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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 39 • Sept. 24–Oct. 1, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Scope: Stalwart sci-fi rockers Volumen stand the test of time Up Front: MHA budget woes force families to find a new roof Up Front: A closer look at Montana’s Clean Water Act violations


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 39 • Sept. 24–Oct. 1, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Scope: Stalwart sci-fi rockers Volumen stand the test of time Up Front: MHA budget woes force families to find a new roof Up Front: A closer look at Montana’s Clean Water Act violations


Dagoba ORGANIC CHOCOLATE

2 oz.

$1 off CertiÀed Organic

RUSSET POTATOES 2 5 lb. bags for $5 Emerald Valley Kitchen ORGANIC DIP AND SALSA

Selected varieties. 14 to 16 oz.

$2.49 FRESH CATFISH Sustainably farmed, ask us for recipes.

Muir Glen ORGANIC TOMATOES 14.5 to 15 oz.

2 for $3

$3 off /lb.

Clif Bar LUNA, TRAIL MIX, & ENERGY BARS

Rising Moon ORGANIC RAVIOLI & TORTELLONI

1.59 to 2.4 oz.

99¢

8 oz.

$2.59

12 oz.

$2.79

local food fair 2009

Garden City Beef STEW MEAT

Live Music, Pony Rides &Montana Flavor Please join us Saturday, October 3, for one of the Good Food Store’s most popular annual events. Come help us recognize and celebrate Montana food producers and their important contributions to our local economy and culture.

$3.49 lb. Spectrum Naturals ORGANIC REFINED CANOLA OIL

Many of your favorite local food producers will be here sampling their fare, plus we will treat you to a picnic on the patio featuring Smith Family Farm Pork Green Chile Stew, Greens & Goat Cheese Noodle Torte, Corn Bread, the deli’s Bitterroot Beet Salad, Big Dipper Ice Cream and more. Our in-store sampling will begin at 10:30 am, with the sidewalk feast running from noon until 3:00 pm.

32 oz.

$3 off CertiÀed Organic BANANAS

Local tunes are on tap too, with Russ Nasset strumming in the deli from 11:30 am to 2:30 pm. And for the kids, we’ll have Parsons Ponies out in the east parking lot.

79¢ lb.

So come celebrate, and savor, our finest local flavor. www.goodfoodstore.com

Missoula Independent

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1600 S. 3rd St. West

Page 2 September 24–October 1, 2009

Seeds of Change ORGANIC SIMMER SAUCE

|

541.FOOD

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Sale prices effective through September 29, 2009


nside Cover Story When the last cigarette butt gets snuffed out inside a Montana tavern next Wednesday night, a certain iconic Western imagery will go out along with it. No more literary references to smoky barrooms. No more killing time on the barstool, alone, with the aide of a cancer Cover photo by Anne Medley stick. No more hippies able to sneak a few tokes of weed under the cloud of tobacco smoke. There are a million reasons to cheer the ban, but still a few reasons to lament its arrival..................................14

Thursday 9/24 @ 9pm

News Letters R.I.P., R.C. Hooker ...........................................................................................4 The Week in Review Wolves, Osprey and a really old dude ......................................6 Briefs Weed delays, midwifery beefs and skateboarding.............................................6 Etc. Sensing a Baucus rally...........................................................................................7 Up Front Missoula Housing Authority struggles to meet demand .............................8 Up Front A closer look at the state’s Clean Water Act violations ................................9 Ochenski Afghanistan represents a chance for real change......................................10 Writers on the Range Finding solace among the Crazies ........................................11 Agenda Middle East politics in Missoula ...................................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan How to never buy garlic ................................................................21 8 Days a Week Can we bum one last smoke?...........................................................22 Mountain High Celebrating National Public Lands Days .........................................37 Scope Stalwart sci-fi rockers Volumen stand the test of time....................................38 Noise Bryan Adams, Darkest Hour, Finn Riggins and The Ax...................................39 Books Condon’s characters fight the war at home....................................................40 Film Soderbergh falls short in Fargo-like film ...........................................................41 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films....................................................42

Exclusives Street Talk ....................................................................................................................4 In Other News ...........................................................................................................13 Independent Personals.............................................................................................43 Classifieds ..................................................................................................................44 The Advice Goddess..................................................................................................45 Free Will Astrolog y ...................................................................................................46 Crossword Puzzle......................................................................................................50 This Modern World ...................................................................................................54

Wednesday 9/30 @ 8pm

HUMP-NIGHT

BINGO EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT @ 8pm SEANKELLYS.COM FOR DETAILS

SUNDAY 8PM FREE Euchre Tournament

MONDAY 10PM



Open Mic Night with Mike Avery!

TUESDAY 7:30PM Fat Tire Pub Trivia

Take our shuttle to every Griz home game! Visit our liquor store and see our incredible wine selction!

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold ADVERTISING & ADMIN COORDINATOR Hannah Smith CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

- The Restaurant A complete menu of Irish favorites, Italian classics, steaks, seafood, sandwiches, homemade soups, and the best breakfast around. All served by a staff of friendly people! Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367

- The Emerald Casino A classy and secluded gambling facility with a professional staff, featuring the all new I-Rewards Cash For Play System!

- The Wine and Liquor Store

The perfect stop before heading to the lake or a party!

E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

4951 N. Reserve Street Just south of the I-90 Reserve St. Exit 830-3210 • www.seankellys.com Missoula Independent

Page 3 September 24–October 1, 2009


STREET TALK Asked Tuesday at lunchtime outside the Break Espresso

Q:

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Alex Sakariassen

The statewide ban on smoking in bars and casinos goes into effect Oct. 1. Do you consider that a welcome change, or will you miss the chance to take a drag between sips? Follow-up: What’s your favorite place to bum a cigarette downtown or, alternatively, your favorite place to avoid the smoke?

Adam West: No. I go outside to smoke regardless of where I am. That’s just my preference. I feel like when I smoke inside the smell sticks to me. Bum from the students: I haven’t really bummed in bars. Campus is the only place I’ve bummed a cigarette.

Postmortem trifecta I read with interest your last cover story, “Dying to go green” (Sept. 17, 2009). It made me think of the green mantra: Reduce, reuse, recycle. One could follow through with that regarding one’s body by being an organ donor (reduce/reuse) and then donate your body to medical science (recycle). When they’re through with whatever is left of you, you could stipulate being planted as per R.C. Hooker’s natural burial plan. A trifecta of a dying sort. Dave Gay Cascade Editor’s note: R.C. Hooker died Sept. 21 in his Somers home. He was 64. He was buried the next day at Natural Cemeteries in the Swan Valley.

the trap and Rick’s brother said, “This animal died because of its owner’s stupidity.” For most of us there are relatively few watershed moments in our personal histories. That day after Christmas in 1997, when Laurie (my wife) and I skied up to our neighbor cradling Buddy’s lifeless body in her arms, forever changed the way I encounter life. Sometimes it is difficult to know how we can live more peacefully in a world striven by violence, but of this I am fairly certain: The cruelty of recreational trapping

That day “ after Christmas in 1997, when Laurie

Yard sale injustice

Keith Lenard: It’s a totally welcome change. I think it’ll be a big improvement all around. I might even start going to Charlie’s again. Loving recent bans: I go to lots of places now. I think Al’s and Vic’s is fun, but I have to say the Top Hat.

Holly Schmidt: As I’m on my way to work at Charlie’s? I’m going to say welcome. I’m a non-smoker, so I’m very excited. Mellow meals: Probably the Depot—the deck and the lounge area. They’ve got great food there.

Life-changing event

Ron Anderson: I smoke, so I’ll miss it. But I thought about it and it might help me quit. So I’m about 50-50. Feeling at home: Charlie’s. This is the first place I came when I moved to Montana from Jersey. It’s a friendly place.

Missoula Independent

I could not believe what you wrote in “Fresh Facts” concerning yard sales (see “Words to the wise,” Aug. 20, 2009). I have been to thousands of yard sales since the 1950s and have never seen dirty baby clothes. What an insult to mothers! The baby clothes I have seen are hardly worn and newly washed. I feel that you should publicly apologize to all mothers. And I don’t think I have ever seen a broken dining room table! Yes, sometimes there are four people having yard sales on the same street, and possibly piles of polyester clothing and cardboard boxes of free stuff, but hardly ever held over until the next Saturday. Not being a skier, I don’t know about gear scattered across Snowbowl, but as far as dirty baby clothes, never have I seen any. Your description of yard sales was completely uncalled for. Doris L. Dey Missoula

Page 4 September 24–October 1, 2009

In his “Trappers fight back” letter defending trapping (see Letters, Sept. 17, 2009), Rick Hawk expressed empathy for the man who was attacked by a raccoon in Seattle. I wish he would have had similar feelings of compassion for my neighbor when her beloved dog Buddy died a horrible death in a conibear trap set next to a popular skiing trail in 1997. When interviewed by the Daily Inter Lake, Bill Hawk, the trapper who set

and I skied up to our neighbor cradling Buddy’s lifeless body in her arms, forever changed the way I encounter life.

does not honor the primacy of mercy to the weak, the powerless and the oppressed. Bob Muth Sr. Kalispell

Flower power The water consumption from the elaborate floral display at Southgate Mall is very troublesome to me. Water is one of the scarcest natural resources of our planet today and the threat of its disappearance from the earth forever is a very real one. When I asked the man at the mall watering the flowers how much water he wastes every day, he replied, “How much do I waste?” To me, this is a gross example of the severe ignorance and/or lack of caring that has put our planet in the position it is in today. I then changed my tone and asked, “How much do you use?” He told me that he uses one

gallon of water per basket, per day to water all the flowers on the facility plus some twice per day. My calculations, using those numbers, estimate the mall wastes 5,565 gallons of water in 4–5 months on these flowers. This is unacceptable. The other thing I noticed, as I was attempting to talk to this man, was the loud noise overpowering our voices. As I walked away, I realized that the noise was coming from the machine running the water through the hose. I’m sure this machine is run by gasoline, one of the highest contributors to the greenhouse gases putting holes in our ozone. I understand the proposed purpose of the hanging flowers; both my parents have worked in marketing and I understand the pros and cons to good presentation. Even with this knowledge, however, I still feel it is irresponsible to create the presentation in this way. The last thing on my mind is money, though I feel to make the most impact on you, I must also include the financial facts. By not having these flowers, you will save over a thousand dollars over the course of 10 years on water alone, plus the cost of the actual hanging baskets. I highly doubt you will lose even near that amount of money from customers not entering the building because there were no flowers in the entrances. Human beings have a responsibility to the planet on which we live. Thus far, our responsibilities have been shrugged off for selfish things like industry, vanity and standard of living. I hope all of these things enter your mind in the coming years when you make choices that have such a large and negative impact on the planet on which all of its creatures depend. Danielle Standley Missoula

Corrections: A photo that accompanied our Sept. 10 story, “Water woes,” misidentified a private ranch outside Huson as the Bar-One Ranch owned by Alfred Barone. Bar-One is adjacent to the property photographed. In the same issue, our story on Kalispell-based Provident Financial, “Real estate’s ripples,” should have said the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The Indy regrets the errors.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 RYA N

Ryan is a very alert, interested dog, which is what we expect from a Border Collie/Karelian Bear Dog X. However, he also has a shy side and enjoys having people approach him gently to win his trust. We think he's a real keeper!

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

549-3934 Any one who has visited a park or trailhead in the area knows how much Missoulians love their Labradors. Delilah will fit right in! She likes to play, swim and go for walks! Of course, like most of those labs you have to love her dopey side too!

S PA R K

Spark is quite possibly the smartest dog currently at our shelter. He knows all sorts of commands and loves to show them off. Most of all he just wants a chance to prove how loyal he will be.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD Located in Stephens Center, behind Holiday Village

LACEY

To describe a Hound as a quiet dog seems like a paradox, but Lacey is indeed a quiet, reserved older lady. She approaches everyone slowly and gently, but she also enjoys playing with other dogs in the exercise yard. She's a sweetheart!

DELILAH

CHICA

Chica is a happy young dog who hopes for a family full of people to play with her and give her lots of tender loving care. She'd love a chance to return that affection in double measure, which we think makes an ideal pet.

BENTLEY

K E L LY

Kelly's coat is full of muted colors, and she has a very reserved personality to match. She's a loving lady, but she's not one to demand attention. We know lots of people must be looking for a cat like that!

It's not Bentley's fault his squished face looks so silly. We tell him it adds character! Anybody looking for a friend to help train for the marathon? Bentley is an ENERGETIC young guy who just needs to be worn out.

SPIRIT

This lovely lady has no qualms about posing for the camera. It's as if she's using her eyes to portray all her hopes and dreams, like a cozy home of her own perhaps with a loyal companion to call her friend forever.

2420 W Broadway 2810 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd Clark Fork River Market

LARAMIE

Laramie is a big, quiet, handsome boy who certainly seems to be part Maine Coon. It's only when you notice his beautiful blue eyes that you realize that the other part is Siamese. What a great combination that turned out to be!

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

We make the world a better smelling place! 837 S. Higgins • 370-5078

KASEY

We have several black and white cats, but none with a face as distinctive as Kasey's! He's not a large cat, but he has great good looks and a hugely loving personality. He's ready to make a new family a great pet.

A N A S TA S I A

It is difficult to get this tiny orange girly to sit still long enough to take a photo. She can usually be found bouncing and darting about the cat room, searching for food to swipe. It's a wonder she stays so thin, but I guess she has that metabolism we are all so jealous of!

Improving Lives One Dog & Cat at a Time Missoula’s Unique Alternative for Dog & Cat Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 517 S. Higgins • 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street

J A M I E LY N N

Jamie Lynn really is quite a character. She actually more closely resembles a squirrel or ferret rather than a cat. She loves to zip around at full speed, but strangely she melts into a pile of purr as soon as you pick her up. We promise she will have the whole family laughing! Loubelle Wissler 240-0753 KC Hart 240-9332 fidelitykc@montana.com

721-1840

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

www.missoulahomes.com “A Team of Professionals Making It Easy for You!” Please Support our Humane Society

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals

721-4710 RA KITTY

Ra is a beautiful, medium sized cat with a big heart. He loves to be brushed or scratched and has a very interesting meow. He is incredibly friendly and will get along great with another cat. His short fur is low maintenance and he has great manners.

FIFI

Fifi is a beautiful black cat with super soft, sleek fur. She is a big lover who enjoys being held or sitting in your lap. She is gentle and is very friendly with everyone she meets.

MEEKA

Meeka is a quiet kitty who enjoys laps and loving caresses while purring her little heart out and giving gentle kitty kisses. Her orange coat is very eye catching and everyone mentions how pretty she is.

K AYLEE

Kaylee is a big girl with a huge heart. Talkative and personable, Kaylee would be a great fit for a family who is looking to add a little love in their lives. She is very cuddly and loves catnip.

Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609 Missoula Independent

Page 5 September 24–October 1, 2009


Inside

WEEK IN REVIEW

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

• Wednesday, September 16

News Quirks by Anne Medley

A hunter from Roberts reports the state’s first fairchase wolf harvest, having shot an animal in the Absaroka-Bear tooth Wilderness nor th of Yellowstone National Park. The backcountry wolf season opened Sept. 15, and the general season opens Oct. 25.

• Thursday, September 17 The Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Board okays new regulations lowering the trigger for air-quality alerts from 65 grams of fine particulate in the air to 35, and requiring all new woodstoves to be approved by the Environmental Protection Agency, part of an effort to comply with the agency’s regulations.

• Friday, September 18 A spirited Osprey crowd—the fourth largest of the season—wears mostly dark attire to help “black out” the Orem Owlz in the second game of the Pioneer League championship’s best-of-three series. The gimmick doesn’t work, however, as the Owlz blank Missoula 10–0 and then go on to clinch the trophy the following day.

• Saturday, September 19 A day after the Kaimin student newspaper exposes yet another violent incident involving Griz football players, UM beats up on Portland State, 49–17, at Washington-Grizzly Stadium. Coach Bobby Hauck doesn’t elaborate on the alleged scuffle involving Trumaine Johnson and Andrew Swink other than to say it’s been handled internally.

• Sunday, September 20 Missoula police arrest Andrew Perry, 29, and Jody Romero, 38, for robbery and unlawful restraint after they allegedly beat up the 17-year-old driver of a truck they were riding in, then continued to drive around with the driver’s 17-year-old girlfriend. The girl eventually freed herself and called police.

• Monday, September 21 Walter Breuning, the world’s oldest man, celebrates his 113th birthday at Rainbow Retirement in Great Falls. Nearly 100 people attend the party, including Gov. Brian Schweitzer, who jokes that he’s supporting Breuning in the next gubernatorial race.

• Tuesday, September 22 Scientists from the United Nations spend a second day touring Glacier National Park to determine whether nearby mining projects render the area a World Heritage Site in Danger. The National Parks Conservation Association was among several groups that asked the UN to assess the situation.

Skateboarding

A bowl for Hamilton Beau Johnson recalls the drawbacks of skateboarding in Hamilton as a kid. A few curbs and a two-step were really all the town offered. Like most Bitterroot skaters, he trucked to Missoula for the good stuff. But if the latest push for a Bitterroot skatepark succeeds, the next generation won’t have to burn gas to reach a funbox or bowl. Hamilton and Ravalli County officials agreed Sept. 14 that the city is long overdue for such an asset. Now skaters are looking to the Montana Skatepark Association (MSA) to help make that plan a reality. “We’re super excited,” says MSA President Chris Bacon. “We couldn’t be more thrilled. The Bitterroot is an area we’ve felt needed a skatepark from the get-go.” Bacon heard of the recent initiative a few months back. He wasn’t surprised; he’s received a call a year for the past five years from someone in the Bitterroot. MSA offered the city guidance this summer on forming committees and drawing up

designs. So far, that’s where their involvement ends. But with MSA honing its grant process, the group seems primed for an expanded role. Bacon says MSA will do what it can to locate funding sources for the Hamilton project, and suggests their past success with such initiatives bodes well for the Bitterroot. “The MSA learned a lot when we started our process to build a park [in Missoula] 10 years ago, and so much has changed,” Bacon says. “There are people to draw on now whereas when we started there wasn’t. There was no ‘us’ before us.” Bacon adds the Hamilton project will probably resemble the park in Polson, which he says cost roughly $250,000. Johnson–who’s been involved with several past Hamilton skatepark initiatives–considers MSA the linchpin. Previous attempts failed not for lack of community support but because of insufficient funding. “If we can get together a good enough plan and it seems like a worthwhile investment for the MSA, they’ll kick down money,” Johnson says. “And everyone will follow suit.” Alex Sakariassen

Marijuana

State drags on dope Montana’s medical marijuana registry isn’t keeping up with a flurry of applications, leaving sick patients without medicine or in danger of legal fallout. “That makes them vulnerable to arrest and prosecution, unfairly,” says Tom Daubert from Patients and Families United, a statewide group supporting people who use the drug to treat illness. Voters legalized medical marijuana with Initiative 148 in 2004. To use marijuana within the confines of the law, patients must register with the Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS), which is legally required to process applications within 20 working days of the submission. But amid growing demand for the program, the agency is lagging behind. “We’re six weeks out instead of four,” says Roy Kemp, who as deputy administrator for DPHHS’ quality assurance division oversees the marijuana registry. Registered marijuana users grew from 358 in 2007 to 3,246 this month. Until recent-

Wildflower

829 S Higgins Mon - Sat 11-6 543.1179

Montessori School

We’ve got Costumes for Halloween! Or Any Ol’time! ‘natural toys for creative play’

www.walkingsticktoys.com

Missoula Independent

Jenny Hunt, 23, picks the last of the season’s peaches at Forbidden Fruit Orchards in Paradise. Orchard owners Lynn and Tom McCamant have been selling out of their peaches at Missoula’s farmers’ markets every Saturday since the harvest began.

Now Enrolling Ages 2-6

Recently Engaged? We have Missoula’s largest selection of save the date cards, invitations, programs, menus, thank yous and more!

How can one not help a maniac who insults policemen in the name of justice?

Fine Arts Emphasis Whole Organic Meals

Take advantage of the Crane & Co. promo: buy 75 or more and get 25 FREE!

~ MacGyver

1703 S. 5th West Missoula • 830-3268

Page 6 September 24–October 1, 2009

127 S. 4th West Missoula • 728-1747


Inside

Letters

Briefs

ly, the agency had only one half-time staffer and a temporary employee to manage the workload. Kemp says the problem isn’t lack of funding. The registry is flush as coffers fill with $50 patient and caregiver application fees. Lag time mounted because DPHHS, which needs legislative approval to hire additional registry staff, didn’t have the okay to do so until July 1. After advertising the position in early July, the new employee started a few weeks ago. “We are putting in overtime hours to catch up,” Kemp says. Daubert still worries that DPHHS is ill equipped to handle the growing load. With the registry unable to create any new staff positions until well after the Legislature convenes in January 2011, he thinks more patients could linger in legal limbo. “I’m a little nervous that this problem will reoccur before the next legislative session,” he says. If the backlog at DPHHS persists, Patients and Families United might bring a lawsuit to force action. “We would ask the Legislature to untie their hands,” says Daubert, “and not micromanage the number of staff that they have.” Jessica Mayrer

Beer

Brewing for Betty Twelve mostly middle-age women gathered at the Hawthorne Suites Hotel last Thursday to get the low-down on how to sniff and swirl thick brown ales and sip light lagers during one of Big Sky Brewery’s Betty’s for Beer series. “Give it a good sniff,” said instructor Tim Chisman, dubbed “Beer Guru” by his Big Sky coworkers, as he explained that the trick is in the whiff. Allowing one’s olfactory nerves to fully get a handle on hops, coriander and orange aromas before taking a swig brings out a beer’s fullest taste. “Then you go back and do it again,” he told the ladies, who offered giggles in response. Big Sky Brewery offers the class a couple of times a year as a way to make women feel confident about beer. During last week’s ses-

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

sion, Chisman alternately sipped and offered tidbits of hoppy knowledge. For instance, lime was originally put in Mexican beer to keep flies away, yeasty brews leave a lingering taste and brewers created ice-cold-beer marketing campaigns largely to cover brewing flaws. Chrisman says the ideal pour should be served at about 55 degrees to bring out the beer’s full flavor. “I don’t like it,” said Tracie Groenier of a Mexican lager. “This is my wet socks.” Groenier explained that she’s traumatized from picking up stale ales while tidying trails for the Forest Service.

“I don’t want to have to gag down the rest of it,” she said, pouring the remnants into a plastic pitcher. The $30 series includes lots of literature, including tasting logs and a rainbow-colored flavor wheel that breaks down how odor translates to taste. The result is oodles of info available for post-class refreshers. Considering that Betty’s serves up more than a dozen three-finger servings, those reference materials would seem to help budding connoisseurs retain newfound knowledge. “I need a taxi,” said a blond-haired woman as the class ended. Jessica Mayrer

Midwifery

Pushing for recognition Dolly Browder can’t emphasize enough the importance of the Midwives and Mothers

Agenda

News Quirks

in Action (MAMA) Campaign. The national initiative is currently pushing for federal recognition for Certified Professional Midwives (CPM) in Medicaid, a change that could revolutionize affordable maternity care. “The campaign goal is to gain federal recognition for Certified Professional Midwives basically so that women and families have increased access to quality maternity care,” says Browder, one of Montana’s 20 to 25 active CPMs. “It’s affordable, it’s in the care and setting of their choice, and it really should save the government a lot of money.” MAMA hits Missoula Thursday afternoon when Browder and other midwives lead a march over the Higgins Avenue bridge and present a petition to Sen. Max Baucus’ Front Street office. For Browder, MAMA aims to give parents a choice in pregnancy. “Right now in the state of Montana, if you are low-income and qualify for Medicaid, your birth has to be in a hospital if you want to get it paid for,” Browder says. Home births with a midwife account for only one percent of the 4.3 million births that take place nationally each year, but the savings are staggering. An average home birth ranges between $3,000 and $4,000, according to the Midwives Alliance of North America (MANA). In-hospital births can cost up to $10,000. “I think it’s a pretty uphill battle to get recognition because we just don’t have the clout,” says Susan Moray, a licensed midwife and press officer for MANA. Moray practices midwifery in Oregon, one of only 11 states where midwives can get reimbursement from private insurers or Medicaid. She says by making recognition a federal issue, MAMA can eliminate state-specific problems with one blow. For lowincome families especially, a safe and affordable alternative could make birth what Browder says it should be: part of the daily process. “Half of the parents I work with as a midwife do not have health insurance,” Browder says. “That’s why I really support this whole health reform, because I think everyone should have that ability.” Alex Sakariassen

BY THE NUMBERS

600

Grizzly bears once again federally protected in the Yellowstone area following a Sept. 21 ruling by U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy.

etc. Ever since Sen. Max Baucus proposed his 223-page health care reform last Wednesday, he and his plan have been called everything from “the worst piece of heath care legislation” in 30 years to “a big congressional punt.” Funnyman Bill Maher jabbed, “It’s everything you could want in a reform bill—you know, except reform. It is a watered-down, ineffectual blow job to the health insurance industry.” And those were some of the nicer reviews. Here’s the thing: Rushing to judgment on Baucus’ bill now is like reviewing Titanic at the 60-minute mark, long before the film’s climactic conclusion. Uh, bad example. But you get the point. Baucus proposed his bill with every intention of seeing it change. Unlike some other legislation that gets force-fed to the public and sugarcoated by incessant cheerleading (cough, Tester’s forest jobs bill), Montana’s senior senator offered up the most detailed health care proposal available and then opened it up for honest debate. Early indications from Senate Finance Committee proceedings indicate Baucus may even be leaning left—as Democratic voters have long hoped—on some of the bill’s key changes. Baucus told reporters at the University of Montana last week, just a few days after a hopeful public deemed his proposal less than perfect, that he was satisfied with the response. It made no sense at the time (and, frankly, listening to Baucus live, he rarely makes sense.) It was as if Baucus had exchanged his rose-colored glasses for blinders. But now his answers are starting to become clear. “I’m very pleased,” he said repeatedly, because he thinks the bill is “about in the middle, it’s balanced, it’s broad-based, it’s common sense, it doesn’t go too far in one direction or the other.” In other words, it’s the perfect starting point to continued negotiations. As the push to reform health care nears the 11th hour, Baucus’ middle-of-the-road, malleable approach might—still—be the only path to getting something passed. And, as he rightly says, something must pass. Getting there is still months away, meaning those who have rushed to judge Baucus may have spoken too soon. With the vaunted “Gang of Six” now broken up and the negotiations largely within Baucus’ own party, he may even be willing to abandon his bipartisan instincts and the health care companies that filled his coffers, and finally satisfy his base. We’re not calling his change of heart imminent, but it’s certainly possible—more so today than ever before. And for that, we’re willing to reserve our opinion and hold out hope for actual reform. Then again, we always thought Leo’d pull through in the end, too.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 September 24–October 1, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Hitting home Housing Authority struggles to meet demand by Jessica Mayrer

A pink doll and a tricycle sit in front of the Christensen family’s South Hills home. An American flag hangs above the porch upstairs, twisted around its pole. The breezeway is full of children’s toys and more bicycles. “If all else fails, we’ll just move out of city limits,” says Ann Christensen, who was told several months ago by the Missoula Housing Authority (MHA) that she, her husband and four kids would have to leave the three-bedroom home they’ve lived in since 2001.

Davidson. “We’re trying to be more efficient with the money that [Housing and Urban Development, or HUD] gives us.” Davidson explains that the agency’s waiting list for smaller units continues to expand, while the need for expensive-to-maintain single-family homes—like the Christensen’s— remains flat. MHA decided to use the money generated by the South Hills home sales to build much-needed one- and two-bedroom apartments,

Beer Drinkers’ Profile Brittany, James, Zara

"Psych, Art, & Mindgames”

Photo by Anne Medley

Ann Christensen stands in the breezeway of the South Hills home she and her family must leave after the Missoula Housing Authority decided to liquidate low-income rental properties.

What brings you to the ‘Horse today? Friendly conversations on male/female relationships and the continual mind games thereof. What do you all do in Missoula? Brittany is a UM Clinical Psych major, James a UM Art major & Zara a UM Neuro Psych major Beverage of choice? Bahama Mamas for the ladies and PBR talls for James

Visit us anytime, after the Market for lunch, after school for refreshments, after work, or as part of a night out on the town. Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse 501 N. Higgins • Smoke-Free!

Missoula Independent

Page 8 September 24–October 1, 2009

Christensen says the 800-squarefoot house is too small for the family, anyway. But her kids—ages 5 through 14—have grown up in the neighborhood and the family would like to avoid leaving the local school district. MHA offers housing assistance to families that on average earn less than $29,700 annually. Christensen’s husband works at Super Wal-Mart and she was laid off from her job with a Wal-Mart distributor in February. But even with MHA’s continued government assistance—they qualify for monthly vouchers through the agency—staying in the area could be tough. “How does a one-income family find a nice house that is within budget?” she asks. “You can’t.” MHA started debating the sale of the Christensens’ home as well as 19 other South Hills rentals in February 2008. It’s one of several belt-tightening maneuvers the agency is undertaking as it attempts to serve more people with fewer resources. “The amount of subsidy and rent we collect on those homes is not enough,” says MHA Director Lori

as well as renovate other public housing. The difficult decision is indicative of larger financial problems plaguing MHA. With federal and state funding either remaining the same or dropping over the last few years, and the recession increasing demand for MHA’s services, Davidson says some of the agency’s programs are in jeopardy of going belly up. “It’s very serious,” Davidson says. To avoid going into the red, MHA expects to cut monthly rental payments to at least 120 families receiving assistance through the federal government’s Housing Choice Voucher Program as of Oct. 1. The voucher program subsidizes rentals for low-income families, with a goal of keeping housing costs at 30 percent of income. Jim McGrath, MHA’s admissions and occupancy manager, estimates the change will force affected families to pay more than 50 percent of their income on rent, with some shelling out as much as 100 percent. (McGrath’s data does not include Indian trust money, food stamps or student assistance as income).

Davidson admits the cuts will hurt some families, but the move’s expected to save MHA roughly $22,000 a month and enable the agency to make it through 2010 in the black. She adds that recently displaced families like the Christensens have been given priority and will receive fully funded vouchers. MHA isn’t the only low-income housing agency treading water. Davidson says hundreds of regional agencies from across the country held “triage” calls with HUD during the past month to hash out the across-theboard money crunch. Nationally, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, which aims to ensure needs of low-income families are met, estimates 400 state and local housing agencies nationally will be forced to reduce or eliminate rental assistance. “HUD said, basically, ‘Do this or else,’” says McGrath of the voucher cuts. The only other option was to outright drop clients. “We have done every cost-saving measure except lower our payment standards,” she says. “Really, it’s the least painful thing that we can think of to do.” Looking forward, Davidson hopes to escape the current crunch once Congress passes a fully funded housing bill. The measure, if passed, would allow MHA to revamp its budget by late winter or early spring, at the earliest. “That’s the one bright spot that we see,” she says. But that relief will come too late for Chanel Hall. The South Hills resident is among those looking for new housing that’s suitable for both HUD’s regulations and her five kids. Finding a rental under budget is tough, she says, especially because MHA nixes some options based on safety violations like old paint, windows that don’t lock and cracked light fixtures. “There’s no such thing as a fivebedroom house for $1,200 a month,” she says. Hall waited three years before MHA gave her the go-ahead to move into her current five-bedroom house on Hillview Drive. The last thing the 35year-old single mom wants to do now is leave the quiet house she’s been in for a year and a half and return to a public housing complex. “Where I was living before,” she says, “was horrible.” jmayrer@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Filtered data A closer look at the state’s Clean Water Act violations by Matthew Frank

A recent nationwide report on the Clean Water Act paints a grim picture of the efficacy of one of the country’s bedrock environmental laws. But a closer look at the study finds that, at least in Montana, the violations prove less about polluted water than they do about convoluted paperwork. According to the New York Times, which published the report Sept. 12, polluters egregiously neglect the Clean Water Act, earning more than 500,000 violations in the last five years alone. In

the-ground reality might not be as bad as the Times’ data suggests. Daily’s Premium Meats accounts for 47 of Missoula’s 103 Clean Water Act violations between 2004 and 2007. The company, a division of Seaboard Foods, which is part of the multinational Seaboard Corporation conglomerate, produces about 25 million pounds of bacon annually at its Mullan Road facility. That’s a lot of briny, meaty water infused with nitrates that requires proper disposal. But of the facility’s violations, only about 10 were

Photo by Anne Medley

Daily’s Premium Meats, which produces about 25 million pounds of bacon annually at its Mullan Road facility, received 47 Clean Water Act violations from 2004 to 2007. Most resulted from incomplete paperwork.

Montana, the Times’ data shows about 300 of the state’s 1,729 facilities with permits to discharge pollutants have violated the law at least once. The Fidelity Exploration & Production Company, which has a permit to discharge wastewater into the Tongue River near Decker, received the most citations with 170. The Times also reported that neither Fidelity nor any of the other polluters in the state have been fined a dime, and that enforcement actions have been inconsistent. But the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), the state agency responsible for enforcing the federal law, says the Times’ data is misleading at best, and inaccurate at worst. “You have to see what these violations are to decide whether or not they’re significant, and whether or not the DEQ’s doing its job,” says John Arrigo, administrator of DEQ’s Enforcement Division. “Now, we’re not perfect, and there are probably violations that need some enforcement, but I don’t believe there are any fish kills or any threats to public health that are occurring as a result of these violations. Many of them are paperwork, and few of them are actual effluent limit exceedences.” A look at Missoula’s top Clean Water Act violators shows why Montana’s on-

actual effluent violations, the result of a recurring problem with its ammonia levels, according to DEQ. The rest were paperwork violations. In addition, almost all of those violations occurred in 2004 and 2005, before Seaboard acquired the facility. Since then, the company has sent its wastewater directly to the city’s Wastewater Treatment Plant for processing and stopped using its on-site lagoons, according to David Eaheart, Seaboard’s marketing director. The company also closed the third-party rendering plant next door. Since 2006, Seaboard hasn’t had any water to discharge on-site at all. Still, it managed seven more violations over the next two years, again due to paperwork errors. Missoula’s Wastewater Treatment Plant, to which the Times attributes 31 Clean Water Act violations between 2004 and 2007, actually had many fewer that dealt with effluent exceedences, according to DEQ. The pertinent violations included high levels of suspended solids, E-coli, and oil and grease. The one major violation came in 2003, when its ammonia levels became too high. That problem was addressed by a $19 million plant upgrade, and the plant was fined $2,500. The remaining violations, says supervisor Starr Sullivan, are paper violations—“typos,

omitted information or some other flub” on paperwork submitted to DEQ, Sullivan says—and not toxic discharges. “Turns out you have to submit a discharge permit even if you’re not discharging anything,” Sullivan says of one example of incomplete paperwork. “That’s perfectly logical, right?” The abundance of paperwork violations has to do with the fact that discharge permit holders are required to submit monthly self-monitoring reports to DEQ, which the agency relies on to track compliance. The failure to complete accurate and timely monitoring reports should be considered a violation, Sullivan says, but the way the data’s presented suggests widespread contamination, when that’s usually not the case. “The article leads one to believe the violations are pollution run amok,” he says. “I don’t believe that’s true.” The Times article also highlights the relatively few enforcement actions for Clean Water Act violations. In Montana, the data shows that between 2004 and 2007 there was only one enforcement action for every 100 violations. “Some people may say, ‘Well, a limit is a limit. If you exceed it you’re in violation. Take enforcement,’” says Arrigo. “Well, yeah, that’s one approach, but we try to focus on the worst of the worst.” The best way to identify the worst, Arrigo suggests, is to look at the actual fines levied by DEQ, not the number of violations. In 2001, it assessed a $200,000 fine against the Yellowstone Club for “stream obliteration by heavy equipment.” In 2000, it fined Glacier National Park $74,100 for discharging sewage into Lake McDonald. In 2002, it fined ConocoPhillips $67,600 for improper waste disposal in Helena. And last year, it fined Fidelity $40,425— not $0 as the Times’ data stated—for toxic discharges into the Tongue River. Since 2000, nine other entities have been fined at least $30,000. “I think one of the things that came out of that article is that EPA, Congress and the public are realizing that, nationally, we have regulated point-source discharges, but run-off from…ag lands are significantly affecting waters like the Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound, and it’s just hard to issue a permit to those,” Arrigo says. “So the whole approach of the Clean Water Act needs to change. You just don’t get that by looking at the permit enforcement.” mfrank@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 September 24–October 1, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

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Missoula Independent

Page 10 September 24–October 1, 2009

Last week’s column noted frustration with the Obama administration over the pace of change in the environmental arena, where many of the Bushera policies continue to remain in effect. But this week, given a stark assessment of the realities of the war in Afghanistan, President Obama now has a great opportunity to make real change by abandoning Bush’s war there, bringing our troops home, stemming the financial hemorrhage and concentrating on America’s many problems at home rather than continuing fruitless global crusades. When the 9/11 attacks shook the nation, President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney leaped at the opportunity not to punish those who carried out the attacks—most of whom were Saudis—but to avenge the former President Bush’s decision not to occupy Iraq and depose Saddam Hussein in the first Iraq War. As we now know, after nearly seven long years of war in Iraq, at a cost of hundreds of billions of dollars, more than 4,000 American deaths and hundreds of thousands of other casualties, Iraq had nothing to do with the 9/11 attacks. Hussein was, after all, a secular, not religious, leader. By deposing him, we have done little but destroy whatever balance he had been able to bring between the two major warring factions within Iraq, the Sunnis and Shiites. Only time will tell what the eventual outcome of that blunder will be, but with U.S. forces primarily removed from urban areas in Iraq, the violence level is already rising and will likely continue when all U.S. combat forces are removed. In the meantime, based on the belief that Osama bin Laden, a Saudi who claimed to be the mastermind behind the 9/11 attacks, was located in the wild Afghanistan-Pakistan border country, Bush launched a second and simultaneous war. Initially, Bush claimed victory because U.S. forces overthrew the Taliban, who are adherents of a very strict form of religious law called “Sharia,” or “Allah’s Law,” that deals with virtually all aspects of life—often in ways that western societies find objectionable. For reasons that defy logic, President Bush decided it was the job of the United States to “free” the Afghanis from the Taliban, which remain the target of that war in a redux of the Crusades in which Christians fought Muslims for centuries to no avail.

Like those early Christian Crusaders, Bush squandered the lives of American troops and enormous amounts of resources to accomplish very little. The Taliban are, in the term most widely used these days, “resurgent”—which shouldn’t be much of a surprise considering they happen to live there. Moreover, Bush embraced the military ruler of Pakistan, now-deposed President Pervez Musharraf, sending billions of dollars and even more billions in military supplies there in an effort to enlist Pakistan’s assistance in driving the Taliban from their border region with Afghanistan.

“ The real change he promised us is still possible—and nothing could prove that more than ending Bush’s

terrible wars.

But now, after years of battle and a lengthening and troubling record of indiscriminate civilian deaths caused by U.S. forces operating under the cover of NATO, we are no closer to our goal than when we started. Bin Laden is still free—or at least as free as you can be when the powerful U.S. government is using every military and intelligence source at its disposal to try and kill you. The Taliban still control most of the country, even threatening the capital of Kabul, where the U.S.-backed puppet ruler, Hamid Karzai, is shakily ensconced. And as an added bonus, the U.S. intervention in Pakistan has achieved two things. First, thanks to his bribed cooperation, Musharraf is gone, which is no great loss. But worse is the destabilizing effect the U.S. intervention and much-hated missile strikes from Predator drones have had on Pakistan, which is, after all, a nucleararmed nation. Like Iraq, only time will tell the eventual outcome of our warmaking in that country of 173 million

people, but right now, it doesn’t look promising. It is against this recent background that President Obama now faces a seminal decision—drastically increase U.S. troop strength, spending and casualties, or pull out of Bush’s ill-advised war and bring U.S. troops home. In this decision, which will be made in the coming days or weeks, President Obama would do well to consider not just the events of the last decade there, but also those of preceding decades and centuries. They call Afghanistan “the place where Empires go to die” for good reason. The British in the 19th century fought enormously bloody battles there for years in deadly conflict with tribal warriors who, amazingly, held the British Empire, the most powerful of its day, at bay and eventually drove them from the country. Leaping forward, the Soviet Union took its shot at Afghanistan in another bloody conflict that started in 1979 and ended a decade later with total Soviet withdrawal. The United States, still locked in a global Cold War struggle with the communists, aided the Afghans with military training and generous stockpiles of such devastating weapons as the shoulder-launched Stinger missile, which was the bane of the helicopter gunships that the Soviets had hoped would overcome the brutal Afghan terrain. Like the United States, England had to ship its men and materiel overseas at tremendous cost, and they lost. The Soviets only had to drive their tanks over the border and into Afghanistan—and yet they, too, lost. President Obama will undoubtedly be assailed by Republican warmongers should he decide to abandon the Afghan war. But in truth, it is the Republicans who should be assailed for getting us into it in the first place— and for the tremendous losses we have since accrued. America needs to help itself. The hour is late and the need is great and growing. President Obama knows that the populace no longer supports this war, nor do his NATO allies. The real change he promised us is still possible— and nothing could prove that more than ending Bush’s terrible wars. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Step by step Finding solace among the Crazies by Joanne Wilke

I’ve always gone to the woods to calm or rejuvenate a spirit too easily rubbed raw by modern life. It shouldn’t have surprised me that this continued into chemotherapy. Cockeyed from surgery and early treatments for ovarian cancer, I thought I was too tired or too sick to feel alive in the woods, but found that even on my worst days it helps more than a whole array of blue and yellow pills. A cancer diagnosis slices your life thin, puts death right in your face, while the systemic poison and illness over months of treatment goes against all sense. Butted against this, I walk along a piney trail near a crackling creek. My dog gallops up and back, but always with one eye on me. He keeps closer than he used to. I try to stay under four miles total, or I’ll have to lie down for a day or two. Sometimes, when I walk, there’s a hint of sweat on my upper lip; sometimes there isn’t. These walks correspond directly to where I am in the three-week cycle of chemotherapy treatments, ranging from a short meditative stroll to genuine, breathless hikes. Despite the cumulative hangover, baldness, hot and cold flashes, numb feet, and the metallic flavor of my tongue, my doctors are stunned by my persistent health. Even so, a trace of chemo rises with each step, like a tendril of smoke from the ashes of my life. Yesterday, I drove 15 slow miles up a rocky road to a campground bordered by a mile of torrential waterfalls. Today, I hike toward Blue Lake, high in the Crazy Mountains, north of Big

Timber. I muse about the origin of “crazy” place names here and elsewhere in the West, how almost every one projects the legend of an early woman settler who went mad from abduction or isolation and loss, and yet was held in a certain reverence by both American Indians and whites. Perhaps hundreds of women made that heartfelt leap into craziness, or perhaps only one. It doesn’t matter if it’s even true

“A trace of chemo rises with each step, like a tendril of smoke from the ashes of my life.

anymore, the myth has a life of its own. I’ll hike seven miles this day into the Crazy Mountains, with long rests in the sun, sitting on thick moss and smooth rock and guzzling purified water and ginger ale. My dog hugs my heels and I know I will pay later, but the beauty and exertion of today is a calculated choice and well worth it for me. Snowdrifts hug the shade as I traverse switchbacks of loose rocks, remembering my running days when I learned I could finish any distance just by putting one foot in front of the

other. It doesn’t matter how fast I go, or how slowly. At last I crest the granite ridge, and there is a moment, a step, when my eyes are level with an unnamed alpine pond that rises over the edge of the trail. I stop and stare. Humped round with surface tension, the water quivers at eye-level, holding its shape like a drop of honey or mercury. But I know that it resembles a specific liquid I’ve seen. Then it comes to me: It looks like the gelatinous swirl of dissolved polyethylene glycol, a stool softener. Suddenly I see with different eyes. Splintered pines become rows of enormous needles and a jumble of smooth boulders are newly bald heads. Despite red paintbrush and yellow daisies erupting from sheer rock walls, the deep, long crack that bisects the ridge becomes an endless cool hallway. My steps echo hollow as everything in my being rejects going forward, toward chemo session number three, four, five. And yet I have to choose life—my life. The crack ends and the trail drops into a wide gorge, but I don’t follow it. Not yet, anyway. Surrounded by perpendicular granite, I step into a spot of cool sun and a high view of blue mountain layers. Across the gorge, white water spouts then avalanches into thick pine trees far below, leaving behind only a distant roar, me and the Crazies. Joanne Wilke is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org ). She is the author of Eight Women, Two Model Ts, and the American West and lives in Bozeman.

2105 Bow St. Missoula, MT 59801

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To: The Missoula Community For over 26 years we have been proud to be a center of health and wellness for Missoula Women. AND we’re looking forward to another 26 years! As one of the country’s first complete women’s fitness centers our vision has been to be a place of physical health, mental strength, open mindedness and open heartedness. This beacon has led us to be a place where women can improve their health, reduce stress and become a part of a dynamic community. We have developed from “gym fitness” to wellness that spans the gamut from an energizing Zumba class, to joyful NIA, cycling, water exercise and a variety of Pilates, yoga….plus massage, facials, physical therapy and more. It has been our privilege to enhance a healthy community by supporting many organizations such as the YWCA, Living Art, the Chamber of Commerce, the American Cancer Society, the Missoula Business Women’s Network and more.

This week we invite YOU, the Missoula public, to join us in a free appreciation and awareness event for Missoula Medical Aid, a local non-profit organization committed to advancing health and environmental quality in Honduras. Please join us Thursday, October 1, from 5–7 p.m. for a presentation of the fascinating and heart-wrenching stories and slides from program volunteers. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and beverages provided.

Thank you, once again, Missoula for supporting us in the truest form of preventative health care and for embracing the work of The Women’s Club.

Visit us at thewomensclub.com or become a fan on facebook.com! Missoula Independent

Page 11 September 24–October 1, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Sometimes, change is hard. And in the Middle East, when it comes to the idea of democratic government, change can be frustratingly difficult. Take Iran, a country ruled by an old guard of Islamic leaders who’d like their theocracy to stay as is, despite thousands of citizens protesting for reform. Similar struggles persist in Iraq and Afghanistan, as both countries grapple with political transition amid a factionalized population. On Wednesday, a group of academic experts gather in Missoula for two days to discuss this dramatic shift in Middle Eastern politics and the challenges therein. Learned scholars like Georgetown University professor Shireen Hunter—author of seven books on subjects like Islam and human rights—join other intellectuals to examine issues such as “Contesting and

Questioning Authoritarianism from Within: Islamic Republic of Iran at a Crossroads.” Unless you’ve been lucky enough to take classes on the subject, Missoula’s exposure to the intricacies of politics in the Middle East is scant. This is your chance to take a global crash course. –Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 24

soula-neighborhoods.org or call 552-6081.

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. Call Lois at 642-3010.

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 27

Help ensure that certified professional midwives are included in health reform legislation when you join members of Midwives and Mothers in Action for a march, starting at 3:30 PM at the parking lot of the Boone and Crockett Club where you’ll sign a petition and then deliver it to Max Baucus’ office. Free. Email Dolly at dbrowdercpm@gmail.com.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 25 Missoula is a really white place. So examine some of your assumptions about race and racism during an eight-week National Coalition Building Institute workshop on racism and inequality which runs every Tue. at 11 AM starting Sept. 29 and ending on Nov. 17. But, you must preregister by today by calling 541-6891 or visiting www.ncbimissoula.org. $150, eight-week course. Help mitigate and end discrimination by training to be a workshop facilitator for Missoula’s National Coalition Building Institute during a “Train the Trainer” seminar running Oct. 9–11 at NCBI, 1130 W. Broadway St. You must register by today by calling 541-6891 or visiting www.ncbimissoula.org. $300. Certified professional midwives wanna be included in health reform legislation too, so lend a hand in their cause during a silent auction and music/food celebration to support the effort at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., from 6–9 PM. Cost TBA. E-mail Dolly at dbrowder@gmail.com.

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 26 Take a tour of Missoula’s southernmost neighborhoods, and snag some free coffee, bagels and lunch, during a Community Forum Bus Tour that begins with a meetup at 9 AM at McCormick Park near Currents Aquatic Center. Free. Register at www.mis-

“Durability of Authoritarian Regimes and the Challenges of Islamist Movements in the Middle East” starts Wed., Sept. 30, at 9:30 AM and runs through Thu., Oct.1. All events take place at UM’s University Center Theatre. Free. Visit www.umt.edu/cap for a downloadable schedule or call 243-2299.

Even if owning a home seems out of reach, check this: Habitat for Humanity of Missoula is currently looking to select low-income applicants interested in building a home in partnership with the org and is having an app meeting at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 2 PM. Free. Call 549-8210.

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 28 Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. Help the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration with more accurate and timely weather warnings, especially if you live in Seeley Lake, during a weather spotter training sesh at Seeley-Swan High School, 456 Airport Road in Seeley Lake, at 7 PM. Free. Call 329-4840.

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 29 Find the strength and will to survive in the company of others during a breast cancer support group at St. Francis Xavier Parish, 420 W. Pine, every first and third Tue. of the month at noon. Free. Call 329-5656. If you’ve got a hankering to pick the brains of this year’s batch of Missoula City Council candidates on issues such as job growth, housing and transportation, head to a candidate roundtable which features a meet and greet at 3:30 PM, a roundtable discussion at 4:10 and a networking sesh at 5, all at the Broadway Inn, 1609 W. Broadway St. Free. Call 543-6623.

THURSDAY OCTOBER 1 The Wheeler Conference hosts “Failure to Inform: Is there a looming media crisis in Montana?” at the Holiday Inn at the Park, beginning with opening remarks at 8:30 a.m. The all-day event includes multiple panel discussions on print, broadcast and digital media. $35. Visit www.wheelercenter.org.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 September 24–October 1, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN – When Jarrell Paul Arnold, 34, walked into a credit union in Anchorage, Alaska, and inquired about his account balance, the teller asked for his name, account number and photo identification. After complying, he showed the teller a note that read, “I have a gun. Give me all the money in your drawer.” The Anchorage Daily News reported the robber stuffed the cash in his jacket and took off, only to be promptly arrested. Robbery suspect Thomas James, 24, died after he spray-painted his face to conceal his identity, according to sheriff’s deputies in Richland County, S.C. SIZE MATTERS – The Port of Seattle will have to pay about $1 million extra for its new cargo terminal because the trench dug to hold the electrical cable for cranes that lift containers from ships was too narrow for the cable. “Clearly, the contractor should’ve built the trench at 2.52 inches, and it’s 2.5,” Port Commission President Bill Bryant told the Seattle Times. A bigger trench would’ve cost $500,000, so the Port decided to order a smaller 2-inch cable from Italy that cost $200,000. It’s also liable for a $1 million rent credit for the tenant whose use of the cable was delayed. WHEN GUNS ARE OUTLAWED – Police in Elyria, Ohio, arrested Thomas B. Heffner, 49, and his 18-year-old son, Thomas W., for fighting with swords. “Heffner Jr. stated that he believes he was being treated unfairly and started to argue,” the police report said. Amy Heffner explained that when the argument intensified, her husband and son grabbed swords off the wall and continued to swing them at each other until the police arrived. KEYSTONE KOPS – Six motorcycle cops crashed into each other while escorting the family of one of the country’s largest Harley-Davidson dealers to his funeral in Ormand Beach, Fla. A Florida Highway Patrol official told the Daytona Beach News-Journal the lead rider slowed down, but the riders near the back of the group didn’t, causing the chain-reaction crash. HUNT & PECKERS – New York City signed a $982,269 contract with a New Jersey company to buy thousands of new manual and electric typewriters over the next three years and a $99,570 maintenance contract with a Manhattan firm to service existing typewriters. The New York Post reported most of the money was for the New York Police Department, which still uses typewriters to fill out property and evidence vouchers printed on carbon-paper forms. The reliance on typewriters contributes to the slow pace of processing arrests, according to Edith Linn, a retired NYPD officer and professor of criminal justice at Manhattan’s Berkeley College. Of the roughly 500 NYPD officers Linn interviewed for her 2008 book Arrest Decisions, many cited the outdated equipment as a reason for their reluctance to make arrests for less serious crimes. HORNS OF A DILEMMA – Marijuana may protect the brain from the harmful effects of binge drinking, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego. They performed brain scans on 16- to 19-year-olds in three groups: binge drinkers, binge drinkers who also smoke pot and those with very little drug or drinking experience. The study, reported in the journal Neurotoxicology and Teratology, found that subjects who drank and smoke showed less brain damage than binge drinkers and only slightly more brain damage than the control group. THE NOSE KNOWS – Honolulu city councilors introduced a bill that would make it illegal for bus riders to have “odors that unreasonably disturb others or interfere with their use of the transit system.” Passengers convicted of body odor would face a $500 fine and up to six months in jail. A British amusement park this summer banned rollercoaster riders from raising their arms after receiving complaints about body odor. Signs at Thorpe Park in Chertsey, Surrey, warn visitors to keep their arms down and “Say no to BO.” Wardens on the rides also remind people to consider their fellow passengers and will remove anyone ignoring the warnings. “Our rides are really scary, and people tend to sweat more than normal due to the fear and anticipation they experience while queuing up,” Mike Vallis, a park director told the Daily Telegraph, “so it can get really pongy.” LITIGATION NATION – A Maryland family wants Honda to pay them $10 million after a tornado picked up their Odyssey van, which, according to their statement, “remained airborne for a few seconds before plummeting to the ground and landing on all four wheels.” Upon impact, the driver’s side passenger window shattered, and glass flew into the car, injuring five occupants. Although the Achumba family said in Prince George’s County Court that the automaker should have used the same laminated glass for side windows that it uses for windshields, the father noted that his wife, a defendant, ignored the tornado warning, choosing to drive her children to school for back-to-school night because she “was upset at the program for not properly caring for her child.” Trina Thompson, 27, is suing her alma mater for a $70,000 tuition refund because she hasn’t found a job since earning her bachelor’s degree this April. The information-technology student insisted the Office of Career Advancement at New York’s Monroe College has “not tried hard enough to help me.” The passenger in a car driven by a drag-racing teenager who seriously injured the driver of a minivan he hit head-on is suing the victim, insisting she “carelessly and negligent (sic) failed to avoid the collision with the other vehicle.” Investigators in Salem, Mass., concluded that Timothy Pereira, 19, was going 81 mph in a 30 mph zone when he lost control of his Ford Mustang, veered across the centerline and hit the Honda Odyssey driven by Christine Speliotis, 42. The Salem News reported that Brandon Pereira, 17, Timothy’s cousin, was ejected from the vehicle and suffered severe injuries. His lawyer, Roland Hughes, said he’s seeking $450,000 from Speliotis, who police said was driving at a reasonable speed and did nothing wrong, because “I’m trying to get compensation for my client anywhere I can.” Fred Hiestand, a leading opponent of frivolous lawsuits in California, is suing the city of Sacramento, the city’s police chief, city police officers and a tow truck company for towing his car after he left it in a no-parking zone. “I was concerned this might happen,” John Sullivan, president of the Civil Justice Association of California, told the Recorder. “Fred has been fighting against frivolous lawsuits for decades, and like a doctor fighting malaria, he’s become infected himself.”

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Missoula Independent

Page 13 September 24–October 1, 2009


Last drag Once the statewide smoking ban goes into effect Oct. 1, a large part of Montana’s bar culture will, for better or worse, go up in smoke by Independent staff • photos by Anne Medley

I

t’s hard to defend smokers anymore. Mountains of medical evidence confirm that cigarette smoke destroys your lungs and leads to a laundry list of other ailments. Second-hand smoke proves just as dangerous. For years, federal and state governments sensed an easy and defensible target, and imposed heavy restrictions on the price and availability of cigarettes, as well as where you can smoke them. Just this week, Uncle Sam even banned cloves, or flavored cigarettes, entirely. Montana finally catches up with the national piling on this week. The Montana Clean Indoor Air Act, which was drafted during the 2005 Legislature, allowed bars and casinos to gradually transition to smoke-free over the last four years. That buffer period officially ends Oct. 1. When that last cigarette butt gets snuffed out inside a Montana tavern next Wednesday night, a certain iconic imagery will go out along with it. No more literary references to smoky barrooms. No more killing time on the barstool, alone, with the aide of a cigarette. No more hippies able to sneak a few tokes of weed under the cloud of tobacco smoke. There are a million reasons to cheer the ban, but still a few reasons to lament its arrival. With that, we sent five writers to some of the last remaining smokerfriendly havens for one last drag.

Small-town bars fear the brunt of the ban

O

ut at Harold’s Club in Milltown, talk of the smoking ban lingers at the bar about as long as a shot of Don Julio. Those with fresh-cracked packs of cigarettes next to their Budweiser coasters don’t seem bothered at first, either out of indifference or insecurity. The bartender, Jenni Regan, passes me a pack of Marlboro Reds and a Pabst. I burn through a smoke and slide down the bar to join a few chuckling locals. The group acknowledges the ban sporadically, breaking up any serious commentary with discussion of the latest social goings-on. “Most guys won’t want to step outside for it,” says Regan, who recently returned to tending bar after maternity leave. “[Management’s] talked about putting in a fire pit. That’ll be cute— bunch of guys standing around a fire out back smoking.” Harold’s boasts a friendliness and intimacy just shy of an episode of Cheers. You could count the number of one-time or impulse drop-ins on two hands and still find your thumbs dangling. Regulars will feel the ban worst, everyone agrees. Smoking stands out as an almost sacred practice here–the Harold’s Club MySpace page boasts, “Yes you can still smoke inside!!!” The bar’s signature decorations show a mounted goat and a bighorn sheep protected by giant plastic bubbles, placed there to protect the taxidermy from the smoke. Will the bubbles disappear come October, I ask, lighting up another. “Probably not,” Regan says as she cracks another line of Bud

Missoula Independent

Lights for the corner boys. “Just in case the thing doesn’t last.” Repeal is a desperate wish for locals accustomed to the nub of a filter between their knuckles. In other words, most of Harold’s customer base holds out hope of an 11th-hour reprieve. “Les comes in every Friday night and just sits back there and smokes, one after the other,” says Mary Pat, who everyone knows as just Mary Pat. “I’ve never seen a guy make that much ash.” Thing is, the bars in downtown Missoula likely won’t be hit as bad, Regan suggests. They can fall back on non-regulars, the throngs that pop in every weekend regardless of the smoking ban. Harold’s clientele is different. Take Joel Smith, who regards the presence of a foreign smoker next to him with muted skepticism. Mention of the ban generates a subtle twitch. “I don’t have to drink beer here,” Smith whispers. And therein lies the rub for smaller taverns like Harold’s. The ban could, as Regan fears, keep loyal patrons from crossing the threshold. The reaction is a little less dire at the Lumberjack Saloon off Highway 12. The place is vacant when I walk in mid-afternoon on a recent Thursday. Anna Tripp assures me from behind the bar that I just caught them on the slowest day she’s seen this summer. There’s usually a line of faces puffing away. And the ban? “Honestly, I don’t think it’ll hurt all that much,” Tripp says. The Jack, as it’s more commonly known, draws campers, hunters and big crowds for weekend musical gigs.

Page 14 September 24–October 1, 2009

“We’ve got a really nice patio,” explains Tripp, “and we’ve got a huge bonfire pit.” John Van Ackeren joins in the conversation after placing a food order. I pass him a cigarette and he justifies his camo pants by telling me he’s been elk hunting all day. A few bugles, he says, but no sightings. Ackeren lives in Salt Lake City now, flipping a foreclosure house he bought earlier this year. But he called Missoula home for 10 years and even worked a stint at the Jack–one of his choice bars when he jets back for hunting season. He’s a social smoker, he says, so his personal stock in the ban is far from heated. “I guarantee it’ll cut my smoking down,” he says. Tripp pours a second round as we discuss the more obvious benefits of the statewide policy: less stink on your clothes, more tolerable hangovers. But Ackeren gets stuck on the other side of the issue. “You know, it’s one thing to have regulations and such,” he says. “But on the other hand, it’s somebody’s bar and they really should be able to run their own business how they want.” Sure, the Jack–like Harold’s or most other outlying bars near Missoula–might see a few regulars a little less often, Tripp admits. But most will likely adapt to new strictures fast. If that doesn’t work, there’s always the sign above the Jack’s bar to fall back on: “No Whining.” —Alex Sakariassen


The morning debate at Charlie B’s G

eorge Daly sips a whisky and water on ice and pulls a yellow box of Top menthol from his pocket. “I think it will suck, personally,” he says of the statewide smoking ban. “It deprives me of life, liberty and happiness—all that crap.” It’s half-past 10 on a Tuesday morning at Charlie B’s, and tendrils of cigarette smoke form a wispy cloud over about a dozen patrons, none of them appearing younger than 50. As the cloud forms into an insulating and pungent gray blanket, Daly, a 30-year Charlie’s regular, says he can’t smell it. “Do you?” he asks. The retired construction worker, Navy man and former Flipper’s Casino barkeep ticks off the names of just about every patron perched along the bar this morning, the majority armed with a pack of tobacco. Among Missoula’s many bars and casinos, locals associate Charlie’s with the smoking crowd more than any other. And Daly echoes the sentiment of many Charlie’s regulars when he wonders why, with plenty of non-smoking establishments available, must the government have to mess with his spot? “If you want to go somewhere smoke-free, you should,” he says. “But it’s not here.” Nine of 10 doctors recommended Camels when Daly started smoking 45 years ago. Looking down at his cigarette-rolling machine, he coughs and says he’s given up quitting. “It’s not going to happen.” Daly doesn’t have much time for arguments for the ban. Second-hand smoke? Daly says bartenders make good money and “every occupation has some environmental risks.” That’s enough to get Twilly Cannon, sitting at a table across from the bar, involved in the conversation. “George, you’re full of shit,” he says. Cannon, a newspaper-reading, cigarette-smok-

ing regular, argues that everyone deserves a healthy workplace. “Smoking is not a right, like George says,” he adds. Meanwhile, 14-year Charlie’s veteran Julie Leriget, sits on the floor writing lunch specials on a whiteboard. “I think I’ve smoked several packs of cigarettes without having one touch my lips,” Leriget says, shrugging her shoulders. Cannon also points out the unintended positives of the ban, like the newly dubbed social phenomenon, “smurting.” That’s when a woman steps outside to smoke and is followed by a suitor. They share a quiet moment, smoke and flirt, or “smurt.” “I’ve seen it in practice,” Cannon says. Daly shrugs at the idea, orders another drink and gets back to his point. Non-smokers are pushing an agenda, he says. Public outdoor spaces are next. And he’s right. Just this week, anti-tobacco advocates at Montana State University announced a push to make the Bozeman campus entirely smoke and chew free. Montana Tech in Butte is slated to ban tobacco next year. Across the country, 429 municipalities have limited smoking in outdoor public places, including parks and ball fields, according to the nonprofit Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights. In San Francisco, those caught smoking in a city park are subject to a $100 fine. “They might as well just shoot us,” Daly says. “We’re social pariahs.” And so, the guys at Charlie’s toss around ways to skirt the rules, like parking a school bus on North Higgins Avenue to use as a smoking lounge. That idea gets 77-year-old B.J. Berjensky to grin as he sips his beer. “What I like about it, is it pisses people off,” he says.“If they ban girls, then I have a problem.” —Jessica Mayrer

Missoula Independent

Page 15 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Angst and apprehension at the Golden Rose The neon lights inside the Golden Rose on West Broadway glow red like the tip of a lit cigarette—and inside the Golden Rose, there are a lot of lit cigarettes. On one Wednesday at around 9 p.m., the bar hosts more than 20 revelers, all of them stationed at red booths or perched at the bar. The jukebox plays Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” and then shifts to the disco new wave of MGMT. It’s a decidedly younger crowd than one would find at Charlie B’s or the Union Club, but just as hearty. This is where the twentysomething kids of old-school barflies hang out, or so it seems. “Not everybody agrees with the bar scene,” says University of Montana student Heather Rasley, a Rose regular. “Not everybody agrees with drinking and smoking, but it’s some people’s lives. It’s free will, according to me. It’s a personal choice and to take that away is sort of fucked up.” Rose bartender Claude Alick stands with a half-smile listening to Rasley. Alick doesn’t smoke, though he gets plenty of it secondhand. “Nobody’s gonna take it away from you,” he says, ribbing her. “You just have to go outside and smoke. You still have your rights.” Two muted television screens flicker on either side of the bar, one showing “Ghost Hunters” and the other Aliens. It’s a crowd where there are more tattoos and piercings than not, where conversation bounces from the plotlines of “Lost” and “True Blood” to religion and

politics. This is where young rockers huddle, smoking their cigarettes between sets at the connected (and smoke-free) Badlander or Palace Lounge. The Rose is a place where, above all, cigarettes and youth seem to be the most common threads, and the ban has threatened to alter the bond. “I’m just wondering where it’s going to go from here,” says Rasley. “Are the smokers going to get exiled from public space altogether?” More people might come out to bars in a non-smoking environment, she says, which is a good thing. And hardcore smokers like herself will go outside and suffer through the weather. But where will it go from there? “It’ll become a whole industry,” Alick says, handing her another Pabst from behind the bar. “There will be a booth outside, right? You walk into the booth and smoke your cigarette and then the booth shoots the cigarette smoke up into the atmosphere. A whole industry.” Allick grins at her and she laughs and rolls her eyes. “That’s fine,” she says, “but there needs to be a balance. If we can’t smoke in a bar we should be able to take our drinks out, within a finite range within the entry of a bar—the back or the front—and be able to drink our drinks.” As she lights another cigarette she nods and says, “I’m okay with the ban. It’s what it is. I’m just wondering how far it’s going to go.” —Erika Fredrickson

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Seeking solace on the rez ention of Montana’s imminent smoking ban evokes little more than a shrug inside the Gray Wolf Peak Casino north of Evaro. One woman with a couple packs of Marlboros stacked on a wad of one-dollar bills is barely willing to turn away from her ringing, dinging machine. The first employee I talk to isn’t aware of the ban at all. Nor should he be, considering that the ban doesn’t even apply here on the Flathead Indian Reservation. But it’s not that simple, it turns out. How, exactly, the ban is applied on reservations in Montana is as cloudy as Gray Wolf Peak’s smoky lounge. Because the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and their members own only about 62 percent of the reservation’s 1.3 million acres, the question of where the ban holds sway has even tribal leaders and state attorneys digging into the fine print. More than that, though, the question touches on sensitive and complex issues of tribal sovereignty, which seem to have made the state hesitant to test the limits of the law’s influence. “A lot of people are unsure how this works, and the flow of information is hard to trace,” says CSKT Communications Director Robert McDonald. This much is clear: The smoking ban will not apply to tribally owned bars, restaurants and casinos. On the Flathead Indian Reservation, that includes the Gray Wolf Peak Casino and Best Western KwaTaqNuk Resort in Polson. (The tribe has passed its own smoking ban inside some other public spaces.) The ban will apply to nontribal members on the reservation who own and operate such establishments. Less clear is how the law applies to establishments owned by tribal members, like the Silver Dollar in St. Ignatius. For it and others, the ban will not be “pursued,” according to state attorneys and officials with the Department of Public Health & Humman Services (DPHHS), an approach that avoids the legal can of worms any pursuit would surely crack open. Calls to the Silver Dollar were not returned. Of course, the tribes can implement their own smoking ban that would mirror the state law, something the tribal council is batting around. “I know with authority that there has been some discussion internally in our health department about this statewide ban, and the fact that the tribes have the option to adopt their own ban if they so chose,” says McDonald. “But that has not been brought forward to council at this point. It’s likely that may happen, depending on the flow of other issues and whatnot. It’s definitely been on their minds, especially with regard to the anti-smoking efforts of the health department. But ultimately it’s the council’s decision.” From a health perspective, the tribes would seem to have very good reason to implement a ban. According to the 2008 Montana Adult

M

Tobacco Use Survey, the prevalence of smoking among American Indians was roughly four times that of white Americans—55 percent versus 14 percent, respectively. Furthermore, DPHHS’s most recent survey of tobacco use and attitudes among American Indians in Montana found that more than two thirds believed smoking should not be allowed in restaurants and other indoor public places. But health implications are balanced by cultural ones, which complicate anti-tobacco efforts on reservations, not to mention the debate over an outright ban. “Tobacco prevention specialists on reservations…certainly understand the toxic nature of

second-hand smoke, but they’re up against something very, very powerful, and that is the historical, traditional and sacred use of tobacco,” says Linda Lee, supervisor of the Montana Tobacco Use Prevention Program. “They have to always be very, very sensitive with any of their teachings or any of their educational pieces when they talk about it, because what has happened is that tobacco, from a sacred perspective, has become enmeshed with commercial tobacco. And so they have a very difficult job to try to start separating that out.” For now, issues of sovereignty and health aside, it would appear Montana’s smoking ban could be a boon for the handful of bars and casinos on the Flathead Indian Reservation where patrons can still light up after Oct. 1. But, when asked if he expects a boost in business, McDonald says he wouldn’t bet on it. “It’s still a long ways to get here,” he says. “There are people who will drive 15 minutes from Missoula to take a shot at winning $500,000 on a 90 cent bet in Evaro, and there are people willing to take a weekend trip and drive 90 minutes to Polson from Missoula to sleep by the lake and gamble on the Class 2 machines that pay out progressive. But it’s still a ways.” Whatever the implications of the state smoking ban for the reservation, they’re certainly not on the minds of those hunkered down at the Gray Wolf Peak Casino, where even an older woman who says she has severe allergies endures the thick smoke for a shot at quick cash. “I should stay away from here,” she says as she slips a crisp twenty into the machine. “It would be nice if it was smoke-free.” —Matthew Frank


Last man standing I

f the statewide smoking ban is the Alamo, then Darrell Keck, owner of the Dixie Inn in Shelby, would be considered Davy Crockett. Four years after the 2005 Legislature worked with the Montana Taverns Association (MTA) to negotiate the Montana Clean Indoor Air Act—and include a four-year grace period for bars and casinos to comply—Keck attempted to reverse the law. The 25-year owner of the roadside lounge, casino and supper club—and former president of the MTA—asked his state senator to introduce a bill that would continue to exempt drinking establishments. The MTA went berserk and lambasted Keck in public meetings. Anti-smoking groups screamed foul. Legislators said they’d firmly stand their ground. The bill, ultimately, was never introduced. Come Oct. 1, Keck says the Dixie Inn will go smoke free. But he’s not happy about it. We caught Keck in Missoula, where he was attending the MTA’s annual convention. He sat on the porch of his non-smoking hotel room, taking puffs of a Marlboro Red. Indy: Why are you against the ban? Keck: I have a large base of smokers—some would say as much as 70 percent—with a lot of truckers that stop in and some locals. It fits my business. There is room for both types of establishments in Montana. It’s not a health issue. It’s a property rights issue. They’re telling us how to run our business. The study that the doctors did in Helena [to help support the statewide ban in 2005] is totally bogus and full of half-truths. I had hoped

to introduce the bill and have some of that come out through testimony, but it just didn’t happen. Indy: You attempted something of a last stand during the last legislative session. Did you think you’d win? Keck: I thought we could win. Once some of the issues were brought up, I thought we’d

money came in and the little independent businesses couldn’t compete in an open boxing match, so to speak. And, frankly, it’s not a last stand. Not yet…We could always sue ’em, if we ever got the money. But right now the out-of-state do-gooders just have us over a barrel. Indy: What do you mean when you say this

Indy: You made the MTA pretty mad when you fought the existing agreement this year. How do things stand now? Keck: We’re friends, win, lose or draw. Some weren’t happy, that’s true. That’s why they make different colors of paint. People disagree. You never paint everything white. Indy: So, will the Dixie Inn comply with the ban come Oct. 1? Keck: I spent $18,000 three years ago to make my dining room smoke-free and complied totally with the exemption on my bar area. We’ll comply again. Indy: Have you made any changes to accommodate the smokers? Keck: We don’t even know what the rules are yet. I have a patio, but I haven’t used it in 25 years and I don’t intend to activate it.

change opinions in the Legislature. But my sponsor decided not to introduce it, and we didn’t get the chance. We didn’t get much publicity because we’re just little, independent business people. We don’t have the money. The proponents of this bill were all funded by a large New York foundation [the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation] and they didn’t have to raise any money. The out-of-state

is a property rights issue? Keck: Back in the English rule, if a king wanted a piece of your land to go hunting on, he just confiscated it. That’s essentially what they’re doing. I own my building. I own my land. I know my business. I don’t expect everybody to offer smoking and I don’t care if the people who don’t like it don’t come into my place. That’s fine. They have a choice and all I want is the same choice.

Indy: Do you think it’ll hurt business? Keck: It’s going to hurt my business drastically, I think. I don’t know how long it will last. Some places bounce back, some don’t. Atlantic City casinos went smoke free [in 2007] and, after a year, it hurt their business so badly that they went back and petitioned to allow smoking. They got it. I think it will hurt gaming revenues for the state, that’s for sure. But how long will it last? That I don’t know. That’d just be a prediction. Indy: I’ve never been to the Dixie Inn. What’s the drink of choice there? Keck: The drink of choice? Just beer. —Skylar Browning

the $$–$$$...$15 and over Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list makes Ciao Mambo a hit for any occasion. Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. • 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$

Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner 7 days a week 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch & dinner. Beer & Wine. Mon-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$ Catalyst Cafe and Espresso Bar 111 N Higgins • 542-1337 Open daily from 7 am to 3 pm. Breakfast and lunch served all day, everyday. Huevos Rancheros, Omelets, Tomato

Lime and Tortilla Soup, Bing Cherry Salads, Fried Egg Sandwiches. Locally owned and operated since 1991. Daily specials from our local farmers and ranchers. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly,

Missoula Independent

dish

attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. 830-3237 All of our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Open Mon-Sat, lunch and dinner. $-$$ The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance • 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$. Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. • 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Page 19 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 406.830.3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the HUB of the LOOP! Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Traditional Irish fare combined with tasty specials from around the globe! FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ Staggering Ox 1220 SW Higgins • 542-2206 123 E Main • 327-9400 Home of the famous Clubfoot Sandwich - unique, portable, delicious! We serve fantastic sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. Now featuring a special summer menu. Call in your order and pick it up on your way to play $-$$

Missoula Independent

The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. • 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$ Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $

Page 20 September 24–October 1, 2009

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors - Russian teacakes, pizzelles, baci di dama, as well as cupcakes, scones, specialty breads, with new specialties added daily. Get bread fresh from the oven between 3 & 5PM. Open M-F 7AM to 6:30PM, Sat 7AM-4PM. We're just around the corner from Bamboo Chopsticks. Stop in today. $ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European handcrafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, MondayFriday 7-6. $


by Ari LeVaux

How to never buy garlic I haven’t purchased garlic since 1996. That’s because I grow enough to eat a bulb of garlic every day, year-round. While most of my garden adventures are hobby-level attempts at self-sufficiency, my garlic crop is for real. Garlic is an overwintering crop, planted in fall and harvested mid-summer. So if you want to have a crop next year, it’s time to think about planting. A year’s supply of garlic hanging in your garage hints at many great meals to come, but by the time you reach that milestone the rewards have already been flowing for months. Your first return arrives in early spring, when your garlic races out of the ground. It’s a foot tall when your neighbors’ gardens are still empty brown patches. As spring continues, your plants will continue to skyrocket, and in late May—assuming you planted a flowering variety—you’ll be treated to a funky display of garlic blossoms curling from the plant tops. These should be harvested and enjoyed, both because they’re tasty and because not harvesting the flowers will result in smaller bulbs. The flowering varieties of garlic are collectively called hardnecks, so named because of their woody flowering stalks. Hardneck garlic generally has better flavor, peels easier and has larger and more uniform cloves, but most large producers grow softneck garlic, which is what you’re more likely to find at the store. Softneck garlic is less labor intensive to produce, because there are none of those pesky and delicious flowers to harvest in spring. To home gardeners, those flowers are more of an asset than a liability, and yet another reason hardneck garlic is better suited to the garden. The first step in growing your own garlic stash is getting your paws on some good garlic for planting. Seed garlic, marketed expressly for planting, is available from nurseries, seed catalogs and online, but there’s negligible difference between that and any other garlic you’ll find. The only advantage to buying seed garlic, which is considerably more expensive, is that you can

Ask Ari:

Photo by Ari LeVaux

so even small bulbs have large cloves. Each rosehued clove peels like a prom dress and delivers great flavor. Most importantly, it grows well in Missoula. In addition to determining which garlic you want to grow, you’ll need to calculate how much you need to plant to get the size crop you want— enough to eat, plus enough to plant next fall. This calculation is a bit tricky. My high school algebra finally came in handy when it came to figuring how many bulbs to plant in order to generate a self-sustaining garlic crop. I

devised an equation in which “x” is the number of bulbs one needs to plant. To solve for x, you need the following values: y = the average number of cloves per bulb of the variety of garlic you’re planting. In my case, Romanian Red averages five cloves per bulb, so y = 5. Z = the number of bulbs you want for eating (in my case, z = 365, or one bulb per day). The equation is: x = z/(y-1). In my case, x = 365/(5-1), or 91.25, which I round up to 92. Working backwards to check my math: 92 bulbs contain 460 cloves, each of which will grow into a bulb. If I harvest 460 bulbs, and subtract the 365 bulbs I intend to eat, I’m left with 95 bulbs for planting next year. The extra three bulbs, a bonus, are the result of rounding up from 91.25. Now for the easy part: planting the garlic. Garlic is generally planted in October or November. It’s a heavy feeder, so you want good dirt with plenty of organic material and nitrogen. Carefully break the bulbs into individual cloves, leaving the peel on and making sure the little scabby plate at the bottom of each clove remains intact. Plant the cloves with the scabby side down, an inch deep, six inches apart, in rows. Then mulch your patch with straw—not hay—about an inch deep. The mulch will keep your garlic warm in the winter and help the soil retain moisture. Come spring, the young garlic will poke through the mulch, and then it’s off to the races. Make sure to keep it wellwatered. When the leaves start turning brown, despite your dedicated watering, it’s time to harvest. Entire books have been written on this subject, so if you’re serious about investing your time, money and land into a big garlic crop, you might want to consult a more in-depth source. I recommend Growing Great Garlic by Ron Engeland. In the meantime, hit the farmers’ markets, get some seed and get planting. The thought of those roots spreading under the mulch will help get you through the winter.

Q

You have several options, none of which may be completely satisfying, but here they are. Goat milk and sheep milk don’t contain A1 beta-casein. So if you can get it, and like the flavor, that’s the easiest and most reliable way to avoid A1 beta-casein.

In milk that does contain A1 beta-casein, the protein is only found in the milk solids. So items like butter and cream, which contain milk fat but not solids, won’t contain A1 betacasein— even if the milk it’s made from does. In the near future, according to an A2 Corporation spokesman, the company plans to re-enter the U.S. market. This will occur either by certifying local herds as A1 betacasein free, or by exporting shelf-stable A2 milk from Australia and selling it online to U.S. consumers. Statistically speaking, milk from brown cows is much less likely to contain A1 betacasein than milk from black and white cows. So if you happen to know what color your local

Missoula's Original Brain Food

www.thinkfft.com Sun-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

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Dear Ari, I read with interest your recent story about A1 beta-casein in milk (see “Good milk vs. bad milk,” Sept. 10, 2009). It was a letdown to learn, at the end of the piece, that certified A2 milk is not available in the United States. What options are there for milk drinkers who want to avoid A1 beta-casein? —Dairy concerned

A

choose your variety, and efforts have been made to ensure it’s disease-free. In addition to being a stickler for hardneck garlic, I also look for large bulb size, peelability and a minimum of cloves per bulb. Fewer cloves means bigger cloves, and there’s nothing more annoying than dinky little hard-to-peel cloves. My variety of choice, a hardneck called Romanian Red, is a dream. The clove-to-bulb ratio is small,

dairy farmer’s cows are, you can tilt the odds in your favor. And, finally, you can attempt to convince your local dairy farmer that it’s worth getting his or her herd tested for its A1 beta-casein content of its milk, and perhaps start purchasing A2 semen and begin the process of converting the herd to A2. If the A2 bandwagon ever starts to roll, dairy farmers who jumped on early will be glad they did. To contact A2 Corporation, either for questions about buying A2 milk or for information on testing and converting a herd, contact Jose Cubillos, at JCubillos@ISIBrands.com.

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541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

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Page 21 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Arts & Entertainment listings September 24–October 1, 2009

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Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

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An unknown source of wind blows through Bill Frisell’s hair when the jazz guitarist plays the University Theatre Wed., Sept. 30, at 8 PM. $34 plus fees at all GrizTix outlets.

THURSDAY

24

September

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. Call Lois at 642-3010.

Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years-old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. Check out “The Geopolitical Implications of Aging” when the Mansfield Center presents a series of discussions for the conference “Methuselah’s Challenge: Aging in America and Asia” starting at 10:15 AM in the University

Center Ballroom and continuing through the d a y. F r e e . C a l l 2 4 3 - 2 9 8 8 o r v i s i t www.umt.edu/mansfield. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Interactive story time with books by John Rawls should stir up some philosophical questions during Ready, Set, Read, an early literacy program for kids’ age 3–7 that includes art projects and games (and kid friendly stories, of course) at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529. Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. Call 5417240 for pricing. Spend your lunch dissecting books instead of your sandwich during the Bitterroot Public Library’s book discussion group which meets this week to discuss The Ginseng Hunter by Jeff Talarigo at noon in the west meeting room of the library, 306 State St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-1670. Potato chips and Reese’s Pieces fall short of a nutritious lunch for your child. If you didn’t get the memo, grab some tips on packing your kid a healthy lunch when the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., presents the discussion “Healthy Sack Lunches” at 1 PM. Free. With the health care debate raging on, kids learn the basics of self-care during After School Adventures: Healthy U featuring the Golgi Clinic at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529. end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., September 25, to calendar@ missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

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Page 22 September 24–October 1, 2009


If your toddler’s movement seems kind of, well, stale, bring them to Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 3:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing. Help ensure that certified professional midwives are included in health reform legislation when you join members of Midwives and Mothers in Action for a march, starting at 3:30 PM at the parking lot of the Boone and Crockett Club where you’ll sign a petition and then deliver it to Max Baucus’ office. Free. Email Dolly at dbrowdercpm@gmail.com. Even if your toddler makes some smooth dance moves, your 5–6-year-old might need some work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Breakdance, slamdance or just inventively dance when your 7-to 8-year-old checks out Creative and Modern Movement, a dance class at 4:15 PM this and every Thu. in the ballet studio of UM’s PARTV building, until Dec. 3. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849. Love and humility mixes with acclaimed cinematography when UM’s Mansfield Center continues its “Aging in America and Asia” conference with a screening of the South Korean movie The Way Home at the University Center Ballroom at 4:30 PM. Free. Call 2432988 or visit www.umt.edu/mansfield.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. It’s time to meld those abstract dance moves into specific form, especially if you’re between the ages of 9–12, at Dance and Choreography, this and every Thu. until Dec. 3 at 5 PM in the ballet studio of UM’s PARTV building. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849. Wiggle those hips and strike poses of elegant expression when former UM dance prof Amy Ragsdale leads a Beginning to Intermediate Modern Dance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., every Thu. at 5 PM. Cost TBA. Call 360-8763. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, noise rock—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352. Gypsies come out during Troupe Night class every Thu. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. Get your fix of tempo runs and drills as you join professional runner Meg Lerch for Thursday Tempo Runs at Greenough Park, every Thu. starting with a stretch at 5:30 PM at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Cost TBA. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383.

Sax, geetar licks and sultry vocals waft through the air along with the pungent odor of beer when the Joan Zen Duo plays the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven doublespaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. Explore the concept of socio-sexual inequity in 1930s China when UM’s Mansfield Center continues its “Aging in America and Asia” conference with a screening of the Chinese film The King of Masks at 7 PM in the University Center Ballroom. Free. Call 243-2988 or visit www.umt.edu/mansfield. The event is free, but don’t count on a complimentary sensual massage: Missoula’s newest Sexology Clinic (that’s the scientific study of sex for all you plebeians), Birds and Bees LLC, kicks open its doors with a grand opening party featuring a DJ and light food, as well as info on classes and an opportunity to meet with therapist Dr. Lindsay Doe, at its headquarters, 1515 E. Broadway St., at 7 PM. Free. Call 544-1019 or visit www.doctordoe.com. Socrates might have supported a single-payer health care system, or maybe not. Hash out your philosophical thoughts about such subjects with others during Socrates Cafe at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 7 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Poet Annie Finch is likely to bust out some wicked stanzas when she reads from her recent work, and talks about her poetry fieldwork with Glacier National Park, at the poetry corner on the fifth floor of UM’s Mansfield Library at 7 PM. Free. Don’t expect to be speaking in tongues when Brian Jameson offers a devotional singing and chanting program at 7 PM at Hamilton’s Two Creeks School, 258 Roosevelt Lane. $3 donation requested. Call 381-0617. Community currencies contrast with those from the federal gov’ment, and the great Noam Chomsky chimes in with some stinging commentary, during the Peace and Justice Film Series screening of The Money Fix in UM’s Urey Underground Lecture Hall at 7 PM. Free. Visit www.peaceandjusticefilms.org. You just might do the push, whip or the jitterbug-lindy when Cathy Clark and Brad Dickson sling swing dance lessons every Thu. from 7–8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., with open dancing from 8–10 PM. $5 person for dance lessons. E-mail cathyc@missoulaboneandjoint.com. The real hip-hop is over here. The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., gives you something to pop and lock about every Thu. at 7:20 PM during beginning and intermediate Hip-Hop Class. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Labor loving brothers and sisters unite for a glimpse into the history of your struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’’ Waiting For Lefty at the Crystal Theatre at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. Your cochlea might ring, but it surely won’t bleed, during a night of melodic leaning metalcore when Orlando, Fla.’s Trivium plays the

Missoula Independent

Page 23 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Missoula Independent

Page 24 September 24–October 1, 2009

Wilma Theatre at 7:30 PM with White Chapel, Darkest Hour and Dirge Within. $21.50 plus fees/$20 advance plus fees at Rockin Rudy’s, Ear Candy and www.ticketswest.com. (See Noise in this issue.) Rock some sweet fiddle solos and bust a move while others shred without use of an amp during Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., at 7:30 PM this and every Thu. through Oct. Free. Call 726-3765. Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should Call 541-8463. Bowling and karaoke go together like health reform and progress during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Sorry ladies, but Thu. nights belong to the dudes at Men’s Night at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where the testosteronefueled karaoke begins at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327. Get your fix of improvised music with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, muster up the courage to belt out some classics, and perhaps win a prize, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue.–Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others under the influence of that music box you sing along to during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Seattle-ite’s The Staxx Brothers celebrate blues rock worship when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Russ Nasset twangs it solo tonight when the country king plays the Old Post Pub, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free.

FRIDAY

25

September

It’s time to honor our country’s true natives during UM’s American Indian Heritage Day, which starts at 7 AM with a sunrise ceremony near the base of the M trail, runs into a proclamation and honor song at noon at the Mansfield Mall, followed by traditional games at the Oval at 1 PM and a round dance featuring dancers from Hellgate High School at 2 PM. Free. Call 243-5834. Find out what those sometimes sun soaked Norwegians think of indigenous studies during a roundtable discussion between UM and the University of Tromso, Norway titled “Indigenous Studies: Intersecting Global Interests” from 9 AM–4 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Call 243-5832. Missoula is a really white place. So examine some of your assumptions about race and racism during an eight-week National Coalition Building Institute workshop on racism and inequality which runs every Tue. at 11 AM starting Sept. 29 and ending on Nov. 17. But, you must preregister by today by calling 541-6891 or visiting www.ncbimissoula.org. $150, eight-week course. Shift gears and renew yourself with poetry during Speaking to the Heart: The Transformative Power of Spoken Poetry, a threeday workshop with spiritual teacher Kim Rosen which starts at a TBA time Friday at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave. $200 person/$175 each for two/$150 each for three or more. Call Cris at 244-2247. If you’ve got flair with a camera MCAT wants you to enter your best short movie, art or music video (but no documentaries) to be presented during A Night of Shorts III at the Roxy Theatre on Nov. 6. So, submit your goods on DVD now, or by 5 PM on Fri., Oct. 9 to MCAT, 500 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 821-3009 or 542-6228. Today’s the last day to check discussions on aging and the implications therein as part of the UM Mansfield Center’s conference titled “Methuselah’s Challenge: Aging in America and Asia” starting with a talk at 9:30 AM on “Living, Learning and Working” in the University Center Ballroom and continuing through the day. Free. Call 243-2988. The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, The Year of the Flood: A Novel by Margaret Atwood. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to

36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Invigorate that spine of yours during a Classical Pilates Mat Class taught by Alison Laundrie every Fri. at Main Street Pilates, 214 E. Main St., at 11 AM. $12. RSVP 541-2673. Orwell’s vision of an animal-run dystopia thankfully has nothing to do with Animal Arts Collective: Farm Animals, an animal-themed kids’ art program at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM and again at 3 PM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529. Help mitigate and end discrimination by training to be a workshop facilitator for Missoula’s National Coalition Building Institute during a “Train the Trainer” seminar running Oct. 9–11 at NCBI, 1130 W. Broadway St. You must register by today by calling 541-6891 or visiting www.ncbimissoula.org. $300.

nightlife Get your buzz on just after work with a varied selection of vino when The Loft, 119 W. Main St., presents a weekly wine tasting every Fri. at 5:15 PM. $10. Bubbly waves of beer coat your throat while you soak in the sounds of Rising Tide, who play Stevensville’s Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 6 PM. Free. Call 777-0680 or visit www.black smithbrewing.com. Certified professional midwives wanna be included in health reform legislation too, so lend a hand in their cause during a silent auction and music/food celebration to support the effort at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., from 6–9 PM. Cost TBA. E-mail Dolly at dbrowder@gmail.com. An office worker, bricklayer, cheerleader and homeless vet come across revelations and tough decisions when Phil Condon reads and signs copies of his book Nine Ten Again at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Call 7212881. (See Books in this issue.) See local Dewey Decimal maven Molly Ledermann on the big screen during a showing of The Hollywood Librarian, which features an interview with Ledermann, with a screening at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 7 PM. Free. Their genre might be a mystery, but I’m guessing Left Lucy offers a mix between Americana and folk when they play The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, at 7:30 PM. $5, with wine tasting available and barbecue food for purchase. Call 541-8464 or email frenchie@thecellars.net. Watch U M student Luke Schellhardt rock the highest vocal range for dudes when the tenor vocalist performs a recital in the Recital Hall of UM’s Music building at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 243-6880. Labor loving brothers and sisters unite for a glimpse into the history of


your struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’’ Waiting For Lefty at the Crystal Theatre at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. Cowpunk and country-rap probably isn’t on tap when Richie Reinholdt and the Country Kings strum up some good ol’ country at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Anticipate a mélange of vocal styles when Matt Fletcher flexes his pipes with a show at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. N. in Hot Springs, at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 1-888-305-3106. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip-hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Feel free to shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” backwards and forwards like the star that you aspire to be when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown,

16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Celebrate alt college radio during the 2009 KBGA Birthday Bash, which features Portland’s Talkdemonic, Spokane’s James Pants, a CD release show from locals Volumen, as well as sets by Victory Smokes, The Racquet, Modality and DJ sets by Mermaid and Fleege at the Badlander and Palace starting at 9 PM. $5. Advance tickets at Ear Candy and KBGA studios. (See Scope and Spotlight in this issue.) Diddle your leg fiddle down to Bigfork’s Rocky Mountain Roadhouse, near Ferndale, and chew on some Americana courtesy of the Canyon Creek Ramblers who play a show at 9 PM. Cover TBA. E-mail tracy@montana bear.com. Sick Pony flushes the sores from your body with a night of indie Americana and bluegrass when they play the Raven in Bigfork, 39 Orchard Lane, at a TBA time. Free. Call 837-2836. Ululate like a freak and kick your sneaks onto the dance floor when the Wild Coyotes overtake the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, at a TBA time, but I think it’s 9 PM. Free. Call 626-5720. Unlikely Conspirators connive to bring you a night of alt rock with shades of Pixies and L7 influences when they play Club Q downstairs at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 9:30 PM. $5. Call 549-0542. Party Train hauls a mix of classic rock and country when they play Florence’s High Spirits Club & Casino, 5341 N. Hwy. 93, at 9:30 PM. Free. Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158.

Expect an Americana rebate and your clunker to hit the dance floor when Cash For Junkers play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Funk and rock jams your ears and feet when Swyl takes the stage of the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

SATURDAY

26

September

Your heart, the planet and your farmer-neighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM–noon as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. And if it’s non-edibles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturday market.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. Get those endorphins pumpin’ early when you join professional runner Meg Lerch for mid to long group runs during Saturday Group Runs, every Sat. at 8 AM starting with a

Congratulations and Way to Go! Nancy Nickerson

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stretch at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. Cost TBA. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org. Take a tour of Missoula’s southernmost neighborhoods, and snag some free coffee, bagels and lunch, during a Community Forum Bus Tour that begins with a meetup at 9 AM at McCormick Park near Currents Aquatic Center. Free. Register at www.missoula-neighborhoods.org or call 552-6081. Snag a train ride to Gold Creek where sapphire mining, poker, cowboy poetry and a barbecue entertain you during Camp-Mak-A-Dream’s Gold Creek Express Fundraiser which starts at a TBA time with a train departure from Missoula’s old Northern Pacific Train Depot, on the north end of Higgins Ave. $150 person. Call 549-5987 or visit www.campdream.org. Witness the ingenuity of local artists as they pillage the wares of Home Resource in order to make the coolest found art they can during SponCon 2009, which starts with the art contest from 10 AM–4 PM, and includes live music at noon from bands like Secret Powers, Electric Dandelion, Tyson Ballew and others until 10 PM, all at Home Resource, 825 W. Kent Ave. Free. Call 541-8300 or visit www.homeresource.org. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fin-

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Mode of Sustainable Transportation: Bicycle How many days did you commute by sustainable transportation to work in August? 13 days. “I would’ve biked more but I went on vacation.” Why do you choose to use sustainable transportation to commute to work instead of driving alone? “I like to bike because it saves gas and decreases greenhouse gas emissions. And it’s peaceful, especially on the weekends.” Profession: Physical therapist at St. Pa t’s Hospital What is Nancy’s prize for being August’s winner? Gift certificate to Finn & Porter

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Page 25 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Since 1996, UM’s KBGA radio has tuned listeners to a swath of underground and contemporary sounds, running the gamut from punk and hip-hop, to folk, noise and world music. But the folks at KBGA don’t just broadcast tunes, they also bring them to our little mountain town through events like the annual Fools Night Out party, or by sponsoring a band for Total Fest.

WHO: Talkdemonic, James Pants and others WHAT: KBGA’s 13th Annual Birthday Bash WHERE: Badlander and Palace WHEN: Fri., Sept. 25, 9 PM HOW MUCH: $5 As thanks to loyal listeners, and in celebration of its transition to adolescence, the station brings two out-of-towners to Missoula on Friday to play for your discerning ears: Portland’s Talkdemonic and Spokane’s James Pants.

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For those living under a musical rock, Talkdemonic is a duo consisting of violist Lisa Molinaro and drummer Kevin O’Connor best known for sporting an elegant and orchestral take on the indietronic genre. Replete with seductive yet sweeping instrumentals—you could argue they have a healthy obsession with minor key scales— the twosome’s music springs with equal fervor from both synth loops and live acoustics.

James Pants, on the other hand, is Spokane’s funkiest white soul brotha who was last seen in Missoula with a full band, opening up for Peanut Butter Wolf a few months back. His return trip is rumored to be a DJ set, but should be chock full of funk and soul hits to get you in the groove. A CD release party by locals Volumen, along with indie flavors from Victory Smokes, The Racquet and Modality round out the party, along with buzzing DJ sets from Mermaid and Fleege. –Ira Sather-Olson

gerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Kick it to your core during a CoreKicking Pilates Class with Alison Laundrie every Sat. at 646 Sixth St. W., at 11 AM. $10, includes childcare. RSVP 214-7247.

Interactive story time with books by Glenn Beck should turn your kid into a Fox News junkie at Ready, Set, Read, an early literacy program for kids’ age 3–7 that includes art projects and games at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529.

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Peruse the works of artisans, craft workers and more in the company of canines and felines when the Humane Society of Northwest Montana holds its second annual arts and crafts fair open house at the society headquarters, 3499 Hwy. 93 N. in Kalispell, from 11 AM–5 PM. Free. Visit www.hsnwmt.com. Call 752-7297. Get a 20 minute shot of artistic pleasure when you take a tour of the Missoula Art Museum’s latest exhibition from the late Freeman Butts titled Family Gifts:Works By Freeman Butts at noon at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Call 728-0447. Contour, gesture and modeled drawing techniques keep the fingers of your child busy with a variety of drawing media like charcoal and pen as Feather Sherman leads Kids Saturday Drawing Club this and every Sat. for four weeks from 1–3 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $50/$45 members. Call 728-0447. An Amtrak route through Missoula may be a long ways off, but we can still celebrate the idea with a passenger rail party at the old Northern Pacific Depot, on the north end of Higgins Ave., which runs from 1–7 PM and includes a live telegraph show, peeps in costumes and more. Free. Call Jeannine Nixon at 880-1255.


Kids mine their minds for an assortment of verbs, adverbs, nouns and more during a writers workshop for ages 10–14 at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St., from 1–3 PM. Free. Call 363-1670. The woolen warriors of Missoula’s Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle bring the world to drink every Sat. at 2 PM in Liquid Planet’s conference room. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits. blogspot.com. Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to make your own recycled bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Saturdays at 2:30 PM. Call 800809-0112. The Montana Independent Film Festival kicks off with a flurry of documentaries including one on the egg industry and another on a 3,000 mile bike odyssey starting at 1 PM and 3:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $8 per screening block/$30 2-day all access pass. $ 7 p e r b l o c k a d v a n c e / $ 25 all access advance. Visit www.mtiff.com.

nightlife Lolo’s Square Dance Center gets countrified and swung up with a country dance featuring music by The Lifers at 6 PM at the center, 9555 Highway 12 near Lolo. $10 person/Free under age 16. E-mail cathyc@missoulaboneandjoint.com. If you missed out yesterday afternoon, you’ve a second chance to catch the Missoula Symphony Orchestra when it plays its season opener which features works by Beethoven, Mozart, Debussy and Stravinsky, and finger work by piano soloist Stewart Goodyear, at the University Theatre at 7:30 PM. $35 to $8 depending on seats. Call 721-3194 or visit www.missoulasymphony.org. The Montana Independent Film Festival sails into the evening with narrative films at 6 PM and awardwinning films and ceremony at 8:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $8 per screening block/$30 2-day all access pass. $7 per block advance/$25 all access advance. Visit www.mtiff.com. Labor loving brothers and sisters unite for a glimpse into the history of your struggle, during the 1930s to be exact, when Montana Rep Missoula presents Clifford Odets’ Waiting For Lefty at the Crystal Theatre at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 for students during a 7 PM student rush. Call 243-6809. Oscillate to a swanky beat when you try your hand at East and West Coast swing dance lessons at 7:30 PM at the Western Montana Fairgrounds, 1101 South Ave. W. Cost TBA. Call 546-6519. Tangy moves and spicy grooves call you onto the dance floor during Hot Salsa Nights at the Elks Lodge,

112 N. Pattee St., at 8 PM, with free dance lessons at 8:30. $7. Call 549-0542. Pointe shoes hit the floor for dance parties and contests, a silent auction fundraiser and more when the Garden City Ballet presents Motown Downtown at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., from 8–11 PM. $10 door. Call 240-6042 or visit www.gardencityballet.org for advance ticket info. If you spaced last night, you’ve got another chance to watch Richie Reinholdt and the Country Kings peddle some country when they play the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Slap on your hottest retro cowboy button-up shirt and head down to a country western hoe down where Lockwood’s Versatiles pumps out mad country music for ye from 8–11 PM. $5. Call 543-7154. David Boone tries his hand at cookie monster vocals (you know I’m joking, right?) when the folkster rocks an acoustic set at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. N. in Hot Springs, at 8 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 1-888-305-3106. If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free. The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Missoula’s punk and metal community aims to do their part in the health reform debate with a cancer benefit show featuring Arrested Adolescence, Come Up Swinging, Mageddon, Thug Nasties and 10MT40s at 9 PM. $5. If you missed out last night, you’ve another chance to get pummeled when Party Train shoots your ears up with some classic rock and country when they play High Spirits Club & Casino in Florence, 5341 Hwy. 93 N., at 9:30 PM. Steel workers, guest workers and other laborers find good company under the wing of bluegrass when The Workers play the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. The Garden City’s favorite power poppers Secret Powers hum away with “Cracks in the Wall” and see “Orange Trees” in their eyes when they play the Top Hat at 10 PM with guests Axshin Slaks. Cover TBA.

SUNDAY

27

September

Catch some new thoughts with the Science of Mind Community during a Sunday service via the Internet when Rev. Kathianne Lewis spreads a spiritual message from Seattle’s Center for Spiritual Living, while you watch the proceedings at the Carriage House in Hamilton, 310 N. Fourth St., at 10 AM. this and every Sun. Free. Call Barb at 375-9996. Quench your urge to watch football with others on several different televisions every Sun. at Lucky Strike Casino, 515 Dearborn Ave., and, if you’ve got the the gusto, belt out some bars during their karaoke contest which starts a 9:30 PM. Free. Call 549-4152. The Montana Independent Film Festival’s finale starts with foreign films at 1 PM and special features at 3:30 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $8 per screening block/$30 2-day all access pass. $7 per block advance/$25 all access advance. Visit www.mtiff.com. Even if owning a home seems out of reach, check this: Habitat for Humanity of Missoula is currently looking to select low-income applicants interested in building a home in partnership with the org and is having an app meeting at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 2 PM. Free. Call 549-8210. Twist and twiddle your legs and thumbs to the sounds of Tom Catmull and Free Range, while also helping out the organization Media Arts in Public Schools, during an auction and concert at Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, from 2–8 PM. Cost TBA. Call Laura at 381-7230. If you missed out yesterday, you’ve a second chance to catch the Missoula Symphony Orchestra when it plays its season opener which features works by Beethoven, Mozart, Debussy and Stravinsky, and finger work by piano soloist Stewart Goodyear, at the University Theatre at 3 PM. $35 to $8 depending on seats. Call 721-3194 or visit www.missoulasymphony.org. Seek connection, mutual life, or even death using the ancient Japanese strategy game Go when a group of enthusiasts meets to play the game this and every Sun. from 4–8 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free. E-mail goinmissoula@yahoo.com.

nightlife Give voice to your creativity and spirituality with a devotional, improvisational song circle that meets the first, third and fifth Sun. of every month from 6:30 to 8:30 PM at Unity Church, 546 South Ave. W. A $2 donation is requested, but don’t

Missoula Independent

Page 27 September 24–October 1, 2009


WRITE NOW IN MISSOULA

:ZZ:ULWHUV:RUNVKRSFRP Six-Week Salon-Style Workshops Begin: 10/7 Short Fiction w/ Brian Buckbee 10/7 Non-Fiction w/ Andy Smetanka 10/13 Screenwriting 101 w/ Catherine Jones 10/21 First Chapters w/ David Cates 11/3 Poetry w/ Chris Dombrowski 11/4 Imitations w/ Elizabeth Urschel 1/4 Non-Fiction w/ Bryan Di Salvatore

let lack of funds (or shyness) be an obstacle. Call 542-1066. Improvisational movement with others takes on a jammy vibe during contact dance improv, this and every Sun. from 6:30–8:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5. Musicians are welcome and encouraged. E-mail missoulacontactimprov@gmail.com. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: Jazz from the Donna Smith Trio, the Front Street Jazz Group and DJ Mermaid. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. The weekend isn’t over ‘til you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, with host Landslide at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when happy hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free.

MONDAY

28

September COMMUNITY “TRAIN-THE-TRAINER” SEMINAR Friday, October 9th - Sunday, October 11th 9:00 am – 4:00 pm each day For over 10 years, NCBI Missoula has reduced prejudice, prevented violence and developed leadership of more than 8,000 people. This seminar provides an exciting opportunity for community members to advance their skills in ending discrimination, reducing intergroup conflict, building inclusive communities. Concluding this seminar, participants may join our NCBI chapter and begin leading programs in their own community, campus, or organization.

Tuition cost: $300 Scholarships available Register by September 25th at http://www.ncbimissoula.org or by calling (406)541-6891.

NCBI Missoula: • Developing Leaders • Ending Mistreatment • Strengthening Communities

Missoula Independent

Page 28 September 24–October 1, 2009

Now that you’ve moved here, it’s time to start speakin’ ‘merican and learning about our wonderful banking and health care systems (you can tell I’m joking, right?), as well as our educational system during Adult Basic Education courses at the Dickinson Lifelong Learning Center, every Mon. and Wed. at 8:30 AM at the center, 310 S. Curtis St. Free. Call 542-4015. It’s time for your kids to brush up on culture outside the land o’ the free, so give them something intellectual to chew on during Culture Trunk: Pakistan at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400. After school activities for your kid aged 8–12 get a little wild and primal during the Roxy Theatre’s After School Wildlife Film Safari which runs Mon.–Fri. from 3–5:30 PM, except for holiday’s, at the theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $6/hour. Call 728-9380 to register. Kids in kindergarten through eighth grade can find a positive, stress-free environment after school when they go to Two Creeks Bridges program which features play materials,

art and more Mon.–Thu. from 3–5:30 PM at 258 Roosevelt Lane in Hamilton. $4 per hour. Call 3634740 to register or e-mail sarchibald@dishmail.com. Find out just how secure, or insecure, our world energy supply is when Admiral William J. Fallon discusses “World Energy Security” in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building at 3:10 PM. Free. Call 243-2981. You work long hours, but your kid doesn’t, so keep them busy after their studies during an after school program for kindergartners through sixth grade Mon.–Fri. at Elrod School, 412 Third Ave. W. in Kalispell, from 3:15–5:45 PM. $10 early out days/$6 regular days. Call 758-7975. Your kids go beyond the ordinary during after school programs at the Missoula International School, which features language classes, art clubs, sports and wellness activities and more throughout the week starting at 4 PM. Call 542-9924 for cost and registration info or visit www.mismt.org. Soon-to-be mommas with bambinos in the oven can feel empowered, relaxed and nurtured during a prenatal yoga class, this and every Mon. at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave., at 4 PM. $11/$10 with card. Call 360-1521. Two sessions of the popular World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class take place at the Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon.: At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5. $30/month, drum rental available. RSVP 396-3352 or visit tangledtones.com.

nightlife If you devote 5:30 to 8:30 PM on Monday or Wednesday nights to silent meditation, political drinking or other non-kid-friendly endeavors, the Parenting Place offers free child care and dinner at 1644 S. Eighth St. Call 728-KIDS to reserve a spot. Learn to mix and match your bellydance styles during Beginner World Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Mon. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for as many classes as you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. Rejuvenate your mind and body from the Monday blues during a Vinyasa Yoga class this and every Mon. at 5:30 PM at the Open Way Center, 702 Brooks Ave. $12/$10 with card. Call 360-1521. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. You’ll probably want to take out those metallic studs when you head to Gothic Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Mon. at 6:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance

Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/per month for each class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Hwy. 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. Get centered with a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. Make your impassioned point in whatever rented costume most fits the bill when the Missoula City Council meets—as they do the first four Mondays of every month, holidays excluded—at 7 PM in the Missoula City Council Chambers, 140 W. Pine St. Free. Call 552-6080. Help the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration with more accurate and timely weather warnings, especially if you live in Seeley Lake, during a weather spotter training sesh at SeeleySwan High School, 456 Airport Road in Seeley Lake, at 7 PM. Free. Call 329-4840. Woodwind abusers, brass heads and percussion players, here’s your chance to join the Missoula Community Concert Band when they start their fall weekly practice at 7 PM in the band room of Sentinel High School, 901 South Ave. W. Free. Call 542-7664. Cure that case of the Monday jitters with a shot of folk from David Boone when he plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste 100, at 7 PM. Free. Joining up with UM’s French Club Le Cercle Francophone means you can repeatedly ask people “sont vous mon papa?” or just brush up on your French skills when the club meets this and every Mon. at James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., at 7 PM. Free At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. Swagger and stagger yourself to a 3/4 time beat when Sandy Lawler presents a beginning waltz class this and every Mon. until Oct. 14 at The Dance Studio, 2105 Bow St., at 7:30 PM. $24 per person. Call 239-6044. Who the hell knows what’s next in the Middle East? I certainly don’t. Admiral William J. Fallon might be able to help when the retired naval officer, who headed the U.S. Central Command in 2007-08, gives the lecture “Iraq, Afghanistan and Beyond” at the


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University Theatre at 8 PM. Free. Call 243-2981. He rocks the “Summer of 69” in ‘09: get yourself expertly positioned to hear Canadian pop rock ace Bryan Adams when he plays a solo acoustic show at the Wilma Theatre at 8 PM. $87.50/$62.50/$42.50 plus applicable fees at GrizTix locations and www.griztix.com. (See Noise in this issue.) Bingo is no longer in the domain of the geriatric when Colin Hickey leads Colin Bingo at 8:30 PM at the Badlander with the first bingo card for free, subsequent cards for $1. Free. Who says America never invented a pub sport? Beer Pong proves them all wrong at the Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, where alcohol and performance anxiety climax into a thing of beauty at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Kick off your week with a drink and an array of electronic DJs and styles

for das booty during the Palace’s Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week. Free. Bring a bicycle with a big hook in it to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and see if you can troll for cars from the bar while you watch the show. Free. Garage rock from the “Land of 10,000 Lakes” revives your Monday night when St. Paul, Minn.’s Private Dancer plays the Badlander with Colin Johnson and Special Peoples at 10 PM. Free.

TUESDAY

29

September

If you live in Columbia Falls and wanna establish sweet business contacts with others, head to a business-to-business network-

ing gathering at Discovery Square, 540 Nucleus Ave., each and every Tue. at 8:30 AM. Free. This week includes a membership open house. Call 250-6100. If you’ve experienced cancer, today’s your last day to sign up for an eightweek Creativity for Life workshop titled “Cancer, Courage and Creativity” which runs from 5:30–7:30 PM every Tue. from Oct. 6–Nov. 24 at the Living Art Studio, 725 W. Alder St., Unit 17. Free, but donations appreciated. Call 549-5329. While Missoula Aging Services is a sprightly 25 years of age, their Meals on Wheels program serves a more mature crowd, and you can too: Deliver hot meals to seniors as often as you’d like—and cash in on the sweet mileage reimbursement— from Mon.–Fri. between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Call 728-7682. You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group

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Missoula Independent

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Missoula Independent

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Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955. Hips gyrate and minds turn during Family in Motion at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529. Find the strength and will to survive in the company of others during a breast cancer support group at St. Francis Xavier Parish, 420 W. Pine, every first and third Tue. of the month at noon. Free. Call 329-5656. If you’ve ever wanted to brush up on the Missoula of yore, the time is now as the Historical Museum at Fort Missoula has just changed its hours and has three exhibits on display, including The Road to Today: 250 Years of Missoula County History every Tue.–Sun. from noon–5 PM at the museum, building 322 at Fort Missoula. $10 family/$3 adults/$2 seniors/$1 students. Call 728-3476. Tag it, brown bag it and get ready for a free lunchtime discussion on “Advances in Conservation Biology Emerging in Collaboration with University of Porto, Portugal” in Room 303 of UM’s old Journalism Building at noon. Free. Call 243-2288. Shaving cream, tempera, chalk and more become the creative fire to ignite artistic passion in your 3.5–5 year old when Alli DePuy teaches Preschool Art Start at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., this and every Tue. until Oct. 13 from 1–2:30 PM. $55/$49.50 members. Call 728-0447. Toss out your 3.5–4 year old’s antiquated dance moves and keep it fresh during Creative Movement at the ballet studio in UM’s PARTV building from 3:30–4 PM, this and every Tue. until Dec. 3. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849 If you’ve got a hankering to pick the brains of this year’s batch of Missoula City Council candidates on issues such as job growth, housing and transportation, head to a candidate roundtable which features a meet and greet at 3:30 PM, a roundtable discussion at 4:10 and a networking sesh at 5, all at the Broadway Inn, 1609 W. Broadway St. Free. Call 543-6623. Teens ages 13–18 stir their creative juices during Teen Media Club every Tue. at 4 PM at the Missoula Public Library computer classroom, where video creation, music mixing and digital art formulation are all the rage. Free. Call 721-2665. Your pre-teens’ after school activities can be more productive (and cooler, I might add) than homework or the boob tube: Shove them off to the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., for After School Art Adventure with Bev Glueckert, where kids ages 7–12 work on printmaking and drawing projects inspired by current museum exhibits

this and every Tue. from 4–5:30 PM until Oct. 13. $55/$49.50 members. Call 728-0447.

nightlife Find the outlet for that excess energy when Gillian Kessler takes you through the flow of it all during World Rhythm Yoga Class every Tue. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Ladies, celebrate your feminist tendencies with cheap drinks when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Ladies’ Night every Tue. from 5 PM to close. Free. Call 370-3200. Hey, we all overindulge a little sometimes, but when you feel you’ve had enough, head down to Take off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), which starts with a weigh-in between 5 and 5:30 PM, followed by a meeting at 5:30, this and every Tue. at the Rocky Mountain Lodge in Whitefish, 6510 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call 862-1233. Get your fresh fruits and veggies from local farmers in the Flathead while listening to the clever and playful lyrics of singer/songwriter Frank O’Brien Jr. during the Whitefish Downtown Farmers’ Market, at Depot Park on the north end of Central Avenue, from 5–7:30 PM. Free. Call 862-2043. It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900. Beginners can try, but those more experienced might catch on quicker during Intermediate World Fusion Bellydance, which takes place every Tue. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. Find your flow, and the will to practice Pranayama, during Ashtanga Yoga on the river with Evan Lovely, this and every Tue. in Sept. at Birds & Bee’s LLC, 1515 E. Broadway, from 5:30–7 PM. Donations requested. Call 544-1271. Lasagna, garlic bread and veggies make a meal fit for an Italian stallion, or an elk, during an Elks Lodge dinner at 5:30 PM at the lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. $9. Call 549-0542. Become Missoula’s next breakthrough cubist-surrealist oil painter when you attend the Missoula Ar t Museum’s Oil Painting Fundamentals with Stephanie J. Frostad, a five-week course at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St., this and every Tue. until Oct. 6 where you learn the basics by using still life subject matter. $105/$94.50 members. Call 728-0447. Beginners can try, but those more advanced in the ways of clay should check an intermediate throwing class, which runs this and every Tue. from 6–9 PM until Nov. 3 at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106

Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/eightweek course. Call 543-0509. Nurturing your kid doesn’t mean giving them candy and plopping them in front of the television while you go off to the bar, so head over to a nurturing parenting class at the Parenting Place, 1644 S. Eighth St. W., from 6–7:30 PM every Tue. until Nov. 17. $60 couples/$40 individuals. Call 728-KIDS. Flush the early-week stress from your system with a Tuesday Track Workout featuring speed training by UM women’s track coach Courtney Babcock every Tue. at 6 PM at Dornblaser Field, on the corner of Higgins and South avenues. Free for Run Wild Missoula members/cost TBA for others. Visit www.runwildmissoula.org. If you’ve got some serious knowledge about hand drumming and a repertoire of riddims, check a Level Three West African Hand Drumming Class this and every Tue. until Oct. 27 from 6:10–7:30 PM where you’ll learn some intricate moves and more at the old Western Montana Family Clinic building, 500 W. Front St. $55, 5-week series/$12 single class. Call 726-4445 or e-mail matthew@drumbrothers.com. A single bracelet does not jingle: Unity Dance and Drum’s all-levels West African Dance Class meets every Tue. evening at 6:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10 per class/$35 for four classes. Call 549-7933. Are you feeling lonelier than normal? Remedy that when Singles of Missoula, a group for singles age 45 and over, meets Tue. at 6:30 PM at the bicycle trail head behind Conlin’s Furniture, 1600 North Ave. W., for a bike ride. Free. Call Cletius at 541-2333. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Go beyond your limits, in a positive way, during the class “Beyond Limits” this and every Tue. from 6:30–9 PM until Nov. 24 at Kalispell’s Shining Mountains Center for Positive Living, 475 Eighth Ave. East N. Cost TBA. Call 257-6539. Stop playing games with yourself–Game Night featuring “mostly Scrabble” takes place at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Missoula, 102 McLeod Ave. 6:45 PM. Free. You never know what you’ll find— except for probably a bunch of womyn—at Womyn’s Night at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Grab the rooster sauce and get spicy when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at a new time of 7 PM followed by intermediate/advanced at 8, every

Presents a marketing workshop for artists on The University of Montana campus. 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 26th Gallagher Business Building, Room 105 The cost is $50, which includes lunch. Topics and Events Featured: • Entrepreneurship resources to • Opportunities and support available business plans from the MT Department of Commerce • Web site development and online selling • Career opportunities in the museum opportunities and nonprofit industries • Micro-business development • Successful artists’ panel discussion

For more information or to register for the workshop, call MWTC Project Manager Geoff Sutton at 406-243-6982

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Great Music doesn’t care what you drive.

The program, featuring Stewart Goodyear, pianist Coriolan Overture – Beethoven Piano Concerto No.20 – Mozart Prelude to The Afternoon of a Faun– Debussy Firebird Suite (1919) – Stravinsky

SAT., SEPT. 26, 7:30 P.M. SUN., SEPT. 27, 3:00 P.M. The University Theatre Tickets: $8 to $35 Visit missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 E. Main St. Sponsored by

Missoula Independent

Page 32 September 24–October 1, 2009

Tue. at the Badlander. $7/per class per person. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buyone-get-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn Parkside, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with signup at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej @yahoo.com. Snappy rhythms and irregular rhymes tickle your insides when Dan Graveley reads Apple Moon and Ron Moser reads from Hey Duke! during a poetry reading at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Call 721-2881. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? This week’s question: What was Who Dunit? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) Whitefish musicians trade their skills for free drinks as the Great Northern Bar hosts Open Mic Night, which begins at 8 PM with an acoustic jam circle, heads into an electric set at 9:30 and features fine hosting by members of the Canyon Creek Ramblers. Free. Call 862-2816. You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 273-9992 to reserve your spot. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real for those in the know every Tue. at 8:30 PM, when Intermediate HipHop Class puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Be your own American Idol during “Jheryoake”—that’s karaoke with Jerry Reeb—every Tue. at 9 PM with Happy Hour until 10 at the AmVets Club. Free. Pierced Arrows prove punk energy and fist pumping garage rock can be expertly executed by the older-and-wiser when the Portland trio plays the Badlander at 9 PM. $8. Opening support from Rooster Sauce. A hip ‘n hot night of indie folk and bluegrass kicks you out of an early week slumber when Michigan’s Frontier Ruckus plays the Palace with openers Wartime Blues at 9 PM. $5.

See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, and muster up the courage to belt out some classics too, and perhaps win a prize, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue.–Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 721-1798. Although their MySpace music page can’t confirm it, I have a sneaking suspicion that the dudes in Billings’ Juice Box are the ones playing some “experimental/jam band/reggae” on the stage of the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

WEDNESDAY

30

September

Explore the challenges of power vested in the hands of a few in the Middle East during the conference “Durability of Authoritarian Regimes and the Challenges of Islamist Movements in the Middle East” which starts at 9:30 AM with a keynote address, moves to discussions from 10 AM–3:30 PM and features more panels on Thu. between 10 AM–4 PM. Free. Visit www.umt.edu/cap/ for a full schedule or call 243-2299. (See Agenda in this issue.) Morning Melodies, a free, funfilled, family-friendly music event tailored to preschoolers, occurs every Wed. at Montana Coffee Traders in downtown Whitefish at 10 AM. Free. If we didn’t have access to it, we’d all be dead. So brush up on your knowledge of water based issues during the 2009 River Center Conference, which starts with registration at 10 AM, followed by a field trip to Milltown Dam at 1 PM, as well as panel discussions at the Holiday Inn Parkside, 200 S. Pattee St., on a host of issues starting at 8:30 AM on Thu. and ending at 2 PM on Fri., Oct. 2. Registration cost TBA. Visit www.umt.edu/rivercenter/conf.html or call 243-2341. Images of insects flicker around your child’s imagination when Kristen Weese presents “Bugs, bugs, bugs” during preschool story time at the Bitterroot Public Library, 306 State St., at 10:30 AM. Free. Call 363-1670. Brush up on your skills as an art guide when the Missoula Art Museum presents an Art Guide Training from 11 AM–1 PM, which includes an overview of the fifth grade art experience, MAM Art Guide policies and touring strategies, all at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Call Renee Taafee at 728-0447 for pricing. Tune the imagination wheel to spin cycle at Ready, Set, Read, an early literacy program for kids’ age 3–7 that includes art projects and games (and kid friendly stories, of course) at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 11 AM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-7529. Runners, get working on your core during a core strength training

class this and every Wed. for 11 weeks from 12:15–1 PM upstairs at the Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. $75/$68 Run Wild Missoula Members. RSVP with Alison Laundrie at alison@thepilates playground.com. Forget treadmills, burn that excess fat, and look stylish too, during Dancercise Around the World with Elenita Brown, a low-impact class designed to stregthen and stretch, this and every Wed. at 2:30 PM until Nov. 4 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Rock those hips to classical and regional Spanish dance styles, as well as Flamenco, when Elenita Brown leads a Flamenco dance class this and every Wed. at 3:45 PM until Nov. 4 at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $75, eight-week course. Call 541-7240. The bird truly is the word when Helen James of the Smithsonian Institution discusses “Evolution, extinction and conservation of Hawaiian birds” in Room 110 of UM’s Interdisciplinary Sciences Building at 4:10 PM. Free. Call 243-5292. Boys move to an entirely different groove at Boys Movin’, a dance class for boys ages 5–9 every Wed. at 4:15 PM for 12 weeks in the ballet studio at UM’s PARTV building. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849.

nightlife Dudes and duderinos, it’s your time to imbibe all day with drink specials this and every Wed. when the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St. in Frenchtown, hosts Men’s Day. Free. Call 370-3200. Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117. Blue Argon plays eclectic blues, R&B, and jazz featuring Colleen Cunningham, Steve Sellars and Jim Clayborn every Wed. at 6 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Red Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. It’s once again time to render flesh, muscles and an assortment of body parts into a work of artistic genius during the Missoula Art Museum’s non-instructed figure drawing classes, which run from 6–8 PM this and every Wed. at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $7/$5 members. Participants must be 18 and over. Call 728-0447. Should your pottery be functional, or aesthetically pleasing? I’m not sure either, but take your pick during an eight-week beginning pottery


class which runs this and every Wed. from 6–9 PM until Nov. 4 at the Clay Studio of Missoula, 1106 Hawthorne St. Unit A. $168/eightweek course. Call 543-0509. I think bluegrass from the ‘root might be on tap when Blue to the Bone plays Stevensville’s Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main Street, at 6 PM. Free. Call 7770680 or visit www.blacksmith brewing.com. Gillian Kessler asks only that you embrace your inner diva as she fuses slick Brazilian moves with modern techniques for her AfroBrazilian Dance Class, which takes place every Wed. at 6:10 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. If you already know the tones and t e c h n i q u e s o f We s t A f r i c a n Drumming, learn how to make more sweet breakbeats when the Drum Brothers’ Matthew Marsolek leads a Level Two West African Hand Drumming Class this and every Wed. until Oct. 28 from 6:10–7:30 PM where you’ll learn some advanced moves at the old Western Montana Family Clinic building, 500 W. Front St. $55, 5week series/$12 single class. Call 726-4445 or e-mail matthew@ drumbrothers.com. Find out the difference between regular pilates and pilates from the Big Apple when Alison Laundrie leads a New York Style Pilates class every Wed. at Main Street Pilates, 214 E. Main St., at 6:30 PM. $12. RSVP 541-2673. Bust some hot moves in 2/4 time when Sandy Lawler holds a beginning country western two step dance class this and every Wed. until Oct. 21 at The Dance Studio, 2105 Bow St., at 6:30 PM. $24 per person. Call 239-6044. Having fully bitched out Barnes & Noble, the Missoula Stitch ‘N’ Bitch needlework circle brings the circle of warm fuzzies to the Good Food Store, where you can knit purls of wisdom every Wed. at 7 PM. Free. BYO yarn and needles, and check out missoulaknits.blogspot.com. Being square will never be as much fun as it is at square dancing lessons every Wed. at the Kalispell Senior Center. 7 PM. $4, children 12 and under must bring an adult. Call 752-4964. If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 7 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Legal issues surrounding land use and wilderness protection are hot

button topics during the 33rd Annual Public Land Law Conference titled “Redefining Wilderness: Landscape, Law & Policy� which features a keynote address by Rick Bass at 7 PM, followed by discussions starting at 8:45 AM on Thu. and ending Fri. at noon. Free. Visit www.umt.edu/publicland/conference.htm for a full schedule, or call 243-6568. Forget what those mainstream physicians say and set your sights on the alternative when Dr. Sarah Lane leads a course on naturopathy called “Introduction to Different Modalities� in the downstairs classroom of the Missoula Naturopathic Clinic, 1805 Bancroft St., at 7 PM. $5. Call 541-3040. River Yang leads your child on a narrative journey when she reads stories in Chinese and English during the Missoula Public Library’s Family Story Time at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Grab that tutu and slap on some ballet shoes every Wed. at 7:20 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Beginning Ballet. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Release that mid and late week stress during Tai Chi Chuan classes every Wed. at 7:30 PM and every Sat. at 10 AM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $10/class. Call Chris at 728-0918. Create some phat polyrhythms on that djembe when Matthew Marsolek of the Drum Brothers leads a beginning series West African Hand Drumming Class this and every Wed. until Oct. 28 from 7:45–9:15 PM at the old Western Montana Family Clinic building, 500 W. Front St. $55, 5week series/$12 single class. C a l l 726 - 4 4 4 5 o r e - m a i l matthew@drumbrothers.com. Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other likeminded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. Jazz guitar licks waft in the air while your eyes fixate on a backdrop of 1940s-era photography when Grammy winning jazz guitarist Bill Frisell plays the University Theatre at 8 PM. $34 plus fees from all GrizTix locations and www.griztix.com. Extend yourself beyond regular ballet using emotion through movement to tell stories and interpret music when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Lyrical Class every Wed. at 8:30 PM. Call 541-7240 for pricing. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: Who Dunit was a shooter arcade game released in 1988.

The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts ladies’ night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Holiday in Cambodia� by the Dead Kennedys, or some similarly badass tune, during Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Experimental post-punkish madness from the tater state slams your discerning ears when Idaho’s Finn Riggins rock the Palace with a show at 9 PM. $5. Broken Valley Roadshow opens. (See Noise in this issue.) Their only weapons are words and the mics that amplify them: Catch an open mic night “Hip-Hop Showdown� featuring local MCs and artists Tonsofun, Acher, Linkletter, Slopstar, Traffic, Tahjbo, Rob Peoples and DJ Dirty Needle at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 9 PM. Free over 21/$1 ages 18–20. Call 549-0542. Fight for the right to belt out a semicoherent version of The Darkness’ “I Believe in a Thing Called Love� every Wed. during Combat Karaoke at Rowdy’s Cabin, 4880 N. Reserve St., at 10 PM. Free. Call 543-8001. The bro’s of Miller Creek command you to watch them shred hard as they proverbially jam up the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

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THURSDAY

01

October

Aspen Hospice of Montana is currently looking for volunteers to help offer comfort, pain relief and emotional support for those who are near the end of their lives. Call Lois at 642-3010. Becoming a confident yoga instructor shouldn’t be that hard, so find out when Nancy Ruby comes to town for a YogaMotion Instructor Traning session starting today at a TBA time and place. Grab detailed info packets at Down Dog Missoula, 327 E. Broadway St. Visit www.yogamotion.com or call 585-9600. Still haven’t joined the interwebs, or figured out how to save a document on a computer? Remedy that quickly during free classes on basic computer use at Stevensville’s North Valley Public Library, 208 Main St., at 9 AM every Thu. until Oct. 29. Free. Call 777-5061. Kids and parents experiment with rhythm and more during Rhythm Tykes, a class for kids 18 months–4 years old this and every Thu. at 10 AM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. $40 five classes/$10 class. Call 396-3352. If you can’t read this, you may be a baby below the age of 36 months, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program at 10:30 AM every Tue., Thu. and Fri. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Missoula Independent

Page 33 September 24–October 1, 2009


Times Run 9/25 - 10/01

Where does it hurt?

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

My one & Only (PG-13) Nightly at 7 & 9:05

 

    

In the Loop (NR) 7 ONLY on Fri (9/25) Tues (9/29) & Thur (10/1)

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave.

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Call 541-WELL to ďŹ nd out if chiropractic can help.

9:00 ONLY on Fri (9/25), Tues (9/29) and Thur (10/1)

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Downtown Missoula

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12th Anniversary Sale & TRUNK SHOW

Sept. 25 & 26 Hundreds of new gemstone strands 10-50% off Free beads & tote bag with qualifying purchase

Pearls, Gemstones, Glass, Shell & Chain Meeting Beading Needs Since 1997 3914 Brooks, Missoula • 251-0055 Master yodeler Wylie of Wylie and the Wild West will do anything for a cookie when he plays the University Theatre Thu., Oct. 1, at 8 PM. $17/$15 advance plus fees at all GrizTix outlets.

Sign up now for afterschool

Performing Arts Classes!

& FABLES

Shambles

!

class 1 MON/WED 4-6 P.M.

Class 2 TUE/THURS 4-6 P.M.

Classes begin October 5

Classes begin October 6

PERFORMANCES Saturday, Nov. 14 at 3 & 5 p.m.

PERFORMANCES Sunday, Nov. 15 at 3 & 5 p.m.

For more information or a detailed class schedule, visit www.mctinc.org/inmissoula/children Sponsored by: Dr. Troy Shaw Orthodontics; Missoula Federal Credit Union; Oz Architects and Intaglio at Oz; Missoula Pediatric Dentistry, PC.

REGISTRATION FORM

Please check the box for the class you’d like to register for:

Mon/Wed Classes

Tue/Thurs Classes

with Saturday performances

with Sunday performances

My child can switch to another class if needed

Child’s Name___________________________________________________ Age______ DOB______________ School ________________________ St. Address___________________________________________________City, State, Zip ________________________________________________ Local Guardian 1 ___________________________________________________ Relationship to child ____________________________________ Address (if different) _________________________________________________ Email ________________________________________________ Daytime/Work Phone ________________________________________________ Evening/Cell Phone _____________________________________ Local Guardian 2 ___________________________________________________ Relationship to child ____________________________________ Address (if different) _________________________________________________ Email ________________________________________________ Daytime/Work Phone ________________________________________________ Evening/Cell Phone _____________________________________

T-shirt size:

Youth S

Youth M

Youth L

Adult S

Adult M

Adult L

Adult XL

(6-8) (10-12) (14-16) I would like my contact information to be released for carpooling purposes (email address required). This will be the child’s first performance at MCT. The registered child has a medical condition—please explain this on an attached sheet or describe here: __________________________________________________________________________________________ I, the undersigned parent or guardian, consent to the attendance of the child named above at MCT classes. I am aware of the commitment and expectations of such an experience and, to the best of my knowledge, my child is willing and able to take part. By the execution of this instrument, I agree to hold MCT—a non-profit organization—blameless for any and all claims which might arise as a result of the participation of my child in this program. I further give my permission to MCT to use any photographs taken of my child for purposes of publication.

Guardian Signature____________________________________________ Date ________________________ A guardian signature is required for participation.

REGISTRATION FEE IS $90 PER PARTICIPANT. A show T-shirt is included. Payment:

Cash

Check, number____________ Credit Card:

Visa

MC

Discover

AmEx

Credit Card Number_____________________________________________ Exp. Date __________________ Cardholder Signature____________________________________________ CVV _______________________ MAIL TO MCT Inc. 200 N. Adams St. Missoula, MT 59802

Missoula Independent

PHONE 728-1911

WEB www.mctinc.org INDY09

Page 34 September 24–October 1, 2009

Shake it ‘til you break it when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., offers Booty Ballet every Thu. at noon. Call 5417240 for pricing. Advocate for abused and neglected children in court when you head to a fundraiser/informational event for Missoula’s chapter of Court Appointed Special Advocates at the Missoula County Courthouse lawn, 200 W. Broadway St., at noon. Free. Call 542-1208. Don’t expect literal papercuts on your child’s hands when Indy contributor Andy Smetanka leads “Afterschool Adventures: Playdate with an Artist� but do expect your child to make some sweet looking silhouette art at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front. St., at 3 PM. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 5417529. If your toddler’s movement seems kind of, well, stale, bring them to Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 3:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. If art loses hands-down to video games, then the Missoula Public Library’s your gig, where Game On! invites teen gamers to glue their eyes on the big screen and mow snacks at 3:30 PM the first Thu. of every Month. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Even if your toddler makes some smooth dance moves, your 5–6 year old might need some work, so bring them to another installment of Creative Movement Class every Thu. at 4 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Breakdance, slamdance or just inventively dance when your 7 to 8 year-old checks out Creative and Modern Movement, a dance

class at 4:15 PM this and every Thu. in the ballet studio of UM’s PARTV building, until Dec. 3. $75/$65 UM faculty and staff. Call 243-2849.

nightlife Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Wiggle those hips and strike poses of elegant expression when former UM dance prof Amy Ragsdale leads a Beginning to Intermediate Modern Dance class at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., every Thu. at 5 PM. Cost TBA. Call 360-8763. You won’t be able to go to this unless you’re a Missoula Art Museum (MAM) or Museum at Fort Missoula member, but, if you can, head to a private reception at 5 PM at the MAM, 335 N. Pattee St., where you’ll meet artist Roger Shimomura and preview his exhibit Minidoka on My Mind before it hits the eyes of others on First Friday. Cost TBA. Call 728-0447. You probably had no idea, but a local cabal of doctors and volunteers recently went down to Honduras to provide medical assistance to locals as part of Missoula Medical Aid. As a thanks, the Women’s Club is holding an open house for them from 5–7 PM at the club, 2105 Bow St., which includes presentations, as well as complimentary snacks and drinks. Free. Call 728-4410. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, noise rock—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352.


Join Us For Gypsies come out during Troupe Night class every Thu. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. $25/month for every class you can make it to. First class is free, $7 drop-in after. Call Blair at 531-3000. After the revolution, we’ll need a new Betsy Ross, which is why you should pick up some tips every Thu. at Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., where their Sewing Lounge begins at 6 PM. $9–10 hour. Call 541-7171. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Sweep yourself into a musical potpourri of sorts when songstress Andrea Harsell graces the Bitterroot Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, with a show at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Sample a taste of Day of the Dead-themed art when Whitefish’s Stumptown Art Studio, 145 Central Ave., holds a First Thursday reception from 6–9 PM which features collage and 3-D art from Flathead Valley high school students. Free. Call 862-5929 or visit www.stumptownartstudio.org. Collagraph prints of CDs and vinyl records grab hold of your iris when Glenn Phillips presents his exhibit Grooves with a First Thursday reception from 6–9 PM at Whitefish’s Walking Man Frame Shop and Gallery, 305 Baker Ave. Free. Call 863-2787. If your aspirations have soured because of the down economy, recalibrate your aims during a Life Coach Associates meet and greet in the small conference room of the Missoula

Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 6:30 PM. Free. Call 721-0387. Feeling too straight and separate? Remedy that situation pronto at Gay Men Together, a safe and affirming place for gay and bisexual men, at 7 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. Swallow your pride, grab up to seven doublespaced pages of your best verbiage, and bring it to this week’s Authors of the Flathead meeting for constructive critique at 7 PM in Room 151 of the Science and Technology Building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. Free. Call 881-4066. You just might do the push, whip or the jitterbug-lindy when Cathy Clark and Brad Dickson sling swing dance lessons every Thu. from 7–8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., with open dancing from 8–10 PM. $5 person for dance lessons. E-mail cathyc@missoulaboneandjoint.com. Grab a 60-minute glimpse into artist Roger Shimomura’s paintings, prints and experimental theater pieces that span a 40 year career during the Missoula Art Museum’s distinguished artist lecture titled “Roger Shimomura: An American Diary� at the Missoula Children’s Theatre, 200 N. Adams St., at 7 PM. Free for MAM and Fort Missoula Museum members and students/$5 public. Call 728-0447 and register by Sept. 28. Work on your boogie skills, but in 3/4 time, during waltz lessons with Barry and Bobbie Bartlette at the Lolo Square Dance Center, 9955 Lolo Creek Road in Lolo, from 7–9 PM. $8 couple. Call 273-0652 or e-mail sqrdance@bresnan.net.

VOLUNTEER TRAINING Tuesday & Thursday Evenings October 13th, 15th, 20th, & 22nd Time: 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Hospice of Missoula 800 Kensington, Suite 204, Missoula There are two kinds of gratitude: the sudden kind we feel for what we receive, and the larger kind we feel for what we give. - Edward Arlington Robinson To sign up for this class contact Hospice of Missoula406-543-4408

Hospice of Missoula provides the full breadth of the hospice benefit as defined by Medicare

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September 30 and October 1 â&#x20AC;˘ UM and Holiday Inn Parkside, Missoula

"Failure to Informâ&#x20AC;?: Is there a Looming Media Crisis in Montana? A conference to explore how changes in the media are affecting the industry, consumers and our democracy.

Wednesday evening's keynote by

Chris Peck is free and open to the public,

7:00 pm,

Registration, including meals, is just $35 by Friday, 9/25, at www.wheelercenter.org. Or call 994-0336

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North Underground Lecture Hall, UM

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Sponsored by: Humanities Montana, D. A. Davidson, NorthWestern Energy, PPL Montana and Exergy Development Group

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Please join us for this important statewide discussion! All are welcome and encouraged to attend. Missoula Independent

Page 35 September 24â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 1, 2009


Rock some sweet fiddle solos and bust a move while others shred without use of an amp during Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., at 7:30 PM this and every Thu. through Oct. Free. Call 7263765. Bring yer guitar, bass or other instrument of choice every Thu. night to The Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, when it holds an open-mic style artists showcase at 8 PM. Free. Interested musicians should Call 541-8463. Yodeling never sounded so boss: Sop yourself to the succulent undulations of Montucky’s country master Wylie and the Wild West, who play the University Theatre at 8 PM. $17/$15 advance/Free children. Tickets available at all Griztix locations or www.griztix.com. Call 243-4051. Cloud your gaze with dreams of shredding during a screening of the ski film Refresh at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., at 8 PM. $7. Call 549-0542. Get your fix of improvised music with Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace at 9 PM every Thu. This week: metallic transmissions from Kalispell’s Vengeance, locals Celestial Chaos and Salt Lake City’s Still-Born. $3.

See a plethora of patterns and colors after a few pitchers, muster up the courage to belt out some classics, and perhaps win a prize, during Kaleidoscope Karaoke every Tue.–Sun. at the Lucky Strike Casino, 1515 Dearborn Ave., at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 7211798. Dance with a cougar or two, or not, every Thu. at 10 PM when the James Bar, 127 W. Alder St., hosts The Social Club, featuring DJ Fleege spinning an expansive array of tech house and progressive electro dance tunes. Free. Cross your karaoke sword with others under the influence of that music box you sing along to during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Although it’s Tuesday, I can still feel bass tones reverberating in my mind. I guess that’s just the after effect of Athens, Ga. metal duo Jucifer, who pummeled listeners—in the best way possible—with some seriously bottom heavy riffage on Sunday night at the Palace. To many in the audience (including the sound guy, Justin Lawrence), it was an exercise in bass therapy. So, in the spirit of entertainment as emotional and physical medicine, I urge you to send me your remedies in the form of events, which, as always, I need by 5 PM on Fri., Sept. 24 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Playa c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”

Your government at work. Requests for proposals Page 48

Missoula Independent

Page 36 September 24–October 1, 2009


It sure feels good to be back in the saddle again. The saddle of my bike seat, that is. You see, I’ve been out of a working bike for a few months now and I’ve felt the affects: uneasiness in the legs and a propensity to rely on that thing called a “car.” My recovery has been smooth, but I just wanted to give a shout out to all you pedaling peeps and remind you, reader, to utilize our recently revamped city bike routes and our prolific bike trail systems, at least before the first snowflake drops. In fact, you’ll have a chance tonight to pedal it up when you join Missoula’s Thursday Night Mountain Bike Group when they meet at 6 PM at the Rattlesnake Trailhead to ride up Sawmill Gulch and then ride the Turkey Trail. Free. Head over to thursdaynightmtbr.org or give Alden Wright a call at 243-4790 or 542-1966. Once Friday hits and you’re in the mood to party, I suggest raising a toast to the Montana Natural History Center by heading to their annual banquet and auction at 6 PM in the Governor’s Ballroom of the Florence Building, 111 N. Higgins Ave. $50/$45 members. If you decide to go, get ready for scrumptious food from Two Sisters Catering, drinks from the Red Bird, as well as a chance to bid on nature trips and more. RSVP by calling 327-0405. On Saturday, you’ll be summoned to duty as part of National Public Lands Day, and I’ve got a handful of projects to keep you bustling. First, you’ll meet with members of the Sierra Club and Westslope Chapter of Trout Unlimited for a day of restoration at Little McCormick Creek, just northwest of town. You’ll do your part by planting willows, dogwood, alder and other plants to help stabilize the stream bank and provide habitat for fish and other creatures. Meet at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 8:30 AM, or alternately head to the Ninemile Ranger Station by 10 AM. Don’t space bringing work gloves, water and raingear, and note a celebration barbeque follows the workday. RSVP by calling 542-1192 or e-mailing rroberts@tu.org.

Stocks, Bonds, and a Whole Lot More.

Five Valleys Audubon Society when they mosey up to Flesher Pass to gaze at migrating raptors and visit a raptor banding site. Slurp a couple shots of espresso so you can run over to UM’s Adams Field House parking lot to meet other trip-goers at 6 AM. Also, bring some good hiking boots and appropriate dress, as there will be some hiking involved. Call Larry Weeks at 549-5632 to sign up. If raptors don’t tickle your intellectual and visual marbles and you’re jonesin’ for an optical rush of goliath proportions, skip the raptor trip and jump on a bus tour exploring Glacial Lake Missoula’s effects on the Mission Valley. You’ll join the Montana Natural History Center and Glacial Lake Missoula Chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute for this expedition, which takes you to a number of water carved locales for your viewing pleasure including the Bison Range, Mission Mountains, Camas Prairie and Rainbow Lake. The trip runs from 8 AM–5 PM and the bus departs from the MNHC headquarters, 120 Hickory St. $35/$30 members. Call 327-0405 to RSVP. Those seeking ecstasy through physical endurance, rather than peeping rock formations, should heed the calling of those saints of physical fury, the Rocky Mountaineers, when they head up Saturday to Miller Peak in the Sapphires for a 20–25 mile mountain bike adventure which follows the Solstice ride route. Time and location to meet at is TBA. Call leader Alden Wright at 243-4790 or 542-1966. After a whirlwind weekend of exertion, I now direct your attention to another round of UM Campus Recreation Department events: a leave no trace trainers overnight course which you must sign up for by Mon, Sept. 28, that costs $45. There’s also signups for UM Photo by Alex Sakariassen raquetball and squash leagues, due Tue., Sept. 28, as well And just when you thought you were done with nature’s as a free lecture on weight management on Sept. 30, and a recurhousekeeping, those folks at Missoula Parks and Rec found a way ring weight management class every Thursday from Oct. 1 to Nov. to snare you and your kid during a day of trail construction, 19, which costs $25. Call 243-2804 or visit life.umt.edu/CREC. And, for all you powder hounds out there, here’s a reminder pond restoration and tree planting at Silver’s Lagoon in McCormick Park from 9 AM–1 PM. Free. A barbeque is also on that season tickets for Whitefish Mountain Resort are curtap for your unwavering servitude. Call 721-PARK or visit rently on sale until Sept. 30 for these prices: $535 adults/$435 www.missoulaparks.org. Also of note to parents: In conjunction college students and seniors/$295 teens and $145 for juniors. with the cleanup, there’s also a free Kaboom! Play Day for Kids Click over to skiwhitefish.com or call 862-2900. Now get out there and dig up some dirt, hop on a bike, or ages 5 and up at the same time at Silver’s Lagoon and features amble about in the woods until we meet again next week. activities like interpretive hikes and aquatic insect studies. Maybe you aren’t inclined to drudge in the dirt on Saturday. If that’s the case, enlighten yourself with a safari of sorts as you join the calendar@missoulanews.com If being closer to home is where your nature-loving heart is, cruise over to another important waterway when the Rattlesnake Creek Watershed Group meets from 9 AM–5 PM in the Bugbee Nature Area of Rattlesnake Creek, where you’ll pull weeds, plant native trees and shrubs, as well as spread grass and wildflower seeds. Free. Bring work gloves, an enthusiastic mind and wheelbarrows, shovels, pitchforks, rakes or rock bars, if you have them. Also, park on Herbert, Raymond or Charis streets and not on Missoula Avenue. Call Andrew at 531-2527 or e-mail rattlesnakecreek.watershedgroup@gmail.com.

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The way to get things done Missoula Independent

Page 37 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Still going strong Stalwart sci-fi rockers Volumen crank out another album by Erika Fredrickson

Volumen played its first show as a two-piece in summer 1996 with only a drum machine and effects rack. In December 1999, the duo—Shane Hickey and Doug Smith—formed a one-night-only band called Spiders From Mars with bassist Bryan Hickey, drummer Bob Marshall and keyboardist Chris Bacon covering David Bowie’s Zigg y Stardust. That lineup quickly became the new Volumen. Ten years later, and after four albums, several tours, hundreds of shows, one one-week break-up, and the usual personal maturation— marriage, children, etc.—the stalwart sci-fi, heavy rock, new-wave band drops a new album, Skipper of Reverses, recorded at Club Shmed. We sat down with guitarist Shane Hickey and keyboardist Chris Bacon to discuss the secret to the band’s longevity and to see how time has—or hasn’t—changed its music.

Shane, getting back to the new songs: “Meoth” is about if you see something terrible you can’t make it go out of your head. I was trying to find my dog and we were in Nashville in 108 degrees. Brutal hot. I finally went to the station wagon and opened the door and he’d been in there the whole time and he had died but he’d tried to claw his way out. His eyes were all bulged out and his tongue was black. That burned in my brain. I was 10 years old and I’m never going to forget that. And there’s this dark part of you, you could keep looking for those things and that’s dangerous. So, that’s a scary story… Chris: I sort of thought it was more of the candle burning at both ends kind of circular idea— Shane: It is. It’s the moth chasing the light of a candle that’s tied to the moth.

Chris: Like he might try to dress up like a woman. Shane: Exactly. Bacon has probably watched every original “Star Trek”…40 times. He’s a fountain of knowledge. Indy: Frodo vs. Bilbo in a battle? Chris: Bilbo. He learned from his experience, whereas I feel like Frodo still doesn’t get it at the end of the whole thing. Shane: And he’s a whiner, right? Jesus. Okay, the ring is heavy, I get it! Bilbo, well, he killed a fucking dragon. Indy: What should the headline of this article be? Shane: Volumen: Still Alive.

Indy: Now that you’re getting older, are you going to start offering senior discounts to those of us who have been coming to your shows forever? Shane: You know how Denny’s is, where you can get the senior specials if you eat dinner at 4 p.m.? We need to have the Badlander have old rocker night where shows start at 7 and they’re done by 10 and then you can go home and watch whatever shitty TV show you’re addicted to, because you’re old. Indy: What’s different about Skipper of Reverses? Shane: We wanted to strip down our sound. We decided it doesn’t count as a song unless two dudes can play it drunk on an acoustic guitar around a campfire. Then we started calling it classic rock from the future but then The Photo courtesy of Andy Kemmis Lights [Seattle band] were busting our balls like, “Doesn’t that mean present Volumen, clockwise from upper left, comprises Doug Smith, Shane Hickey, Bryan Hickey, Bob rock, like nü metal?” That’s depressing. Marshall and Chris Bacon. “It’s not like any of us are mild personalities,” says Shane. “You’d expect I’d like to think that classic rock from the us to fight all the time and break up. But if it was going to happen it would have happened by now.” future would be like this [album]. I think it’s the most cohesive record we’ve made. Chris: Still crazy after all these years. We’ll see. I always get my hopes up and then I see Indy: You guys have never shied away from Shane: Volumen: Still living. Also…still a the first review and it’s like “Joke band Volumen your sci-fi roots. So, Shane, I hear they’re raising band! makes new joke record,” and I’m like, “What the the level cap to 85 in World of Warcraft fuck?” We made one joke record. One! (Cataclysm version). How do you feel about that? Indy: Will this band ever break up? Shane: [Laughs] I hadn’t heard that….There’s Shane: I hope we play until somebody dies— going to be a Star Wars one that’s going to be the that seems like a terrible way to say it… I’d want Indy: Are the songs mostly about your wast- shit. You can be a Sith or a Jedi, and it’s back in the to put out a record every other year. Play every ed youth? old republic. This time I’m going to make the right third month. We basically have to get out differShane: Not really. Let’s see. “Time Travel” is move and make the bad guy. All the douchebags ential equations and solve matrices in order to about how if you had access to a time machine make the alliance or jedis. figure out when everyone can practice. But since you’re still going to fuck it up. Every human male 1999 it’s been the five of us and at this point if in his 20s would use it to go back to that one relaIndy: Kirk v. Picard? somebody left, it’s over. We’d do something else. tionship that he fucked up…It’s about somebody Chris and Shane: Kirk. We can’t do a Menudo or a Ramones. This is the who goes back but because he still remembers Shane: I say that because I want to back up band that’s going to be the band. [the breakup] he ruins it anyway. Bacon, but I’m a Picard guy. Are we saying they’re fighting? Kirk’s a wild card but he might be unbalVolumen play a CD release party at the Indy: The time machine thing is tricky. anced enough that Picard will outthink him. But Badlander for KBGA’s Birthday Bash Friday, Chris: Yeah. It’s never going to be right; you if it’s instinct or pure manpower, it’s Kirk. But if Sept 25, at 10 PM. $5. can’t fix it. Picard knew he was going to be facing Kirk he efredrickson@missoulanews.com Shane: Scientists, please read the comics! would come up with a ruse…

Missoula Independent

Page 38 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Bryan Adams 11

Polydor

Please forgive Bryan Adams; he can’t stop loving the big cliché. It sort of warms my heart to know that he’s still cycling through the library of standard love song tropes, hoping to find another unplumbed combination of nonstatements to follow up the 1991 epiphany, “(Everything I Do) I Do It For You.” He’s done well sticking to the basics, from “those were the best days of my life” (“Summer of 69,” 1984) to “you still turn the fire on” (“Please Forgive Me,” 1993).

Darkest Hour The Eternal Return Victory Records

Modern metal has become so compressed and formulaic as to require the biggest enema in the industry. The uncreative, limp way these records are recorded sucks any dynamic immediacy right off the grooves. The flatline layers of guitars and bass (when you can hear it) over constant double-kick drumming, plus an atonal yellfest of vocals, have become ingredients checked off a list of mediocrity that may as well come from something about as threatening as a Chick-fil-A menu at the food court in the mall. At least Darkest Hour manages some impressive guitar work when it isn’t buried under about 10 layers of identical tracks. Some sharp leads and harmony parts make the mandatory number of lis-

Finn Riggins Vs. Wilderness Tender Loving Empire

Finn Riggins is what happens when music majors attack. The Hailey, Idaho, band’s latest recording hits pop a good one upside the head. Each member of the three-piece is credited with playing at least three instruments on the album. All three players sing, too, and they do it well. The result is a wall of finely detailed sound that is as bracingly complex as it is catchy. “Dali” sounds like Blondie meets Yes in the Caribbean. I can only describe “Furs” and “Vs.

The Ax

Our Queen of Dirt Whoa! Boat

At first listen The Ax struck me as just another lo-fi, guitar/drum duo pushing a tiring gimmick that was more hip than substance. A second listen and I was nodding along most of the way. By the third, I was rocking out. That’s a good sign. Often enough, records that grab me immediately don’t have the staying power of those that work a little to pique my interest. This record has real energy and urgency throughout, driven primarily by Adam Jelsing’s front-of-the-beat drumming. Listen to how “Weak Creatures” batters along and then tell me I’m wrong.

Last year’s 11 is true to form, featuring songs like “Broken Wings,” “Somethin’ to Believe In,” “Mysterious Ways” and “Walk On By,” none of which are covers or bear any relation to better songs by Mister Mister, Poison, U2 or Burt Bacharach. Adams’ voice, at least, is in good form. His husky inflection and slightly boyish range haven’t changed in 25 years. Unfortunately, none of 11’s tracks manage to transcend the elusive barrier between hopelessly cheesy and confoundedly catchy. Adams has managed that feat before, but it’s been over 10 years since he struck gold, since lightening struck twice, since he flew on broken wings…oh, sorry about that. Please forgive Bryan Adams, for he just does what he does. (Ali Gadbow) Bryan Adams plays the Wilma Theatre Monday, Sept. 28, at 8 PM. $40–$85. tens prior to an honest review at least bearable. Not so for the vocals. They are exactly the same on every part of every song. Lacking any variation in emotion, the “anger” here is as truthful as calling the phone book literature. There’s no question these guys can play. But they need to strip it back to 16 tracks, throw out the jackass Mac-styled mixing and revisit the hardcore punks that inspired them. That should remind them that this music doesn’t have to be generic. (Chris La Tray) Darkest Hour plays the Wilma Theatre Thursday, Sept. 24, at 7:30 PM with Trivium, White Chapel and Dirge Within. $22/$20 advance.

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Bird” as super-spy adventure dance themes. In “Mahoney,” Finn Riggins breaks out the prog rock with a driving beat and layered, rhythmic vocals building to a frenzied conclusion. Vs. Wilderness is a kick-ass album. Every track more than holds its own, and it’s hard to choose a favorite, but I’ve got it narrowed down to two: “Shaky” and “Wake (Keep This Town Alive”). Lisa Simpson’s luminous vocals on “Shaky” flirt with a sweet, drifting melody on steel drum, guitar and organ. On “Wake,” Finn Riggins adds a pinch of gospel to a Matt & Kim-style synth-pop crowd pleaser. I haven’t heard whoa-oh-oh used this well in months. (Ali Gadbow) Finn Riggins plays the Palace Wednesday, Sept. 30, at 9 PM with Broken Valley Roadshow. $5. I may change my mind, but the almost stoner rock riffs of this record remind me of early Nebula, with the garage-based grooves and the slightly off-tune, multi-tracked vocals and atypical jazz chords. The main differences—and they are almost deal breakers for me—are the lack of any scorching leads and the bottom anchor of a bass guitar. My ears scream for both here. Ultimately, this is one of those records that will work great a track or two at a time in a mix, but beginning to end is just a little too repetitive for my attention span. (Chris La Tray)

Missoula Independent

Page 39 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Missoula Independent

Page 40 September 24–October 1, 2009

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Post-traumatic tales Condon’s characters fight the war at home by Azita Osanloo

During one crucial moment in the title story closet while her roommate and the roommate’s of University of Montana environmental studies boyfriend have sex on Dee’s bed. The two misfits professor Phil Condon’s latest collection, Nine had walked into the room unexpectedly (and Ten Again, Clint, a 31-year old fuel tank trucker in unaware that Dee had returned early from her Livingston County, stares out a barroom window. own date). After finding Dee’s open diary on her “The edges of the glass were frosted and a desk and reading a passage about Dee’s attraction beer sign blinked in the center, but you could still to her roommate’s boyfriend, the two engage in a see through,” he writes. “Pickups came and went roleplay where the roommate pretends to be the on the square and the bar door opened and “prudish” Dee while the boyfriend violates her. closed, but nothing changed. And the nothing After their feverish, half-drunk love, the two leave changed was what Clint saw most clear.” and Dee emerges from the closet: “They had left Depending on how you take it, Clint’s exis- all the lights on, and [Dee] looked around, feeltentialism is kind of ironic. It’s ing she hadn’t seen the room 2002 and the television in the before, as if it were a kind of Buzz Inn bar, tuned to Fox museum with each exhibit News, shows a grave George W. demonstrating one of her flaws Bush standing behind a podium. and defects.” Only a moment before Clint On one level, these stories looked out the barroom window are profoundly admirable. to see nothing but sameness, a Condon is a natural storyteller, man he’d been talking with one who recounts defining pointed to the very same winmoments with startling accuradow: “Let me tell you somecy. Yet, Condon manages something, she’s a new world kicking thing else here as well; he stakes out there…She ain’t ever gonna out deeper territory in this colbe 9-10 again, boys.” lection, where the notion of The man at the bar is war—be it Vietnam, Desert named Rex Moorford, a shady Storm, or the current crises—is character Clint’s inclined to dis- Nine Ten Again so omnipresent it appears like a like, but he’s willing to give the Phil Condon character in itself. During a basman the benefit of the doubt paperback, Elixer Press ketball game where Dee is when Rex offers to include Clint 200 pages, $17.00 cheering for the Griz basketball in a plan to go to Iraq (where, team, an anti-war protestor inevitably, “we’re gonna go back to get that interrupts the game. The event troubles and presucker and his frigging mustache...”). The occupies her, until she becomes the subject for impending war offers a chance for working men, ridicule and foreplay. For Clint, impending war is like Rex and Clint, to take advantage of a situa- an occasion that reminds him that while the tion where oil men and drivers will be needed, world may spin, he will remain in the same place, in exchange for a hefty payday. For Clint, the always. For others, war has a more direct effect. A opportunity is more than just the money—it’s Vietnam veteran, suffering from Agent Orange the chance to offer something viable to his syndrome, struggles with paranoia while trying to estranged wife and son. It’s also the chance to maintain his image as a father and husband. All do something other than “pissing your life away the while, his wife goes on making spaghetti and on dreams you can’t tell anybody what they are his two kids grow up to alternately pity and reject if they even asked.” When Rex fails to show up to him. In Missoula, a homeless veteran who hangs the diner where they’ve planned to iron out the out on the Madison Street bridge loses his dog to details over breakfast, Clint feels the disappoint- a family man with the money to pay for the dog’s ment and anger palpably. care. Often, war doesn’t change the rhythm of For some, it seems, the post 9/11 world offers one’s daily life, but its reality looms and everyone new opportunities. But for Clint, it’s still a place is affected. where nothing really changes. In these stories, war acts as a backdrop that Clint’s anger drives him to the brink of ration- somehow choreographs, if only indirectly, the al behavior, only to retreat, at the last moment, to flow of life for individuals who live thousands of the regular, workaday desperation that is his nor- miles from action. It’s hard to write despair. It’s mal mode. And that kind of desperation seems even harder to write about war. Condon has manworse. That men and women lead lives of quiet aged to write about both in a way that deeply desperation is no new observation, but writing affects and somehow manages to show the driving about it with an empathy that is genuine and even force behind the souls of men and women. surprising is an uncommon feat—one that Condon achieves throughout this tenderly writPhil Condon reads from Nine Ten Again at ten collection. Fact & Fiction Friday, Sept. 25, at 7 PM. Free. In another story, Dee, a naïve UM cheerarts@missoulanews.com leader, finds herself trapped in her dorm-room


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Bad information Soderbergh falls short in Fargo-like film by Andy Smetanka

Of all the riddles in the Coen Brothers oeuvre, The deeper he gets in the cloak-and-dagger the great lie that begins Fargo might be the most proceedings, the more he starts acting like intriguing of all. If your memory needs refreshing, Fargo’s Jerry Lundegaard—flummoxed by the it goes like this: “This is a true story. The events strain of balancing his double life, and apparentdepicted in this story took place in Minnesota in ly too naïve to live a lie without acting suspicious. 1987. At the request of the survivors, the names The difference is that we know Jerry Lundegaard have been changed. Out of respect for the dead, is trying to get away with a crime, while Whitacre the rest has been told exactly as it occurred.” can’t help acting funny trying to help clear one First sentence, second sentence...so far so good. up. Or is that really what he’s doing? But “survivors” in the third sentence suggests that Here, again, is both the strength and damning someone didn’t survive, that some attention shall be flaw of The Informant!: We’re not sure how far we paid to this matter, and circumstances are such that can trust Mark Whitacre. If anything, we wish we the survivors apparently wish to keep their distance. could avoid his tedious company. Ostensibly to And then, in the fourth sentence, all bets are off. So reveal an inner life (on top of the two outer ones eager are we, as viewers, to avoid creating extra work already in play) Soderbergh employs the shopfor ourselves too early in a movie, we’ll fall for just worn tactic of the running interior monologue. about anything. We’ll even take American cinema’s arch-ironists—even then—at face value when they proclaim to uphold the honor of the deceased. At their very word. One actually goes into the movie with the sense that some wrong shall be put to right by it, something noble achieved—for what nobler work can there be than restoring justice to the dead? The Informant!, on the other hand, directed by another great smirker, Steven Soderbergh, starts off with a much less cunning ploy to get itself off “Two rolls of toilet paper and a copy of Modern Jackass, pronto.” the hook. Or rather to remind the viewer of his place straightaway. After stating that, What’s actually on Whitacre’s mind, though, is although the movie is based on a true story certain mostly superficial and distracted twaddle: musings details have been altered or conflated, the disclaimer on which designer ties are on sale, whether he’d be proclaims, “So there.” So you’re the boss of me, better off buying them in Paris and smuggling them then, are you, movie? Because you say so, is that it? home, and whether “Porsche”—he owns eight What are we, 8 years old? If Fargo beguiles one into cars—is pronounced like “porsh” or “porsha.” believing a fabulous lie, The Informant! thumbs its Right from its cocky disclaimer, The nose at its audience in a far more artless—not to say Informant! similarly suffers from a kind of identicondescending—fashion. That’s a foolish way to start ty crisis. If it’s supposed to be a comedy, it’s not if you want to be taken seriously. very funny, nor is it suspenseful if it’s supposed Dodgy disclaimers aren’t the only thing linking to be a thriller. It seems caught squarely, and with the two movies. Like Fargo’s Marge Gundersen, Matt a great deal of talent trapped in the indecision, Damon’s character in Informant! displays a childlike between Catch Me If You Can and The Insider. obliviousness to irony that would almost endear him With the signal exception of the acting, most to viewers if there wasn’t also something shifty and things about it seem misdeployed, not least the evasive about him, some quality—hard to put your fin- perky score by veteran composer Marvin ger on—that warns against trusting him completely. Hamlisch, which infects everything with a retroDamon’s Whitacre is a high-ranking, and splen- kitsch flavor (the movie is set in the early ’90s but didly well-compensated, corporate executive for sounds like the early ’60s) and reduces any agribusiness empire Archer Daniels Midland. He intended gravity to “Leave It to Beaver” levels. comes from a humble background, caught a couple It’s debatable, of course, how much gravity of “very lucky breaks” and thrives on the culture of Soderbergh intended there to be. As a director, corporate advancement. He also describes himself he’s equally good at concerned and forthright, as a “white hat,” standing tall and often alone for standoffish and evasive. The latter qualities seem what he thinks is right. When production of a corn- to get the better of him here. Damon is excellent derived amino acid starts to falter, Whitacre thinks in the lead role, more intriguing as Soderbergh industrial saboteurs are behind it and breathlessly reveals Whitacre’s layers of duplicity one by one, reveals to his colleagues an extortion scheme mas- and the supporting cast is uniformly excellent. terminded by a shadowy Japanese businessman. But as a whole the movie seems made of parts The FBI gets involved, their poking around leads to that don’t quite fit. bigger and more damning revelations, and before he knows it Whitacre is caught between doing the The Informant! continues at the Village 6. right thing—or so he says—and closing ranks with arts@missoulanews.com his executive colleagues to save their own hides.

Missoula Independent

Page 41 September 24–October 1, 2009


Scope Noise Books Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

OPENING THIS WEEK FAME Teens fight for artistic supremacy and good grades from Kelsey Grammer in this remake of the Oscar winning original. Carmike 10: 4:35, 7:10 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1, 4, 7 and 9:30 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 2:05, 4:35 and 7:35. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45. MY ONE AND ONLY Renée Zellweger plays a 1950s gold digger on the hunt for a sugar daddy to take care of her and her kids. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9:05 with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:05.

Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:30, 3:50, 6:30 and 9 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 3:25, 5:40 and 8. CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS Food falls from the sky and Bruce Campbell hacks away at a vocal cameo in this 3-D animated kids’ flick. Carmike 10: 5:30, 7:40 and 9:50 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:25, 4:55, 7:05 and 9:05 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 3:45, 6:10 and 8:25. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45. DISTRICT 9 Peter Jackson produces a film about refugee aliens controlled by a multi-national corporation that cares

10: 4, 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 4:30 and 9:35 with midnight show Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 3:40 and 8:10. IN THE LOOP The War in Iraq gets a belly-laugh in this stinging satire about a British official who tries to stop Bush and Blair-like presidents from plunging the Middle East into its current chaotic state. Wilma Theatre: 7 nightly with no show Sat., Mon. and Wed. THE INFORMANT! Matt Damon plays a nerdish whistleblower that realizes his story doesn’t quite hold water when the FBI finds some skeletons in his closet. Village 6: 7:15 and 9:55 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:45 and 4:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9

PANDORUM Dennis Quaid and Ben Foster wake up from a blackout on a spaceship, only to realize they’ve gotta snuff out a disease before it nabs them. Village 6: 7 and 9:30 with additional Sat.–Sun shows at 1:30 and 4:20. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 9:40 with a 7:45 show on Sun. and midnight shows Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 2, 4:40 and 7:45. SURROGATES Bruce Willis rocks a fitting role as an FBI agent that abandons his robotic proxy in order to avenge a killer. Carmike 10: 5:35, 7:45 and 9:55 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:15 and 3:25. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:20, 1:20, 2:30, 3:45, 4:50, 6:15, 7:15, 8:30 and 9:45, with 7:40 show on Sun. and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 2:10, 3:20, 4:30, 5:30, 6:40 and 7:40.

NOW SHOWING 500 DAYS OF SUMMER See what happens when a lovestruck sap woos Zooey Deschanel while holding onto the notion that love cures all. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30. 9 Tim Burton produces a rad, post-apocalyptic hell where little mutants called stitchpunks fight for survival against menacing machines. Carmike 10: 5, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1 and 3. Stadium 14: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:40, 4:45, 6:50 and 8:50 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:40, 3:50, 6:05 and 8:05. ALL ABOUT STEVE Sandra Bullock plays a socially awkward, obsessive wordsmith who follows television camera slinger Bradley Cooper around on his beat, trying to snare his heart in this cornball rom-com. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:25 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in This fishing report brought to you by

THE SECRETS OF JONATHAN SPERRY Christian themes saturate a story about a 12year-old boy that develops a “unique friendship” with a septuagenarian man after mowing his lawn. Village 6: 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45 and 4:30.

SOUL POWER Sweaty footage of James Brown and others from the Zaire ‘74 music fest gets interspersed with cuts from Muhammad Ali and George Foreman’s fight of that summer. Wilma Theatre: 9 nightly with no show Sat., Mon. and Wed. New details of Baucus’ health care reform emerge every day. Pandorum opens at the Village 6 on Friday.

only about making profits. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:10 and 9:45 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9:15.

show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:05, 4:05, 6:35 and 9:10 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:45 and 7:55.

EXTRACT Jason Batemen wants to sell his plant extract business but his plans get thwarted when his wife cavorts naughtily with a manslut. Includes sweet cameos from Gene Simmons and Ben Affleck. Village 6: 7 with and additional Sat.–Sun show at 4.

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS Brad Pitt aims to kick some serious Nazi ass with his Jewish war buddies in this latest offering from Quentin Tarantino. Carmike 10: 4:10 and 7:20 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 4:15 and 7:30 and midnight Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 4:20 and 7:30. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15 and 7:15 with Sat.–Sun. show at 1:30.

THE FINAL DESTINATION Hillbilly pastimes careen with the grim reaper in this 3-D horrorshow that reeks of overproduced cheese. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 4:35 and 9:20 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 3:35 and 8:15. G-FORCE Guinea pigs take up spy work from the United States government in order to take down a billionaire bent on world takeover. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 2:35 and 6:55 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25 and 6:15.

JENNIFER’S BODY A stuck-up teen turns into a blood-lusting, nympho demon, but her best friend hoards her prey. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaoplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7:25 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. shows at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:30, 6 and 8:20.

GAMER Humans control each other not by wealth or political prestige, like in the real world, but through multi-player online games. Carmike

JULIE & JULIA This adaptation of two memoirs revolve around cooking, blogging about cooking and the quest to become a culinary master, all thanks to cookbooks

THE TIME TRAVELER’S WIFE Your heart strings are bound to be tugged in this flick about a time traveling man and the woman who tries desperately to keep him grounded. Village 6: 7:20 and 9:50 with additional Sat.–Sun show at 1 and 4. WHITEOUT Kate Beckinsale’s a badass female U.S. Marshal stationed in Antarctica trying to solve the continent’s first murder, while also fending off a killer. Village 6: 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 4. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Mon.–Sun. at 1:25 and 7:20 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu at 1:20 and 5:55. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9:05. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Sept. 25. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton–363-5141. Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.

The Kingfisher’s Weekly Fishing Report: Week of Sept 24th. Here comes more warm weather! If nothing else, the lack of wind will be a nice change of pace! With overnight frost warnings finally making their appearance and dropping water temperatures in store, look for the fall hatches to begin in earnest. Blue wings and mahoganies will soon be the main focus although at this point, there is still more diversity. Bigger drakes, hoppers, ants and even some caddis are still relevant on the local waters right now. As the month progresses with colder nights and shorter days, count on the best fishing of the day to move squarely into the midday hours. The water's getting bony up here in a lot of areas making for sketchy floating in some places, but excellent wading almost river-wide. A #14 purple haze or an ant/dropper rig should do good things for you on the 'root today.

Blackfoot

Missoula Independent

LOVE HAPPENS Jennifer Aniston slings flowers and is bitter about love, but a chance encounter with a self-help guru just might help her score. Carmike 10: 4:20, 7:05 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:40. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 1:15, 3:55, 6:45 and 9:15 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:50, 4:50 and 7:50.

SORORITY ROW Reignite your dislike for sororities in this flick about sorority girls who accidentally kill one of their own, only to be faced with a mysterious killer bent on retribution. Village 6: 7:15 and 9:45 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 1:45 and 4:30.

Bitterroot

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by Julia Child. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:25, 3:40, 6:40 and 9:25 and midnight on Fri.–Sat. and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4:25 and 7:25. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinee at 3 and no 9:10 show Sun. Showboat in Polson: 4:15, 6:50 and 9:10.

**read the other info section @ www.kingfisherflyshop.com/missoula-hatch-reports to lean how you could win a $3,000 shopping spree from The Kingfisher** Probably a good call today with the

bright skies and lack of wind. Good numbers of October caddis. some mahoganies and blue wings should have the fish looking up. A variety of terrestrials from tarantulas to ants should be effective as well. Putting deep droppers under any of this stuff will also improve your odds pretty dramatically. The upper and lower river still seem like they are much more spotty right now with lots of little fish getting in the way of your big fish joy. Get out and enjoy the late summer while it lasts because all of a sudden deep fall will be upon us and the warm days will be a distant memory.

Clark Fork

**read below to learn how you can win a $3,000 Kingfisher shopping spree!** The best fishing on the Clark recently has been late afternoon to early evening. Good trico hatches are still motivating fish to the surface on the mid and lower river and the mahoganies are creating very good, late in the day dryfly action to rising pods. The blue wings have gotten going down here too although the hatches have been sporadic. We're still having good luck with slender bodied golden stone patterns with a

size 16 beadhead p-tail which is probably your best bet for prospecting. Having a diversity of mayfly options like comparaduns, sparkle duns, thorax ties, etc. . .will help a bunch when you run into the finicky pods. Expect to see more and more of these shallow water risers as we move into late Sept. early October. Some of the best fishing of the year is beginning right now!

Rock Creek

Good stuff on the creek today as the unseasonably summer like weather continues. The upper 1/2 of the creek has been a bit more consistent recently, especially for dryfly action, but the lower 1/2 is fishing well too. A purple haze or GT emerger in a 14 have been very reliable choices recently, but the fish have been more than willing on a variety of offerings. For sure the most important elements to your success up here are quiet casts and longer drag-free drifts. Putting about any midsized pattern (12s and 14s) over their heads will generally get some attention. Tandem nymph rigs as well as deeper droppers have been working well with SMALL mayfly patterns working the best. . . .cop-

per Jonns, brassies, etc . . .in 16s and 18s. Today's flow near Clinton is 292 cfs.

Missouri

Decent fishing subsurface with some action here and there on ants and hoppers. LOTS of people on the upper end depending on the day. Avoiding drifting weeds has now become part of the game again in typical fall fashion. We need the long term cool down to happen over here to bring on the serious fall fishing. Smaller cripples and comparaduns in 16s to 20s will be the goods early but smaller ants and beetles will hold their own for awhile longer too. Midday, it'll be patient prospecting with hopper/dropper rigs for the occasional fatty. There is still some caddis activity late afternoon and early evening, but the best fishing remains early in the day now with tricos. The nymphing is still the best way to get numbers, but it's not like it was a month ago. Today's flow below Holter is 3950 cfs.

Th e O l d Po s t - Th e b e s t b u l l - t r o u t - f r e e f i s h t a c o s i n t h e w e s t !

Page 42 September 24–October 1, 2009


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Missoula Independent page 44 September 24–October 1, 2009

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“Basic Self Help EFT Acupressure” Thursdays & Fridays from 6:30pm8:30pm WEEKLY. Starting on June 18th & 19th. FREE in Missoula. For more information: dianne.getbetternow@gmail.com 406-225-8504 Build A Recycled Recumbent or 4 Wheel Bike- Free Build a Bike Group-Meets Weekly @ Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. 1st St W., SATURDAYS 2:30pm, Please call to RSVP & for other meeting times. Group Contact “Bob Ruby” @ 800809-0112 See Group @ http://missoulaareaevents.ning.com Must Volunteer for 2 hrs at local free cycles. Call for Hrs: Free Cycles Office 406- 541-PATH (7284) Call for Artist. Bernice’s Bakery for 2011. Submission fee $15. Due September 30th. Other submission requirements and info call 728-1358

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VOLUNTEERS Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area.

McIntosh Apple Day Festival is coming Saturday, Oct. 10th!! We need volunteers to for the following days: Thursday, October 1st – Frozen pie making – Bring your rolling pin! Wednesday, October 7th – Apple peeling and baking prep Thursday, October 8th – Apple pie assembly, baking and moving pies Saturday, October 10th – Apple day booths We are also in need of pint size, commercial mason jars with lids that are in good condition. Donations will be greatly appreciated. For more information, please call Ravalli County Museum at 363- -3338 Volunteer Tutors Needed! Do you want to make a difference in a child’s life? Become a McKinney tutor! WORD is currently seeking volunteers to work with homeless and at-risk children, K-8th grade. McKinney tutors are changing the world, one child at a time. Be a part of that change and call today! Contact Kimberly Apryle for further information (406)543-3550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org

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TO GIVE AWAY LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889

EMPLOYMENT ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 BODYGUARDS WANTED. FREE Training for members. No Experience OK. Excellent $$$. Full & Part Time. Expenses Paid When you Travel. 1-615-228-1701. www.psubodyguards.com COMBINED JANITORIAL & OFFICE CLEANING, P/T, Msla. #2976317 M i s s o u l a Wo r k f o r c e C e n t e r 728-7060 COOK - INSTITUTIONAL, F/T, Msla. #2976336 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Currents Aquatics Center Cashier: Fun job with lots of public contact in a healthy, positive setting! Early morning, evenings, weekends, 15-20 hours, $7.88. Work-study ok. Application at Currents Aquatics Center in McCormick Park, 600 Cregg Ln. or http://www.ci.missoula.mt.us/inde x.aspx?NID=327. For details: dbeaudin@ci.missoula.mt.us. Deadline 9/28, 5p.m. C U S T O D I A N , P / T, M s l a . #2976331 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 CUSTOMER SERVICE TEAM MEMB E R , P / T, M s l a . # 2 9 7 6 3 3 0 M i s s o u l a Wo r k f o r c e C e n t e r 728-7060 FRONT DESK CLERK, P/T, Msla. #2976333 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 GARDENING HELP NEEDED. Weeding and yard cleanup on a part-time, temporary basis. $10/hour. 406-546-8822 GOVERNMENT JOBS: Earn $12 to $48 Per Hour. Benefits, Paid Training. Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Administrative, Clerical, Of fice, Accounting, Finance, Wildlife, More! 1-800320-9353 x 2001 HEALTH ENROLLMENT SPECIALIST F/T, Msla. #2976326 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 MAIL AND SCANNING CLERK, F/T, Msla. #2976324 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 OFFICE ASSISTANT, P/T, Msla. #2976321 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 QUALITY ASSURANCE ADVISOR, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking a full-time quality assurance advisor for new organization in Missoula. Duties include participating in design of call monitoring format and quality standards, compile & track performance at team levels, oversees & performs call monitoring and provides feedback to manager & site level. Two years of call center

and/or customer service experience preferred. Must have excellent oral, written, and interpersonal communication skills. Salary is dependent on experience. #2976327 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 SECRETARY - CSPD, P/T, Msla. #2976334 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp TIRE TECHNICIAN, F/T, Msla. #2976335 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL PERFORMANCE CONSULTANT, F/T, Msla. #2976328 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Physics Teacher Wanted SpectrUM Discovery Area is hiring a certified science teacher for it’s traveling science program. MosSE (Montana spectrUM Science Experience), the mobile science center of the University of Motana is touring Montana and Idaho in October and November with the popular Motion exhibition. Applicant must be a physics teacher and have experience providing teacher professional development. We’ll be visiting 6-8 sites this fall which span approximately 4-5 weeks, with potential for more opportunities in the future. This is a contracted position with spectrUM Discovery Area and the University of Montana and pays $600/week. Contact Holly Truitt for more details, (406) 243-4323, holly.truitt@mso.umt.edu

SKILLED LABOR SATELLITE INSTALLATION TECHNICIAN, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking full-time satellite installation technicians for Missoula, Great Falls, & Butte area. Duties include installing satellite equipment, running and pulling TV cable, programming and calibrating equipment, plan installations, coordinates installation schedules with customers, and maintains customer rapport. Must be able to lift 75 lbs and climb 40 foot ladders. Requires one year experience in electronics or telecommunications. Pay is a minimum of $9.75 or higher depending on experience. Benefits available. Due to lack of company vehicles, applicants will need to have a vehicle with ladder racks and will be reimbursed for gas and insurance costs. #2976337 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 SMALL ENGINE MECHANIC LEAD, F/T, Msla. #2976332 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION AIRCRAFT MECHANIC apprenticeships. Medical/dental, vacation, raises, $ for school. Great career! HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044 CONSTRUCTION No exp needed. Paid training, good salary & benefits, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800437-6044 FIREFIGHTER Paid training to join elite U.S. Navy team. Good pay, medical/dental, promotions, vacation. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 GOVT JOBS HS grads ages 17-34. Financial security, great benefits, paid training, 30 days vacation/yr, travel. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289 PAID APPRENTICE HS grads ages 17-34. Electronics, engineering, communications, etc. Great benefits. Relocation avail. Call Mon-Fri 800887-0952

By Amy Alkon

TRAINEE Good pay, regular raises, great benefits, $ for school, vacation. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 877-475-6289

HEALTH CAREERS CNA, F/T, Msla. **HIRING AS SOON AS POSSIBLE** #2976319 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT/NURSE P R A C T I T I O N E R , P / T, M s l a . #2976325 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

OPPORTUNTIES HELP WANTED. Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Do you love the Missoula Independent? Are you an enthusiastic, motivated, self-starter? Then we want to talk to you! The Missoula Independent is looking for an Account Executive for magazine, newspaper and online ad sales. Requires strong organization and communication skills. Media sales experience preferred, BUT NOT REQUIRED. Great benefits and work environment.

Send resume and a cover letter SELLING YOURSELF to: pkearns@missoulanews.com or to PO Box 8275, Missoula 59807

BOY MEEKS GIRL Recently, you wrote about “female flirting moves recognized across cultures”—smiling, making eye contact and looking away, toying with hair or objects, and touching a guy’s arm. I disagree about them being “recognized.” Female employers have made eye contact and even smiled, but that didn’t mean they wanted a romantic relationship. If a woman toys with an object, it usually means she’s restless and will soon tell me she has somewhere else to be. As for armtouching, once, when I was on the phone with an auto insurance agent, a receptionist tapped my hand to remind me to mention something. In contrast, when I met my former girlfriend, she grabbed me in such a way that she clearly let me know where I stood with her. Perhaps I’m the only guy missing these signals; then again, I don’t like riddles. I’m too shy to pursue a woman, so unless she makes some big move, we end up going our separate ways. —Dateless A girl practically has to sexually assault you to tell you she’s interested—or, as you put it, “grab” you in such a way that she “clearly” lets you know where you stand. Um…either she wants to be your girlfriend or your urologist? These flirting moves are human universals, meaning women around the world do these things when they’re attracted to a guy; it’s not like women bang pots and pans together in China. They are typically subconscious signals for both the sender and receiver, and a woman will generally send more than one if her desire goes beyond helping you save a bundle on your car insurance. While most men aren’t keeping a running tally of a woman’s flirting moves, humans who aren’t on the autism spectrum have a capacity called “theory of mind.” This is a sort of mind-reading—an ability to guess what’s somebody’s feeling by observing their body language. If some man’s red-faced and flipping you off, you know he probably isn’t longing to buy you a steak dinner. If a woman’s “toying with an object”— say, frantically jiggling the locked doorknob of the supply closet you’re both stuck in—it’s safe to assume she wants to go out, but probably not on a romantic, candlelit date with you. If you can’t hear what a woman’s body language is telling you, it’s probably because the loudest sound in the room is your low opinion of yourself. So, you’re shy.

So are lots of guys. Ask one of them how he got a girlfriend, and you won’t hear “I stayed home complaining bitterly to my cat about being dateless, then this beautiful sweet girl came to my door, asked if I felt shy and resentful, and if so, could she be my girlfriend?” You are free to wait for that rare woman who will grab you like she cares—and wait and wait, because she’ll probably be the lady who’s paid to roll you over at The Home. The more you avoid what you’re afraid of, the more you ingrain avoidance as your personal operating system and datelessness as your lot in life. If you really are signaldeaf, don’t hit on women in your workplace, but hit on women everywhere else. There’s no need to log hair-twirls; there’s just finding a woman attractive and being man enough to chance 10 seconds of feeling foolish if she says no when you ask her out. Remember, dating’s a numbers game. You could be the biggest worm ever to wriggle the planet, but if you try enough women, one of them will eventually be blind enough, drunk enough, or deluded enough to say yes.

APPEASE AND CARATS My fiancé broke off our engagement. The ring was his mother’s. She’s left messages, asking to talk—probably about the ring, which my ex accused me of “hijacking.” That bothers me, as does knowing the ring was never really mine. Friends are telling me to keep it. —Miffed Think of the ring like the toilet in your apartment—something that’s all yours, but not to take with you as a keepsake when you move on. Because it’s jewelry, it seems like a gift, but it’s really a symbol of the marriage to come. If nothing’s to come, the ring should come off and find its way back to its original owner. Yeah, your fiance was a jerk. And it’s tempting, when people are jerks, to jerk back—which means letting who you are be dictated by others instead of living by your own standards. If you’re just looking to keep the thing, be honest about it. Otherwise, maybe be glad you’re only removing a ring, not looking for a tattoo artist who does decent enough cat and mouse heads to turn “Tom and Kerry Forever” into “Tom and Jerry Forever.” Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r Av e , # 28 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

Missoula Independent page 45 September 24–October 1, 2009


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

EMPLOYMENT

By Rob Brezsny

Frustrated with your job search?

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Jonathan Lee Riches is renowned for filing numerous lawsuits in U.S courts. Some of his targets are actual living people, like Martha Stewart, George W. Bush, and Steve Jobs. But he has also gone after defendants like Nostradamus, Che Guevara, the Eiffel Tower, the ex-planet Pluto, the Holy Grail, the Appalachian Trail, and the Garden of Eden. This would be a good time for you to draw inspiration from his example. I don’t mean that you should become a litigious fanatic, but rather that you should seek redress and vindication from those people, places, and things that have not had your highest interests in mind. This could take the form of a humorous message, a compassionate prank, or an odd gift. Remember, too, that old saying: Success is the best revenge.

They didn’t rate us the #1 Employment Agency for nothing!

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): This would be an excellent time for you to learn how to brew your own beer (tinyurl.com/zteca) or build your own telescope (tinyurl.com/2yert5) or teach yourself how to operate a forklift (tinyurl.com/lgoyk5). Your ability to master practical new skills is at a peak, and your need to develop more self-reliance is more pressing than usual. Once you raise your confidence levels, you might even move on to more challenging tasks, like concocting your own home-made flu shot (tinyurl.com/kmchwx) or reconfiguring the way your brain works (tinyurl.com/lxhuap or tinyurl.com/ns5vhv).

Let’s prove it to you!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Novelist James Patterson has signed a deal with a publisher to churn out 17 new books between now and the end of 2012. (By comparison, it took me six years to write my first book, nine years to write my second, and five years for my third.) According to my reading of the astrological omens, you Geminis will have James Patterson-like levels of fecundity for at least the next four weeks. I suggest you employ that good mojo to create a masterpiece or two.



CANCER (June 21-July 22): As I gaze out the window of my home office, I see a vast wetland crossed by a creek that originates in the bay. At high tide, the creek is as wide as a river. At low tide, it’s as narrow as a village street. Sometimes it flows north vigorously, while at other times it surges south with equal force. Now and then it’s perfectly still. Its hues are a constantly mutating blend of grey, green, blue, and brown, and at sundown and sunrise they’re joined by tinges of pink, purple, and orange. As a Cancerian, I find this intimate spectacle to be both comforting and invigorating. It’s a reflection of my own ever-shifting moods, a reminder that I’m a watery creature whose fluidic changeability is natural and healthy. What I wish for you, my fellow Crab, is that in the coming week you will also surround yourself with prompts that help you to be at peace with who you really are.



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What exactly is a “wild goose chase,” anyway? Does it refer to a frenetic and futile hunt for an elusive prey that’s never caught? Or might it also mean the meandering pursuit of a tricky quarry that after many convoluted twists and turns results in success and generates a lot of educational fun along the way? Either definition could apply to your wild goose chase in the next three weeks, Leo. Which one will ultimately win out will probably depend on two things: 1. how well you detect the false leads you get; 2. how determined you are to be amused rather than frustrated by all the twists and turns.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your time is up, Virgo. No further stalling will be allowed. We need your answer now: Will you or will you not take advantage of the messy but useful offer that is on the table? Don’t ask for an extension, because you ain’t getting one. Please take advantage of this chance to prove that you love yourself too much to get hoodwinked and abused by perfectionism. Be brave enough to declare your allegiance to the perspective articulated by the mathematician Henri Poincaré: “There are no solved problems. There are only more-or-less solved problems.”



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): This is an excellent time to celebrate the pleasures of emptiness…to extol the virtues of the blank slate…to be open to endless possibilities but committed to none…to bask in the freedom of not having to be anything, anyone, or anywhere. Are you smart enough to need no motto to live by? Are you resourceful enough to rely on nothing but the raw truth of the present moment? If so, you will thrive in the coming days.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): During the dialog about health care in the U.S., certain highly relevant facts are never discussed. For example, it’s ludicrous for right-wingers to fear that a government-run health system would freshly infect our capitalist system with the stain of socialism. The truth is, America has long had the biggest socialist enterprise in the world: its sprawling military establishment, which is completely paid for by taxpayer dollars and run by the government! Another unacknowledged fact is this: The single smartest strategy for financing universal health care (as well as dramatically improving the economy) would be to reduce military expenditures. Americans don’t seem to realize that their monstrously huge military empire is a case of supreme overkill: It girdles the globe in ways that are unprecedented in the history of civilization. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, to illustrate the way that a seemingly serious discussion can be thrown off course and rendered unproductive when it ignores critical information. Please make sure nothing like that happens in your personal sphere in the coming weeks.

www.employmissoula.com 728-7060

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Achieve optimum health with footbased meridian therapy. 459-3035 Audrey S. Romine Certified Zone Therapist

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CASH 4 CLUNKERS waxing special

Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

Dr. Christine White, ND 542-2147 • 521 S 2nd www.BlackBearNaturopaths.com

B o d y C a re By Michelle Waxing • Facials Massage $45/hr P R O F E S S I O N A L S E RV I C E S O N LY

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In the coming weeks, your medicinal effect and your power to incite change will be peaking simultaneously. You may heal people by shaking their certainties or you may scare people as you motivate them to shed their lazy approaches. You could be a stringently benevolent force or a disruptive fixer of broken things. My only advice for you is to work hard to stay humble. The potency of your influence might tempt you to get full of yourself, and that would undermine the beauty of your impact.

We Trade Accepted

406-270-3230



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I’m embarrassed to confess that when I’m shopping for an herbal supplement I’ve never bought before, my choice is unduly influenced by how much I like the packaging. For example, I might opt for the brassy orange and white bottle with bold black lettering over the brand with the washed-out blue-green color scheme and delicate purple font. I hope you won’t fall victim to any version of my folly, Capricorn. It’s especially important that you make your decisions based on a piercing analysis of the inner contents, not a superficial survey of the outer display.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Study the following facts to derive oracular clues about your upcoming destiny. 1) Some bacteria are inimical to human beings, but others are friendly, like the creatures that inhabit your intestine and help you digest the food you eat. 2) There are snakes whose venom is poisonous in large doses but healing in small amounts. 3) The term “demon” is derived from the ancient Greek term “daimon,” which referred not to an evil supernatural being but to a benevolent guardian spirit that conferred blessings on a person.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): On the website “Yahoo! Answers,” readers pose questions that are answered by other readers who have expertise on the subject. In a recent entry, a young woman asked, “Is there a spell to become a mermaid that actually works?” Of the 50+ replies, most are snarky and mean, ridiculing the asker of the question, and not a single one gives useful information. I encourage you to offer your own insight on the subject sometime soon. (Go to tinyurl.com/mdclt4.) You are now at the peak of your ability to act, think, feel, love, and dream like a mythical sea creature.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Affordable • Quality • Personal • Check-ups • Same Day Appt's • Bio-Identical Hormones • Medical Weight loss

541-8090 We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington Corner of Bow & Kensington

rivercityfamilyhealth.com Missoula Independent Page 46 September 24–October 1, 2009

We make it personal

Local Medical Cannabis Certifications

Call for appointment 541- 8092 742 Kensington (intersection of Kensington & Bow)


AUTOMOTIVE

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 543-2220

Go to CarlaGreenMassage.com. 15 minutes free when you intake, pay and schedule online @ CarlaGreenMassage.com 406-360-8746

BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103

LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 http://astrologymontana. webs.com Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org)

inquir y facilitated by Susie 406-543-2220 M o n t a n a P a i n Management A Missoulabased company offering relief resources with full range cannabis therapeutics. 9 medicinal cannabis s t r a i n s AVA I L A B L E N O W . (406) 529-2980 Professional in-home/on-location massage therapy. 18 years experience. Deep Swedish

Massage, Sports Massage, and Therapeutic Aromatherapy Massage. Danielle Packard, CMT 274-3221.

Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins

CRUISEGENERAL

MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark- (406) 728-2629

Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090

We need your trucks and SUV’s. Buy, Sell, Consignment. Russell S t r e e t B r i d g e . w w w. m i s soulacarandtruck.com 543-6600 Turner’s Missoula Car & Truck

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 493-0025

IMPORTS

Phoenix Tarot Find answers from the knowledge of times past. 546-5767

2008 HYUNDAI ELANTRA SE OPTIONS WARRANTY 5SPD MANUAL 23K HIGHWAY MILES GRAY/BLACK $12000 #330-4174628

MARKETPLACE AUCTIONS

PETS & ANIMALS

Auction: Wednesday 9/30/09 @ 5:15 p.m., Health Dept., 301 W. A l d e r, s e c o n d f l o o r. Approximately 35 HP desktop computers, various speeds w/monitor, keyboard, mouse, windows OS. Misc peripherals. Contact Jim Carlson @ 258-4996. Cash or check only.

Mini Horse & Animal items Halters, harnesses, leads. 16 gal., 20 qt., & 8 qt. heated buckets. Tank deicers. 20 Goldfoot dlx elec. fence posts, braid & wire. 2 fence feeders. 32 oz. pet water bottles. Misc. small items. 728-8429.

WANTED TO BUY CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794

The Sports Exchange

USED BIKES 4 SALE Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments 111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056

COMPUTERS Brand New Laptops & Desktops. Bad Credit, No Credit – No Problem Small Weekly Payments Order Today and get FREE Nintendo WII game system! 800816-2232

Crystal Limit 3 DAY SALE OCT 9, 10 & 11 1920 Brooks • 549-1729 crystallimit.com

Brand New Laptops & Desktops. Bad Credit, No Credit – No Problem Small Weekly Payments Order Today and get FREE Nintendo WII game system! Call Now – 800-840-5439 Even Macs are computers! Need help with yours? CLARKE CONSULTING @ 549-6214 RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. L a p t o p s $ 1 9 5 . 1 3 3 7 We s t Broadway. 543-8287.

MUSIC ACCESS MUSIC. MUSICIANS BAILOUT SALE! GUITARS, AMPS, MANDOLINS ALL ON SALE!

Puddin's Place

Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington (next to Baskin Robbins)

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

ACCESSORIES UP TO 50% OFF! STRINGS 50% OFF! 728-5014. CORNER OF 3RD & ORANGE. 406-728-5014. accessguitar.com

406-239-1949 for more info or to make arrangemnts to see this camera and included accessories.

All strings are 1/2 off EVERY WEDNESDAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM

MISC. GOODS

Drumheads are 35% off EVERY DAY at Electronic Sound & Percussion. Located on the Hip Strip at 819 S Higgins. ESPMUSIC.COM

ELECTRONICS Nikon Coolpix 5700 $250 Digital Camera with a brand new CCD Image sensor in great condition. Call Steve @

36 INCH PAULSBO 4 HARNESS LOOM. String heddles, reeds, shuttles, bench, and warping reel. $400. 961-5165 Misc. Household items Dark wood desk, hexagon end tables w/cupboard, fireplace tool set, Holmes humidifier, Digital quartz synthesizer stereo receiver, hanging baskets, 30” flower boxes, 3’ & 4’ kitchen countertops, SS double sink, elec. boxes & wiring, and archery tree stand. Contact 728-8429.

1997 infiniti j30 $4200 1997 RWD, v6 automatic transmission, pearl cream. car comes loaded with air conditioning, sun roof, tinted power windows, power/heated front seats, leather interior, Bose cd/tape/am fm stereo system. comes with car cover and two studded tires. 119,000 miles. for more information 646 232 0431 (cell) 2000 SUBARU OUTBACK LIMITED EDITION. Leather, dual moonroofs, 118K miles. AWD, great mileage. Excellent condition. $7995/OBO. Call 406-885-3925

4X4 2003 Chevy S-10 Crew Cab White, clean, runs great, 125,000 miles, $6000. OBO call 549-0289

SPORT UTILITY 2002 Subaru Outback Dark Red, Automatic, AC, cruise, power windows/locks, 136k. Newer tires, recent tune up, timing belt replaced this spring. 25 mpg. Great condition inside and out. $7000. 406-550-2852

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus & All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300

QUALITY WORKMANSHIP "GUARANTEED"

A Touch of Class NEW TO YOU

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95

Antiques & Treasures 11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

4 Wheel Alignment

New Arrivals!

1414 Montana St. 406-728-3144

Outlaw Music MISSOULA’S new go-to place for CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE. North Reserve Business Complex (Behind Johnny Carino's) unit k3 406.542.1202

Carlo's One Bathing Night Stand Beauties Costume Rental ies r o s s e Acc Wigs 109 S. 3rd W. • 543-6350 12-6 • M-Sat • On the Hip Strip

541-7533

Specializing in Stringed Instruments

724 Burlington Ave. Open Mon. 12pm-5pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm

Shop. Donate. Make a Difference.

Custom PUBLIC NOTICES Fly Rods 543-0176

Beads Missoula

10-6 • 543-0018

PUBLIC NOTICE

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214

1. Part 1 Zoning District Amendment Request Part 1 Zoning Districts 4, 10, 12A, 32, & 36 A request to amend Resolution 81-132 to permit home occupations in Part 1 Zoning Districts 4, 10, 12A, 32, and 36 (see Map Q), subject to the existing standards outlined in Resolution 81-132. These home occupation standards currently apply to all other existing Part 1 Zoning Districts.

215 e main • missoula, mt • 541-6110 8:30am - 5:30pm weekdays 11am - 2pm Saturday

LDR Kennel

Furniture, Tapestries, Books, Household Goods, Etc. 1358 1/2 W. Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

Chapter 13 & other options

The Planning & Zoning Commission will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Wednesday, October 14, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of the County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Broadway in Missoula, Montana.

The Multi Item Store 25% OFF Through Oct. 31

Stop Foreclosure

rodsbyjay@gmail.com

501 S. Higgins Ave.

Open Every Day

Missoula County Government

Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657.

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

Daniel Morgan Andrew Pierce 433 W. Alder • 830-3875

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owning delinquent storage rent for the following units: 74, 361, 370, 477, 481, 568, 632, and 633 Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods including office furniture, desks, baby strollers, car storage carrier, office phone system, boxes & boxes of old rare book collections, file cabinets, TV & stereos. These units may be Monday, viewed starting September 28, 2009 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 uesday, September 29, prior to Tu 2009, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

Missoula Independent Page 47 September 24–October 1, 2009


PUBLIC NOTICES Missoula County Government The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, October 6, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Subdivision Request – Long Addition No. 2 A request from Jack Long, represented by WGM Group, Inc., to subdivide a 35.78 acre parcel into 17 commercial/light industrial lots. The property is located in the Wye vicinity, south of Highway 10 West and on both sides of Alita Drive. The property is legally described as TR A3 COS 4048 & Portions A & B of Long Addition Less R/W in N _ 28-14-20; TR A2 COS 4021 in E _ NE _ NW _, P.M.M. (see Map N). The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on this subdivision at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 21, 2009, in Room 201 of the County Courthouse at 200 West Broadway in Missoula. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The request is available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. TO BE PUBLISHED September 17 & September 24, 2009 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION. The Office of Planning and Grants has received a floodplain application from Mr. Ken Wickman to work within the Clark Fork River floodplain. The project is located at 19875 MiCasa, Tract 5C of COS3493 near Frenchtown in Sectiion 32 Township 15N Range 21W and includes the replacement of an existing manufactured home with a stickframe home. The primary purpose of the Floodplain Development Permits is to promote the public health, safety and general welfare, to minimize flood losses in areas subject to flood hazards and to promote wise us of the floodplain. Copies of the full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application #10-01 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., October 16, 2009. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 2584841 for more information MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Evaro/Finley-O’Keefe Creek Community Council Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the proposed Evaro/Finley-O’Keefe Creek Community Council are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009 /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Seeley Lake County Sewer District Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009.. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on

Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot.. All active and inactive electors of the Seeley Lake County Sewer District are entitled to vote at said election.. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Municipal Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors of the City of Missoula are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION Notice is hereby given that regular* registration for the Seeley Lake Resort Area Election to be held on November 3, 2009, will close at 5:00 p.m., on October 5, 2009. *NOTE: If you miss this regular registration deadline, you may still register for the election by showing up at the county election center up to and including on Election Day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you can drop off a late voter registration card, but you will need to return to the local election center on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. All active and inactive electors

of the proposed Seeley Lake Resort Area District are entitled to vote at said election. Persons who wish to register and who are not presently registered may do so by requesting a form for registration by mail or by appearing before the County Election Administrator. Inactive electors may reactivate by appearing at the county election center in order to vote, by requesting an absentee ballot in any election, or by notifying the County Election Administrator in writing of the elector’s current residence in the county. If you have moved, please have your registration transferred to your present address. DATED this 25th day of August, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on November 3, 2009 a mail ballot election will be held for the election of creating a Seeley Lake Resort Area District.. The drop off locations will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on Election Day. The drop off locations are: Cold Springs School Courthouse (Election Office) Fairgrounds Election Center Hellgate School Lowell School Paxson School Rattlesnake School Russell School Seeley Lake School DATED this 8th day of September, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF ELECTION Notice is hereby given that on November 3, 2009 a mail ballot election will be held for the election of creating an Evaro/Finley-O’Keefe Creek Community Council. The drop off locations will be open at 7:00 a.m., and continue to be open until 8:00 p.m., on Election Day. The drop off locations are: Cold Springs School Courthouse (Election Office) Fairgrounds Election Center Hellgate School Lowell School Paxson School Rattlesnake School Russell School Seeley Lake School DATED this 8th day of September, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Election Administrator Missoula County By Debbe Merseal, Chief Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ANNEXATION TO MISSOULA RURAL FIRE DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that a public hearing will be held on the 30th day of September, 2009 beginning at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, on a petition for annexation into the Missoula Rural Fire District for the following area: SUID: 3726309 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: MACKINTOSH MANOR LOTS, LOTS 16A, 40A, 41A, 42 AND 43. LOT 41A LOCATED AT: SE _ SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 11 N, RANGE 20 W PROPERTY ADDRESS: NOT ASSIGNED SUID: 3726203 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: MACKINTOSH MANOR LOT 40A-1 LOCATED AT: SE _ & SW _ SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 11 N, RANGE 20 W PROPERTY ADDRESS: NOT ASSIGNED (For complete legal descriptions, see map on file in the Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 200 West Broadway, 2nd Floor.) AND THAT all interested persons should appear at the above mentioned time and place to be heard for or against said petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioner’s Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse Annex, Missoula, Montana 59802, prior to the hearing day. BY ORDER of the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County, Montana. Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder/ Elections 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3241 Date: September 4, 2009 MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pine Street (Seeley Lake, MT) Parking Restrictions The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on a resolution to declare Pine Street in Seeley Lake, Montana a no parking zone and direct the Public Works Department to sign it accordingly. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing on September 30, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of the County Courthouse, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway,

Missoula Independent Page 48 September 24–October 1, 2009

Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 721-4043. Additional information on the hearing including a copy of the proposed resolution may be obtained from Gregory Robertson, Director of Public Works at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 or by calling (406) 258-4818. DATED THIS 8th DAY OF September, 2009 /s/ Bill Carey, Chairman Board of County Commissioners MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO APPROVE DESIGNATION OF MISSOULA COUNTY AS A RECOVERY ZONE FOR PURPOSES OF THE AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County (the “County”) has passed a Resolution of Intention (the “Resolution”) to designate the County as a “recovery zone” for purposes of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (“ARRA”). The County will hold a public hearing on such designation on Wednesday, September 30, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 West Broadway, 2nd Floor, Room 201, Missoula, Montana. Any interested persons may appear and will be heard or may file written comments with the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer prior to the hearing. Pursuant to ARRA, the County has received an allocation of authority to issue certain tax exempt and tax credit financing bonds to help finance public and private projects within the County. These Recovery Zone Bonds may be issued by the County or the County may reallocate its authority to issue these bonds to other qualified jurisdictions within the County in order to finance projects. The County must designate such a recovery zone by October 1, 2009 or it will be deemed to have waived its allocation of such authority. Copies of the Resolution are on file in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer. For further information on the action to be taken, contact Dale Bickell Chief Administrative Officer or Andrew Czorny, Chief Financial Officer, Missoula County, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, 406-7215700. Dated: September 17, 2009. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA Vicki M. Zeier, County Clerk and Recorder/Treasurer By, /s/ Verna Lemer, Deputy Clerk and Recorder MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) FOR Professional Engineering Services for Groundwater Study and Development of Preliminary Engineering Report for the Wye Area Regional Water System Notice to Engineering Consultants: Missoula County has been awarded a Renewable Resource Project Planning Grant from the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) in the amount of $20,000 for a groundwater study and assistance in preparing a Preliminary Engineering Report (PER) for the development of the Missoula County Wye Area Regional Water System. Qualifications and Proposals are to be submitted to Missoula County Public Works at the address below no later than Monday, October 26, 2009 by 4:00 PM Mountain Time. Proposals shall be clearly marked Consultant’s Proposal for Engineering Services for Wye Area Regional Water System Project. Contingent upon this award, the Missoula County Board of Commissioners is soliciting qualifications and proposals for engineering and grant management services to assist the County in the development and administration of this project in compliance with all applicable requirements under the Montana DNRC Renewable Resource Planning Grant program. Payment terms will be negotiated with the selected respondent. The fee for engineering services will be paid with Grant funds. Development of the PER, per the Grant Agreement, is scheduled for completion by December 31, 2010. Project Background: The project is located in the Wye Area near the intersection of Highways 93 and I-90 approximately nine miles northwest of the City of Missoula. In response to potable water supply and distribution needs Missoula County elected to review the current water systems serving both commercial and residential developments in the area and evaluate the needs, alternatives and associated cost of developing a regional water system to serve the area. Scope of Consultant Services: The firm selected for this project will

be required to perform the following activities: 1. Conduct a groundwater study to consist of : reviewing existing wells within the design area; reviewing existing well logs and groundwater reports; and potential drilling and monitoring of test wells as necessary to determine the availability of water and the impacts the project may have on Missoula’s solesource aquifer. 2. Identify all possible alternatives for providing a regional water system to the Wye Area. 3. Correspond with state and federal agencies regarding impacts of the project. 4. Analyze viable alternatives for providing a regional water system to the Wye Area. 5. Prepare a Preliminary Engineering Report (PER), along with supplemental materials, meeting the requirements of the most current edition of the Uniform Application for Montana Public Facility Projects. Committee Selection and Evaluation Criteria: Selection of the consultant will be made by a three to five person team selected by the Missoula County Public Works Director. If needed, questions may be directed to respondents to clarify proposals. Respondents will be evaluated according to the following factors with a maximum of 100 points possible: 1. Professional qualifications, past performance and references: 0 30 Points 2. Ability to meet schedule : 0 - 35 Points 3. Experience and familiarity with groundwater studies and water system design: 0 - 25 Points 4. Familiarity and availability to project: 0 - 10 Points Submission Instructions: Five copies of consultant’s written proposal shall be submitted to the Missoula County Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 on or before 4:00 p.m. Mountain Time, on Monday, October 26, 2009. Envelopes shall be clearly marked “Consultant’s Proposal for Engineering Services for Wye Area Regional Water System Project”. Award will be made to the most qualified consultant whose proposal is deemed most advantageous to Missoula County, all factors considered. Unsuccessful respondents will be notified in writing as soon as possible. This solicitation is being offered in accordance with state statutes governing procurement of professional services. Accordingly, Missoula County reserves the right to negotiate an agreement for each project, some projects or all projects based on fair and reasonable compensation for the scope of work and services proposed, as well as the right to reject any and all responses deemed unqualified, unsatisfactory or inappropriate. Questions should be directed to: Gregory H. Robertson, P.E., AICP Director of Public Works Phone: (406) 258-4818 Email: groberts@co.missoula.mt.us MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause Probate No. DP09-156 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MELVIN G. LONG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice of said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Cindy J. Long, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, Montana 59807-9197, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 18th day of September, 2009. /s/ Cindy J. Long, Personal Representative, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, MT 59807-9197 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause No. DP-09-154 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ARLIN BURNISS ANGELSTAD, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Kim L. Angelstad, at St. Peter Law Offices, P.C., 2620 Radio Way, PO Box 17255, Missoula, MT 59808, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 11th day of September, 2009. /s/ Kim L. Angelstad, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No 4 Probate No. DP-09-153 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KARL J. KELLNER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Judith C. Kendall, certified mail, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 11th day of September, 2009. /s/ Judith C. Kendall, 2524 Highwood Drive, Missoula, MT 59803

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-157 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF MICHEL McGUIRE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Anneke Hilvert, the Personal Reprsentative, return receipt requested, c/o Doreen D. Antenor, Attorney at Law, 415 North Higgins, Suite 7, PO Box 8597, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 15th day of September, 2009. /s/ Anneke Hilvert, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Cause No. DP-09-133 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE: The Estate of Eddie R. Williams, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Patricia Davenport, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at c/o Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades, P.C., 1821 South Avenue West, Third Floor, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court, DATED this 9th day of September, 2009. /s/ Patricia Davenport, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-09-146 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CARL RALPH WIZEMANN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Linda Young, the Special Administrator, return receipt requested, in care of THIEL LAW OFFICE, PLLC, 315 West Pine, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 2nd day of September, 2009. /s/ Matthew Thiel, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-09-150 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CHARLES ALAN WIEDERSPAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Holly Beaudry, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of THIEL LAW OFFICE, PLLC, 315 West Pine, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 1st day of September, 2009. /s/ Matthew B. Thiel, Attorney for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-09-142 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF TIMOTHY GERALD ELDRIDGE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Gayle Morrison, the personal representative, return receipt requested, at O’Connell Law Office, PLLjC, Philip J. O’Connell, Attorney, PO Box 8515, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court, DATED this 13th day of August, 2009. /s/ Gayle Morrison, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-09-151 Judge: Harkin NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT E. SULLIVAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to MAUREEN P. DOUGHERTY, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Crowley Fleck Law Firm, PO Box 797, Helena, MT 599624-0797, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated September 2, 2009. /s/ Maureen P. Dougherty, Personal Representative c/o Daniel N. McLean, PO Box 797, Helena, MT 59624-0797 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/12/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200512053, Bk 752, Pg 1354, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Carolyn E. Honn, and spouse if any was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: That portion of Lots 15 and 16 of Block 13, of Low’s Addition to Missoula, Montana, according to the official plat thereof on file and of record in

the office of the County Clerk and Recorder of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a point on the South boundary line of Lot 16 which is 38 feet West from the Southeast corner of said Lot 16; continuing along the South boundary line of Lot 16 and Lot 15, a distance of 42 feet, more or less, to the Southwest corner of Lot 15; running thence North along the West boundary line of Lot 15, a distance of 130 feet, more or less, to the Northwest corner of said Lot; running thence Easterly along the North boundary line of Lot 15, a distance of 31 feet 6 inches to a point; thence South and parallel to the West boundary line of Lot 16, a distance of 25 feet; thence East at right angles a distance of 10 feet 6 inches; thence South and parallel to the West boundary line of Lot 16, a distance of 105 feet, more or less to the place of beginning. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for Structured Asset Securities Corporation Trust 2005-WF3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 20, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $145,459.39. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $138,668.91, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on November 30, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.05853) 1002.130232-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/12/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200508822, Book 750, Page 1455, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which J. Terry Amble and Diann R. Amble was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 12 in Phase II of Crestview Heights Phase II, III and IV, a platted subdivision in the City of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200827436, Bk 830, Pg 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the holders of Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc., AssetBacked Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-WF2. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 24, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $275,051.01. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $257,588.68, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 3, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made


PUBLIC NOTICES strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19163) 1002.105664-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/19/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200730329, Book 809, Page 230, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Pamela Stanford, a married person and Joseph Stanford, as Joint Tenants was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 in Sun Mountain Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200828038; B:831, P:227, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for WFMBS 2008-AR1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of July 30, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $702,701.72. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $644,528.75, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 9, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19348) 1002.106432-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/05/99, recorded as Instrument No. 199921847 Bk. 592, Pg. 869, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Richard T. Nelson, a single man, and Carla Asbury, a single woman was Grantor, North American Mortgage Company was Beneficiary and Title Services, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 in Block 2 of Canyon View Subdivision, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200704350 Bk. 792, Pg. 625, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 4, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $95,620.82. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $92,326.47, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula

County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 11, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06096) 1002.130910-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200725637, Bk. 806, Pg. 790 and re-recorded on October 25, 2007 as Instrument No. 200728089, Bk. 807, Pg. 1449, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kristin D. Marshall, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: Tract 5A-2A of Certificate of Survey No. 2582, located in the W 1/2 of Section 27, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Parcel II: A 60’ right-of-way for roadway purposes and for the installation and maintenance of utilities over the 60’ private road and public utility easement shown on Certificate of Survey No. 1155, which extends from the above-described real property to the county road. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 3, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $373,074.97. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $356,238.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 11, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.05994) 1002.130901-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/12/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200308773, Bk. 701, Pg. 551, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Laramie D. Loewen, an unmarried person was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. dba Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and First American Title Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: The West 10 feet of Lot 11, all of Lots 12, 13, 14 and the East 25 feet of Lot 15 in Block 66 of Car Line Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Recording Reference: Book 199 of Micro Records at Page 2284. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly

installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of August 10, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $203,929.13. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $198,274.88, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on December 18, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06305) 1002.131339-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 2, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 62 of Grantland 10, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Less and excepting therefrom Certificate of Survey No. 1031. Joann Higginbotham, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Fidelity Nation Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 22, 2005 and Recorded on June 27, 2005 under Document #200515738 in Bk754, Pg-2043. The beneficial interest is currently held by Waterfall Victoria Master Fund Limited (WVMFL).. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,810.95, beginning October 1, 2006, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 8, 2009 is $256,438.69 principal, interest at the rate of 8.625% now totaling $63,668.47, late charges in the amount of $1,020.52, escrow advances of $11,280.67, suspense balance of $ and other fees and expenses advanced of $170.46, plus accruing interest at the rate of $60.60 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby {including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 24, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On June 24, 2009, before me, a notary public in

and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Miranda Marx Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 05/05/2015 ASAP# 3246337 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009, 09/24/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 30, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 10 in Block 31 of Knowles addition, a platted subdivision in the city of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof John Sherman Geesen, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Pinnacle Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 26, 2006 and recorded on August 7, 2006 in Book 780, Page 705, under Document No 200619813. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank Nat’l Trust Co, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-10. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,515.00, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 8, 2009 is $259,735.14 principal, interest at the rate of 11.050% now totaling $10,117.35, late charges in the amount of $905.40, escrow advances of $8,441.65, and other fees and expenses advanced of $73.05, plus accruing interest at the rate of $78.63 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 20, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On July 20, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3270075 09/24/2009, 10/01/2009, 10/08/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 8 of Hidden Hills, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Richard Sales and Rene Sales, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services of Missoula, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 24, 2004 and Recorded on March 29, 2004 under Document # 200408179 in Bk-728, Pg1369. The beneficial interest is currently held by The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank, as trustee for the benefit of the Certificate holders of Equity One ABS, Inc. Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2004-3. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,347.78, beginning March 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of July 15, 2009 is $152,982.22 principal, interest at the rate of 9.625% now totaling $6,183.68, late charges in the amount of $735.95, escrow advances of $2,711.79, and other fees and expenses advanced of $401.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $40.34 per diem,

late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 29, 2009 Charles J Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On June 29, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3248869 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009, 09/24/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 9, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SE1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS TRACT 43B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4784. TOGETHER WITH ROAD EASEMENT ACROSS TRACT 43A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4784. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 23560 WAPITI ROAD HUSON, MT 59846 Michael Cratty married to Monique Cratty, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Ameriquest Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 23, 2005 and recorded October 4, 2005 as document number 200526197 in book 761, page 967. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee in trust for the benefit of the Certificateholders for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Trust 2005-R10, Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-R10. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $3,032.07, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of is $384,978.39 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25000% now totaling $19,034.72, late charges in the amount of $1,182.16, escrow advances of $2,544.17, suspense balance of $69,967.85 and other fees and expenses advanced of $356.20, plus accruing interest at the rate of $65.92 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors, if such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then

due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: June 30, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On June 30, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steel Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3249180 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009, 09/24/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on November 9, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 3 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2719, A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF SECTION 12 AND THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 23 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. 1994 CHAMPTION HOME BUILDERS HUD SERIAL #IDA 135337 AND #IDA 135338 CERTIFICATION LABEL #16-94-894-1885 Cynthia A. Korpi and Ernest L Maner, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 27, 2005 and Recorded August 01, 2005 at 11:49 o’clock a.m. in Book 757, Page 447, under Document Number 200519567. The beneficial interest is currently held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $831.36, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of June 24, 2009 is $73,055.77 principal, interest at the rate of 5.375% now totaling $2,865.28, late charges in the amount of $385.32, escrow advances of $909.53, suspense balance of $-250.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $94.90, plus accruing interest at the rate of $10.76 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July 2, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On July 2, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledge to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2010 ASAP# 3252483 09/10/2009, 09/17/2009, 09/24/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on January 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lots 12, 13,

14, 15 and 16 of Block 87, CARLINE ADDITION, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the recorded plat thereof. Linda Kooren, as Grantor, conveyed the real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Dean Gingerich, as Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture recorded April 3, 2007, in Book 794 of Micro, Page 1087, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. A Substitution of Trustee designating Kevin S. Jones as Successor Trustee was recorded September 9, 2009, in Book 847, Page 189, Document No. 200922143, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, his option of declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $268,919.56, plus interest at a rate of 12% totaling $24,054.46, plus late fees of $2,160.00, and escrow fees of $156.00, for a total amount due of $295,290.02, as of September 15,2009, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the abovedescribed property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the property described above in accordance with the terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 17th day of September, 2009. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula). On this 17th day of September, 2009, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at: Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013 SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for the construction of St. Regis Wastewater Treatment Facility Maintenance Building, as described in the Project Manual, will be received by the ST. REGIS SEWER DISTRICT, ST. REGIS, MONTANA at the office of the ENGINEER, 3011 Palmer St., Missoula, Montana, 59808, until 3:00 P.M. local time on October 2, 2009, and then publicly opened and read aloud. Late bids will be returned unopened. Each bid shall be submitted in a sealed envelope. The envelope shall be clearly marked as follows: “BID PROPOSAL” “ST. REGIS WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY MAINTENANCE BUILDING” “ST. REGIS SEWER DISTRICT” This project consists of, but is not necessarily limited to, the following major items: Construction of a 20 foot by 30 foot masonry maintenance building. The Project Manual (Contract Documents) may be purchased from the office of Morrison-Maierle, Inc., 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, MT, telephone 406 542 8880. The cost is $50 each, including delivery by US Postal Service mail or United Parcel Service (UPS) ground service. Payment of an additional $20 is required for express mail. After award of the contract, the successful Bidder will be furnished five Project Manuals free of charge.The Project Manual may be examined at the following locations: Offices of the consulting engineer, Morrison-Maierle, Inc., at: 3011 Palmer Street, Missoula, MT; or at plan exchanges in Great Falls, Billings, Dodge-ScanBoise, Kalispell, Missoula, and Montana Contractors Association, Helena. Each bid must be accompanied by a Certified Check, Cashier’s Check, or Bid Bond payable to the St. Regis Sewer District, Montana, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total bid amount. The successful BIDDER shall furnish approved Performance and Payment Bonds, each in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the contract amount. Workmen’s Compensation, Comprehensive General Liability, and insurance certificates shall be provided by the successful Bidder. This project is funded in part through the American Recovery and Resource Act of 2009 and shall be required to follow the certification and reporting requirements of the Act. The St. Regis Sewer District is an equal opportunity employer and the successful bidder shall comply with the EEO requirements within the project manual. Information, as required in Section 00200 Instructions to Bidders, Article 4, shall be submitted with the bid for review and evaluation by the Engineer and Owner. No bid may be withdrawn within a period of 60 days after the bid opening date. A pre-Bid conference will be held at the St. Regis Community Center at 10:00 A.M. local time on September 24th , 2009. Bidders are not required, but strongly encouraged to attend the conference. Topics will include the project ARRA Buy American and new DBE bidding requirements. Before a contract will be awarded, the District may conduct investigations to determine the performance record and ability of the apparent low Bidder to perform the size and type of material specified. Upon request, the Bidder shall submit information as deemed necessary by the District to evaluate the Bidder’s qualifications. The District reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to determine which bid is, in the District’s judgment, the lowest responsible bid. The District also reserves the right to waive any informalities, irregularities, or minor deviations in any bid and to delete certain items listed in the bid. A detailed listing of bid items and contractual specifications are described in the Project Manual. Published this 17th day of September, 2009. St. Regis Sewer District P.O. Box 184 St. Regis, MT 59868 PUBLICATION NOTICE DATES: Missoula Independent, Missoula, MT September 17, 2009 and September 24, 2009

Missoula Independent Page 49 September 24–October 1, 2009


JONESIN’

C r o s s w o r d s

"Remember the Date"–we'll make it three times as easy for you.

by Matt Jones

RENTALS PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

Join the Montana Landlord's Association 10 chapters in Montana!

ACROSS

DOWN

1 "This is only a test" grp. 4 Mission that figured into "Pee-wee's Big Adventure" 9 "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" author's monogram 12 Captain Hook's helper 13 More urgent 14 Radiohead lead singer Yorke 16 Israeli statesman Abba 17 1996 Madonna musical 18 ___ Six (Louisiana group who was the focus of 2007 rallies) 19 Commedia dell'___ 20 Word after Pink or black 21 Punch-to-the-solar-plexus noises 22 Limestone, mostly 24 Panama, for one 26 Arctic, for one 27 Pacer maker 29 ___ a customer 30 Director Anderson 31 Electromagnetic physicist Michael 34 Former San Francisco Giant Robb 35 There's no helping it 37 At no cost 40 "If Democrats Had Any Brains, ___ Be Republicans" (Ann Coulter book) 41 Ingredient in many soaps 45 ___ Me (Requiem Mass movement) 47 "You got that right" 49 Conjure up 50 Sudoku component 53 Sean of "The Goonies" 54 "You Will Be My ___ True Love" (song from "Cold Mountain") 55 In a smooth way 58 "___ recherche du temps perdu" (Proust work) 59 Event with an opening on 8/8/08, since 8 is a lucky number 62 Joan's TV home 63 Give a snotty look to 64 Rubber seals 65 Poultry farm

1 Hug 2 With "The," band with a remastered box set of albums released 9/9/09 (the date referring to one of their songs) 3 Dramatist who was adviser to Nero 4 Not so klutzy 5 Multi-continent charity concert held on 7/7/07 6 "Summertime" from "Porgy and Bess," e.g. 7 International standardized measurement promotion that may get more attention next year, since it's held on 10/10/10 8 Unwritten tests 9 He baptized Jesus 10 Horror movie remake officially released on 6/6/06 (at 6:06:06 a.m.) 11 Prove wrong 12 Manatee, e.g. 15 Vintner Paul who would "sell no wine before its time" 23 Poop 25 Movie with Robin Williams and LL Cool J 28 The old ball and chain? 32 "The Thin Man" dog 33 Carmaker headquartered in Bavaria 35 Onion relative 36 Bended pipes 37 Crappy motel 38 Where Tanguy may have got tan? 39 To linguists, it's African American Vernacular English 42 Rogers' dance partner 43 It hooks up to an engine 44 Heather Locklear soap 46 Live (in) 48 They understand in simple terms 50 Structures on sitars 51 Prefix meaning "egg" 52 Like the band Manic Street Preachers 56 Centimeter or candela, e.g. 57 "Flashdance" director Adrian 60 ___ and Daxter (video game series) 61 Cause of a pocket stain, perhaps

Last week’s solution

©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0433.

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ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - RENTMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Rentmates.com Female Roommate Needed. Private bath, W/D. No smoking or pets. $375 includes utilities. 546-5940

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Missoula Independent Page 50 September 24–October 1, 2009

CABINETRY Happy Valley Contracting Cabinetry and General

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Affinity Environmental offers asbestos, lead, and mold inspec-


OME PAGE

MISSOULA REAL ESTATE AT A GLANCE

Market Stabilization: Were the predictions correct?

By Bryan Flaherty, President, MOR

In 2008 we were in the midst of the housing downturn. Economists and real estate professionals predicted that we wouldn’t see stabilization until the third quarter of 2009. Their thought was that once the market was stable, forecasting recovery would be feasible. The question is, how accurate were their predictions? As it turns out, very accurate. Following are some nationwide data in support of third quarter stabilization:

• Pending home sales are up! • Median home price increased $25,000 between 2002-2003 and fell by about that amount between 2006 and 2007. Since 2007, median home prices have remained comparable to 20022003 levels, which is another indication of stabilization. It appears that earlier predictions of the housing market were correct, and we are already beginning to see a more positive national housing story emerge. Still, as a consumer in the

• A sustainable resale market is projected to be about 5.2 million units annually, and current sales are just under 5 million units. (For reference, at the height of the real estate frenzy in 2005, that number was 7.2 million units). • Inventory in many of the areas where the market was flooded with foreclosures is being bought up, indicating that those particularly unstable markets are beginning to stabilize.

local market, you will want to continue to do your homework and research general local market statistics and specific neighborhood statistics. You will also want to analyze your financial position by identifying financing options that include potential assistance programs such as the $8,000 first-time homebuyer tax credit that expires in less than three months. Then you can be confident that whatever decision you make is right for you.

NEW LISTINGS :: PRICE REDUCTIONS :: OPEN HOUSES

• • • •

• 3 Sandwich Franchises • National Chain • 2 additional franchises available • Great locations

$650,000 MLS# 905917

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880-7653

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PRICE REDUCTION

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3bd, 2ba, 2 Car Garage Apartment in basement Wood floors under carpet Stone fireplace, patio

• • • •

$224,900

825B Crestmont Way

MLS# 905286

• • • •

3bd/2.5ba/2car garage Townhouse with views Energy efficient appliances Master suite w/ walk-in

Missoula

$1,399,000 MLS# 707401 Agent Owned

$600,000 below appraisal! 8,000 sqft home, 5Bd/7Ba Home theatre, pool, tile, granite On 2+ acres with VIEWS 491 Arrow Hill Drive Hamilton

Joni Kearns

Pat McCormick

Shannon Hilliard

406.240.7653

406-239-8350

406-531-6038

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PRICE REDUCTION

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PRICE REDUCTION

PRICE REDUCTION • • • •

• Stillwaters on the Clark Fork • Lot prices reduced up to $100,000 • Now is the best time to build

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318 Dearborn

MLS# 904218

Diane Beck

• • • •

$148,000

$299,500

4 BD, 2.5 BA Energy Efficient Low Maintenance Lewis & Clark Area

Loubelle Wissler

PRICE REDUCTION

MLS# 906359

• • • •

2 Bed/1 Bath condo Extensively updated Gas Fireplace New Appliances

3100 Washburn Ave, Unit #21

406-240-0753

$239,900

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

$283,000 MLS# 905007

4 BD/2BA Home 6+ Acres Great horse property! 2 Barns, arena & water rights

Frenchtown

JERI FISHER REAL ESTATE

Kerrigan Masters 406-329-2066

541-9576

Judy Gudgel 406-370-4580

jeri@montana.com

judy.gudgel@prumt.com

• • • •

$189,500 MLS# 904835

3BD/2.5BA 1500+ square feet Solarium Privacy

5604 S. Bridger Court

Ann Blair (406) 721-3683 ann@prudentialmissoula.com

For more information on Missoula Real Estate including property for sale, visit www.missoularealestate.com montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 51 September 24–October 1, 2009


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REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 2 Bd, 1 Ba, 1 Car Garage. Close to Downtown. New roof, paint & flooring. 910 Byron, Missoula. $159,900. MLS# 903104. Matt Rosbarsky @ Clark Fork Realty. 406-728-2621 www.ahomein missoula.com Log cabin with no close neighbors. Beautiful views of flint Creek, Mission, Rattlesnake & Sapphire Ranges. $99,900 MLS# 906248 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 W i n d e r m e r e R E . Te x t : 4 4 1 3 3 Message:12590 for pics 2bd/1ba, 2car gar Immaculate 217 South Ave W. $232,000 Close to Univ. Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com 3 Bed/2 Bath in Stevensville. Nice Bitterroot home with great views from back deck. Low maintenance vinyl siding, large double car garage $239000 MLS# 902482 Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 W i n d e r m e r e R E . Te x t : 4 4 1 3 3 Message:12890 for pics 3BD/2BA Mechanic’s Dream Home, 3 car garage, mechanic’s pit, hardwood floors, large deck, privacy fenced yard Superior $158,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 3BD/2BA, DECK & SHED 4721 Sage St. in Westview Mobile Park. Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com 3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 acres, 4 car garage, huge tiled walk-in shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-framed cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4 mos New Liberty, 28’x52’, 3bd 2ba. Move or lease lot. Realtors welcome. $81,000 546-5816 4,800 SQ FT EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan, large family room, deck with hot tub and great views. $399,900.Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy1 to 74362, or visit...

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4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4BD/3BA, 3GAR + VIEWS 6960 Linda Vista 4 doors off Upper Miller Creek. Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.MoveMontana.com 4bd/3ba, Lovely Home w/Views 6960 Linda Vista $349,500 Anne Jablonski 546-5816 www.Move Montana.com 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. $135,000. MLS#906610. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-

6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message: 12594 for pics AMAZING HOME OVERLOOKING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

FSBO- PLEASANTVIEW HOMES 2765 Fleet St.:’03 2 Story 3BR/2BA/2GAR/AC/UG,Close to schools, Landscaped/Deck, Kennel.$219,900. Jake 240-1536. GORGEOUS FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, great views inside and out, large deck, outdoor sauna, and more. $295,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy3 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS SLANT STREETS CRAFTSMAN. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, many original features including hardwood, built-ins, beautiful mouldings & windows, large kitchen, dining room, full basement & more. $379,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy20 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS STEVENSVILLE AREA HOME ON 10 ACRES. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, single-level living, double garage, hardwood and tile flooring, beautifully landscaped, great deck with outdoor living space, and much more. $474,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy13 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

Missoula Independent Page 52 September 24–October 1, 2009

GREAT DOWTOWN MISSOULA LOCATION. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, Built-Ins, Walk to Downtown. $329,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy8 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, guest quarters, heated double garage, $695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Large Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com PRICE REDUCTION! 2BD + Bonus, 1650 square feet, lots of light, single garage. $209,000, MLS#906431. Judy Gudgel/Kerrigan Masters, Prudential Montana RE- 3292066/329-2017 PRICE REDUCTION! 2BD/2BA/ 3BONUS, 2 Car Garage. Fenced yard, great neighborhood! $229,900. MLS#901196. Shannon Hilliard, Prudential Missoula RE, 239-8350. Rattlesnake Beauty NEW efficient, executive, 4 bed, 2.5 bath, home theater, new appliances, JennAir range. Dream kitchen. HUGE Master bedroom/bath/WIC. Green, efficient heating, cooling. Gorgeous Mt. Jumbo views, seasonal stream. Large 15k square foot lot. RENT TO OWN a poss, terms negotiable. $499K. 360-9711

RUSTIC ELEGANCE CLOSE TO TOWN. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, Double Garage, High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, log accents, next to open space, easy walk to river, gorgeous. $329,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

D i a n e B e c k @ R e a l t o r. c o m , 880-7653. PRICE REDUCTION! 3BD/2.5BA, 1500+ square feet, solarium, privacy. $189,500. MLS#904835. Ann Blair, Prudential Missoula RE, 721-3683

LAND FOR SALE

SINGLE LEVEL LIVING JUST A SHORT WALK TO DOWNTOWN STEVI. 4Bdr/3 Bath, Open floor plan, large living room, great mountain and valley views. $239,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy15 to 74362, or visit...

5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com

University Home for Sale 317 S. 6th E $290,000 2+ bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage, new roof, hardwoods, 3 blocks from the University! Call Mike 406-546-6386

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com

www.mindypalmer.com

UPDATED POTOMAC AREA HOME ON 16.5 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $239,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy5 to 74362, or visit...

www.mindypalmer.com

Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

CONDOS/ TOWNHOMES NEW LISTING! 2BD/1BA, extensive updates, gas fireplace, new appliances. $119,000, MLS# 906398. Diane Beck, Windermere,

Four 10 ACRE TRACTS IN GARNET MOUNTAINS. $27,500-$45,000. Call Dick at Montana International Realty 406-883-6700 4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $349,900 MLS#901764 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 riceteam@windermere . c o m . Te x t : 4 4 1 3 3 M e s s a g e : 12886 for pics

COMMERCIAL 3 Franchise Sandwich Businesses For Sale! $650,000- Missoula, MT. Call Loubelle for info: 240-0753. 40 x 82 insulated metal free span building. 1 acre with security fence. Three 14 foot overhead doors and one 9 foot door. Easy access and

great exposure. $324,900 MLS# 901478 Janet 532-7903/Robin 240-6503 Text: 44133 Message: 12595 Tanning Salon $65,000- Top of the line equipment, excellent client base. 10 years same location. Call Loubelle at Fidelity RE 240-0753 or 543-4412. www.missoulahomes.com

OUT OF TOWN 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.YourMT.com Gorgeous leveled 80 acres of farming land in St. Ignatius with 3 Bed/ 2 Bath manufactured home. Amazing views of the Mission Mountains. 58503 Watson Road MLS # 706304 Price: $520,000 Call Priscilla @ 370-7689, Prudential Missoula.

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL Mortgage Payments or CASHNOW! Replace the monthly payments you’re receiving for property you have sold with CASH NOW. I can help sell your secured note. Call me, Emmett Roney, today to get your cash. 406-239-2529

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com


Austin McKee

REAL ESTATE In the Heart of Downtown Missoula • $675,000 322 N. Higgins • MLS# 906179

RICE TEAM

Two story brick building with commercial and residential use options. Great storefront and high traffic count. Includes use of basement and parking in the back.

Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Joy Earls Great Neighborhood! Great Price! Close to GF Store & Franklin School 1852 S. 8th West. $179,900 MLS#904867

Proud to be a part of Windermere's new commercial real estate division!

"Raised on Real Estate" Experience with a fresh perspective. CELL: 546-5705 • www.Live-Montana.com

Check my $5000 to buyer at website for closing if home closes more info & by October 31, 2009!! listings.

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com

LOC8 UR NU HAUS ON UR CELL!

3631 Brandon Way, Msla $277,900 • MLS# 906808

Text to: 74362 Mssg.: TextMLS

Rochelle Glasgow

Any cell. Any listed Western MT property.

glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

544-7507

370.7689

priscillabrockmeyer.com

Steve.Corrick@PruMT.com

406-329-2033

The Realtor® Who Speaks Your Language

Missoula’s Most Efficient Home!

The "I-PAD" is Missoula's most durable & efficient hybrid home.

• • • •

Save 60-70% on operational costs Locally handcrafted 3BD/2BA Units available soon Buy direct from the builder: $215,426 • For more information contact Glen at (406) 360-3272

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. mls# 902286

Great neighborhood

Mary Mar ry

5 bedroom, 2 bath, double attached garage with updates in kitchen. Finished basement with family room, 2 bedrooms, bath & bonus room. Heat is water base board.

R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net www.marysellsmissoula.com

110 South Ave West, Msla $320,000 • MLS# 905618 Building & Land For Sale

Missoula Proper ties

Commercial office building in a great location on South & Higgins. It offers lots of paved parking, handicap ramp with handicap restroom.

131 S. Higgins MLS 901474 Wilma Condo NOW $389,000 Showings Available by Appt.

Anna Nooney BA, RLS, GRI

Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com

www.BuyInMissoula.com

Mortgage Rates Are Still Historically Low! Mortgage Rates Are Still You may be able to: Historically Low! • Lower your monthly You may be able to: payment • Lower your monthly

payment • Switch from an ARM • Switch from an ARM to a predictable to a predictable fixed-rate loan fixed-rate loan

5999 Cunningham Ct. So of Lolo, 3800 sq ft home 4 yrs new, Ranch w/ full finished basement $390,000

CALL ABOUT MY COMMERCIAL LISTINGS

1500 W. Broadway • Missoula • MT, 59808

• Get a shorter term to • Get a shorter term pay off your to pay off your mortgage faster mortgage faster

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 406-239-7588 • www.MissoulaMultifamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

• Finance • Financeyour yourclosing closing costs of your your costsas aspart part of new new loan. loan Don’t miss your chance,

Jerry Hogan REALTOR®, QSC® 406-546-7270 • jerryhogan.point2agent.com Specializing in: Investment Properties

Don'tcontact miss yourme chance, today. contact me today.

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, WHS, QSC®, PSC® 406-544-8570 • www.MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

Astrid Oliver

Finalist

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com Missoula's All New, All Local Online Community!

Professional Service on a Personal Level To buy or not to buy - that is the question. • Can you still get a home loan? • How does the current market affect you? • Will the government’s programs help you? • Where should you start the buying process? • For answers to these questions & more call Mary today. I have the experience and understanding to help navigate you through the Real Eastate Experience

Mary Marry REALTOR®, Broker

406-544-2125 www.marysellsmissoula.com mmarry@bigsky.net

Home Mortgage Consultant 1800 S. Russell St. Ste.200 Missoula ,MT 59801 Phone: 406-329-4061 Cell: 406-550-3587 Home Mortgage Consultant Astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com 1800 S. Russell St. Ste. 200 http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/ Missoula, MT 59801 astrid-oliver Phone: 406-329-4061 Cell: 406-550-3587 Credit is subject to approval. astrid.m.oliver@wellsfargo.com Some restrictions apply. This http://www.wfhm.com/wfhm/astrid-oliver

Astrid Oliver

information is accurate as of date of printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Credit is subject to approval. Some restrictions apply. Fargo Home Mortgage is a This information is accurate as of date of printing and is division of Wells Fargo Bank, subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo Home N.A. © 2009 Wells Fargo Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. 2009 Bank, N.A. All rights Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. reserved. #63731 All rights reserved. 03/09-06/09 #63731 06/09-09/09

Missoula Independent Page 53 September 24–October 1, 2009


REAL ESTATE

PORTICO REAL ESTATE

Community Based Client Driven Uniquely Missoula

• • • •

406-327-8787

445 W Alder - PORTICOREALESTATE.COM $99,500/up, MONEY TO HELP Upper Rattlesnake with VIEWS! N. Side Lot. Ready to build. NEW LISTINGS: 28,500 Condo on river

MLS#803924 $769,000 1120 Toole MLS # 906999 $183,900

$229K SOLD River Front Custom Home $599,000 Lake-front Condo

2 Bd, 1 Ba, 1 Car Garage Close to Downtown Close to Lowell School New roof, paint & flooring 910 Byron Missoula

$159,900 MLS# 903104

Matt Rosbarsky 406-728-2621 matt@clarkforkrealty.com • www.ahomeinmissoula.com

179,900 Nice, Newer Starter

4620 Storehouse Way, Missoula

MLS#903003 • $215,000 MLS#906922 • $299,900

3 Bed/2 Bath/Double Garage This great, Edgell-built home is located right next to the common area park in the Windsor Park Subdivision.

4.35 acres, river access 10.42 acres, 3bd/2.5ba, irrig. NEW LISTING

Completely Remodeled, 3 Bed, 2 Bath 605 College, Stevi $179K - Sweet starter/retire pad, radiant heat 3bd/2ba Large Lot

- Amazing Arts & Crafts style

$194k cute Lewis/Clark Cottage

What will be the next page in your family scrapbook?

MLS# 907201 $208,000

$145K Low maint. condo.

Nice piece of ground, Sellers may consider financing

Graduation 2013?! Just paid 4 years rent?

Sold house with 4 years worth of equity!

OR

Steve Corrick Specializing in College Housing

Steve.Corrick@PruMT.com • 406-329-2033 • www.MagnificentMontana.com

Privacy, Fruit Trees & Views MLS# 907106 • $209,000 4BD/2BA home on nearly one acre. Hardwood floors, fireplace, carport, heated shop, additional outbuilding, basketball court, wonderful deck. Only 45 minutes from Missoula! www.SaintMarysLakeRoad.com

Kevin & Monica Ray

207.1185 • 822.7653 1720 Brooks • Suite 5

Missoula Independent Page 54 September 24–October 1, 2009

www.YourMT.com


IQF Center Cut Halibut Steak

$6.99

Washington Peaches Or Nectarines

99¢

lb.

Bonne Mamam Cherry Fruit Sauce lb.

$3.29

20.8 oz.

Big Sky Or Sierra Nevada

$6.59 6 pack

Painted Hills All Natural Boneless Rump Roast Or Bottom Round Steak

$2.99

99¢

lb.

Lindeman's Australian Wine

Cardini's Original Caesar Dressing lb.

lb.

Painted Hills All Natural Top Sirloin Steak

$5.49

Bitterroot McIntosh Apples

English Cucumbers

$3.59

$5.99

32 oz.

.75 liter

Crayons Energy Sports Drink

2 For $3

$1.99

Bonne Mamam 13 oz. Preserves

2 For $7

4 pack

Jennie-O Ground Turkey

$1.59

16 oz.

USDA Organic Leeks

89¢

each

Reese Sliced Papaya In Orange And Passionfruit Juices

$2.19

Asst. Nakano Rice Vinegars

2 For $5 12 oz.

15.5 oz.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 Missoula Independent Page 55 September 24–October 1, 2009


Garden City Ballet Presents

Motown Downtown Saturday, September 26, 8pm - 11pm

Spontaneous Construction 09 A Festival of Creative Re-Invention

Saturday, September 26 Noon - 10pm Home Resource (800 block of West Kent) Contest: 10am - 4pm; Street Party: 12-10 Free admission! More info: 541-8300 or homeresource.org/sponcon09

Downtown Dance Collective (121 W. Main Street) * Dance Party * Silent Auction Fundraiser * Refreshments * Dance Contest with Prizes More info: gardencityballet.org

Midwives and Mothers in Action (MAMA) Federal Recognition of Certified Professional Midwives (CPMs) in Health Reform

Political Action March: Thursday, September 24, 3:30pm East parking lot of Boone & Crockett

Silent Auction/ Music/Food: Friday, September 25, 6:00pm Downtown Dance Collective (121 W. Main) Music by The Workers Info: midwiferyhomebirth.com


Missoula Independent