pumps. Gain 13 inches permanently. Testosterone, Viagra, Cialis. Free Brochures. 619-294-7777 http://www.drjoelkaplan.com (discounts available) Professional in-home/on-location massage therapy. 18 years experience. Deep Swedish Massage, Sports Massage, and Therapeutic Aromatherapy Massage. Danielle Packard, CMT 274-3221. Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift

Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management

Go to CarlaGreenMassage.com. 15 minutes free when you intake, pay and schedule online @ CarlaGreenMassage.com 406360-8746

Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 4930025

542-2147 • 521 S 2nd www.BlackBearNaturopaths.com

* Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Str e s s * D e p r e s s i o n * E m p o w e r y o u r s e l f

B o d y C a re By Michelle

MSW, CHT, GIS

Call Word of Hope at Did you know?  Posting a classified ad is FREE! www.missoulanews.com

Waxing • Facials Massage $45/hr

Achieve optimum health with footbased meridian therapy. 459-3035 Audrey S. Romine Certified Zone Therapist

We make it personal

P R O F E S S I O N A L S E RV I C E S O N LY

We Trade Accepted

406-270-3230

Shear

Reiki promotes your body's natural ability to heal itself. Reiki is a series of hand positions which gently applies energy from head to feet. It is effective for the physical, emotional, mental & spiritual

Local Medical Cannabis Certifications

Art Salon GIRLS NIGHT OUT!!

REIKI INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE, LLC

Get your hair fixed with the ladies. Friday Sept 25 @ 6 30 pm Cost $15 Includes drinks & appetizers (makeup addiotnal $5) Must RSVP

2620 Radio Way, Missoula REIKI SESSION $60.00 BY APPOINTMENT

Reiki Certificates Available CALL FOR MORE INFO

Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

Dr. Christine White, ND

728-5693 • Mar y Place

“The past is not the past if it still affects your present.”

Black Bear Naturopathic

CASH 4 CLUNKERS waxing special

Hypnosis & Imager y

For free confidential help after an abortion

406-549-6565

Health care reform that matters!

Call for appointment 541- 8092 742 Kensington

Call 214-3112 • 1804 North Ave

360-9153

(intersection of Kensington & Bow)

w w w. s h e a r a r t s a l o n. c o m

Need a date for Aunt Millie's 90th Birthday Party?

Common side effects may include: Affordable • Quality • Personal • Check-ups • Same Day Appt's • Bio-Identical Hormones • Medical Weight loss

Good Hair Days • Specializing In Men's & Women's Cuts

KRISTA

• Curly Hair

541-8090 We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid Missoula's All New, All Local Online Community!

Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington Corner of Bow & Kensington

rivercityfamilyhealth.com

• Short Hair

KEARNS

• Hair Coloring

HAIRSTYLIST

• Free Style Consultations • Exclusive Distributor of DevaCurl Hair Products

406-529-2085 220 Ryman Street, Missoula

MARKETPLACE The Sports Exchange Custom Fly Rods

USED BIKES 4 SALE Buy/Sell/Trade

543-0176 rodsbyjay@gmail.com

Consignments 111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056

AUCTIONS Auction: Wednesday 9/30/09 @ 5:15 p.m., Health Dept., 301 W. Alder, second floor. Approximately 35 HP desktop computers, various speeds w/monitor, keyboard, mouse, windows OS. Misc peripherals. Contact Jim Carlson @ 258-4996. Cash or check only.

TOOLS! 3 wood planers: 12”, 24”. One 6” jointer. One flooring machine. 1976 Chevy truck. 16’ trailer. 3 5KW generators. All for $4,000. 406-563-2498

SPORTING GOODS .30/30 WINCHESTER CARBINE PLUS EXTRAS. 728-3632

MISC. GOODS 36 INCH PAULSBO 4 HARNESS LOOM. String heddles, reeds, shuttles, bench, and warping reel. $400. 961-5165

COMPUTERS Brand New Laptops & Desktops. Bad Credit, No Credit – No Problem Small Weekly Payments -

Order Today and get FREE Nintendo WII game system! 800816-2232

Lunch Available! Admission $5’ good both days. New Dealers welcome, call 406-442-5595

Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 549-6214

MUSIC

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287.

ANTIQUES HELENA ANTIQUES SHOW & SALE, Helena Civic Center; Saturday, Sept.19th, 10am-5pm; Sunday, Sept.20th, 10am-4pm. Over 100 quality Dealers. Murry’s

ACCESS MUSIC. MUSICIANS BAILOUT SALE! GUITARS, AMPS, MANDOLINS ALL ON SALE! ACCESSORIES UP TO 50% OFF! STRINGS 50% OFF! 728-5014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com

PETS WEAVER QUARTER HORSES DISPERSAL SALE, Saturday, September 19, 2009, 1:00 p.m. Great Falls, MT. Proven program

selling 175+ lots. www.weaverhorses.com For catalog or info call 406-378-2600

WANTED TO BUY CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794 WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201

Missoula Independent Page 39 September 17–September 24, 2009


MARKETPLACE A Touch of Class

Crystal Limit

NEW TO YOU

3 DAY SALE OCT 9, 10 & 11

Antiques & Treasures

1920 Brooks • 549-1729

11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

crystallimit.com

The Multi Item Store

CRUISEGENERAL We need your trucks and SUV’s. Buy, Sell, Consignment. Russell Street Bridge. www.missoulacarandtruck.com 543-6600 Turner’s Missoula Car & Truck

4X4 2003 Chevy S-10 Crew

Cab White, clean, runs great, 125,000 miles, $6000. OBO call 549-0289

SPORT UTILITY 2002 Subaru Outback Dark Red, Automatic, AC, cruise, power windows/locks, 136k. Newer tires, recent tune up, timing belt replaced this spring. 25 mpg. Great condition inside and out. $7000. 406-550-2852

IMPORTS 1997 infiniti j30 $4200 1997 RWD, v6 automatic transmission, pearl cream. car comes loaded with air conditioning, sun roof, tinted power windows, power/heated front seats, leather interior, Bose cd/tape/am fm stereo system. comes with car cover and two studded tires. 119,000 miles. for more information 646 232 0431 (cell)

New Arrivals!

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus

MISSOULA’S new go-to place for CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE. North Reserve Business Complex (Behind Johnny Carino's) unit k3 406.542.1202

& All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

Puddin's Place

Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington (next to Baskin Robbins)

LDR Kennel EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

25% OFF Through Oct. 31 Furniture, Tapestries, Books, Household Goods, Etc.

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

549-6214

Outlaw Music

1358 1/2 W. Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

541-7533

Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

327-0300

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 1st day of September, 2009. /s/ Matthew B. Thiel, Attorney for Personal Representative

According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 10/01/07 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 15, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $185,521.27. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $166,093.26, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 23, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.15442) 1002.89743-FEI

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE AND SALES See us for your ser v i c e n e e d s and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Evaro/Finley-O’Keefe Creek Community Council Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the proposed Evaro/Finley-O’Keefe Creek Community Council are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009 /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Seeley Lake County Sewer District Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009.. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot.. All active and inactive electors of the Seeley Lake County Sewer District are entitled to vote at said election.. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Municipal Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the City of Missoula are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Seeley Lake Resort Area Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. *NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the proposed Seeley Lake Resort Area District are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on November 3, 2009 a mail ballot election will be held for the election of creating a Seeley Lake Resort Area District.. The drop off locations will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on Election Day. The drop off locations are: Cold Springs School Courthouse (Election Office) Fairgrounds Election Center Hellgate School Lowell School Paxson School Rattlesnake School Russell School Seeley Lake School DATED this 8th day of September, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ANNEXATION TO MISSOULA RURAL FIRE DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that a public hearing will be held on the 30th day of September, 2009 beginning at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, on a petition for annexation into the Missoula Rural Fire District for the following area: SUID: 3726309 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: MACKINTOSH MANOR LOTS, LOTS 16A, 40A, 41A, 42 AND 43. LOT 41A LOCATED AT: SE _ SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 11 N, RANGE 20 W PROPERTY ADDRESS: NOT ASSIGNED SUID: 3726203 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: MACKINTOSH MANOR LOT 40A-1 LOCATED AT: SE _ & SW _ SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 11 N, RANGE 20 W PROPERTY ADDRESS: NOT ASSIGNED (For complete legal descriptions, see map on file in the Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 200 West Broadway, 2nd Floor.) AND THAT all interested persons should appear at the above mentioned time and place to be heard for or against said petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioner’s Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse Annex, Missoula, Montana 59802, prior to the hearing day.BY ORDER of the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County, MontanaVickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder/ Elections 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 2583241Date: September 4, 2009 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pine Street (Seeley Lake, MT) Parking Restrictions The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on a resolution to declare Pine Street in Seeley Lake, Montana a no parking zone and direct the Public Works Department to sign it accordingly. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing on September 30, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of the County Courthouse, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Any person wishing to be heard on the

Missoula Independent Page 40 September 17–September 24, 2009

matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 721-4043. Additional information on the hearing including a copy of the proposed resolution may be obtained from Gregory Robertson, Director of Public Works at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 or by calling (406) 258-4818. DATED THIS 8th DAY OF September, 2009 /s/ Bill Carey, Chairman Board of County Commissioners MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on November 3, 2009 a mail ballot election will be held for the election of creating an Evaro/FinleyO’Keefe Creek Community Council. The drop off locations will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on Election Day. The drop off locations are: Cold Springs School Courthouse (Election Office) Fairgrounds Election Center Hellgate School Lowell School Paxson School Rattlesnake School Russell School Seeley Lake School DATED this 8th day of September, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-09-146 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CARL RALPH WIZEMANN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Linda Young, the Special Administrator, return receipt requested, in care of THIEL LAW OFFICE, PLLC, 315 West Pine, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 2nd day of September, 2009. /s/ Matthew Thiel, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-09-150 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CHARLES ALAN WIEDERSPAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Holly Beaudry, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of THIEL LAW OFFICE, PLLC, 315 West Pine, Missoula, Montana 59802, or

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-09-142 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF TIMOTHY GERALD ELDRIDGE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Gayle Morrison, the personal representative, return receipt requested, at O’Connell Law Office, PLLjC, Philip J. O’Connell, Attorney, PO Box 8515, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court, DATED this 13th day of August, 2009. /s/ Gayle Morrison, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-09-151 Judge: Harkin NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT E. SULLIVAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to MAUREEN P. DOUGHERTY, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Crowley Fleck Law Firm, PO Box 797, Helena, MT 599624-0797, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated September 2, 2009. /s/ Maureen P. Dougherty, Personal Representative c/o Daniel N. McLean, PO Box 797, Helena, MT 59624-0797 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/10/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200514158, Book 754, Page 463, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Anirban Mitra, a married man was Grantor, JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 10 of Canyon View Two, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. Book 817, Page 336, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/12/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200512053, Bk 752, Pg 1354, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Carolyn E. Honn, and spouse if any was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: That portion of Lots 15 and 16 of Block 13, of Low’s Addition to Missoula, Montana, according to the official plat thereof on file and of record in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a point on the South boundary line of Lot 16 which is 38 feet West from the Southeast corner of said Lot

16; continuing along the South boundary line of Lot 16 and Lot 15, a distance of 42 feet, more or less, to the Southwest corner of Lot 15; running thence North along the West boundary line of Lot 15, a distance of 130 feet, more or less, to the Northwest corner of said Lot; running thence Easterly along the North boundary line of Lot 15, a distance of 31 feet 6 inches to a point; thence South and parallel to the West boundary line of Lot 16, a distance of 25 feet; thence East at right angles a distance of 10 feet 6 inches; thence South and parallel to the West boundary line of Lot 16, a distance of 105 feet, more or less to the place of beginning. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for Structured Asset Securities Corporation Trust 2005-WF3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 20, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $145,459.39. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $138,668.91, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 30, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.05853) 1002.130232-FEI


PUBLIC NOTICES MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-09-133 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE: The Estate of Eddie R. Williams, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Patricia Davenport, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court, DATED this 9th day of September, 2009. /s/ Patricia Davenport, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/24/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200502325, Bk 747, Pg 373, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Geoffrey G. Harp and Patty Jo Duncan Harp, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. d/b/a Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Title Services Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3 in Block 3 of the amended plat of Hillview Heights No. 2, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Midfirst Bank. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 23, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $169,210.12. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $160,575.69, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 2, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.05358) 1002.130248-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/12/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200508822, Book 750, Page 1455, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which J. Terry Amble and Diann R. Amble was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 12 in Phase II of Crestview

Heights Phase II, III and IV, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200827436, Bk 830, Pg 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the holders of Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc., AssetBacked Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-WF2. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 24, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $275,051.01. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $257,588.68, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 3, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19163) 1002.105664-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/19/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730329, Book 809, Page 230, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Pamela Stanford, a married person and Joseph Stanford, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Sun Mountain Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200828038; B:831, P:227, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for WFMBS 2008-AR1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 30, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $702,701.72. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $644,528.75, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on

December 9, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19348) 1002.106432-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/05/99, recorded as Instrument No. 199921847 Bk. 592, Pg. 869, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Richard T. Nelson, a single man, and Carla Asbury, a single woman was Grantor, North American Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 in Block 2 of Canyon View Subdivision, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200704350 Bk. 792, Pg. 625, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 4, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $95,620.82. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $92,326.47, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 11, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06096) 1002.130910-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 2, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in

Missoula County, Montana: Lot 62 of Grantland 10, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Less and excepting therefrom Certificate of Survey No. 1031. Joann Higginbotham, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Fidelity Nation Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 22, 2005 and Recorded on June 27, 2005 under Document #200515738 in Bk754, Pg-2043. The beneficial interest is currently held by Waterfall Victoria Master Fund Limited (WVMFL).. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,810.95, beginning October 1, 2006, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 8, 2009 is $256,438.69 principal, interest at the rate of 8.625% now totaling $63,668.47, late charges in the amount of $1,020.52, escrow advances of $11,280.67, suspense balance of $ and other fees and expenses advanced of $170.46, plus accruing interest at the rate of $60.60 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby {including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 24, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On June 24, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Miranda Marx Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 05/05/2015 ASAP# 3246337 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009, 09/24/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 4, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 18 in Block 1 of Thibodeau and Poitras Tract, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Rodney Roberts and Heather A Roberts, who acquired title as Heather A Swingley, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 19, 2006 and recorded on October 25, 2006 at 1:07 o’clock P.M., in Book 785, Page 1373, under Document No 200627759. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as trustee for

Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-1. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1098.45, beginning March 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 13, 2009 is $123,500.49 principal, interest at the rate of 10.00% now totaling $4522.71, late charges in the amount of $197.73, other fees and expenses advanced of $17.85, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.02 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 26, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On June 26, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3245934 09/03/2009, 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 8 of Hidden Hills, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Richard Sales and Rene Sales, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services of Missoula, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 24, 2004 and Recorded on March 29, 2004 under Document # 200408179 in Bk728, Pg-1369. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank, as trustee for the benefit of the Certificate holders of Equity One ABS, Inc. Mortgage PassThrough Certificates Series 2004-3. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,347.78, beginning March 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 15, 2009 is $152,982.22 principal, interest at the rate of 9.625% now totaling

$6,183.68, late charges in the amount of $735.95, escrow advances of $2,711.79, and other fees and expenses advanced of $401.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $40.34 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 29, 2009 Charles J Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On June 29, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3248869 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009, 09/24/2009

ROAD EASEMENT ACROSS TRACT 43A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4784. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 23560 WAPITI ROAD HUSON, MT 59846 Michael Cratty married to Monique Cratty, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Ameriquest Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 23, 2005 and recorded October 4, 2005 as document number 200526197 in book 761, page 967. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee in trust for the benefit of the Certificateholders for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Trust 2005-R10, Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005R10. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $3,032.07, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of is $384,978.39 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25000% now totaling $19,034.72, late charges in the amount of $1,182.16, escrow advances of $2,544.17, suspense balance of $69,967.85 and other fees and expenses advanced of $356.20, plus accruing interest at the rate of $65.92 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 9, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SE1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 43B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4784. TOGETHER WITH

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owning delinquent storage rent for the following units: 74, 361, 370, 477, 481, 568, 632, and 633 Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods including office furniture, desks, baby strollers, car storage carrier, office phone system, boxes & boxes of old rare book collections, file cabinets, TV & stereos. These units may be Monday, viewed starting September 28, 2009 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 prior to Tuuesday, September 29, 2009, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

Missoula County Government The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, October 6, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Subdivision Request – Long Addition No. 2 A request from Jack Long, represented by WGM Group, Inc., to subdivide a 35.78 acre parcel into 17 commercial/light industrial lots. The property is located in the Wye vicinity, south of Highway 10 West and on both sides of Alita Drive. The property is legally described as TR A3 COS 4048 & Portions A & B of Long Addition Less R/W in N _ 28-14-20; TR A2 COS 4021 in E _ NE _ NW _, P.M.M. (see Map N). The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on this subdivision at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 21, 2009, in Room 201 of the County Courthouse at 200 West Broadway in Missoula. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. TO BE PUBLISHED September 17 & September 24, 2009

Missoula Independent Page 41 September 17–September 24, 2009


JONESIN’

C r o s s w o r d s

“Dietary Restrictions”–don’t go over your limit. by Matt Jones

ACROSS

DOWN

1 Gentle farm animal 5 Motor scooter model 10 Canadian Indian 14 Cookie served crumbled in some drinks 15 Rods with wheels 16 Gordie on the ice 17 Guy who grows tubers in Tubingen? 20 Up to this point 21 1936 Summer Olympics track star Jesse 22 "Hasta ___!" 25 Humdinger 28 Bird in hieroglyphics 29 It's a nice piece of glass 30 Diamond figures 34 Revolutionary fixing flats in California? 38 Mining find 39 Wager 40 Abduction ship, in tabloids 41 The Jaguars, on some scoreboards 42 10-minute film about baseball's Darryl? 46 Pro grp. 47 Like ___ of sunshine 48 Peek-___ 49 Column type 51 Way too proper 53 Flower part 56 "Shush!" 58 Yiddish outburst high up in Colorado? 64 "___ Love Her" (Beatles song) 65 Journalist ___ Rogers St. Johns 66 Prefix before "dynamic" 67 Subservient response 68 Components of entertainment centers 69 Showy light

1 Bump locale? 2 "___ 'Friends' Electric?" (1979 Gary Numan song) 3 Debussy's "La ___" 4 Speech full of hot air 5 She makes a living off of letters 6 Former Montreal player 7 It seems like it'll never end 8 Humane Society adoptee 9 Drunk-skunk connection 10 Dish on a Chinese menu 11 Tattoo flower, often 12 McGregor of "Angels & Demons" 13 Wriggly critters 18 Author Rand 19 "Blues in the Night (My Mama Done ___ Me)" 22 Alcoholic morning drink 23 Scrubs a space mission 24 SF team, to fans 26 Insult preceder? 27 Full of foliage 29 Czar named "The Great" 31 Teens' summer work opportunities, usually 32 Location of the Lighthouse of Alexandria, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World 33 Adult shop purchase, perhaps 35 "Charlotte's Web" author's monogram 36 Steel for use in concrete 37 Romaine lettuce, alternately 43 Singer with the 1974 #1 hit "Rock Me Gently" 44 Squash handful 45 Hispaniola resident 50 Clearasil rival 51 Edible pockets 52 Stephen of "The Crying Game" 53 Supercomputer company since the 1970s 54 Optimally rated 55 Some TV screens 57 Home of the Runnin' Rebels 59 ___-jongg 60 Like 123, but not 456 61 Word before maiden names 62 Precious metal: Sp. 63 Hither and ___

Last week’s solution

©2009 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0432.

PUBLIC NOTICES property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors, if such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 30, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On June 30, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steel Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3249180 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009, 09/24/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 9, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 3 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2719, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 12 AND THE SOUTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 23 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. 1994 CHAMPTION HOME BUILDERS HUD SERIAL #IDA 135337 AND #IDA 135338 CERTIFICATION LABEL #16-94-8941885 Cynthia A. Korpi and Ernest L Maner, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 27, 2005 and Recorded August 01, 2005 at 11:49 o’clock a.m. in Book 757, Page 447, under Document Number 200519567. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $831.36, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 24, 2009 is $73,055.77 principal, interest at the rate of 5.375% now totaling $2,865.28, late charges in the amount of $385.32, escrow advances of $909.53, suspense balance of $-250.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $94.90, plus accruing interest at the rate of $10.76 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s

Missoula Independent Page 42 September 17–September 24, 2009

fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 2, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On July 2, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2010 ASAP# 3252483 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009, 09/24/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 30, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOTS 9 AND 10 IN BLOCK 8 OF COOK’S ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. George S. Garr, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 15, 2007 and recorded May 21, 2007 as document number 200712521, in book 797, page 1117. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $593.19, beginning February 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on

said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of May 14, 2009 is $185,288.40 principal, interest at the rate of 3.87500% now totaling $2,431.27, late charges in the amount of $88.95, other fees and expenses advanced of $22.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.67 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby {including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 22, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 06/22/2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3240472 09/03/2009, 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on October 30, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 5A of Crestview Heights Phase IIIA, an amended subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Charles Jennings, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title

Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 26, 2006 and Recorded October 31, 2006 in Book 766, page 467, as Document No. 200628274. The beneficial interest is currently held by OneWest Bank FSB f/k/a Indymac Federal Bank FSB. Charles J. Peterson is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,337.65, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 10, 2009 is $198,698.01 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $10,967.01, late charges in the amount of $471.92, escrow advances of $4,087.91, other fees and expenses advanced of $91.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $38.79 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 22, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On June 22, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson,

Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3240535 09/03/2009, 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009 SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for the construction of St. Regis Wastewater Treatment Facility Maintenance Building, as described in the Project Manual, will be received by the ST. REGIS SEWER DISTRICT, ST. REGIS, MONTANA at the office of the ENGINEER, 3011 Palmer St., Missoula, Montana, 59808, until 3:00 P.M. local time on October 2, 2009, and then publicly opened and read aloud. Late bids will be returned unopened. Each bid shall be submitted in a sealed envelope. The envelope shall be clearly marked as follows: “BID PROPOSAL” “ST. REGIS WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY MAINTENANCE BUILDING” “ST. REGIS SEWER DISTRICT” This project consists of, but is not necessarily limited to, the following major items: Construction of a 20 foot by 30 foot masonry maintenance building. The Project Manual (Contract Documents) may be purchased from the office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, MT, telephone 406 542 8880. The cost is $50 each, including delivery by US Postal Service mail or United Parcel Service (UPS) ground service. Payment of an additional $20 is required for express mail. After award of the contract, the successful Bidder will be furnished five Project Manuals free of charge.The Project Manual may be examined at the following locations: Offices of the consulting engineer, Morrison-Maierle, Inc., at: 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, MT; or at plan exchanges in Great Falls, Billings, Dodge-Scan-Boise, Kalispell, Missoula, and Montana Contractors Association, Helena. Each bid must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to the St. Regis Sewer District, Montana, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total bid amount. The successful BIDDER shall furnish approved Performance and Payment Bonds, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Workmen’s Compensation, Comprehensive General Liability, and insurance certificates shall be provided by the successful Bidder. This project is funded in part through the American Recovery and Resource Act of 2009 and shall be required to follow the certification and reporting requirements of the Act. The St. Regis Sewer District is an equal opportunity employer and the successful bidder shall comply with the EEO requirements within the project manual. Information, as required in Section 00200 Instructions to Bidders, Article 4, shall be submitted with the bid for review and evaluation by the Engineer and Owner. No bid may be withdrawn within a period of 60 days after the bid opening date. A pre-Bid conference will be held at the St. Regis Community Center at 10:00 A.M. local time on September 24th , 2009. Bidders are not required, but strongly encouraged to attend the conference. Topics will include the project ARRA Buy American and new DBE bidding requirements. Before a contract will be awarded, the District may conduct investigations to determine the performance record and ability of the apparent low Bidder to perform the size and type of material specified. Upon request, the Bidder shall submit information as deemed necessary by the District to evaluate the Bidder’s qualifications. The District reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to determine which bid is, in the District’s judgment, the lowest responsible bid. The District also reserves the right to waive any informalities, irregularities, or minor deviations in any bid and to delete certain items listed in the bid. A detailed listing of bid items and contractual specifications are described in the Project Manual. Published this 17th day of September, 2009. St. Regis Sewer District P.O. Box 184 St. Regis, MT 59868 PUBLICATION NOTICE DATES: Missoula Independent, Missoula, MT September 17, 2009 and September 24, 2009


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4104 Hillview Way, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath units gas f.p. dw, w/d hkups, single garage. Rent $850. 7218990 701 Stephens 4 bedroom house fenced yard pets on approval $1,375.00. Missoula Property Management- 251-8500 Condo off 36th & Paxson. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, W/D. No smoking, no pets. $1350/month. 406-2103420 or 406-210-3393 RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

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RENTAL WANTED Looking for older MH or home to rent in Turah, Clinton, Evero hill or Huson, Please no MH parks. Contact Vanessa at 406-461-1111

RENTALS OUT OF TOWN Gorgeous 3 Bed/2.5 Bath home on 10 AC. Fantastic horse/dog property. Private pond. Stable. Large shop. Attached garage. 2,800 sqft. Spacious, modern & super efficient. Beautiful kitchen. High ceilings. Expansive views. Surrounded by open space & ranchland. 3 miles to St. Ignatius. Easy 40-minutes to Missoula. $1,550/month. Yr lease. Call 406-546-4530.

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Missoula Independent Page 44 September 17–September 24, 2009

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REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 2 Bed/1 bath Brand new log cabin with new three stall horse barn and tack room, hardwood floors and beautiful stone fireplace. $425,000. MLS#905429. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message: 12887 for pics 3 Bed / 2 Bath in Potomac area on 10 acres. Covered deck, fenced acreage and great views. $264, 900. MLS# 902389. Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12592 for pics 3BD/2BA Mechanic’s Dream Home, 3 car garage, mechanic’s pit, hardwood floors, large deck, privacy fenced yard Superior $158,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

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GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $295,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit...

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1 BD House 2026 9th St. $585/mo. 1 BD Duplex 3317 S. 7th $600/mo. 1 BD Apt 2007 Wyoming $465/mo. 2 BD - Uncle Robert Lane, $620/mo. Visit our website at www.fidelityproperty.com

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110 South Ave West, Msla $320,000 • MLS# 905618 Building & Land For Sale Commercial office building in a great location on South & Higgins. It offers lots of paved parking, handicap ramp with handicap restroom.

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One-level Ranch-style Home MLS# 904437 • $234,000 New 3 Bed, 2 bath with open floor plan and double garage located in RiverRidge which has a nature trail, trout ponds, & amazing views above the Clark Fork River for you to relax & unwind.

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• 23645 Mullan/Huson • Beautiful 14 acre parcel • Meadow with trees & pasture • Modulars or double wides ok • $184,900• MLS#906774 Text:44133 Message: 12881 for pics

• 4 Bed/3 bath cedar home on 11 acres • Private location with lots of trees • 28 x 28 garage / large parking lot • Near Potomac with easy access • $349,900 • MLS#906884 Text:44133 Message: 12886 for pics

• 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home • Addition for possible den or office • Shop & extra space in dbl garage • Zoned for multifamily or commercial • $135,000 • MLS#906610 Text:44133 Message: 12594 for pics

Professional Service on a Personal Level To buy or not to buy - that is the question. • Can you still get a home loan? • How does the current market affect you? • Will the government’s programs help you? • Where should you start the buying process? • For answers to these questions & more call Mary today. I have the experience and understanding to help navigate you through the Real Eastate Experience

406-544-2125 www.marysellsmissoula.com mmarry@bigsky.net

Mary Marry REALTOR®, Broker

Tall Timber Log Home E. Missoula MLS#906672 $234,000 Custom built on almost 1/2 acre on dead end street that adjoins the old Mt. Jumbo school playground. Open kitchen, living room, vaulted ceilings, 3/4 wrap around deck. Fully finished basement, pine floors throughout, lots of windows, master suite is the entire upper level. Newly stained exterior on both logs and decks. Ready to move in! Bring your RD buyers.

Grant Creek Log home on 26+ private acres $525,000

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 544.3098

• Cute little log cabin on 6.822 acres • Great hunting area, w/ great views • Well is in, but needs pump & generator • Snowmobile access in the winter • $99,900• MLS#906247 Text:44133 Message: 12590 for pics

Check this out with a Rural Development Loan! 2BD/1BA, large private yard. Enjoy the feel of yester year!

370.7689

priscillabrockmeyer.com

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

New Home/Land Package 6605 West Kiki Court Joy Earls 531-9811 MLS#903596 • Starting at $299,970

GORGEOUS SLANT STREETS CRAFTSMAN. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, many original features including hardwood, built-ins, beautiful mouldings & windows, large kitchen, dining room, full basement & more. $379,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy20 to 74362, or visit...

Peterson

Mary Mar ry Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

www.mindypalmer.com

Lorin & Amy

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. mls# 902286

Price Reduced

www.mindypalmer.com

Text to: 74362 Mssg: TextMLS

Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

www.mindypalmer.com

3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 acres, 4 car garage, huge tiled walkin shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-framed cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

Newer Jr. 1 Bd apartments at an Affordable Price

Rent: $495 - $585

AMAZING HOME OVERLOOKING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit...

FSBOPLEASANTVIEW HOMES 2765 Fleet St.:’03 2 Story 3BR/2BA/2GAR/AC/ UG,Close to schools, Landscaped/ Deck, Kennel.$219,900. Jake 240-1536.

4,800 SQ FT EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan, large family room, deck with hot tub and great views. $399,900.Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy1 to 74362, or visit...

Joy Earls

5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $219,900 MLS#906641. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Text:44133 Message:12591 for pics

3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

3320 Great Northern Ave.

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

Borders Lolo National Forest. Ski out your back door, drive 10 minutes to Snowbowl Ski area, or take a hike in 3 different directions in the summer! Located just 15 minutes from downtown Missoula!The main house is a 3 bd, 2 bath, 3 story log home, with completely renovated bathrooms, newer 3 car open garage with tons of storage built above it and a small guest cabin! www.11815benchrd.com

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

OR

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Sold house with 4 years worth of equity!

Steve Corrick • Specializing in College Housing Steve.Corrick@PruMT.com • 406-329-2033 • www.MagnificentMontana.com

Missoula Properties

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Missoula Independent Page 45 September 17–September 24, 2009


REAL ESTATE GORGEOUS STEVENSVILLE AREA HOME ON 10 ACRES. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, single-level living, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, beautifully landscaped, great deck with outdoor living space, and much more. $474,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy13 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS STEVENSVILLE AREA HOME ON 10 ACRES. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, single-level living, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, beautifully landscaped, great deck with outdoor living space, and much more. $474,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy13 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com GREAT DOWTOWN MISSOULA LOCATION. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, Built-Ins, Walk to Downtown. $329,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy8 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com New home in Riverwalk Estates with no steps and easy maintenance, 3

bed/2 bath/double garage. 6549 Kiki Court, Missoula. $339,500. MLS#808566. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 New land/home package in Riverwalk Estates. No steps, concrete entrances with covered porch & patio. 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. MLS#903596. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811 One block to the U!! Gardens, arbors, fruit trees and more. 4 bed/2 bath. 737 Evans, Missoula. $399,870. MLS#902594. JoyEarls@windermere.com 5319811 Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Large Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689 Quaint home on 2 lush lots with apples, grapes, currants, raspberries, cherries, and flowers. 2 bed/1 bath. 1852 8th West St., Missoula. $179,900. MLS#904867. JoyEarls@windermere.com 5319811 Rattlesnake Beauty NEW efficient, executive, 4 bed, 2.5 bath, home theater, new appliances, JennAir range. Dream kitchen. HUGE Master bedroom/bath/WIC. Green, efficient heating, cooling. Gorgeous Mt. Jumbo views, season-

al stream. Large 15k square foot lot. RENT TO OWN a poss, terms negotiable. $499K. 360-9711 RUSTIC ELEGANCE CLOSE TO TOWN. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, log accents, next to open space, easy walk to river, gorgeous. $329,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4Bdr/3 Bath, Open floor plan, large living room, great mountain and valley views. $239,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy15 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com University Home for Sale 317 S. 6th E $290,000 2+ bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage, new roof, hardwoods, 3 blocks from the University! Call Mike 406-546-6386 UPDATED POTOMAC AREA HOME ON 16.5 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $239,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy5 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

LAND FOR SALE 5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com Four 10 ACRE TRACTS IN GARNET MOUNTAINS. $27,500-$45,000. Call Dick at Montana International Realty 406-883-6700 One acre commercial lot between Lolo and Florence on Old Hwy 93. Can also be used for residential along with commercial use. $124,900. MLS#905542. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12598 for pics

COMMERCIAL 3 Franchise Sandwich Businesses For Sale! $650,000- Missoula, MT. Call Loubelle for info: 240-0753. 40 x 82 insulated metal free span building. 1 acre with security fence. Three 14 foot overhead doors and one 9 foot door. Easy access and great exposure. $324,900 MLS# 901478 Janet 532-7903/Robin 240-6503 Text: 44133 Message: 12595

Tanning Salon $65,000- Top of the line equipment, excellent client base. 10 years same location. Call Loubelle at Fidelity RE 240-0753 or 5 4 3 - 4 4 1 2 . www.missoulahomes.com

OUT OF TOWN 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL DROWNING IN DEBT? 1-866-4155400. We Can Help! Stressed out from aggressive collection calls? We Can Help You Today! Free Consultation! Call Today Toll Free! 1866-415-5400 Mortgage Payments or CASHNOW! Replace the monthly payments you’re receiving for property you have sold with CASH NOW. I can help sell your secured note. Call me, Emmett Roney, today to get your cash. 406-239-2529 REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 65% LTV. We specialize in “Non-Bankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406721-1444; 800-999-4809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

For all your home mortgage needs call

Lisa Triepke lisa@landlmortgage.com

370-7050 Purchase Refinance Construction 1st Time Home Buyer Programs 2nd Mortgages

Missoula Independent Page 46 September 17–September 24, 2009

514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

#228,1092


Painted Hills All Natural Boneless Top Round or London Broil

$3.29

lb.

Arrowhead Organic Split Green Peas

Dancing Bull California Wines

$1.99

$1.39

$6.99

lb.

16 oz.

.75 liter

lb.

Painted Hills All Natural Bone-In Ribeye

$7.59

New Crop Washington Honey Crisp Apples

New Crop Washington Fuji Apples

$1.49

Morningstar Farms Natural Vegan Burgers lb.

$2.79

Kettlehouse

$6.99 16 oz. can 4 pack

10 oz.

Painted Hills All Natural Extra Lean Ground Beef

$2.99

Flathead Bibb Lettuce

2 For $3

lb.

Honest Tea & Honest Fruit Ade

$1.00

Shocktop & Landshark

$5.49 6 pack

16 oz.

IQF Vacuum Pack Tilapia Fillet

$3.99

USDA Organic Bananas lb.

79¢ lb.

Pacific Foods Buttery Sweet Corn Soup

$1.39

Garlic Bread

$1.99 Loaf

16 oz.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 Missoula Independent Page 47 September 17–September 24, 2009


SM I C A R T S N ROCK AGAI r 18, 5-10pm

tembe Friday, Sep ; Free admission! ommunity: Bands include .org Caras Parkness about inequality in our&c more! Info: ywcaofmissoula re Home Raising awa Birds Mile r, e d in C u a Chereal, Lu

PUS O L L A F ’ S R E T I WR pm

er 18, 7 Friday, Septemb Dana Gerallfoerrthye undergraduate writingl."program, e Ova A fundrais holarships and "Th sc , ts en ev ry ra te li 243-5627 or Tickets or Info: ish/creative_writing cas.umt.edu/engl

ana t n o M f o Songs r 18, 7pm

Big Sky Countr Harvest Festivay l F ri. – Sat. September

Just outside of Hot

18 & 19

Springs, Montana Farmers, gardeners, cr af ts pe ople, musicians, artis Montana and adjace nt st at es and provinces will shts and others from hand grown, hand-m owcase their mostly ad e products for sale kids’ activities, arts an d ba rt er. Good fo , /c ra ft s, informative speake out the event. More rs and workshopsod info: 406-741-53 round 99 or bigskyharves tfestival.com

PEACE

ession S m a J & Concert

e Friday, Septemb one dis - Jack Gladst e ri tr lo a F e n h Th Jo a ll u m Catm Wil ane Clouse - Tom or 728-9380

PART Sunda Caras y, Septemb Y 09 er 20, A com Park 4-9pm Food, munity cele bra live

tion auc Info: 5 43-39 tion, raffle of peace: p 55 or jrpc.o rizes, musi rg c, kids '

Featuring Sh www.montanamatters.com Bob Wire. Info:

activit ies

2nd Annual Pedal Festival Saturday, September 19, 11am - 6pm Caras Park

Food, Music, Beer, Wine, Bike Parade (wear a costume!)

LDERNESS I W F O G N I N A E M E TH NATURE F O S T H G I R E H T D AN 9, 7pm Saturday, September 1 Hamilton Community C)enter in (223 S. 2nd Street

erness Act's ation of the Wild th Annibr le ce In ! on si is Free adm atch's 20 and Wilderness W ASH. N 45th Anniversary thor RODERICK au by lk ta A y: ar vers ch.org Info: wildernesswat

l Fest Peda courtesy photo Siple g of Gre

ROCKIN RUDY’S Record Heaven

World Headquarters

Vinyl • Records • Turntables 821 S. Higgins • 542-1104

237 Blaine • 542-0077 Open Mon - Sat 9:00 - 9:00; Sun 11:00 - 6:00

w w w. r o c k i n r u d y s . c o m


Missoula Independent