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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 20 • May 14–May 21, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Grace decision offers little legal or emotional closure Up Front: Westside neighbors raise concerns over group home Scope: Jeff Ament resurrects pre-Pearl Jam hardcore band


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 20 • May 14–May 21, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Up Front: Grace decision offers little legal or emotional closure Up Front: Westside neighbors raise concerns over group home Scope: Jeff Ament resurrects pre-Pearl Jam hardcore band


Missoula Independent

Page 2 May 14–May 21, 2009


nside Cover Story Right about now the Class of 2009 may be freaking out, and you can’t really blame ’em. Just days before this weekend’s commencement ceremonies at the University of Montana, the U.S. Department of Labor announced that national Cover photo by Chad Harder unemployment reached 8.9 percent in April, its highest point since 1983. But fear not, new grads. Short of offering you a job or paying off your student loans, we’re here to help. Specifically, we asked a smattering of locals—some famous, some not so famous—to offer up their best advice—some serious, some not so serious—as you set off on your way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

News

Letters Busting on Baucus and rec taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Week in Review Quinn’s a ’phin, Blue Mountain delayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Briefs House prices rise, Mary Kay saves the world . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Etc. Please move along, nothing to see here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Up Front Concerns escalate over Westside group home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Up Front Grace decision offers little legal or emotional closure . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ochenski Single-payer advocates speak up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Writers on the Range What newbies must overcome in Western debates . . . . 11 Agenda Staying close to home with Localfest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment

Flash in the Pan Gene revolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 8 Days a Week All pomp and circumstance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Mountain High Seeking Bicycling Ambassadors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Scope Jeff Ament resurrects pre-Pearl Jam hardcore band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Noise All in the Family, Knot Knocked Up, Sonic Youth and Justin Townes Earle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Books Larsen maps scientific imagination in T.S. Spivet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 DVD Films that graduate summa cum laude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Thursday 5/14 • 9pm

Bob Wire Friday 5/15 • 9pm

Cash for Junkers Sunday 5/17 • 5ish

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Exclusives Street Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In Other News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Independent Personals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 The Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Free Will Astrolog y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 This Modern World. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jonas Ehudin STAFF REPORTERS Jesse Froehling, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen PHOTO INTERN Ashley Sears COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Hannah Smith, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Jennifer Savage, Caitlin Copple, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Jessie McQuillan, Brad Tyer, Katie Kane

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with Purchase of Beverage Page 3 May 14–May 21, 2009


STREET TALK

by Ashley Sears

Asked Tuesday morning in downtown Missoula.

Q:

This week the Indy celebrates the University of Montana’s Class of 2009 as they get ready to enter the real world. What advice would you like to pass along to this weekend’s graduates? Follow-up: If you could go back to your first few months after graduation what would you do differently?

Pete Davies: Travel as much as possible, and watch out for your friends. A lot of people make life-long friends while they’re in school, so don’t let those friendships lag. Following through: Well, I would have graduated.

Joyce Felton: When you take a job, you’re there to work for your employer. You are not doing him a favor by working for him. I don’t have a lot of opinions, but I’ve got an opinion about that. Back to school: Get more education.

Larry Marshall: Be careful of what you think is the real world. The right path: Not a thing.

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Forget the fees Hats off and “hooray” to George Ochenski for his superb opinion piece on forest fees (see “Max attacks RAT,” May 7, 2009). Fees have festered with the public like a witch’s brew for over a decade now. The outdoor recreation public is rightly outraged. The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) have vastly overreached their authority by excessively charging fees in a ham-fisted manner in inappropriate or illegal backcountry locales. A concrete example of the perfidy is High Impact Recreation Areas (HIRAs). The USFS unilaterally takes a grease pencil to a forest map and draws a big circle around a few hundred thousand backcountry acres and voila!, it’s declared a HIRA and thus a “fee site.” Examples are the Mt. Evans State Highway in Colorado and Mount Lemmon behind Tucson. HIRAs were never approved by Congress. The USFS simply invented them out of thin air in order to keep extracting the fee dollars. Accountability was thrown overboard. In addition to an out-of-control USFS and BLM, Congress is also culpable. That the richest nation on the planet would double-charge its citizens to take a walk in the woods or float their own wild river is unconscionable. It is a case of vastly misplaced priorities. Congress must no longer treat the precious public lands like a forgotten stepchild. Recreation management funding needs to be appropriately increased through the normal appropriation process. “Recreation Management by Fee” is a slippery slope leading inexorably to commercialization and privatization of our common heritage—the public lands. Left unchecked, it will become an ugly mudslide. I urge all outdoor recreation users and public lands advocates in Montana, Idaho and across the nation to get solidly behind the commonsense “Fee Repeal” effort. Scott Phillips Hailey, Idaho

No Mass appeal

Amanda Ensign: Put off joining the real world for as long as possible. Spreadin’ the wings: Nothing. I didn’t have a job for a year, and I just traveled around the world.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 May 14–May 21, 2009

Max Baucus says he wants to frame national health care reform on the pattern we provide here in Massachusetts (see this week’s column by George Ochenski, page 10). Please, we love to hunt and fish under your big sky, but if anybody falls ill while the nation is under such a plan, we’ll be shivering under a very thin tent!

Let your senator know your opposition to plans like ours. We need real reform, which must include a public option modeled on Medicare or the VA. Without the market regulation provided by a competing public plan, you will find as we did, a system that is just more of the same: more expensive, more inefficient and one that cedes monopoly power to insurers. We have already learned that a “Mass plan” delivers no meaningful benefits to previously insured citizens, nor does it reduce “cherry picking.” It is also disruptive for primary care providers, who are already a shrinking part of the work force.

We love to “hunt and fish under your big sky, but if anybody falls ill while the nation is under such a plan, we’ll be shivering under a very thin tent!

Thank you for letting an Easterner testify. Lawrence George Boston, Mass.

Watch and learn Congress is moving toward a universal health care system for this country, led partly by Sen. Max Baucus because he is the chairman of the Senate Finance Committee. His plan, however, is aimed more toward protecting the unreasonable profits of private insurance companies than providing affordable health care. A recent report by Consumer Watchdog.org reveals that, during the last two election cycles, the senator received more campaign contributions from the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries than any other Democrat currently in the House or Senate. All told, Baucus received some $183,750 from insurers and $229,020 from drug companies.

A less myopic review of the facts would point toward a different approach: a single-payer, universal health care system. Some Americans dismiss such an approach for a variety of questionable reasons. If you are one of these people, I encourage you to spend a few minutes reviewing the video at www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAvy9jew 9dM. If you still reject this approach I would like to know why. Perhaps there is something more that I need to consider. Paul Pacini Helena

Veto victory On behalf of all Northern Plains Resource Council members, especially those of us who hold water rights, thank you Governor Schweitzer for your veto of House Bill 575. This bill declared that water pumped out of the ground during the production of coal bed methane was—suddenly—surface water. This language was not only absurd, but it meant that senior water rights holders to that groundwater had no way to contest the depletion or loss of their water. Northern Plains has never opposed coal bed methane development—as long as it is done responsibly. Northern Plains’ members care passionately about how this development proceeds because of the industry’s potential to ruin Montana’s waters (surface and groundwater) and its lands and our agricultural livelihoods. We believe that the devastating effects that methane development will have on our water do not have to happen if the methane industry will simply “do it right” and leave the water in the ground or re-inject it. HB 575 was not needed. While the Board of Oil and Gas Conservation has the jurisdiction to issue permits to drill for methane, the courts have ruled that this agency does not have exclusive jurisdiction. The Department of Natural Resources and Conservation has jurisdiction over the state’s water resources. That agency simply needs to exercise its public trust responsibilities and get involved in the methane development process. We applaud you, Governor, for your leadership and recognition that this legislation would overturn 140 years of settled Montana water rights laws. Beth Kaeding Chair, Northern Plains Resource Council Bozeman

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

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Missoula Independent

Page 5 May 14–May 21, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

News Quirks

VIEWFINDER

• Wednesday, May 6

by Chad Harder

Richard “Dick” Galli, 72, proprietor of Hamilton’s Flyfishing Center fly shop, drowns in the Bitterroot River after his raft overturns just south of Hamilton. Two fellow fishermen in the raft swim to safety on an island. Galli’s body is found down river west of Quality Supply.

• Thursday, May 7 Gov. Brian Schweitzer and Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall sign a pact to develop North America’s first large-scale initiative to sequester greenhouse gases from a coal-burning power plant. The $230 million project entails piping carbon dioxide from Canada into Montana, where it would be pumped underground.

• Friday, May 8 The courtroom at the Russell Smith Courthouse is subdued save for a murmur or two when the jury returns a not-guilty verdict in the W.R. Grace case. A gag order barring attorneys from talking to reporters about the case is lifted, but U.S. Attorney Kris Mclean leaves immediately following the verdict.

• Saturday, May 9 More than 700 people sign a petition to support the reinstatement of Amtrak’s North Coast Hiawatha through southern Montana at a National Train Day event in downtown Missoula. A band plays, advocates blow train whistles and kids walk away with paper conductor hats. Amtrak’s report on the feasibility of restoring the route is due in October.

• Sunday, May 10 The Missoula Symphony Orchestra concludes the 2008-2009 season with a matinee performance at the University Theatre. The program includes Christopher Theofanidis’ “Rainbow Body,” Sergei Rachmaninoff’s “Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor” and Dmitri Shostakovich’s “Symphony No. 1 in F Minor.”

• Monday, May 11 The Miami Dolphins ink a free agent deal with former Griz offensive lineman J.D. Quinn after the center was not picked during the April 26 NFL draft. Quinn becomes the third Griz player behind Colt Anderson (Vikings) and Colin Dow (Bengals) to sign a rookie free agent contract this year.

• Tuesday, May 12 The Lolo National Forest announces that “wet weather has slowed expansion work at the Main Blue Mountain Recreation Area Trailhead,” delaying its opening two weeks. “We’re hoping to have the trailhead open by June 1 if not earlier, as long as the weather cooperates,” says spokesman Andy Kulla.

Do you wear clothes? Carlo's One Night Stand

The thousands of arrowleaf balsamroot flowers blanketing the North Hills this week are a sure sign spring has arrived in Missoula. A massive taproot allows Montana’s largest wildflower to live more than 100 years, but makes transplanting them challenging.

Biodiesel

Cenex looks in-state Results will be a long time coming, but biodiesel could make a comeback at Missoula pumps. Cenex, which stopped carrying biodiesel this spring after its supplier went out of business, is currently scouting new producers. Kyle Stensrud, energy division manager for Cenex partner Mountain West Cooperative, says he’s fielded calls from up to 10 biofuels producers from within Montana. None have panned out so far, but last week he spoke with the most promising candidate yet, Earl Fisher Biofuels of Chester. That chat left Stensrud “cautiously optimistic.” Brett Earl and Logan Fisher, both fourth generation farmers, founded the small-scale biodiesel company in 2006. They operate an oilseed crushing plant with three full-time employees. The plant is built to produce 275,000 gallons a year, and Earl Fisher supplies local farmers and ranchers on a pick-up basis. “We’re more interested in just getting biodiesel more established in the state and making it more of a common staple as far as fuel is concerned,” Fisher says.

Missoula Independent

Real Estate

Crash averted? While the housing market crash sinks home values around the country, including the Flathead Valley, the Missoula market appears impervious. In fact, according to numbers from the Missoula Organization of Realtors (MOR), home values are actually rising in early 2009. In the Missoula Urban Area, the year-to-date (Jan. 1 to April 30) median home price stands at $224,500, up from $208,200 in 2008 and $206,000 in 2007. “From our point of view, things are hoppin’,” says real estate agent Steve Palmer. “In the past 10 days alone, we have put four buyers and one of our listings under contract. We had our third best year ever last year and are on track to match or exceed that level of business this year.” While prices are up, sales remain significantly down. In Missoula County, 237 homes sold in the first four months of the year, compared to 337 in 2008 and the high of 466 in 2006. But real estate experts say the market can weather the drop. A one-point drop in interest rates has

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Those aims fit well with Cenex’s ultimate goal of supplying Montana-marketed biodiesel produced with Montana-grown crops. Cenex is motivated to find a biodiesel solution in part because of customers like Nancy Wilson, director of the University of Montana’s transportation department. The campus bus fleet’s use of biofuels is dependent on Missoula stations with existing biodiesel infrastructure. Wilson says her department recently discussed building an oncampus pumping facility, but the project proved too costly. She’s the one who ended up connecting Earl Fisher with Cenex. According to Stensrud, the missing piece in the puzzle is simply finding a reliable supplier. Cenex already has a ready-made biodiesel infrastructure. Now it’s a question of evaluating fuel grade, testing and supply potential. “Once we find a supplier, we want to make sure they’re a supplier long-term,” Stensrud says. “We basically had three suppliers in the last seven years, and two of them went out of business…We don’t want to get into the biodiesel and then out of it and then in it and then out of it.” Alex Sakariassen

542-2544

Page 6 May 14–May 21, 2009

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Inside

Letters

Briefs

proven beneficial to home buyers, according to Brint Wahlberg, MOR’s president-elect. “Purchasing power has increased,” he says, “and that’s helped a lot of people.” Interestingly, Wahlberg says another factor may be weak condo sales. With the glut of condos and townhouses on the market—198 were for sale as of press time—financing proves challenging because of how the stagnant market affects appraisals and homebuyers’ interest rates. With so few $135,000 condo sales, the median home price skews higher. “It’s a little tough to sell condos still in Montana because it’s, you know, Montana,” Wahlberg says. So why is Missoula’s market as resilient as it is? “It starts with the fact that it wasn’t as over-inflated as many others,” says economist Larry Swanson of the Center for the Rocky Mountain West. “The bubble didn’t really grow to a size that couldn’t be sustained, so the values hold even as activity or sales decrease significantly.” Matthew Frank

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

rently phasing out non-recyclable compacts and putting reusable ones on the market. They received over 300,000 old compacts in response. The Compact Recycling Program is just one of several environmentally conscious initiatives Mary Kay has undertaken. The company also

Bitterroot to corn- and potato-starch based Mary Kay solves world hunger switched packing peanuts over the mainstream A press release from Mary Kay Inc. caused reporters in the Independent newsroom to do a double-take last week. Apparently the Dallasbased cosmetics supply mogul, with the help of the Arbor Day Foundation and the U.S. Forest Service, “completed the total reforestation of the Bitterroot National Forest.” Well done. Mary Kay’s reforestation initiative in the Bitterroot supplied the Forest Service with 200,000 new trees, which were planted during the last three days of April. Those trees won’t, as the release says, “complete the reforestation at Bitterroot,” but they’re enough to kick-start a new portion of Mary Kay’s Pink Doing Green Sustainability Program. The press release’s point of contact, Ryanne Dalton, declined to comment on the hyperbolic wording, instead referring questions about the project to Beth Lange, the company’s chief scientific officer. The reforestation plan is part of Mary Kay’s Compact Recycling Program, which promises to plant a tree for every used compact submitted by customers nationwide. Mary Kay is cur-

Styrofoam. “We’ve had sustainability projects for years, so this is nothing new for Mary Kay,” says Lange. Mary Kay is one of several corporations, including Citibank and Enterprise Rent-A-Car, funding Bitterroot reforestation efforts through the Arbor Day Foundation. The Foundation’s activity in the Bitterroot heightened after extensive forest fire damage in 2000, says Nan Christianson, public affairs officer for the Bitterroot. Still, Mary Kay’s 200,000 trees are just twigs in a very large forest. Christianson says the district hopes to stretch the trees across 1,400 acres of a 1.6 million acre wilderness thinned by fires, harvesting and insects. That rounds out to about 400 to 700 trees per acre. Far from the “total reforestation” the news release brags, but Christianson says she’s still thankful for the company’s commitment to healthy forests. And as for that press release? “I might not have worded it that way,” she says. Alex Sakariassen

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS Percent increase of W.R. Grace & Co. stock after a jury Friday found three company executives not guilty of charges that they knowingly poisoned the town of Libby with asbestos. The stocks closed at $13.06.

36

Politics

City plays defense When Missoula city officials hired lobbyist John MacDonald to represent their interests in Helena, city spokesperson Ginny Merriam described MacDonald’s job as “more reactive than anything else.” The 61st Legislature adjourned April 28 and MacDonald, who was in Missoula May 6 to talk to the Committee of the Whole, confirmed that the city spent much of the session playing defense. “Municipalities and counties really have to watch to make sure there aren’t efforts underway to take away what they have,” MacDonald says. In that sense, the city’s legislative success can be quantified by the number of bills that didn’t pass as much as those that did. In his report to the city, MacDonald lists 10 onerous land use bills alone that the city helped defeat. “We’re still a rural state,” he explains. “So a lot of the issues that are important to the rural lawmakers are not issues that are going to be important to urban lawmakers.” MacDonald’s biggest disappointments occurred when SB 506, the local option sales tax, and HB 472, Rep. Dick Barrett’s sidewalk maintenance bill, both failed. MacDonald knew the local option bill would be an “uphill” battle, but Barrett’s bill, which MacDonald calls “fantastic,” died after strong opposition from the Montana Department of Transportation. MacDonald is the first lobbyist the city has ever hired to represent its interests and City Administrative Officer Bruce Bender says Macdonald’s service proved invaluable. “In my 20-plus year of being involved in [legislative sessions], it was a real benefit,” Bender says. In the past, city officials had to weigh the benefits of testifying at a 10-minute hearing against the four-hour time commitment in travel time. Having a lobbyist, Bender says, solved the problem and also provided the city a much more consistent presence in Helena. Bender says the city plans to hire another lobbyist next session “And hopefully,” he says, “it’s Mr. MacDonald. He was very good at it.” Jesse Froehling

etc. Montana seems to suffer an identity crisis when it comes to self-promotion. Simply put, we’re never quite sure how to sell ourselves to the outside world. The latest example comes from Travel Montana, the state’s tourism agency. A few months ago it launched a new $500,000 national print advertising campaign, part of the $5.2 million it spends annually to promote tourism. The slogan? “There’s nothing here.” The words overlay picturesque Montana scenes, like a bison crossing a creek in Yellowstone National Park, or Grinnell Lake in Glacier. “Nothing but a landscape so big and rugged and open that it stretches your soul,” the Glacier ad copy reads. “Nothing but the corner store where the sign reads, ‘If we don’t have it, you don’t need it.’ And nothing but a million stars overhead to remind you that no one should settle for a hotel with a mere five. All this nothing leaves more room for the unexpected to happen. Montana. You just never know.” You never know? First of all, that was the appropriate slogan for the New York State Lottery for years. But, more importantly, what’s this ad campaign saying? It’s like telling out-oftowners: “Montana: If you’re lucky, you can find something to do here, maybe.” It reminds us of the novelty campaign created a few years ago by a Flathead entrepreneur. In order to dissuade the rampant influx of Californians, he created T-shirts and bumper stickers that read, “Montana Sucks,” with smaller type adding, “now go home and tell all your friends.” That tonguein-cheek approach has now become the state tourism agency’s strategy. Call it reverse psychology advertising. It all makes us wonder about Montana’s true brand, the sorts of things “Montana” conjures in the minds of folks on the left and right coasts. With our wide-open spaces and perceived political irrelevance, maybe it is “nothing,” for better or worse. Or maybe, if a slogan were drawn from recent headlines coming out of the state, it would be even less flattering. It might be something like, “Montana: Where horses come to die.” Or maybe, “Montana: Home to Guantánamo detainees… and you.” Or, in the wake of the maddening W.R. Grace verdict, “Montana: Look, but don’t breathe.” Maybe a slogan is the wrong way to go entirely. We like to think the word “Montana” mostly projects a positive meaning by itself, unlike, say, “Arkansas.” Let the Razorbacks think up cutesy slogans and ironic catchphrases. Instead of “There’s nothing here,” we’d prefer no slogan at all.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 May 14–May 21, 2009


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Missoula Independent

Page 8 May 14–May 21, 2009

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Not on my street Westside neighbors raise concerns over group home by Alex Sakariassen

Brook Blair walks down Sherwood Street on Missoula’s Westside pointing out the houses with young families. He and his wife, Molly, are about to have their second child, so Blair knows what to look for: dump trucks, forts and what Blair calls the “plastic explosion” of toys scattered across the yard. “House right there is expecting a child,” he says, nodding his head. He indicates another. “One-year-old.” And another. “Two-year-old.”

Dan Lester says he created the Victory House because convicted violent and sex offenders, drug addicts and alcoholics deserve a second chance when they exit the state penal system. He offers them support, mostly through faith. “Our idea was to take people that really wanted to change their lives and wanted to have a closer walk with Jesus,” Lester says. “That’s the number one thing we ask before anybody comes over to the house is ‘Do you truly want a closer walk with the lord Jesus’ … It’s my firm belief that that’s what’s going to cure people.” Lester is a co-founder of the 3:16 Mission and former owner of the Toole Avenue Food Market. He opened the Victory House more than three years ago as a faith-based residence for up to 12 men. Residents at the Victory House lead a structured life under a signed contract. They live by a zero tolerance policy, pay $200 a month for rent and food, and attend three mandatory Bible classes every weekday. Lester maintains each is accountable to the others. Most have monthly Photo by Chad Harder meetings with parole officers, some with outside Brook Blair and his wife have expressed con- counselors as well. If you cern that the Victory House for Men, located in the background, houses three registered sex break the rules, you get the offenders. Neighbors struck an agreement with boot. the group home to have those residents But enforced curfews removed within the year. do little to soothe neighbors. Brad Hash lives two This is a walk-to-school route, he doors down from the Victory House, and says. There’s a park and an elementary he and his wife are expecting their first school down the street. You can see the child in December. The more he’s Bitterroot Gymnastic Studio from Blair’s learned about the facility since moving porch. Around a corner, there’s a daycare into the neighborhood in June 2006, the center. “There’s five or six kids on that more concerned he’s become. block,” he says. “Kids everywhere.” “If it’s just housing alcoholics, you There’s also the Victory House for don’t want to set it right next to a 24-hour Men, situated at the end of Sherwood bar,” Hash says. “You don’t want to put Street, next to the Ceretana building. It’s the candy right out in front of the child a flat-front stucco house painted drab and expect them not to be tempted.” blue, quiet and unassuming. But it’s Lester says Victory House has become a growing concern of neighbor- responded to the neighborhood’s conhood parents like Blair. Three of the 12 cerns. When Blair said he was worried Victory House residents are registered about residents hanging out on the front sex offenders, and neighbors aren’t com- stoop and smoking, Lester moved them fortable with the group home’s location into the backyard. and lack of supervision. The situation “We want to be good neighbors,” came to a head last month when the city Lester says. “My goodness, I can undernegotiated an agreement that would pre- stand people’s concern, but what’s the vent the Victory House from taking in alternative? Everybody says, ‘Well, you’re more sex offenders, and ensured the doing good work but don’t do it in my three living there now would be out with- neighborhood.’ But it has to be done in in a year. somebody’s neighborhood.”

The house on Sherwood was the only sure bet for Lester and his partners, Steve Moon and Don Godbey. Property owner Bear Stauss gave the group a 90-day trial and afterwards offered them a three-year lease. Stauss renewed the lease for three more years last month. “He was kind enough to give these guys a chance, to give them a chance with their lives,” Lester says. “That’s why we ended up there, because the owner gave us a chance.” None of the neighbors argue against the need to give these men a second chance—they’re simply concerned about the home’s proximity to so many children. “The idea has value, and I’m all in support of these types of facilities if there are mechanisms in place to ensure community safety,” Hash says. But he feels the Victory House has fallen short of that, “considering the location of that facility within a neighborhood of families and couples.” The neighborhood’s concerns eventually reached the City Council and, later, landed with Detective Jamie Merifield. She says she’s been aware of the Victory House for some time, but has only had personal contact with Lester since midMarch. At that time, Lester met with Stauss, Merifield and neighbors to negotiate a resolution. “It was pretty heated,” Merifield says. “It was difficult. I think people are frustrated, feeling like they’re not being heard.” Law enforcement views the agreement as a possible setback. Merifield, herself a parent, says the Victory House residents in question are the three most monitored individuals on the sex offender registry. Having them in such a structured residence reduces the risk of an incident. “What I tried to express to the neighbors is if these people weren’t allowed to live in the Victory House, they’d be homeless,” Merifield says. “And a homeless sex offender is much more difficult to supervise.” The point that tight supervision would quickly land any of the men back in jail following an incident gained no traction with Blair. He remains uneasy that, at least for the next year, three sex offenders will reside near his home. “My attitude is,” he says, “if that one screw-up is my child, how am I supposed to take comfort in the fact that that guy’s going back to jail?” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


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Lack of precedence Grace decision offers little legal or emotional closure by Jesse Froehling

Moments after a jury acquitted three former W.R. Grace & Co. executives of charges that they knowingly poisoned the town of Libby with asbestos, Mike Crill, a former mine worker dying of asbestos exposure, leaned on a bike rack in front of

“The way we work in the legal system is that you kinda have to get to a court of appeals decision to set a precedent,” says University of Montana law professor Andrew King-Reis. “Judge [Donald] Molloy made a lot rulings that are signifi-

Photo by Chad Harder

Mike Crill, a former worker in the Libby vermiculite mine, sobbed in front of the courthouse in the wake of the jury’s decision exonerating W.R. Grace & Co.

the Russell Smith Courthouse and sobbed into his arm. “They’re guilty of killing us,” he screamed to anyone who would listen. A few days later, after he’d had time to process the verdict, Crill tried again to put the jury’s decision into perspective. “I’ve been going 150,000 miles an hour here,” he says. “It’s hard to explain for somebody who’s been involved this long, trying to fight for justice and standing up for the people and keeping a face on this, to come to the end of this road and have this be the end of it. It’s just a total numbness.” Crill’s not the only one feeling numb to the jury’s decision. A guilty verdict would have given Libby residents a chance “for justice,” as Crill puts it, and their disdain for the decision was well documented. But the case was also expected to set legal precedence relating to the Clean Air Act, and that expectation was also unfulfilled with the jury’s verdict.

cant, but the court of appeals won’t have the opportunity to review any of the ones made during the trial.” King-Reis, who advised UM’s Grace Case bloggers during the trial, followed the proceedings as closely as anybody. He explains that Congress enacted the Clean Air Act in 1990 and, since it’s still relatively new, “there are really interesting, important legal questions surrounding the interpretation of the Clean Air Act” that this case was expected to answer. Typically, King-Reis says, prosecutors use the Clean Air Act to press charges against an employer who, say, has a railroad tanker that needs cleaning. The employer sends workers into the car and the workers become sick as a result of the toxic fumes—and then the employer sends them back in again. “It’s never been used in a situation where you release something [like asbestos] that is hazardous until it’s

cleaned up,” King-Reis says. “There isn’t the immediacy in asbestos exposure that we’ve seen in other Clean Air Act cases. It could have set a very interesting precedent for the Clean Air Act. But because of the posture, I don’t think it has much precedential value.” King-Reis says the government needed to win its case, forcing Grace’s attorneys to appeal the decision to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. “A Ninth Circuit [decision] would be binding to all the other judges in the circuit and persuasive to other courts of appeals,” King-Reis says. “But because of the way it worked out, we can’t really assess its precedential value.” Local environmental lawyer Bill Rossbach was interested to see how the case potentially changed criminal trials involving asbestos. Civil lawsuits have already proven successful, but criminal cases are a completely different ballgame. “To prove that asbestos is hazardous and caused injury, the burden of proof is that it’s more likely true than not,” he says. “But in a criminal case, it’s beyond a reasonable doubt. This has to do with the difference between making somebody pay you some money and making somebody go to jail…In a criminal case, there has to be an intent to harm. In a civil case, you just have to show that you did cause harm. It’s a very, very different type of lawsuit.” Former state auditor John Morrison says the lack of precedence isn’t the only issue. He’s worried the verdict may discourage other prosecutors. “I was proud of the U.S. attorney for bringing the case, but they were trying to accomplish something that had never been accomplished before,” he says. “It’s hard to prove criminal violations in a toxic waste case. Very hard. The case will not have precedential value, but it might discourage some prosecutors from filing these types of cases in the future. I hope it doesn’t.” The outcome has Crill concerned that the decision sets an unintended precedent outside of the courtroom. He says he’s been given a death sentence after being diagnosed with pleural thickening that will eventually lead to mesothelioma. To see the executives he believes are responsible for his illness walk away free sends a haunting message. “It’s been a pretty bad blow for us,” he says. “Their stocks are going up now. It’s like they’re being awarded for killing people. I guess you have to walk in my shoes to see this point, but everybody is making a killing off killing us.” jfroehling@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 May 14–May 21, 2009


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Single-payer push Congress ignores the right health care system

ONLY ONE ENTRY PER PERSON PER EVENT Missoula Independent

Page 10 May 14–May 21, 2009

When polls continuously showed two-thirds of Americans wanted out of George W. Bush’s disastrous Iraq War, Congress didn’t get it and continued to pour hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars down the drain. Nor did they get it when the public came unglued at the trillion-dollar bailout of the very financial institutions that caused the on-going economic collapse. And now, with a rising tide of citizens demanding a single-payer health care system, Congress still doesn’t get it. But make no mistake, a single-payer revolt is underway across this nation and this time around, if Congress ignores vox populi, it will be doing so at its own peril. Just last week, at a health care hearing chaired by Montana’s own U.S. Sen. Max Baucus, single-payer protesters stood up, denounced the fact they were excluded from a place at the table, and were summarily escorted out of the hearing room by police at Baucus’ order. The incident is available for viewing online at YouTube and, quite frankly, Baucus should be ashamed of both his performance and that of his committee members. As the protesters stood, one by one, they shouted out that America’s health care options were being dominated by big insurance and pharmaceutical industries and their cronies. One by one, Baucus told the police to remove them from the hearing room until, due to the persistence of the protesters, he joked, “We need more police.” To the embarrassment of the American public and our supposed democracy, Baucus and his committee members laughed while their fellow citizens were being hauled out of the hearing room. Granted, it is impossible to hold a hearing when people are interrupting and speaking or heckling from the audience. But this protest was organized by a large coalition of single-payer advocates, including Physicians for a National Health Program. One of those physicians was Dr. Margaret Flowers, who co-chairs the Maryland chapter of the national group. “Health insurance administrators are practicing medicine without a medical license,” she told the committee. “The result is the suffering and death of thousands of patients for the sake of private profit. The private health insurance industry has a solid grip on patients, providers and legislators. It’s time to stand up and declare that health care is a human right.” Indeed, with 50 million Americans uninsured and the highest cost for the lowest benefits among developed

nations, there can be little doubt that the current system, if you can legitimately call it that, is broken beyond repair. Yet, of the 15 witnesses at the Senate panel, not one was there to make the case for a Medicare-for-all single-payer option. Baucus, who has repeatedly said all options are on the table, apparently doesn’t think singlepayer, such as that used by most of the developed nations, deserves a voice. Instead, as he has also said many times, Baucus thinks we should come up with some new, unique, “American” health

“Baucus and

his committee

members laughed while their fellow citizens were being hauled out of the hearing room.

care plan that keeps the insurance industry ensconced between citizens and their medical, dental, mental and physical health needs. As many have pointed out already, the insurance and pharmaceutical industries have not been lax in doling out millions in campaign contributions to Congress—and Baucus has been the top Democrat recipient of that largesse. That kind of money buys big mojo in D.C., which is apparent in the actions of the senators while the protesters were being arrested. Not a single senator stood up, took the microphone, and asked Chairman Baucus to amend the panel—or convene another panel—to allow the physicians to address their vision of what a singlepayer system would look like or how it would work. But while we have numerous examples of working single-payer systems worldwide, we have very little idea of what kind of a Rube Goldberg, “uniquely American” contraption

Baucus and his Senate pals will finally embrace. All the big questions remain hanging—from how it will work to how we will pay for it to who will call the shots on who gets what kind of health care. Obviously it’s a lot easier for people to look at functioning single-payer systems in other countries and get some idea of what an American singlepayer system would look like. It’s also possible to estimate what it might cost and compare them to the overwhelming costs of our current non-functioning system. Just this week, perhaps sensing the single-payer sea-change that no amount of campaign contributions can turn back, the insurance, pharmaceutical and associated health care cadres met with President Obama to pledge that they would “save” the American public $2 trillion in health care costs over the next decade if only he would keep them in the game and preserve the status quo. But here’s the hitch: Health care costs have been rising an average of 7 percent a year and the great deal that big insurance and big pharma held out to the president is to simply reduce that growth by 1.5 percent annually. Get it? The bills continue to climb into the stratosphere, health care continues to be unaffordable for 50 million Americans (or more, counting the under-insured) and the industry offers only to slightly reduce the rate by which those costs will continue to mount into the foreseeable future. No, they’re not going to bring them under control, no they’re not going to reduce them, and no, they offered not a single specific commitment about how they would even meet their measly 1.5 percent cutback. Is it any wonder Americans are increasingly up in arms over what appears to be a serious hearing deficiency from Congress? Is it any wonder that support for a sensible single-payer plan continues to grow? The debate is red hot and getting hotter by the minute. Those seeking to join the rising tide of citizens demanding single-payer can contact the newly formed Montanans for Single Payer at www.montanansforsinglepayer.org and embrace their motto: “Everybody in, nobody out.” Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


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The grandpappy clause What newcomers must overcome in Western debates by Gina Knudson

I live in Lemhi County, Idaho, but nobody else in my family ever did, and recently, that’s become a problem. I love the boiled-down democracy of City Council meetings, the frank discussions of local school boards, the drama of planning and zoning hearings—and no, I’m not kidding. I find local politics fascinating, and I’ve have rarely met an opportunity for public comment that I didn’t seize. But now, some of my fellow citizens are trying to insert what I lovingly call the “grandpappy clause” into our local system of democracy. This most recently arose as our Lemhi County Planning and Zoning Commissioners entertained revisions to the county’s comprehensive plan and development code. Perhaps I’m crazy, but this seems to me like a fantastic time to come together as a community and outline what we love about this natural wonder we call home. We love our farms and ranches, the open space they provide, the county fair, the sweeping view of the Beaverheads, the Salmon and Lemhi rivers, steelhead fishing, elk hunting, seeing ospreys swoop down on wriggling trout. We’re nestled between the Continental Divide and the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, and we’re wary of suffering the fate of communities such as the Bitterroot Valley of Montana and Idaho’s Teton County, where local people watched as subdivisions swallowed up agricultural ground. The resulting traffic and the financial strains on schools and law enforcement swallowed up local treasuries. In Lemhi County, people are aware of the need to plan for the future. Hundreds of residents have already weighed in on a county plan, changing wording and challenging old assumptions. But as our planning and zoning commissioners prepare to vote on the new development code, a new clause has been proposed, one that details not

where your parents were born, but where their parents were born. Some of my fellow residents have suggested that if your testimony doesn’t begin with the phrase, “My grandpappy settled in Lemhi County (insert number) years ago…,” your comment should be placed in a pile labeled “Transplants, vocal minority or strangers who have come from other states.” I am not from another state, thank the good Lord, but I proudly fall under the first two labels. My husband and I transplanted ourselves from the Idaho desert to the mountainous Salmon seven years ago, and we’ve never been sorry. I

The notion “ that multigenerational residents should receive preferential treatment in local democratic processes is shortsighted and

bigoted

believe that this remarkable part of the world is a place my people would have loved, if they had not ended up high-centered on the lava rocks of southern Idaho long ago. As for being part of a vocal minority— well, guilty as charged. Democracy means more to me than majority rules. I believe innovation happens when someone

attempts to try something new. More than a few changes in the world have come about just because of a vocal minority. My grandpappies would be proud of me if they thought I was playing that role—being a vocal minority in this or any other community in the world. Settling on a comprehensive plan may not sound exciting, but it is important. If enough citizens care to become involved, these documents can respect the culture of a place and its people and also chart the course ahead. The last thing a comprehensive plan should do is disenfranchise a broad cross-section of a community’s citizens. Fewer than 8,000 people live in Lemhi County, and so the locals celebrate when a new surgeon, a fiddle player, a Little League baseball coach or a family with straight-A students moves to town. The county treasurer doesn’t hesitate to add new homeowners to the tax rolls. We don’t require most of our newcomers to apply for a temporary work visa. The first night I spent in our new home in Salmon sealed my fate. I woke up at midnight and saw a herd of elk in the moonlight. The still-snowy peaks of the Continental Divide stood out in silhouette, and I heard Jesse Creek’s spring runoff warble through my window screen. Since that first night, this has been my home. We’ll raise our children here, and someday my ashes will mingle with this sandy soil. The notion that multigenerational residents should receive preferential treatment in local democratic processes is shortsighted and bigoted, and, quite frankly, it stinks … a lot like a grandpappy’s old boot. Sooner or later, after all, everybody can use a new pair of shoes. Gina Knudson is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She lives and rabble-rouses in Salmon, Idaho.

Missoula Independent

Page 11 May 14–May 21, 2009


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And how, exactly, does a 21,000-mile road trip fit under the heading “local?” First, you populate “Baby,” the Japanese fire truck retrofitted to run on vegetable oils, with longtime Missoulian Seth Warren, then send him and paddlemate Tyler Brandt on an intercontinental journey to expound upon the promise of biofuels. And while you’re at it, have them film the expedition, have the film bring home the awards and praise, and then bring the Elements Tour and Baby the fire truck to Caras Park. Which brings us to the local connection: Missoula’s inaugural Localfest ensconces Baby and her pilots in the rubric of using your purchasing power nearby. A freestyle kayak competition, gourmet local food, live music by Micah Wolf, Tom and the Tomatoes, Cash for Junkers, Tractor Jack and the Muddy

The Elements Tour, featuring Baby the Biolfuel Truck, collides with the inaugural Garden City Localfest from noon–8 PM in Caras Park on Sat., May 16. Free. Visit sbcmontana.org or naturepropelled.com.

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Tue. 19 May

Learn about their varied programs, hang with current and former members and enjoy the creative powers of the community from 6–10 PM at the Greenough Park Pavilion, where an AmeriCorps Potluck offers food, frisbees and fun. Free, but bring a potluck dish, okay? Call 243-5531.

The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

Sat. 16 May

Send your visions for the future to Washington when the Organizing for America Listening Tour waits with open ears at 7 PM in the Missoula Public Library. Free.

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Missoula Independent

Page 12 May 14–May 21, 2009

Take part in a community action to support those who supported us from 8 AM–4 PM as the Poverello’s Salcido Center, 308 W. Pine St., hosts the Veterans Stand Down, a one-day intervention program where vets hook up with clothing, food, education, live music and other resources. Free. Call 728-1809. Raise funds to care for the 1,600 afflicted Montanans during a Multiple Sclerosis Walk, which begins with registration at 9 AM at McCormick Park. Registration is free. Call 2525927 or visit msmontana.org. It’s a year-end wrap-up and a looking forward at 10 AM at the Arlee Senior Center, where the Arlee Community Development Corporation’s annual meeting also features new board elections. Free. Call 726-5550. Enjoy the dinner, the live and silent auctions and the music of Tom Catmull when the Five Valleys Land Trust throws the hangar doors open wide at 5:30 P M for their “Protecting Land, Celebrating Place” spring banquet in the Northstar Air Hangar at the Missoula International A i r p o r t . $ 50 . R S V P 54 9 - 0755 o r e - m a i l elizabeth@fvlt.org.

Join Sentinel High School’s Amnesty International, the Montana Abolition Coalition and the Montana Human Rights Network at 8 PM in Caras Park—and bring a candle—on this Global Day of Action for Troy Davis, a 17year Georgia death row inmate who’s never received a federal court hearing in spite of seven of nine witnesses recanting testimonies that got him convicted in the first place. Call 728-2400, ext. 7603, or visit amnestyusa.org/troydavis.

Wed. 20 May Note the 6:45 PM meet-up time, as the Ride of Silence, an annual global event to commemorate cyclists killed by motor vehicles, leaves Caras Park promptly at 7. Be prepared to ride silently and slowly in honor of our fallen kin. Free.

Thu. 21 May

Mon. 18 May

The Sustainable Business Council unveils the winners of their fifth annual Sustainability Awards at 6 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W., after the 5:30 social hour gets everyone primed to accept runner-up status. And stick around for the 6:15 panel of winners. Free.

Take up the struggle against domestic and sexual violence in the Bitterroot when you attend Supporters of Abuse Free Environments’ (SAFE) four-day Volunteer Training, which begins at 6 PM through Thu., May 21. Free. RSVP 363-2793.

Fight global warming as you submit comments in real time when the Sierra Club hosts a live stream from Seattle of the EPA Hearing on the Danger of Greenhouse Gases at 7 PM at the Elk’s Lodge. Steer the feds toward taking action, but first you should RSVP 549-1142.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.


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I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - When John Comparetto exited a bathroom stall at a Holiday Inn outside Harrisburg, Pa., he said a man pointed “a very large handgun” in his face. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported the robber fled with Comparetto’s money and cell phone, but Comparetto, a retired New York police chief, pulled his ankle gun and gave chase, joined by some of the other 300 police officers attending a convention at the hotel. They quickly arrested Jerome Marquis Blanchett, 19, whom Comparetto dubbed “probably the dumbest criminal in Pennsylvania.” Oklahoma state police arrested David Louis Siany, 51, for bank robbery after a criminal justice student at the University of Central Oklahoma identified him from a surveillance photo on a news website. The student was Michael Siany, 21, the suspect’s son. “A lot of things went through my mind,” the younger Siany told the Tulsa World, “but I knew the right thing to do.” FLU FEVER - Swine flu fears prompted Pennsylvania’s Slippery Rock University to announce the school would hold a separate graduation ceremony for 22 students who recently returned from Mexico, where, health officials said, the flu originated and spread rapidly. University official Karl Schwab said the school would recognize the students’ sacrifice of not graduating with the rest of their class by videotaping the private ceremony and showing it at the main ceremony. Noting Jewish dietary law considers pigs unclean Israel’s Orthodox Jewish deputy health minister, Yakov Litzman, declared that swine flu would be called “Mexico flu.” Mexico’s ambassador, Frederico Salas, promptly complained to Israel’s foreign ministry, which labeled Litzman’s announcement “a slip of the tongue.” A ministry official told Agence France-Presse, “Israel has no intention of giving the flu any new names.” U.S. officials recommended calling the flu pandemic something else after other countries threatened to ban pork exports from North America, especially from Iowa, the leading U.S. pork producer. “It’s important to not refer to swine flu,” Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, a former governor of Iowa and longtime friend of the pork industry, told reporters. “It’s important to convey the message that consuming pork will not cause this illness.” Not only can pigs still be eaten, but according to the National Pork Producers Council, which lobbies the federal government on behalf of the nation’s 67,000 pork producers, they can even be petted and hugged, or tickled until they squeal. While lobbyists and officials discounted the likelihood of pigs transmitting the flu to humans, a human infected 200 pigs on a farm in Alberta, Canada, with the H1N1 virus. Brian Evans, a senior official from Canada’s food safety agency, told journalists that the man, a farm worker who recently returned from Mexico, and the pigs were recovering. MODERN TIMES - Police in Pittsfield, Mass., charged Stephanie K. Lighten, 26, with domestic assault and battery after she reportedly tried to use a large syringe to artificially inseminate her wife by force with her brother’s semen. The Berkshire Eagle reported that Jennifer A. Lighten, 33, told police her wife was “all liquored up.” THE RIGHT TO BARE FEET - Flying footwear has become so rampant in India’s general election that authorities began erecting metal safety nets to protect politicians from disgruntled voters during campaign speeches. Candidates have also asked party workers to remove their shoes at meetings and alerted their security staff to scrutinize people at rallies and journalists at news conferences. Police in Akron, Ohio, said a 52-year-old woman who took a job as an exotic dancer to help make ends meet was attacked on her first day by a jealous co-worker, who hit the victim several timers in the face with a stiletto shoe. “The other girls were upset she was there and said, ‘We don’t need any more dancers around here,’” police Lt. Rick Edwards told the Akron Beacon Journal. FORGOTTEN BUT NOT GONE - When a loud siren sounded in a Washington, D.C., neighborhood at 5:30 a.m. and lasted nearly 90 minutes, alarmed residents were unsure of the source and what action to take. The University of the District of Columbia announced later that the alarm was on one of its buildings but is not part of the university and “may be part of a Municipal Civil Defense system.” UDC official Jacquelyn Boynton explained that several crisis alarms had been installed in 1975, but current university staffers weren’t aware of them and aren’t even sure they still have a use. Scientists at the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration have forgotten how to make a key component of a Trident nuclear missile warhead, according to the Government Accountability Office. As a result, the warhead refurbishment program has been delayed at least a year at an additional cost of $69 million. NNSA “lost knowledge of how to manufacture the material because it had kept few records of the process when the material was made in the 1980s,” the GAO report said, “and almost all staff with expertise on production had retired or left the agency.” MENSA REJECT OF THE WEEK - David Senior, 26, was trying to show a woman afraid of heights that it was safe to lean over a sixth-floor hotel balcony in St. Pete Beach, Fla., when he fell four stories onto a second-floor concrete ledge. The St. Petersburg Times reported Senior was rescued and hospitalized in fair condition. SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - A wounded man at a gun shop in Kane County, Ill., told sheriff’s deputies he had just finished target practicing and was removing the magazine from a .45-caliber handgun when the weapon discharged a bullet through one of his hands. The suburban Chicago Daily Herald reported that after being taken to the hospital, the unidentified man began crying and admitted the gun went off after he grabbed it by the barrel. WRONG ARM OF THE LAW - Two undercover detectives were trying to buy drugs in St. Petersburg, Fla., when the drug sellers robbed the detectives. The detectives fired at the fleeing suspects, who drove off in a blue SUV, pursued by undercover and patrol units. The St. Petersburg Times reported that moments later, off-duty police Officer Stephen Mathews, who heard about the incident over the radio, rammed a dark SUV he thought was the suspect’s, but it turned out to be an undercover vehicle. Meanwhile, a second cruiser tracked down the suspects a few blocks away, and officers arrested Antwan Marquis Britt, 21, and Christopher Jerome Toliver, 20.

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Missoula Independent

Page 13 May 14–May 21, 2009


Graduation Sale!

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Winner--"Montana's Best Beer" at the 2009 Garden City Brewfest www.tastemontana.com Missoula Independent

Page 14 May 14–May 21, 2009


ight about now the Class of 2009 may be freaking out, and you can’t really blame ’em. Just days before this weekend’s commencement ceremonies at the University of Montana, the U.S. Department of Labor announced that national unemployment reached 8.9 percent in April, its highest point since 1983. Even worse, the same report predicted that number would rise to at least 10 percent in the coming months and that some economists don’t see the job market returning to normal until

R

2013. That’s a little daunting, because even the biggest procrastinator doesn’t want to kill four years backpacking in Europe. But fear not, new grads. Short of offering you a job or paying off your student loans, we’re here to help. Specifically, we asked an assortment of locals—some famous, some not so famous—to offer up their best advice—some serious, some not so serious—as you set off to the real world. We hope you find a pearl of wisdom or three that helps you on your way.

Welcome to the real world, kid Wisdom, wisecracks and worldly advice for this year’s graduating class— and, perhaps, all of us.

weaker, whom no one else will defend. Be noble. Don’t worry about things you can’t control, you’ll get ulcers. Don’t believe everything you read or hear or see about Elvis. Or anyone or anything else. Don’t be violent. Don’t complain too much. Take responsibility for your mistakes. Be humble, and be decent.

The Rock Star

Huey Lewis The Mayor

John Engen The city’s 50th mayor was born in Missoula in 1964 and attended Willard Elementary School, Hellgate High School and UM, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism.

Here’s the advice: No matter who you are, you are not obliged to set the world on fire. You don’t have to worry about what it is you’ll be doing for the rest of your life. That stuff happens, and it isn’t always pretty. Just keep learning, watching, living, enjoying. Life is not fair, but you can be fair. Think for yourself, because there are plenty of folks around who’d be happy to do it for you. Make jokes, be occasionally irreverent. Don’t stand on ceremony. Once in awhile, stand up for someone who’s

Huey Lewis and the News recorded Sports in 1983, one of the highest selling pop albums ever. The frontman currently owns a house in the Bitterroot.

Three words: Don’t grow up.

The Coach

Robin Selvig Selvig has won more than 700 games in his 31-year career as head coach of the Lady Griz. He ranks ninth on the NCAA’s Division I all-time win list.

The best advice my dad imparted to me was to work to be the best no matter what I decided to do, and that was whether I was working at McDonald’s or trying to be a basketball coach. That was instilled in me at an early age. My last year of college I realized that basketball was too big a part of my life to not be a part of it. So I decided to become the best coach I could be. I wasn’t a real goal-setter or anything like that. It was just my dream and I was just fortunate enough to pursue it and make it work. With my kids, I told them to simply pursue what they wanted to be, and they have—one’s pursuing a career in business and the other is going to be a doctor. I didn’t really advise them. When they asked me for advice, all I said was, “Well, what do you want to do?” Sometimes it’s that simple. One thing sports do is help you handle disappointment. You always have disappointments; you always lose some. I think that’s a good life lesson. What I try to instill in my players is that you don’t win every game, and that this is just a game. There are things way

more important. I think any successful athlete learns how to handle disappointment. If you’re a quitter you don’t make it in sports, and you don’t make it in life. You have to get back up on the horse. You don’t get something for nothing. You work at it. If you’re looking for the government to take care of your life, it’s probably not going to happen. You have to be someone who goes out and works for what you get. Most people who have that kind of get-up-andgo, who try to be the best at what they do, they’re the ones who are usually successful.

UM Photo by Todd Goodrich

Missoula Independent

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The Midwife

Sandhano Danison Danison attended midwifery school in 1984 and is a certified midwife in Missoula. She has assisted in more than 600 births.

I feel like right now, in the bigger picture of what’s happening in the world, it’s easy to be disconnected from the earth, from life, from our emotions. We live in houses that have forced-air furnaces and air conditioning. We have our cars. We watch TV and play video games. We don’t have to be that connected to live life. But birth is one of those places where it’s happening right now, in the moment, and you don’t have that choice to disconnect. During that precious time, birth, we’re connected emotionally within ourselves, with our families, with the earth, with the moment. For me, I feel like birth connects us and reminds us of how important that connection can be, and that it does matter. We’re all trying to find happiness. And it’s a curious thing knowing how to find that and not get lost into empty things. How big of a house does it take to be happy? Is it toys, or a TV? Is it happiness that we can eat some sort of exotic fruit in Missoula and not even think how that got here? It doesn’t have to be a bummer, but we need to think about it. We don’t need to get so lost into status and huge houses and multiple cars and everything being brand new. That doesn’t necessarily bring happiness. It’s hard. The answers aren’t easy,

but I think we need to think about these things. When I’m at a birth I’m awed by the strength women have. And these babies are so soft and sensitive and fresh, but so bright and there and present. If we’re connected to ourselves and the things around us, we have the strength to figure this out.

The Etiquette Coach

Elton Anderson Known locally as Mr. Manners, Anderson moved to Missoula in 2004 from New York City. He’s a classically trained pianist and ballet dancer who currently offers etiquette consulting.

you want to live in, whatever it is you feel you would like. Prepare yourself, present what it is you would like people to help ascertain what you’re going after. Be determined to do it. Know that you’ll have to negotiate and compromise. You may get what you want, and it may come in increments. Be flexible and willing to start somewhere. Where that place is, find within it some part of your original vision and work on that muscle. And always mind your manners.

The Congressman

Pat Williams Williams served nine terms as a U.S. Representative from Montana. After his retirement, he returned to Montana and is teaching at UM.

I have two pieces of advice. First, maintain an active and healthy skepticism. Second, and more important, is to remember that a person is physically designed to look around, so do it. Know where you’ve been, where you might be going, and who is at your side. That’d be it.

Photo courtesy Elton Anderson

The Simpsons Guy

Ron Hauge Acknowledge that what you see is alarming and makes you afraid, but realize that you cannot have courage if you do not have fear. Do not allow the fear to stop you. Visualize what you like. The sort of job you’re looking for or the sort of town

Hauge is a former Missoula resident and veteran writer/cartoonist for the hit Fox series “The Simpsons.” He currently lives in Los Angeles.

As a headstrong young man I offended people who didn’t deserve it, walked out on jobs that didn’t suit me, and imposed myself on friends when I

was broke and refused to take real work. I worked harder than anyone else but only doing the things I wanted to do, and with nothing else to fall back on. Everyone should do the kind of work they enjoy or die trying was my feeling, and in the early days I missed enough meals to come pretty close. I would advise you not to do that part if you can help it. I moved to New York in 1980 with $180 in savings and lived in a small slummy apartment over a Chinese restaurant while I tried to make it. I had some talent and luck and I would advise any young person today to have a bunch of each. But you shouldn’t rely on the luck thing as much as I did. Do take every opportunity that comes along though, when you’re lucky enough for that to happen. Any criminal can tell you that motive and opportunity have to get together in order to get the job done. It’s the one thing legitimate careers and street crime have in common, if you don’t count Wall Street. I guess the hidden advice in this is that you don’t want to be too confident and too comfortable right away, though a little of each is necessary. Humble can be a better place to start. My friend Sandy worked with a young writer who came into a show and really decorated up his office the first couple weeks, after which time he was let go. My friend remembers looking out his window into the studio parking lot and seeing this fresh-faced young guy lugging a mounted deer head out to the trunk of his car and trying to fit it in. He said it was the saddest thing he’d ever seen. So if nothing else, don’t be the deer-head guy your first job.

I suppose I should have lisco-workers with spouses and chiltened to my professors who told dren and keep a five-year plan in me broadcasting won’t make me mind so you’re always moving rich. I still have the stub from forward professionally. Make new my first paycheck from WOWLfriends and be generous. Read TV in Florence, Ala., where I often and find an outlet unrelated made $800 a month. A big night to your professional life. If you for me back then involved have to move away, embrace your watching TV with bad reception new town and get to know it. You in front of my kerosene heater don’t have to live there forever. while sharing a bottle of awful You can handle anything for a wine with friends. I had the year. Don’t be so connected to time of my life. your old life that you don’t see Five months later, I drove my the wonderful new things in front half-dead car while towing an overloaded trailer and of you and remember you’re not in a race with anyblowing oil across the highways of the South. I was on one. Most of my friends have always earned at least my way to the promised land of Missoula and my $900- twice as much as me. At least I can say I have the a-month reporting job. more exciting job. I have several You have to earn bits of advice for respect. Remember The Anchor graduates. First, that when you’re Jill Valley embrace your poverposting pictures on The KPAX news anchor and assistant news director has been named ty. I still have a diffiFacebook. If there’s Montana’s Broadcaster of the Year four times and is Missoula’s reigncult time paying full even a flutter of a ing Best TV Personality, as voted by the Indy’s readers. price for anything. chance you’ll want to My early broadcastrun for office someing days honed my day, keep it clean. bargain hunting skills to shameless levels. In this econIt’s okay to eat chili for breakfast, by the way. omy, however, I am no longer considered cheap. I’m And most importantly, keep a stash of toilet paper thrifty and wise. hidden in your apartment at all times. Living alone has Stay out of other people’s fights at work, volun- its challenges that often reveal themselves at the worst teer to do extra work, work on the holidays for your times. Good luck and don’t forget to twitter. The Simpsons TM and © 2009 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Missoula Independent

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The Evolutionary Astrologer

Deb Clow Clow, owner of Love Dog Design in Missoula, cast a chart for the “birth” of this class graduating into the next phase of their lives.

Be kind. Be brave. Work hard. And no matter what, keep your sense of humor securely intact.

unusual, the illogical, the unconventional intuitive hits, which will, ultimately, carry you safely into the rest of your days. Remember to laugh and dance and breathe deeply. You have come to do noble work. May you feel and manifest the infinite blessings awaiting you.

The Showman

Severt Philleo For four straight years in the late 1990s, Philleo won the Indy’s Best of Missoula award for Best Actor and Best Actress. He recently returned to Missoula to perform Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde.

the grind of the real world and I think when that starts to happen it means you need to take another class. Seek other knowledge. Take a macramé class like a normal person! For years I resented the fact that I had to work at the Crystal. I thought that it negated my theater work because it was my day job, and I got really bitter. And then I realized that while theater for the community is more important to me by far than renting videos, I also had to realize that in that daily interaction of my retail jobs—at Bloomingdale’s, at Macy’s, at the Crystal—that there is so much opportunity for learning and connecting with people. Look at everyone you encounter through the day as a professor. Always realize each person has something to teach you. Sometimes it’s

Photo by Chad Harder

On the surface, this advice seems so simple and yet, you have been born into Interesting Times. And interesting times require interesting and very courageous acts of imagination. As each of you enters more fully into the wide wild world, you will feel a tremendous, healthy desire to be seen and heard for exactly who you are. The trick to working with that desire is for you to know, at the deepest level of your being, who you are. If that sounds like a simple-minded and redundant statement, it is. But the intricate disguises created by the maze of our minds and of the voices we’ve buried there from our families and our culture, so often leave us confused about the essence of who we truly are. Each of you is an extraordinary facet of the One Loving Heart of the Universe. And as such, each of you is carried in each moment by the light of all that is. But the unique expression of your singular character is extraordinarily important to the outcome of the human drama in which you find yourselves today. And tomorrow. Even into eternity. In addition to the individual nature each of you is carrying forward, you are a part of your larger generational wave, and this communal body has embedded within it a code of “service” and tenaciousness and vision which will, ultimately, transform our collective understanding of how to go about the business of living our lives. You will encourage in each other a desire to serve the greater good. You will remind us, in an infinite number of ways, how to create a world where there is justice for all. You are capable of burying the insane barriers that have separated humans from each other for all of time. Each of you is perfectly attuned to the journey you are navigating. And so, be kind. Be brave. Work hard at re-creating worn-out paradigms. Pay close attention to the

Photo by Chad Harder

I basically quit school. I said, “I’ve been educated, I’ve been here four years, I’m going to go to Hollywood to be in a movie with Meryl Streep. I was shocked when my agent said, “Okay, put on 10 pounds of muscle, get dermabrasion and I can get you headaches and dog food.” He meant commercials. You end up realizing that there are only so many CEO positions. George Clooney’s got one and Meryl Streep has the other. You can count the top people on your fingers and the rest is the reality of where you figure into it. That is the real world. That’s it. But don’t be discouraged by that. Oftentimes I think many of my experiences at the University of Montana were much more real than the “real world.” I remember one instance in our acting class when Randy Bolton required that we walk up Squaw Peak and spend the night and basically go on a vision quest. And we were like, “Is he high? We’re actors, we’re not outdoorsmen.” But it ended up being one of the most elevating and enlightening experiences I think I’ve ever had. There we were with backpacks on, you know, clacking sticks together to frighten bears away. That is still vivid in my memory. You should learn to apply those experiences. Often times when people graduate they fall into a rut. The hopefulness and the joy of learning can dissipate—you just end up being stuck in

not necessarily a good lesson. You know, “This person is teaching me what it is to be an asshole. Oh, I get it now!” But just keep your awareness about you.

Once you get your piece of paper, your degree, that doesn’t mean you get to stop learning. Also, too, the point of a university education is to make a mark in the world; state your manifesto and be heard and understood. Be an inspiration to people. The time that I spent in Missoula, which really was the time I was the least monetarily successful, was the time when I was the most successful at my craft.

The Movie Star

J.K. Simmons Simmons graduated from UM in 1978 and has appeared in more than 80 different television shows and films. He’s perhaps best known for his roles as J. Jonah Jameson in Spider-Man, the dad in Juno and for his current role in TNT’s “The Closer.”

Don’t go into show business. Just kidding. I think my advice now might be, if it’s at all feasible economically, see the world. Get out there. Travel. Go see the East Coast, go to Europe, go to Canada. Travel and meet people and experience life. If you’re not in a situation where you need to buckle down, if you don’t have a wife and kid that need to be supported, then enjoy this time and enjoy your youth and your freedom. Even though you’re currently living in one of the most beautiful parts of the world, there’s a lot more out there to experience. I remember a quote that I heard once that was simply, “We are more alike than different.” Some people tend to see differences and some people tend to see unifying factors, and I’ve always believed that we are more alike than different. So if you go to North

I have a degree and I’ll never use guitar and do songs about different it, and I knew when I was getting it sounding farts and they have halfI’d probably never use it. I did, howhour specials on Comedy Central ever, think that having a degree simply based on their youth. The would impress someone or eventualyounger you are, the more impressed ly get me more money, but when people are, even if talent-wise you’re you’re an artist, no one cares about a little green. That’s another rude that. I’ve never once showed my awakening. framed diploma with a Monte Dolack But I’m enjoying the work and I picture to anyone, and I don’t think I don’t want to quit. I think that everyever will. one would be disappointed in me if I I guess there’s a point every year quit, which keeps me going. where I’m completely out of money, Sorry. I think that’s all I have. I debating whether or not to borrow got a little traumatized this morning money from my dad who already when a man entered my bedroom paid for my college. while my pants were You know, that’s the down…Ah, well, it’s The Comedian real world stuff. happened a handful Now that I live in of times–just usually Chris Fairbanks L.A., I find that most not that early in the Fairbanks grew up in Missoula before launching a successful career of the people who morning. I at least as a stand-up comic and illustrator. When we called him, he’d just live here are already usually have shoes been accosted in his Los Angeles home by the ex-boyfriend of the girl rich so that’s why on. But I didn’t have he’d been dating for two days. No kidding. He was shaken up, but they can comfortshoes on and I still ready to dole out some real world advice. ably hang out and thought, “He’s do comedy for free going to stomp on without having a real job. That part has been the rude my toes. He’s going to break my mirror and cut my awakening. feet.” It’s really vulnerable to not have shoes. That’s Also, there are kids out here that are 18 and play something to think about.

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than the one you feel you’re specifically trained for. An awful lot of people that I know who are very happy in their lives are doing something they never dreamed they’d be doing when they were 22 years old. Be open to all the possibilities that are out there, both career wise and life wise.

The Transient

John the Guitarist Set up on the corner of Higgins and Pine, John plays reggae and blues on an Old Hickory acoustic guitar. He doesn’t pay taxes. He does have family on the Blackfeet Reservation. He says the money he makes on the corner will go exclusively toward coffee (he says he doesn’t drink alcohol) and future travel to Oregon.

Africa and see a completely different world than what you’re seeing in area code 4-0-6, yes, it is a completely different world, but at the core of it we’re all part of the same species and we are more alike than different. It’s interesting to see the differences and celebrate the differences. When you’re sitting in a beer garden in Germany trying to understand a language that you don’t speak, ultimately people are very much the same and want the same things. Especially in the economic climate and the world climate that we’re currently living in, I would encourage the graduating class to be open to other careers

It seems like when I’ve got lots of possessions like new cars or a nice big house, I’m very unhappy. Seems like when I’m down to nothing but a backpack, a sleeping bag and a guitar, I’m happy. Most people don’t look at it that way because we’re conditioned. Even I was conditioned in school, all “Be successful, have the two cars, the biggest house on the block, impress your friends.” For some reason I didn’t choose that road.

The Writer

Annick Smith In her early 20s, Smith was a mother of two struggling to get through college. Since settling in Missoula, she has had twin boys, coproduced the film A River Runs Through It,

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

and helped create the Montana anthology The Last Best Place.

In June of ’82 I graduated from Second, clean your lodge. Make the University of Washington with a time for a big lodge cleaning. degree in communications, a Rose Reflection. Personal. Honest. Bowl ring and an eclectic blend of (Maybe historical.) Recognize and confidence and insecurity. I had no neutralize toxic liabilities that are job, little money, but was lucky to clouding the sunlight to your heart, be coupled with a tribally driven mind, body and soul. A mentor may identity with Montana. In the pasbe helpful. Psychologist Dr. Jung’s sage of 27 12-month cycles since words are worth pondering: “One then, I have been taught, when does not become enlightened by teachable, three suggestions on imagining forms of light, rather by how to live and live well. This, I can making the darkness conscious.” share with you. Gently incorporate your concept of First, awaken to Iihtsipaitapiiyo’pa the “Mystery” into this activity. (Blackfeet), “the one through whom we live.” Call this Finally, nurture homeland and community. I sugMystery what you will, but I am comforted that all gest, if you haven’t already done so, you expand your world religious traditions recognize there is something concept of “homeland” to include the whole planet greater both within and beyond self. Dogmas vary. and its ecological systems. I further recommend broadMine is a hybrid dogma inspired by my grandpa Red ening the definition of “community” to include all Crow’s suggestion to consider “all lodges” but take species that are woven from the earth’s fabric. only the “good things” into your heart. An old Irish Why? Since all beings in creation are born from a comgodmother put it more bluntly stating, “Righteousness mon Mystery, we can logically assume there is a kinship is a good thing, but present among all of grandson, self-rightcreation. We are all The PoetSinger eousness is a pain in related. From the Jack Gladstone the ass.” morally considerate Gladstone is a lecturer and “PoetSinger” from the Blackfeet Indian Consider knowposition of protecting Nation of Montana. Gov. Brian Schweitzer once called him ing absolutely that our relatives, human “Montana’s Blackfeet Troubadour.” y o u d o n’ t k n o w and non-human, and absolutely. This insuring the viability leaves open the path to humility and teachability. of life on earth, we have many works to continue. Failure Awaken to recognize you are a part of something both isn’t an option. Grizzly Mother will sacrifice her life for the within and beyond self. This is the source of the wind, health and survival of her cubs. Take with you, now, the of the tide and of the starlight. Spirit of the Great Bear. Her path is yours.

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The way has been long and rough. But one thing I believe is worth thinking about for kids graduating today is there are lots of things in the world. They should give themselves the opportunity to try out various selves, not be pushed into a straight career path unless they’re sure that’s what they want. Variety of jobs, of interests, of obsessions really enriches your life. I would suggest do not take one path, take many paths and you will get to a more interesting end goal. I think there’s lots of pressure on kids to decide at 18 that “I’m going to be a doctor,” or “I’m going to be a carpenter,” or “I’m going to be a nurse.” And maybe that’s what they should be, but I think they need to leave their eyes and ears and hearts open to other things that come along that interest them, because if they don’t try them now it’s going to be much harder later. If you want to get rich this is not good advice. But it may be good advice if you want to be fulfilled and have a rich life.

The Problem Solver

Charlotte Kasl Kasl serves as a licensed professional clinical counselor, certified addiction specialist, Reiki Master Healer, consultant and teacher living in the Bitterroot. Her most recent book is titled, Yes You Can! Healing from Trauma and Addiction with Love, Strength, and Power.

The best advice I ever received wasn’t advice. It was simply the love I felt from my grandmother and aunt Margaret. They were always glad to see me, talked to me in a real way. They were fun, interesting, growing people, who were always learning. Margaret had a great sense of humor and was teaching English to Asian children into her late 80s. I visited her in Missoula every summer for 18 years until she passed on. So, find people who love you, and love them back. It’s the most calming, joyful thing you can have in life and will help you feel a stability at your core. I came from a family that valued education in the broad sense. They communicated a love of nature, hiking, learning and taking part in community events. We were taken to football games, concerts, plays, parades, church rummage sales and museums, and given a lot of room for creativity. My father taught by example to question things (although, not always him), and to see all sides of a situation. My grandmother had a lively intellect until the day she died; she had earned a degree in botany in 1896. My grandfather was an engineer. If you drive out on Clemens Avenue, by Dale’s Dairy, you’ll see an old concrete white house sitting perpendicular to the road. My grandparents and my teenage father and his brother built that house over a two year period by hauling sand and gravel to make their own concrete blocks—two college educated parents who became poor truck farmers to send their kids to school. That’s the legacy that shaped me.

The Olympian

Eric Bergoust Bergoust competed in four successive Winter Olympics and won the 1998 gold medal in Nagano, Japan, in the freestyle ski jump. He lives in Missoula.

As a competitor in aerial skiing, I learned that to make changes to a specific part of my technique I had to ignore other aspects of my jump and let them fall apart in order to fix a bad habit. I could feel my teammates saying, “What’s wrong with Bergy today?” because 95 percent of each jump was ugly, but they didn’t know that I was only focusing on the other 5 percent that day. I had to be willing to look bad in order to be more productive. Looking bad or failing in front of others and being okay with it is not something you either have or you don’t have. People have different levels of it and it’s a skill that if practiced becomes an unconscious habit. It’s helpful to practice being yourself without hearing in your mind what others may say about you. Too often people don’t feel free to be different, but if change is the only constant, doesn’t resisting change defy logic? Feeling free enough to look and act how you feel honors your freedom. Worrying about what others think can change the way you act or your decision making away from who


you want to be. It’s distracting when you should be thinking of more important things, like how you’re going to save the world. Wonder why other people do things and ponder their results. This

will help you understand why you want the things you do and will remind you to take time to consider everything that comes with achieving your goals. Explore with an open mind the wide variety of productive ways to spend

your next few decades. No one can say what this rapidly expanding and exponentially speeding universe has for you.

The Detainee

Umberto Benedetti Benedetti worked as a cabinetmaker on an Italian luxury liner when, at the start of World War II, he and his shipmates were detained by the U.S. government and sent to Fort Missoula. He spent nearly three years at the camp before being released in 1943 and later joining the U.S. Army. He used the G.I. Bill to attend multiple colleges and universities and eventually received his master’s degree in education from UM in 1980, at age 68. Now 97, he still lives in Missoula.

Photo courtesy of Don Cook

things are changing. You need to find your job, that is a tough time. You need to choose your way, that is a tough time. I did many things and did not succeed. But you need to acquire the experience because that is life. I go day-by-day. This is how it is. But I don’t complain. I live a full life, I try, I don’t complain. I have no regrets. Make sure you put that in there—I have no regrets. I cannot complain about anything. editor@missoulanews.com

I live a very good life. I can say nothing wrong. I cannot complain. I always work very hard. I didn’t smoke. I drink a little, but not much. There was no extravagance. I didn’t go, say, overboard. That is why I still feel good. In November, I will be 98. During the war, I was imported here and I cannot complain. That is how it is sometimes. That is life. It was not bad. I was not a prisoner. We could not go out, but it was a good life. We had the theater. We had the dances. We had many things. You can live a good life, even like this. Experience means a lot. When I was 22, I had no experience. Now, I have experienced a lot, and your mind changes. That is a tough time, when

the $$–$$$...$15 and over The Keep Restaurant 102 Ben Hogan Dr. 728-5132 Steak - Seafood - Fine Wines and Spirits. Serving dinner 5pm-10pm seven days a week. Cocktail hour Mon-Thur 5pm-6pm in our fireside lounge. The ideal setting for weddings, receptions, and rehearsal dinners. Dates still available in 2009, call today. For dinner reservations call 728-5132. www.thekeeprestaurant.com $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. 549-2790 Enjoy the warm ambience of our cozy neighborhood bistro with an urban feel. Our chefs transport flavors from Europe and the

Mediterranean offering a creative New American twist on classic fare. Featuring the freshest ingredients from local growers. Serving lunch Tuesday through Sat. 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tuesday through Sun. 5:00close. Beer and wine available. $$–$$$. Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Lunch and dinner, Mon.-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula Find. Popular with the locals. Voted best Pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone-deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice & noodle bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups & sandwiches, “Pizza by the Slice.” Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for both lunch & dinner. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups,

salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

dish

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$. Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. MF 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Getting ready for outside seating? So are we. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$

Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$

Missoula Independent

Page 19 May 14–May 21, 2009


COFFEE FOR FREE THINKERS

May

COFFEE SPECIAL

Guatemala Antiqua Italian Roast $9.75 lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS

BUTTERFLY HERBS

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

232 N. HIGGINS • DOWNTOWN

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

the

COFFEE, TEAS AND THE UNUSUAL

dish

SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Open for Lunch and Dinner! Check out our new menu: Sesame House Salad, Soba Vegetable Pasta, Warm Brie Salad, the Dubliner, Eggplant Parmesan Sandwich, and Great Italian Pastas. Irish favorites, too: Pasties, Fish and Chips & Shepherd’s Pie. “where the Gaelic and the Garlic mix!!” $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 12 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Vietnam Noodle 2100 Stephens 542-8299 A true Vietnamese dining experience! Enjoy our authentic beef noodle soup, spring rolls, pad thai, Vietnamese style hot & sour soup, noodle soup bowls & daily lunch/soup combo specials. We suggest that you also try our new stuffed hot peppers. For your cooking pleasure at home, we have an Asian grocery next to our restaurant! Get a free meal on your birthday when you bring 5 or more friends. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

Missoula Independent

Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant 11300 US Hwy 93, Lolo 273-9819 Brand new Thai & Chinese cuisine featuring original recipes. Specializing in curry. Extensive menu, vegetarian options and many soup options as well including Vietnamese style pho, Tom Yum, wonton and more. Wok-ee Mountain Asian Restaurant is perfect for take out or dine in. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 36 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $ Bucks Club 1805 Regent • 543-7436 Missoula’s best Food & Drink Values. 2-for-1 food specials daily. Eat the legend. Burgers for a buck. Over 1,000,000 sold. Great Breakfast served daily. If you go away hungry, don’t blame us. Mon.–Sat. Open 7 AM and Sunday 8 AM. $

Bucks Club

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$

Page 20 May 14–May 21, 2009

eMpanadas 728-2030 www.empanadalady.com eMpanadas are back! Indulge in your favorites at the Clark Fork River Market this Saturday, 8am to 1pm and at Downtown Tonight, Caras Park, Thursdays, June-August 5:30-8:30pm. Baked to perfection with fresh, local ingredients,10 exquisite varieties of Argentine-style empanadas await you: Carne de búfalo, lamb, pollo, humita, and more.$ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

Bitterroot Valley Main Street Cafe 363-4567 upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton Danielle Dupuy presents...A little taste of France in the Bitterroot. Serving Gourmet French American Cuisine. Lunch Board: Tuesday through Friday 11:30 to 2pm. Dinner A La Carte: Tuesday through Saturday 5 to 9pm. Reservations Accepted. For special events (business meetings, birthdays, baby showers, etc.) please call Chef Jason Tenesch.

Whitefish Café Kandahar 406-862-6247 A George’s Distributing fine wine tasting, a Café Kandahar 7 course wine dinner, Kandahar Lodge luxurious accommodations and an Andy Blanton champagne brunch come together May 14-15 for a “Not To Be Missed” event. Meet & greet with the winemakers. Full package $299 for two. Call 406-862-6247 for limited tickets.


by Ari LeVaux

Gene revolution Monsanto sued Germany last month, after that country’s agriculture minister, Ilse Aigner, banned the planting of corn seed engineered to resist the corn-borer moth. In banning the seed strain, called mon810, Germany joined France, Greece, Austria, Hungary and Luxembourg. While only Germany has so far been challenged in court, the biotech giant has reserved the right to sue other mon810-resistant countries as well, on the grounds that since mon810 was approved by the European Union, it’s illegal for member states to ban it. Monsanto has gained infamy by suing farmers whose fields become contaminated with genetically modified (GM) pollen from neighboring farms. By going after sovereign nations, the megacorporation is at least picking on targets closer to its own size. Monsanto is demanding proof that mon810 poses a risk to the German people, environment or economy—proof Germany has yet to provide. While such evidence, if it exists, would be enlightening, Monsanto’s demand raises another question: Is innocent until proven guilty the standard by which the dangers of self-replicating genetic material should be assessed? Guilty until proven innocent, a more cautious approach, appears to be favored by mon810resistant countries. And mon810 has hardly been proven innocent. Its modified genome has been shown to be unstable—the inserted genes are prone to drift away from the points on the chromosome where they were originally inserted. This makes mon810 potentially problematic to track, detect and predict. An Austrian study released in November 2008 suggests a link between mon810 and infertility in mice. The study’s authors cautioned that these results are preliminary and called for more study. Monsanto, not surprisingly, has disputed the science behind the study. On the environmental front, studies have shown that mon810 can kill Monarch butterfly larva, although so far efforts to demonstrate negative effects of mon810 on Monarch populations have failed.

Ask Ari:

tion, and many of their newspapers, are saying “not so fast.” An editorial in Die Welt argued: “As long as doubts remain about this strain of corn and its potential danger to humans and the environment, it is our duty to ban it. This is neither populism nor panic-mongering. It is an act of reason—first to test the genetic process, then to gather facts.” Back on this side of the pond, another study is causing a different kind of problem for Monsanto. The Washington D.C.-based Union of Concerned Scientists has released a report, “Failure to Yield,” that surveys the scientific literature from the past 20 years, and examines genetic engineering’s effectiveness at boosting crop yields. “Many commentators and stakeholders have pointed to the alleged promise of genetic engineering (GE)—in which the crop DNA is changed using the gene-insertion techniques of molecular biology—for dramatically improving the yields of staple food crops.

“But a hard-nosed assessment of this expensive technology’s achievements to date gives little confidence that it will play a major role in helping the world feed itself in the foreseeable future.” Corn and soy are the two most commonly grown genetically modified crops, with 90 percent of American soy and 63 percent of American corn, by acre planted, being GM. After comparing the results of 11,275 field trials, lead researcher Doug Gurian-Sherman concludes: “GE soybeans have not increased yields, and GE corn has increased yield only marginally on a crop-wide basis. Overall, corn and soybean yields have risen substantially over the last 15 years, but largely not as result of the GE traits. Most of the gains are due to traditional breeding or improvement of other agricultural practices.” While no shortage of people and groups ask questions about the safety and efficacy of GM crops, too few people, unfortunately, ask the larger question: Do we even want to be growing so much corn and soy? As Michael Pollan (The Omnivore’s Dilemma; In Defense of Food), has so meticulously pointed out, corn-based products like corn syrup have infiltrated the American diet to an alarming extent, and wreaked havoc on American health. Most soy is destined for animal feed, and methane from soy-fed livestock is one of the most significant contributors to global warming. Monsanto promotes genetically modified crops as means to feed the world, but that altruistic argument kind of shrivels in light of the fact that so much of its product is destined for animal feed. The dedication of cropland to growing food for animals, whose meat feeds the wealthy classes, is widely recognized as one of the prime causes of hunger among the world’s poor. If the Union of Concerned Scientists is correct in concluding that genetic tinkering has failed to increase soy yields, that’s another blow to Monsanto’s altruistic pretense. I’m not saying genetic engineering is inherently a bad thing. But in the hands of megacorporations like Monsanto, the risks outweigh the rewards.

Congrats to Grads, from Your Friends at Food For Thought! Sun thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm

540 Daly Ave • 721-6033

Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. www.thinkfft.com Across from the U of M campus.

Flying the coop

Dear Flash, First of all, thank you for all you did to get the chicken law passed in Missoula. I love my flock, but I do have a henrelated problem. They like to fly over the fivefoot fence and into the backyard. From there it’s a 4-foot flutter into the alley behind the house. Once in the alley, they will hunt and peck their way down the block, and even into other yards. I’ve heard you can put netting over your yard, but I’m wondering if there’s a simple solution, like psychological deprogramming or something. I know some people clip wings, too, but that sounds too cruel.

Q

Based on information like this, the mon810resistant countries have decided further investigation is warranted. So the question becomes whether a sovereign nation has the right to proceed with caution before introducing an organism of concern into its food production system. Monsanto seems ready to throw such caution—along with clouds of GM corn pollen—to the wind. The company is pushing the EU court for a decision by mid-May, in time for German farmers to plant a mon810 crop this season. The Germans, known for their conservative disposi-

Any advice? —When Hens Roam Assuming there’s nothing you can do to make the girls happier in their yard, clipping wings is your best option. It isn’t cruel—no more painful than getting a haircut. The chicken needs to be calm when you do this, so dusk is a good time. Have a friend hold your chicken. Gently lift one wing away from the body, and snip 2 or 3 inches off the ends of the feathers sticking out behind the wing. Repeat with the other wing. If you’re nervous about snipping too much you can always snip a little

A

and see if that stunts their flying enough. But as long as you’re snipping feathers and not flesh, there really isn’t such a thing as too much. And thanks for thanking me for helping legalize chickens. I’m not sure I deserve any credit, though I’m happy to take some. Mad props belong to Missoula Community Food and Agriculture Coalition (CFAC), and to all the people who pestered City Council, especially the goofballs with the awesome “I’m pro-chicken and I vote” T-shirts that I wish I had. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

Missoula Independent

Great Food No Attitude.

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

Page 21 May 14–May 21, 2009


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings May 14–May 21, 2009

THURSDAY May

14

Kids aged 5–13 can teach the man a thing or two during Movin’ with the Mayor, a health promotion event at 3:30 PM at Franklin Park. Free. Call 721-PARK.

Even those without a bun in the oven will benefit when the Happy Mama Prenatal Center, 736 S. First St. W., presents a lowimpact Community Yoga Class every Thu. at 4:15 PM. $5 suggested donation. If you know when to fold ‘em, you’re more than welcome at the Lodge at Whitefish Lake, where the three-day Todd Brunson Montana Poker Challenge begins this evening. Call 250-1306. Be the blender for a fruit smoothie of movement traditions every Thu. at 5 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, where Shake, Rattle and Pose: Yoga Dance Fusion carries you through the motions and delivers you at Oneness’ door. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

We're proud to be part of a team that is committed to earning your trust.

Put your wee beastie’s flailing to good use when you sign them up for the ongoing Y Music Dance Therapy Group for kids aged 6–9, which teaches ways to use your body to manage big feelings, soothe tattered nerves and develop social skills, and meets every Thu. at 5 PM at the YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St. All genres are encouraged— excepting, perhaps, death metal—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352.

Photo courtesy of Michael Wilson

It takes serious cheek muscles to support a hat like that. Enjoy an acoustic evening with the Lyle Lovett Trio in the Wilma Theatre at 8 PM on Thu., May 21. $59.50 at Rockin Rudy’s.

end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., May 15, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

P.T. Tip of the week: When you need to ice on a chilly day, try putting heat on your stomach while you ice your aches away.

Now with two locations:

2825 Stockyard Rd., Ste. I-3 • 541-2606 5000 Blue Mtn. Rd. • 251-2323 AlpinePTmissoula.com HealthAndFitness101.com Missoula Independent

Page 22 May 14–May 21, 2009

Mon-Sat 11-4pm


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Page 23 May 14â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 21, 2009


nightlife Whether the glass is half empty, or just greasy and thumb-printed, we can all agree that Bittersweet plays Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. The valley’s haven for year-round thrashers, Fiftytwo Skatepark, on El Way past the Missoula Airport, hosts Girls’ Skate Club Night every Thu. at 6 PM, which means girls skate for free. Guys are welcome, but should plan on parting with a few bucks. Call 542-6383. Platinum-grilled producers-to-be can learn to use Apple’s GarageBand at a Digital Recording Workshop at 6:30 PM at the Tangled Tones Studio, 2005 South Ave. W., which is followed by an hour of music lab time. $35. RSVP 529-2601 or lcleminshaw@bresnan.net. Learn how to support your child’s transition into kindergarten with WORD’s five-week series “The ABC’s of Kindergarten Readiness,” which begins at 6:30 PM every Thu. through June 11. Free., and childcare is available. RSVP 543-3550, ext. 255. Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, hosts a Local Artist Showcase at 7 PM, where dropins are always welcome. Free. Call 541-8463. Famed tromping troubadour Walkin’ Jim Stoltz brings his multimedia presentation Forever Wild to the Swan River Community Hall at 7 PM. Admission is by donation. Call 755-1379. A smattering of humor, pathos, adventure and slapstick could await when the UM University Center Theater presents a Graduate Film Showcase, featuring the films of third-year MFA candidates, at 7 PM. Free. Call 243-4540. The New Lakes Reading Series presents a reading by Kevin Goodan from his second fulllength book of poems, Winter Tenor, at 7 PM at Shakespeare & Co., 103 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 549-9010. With ungulate unemployment skyrocketing, your attendance is sure to help when the North Hills Elk Working Group meets at 7 PM to discuss what’s to be done. Actually, these folks are more interested in population counts than in getting elk to start earning their keep. Free. Come to The Cottage Inn in Kila for a 7 PM Irish jam session and stay for the weekly cribbage tournament at the world famous home of “Turbo Crib.” Free. Call 755-4572. If your normal swing spot’s become jam-packed with losers, head to the Eagle’s Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., where swing lessons begin every Thu. at 7 PM and the dance party gets going in earnest at 8. $5.

Missoula Independent

Transport yourself to the Emerald Isle as the words of author-brothers Frank and Malachy McCourt are paired with dancing, leaping and twirling when Echoes of Ireland step-dances into UM’s University Theatre at 7:30 PM. $43.50/$38.50 students and groups. Visit griztix.com. Bring your axe—or banjer for you backwoods types—and reminisce about music’s goodle days at the weekly Old Timey Music Sessions at Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., at 7:30 PM. Free. Call 726-3765 or 880-6834.

at Los Caporales in Columbia Falls at 9 PM. Call 892-5025. Landslide hosts open mic night at the Bandit Saloon in Columbia Falls every Thu. and Tue. night, starting at 9 PM. Free. Bassackwards Karaoke turns your world underside-up every Thu. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on Airway Boulevard. Free. Call 531-8327.

you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Stroll on into the Montana Hemp Council’s new digs—113 W. Main St., in the back of Authentic Creations—and find out how you can get involved in this righteous struggle during their office hours, which run from noon–2 PM today,

Montana’s Dance Education Project presents Just Dance, a blending of styles featuring 50 students, at 7:30 PM in the Big Sky High School Auditorium. $4. Call 243-2870. Help support When In Rome Productions Inc.’s efforts to bring us a little culture when you attend their We Art Missoula Benefit, an 8 PM silent auction with entertainment, dancing, dessert and more at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $5.

Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, led by Calif.’s dark industrialists 26z with unholy support provided by Kalispell’s Throne of Malediction and Missoula’s own Walking Corpse Syndrome, as well as perhaps a diddy or two by Slit Throat, at the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. $3. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, krunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Join Sandy Bradford and Mark Souhrada when they host the jam

Page 24 May 14–May 21, 2009

Arrive at 5 PM for an open house at the renovated Bigfork Center for the Performing Arts, and stick around as the Bigfork Summer Playhouse kicks off their 50th season with the rousing musical Smokey Joe’s Cafe, a ‘50s and ‘60s revue with characters such as Elvis and Peggy Lee. $19/$18 seniors/$14 under 10. Call 837-4886 or visit bigforksummerplayhouse.com.

Looking for a varied buzz? Try a weekly wine tasting at the Loft of Missoula, 119 W. Main St., where the sweet juice of divinity begins flowing at 5:15 PM every Fri. $10. It’s round one for Victory Smokes, Fiancée, Places and Deny the Dinosaur?, who present a special all-ages show at 5:30 PM at the Badlander. $5/$7 under 21.

Driven by the Jan. World Social Forum in Brazil to deliver the global south’s message to their northern homeland, the Open Field Artists present ¡VIVA!, a multimedia evening of dance-theatre, visual art, live music and vocals, at 8:30 PM at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club, 2537 S. Third St. W. $7. Call 396-3104, 369-2806 or 531-0930. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

Grab a sheet of refrigerator cardboard and show off your breakinest moves—or simply watch our local pool of b-boys and b-girls—when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts the dance jam Top Rock Thursdays every Thu. at 8:30 PM. $2. Call 541-7240.

The silent auction kicks things off at 5 PM, with dinner rolling out at 6:30, as Missoula 3:16 hosts their Help for the Homeless Banquet at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St., which boasts none other than Isaiah Reed as keynote speaker. Cover TBA. Visit missoula316.org.

nightlife

Bring your instruments of entertainment, but leave the drum kits at home, as Polson’s East Shore Smoke House, half a mile north of the Finley Point turnoff on Highway 35, hosts a weekly “semiunplugged” Blues Jam from 8–11 PM. Free. Call 887-2096.

Bowling and karaoke go together like oingo and boingo during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. (See Books in this issue.)

Learn about their varied programs, hang with current and former members and enjoy the creative powers of the community from 6–10 PM at the Greenough Park Pavilion, where an AmeriCorps Potluck offers food, Frisbee and fun. Free, but bring a potluck dish, okay? Call 243-5531.

Photo courtesy of Wilson Graham

Look, folks, bedroom eyes only get you so far in this world. Add a 20-instrument repertoire—like the sitar, hammered dulcimer, crumhorn, bowed psaltery, doumbek, charango and more—and you’ve got Four Shillings Short, the duo who plays the Celtic Connection, 114 E. Main St., at 7 PM on Fri., May 15. Donations appreciated. Call 721-6725.

Vocals soaring in a seemingly solid arc of maximum honky tonk sensibility, Bob Wire plays Sean Kelly’s at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471.

FRIDAY May

15

The Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., has five upcoming options for your kids, so register for a session or two of their Passport to the World Summer Camps, which begin June 15. $75/$65 members per weekly session. RSVP 541-PLAY. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants

Mon., May 18, and Thu., May 21. Call 493-0425. Every weekday, kids aged 6–13 flock to the ZACC, 235 N. First St., w h e r e t h e Yo u n g A r t i s t s Afterschool Program provides experiences with ceramics, painting, construction, wire, robots and more. $12 per day. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com Expand your child’s anthropomorphic capacities when the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., presents Animal Art Collective: Discover the Armadillo at 3:30 PM. $4.25/members free. Call 541-PLAY. Author Reif Larsen hosts a discussion about the writing process and the unusual aspects of his book, The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet, at 3:30 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins

The Can’t Hardly Playboys pick ‘em old and new—as long as it’s acoustic folk and rock—every Fri. from 6 to 8 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 7559463. Predict a future where domestic violence goes extinct when you attend the Supporters of Abuse Free Environments (SAFE) Crystal Ball, which begins at 6:30 PM at the Bitterroot River Inn and features food by Caffe Firenze, live and silent auctions, music by the Joan Zen Duo and more. $50/$75 patrons. RSVP 363-2793. Enjoy the palate-pleasing grub with “the cat and the fiddle” when Charlie Seitz and Ellie Nuno play at 6:30 PM at The Keep. Free. With their 20-instrument arsenal, traveling minstrels Four Shillings Short pack the Celtic Connection, 114 E. Main St., with more sound than you can shake a shillelagh at, at 7 PM. Donations appreciated. Call 721-6725. Author Reif Larsen presents a reading and signing of his book, The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet, at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881. (See Books in this issue.)


Melissa Blue offers an evening of singing the blues at the Hangin Art Gallery and Coffee House in Arlee at 7 PM. Call 726-5005. A tradition continues as the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts another Third Friday Social Dance Night, which this month means Heather Adams offers salsa dance lessons at 7 PM, with the group party beginning at 8. $8/$5 members/$3 dance only. Call 541-7240. Oh, ye of light pockets, despair not, as the Missoula Public Library offers a big-screen vacation from your pennilessness at 7 PM, as they screen some recent box office hit or another as part of their Cheap Date Night. Free. Call 721-2665. Get wild on the dance floor, or just bring your instrument and jam with the band, when an all-ages Friday Night Dance Party thumps into the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. $3. Call 543-7154. Bring yourself a little closer to the great unknowable during the final Dances of Universal Peace circle of the season, which kicks off at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Participatory, easy to learn and sacred dances from around the globe await. Donations most appreciated. Call 251-3010. The UM Music Department presents a student recital featuring clarinetist Madeline DeMahy at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880. Montana’s Dance Education Project presents Just Dance, a blending of styles featuring 50 students, at 7:30 PM in the Big Sky High School Auditorium. $4. Call 243-2870. Expect the expected when The Jimmy Snow Band plays the Missoula Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 2070498. Live music of an unspecified nature shakes things up at 8 PM at The Raven in Bigfork, 39 Orchard Lane, which should add some spice to the Walleye Fish Fry as well. Visit sleepeatdrink.com. Driven by the Jan. World Social Forum in Brazil to deliver the global south’s message to their northern homeland, the Open Field Artists present ¡VIVA!, a multimedia evening of dance-theatre, visual art, live music and vocals, at 8:30 PM at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club, 2537 S. Third St. W. $7. Call 396-3104, 369-2806 or 531-0930. (See Spotlight in this issue.) It’s round two for Victory Smokes, Fiancée, Places and Deny the Dinosaur?, who present their second show in a day at 9 PM at the Badlander. $5/$7 under 21. Seattle sends fine rock emissaries White Hawk to show us exactly

how it’s done at 9 PM at The Other Side. Cover TBA, and add two bucks if you’re under 21. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Don’t expect to be released early for good behavior when The Lifers play Florence’s High Spirits at 9 PM. Free. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sexy at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Paint your eardrums with a palette of hip hop, funk, house, techno and more when Friday Night Delights delights the Palace Lounge at 9 PM. Free. Get your freak on at AmVets Club, where DJ DC rocks dance music at 9 PM. Free. Release your inner Kool Moe Dee when Larry’s Six Mile Casino and Cafe in Huson presents an evening with Grayhound Karaoke at 9 PM. Free. Call 546-8978. When the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., turns over the sound system to a live DJ every Fri. at 9 PM, all you’ve got to remember is to turn south after taking exit 89 from I90. Free. Call 370-3200. Tom Catmull and the Clerics keep your magic slippers gliding across the floor at 9:30 PM at the Union Club. Free. Your favorite swing-dancin’ fun-times band, Cash For Junkers, just might venture into the treacherous territory of freestyle rapping when they play Sean Kelly’s at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. Your funkometer will be badly in need of calibration after Reverend Slanky funks the living hell out of it at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY May

16

Today’s Kundalini Yoga class, led by Sylvia Robert at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., begins at the godly hour of 7 AM and features mainly singing and chanting. $80 for eight classes/$60

for six classes/$12 drop-in. Call 541-7240. Take part in a community action to support those who supported us from 8 AM–4 PM as the Poverello’s Salcido Center, 308 W. Pine St., hosts the Veterans Stand Down, a one-day intervention program where vets hook up with clothing, food, education, live music and other resources. Free. Call 728-1809. A host of local veterinarians offer a low-cost Spay/Neuter Clinic beginning at 8 AM, appointments and rabies shots ($5) are required, and puppies accompanied by their mom will be “fixed” for free. $40 first dog/$25 add’l beasts. RSVP 240-4693. Help the rest of us remain uncharred this summer once you attend a Fireline Safety Class and Pack Test, which begins at 8:30 AM at the Corvallis Grange Hall. The pack test takes place at 2 PM at the Darby High School track, and you need to bring your own 45-pound pack. $80. Call 5237887 or visit bitterrootwildfire.com.

Just outside Southgate Mall, Paxson St. Entrance, Off Brooks • 542-SEED

Your heart, the planet and your farmer-neighbors give thanks every Sat. from 8 AM-noon as you head down to the Clark Fork River Market (clarkforkrivermarket.com), which takes place beneath the Higgins Street bridge, and to the Missoula Farmers’ Market (missoulafarmersmarket.com), which opens at 8:30 at the north end of Higgins Avenue. And if it’s non-edibles you’re after, check out East Pine Street’s Missoula Saturday Market (missoulasaturdaymarket.org), which runs 9 AM–1 PM. Free to spectate, and often to sample. Raise funds to care for the 1,600 afflicted Montanans during a Multiple Sclerosis Walk, which begins with registration at 9 AM at McCormick Park, features kids’ activities, demonstrations and lunch for the walkers once they’ve done their walking. Registration is free. Call 252-5927 or visit msmontana.org. The first in the Travelers’ Rest State Park’s monthly parties—this one’s dubbed the “Spring is Here!” Celebration—begins at 9 AM and doesn’t let up with the interpretive programs, kids’ activities, plant and bird programs and more until 6 PM on Sun., May 17. $2/members and under 19 free. Call 273-4253 or visit travelersrest.org. You are invited to bring your family’s brain injury survivors and others to the Puzzle Club Support Group every Sat. at 9 AM at Jokers Wild, 4829 N. Reserve St. Free. Call 728-9117. Enjoy a weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise when you bring yourself to the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., for Saturday Morning Nia every Sat. at 9 AM. $10. Call 360-8763 or 541-7240.

Missoula Independent

Page 25 May 14–May 21, 2009


SPOTLIGHT rehumanize yourself

If you’re south of Missoula, your weekly dose of freshness awaits at the Hamilton Farmers’ Market, which opens at 9 AM every Sat. through Oct. 3 on Bedford Street near the Ravalli County Museum. Free. Call 961-0004. The University of Montana sets its students free in two waves as they host their 112th annual Commencement Ceremonies in the Adams Center: The Colleges of Arts and Sciences and Technology begin at 9:30 AM, and students from the professional schools and colleges get theirs at 2 PM. Watch for flying hats. It’s a year-end wrap-up and a looking forward at 10 AM at the Arlee Senior Center, where the Arlee Community Development Corporation’s annual meeting also features new board elections. Free. Call 726-5550. Renew your child’s commitment to feeling the rhythm when Tangled Tones hosts Kids Vibrations at 11 AM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $4/two for $6/three or more for $10. Call 396-3352.

Photo courtesy of Jonathan Marquis

When Heidi Junkersfeld, founder and producer of the Open Field Artists (OFA), traveled to Brazil in January for the ninth World Social Forum (WSF), her mission was not simply to attend, but to carry the meeting’s message back to America.

characters and performance artists beckoning them inside. While the performance is scripted and based upon the WSF experience, Junkersfeld firmly states that “each individual artist talks about and explores their own ideas of an evolved planetary society, both as individuals and how we take care of the planet.”

The 150,000-person gathering in the rainforest Once inside, a visually near Belem highlighted ways in which our modern culture of consumption and exploitation has WHAT: ¡VIVA! stripped not only the planet, but our own WHEN: Thu., May 14–Sat., May 16, 8:30 PM souls as well. This week, WHERE: Orchard Homes Country Life Club, OFA’s dancers, poets, 2537 S. Third St. W. singers, stilt-walkers and artists join her in sound- HOW MUCH: $7 ing the alarm. “The message that they’re sending is that we have to be a unified world, and unified with nature as well,” says Junkersfeld. “We have to return to what it is to be human, that’s where the idea of ¡VIVA! comes from.” As audience members arrive outside Orchard Homes, which lies west of the intersection of Reserve and Third streets, roughly across from Wheat Montana, they’ll be greeted by mythological

Missoula Independent

stunning awakening is in store, and all-ages audiences can expect a great dose of entertainment overlaying the bedrock truth of the need for social change.

The OFA will continue the work of ¡VIVA! after these three shows, and the challenge is presented to Missoula audiences to support “non-university-based experiential socio-spiritual art” as they progress. As Junkersfeld puts it, “Everyone needs to wake up individually, in whatever way that they can, to listen to themselves and recreate community on a global scale, which is not something that the television is going to teach us to do.”

Page 26 May 14–May 21, 2009

—Jonas Ehudin

Free. Visit sbcmontana.org or naturepropelled.com. (See Agenda in this issue.) Practice your rapid eye movement when you check out all that’s new during a Twenty Minute Tour every Sat. at noon at the Missoula Art Museum. Free. Call 728-0447. Add your mark to a huge group art piece when a “Hands On” Sewing Circle, which runs from 12:30–2:30 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, invites you to stitch a bit of hand-shaped wool onto Marie Watt’s exhibition Heirloom. Free. Call 721-0447. The Lord holds two days of open auditions for his new dance ministry beginning at 1 PM at Kalispell’s Flathead Health & Fitness, 300 First St. W., and running through Sun., May 17. Free. Call 257-6142. Give your health a healthy boost this spring as Dr. Kristin Green and Amy Kraft present a doubleshot of vitality from 1–5 PM with their Yoga and Physical Therapy Class. $55. RSVP 546-6922 for location.

When Seuss Saturday, the early literacy program for kids aged 3–6, fires up at 11 AM at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., you’ll be pleased to know that all vowels and consonants are free. $4.25/Free for members. Call 541-PLAY.

Bring your mat and your frugal spirit when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., hosts Pilates Day, which begins at 1:30 PM, features four hours of classes with an array of instructors and promises a drawing for even more free pilates classes. Free. Call 541-2673.

Alison Laundrie gets you in shape and provides a few moments away from your spawn every Sat. at 11 AM during a Pilates class at Sunflower Montessori School, 1703 S. Fifth St. W. $10 includes childcare. RSVP 214-7247.

Veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can join facilitator Chris Poloynis every Sat. at 3 PM, when Spartans Honour, an outdoor PTSD support group, meets at Greenough Park’s southernmost footbridge. Free. Call 327-7834.

Have your off-the-grid fun and eat it too when the Sustainable Business Council’s inaugural Garden City Localfest steamrolls Caras Park from noon–8 PM with local food and drink, demonstrations of biofuelburning Japanese fire trucks and gravity-resistant Japanese visual artists, live music by Micah Wolf, Tom and the Tomatoes, Cash for Junkers, Tractor Jack and the Muddy Spuds and MudSlide Charley, kids’ activities and more.

nightlife Enjoy the dinner, the live and silent auctions and the music of Tom Catmull when the Five Valleys Land Trust throws the hangar doors open wide at 5:30 PM for their “Protecting Land, Celebrating Place” spring banquet in the Northstar Air Hangar at the Missoula International Airport. $50. RSVP 5490755 or e-mail elizabeth@fvlt.org.


Featuring: Freestyle Kayak Competition at Brennan’s Wave Gourmet Food f rom Locally Grown, Harvested and Produced Ingredients Goal of an Off The Grid Event by Utilizing Alternative Energy Vendors • Children’s Activities Beer Garden with Local Breweries and Wine Special Invited Guest Speakers Mayor Engen, Gov. Schwietzer & Senator Tester Arts & Craf ts • Demonstrations f rom Local Sustainable Businesses Quality Hand-Made Wares f rom Talented Local Artists

Performances by: Tom and the Tomatoes • Mudslide Charley • Cash for Junkers • Tractor Jack and the Muddy Spuds Live Mural Painting by World Famous Japanese Artists “Gravity Free” ...and much much more!!!

Refreshing Change of Pace Essential oil blending bar Bath & body care Herbal extracts Inspiring gifts Supplements Owned & operated by local, trained herbalists 180 S. 3rd W. next to Bernice’s • M-F 10-6 • Sat 11-5 • 728.0543

Giclee Art • Gift Cards • Writings Natural Herbal Products

Shop is often open

1520 S. 7th St. W. • Missoula Highlandwinds@gmail.com

406- 541-7577

Local Fresh Ingredients • Bike Powered Argentinean Style • Homemade

Clark Fork River Market • Saturdays 8-1 Downtown Tonight • Thursdays 5:30-8:30

www.empanadalady.com • 728-2030 coupon: get your 2nd empanada at 1/2price

Missoula Independent

Page 27 May 14–May 21, 2009


Satisfy that thirst for something beyond ordinary wine at the Hidden Legend Winery, at Sheafman corner and Highway 93 S., where the honey wine flows and the local music rolls every Sat. at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 363-6323. These guys—or at least their selfimages���could benefit from a little union organizing: The Working Class Zeroes plays Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. The UM Music Department presents a student recital featuring pianist Emily Trapp at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880. Th e M i s s o u l a Fo l k l o r e S o c i e t y throws a Volunteer Appreciation Contra Dance in the Union Hall, with lessons beginning at 7:30 PM and the booty-shakin’ getting underway at 8 PM, with music from Skippin’ A Groove and a “calling open mic.” $8/$6 members. Call 543-6508. The Women’s Health Fund hosts the annual Women’s Spring Dance, where the booties shake to tunes from DJ Annie B. from 8 PM–midnight at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $5, and BYOB. Call 721-2482. Expect the expected when The Jimmy Snow Band plays the Missoula Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 207-0498.

local swing tunes from Shane Clouse and Stomping Ground pound the shores of the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free.

This evening’s local offerings don’t come any funkier: Reverend Slanky tosses your brain into a suitcase of the funky stuff at 9 PM at the Badlander. $5.

They’re newly remodeled and ready to rip: Boomers Pub, 2021 Brooks St., hosts a massive graduation blowout and CD release party for Ball ‘N Jack, who commence to tear the place up with live ‘n’ local sets of raw rock at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 549-5059.

Hardcore trailblazers Deranged Diction—the ones with the really famous bass player—inhabit the Palace Lounge at 9 PM, where they play a stage warmed by Reptile Dysfunction and Rooster Sauce. $10/$12 under 21. (See Scope in this issue.) It’s your last chance for a while, what with summer coming on and all, so use the Elk’s Lodge’s Front Street side entrance and dance the night away when Club Q opens at 9 PM with the hottest tunes being spun by the one and only Duke. $5/$6 under 21.

Keep your hip hop live and local as the Top Hat hosts the Rock Lovely Enter tainment Par ty—witness Frodie and the rest of the artists from their CD All in the Family—at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. (See Noise in this issue.) DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

Don’t expect to be released early for good behavior when The Lifers play Florence’s High Spirits at 9 PM. Free.

SUNDAY

Feel free to perform during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone knocks you over and sprains your elbow tendons. Well actually, you should be very surprised if that happens. Again. Free.

You’re hereby invited to Hamilton’s Carriage House, 310 N. Fourth St., every Sun. at 9 AM, in order that you might bear witness to Rev. Kathianne Lewis’ message from the Center for Spiritual Living in Seattle. Free. Call 375-9996.

If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. You’re a diva on the dance floor: AmVets Club offers up DJ DC and his dance music at 9 PM. Free. Be sure to wear your largest 10-gallon chapeau as wave upon wave of

meets on the third floor of the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. Free. Visit allsoulsmissoula.org. Learn about defensive strategies, amendments, worms, bees, squirrels, bats, birds and mulch, mulch more during a four-hour Victory Garden Class at noon at the Green Light, 128 W. Alder St. $25. RSVP 541-TOBE. The Nursing Nook, 1900 S. Reserve St., helps you feel just a bit more prepared with the 1 PM class Infant, Child and Adult CPR and First Aid, which is offered the third Sunday of every month. $60. RSVP 721-5440. Despite its great length and intellectual complexity, Bill Harley has agreed to perform the epic tale of “Zanzibar” when the beloved bard of the wee beasty set performs at 2 PM in UM’s University Theatre. $15/$10 under 19. Call 243-4051 or visit griztix.com.

nightlife

The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200.

MAM

Driven by the Jan. World Social Forum in Brazil to deliver the global south’s message to their northern homeland, the Open Field Artists present ¡VIVA!, a multimedia evening of dance-theatre, visual art, live music and vocals, at 8:30 PM at the Orchard Homes Country Life Club, 2537 S. Third St. W. $7. Call 396-3104, 369-2806 or 531-0930. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

May

17

Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed and head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Free. You’re invited to wrestle with the claims of Jesus in an open and accepting environment every Sun. at 10 AM, when All Souls Missoula

Find your muse at the bottom of a highball glass when Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School rolls into the Union Hall at 7 PM for three hours of incredible modeling by Stephanie Hohn and Marc Moss, music by DJ Mermaid, delicious cocktails, drawings and debauchery. Dry art media are encouraged. $8. Visit sketchymissoula.com.

can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke night, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when Happy Hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free. Hate smoky pool halls? No sweat— and no smoke: Head underground when The Palace, 147 W. Broadway, features a rotating cast of Random Rock DJs at 9 PM every Sun. Free.

MONDAY May

18

You’ve but a few short weeks before the registration deadline for Y Music Summer Camps, so unless you want to continue to raise that brood of tonally defective offspring, get in touch with the good folks at the Y. Prices vary, so call 721-YMCA or visit ymcamissoula.org.

Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs at 7 PM, live jazz by Donna Smith at 7:30 and a rotating cast of bands thereafter. Free.

Two sessions of the popular World Rhythm Youth Hand Drumming Class take place at the Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W. every Mon.: At 4:30 PM, kids aged 5–7 can get their grooves on, and a class for those 8 and above begins at 5:15. $30 per month/drum rental: $15 per month. RSVP 396-3352 or visit tangledtones.com.

The weekend isn’t over until you wrap it up with Jam Night at the Finish Line, 153 Meridian Road in Kalispell, where Landslide hosts at 8 PM. Free. Call 257-0248.

Gothic Fusion Bellydance takes place every Mon. at 5:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Beginners are more than welcome. $7. Call 531-3000.

Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you

If you devote 5:30 to 8:30 PM on Monday or Wednesday nights to

THURSDAY, MAY 21 Artini: Cultural Souvenirs // 5:30-9 PM, Free Professor and art historian Valerie Hedquist opines about M.A. Papanek-Miller’s exhibit at 7PM. The artist will sign exhibit catalogs. Lace up your dancing shoes and enjoy some mighty fine bluegrass with Iron Lasso! As always, Artini offers wine, beer, and non-alcoholic beverages, and fabulous food generously donated by Valerie Hedquist.

SATURDAY, MAY 23 Meet the Artist // 12 PM, Free Join exhibiting artist, M.A. Papanek-Miller for a tour of her exhibition. MAM published A Snowman Cares for Our Memory of Water. Buy it and have the artist sign it! $20 M.A. Papanek-Miller, Run, IV (detail), 2004, mixed media, 30 x 30”.

“HANDS ON” SEWING CIRCLE Saturdays // 12:30-2:30 PM, Free Join people of all ages and talents as they sew hand-shaped pieces of wool onto Marie Watt’s exhibition Heirloom. The traced hands are from children and adults in the Missoula area who have visited the MAM exhibit. Marie Watt, Heirloom installation detail, 2009.

MISSOULA ART MUSEUM 406.728.0447 // www.missoulaartmuseum.org // Free Expression. Free Admission. Thanks to the Missoula Independent for their support of MAM’s advertising efforts. Missoula Independent

Page 28 May 14–May 21, 2009


silent meditation, political drinking or other non-kid-friendly endeavors, the Parenting Place offers free child care and dinner at 1644 S. Eighth St. Call 728-KIDS to reserve a spot.

nightlife Take up the struggle against domestic and sexual violence in the Bitterroot when you attend Suppor ters of Abuse Free Environments’ (SAFE) four-day Volunteer Training, which begins at 6 PM through Thu., May 21. Free. RSVP 363-2793.

$150. Individual consultation’s on the menu as well. Call 493-0746 or visit 406writersworkshop.com. Experience momentum, balance, and timing tuned with a strong drummerdancer connection every Mon. at 7:30 PM with West African Sabar dance class at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W., across from Hawthorne Elementary. $10. Call 721-3854 and drum up directions at terangaarts.googlepages.com. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702

TUESDAY May

19

Bend, stretch and play every Tue. and Thu. at Happy Mama, 736A S. First St. W., where Yoga for Everybody eases the suffering at 9:30 AM. $12 drop-in/$10 advance. Call 880-6883. Historically speaking, Afghans have proven to be impossible to control, but you’ll have plenty of guidance when you join the group Knitting for Peace, which meets every Tue.

Tuesdays ease your entry into ceramics ownership from noon–6 PM every Tue. at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com. As the U.S. unemployment rate hits 8.6 percent—16 percent if you count people who’ve stopped looking or taken part-time jobs—the City Life Center, 1515 Fairview Ave., steps in to the rescue with a Job Skills Fair at 3 PM. Free. Call 532-1590 or 532-1555.

nightlife Join in the conversation regarding underage drinking in Missoula at

Dr. Shelby Smith helps you discover the common culprits of your daily aches and pains at 6 PM at Vitality Chiropractic Clinic, 410 W. Spruce St., with the health presentation “Move Well.” Free. RSVP 549-0119.

Get gooey during Open Instructed Studio at the Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., every Tue. at 6 PM through June 30. $168/eight-week session. Call 543-0509.

Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Highway 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141.

Cathy Clark directs your feet through the mouthful that is Beginning Latin Style Cha Cha every Mon. in May at 7 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. There’s a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207. Quick! You’ve a mere matter of hours before the first 406 Writer’s Workshop—think year-round “salonstyle” writing classes—begins a sixweek focus on fiction at 7:15 PM, led by teacher and author Brian Buckbee.

It’s always a glutenous good time when Wheat Montana, 2520 S. Third St. W., presents Black Mountain Bluegrass at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 327-0900.

Don’t it make your green grass blue? The pickin’ circle begins at 6 PM, and house pickers Pinegrass play at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865.

What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992.

Having barely made it out of Missoula alive, bard of the youth Bill Harley presents a more family-centric performance at 7 PM in the Johnny Arlee-Victor Charlo Theatre at Salish Kootenai College. $14/$12 advance. Call (800) 823-4386.

Instructor Holly Jeremiassen teaches young people aged 10 and up the finer points of glass fusing every Tue. at 5:30 PM during Youth Glass Class. $15 per session. Call 5497555 or visit zootownarts.com.

Heavy hitters—from the Missoula County Weed District to the Montana Department of Agriculture—present you with the info you need to know at 6 PM at Quality Supply, 2801 W. Broadway, during the class Noxious Weeds and Revegetation. Free. Call 329-1346.

Mr. Pibb, hit the road! Mountain Dew, here’s your pink slip! Refine your Soda Firing technique every Mon. at 6 PM through July 2 at the Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St. $200/eight-week session. Call 543-0509.

If you can’t seem to count four musicians, blame the wine when the Discount Quartet plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Call 549-2906.

Jody Mosher offers another weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise—aka Nia—every Tue. at 5:30 PM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. First class free/$6 each thereafter.

The Missoula Art Museum presents the four-week course Figure Drawing for Adults at 6 PM, in which Bob Phinney and a slew of live models merge to introduce you to the basics of the form. $75/$67.50 members. Call 728-0447.

Photo courtesy of Susan Wilson

Dude, shoplifting from music stores is such bad karma. Consummate kids’ artist and Grammy-winner Bill Harley presents two shows this week, beginning at 2 PM on Sun., May 17, in UM’s University Center, and continuing at 7 PM on Mon., May 18, at Salish Kootenai College. UM: $15/$10 under 19; SKC: $14/$12 advance. Call 243-4951 or visit griztix.com, and call (800) 823-4386 for the SKC show.

Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated.

from 11 AM–1 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-3955.

Unite the clans with Geneva Bybee, who presents Tribal Fusion Bellydance at 8 PM every Mon. and Wed. at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing.

New moms discuss the ups and downs of motherhood when Families First presents another New Moms Support Group at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-7690.

For once in your life, leave the bar with a slightly thicker wallet with DJ Hickey’s Rawk and Roll Bingo Night every Mon. from 8:30 PM until midnight at the Badlander. $1 per card, and the opening round’s always free.

Toes will tap and fingers will snap (in the painless way) when the Rocky Mountain Rhythm Kings ride into Snappy Sport Senter, 1400 Hwy. 2 E., every Tue. at noon. Free, donation suggested. Call 257-7525.

The Milkcrate Mechanic keeps the groove fine tuned when he presents random music for random people, featuring rotating DJs and acts, free pool and mad krunk every Mon. at 9 PM at the Palace Lounge. Free.

Find strength and the will to fight at the Breast Cancer Support Group, which meets at noon each Tue. at St. Francis Xavier Church, 420 W. Pine St. Free.

Bring your music appreciation glands to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and you’ll soon find yourself surrounded by the finest musical acts on the planet. Free.

The Shootin’ The Bull Toastmasters Club meets at noon at the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, 5705 Grant Creek Road. The first few are free. Call 529-5488. The dictionary defines “BOGO” as an acronym for “Buy One, Get One,” which means BOGO Pottery

Hidden in Plain Sight, which features a simulated alcoholic teen’s bedroom, tours of the mobile impaired driving assessment center, a panel discussion, free barbecue and a cash coffee bar at 5:30 PM at the City Life Community Center, 151 Fairview Ave. Free. Your whole family is invited to get a working glimpse at farm life—and the delicious results thereof—during another Families First Farm Night, which takes place from 5:30–7 PM at the PEAS Farm, 3010 Duncan Drive, and features music by Tom Catmull, activities by the Children’s Museum and a delicious organic meal for everyone. Free. RSVP 721-7690. It’s Tuesday, and you ate your last tube steak for breakfast, so why not Dine With the Elks from 5:30–7 PM? This week, seasoned and shredded chicken thigh and breast meat enchiladas, red rice, refried beans, buttered corn and vanilla ice cream with caramel accompany the flashy pianizing of Adrienne Dussault. $9 per plate. RSVP 549-0542.

Missoula Independent

It’s a spicy good time when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at 6 PM, followed by intermediate/advanced at 7, every Tue. at the Badlander. $5. The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. Platinum-grilled producers-to-be can learn to use Apple’s GarageBand at a Digital Recording Workshop at 6:30 PM at the Tangled Tones Studio, 2005 South Ave. W., which is followed by an hour of music lab time. $35. RSVP 529-2601 or lcleminshaw@bresnan.net. When the North Valley Public Library in Stevensville hosts the new program “Reflect: Community Readings and Conversations” at 6:30 PM, participants will read a short passage and then discuss the piece’s relationship to civic engagement, service and community values. Free. Call 243-6022.

Page 29 May 14–May 21, 2009


CALLING ALL : S T S I T R LOCAL A Give us your

BEST! Every year our readers painstakingly complete their ballots, we diligently count 'em and then we dev ote an entire issue to showcasing what's been vote d BEST OF MISSOULA. And this year we invite you to showcase your own self by getting your artistic take on Best of Missoula included in that issue. In other words, show us what “Best of Missoula”mean s to you...it could be a painting, a photograph, a dra wing, etc., but it must somehow incorporate the Mis soula Independent and it must somehow be totally awe some.

GET

A single bracelet does not jingle: Unity Dance and Drum’s all-levels West African Dance Class meets every Tue. evening at 6:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/class or $35/four classes. Call 549-7933.

group dedicated to advancing President Obama’s legislative agenda and building on the grassroots foundation created during the campaign, waits with open ears at 7 PM in the Missoula Public Library. Free.

Experience cross-cultural experiences with native speakers during a session of Spanish lessons, which meet at 6:30 PM every Tue. and Thu. through July 2 at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts. $200 per session. RSVP espanolmt@gmail.com.

Like a sort of homecoming, UM alumni and friends pack Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave., where a joint reading features Gary Thompson and Tom Aslin at 7 PM. Free. Call 721-2881. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

Send your visions for the future to Washington when the Organizing for America Listening Tour, a

The Missoula Writing Collaborative’s Jeremy Smith offers up the fruit of his tutelage during a Poetry Performance by Rattlesnake

School, which begins at 7 PM at the Missoula Art Museum. Free. Call 728-0447. If you can’t read this and you’re not interested in Tiny Tales, allow me to suggest the 7 PM informal English conversation group Talk Time, which is led by TEFL instructor Adam Hart and meets the first and third Tue. of the month at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-2665. You’re invited by Turning the Wheel to take part in some BodyCentered Creative Expression to live music every Tue. at 7 PM. $5–10 donation. Call 543-4414 for location and more details.

SPOTLIGHT twofer tuesday

Published!

Our panel of esteemed judges (OK, some of the Indy staff) will evaluate the entries and select the best to be published in our

July 9th Best of Missoula issue Submission FORMATS: AL ART EPS • ORIGIN • JPEG • F IF T • F • PD

ENTRY DEADLINE: May 31, 2009

Entries may be submitted via email to m LFoland@missoulanews.co or delivered to MT 59801 317 S. Orange, Missoula

CONTEST

RULES

original work, it has not been copied from Entrants represent and warrant that their submission is their or entry. person other any of rights the others, and it does not violate dent and will not be acknowledged or All entry materials become the property of the Missoula Indepen y of the entrant, but entry in this propert the remain shall ion submiss any in ht copyrig The returned. , without further compensaconsent and ion permiss al perpetu ble, contest constitutes entrant's irrevoca state for editorial, adverand city and name 's tion or attribution, to use the submission and the entrant authorized by the sponsor, in others and/or sponsor the by s purpose y publicit and tising, commercial throughout the world, for the duration of the any and all media now in existence or hereinafter created, zed by the sponsor shall have the right to copyright in the submission. Sponsor and/or others authori and discharges the sponsor, the judges, releases entrant Each ion. submiss the edit, adapt, and modify the contest, their employees, agents or of tration adminis or any party associated with the development companies, or affiliates from any and all liarepresentatives or any of their parents, subsidiaries, sister on, legal claims, costs, injuries, losses limitati t withou g includin , contest bility in connection with the or lfoland@missoulanews.com 09 543-66 info: or damages, demand or actions of any kind. More

Missoula Independent

Page 30 May 14–May 21, 2009

As we bid a fond farewell to this year’s batch of and her eyes crinkle blue/ in this moment,/ the university fodder, Missoula’s literary community wel- room we are in.” comes back two grads from another time. Thomas A parent’s passing away from us is a stark reality we Aslin and Gary Thompson wrote their way through all face, and these poets broaden our collective experiUM’s MFA Creative Writing ence in preparation for that Program in the ‘70s, and WHO: Thomas Aslin and Gary Thompson day. Aslin, in his “Still Life,” this week they both holds us as we step into return with new books of WHAT: Poetry reading that frightening future: “No poetry under their wings. one else is home other The two complement each other in style and topics, and a common bridge between their work is an open view of their lives’ inner workings.

WHEN: Tue., May 19, 7 PM

than my father/ who lies here breathless and inert./ Yet, how can I step from the room/ and leave him? No one prepares us,/ not for this. And who among us/ can discern the weight,/ let alone the measure, of a breath?”

WHERE: Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. HOW MUCH: Free

Family features prominently, and both men have struggled to reconcile the myriad issues that arise when we decide to have parents. Thompson’s “Dear Chrysalis” invokes a visit with the author’s mother: “Gary I whisper./ Her face empties slowly,/ but then something flickers—/ Oh Gary she says,/

And while this reading promises to be a reunion of two poets and their friends and mentors, it’s clear from the collected work that there will be space there for all of us. —Jonas Ehudin


The Rocky Mountain School of Photography, 210 N. Higgins Ave., presents Scott Rouse, whose 7 PM lecture “Making a Photo Book: Where to Start” will have you itchin’ to apply paste to paper and whatnot. Free. Call 543-0171. Hey wrong-side-of-the-street-rider: You can learn to bike responsibly at Free Cycle’s Bike Well classes at 7 PM at 732 S. First St. W., where class also convenes on Wed. and Thu. Call 541-7284 for times. Join Sentinel High School’s Amnesty International, the Montana Abolition Coalition and the Montana Human Rights Network at 8 PM in Caras Park—and bring a candle—on this Global Day of Action for Troy Davis, a 17-year Georgia death row inmate who’s never received a federal court hearing in spite of seven of nine witnesses recanting testimonies that got him convicted in the first place. Call 72 8 - 2 4 0 0 , e x t . 76 0 3 , o r v i s i t amnestyusa.org/troydavis. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? Here’s one for the graduating class: What’s the current unemployment rate in the U.S.? (Find the answer

in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) It’s still bigger than disco: The Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., keeps on keepin’ it real every Tue. at 8 PM, when Hip Hop Class puts the “back” back in “back in the day.” Call 541-7240 for pricing. Enjoy Tunes on Tuesdays with Christian Johnson from 8:30–11 PM, an acoustic open mic jam every Tue. night at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. DJs Karl K, Dillon, Cosmic Diva, Timmie Irie, Tobin and Kris Moon play music for the irie-hearted every Tue. at 9 PM when Reggae Night overstands all your troubles at the Badlander. Free.

L.I.V. Karaoke night gives your larynx a weekly workout with a 9:30 PM sesh at the Elbow Room. Free. Call 531-7800.

WEDNESDAY May

20

Take a load off in the company of friends every Wed. from 9–11:30 AM as Aspen Hospice, 107 Bell Crossing West, hosts the Caregiver Coffeebreak. Free. Call 642-3010. Join the Flathead Audubon Society’s Neal Brown for the twohour jaunt Birds of the Wild Mile every Wed. through June at 9 AM at the trailhead of Bigfork’s Wild Mile Nature Trail. Free. Call 837-5018.

The moon’s always full and the pack’s always howlin’ at the Wolf Den’s Open Mic Night in Polson. Free. 9 PM. Call 883-2054.

Get down with Gramps and the baby when Heather Adams leads Family Dance at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., at 3 PM every Wed. in May. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

Forego the weekly shower and join Unwashed Promotions for live music and moist DJs Harvey and Heyska when Punk Rock Tuesday fumigates the Palace Lounge every Tue. at 9 PM. Free.

Stevensville’s newest brewery— Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St.—hopes you’ll wash down that beer with a show by Andrea Harsell and Louie Bond at 5 PM. Free. Call 777-0680.

Young urban people can add to their movement repertoire every Wed. at 5 PM when the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., presents Breakin’ for Kids. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

nightlife Share your connection to and experiences with teen pregnancy when Missoula Adolescent Pregnancy, Parenting and Prevention Services (MAPPPS) hosts the community speak-out “Tell YOUR Story” at 6 PM in Room 326 of UM’s University Center. Free. Call 880-4664.

Brazilian Dance Class, which takes place every Wed. at 6 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. A revolving cast of local singers and musicians makes up the band Katy and Friends, who do the rocking every Wed. at 6:30 PM at the Cottage Inn in Kila. Free. Call 755-8711.

Combine a relaxed and supportive atmosphere with live models in their birthday suits—18 and over only, please—and you’ve got the Missoula Art Museum’s Hump Day Figure Drawing group every Wed. from 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. Call 728-0447.

Note the 6:45 PM meet-up time, as the Ride of Silence, an annual global event to commemorate cyclists killed by motor vehicles, leaves Caras Park promptly at 7. Be prepared to ride silently and slowly in honor of our fallen kin. Free.

Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117.

When the Bitterroot Public Library in Hamilton hosts the new program “Reflect: Community Readings and Conversations” at 7 PM, participants will read a short passage and then discuss the piece’s relationship to civic engagement, service and community values. Free. Call 243-6022.

Gillian Kessler asks only that you embrace your inner diva as she fuses slick Brazilian moves with modern techniques for her Afro-

Missoula Independent

Learn to mystify and entrance by wiggling those hips every Wed. dur-

Page 31 May 14–May 21, 2009


Featured Artist: ••

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and more during WORD’s Toddlers, Babies and Books at 11 AM every first and third Thu. of the month, where the snack’s always free. And so is the program. Call 543-3550, ext. 255.

Wednesdays are for the tango, and nobody know this like the Downtown Dance Collective, where Abby and Diego offer three tango options beginning at 8:30 PM every week. Call 541-7240 for pricing.

The Missoula Nonprofit Network presents Put Your Best Foot Forward: Non Profit Media/Marketing Pitfalls and Opportunities at 11:30 AM at the YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway. $10/members free. RSVP sits@mountainhomemt.org.

Evlene and Acee Vill invite you to join them in celebrating the release of their new CDs at the Badlander at 9 PM. Cover $5.

Try a high energy, low impact workout on for size every Thu. at noon at the Downtown Dance Collective, where African Boogie gets you sweating with the basic body forms found in African dance. Call 5417240 for pricing.

You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s welcome-to-life-onthe-outside-kiddos trivia question: If we look simply at the number of Americans who are seeking jobs, the unemployment rate is 8.6 percent, the highest it’s been in over a quarter century. If we add in those who’ve given up the search or who’ve taken part-time jobs, the figure jumps to about 16 percent. Oh, and always wear sunscreen. Hate smoky pool halls? No sweat— and no smoke—but plenty of girl power: Head underground at 9 PM every Wed. when The Palace, 147 W. Broadway, presents Ladies’ DJ Night. Free.

sa

204 S 3rd St West

ing a Hula/Tahitian Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., where you can learn beautiful and energetic rhythms at 7 PM. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482.

830-3192

TRAUMA & THE MIND - BODY CONNECTION with BESSEL VAN DER KOLK, MD

Discover the human experience of trauma. Learn radical new approaches to treatment.

Spit the gorf out of your taorht with Bassackwards Karaoke every Wed. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on North Reserve Street. Free. Call 531-8327. This Missoula legend has nothing to do with ground beef: Wasted Wednesday at the Top Hat offers unlimited tap beer and M-Group at 10 PM and the wisdom you’ll gain is worth the $7 cover many times over. Call 728-9865. Longevity is the man’s secret weapon: DJ Dubwise spins mad flava all over the ladies’ drink specials starting at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA UC BALLROOM FRIDAY MAY

22 • 8:30 - 5:00 SATURDAY MAY 23 • 8:30 - 4:30 TWO DAY CONFERENCE • $150 • CE’s available

“THE BODY KEEPS THE SCORE”

SPECIAL FRIDAY NIGHT LECTURE • 7 - 9 PM Open to the public • $15 Free to conference attendees

For more information: ebtg.org Exploratory Beyond Trauma Group Healing Through the Mind Body Connection

THE EXPLORATORY BEYOND TRAUMA GROUP SUPPORTS EFFORTS TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES FOR SURVIVORS OF TRAUMA.

Missoula Independent

Page 32 May 14–May 21, 2009

THURSDAY May

21

Explore movement as an avenue for deeper self-understanding every Thu. at 9 AM when Hillary Funk Welzenbach hosts an Authentic Movement Group at Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $25/session. RSVP 541-2662. Your youngling who’s not seen three years is invited for an hour of songs, rhymes, body games, storytelling

Give your youngsters something to strive for—or to avoid—when the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., serves up a Playdate with an Artist at 3 PM. $4.25/members free. Call 541-PLAY. Kids aged 5–13 can teach the man a thing or two during Movin’ with the Mayor, a health promotion event at 3:30 PM at Westside Park. Free. Call 721-PARK.

nightlife The Sustainable Business Council unveils the winners of their fifth annual Sustainability Awards at 6 PM at the Stensrud Building, 314 N. First St. W., after the 5:30 social hour gets everyone primed to accept runner-up status. And stick around for the 6:15 panel of winners. Free. It’s an all-inclusive art party when the Missoula Art Museum hosts Artini: Cultural Souvenirs at 5:30 PM, where UM art history professor Valerie Hedquist explains the ageold quandary regarding why “A Snowman Cares for Our Memory of Water,” exhibiting artist M.A. Papanek-Miller signs her books and bluegrass from Iron Lasso helps wash down the delightful noshes and smooth beverage. Free. Call 728-0447. He’s still revving his engine, getting primed to blast on outta here, but not before Ryan Bundy plays Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St., at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-7468. Expectant parents can get a leg up on the competition as The Nursing Nook, 1900 S. Reserve St., presents the 2.5-hour class Breastfeeding Prep for Success at 6 PM. $60 includes 10 percent off breastfeeding supplies. Call 721-5440. Fight global warming as you submit comments in real time when the Sierra Club hosts a live stream from Seattle of the EPA Hearing on the Danger of Greenhouse Gases at 7 PM at the Elk’s Lodge.

Steer the feds toward taking action, but first you should RSVP 549-1142. Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, hosts a Local Artist Showcase at 7 PM, where dropins are always welcome. Free. Call 541-8463. In honor of the extremely posthumous publication of the book Who is Mark Twain?, Hamilton’s Chapter One Book Store hosts an authentic Mark Twain impersonator to tell stories and describe the writer’s life and times at 7 PM. Free. Call 363-5220. Got a little extra cash? Great, do you think you could get me a ticket to witness an acoustic evening with the Lyle Lovett Trio at 8 PM in the Wilma Theatre? C’mon, it’s only $59.50! Hook a brother up and go fetch it at Rockin Rudy’s. The underground couches fill with laughing throngs when hometown hilarity arrives in the form of funnyman Chris Fairbanks, who brings New York comedian and bud Todd Barry along to incite mass laughter at 9 PM in the Palace Lounge. $10. (See Feature in this issue.) If your ears have longed for a few hours of nice loud metal, give them all they deserve and more as The Other Side plays host to Psychostick, Universal Choke Sign and Blessiddoom at 9 PM. $13/$10 advance. Missoula’s most ballady balladeer, Russ Nasset, graciously picks up a gig at the Old Post Pub, playing every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. Join the ranks of the Missoula Metal Militia, which brings metal DJs and bands to the Palace Lounge at 9 PM every Thu. Free.

Every since the days when all you had to do was sit around your kitchen table eating your mom’s pancakes, you’ve wondered just one thing: What’s the first name of Mrs. Butterworth? Now that you’re a little older and wiser, it’s time to make your mark on this world. You must guess the lady of syrup’s given name, and you’ve got until July 17 to do so. If you’re feeling lucky, visit mrsbutterworthsyrup.com/namecontest for your chance to win $500 and all the syrup you can drink for a year. Personally, I think her first name’s Highfructina, but there’s no way that’ll win. And while you’re online with your thinking cap firmly attached, send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., May 15, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. And for Peet’s sake, don’t submit events through our website. Just don’t do it.


Well, hey there, all you college grads. Congratulations on your years of toil, all the beer bongs you smartly avoided and all the times you fled campus for jaunts into the Rattlesnake. You did take plenty of trips into the Rattlesnake, right? Good. And now that your days of lolling around the Oval and occasionally making it to class are over, it’s time for you to get a frickin’ job. Or so they keep telling me… One sweet option for the two-wheeled set is to take a job with the city. The Missoula Bicycle Pedestrian Office is currently seeking the perfect duo to be Bicycling Ambassadors this summer. Basically, you’ll spend your summer days interacting with cyclists, offering handy little tips on how to more effectively and legally ride a bike, and doing your best to defuse any tense situations. And really, those situations almost never happen. Unless you don’t have your facts straight. But that’s another issue entirely. Applications are due Wed., May 20, with the job kicking off on June 15. Interested parties are to contact Phil Smith at psmith@ci.missoula.mt.us for more details and an application. Godspeed. And we jump straight into this week’s bulging folder of events with two that take place promptly: At 7 PM in Bigfork’s Swan River Hall on Thu., May 14, famed defender of the wild and hill tromper Walkin’ Jim Stoltz presents Forever Wild, a multimedia celebration of wilderness. You’ve the option to donate at the door, and you can call 755-1379 or visit swanview.org. If your aim is more to be proactive than to be entertained, familiarize yourself with the plight—or lack thereof—faced by some of our more famous local critters. At 7 PM on Thu., May 14, the North Hills Elk Working Group meets at the Grant Creek Inn to discuss fluctuations in elk numbers and locations, and to discuss the efficacy of various hunting plans. Once you’ve gotten your elk on, the next day holds this cherished li’l nug: On Fri., May 15, a coalition of interested people and organizations invites you to meet at 4 PM at the main Rattlesnake trailhead for a tour of Mountain Water’s

fish ladder. The event is linked to Endangered Species Day, which takes place annually on the third Friday in May and is often celebrated by spending the day with a North American pika in one’s shorts. Call 543-1192 or 721-0476, ext. 3. The next day we’ve a perfect storm of events, both of which compete with one another and originate from the same source, The Rocky Mountaineers (TRM). On Sat., May 16, you’re invited to scale Grey Wolf Peak in the Mission Mountains, a snow climb that requires all the necessary equipment you’d expect. Call 240-7612 or 721-6384. Alternately, you could take part in TRM’s Lochsa Lodge Cycling Trip, a 113-mile ride through some really sweet country. The ride begins at the Lolo Conoco, features a lunch stop and turnaround at the Lochsa Lodge and is a great warm-up if you’re considering participating in this year’s RATPOD. Call 543-0898 or e-mail mysurveyor@gmail.com. Now, when the Rocky Mountaineers start offering bike rides, it’s only a matter of time before somebody from Missoulians on Bicycles (MOBI) takes it upon themselves to settle matters. Here’s hoping they put off their revenge until after the weekend, as Sat., May 16 features MOBI’s seventh annual Sula to Wisdom ride, an 80-mile roll that promises “double your divides and quattro your passes” after the 7:30 AM K-Mart meet-up. Our southern cyclists can sleep in and meet at 9 AM at the Sula store. Call Norman at 370-3876. Another job option springs to life just as soon as something around here bursts into flame, so be ready once you attend the Bitterroot Wildfire Contractors Association’s Fireline Safety

Class and Pack Test, which begins at 8:30 AM at the Corvallis Grange Hall on Sat., May 16. See some great scenery this summer, and spend a little time trying to extinguish it. Call 5237887 or visit bitterrootwildfire.com. The MOBI appear in full glory again this weekend, as Sun., May 17, features two bike rides: The 87-mile ride to Painted Rocks Reservoir leaves from K-Mart at 7 AM (Call 7288722), and the 12-mile Geezer Ride to the River City Grill leaves at 10 AM from the Greenough Park parking lot (Call 240-9279.) And see if you can head off that imminent blood feud with the Rocky Mountaineers, okay? As green little buddies are popping up all over the place, it’s fitting that the Clark Fork Chapter of the Montana Native Plant Society should spring back up as well: On Tue., May 19, your dexterous digits are called upon to help with a Dyer’s Woad Pull at 6:30 PM at the Mount Sentinel trailhead. Marilyn awaits your call at 243-6642. And finally, let’s take a moment to remember our fallen friends who just wanted to ride their bicycles. On Wed., May 20, meet up at 6:45 PM at Caras Park for the Ride of Silence, an annual global roll in honor of twowheelers who’ve met with the Photo by Chad Harder business end of the automobile. Please wear a helmet, be prepared to ride slowly and silently and do your best not to be among next year’s honorees. Oh, and before you head into the wild this week, all I ask is that you drop off a few dozen fresh-baked chocolate chip cookies at the Indy office, care of Comrade Calendar. Happy trails! calendar@missoulanews.com

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Old school Jeff Ament resurrects pre-Pearl Jam hardcore band by Andy Smetanka

“It was a different time,” ventures Jeff Ament, reflecting on the state of public acceptance for dyed hair, torn and scrawled-on clothing and the other outward trappings of punk rock in Missoula, circa 1982. “It was definitely a time when you’d be walking down the street and people would yell, ‘Hey Devo!’ out their car windows.” Same thing when Ament and his friends went to watch cover bands at places like the long-gone Trading Post and the Forum. They were often befriended by the bands—a boon to young punks just getting to grips with their instruments—but around midnight things might start getting ugly with the other patrons. “First someone might flick a cigarette butt at our table,” Ament recalls. “Then maybe throw a couple of bottles. There were confrontations. There comes

sound and required special corrupting. “Sergio was a jazz drummer,” Ament explains. “I gave him [Poison Idea’s] Pick Your King and Pay to Cum by the Bad Brains and said, ‘This is what we’re after.’ Two days later he came back asking, ‘Um, are there other bands like this?’” Ament hurled himself into bass-playing and songwriting duties. He contributed Rocky Mountain scene reports to MRR. Per hardcore convention, he took the extra gung-ho step of signing his punk rock correspondence and reportage as “Jeff Diction.” “I was having more fun doing this than I’d ever had doing anything,” he says. “Just the energy of four guys plugging in, letting it all hang out, cooperating to somehow create some kind of art. There were times when it just felt ferocious to me, tapping into that energy, like when 50 people would show up at

wrote a batch of slower and dirgier songs but never got around to recording them in the studio. Weeks and months went by with no practices or shows, and, like many a burned-out band before and since, Deranged Diction quietly stopped being in early 1984. At this point in our story, we enter an era familiar to millions as the murky prehistory of Ament’s slightly more famous band, Pearl Jam. After Deranged Diction came the proto-grunge Green River (whose lineup included Pearl Jam guitarist Stone Gossard and future Mudhoney members Mark Arm and Steve Turner), then Mother Love Bone, Temple of the Dog, and, well, you know the rest. The idea for resurrecting Deranged Diction came from a chance meeting between Ament and Moody at a Seattle record shop and Ament’s sugges-

Clockwise from left: Deranged Diction’s new album cover; the band circa 1983 at a Missoula show; Jeff Ament, left, and Bruce Fairweather rock out; and Deranged Diction reunited with, from left, Bruce Fairweather, Rod Moody, Sergio Avenia and Jeff Ament.

a point where you have to stand up for yourself.” Indeed. Ament channeled his own aggression into Deranged Diction, a hardcore band that started with a chance skateboarding encounter on the University of Montana campus. At home on the HiLine, the Big Sandy native had caught his first whiff of punk in skateboarding magazines and ambitious rock glossies like Creem and eventually discovered Maximumrocknroll, a kind of smudgy, bimonthly newsprint Bible to a growing international network of punks trying to find each other. By the time he got to college, he remembers, there was no looking back. “It was incredible,” he enthuses. “You could send a dollar and a tape to someone you found in MRR and two weeks later you’d get your tape back full of new music. It was like you joined this fraternity, this network of like-minded people listening to the same thing in other parts of the country.” Galvanized, Ament and pals started playing Black Flag and Dead Kennedys covers before giving themselves the “summer assignment” of writing original songs. Three members—Ament, singer Tom Kipp and guitarist Bruce Fairweather—were avid hardcore listeners who incorporated their disparate influences into the mix; Sergio Avenia, who replaced original drummer Jon Donahue, was new to the

Missoula Independent

Page 34 May 14–May 21, 2009

one of our shows and all start slam-dancing. That’s always been the thing for me with music—the energy, when it all just happens.” Inevitably, Missoula started feeling smaller and more remote. In late 1982, Ament, Avenia and Fairweather were encouraged to move to Seattle by the emergence of a tight-knit hardcore scene that revolved around a new venue called the Metropolis, which Ament describes as a punk clubhouse owned by a benevolent French bohemian. It was in this freewheeling milieu, circa summer of 1983, that he first crossed paths with a roster of future bandmates that reads, 25 years later, like a who’s-who of Seattle rock extending well into the present. The transplanted DD briefly thrived, procuring the services of vocalist number three, Rod Moody, through a “singer wanted” ad in the classifieds and opening up for quasi-national punk bands like Hüsker Dü and the Butthole Surfers. But the fraternal vibe dissipated when the Metropolis closed, and by 1984 the sound of hardcore had begun to change as well. “Way more metallic,” says Ament, who recalls his astonishment at the sight of Rollins-era Black Flag members warming up offstage for their Seattle show by banging their heads furiously to Ronnie James Dio-era Black Sabbath. With Moody on the mike, Deranged Diction

tion that they properly record the Seattle-era songs that never made it past practice tapes. Fairweather and Avenia were soon aboard. Special effort was given to retain the spirit of the original material, Ament insists, set to be released with a pair of vintage Missoula sessions as a two-disc set on Feedback Records. The Missoula sessions were recorded in October, 1982, and May, 1983 by someone whom Ament knows only as John the Greek, who had an eight-track Fostex reel-to-reel and an apartment somewhere near Greenough Park. Ament says he’s been meaning to drive around looking for it again. It’s been over 25 years, after all, which is also why the bassist has been diligently woodshedding Deranged Diction songs to get ready for reunion shows in Missoula and Seattle. “It might sound cheesy,” Ament ventures, “but I feel lucky to still be friends with these guys and have the chance to finally tie a bow around this thing that fell apart without us even knowing why. It’s great.” Deranged Diction plays the Palace Saturday, May 16, at 9 PM, with Reptile Dysfunction and Rooster Sauce. $10. arts@missoulanews.com


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Various Artists All in the Family Wapikiya Records

On this 19-track comp i l a t i o n , Wa p i k i y a Records offers locally flavored gangsta rap that’s heavy on bragging rights, tales of street life and partying hard. In fact, ardent fans of 50 Cent, Eazy-E and The Game will find something to gnaw on with this release. But if you’ve never been particularly fond of those rappers, All in the Family probably won’t suit your tastes since it’s so closely linked to that style.

Knot Knocked Up Pseudo Psluts Masa Records

Knot Knocked Up’s well-timed screams and trashcan rhythms are surprisingly listenable. On Pseudo Psluts, the local all-girl experimental noise group sound as if the ranting and chanting witches of Macbeth formed a band. Hollow drumming and shrieks evoke tribal ritual. And with song titles like “Zombie Rape” and “Cunt Puddle” you can’t accuse them of thematic prudishness. “Chemical/Physical” sounds like the sort of weird art noise of Men’s Recovery Project, only with simmering punk melodies à la Bratmoblie or Bikini Kill. “Spank Me Slow” could be part of an experimental rock opera. Then there’s the a cappella “Crisco,” which comes across like

Sonic Youth The Eternal Matador

After nearly 30 years in the business Sonic Youth has perfected its cool, super-hip, slightly sardonic sound, but The Eternal is meant to signal a departure: It’s the band’s first release on easy-going Matador after years with industry behemoth Geffen. A revived commitment to experimentation may be evident to a hardcore fan, but it sounds like a Sonic Youth album to me. There are some memorable hits—including “Antenna,” a 6-minute reverie on love and radio

Justin Townes Earle Midnight at the Movies Bloodshot Records

Justin Townes Earle had a lot riding on his sophomore release, Midnight at the Movies. As if being Steve Earle’s son and Townes Van Zandt’s namesake wasn’t pressure enough, the younger Earle set the bar phenomenally high with his 2008 effort, The Good Life. But, less than a year later, he’s cranked out another humdinger of an album, helping cement his name in the annals of American roots music. Drawing on diverse influences, Earle maintains a steady ethos while seamlessly encompassing myriad styles, including pre-war folk, country, indie pop and bluegrass. The results are provocative and eminently listenable. “They Killed John Henry” is

The gangsta rap influence comes across strongest on cuts like “A Hood Day”—aka, a weekday that includes bottles of malt liquor, a game of craps and late-night sex—or on tracks like “She’s on Fiya,” an ode to strippers. This compilation meanders into broader lyrical territory, too, such as the loss of friends (“Pour A Lil Liquor”) and supporting American troops (“American Soldier”), but it’s mostly situated in the traditional gangsta realm. Overall, All in the Family’s various artists— including Overtime, Frodie, Pookie and Young Jay— demonstrate honed lyrical styles, even if they often rely too heavily on cliché themes. But if you like this kind of hip hop and don’t mind predictable content, you’ll probably be entertained. (Ira Sather-Olson) Artists from All in the Family play the Top Hat on Saturday, May 16, at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

Admission: FREE

drunken improv in a latenight kitchen. Frontwoman Mikki Lunda belts out hauntingly shrill catcalls that end almost gracefully in punctuated meows. Rather than ear splitting, the band’s instrumental imprecision exhibits a sort of animalistic insanity that’s more sincerely visceral than most art noise. This is a novelty record that you might not listen to more than once, and perhaps never all the way through. But unlike so many noise bands set on masturbatory cacophony without care for their listener, this debut offers a playfulness that’s at least compelling enough to listen to for the experience. (Erika Fredrickson) waves, the sexy-surfy “Malibu Gas Station,” and the woefully short “Sacred Trickster.” There’s also a miss or two, like the circus-disco art song “Anti-Orgasm,” which feels like somebody is trying too hard. For me, Sonic Youth and making out are synonymous, which is why I’m mad that my boyfriend isn’t home right now. My first awkward smooches in the front seats of compact cars occurred to the soundtrack of Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star, and I can’t hear Kim Gordon’s voice without feeling a little woozy. Like all Sonic Youth material, much of The Eternal blends into a continuous soundscape that can get boring, even with ex-Pavement member Mark Ibold on bass. But it works for road tripping— or for a romantic interlude in a Toyota Corolla. (Ali Gadbow) an unabashed nod to straight-up Americana, while others, like “Black Eyed Suzy ” (about a down-and-out streetwalker), borrow classic nomenclature but offer a 21st-century story. And “Halfway to Jackson,” replete with trains and no-good women, is destined to become a classic. Earle could easily ride his father’s coattails, but his desire for independent success is clear. In “Mama’s Eyes,” he brandishes the line, “I am my father’s son…We don’t see eye to eye/I’ll be the first to admit I never tried.” With that defiant spirit and musical savvy, Earle’s making a name for himself all on his own. (Melissa Mylchreest)

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Marginalia magic Buzz builds for Larsen’s T.S. Spivet by Jay Stevens

Maybe you’ve heard the buzz surrounding Reif “I sometimes wondered,” muses T.S., “how Larsen’s The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet. The things would have turned out differently if [biologist author, among other puff pieces, earned a short pro- and mentor] Dr. Yorn were my father…Then [we] file in the May issue of Vanity Fair—quite an accom- could sit around the dinner table and have scientific plishment for a 29-year-old first-time novelist. The discussions about antennae morphology and how to buzz, however, isn’t about the book itself but the drop an egg off the Empire State Building without it frenzy among publishers jostling for position: breaking. Would life be normal then?” Exactly 10 publishers bid on the book, and the winBut the book is also deeply flawed. The loose ner, Penguin, paid Larsen nearly a million dollars for plot occasionally tips unrelated side-passages and the rights to publish it. “Recession?” wrote Vanity plot developments that go nowhere into the story. Fair’s Evgenia Peretz. “What recession?” Near the beginning of his journey, T.S. informs us he To understand why publishers paid out for this has a “hyperactive metabolism” and needs to eat regbook at a time when the ularly, else his “brain slowly industry is hurting, simply began to shut down.” It’s a crack open the novel and condition that causes him, a glance through the pages. few hours after he hitches a It’s beautifully wrought ride on his freight train, to with intricate maps and search for a McDonald’s drawings written into the Happy Meal at its first stop margins, all accompanied in Pocatello, Idaho. While by the puckish narration of the story advances during a 12-year-old genius cartogthis excursion—he meets a rapher, Tecumseh Sparrow hobo storyteller named Spivet. The book’s margin“Two Clouds,” and the alia represent the musings restaurant’s golden arches o f T. S . , t h e s o n o f a dislodge a vital memory— Montana rancher father T.S. manages to ride the and an eccentric coleoptertrain the rest of the way to ist mother, who maps the Chicago with hardly a everyday objects and emothought of food. It’s a nigtions in his own life—from The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet gling but vital detail that dishis older sister’s five cate- Reif Larsen tracts the reader from the gories of boredom, to the hardcover, The Penguin Press HC plot as it unfolds, the way a “patterns of cross-talk” at 352 pages, $27.95 pricetag hanging from a pair his family’s dinner table— of glasses, say, distracts from as well as more scientific topics, including the dia- the wearer’s eyes. gram of the Berkeley Pit and the water table of his And the last third of the story undergoes a seisfamily’s ranch. mic shift in tone and story. The bulk of the book folAt the heart of the story is a family tragedy: the lows the believable actions of a 12-year-old genius death of the older brother, Layton, from an accident running away from home. Sure, it’s fantastic and that occurred during one of T.S.’ scientific experi- exaggerated, but it’s plausible—kind of a magical ments. The accident deeply wounded a family realism. But about 200 pages into the novel, the already struggling with its disparate personalities book turns into a kind of hallucinatory satire combecause Layton had bridged the gulf between the plete with a secret society scuttling about underfather’s mute cowboy world and T.S.’ scientific one. ground tunnels beneath the nation’s capitol, where With the boy’s death, the silence in the Spivet house- T.S. transforms from a courageous explorer into a hold threatens to break the family, and when T.S. passive child who’s pulled and pushed by the variwins a prestigious award from the Smithsonian, he ous grownups who have an interest in him. hops a freight train to Washington, D.C. It’s on the Still, the book is special. In Larsen’s story, we’re journey east that T.S. comes to terms with his broth- treated to scatter shot, yet deep investigations—a er’s death and his family’s dysfunction. book that ties disparate ideas and observations into While the story is moving, it’s the jumping, a kind of holistic statement in a text that uses a mix ever-shifting thoughts of T.S. Spivet that makes the of media to advance the plot. And isn’t that how we novel hum. He charts the style of how his sister read nowadays, thanks to the Internet? From The shucks corn, compares the squeak of his family’s Selected Works of T.S. Spivet, I can see a possible gate to his neighbor’s, draws the evolution of his framework for writers to integrate music, video and father’s facial expressions. A standoff with his mid- perhaps even reader participation into their works. dle-school science teacher leads to an aside (with And maybe that’s why publishers, faced with everdrawing) on male pattern baldness. A farewell diminishing interest in their products, decided to glance at his family’s ranch leads to a diagram of bid so lavishly on the book. Maybe they see their the flight patterns of Yuma bats on the property. future. Awkward dinner conversation births an investigaReif Larsen leads a discussion on The tion of the different “pea anger ovals” of food Selected Works of T.S. Spivet at Fact & Fiction pushed around on his sister’s plate. It’s the con- Friday, May 15, at 3:30 PM, and reads from the trast between the sophistication of a keen scientific book at 7 PM. mind, and the naive observations of a child trying arts@missoulanews.com to make sense out of human relationships.


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When I graduated college Spike Lee delivered the commencement address. In between anecdotes from his time directing Clockers and Malcolm X, he went for an easy “Do the right thing” theme. He only mentioned Denzel once. Three years earlier I was lucky enough to hear James Earl Jones give a similar graduation speech. He saved his money line for the end: “And may the force be with you,” he told a roaring crowd of graduates. Never mind that Darth Vader pimped for the Dark Side. The lesson behind both speeches: Don’t be afraid to give graduates what they want, and keep things simple. When it comes to college graduation movies, the same predictable approach applies. Almost every one sticks to a certain angst-ridden, decade-defining, what-now formula, and these five films did that best.

St. Elmo’s Fire (1985) Let’s just say Demi Moore has aged infinitely better than her film. This Brat Pack favorite features a who’s-who of ’80s stars, like Moore, fighting a what’s-what of ’80s ailments in the haze of post-college confusion. Moore’s a cokehead who sports crimped hair and lives in a pink apartment. Dirt-poor but earnest Emilio Estevez stalks med student Andie MacDowell, a woman he can never have because he doesn’t make enough money. Rob Lowe plays the saxophone, wears dangly earrings, drinks too much and refuses to grow up. Andrew McCarthy sleeps with Judd Nelson’s fiancée, Ally Sheedy, who wonders in one fleeting moment why things can’t go back to the way they were in college. And there you have it—they can’t. End of story. But before we hammer home the point, we get to see Moore lock herself in her empty pink apartment trying to, I guess, freeze herself to death. And then we see McCarthy, Sheedy and Nelson, while trying to save Moore, solve all their problems on the apartment’s fire escape. And then Lowe finds himself after becoming Moore’s actual savior. Silly, silly stuff, but still entertaining, much like Falco and Dexys Midnight Runners.

Kicking and Screaming (1995) Noah Baumbach (The Squid and the Whale) delivered a much better written, infinitely smarter, more timeless version of St. Elmo’s Fire. Bonus points for it being his first film—Baumbach wrote, directed and acted in this underappreciated autobiographical gem while just 26 years old. Nothing much happens in Kicking and Screaming, but the writing’s sharp. Four mostly intelligent dudes have no idea what to do now that college is over—one’s girlfriend leaves him for Prague, another wimps out on grad school in Milwaukee, a third re-enrolls in school for lack of a better option (and to keep dating Parker Posey) and the last one, Max, endlessly spins his wheels. “I’m too nostalgic,” Max says at one point. “I’ll admit it.”

“We graduated four months ago,” says his friend. “What can you possibly be nostalgic for?” “I’m nostalgic for conversations I had yesterday. I’ve begun reminiscing events before they even occur. I’m reminiscing this right now. I can’t go to the bar because I’ve already looked back on it in my memory…and I didn’t have a good time.” Character development exists only in the sense that you feel like you’ve probably churned through the same thoughts as these characters, but it’s enough to make this the best by-the-numbers college graduation film of the bunch.

Into the Wild (2007) Mentioned mostly as a cautionary tale for those truly frazzled UM seniors who want to romanticize Christopher McCandless’ epic—and pretty stupid— vision quest to Alaska after graduating from Emory University. Remember that he dies in the end. And remember there are other ways to escape reality, hug trees and run naked in nature. That’s what UM’s Environmental Studies Program is for.

Reality Bites (1994) Ben Stiller’s no Noah Baumbach, at least when it comes to graduation movies. Stiller directed and starred in this much more popular Generation X ode that is to the ’90s what St. Elmo’s Fire is to the ’80s. (Seriously, almost nothing in Kicking and Screaming screams 1995, but just look at Stiller’s attire here as an executive at an MTV-like cable channel and you’re instantly in the costume shop of “Beverly Hills 90210.”) The story centers on aspiring documentary filmmaker Winona Ryder, razor-tongued slacker Ethan Hawke and Stiller as the polite professional who “sold out” for having made it. Guess which one ends up with Ryder in the end? Everything you need to know about the film occurs in this snappy exchange: “I just don’t understand why things just can’t go back to normal at the end of the half hour like on the ‘Brady Bunch’ or something,” says Ryder, echoing, more or less, Sheedy’s line in St. Elmo’s Fire. “Well, ’cause Mr. Brady died of AIDS,” counters Hawke.

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The Graduate (1967) The valedictorian of this list, without question. Mike Nichols’ classic still represents the generational divide between college grads and their parents. Dustin Hoffman simply wants to return home with his degree and think things through before starting his life. His suburban folks want him to get started climbing the corporate ladder; they mention plastics more than once. Meanwhile, Anne Bancroft provides the best coming-of-age teachings a befuddled 20something boy could dream for. And to think, some kids only remember this film for the Simon & Garfunkle soundtrack. Here’s some real world homework: Watch this, graduates, if you haven’t already.

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Page 37 May 14–May 21, 2009


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OPENING THIS WEEK Angels & Demons Tom Hanks is back as crack symbologist Robert Langdon—the one who broke The Da Vinci Code—and now he’s caught between the Catholic Church, the Illuminati, a sexy co-star (Ayelet Zurer) and Ewan McGregor, who can’t use the Force this time. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5, 7, 8 and 10, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1, 2 and 4, and at the Village 6 at 7 and 10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3.

his subsequent rediscovery by writer Robert Downey Jr., who helps get him back behind a cello. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7:05 and 10:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 12:15 and 4. Star Trek Young dynamic duo James Kirk and Mr. Spock take the U.S.S. Enterprise and her crew out for their maiden voyage, as director J.J. Abrams

ic past and violent birth of Wolverine, and see several fabled mutants on screen for the first time. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:15, 7 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Also playing at the Village 6 at 5, 7:30 and 10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at noon and 2:30. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun.

Kalispell at 4:15 and 9:35. The Soloist Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 and 9:25 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 3:55, 6:45 and 9:25. Star Trek Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:35, 3:05, 4:35, 6:05, 7:05, 8:05, 9:05 and 10 with Fri.–Sun. shows at 12:05.

NOW PLAYING 17 Again Imagine you had the chance to be, um, 17 again and re-do your life, this time avoiding such pitfalls as marrying your pregnant high school girlfriend and tossing away a basketball scholarship. Now watch the film. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:30, 7:30 and 10, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Earth Polar bears, elephants, humpback whales and James Earl Jones follow the path of the sun across our planet with some totally sick shots. Rated G. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Fighting Channing Tatum is a poor kid who moves to New York City with no prospects. Once he and manager Terrence Howard discover he can scrap like nobody’s business, the two start a life of wiping with Benjamins. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 6:30 and 9:10, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:40. Ghosts of Girlfriends Past In an extreme nod to A Christmas Carol, super ladies’ man Matthew McConaughey is haunted by the ghosts of his exes in an attempt by his dead uncle to help him mend his playin’ ways and shack up with the love of his life, Jennifer Garner. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:20, 7:15 and 10:10, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:25. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Gomorrah Modern Italians in Naples and Caserta are unwitting victims of the powerful Camorra syndicate, which exercises its violent agenda as ruthlessly as ever in this exposé told from the perspective of various characters trying to escape the mafia’s long reach. Not rated. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9:20 with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:20, with no 7 shows Fri., Sat. or Thu. Monsters Vs. Aliens 3D In DreamWorks’ latest animated 3D film, young Susan is transformed into a giant monster after being struck by a meteor. She’s whisked away to a secret military location, where she meets other monstrous folk the government has been collecting over the years. When aliens attack the planet, there’s no better group to save it. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:20, 7:15 and 9:35 with Fri.–Sat. matinees at 1:15. Obsessed Idris Elba is a man who’s got everything, including Beyoncé Knowles for a wife, but gets in trouble when a pretty temp proves pretty tempting. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 4:05, 6:50 and 9:25, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. The Soloist Jamie Foxx tells a tale based upon an L.A. musical prodigy’s slip into homelessness and

Missoula Independent

“Actually, monsignors, this isn’t a bake sale meeting. It’s an intervention. About the doily-wearing.” Angels & Demons opens Friday at the Carmike 10 and Village 6.

(“Lost”) boldly goes where no one’s gone before in remaking the 1979 film based on the ‘60s TV series. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:10, 4:40, 7, 7:30 and 9:50 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:20 and 1:50 and at the Village 6 at 4:10, 7 and 9:50, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. State of Play Super-edgy-thriller time, people: An all-star cast spins a tale of conspiracy and political maneuvering, which of course always sloshes over into murder, now, doesn’t it? Spend a coupla hours with Russell Crowe, Ben Affleck, Rachel McAdams and Robin Wright Penn. Rated PG13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:35, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Sunshine Cleaning Amy Adams and Emily Blunt star as sisters in this tale of a start-up crime scene cleaning business, with support from Alan Arkin and Steve Zahn. Rated R. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9, with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3 and no 9 shows on Fri., Sat. or Thu. X-Men Origins: Wolverine He’s a quick healer with adamantium claws and a tendency to go berserk: Witness the trag-

Page 38 May 14–May 21, 2009

FLATHEAD SHOWTIMES 17 Again Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:15, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:20. Angels & Demons Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10, with Fri.–Sun matinees at noon. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 6:50 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15 and at the Showboat in Polson at 4, 6:50 and 9:30. Earth Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:20, 2:30, 4:50, 6:55 and 9:30 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 3:40, 6:55 and 9:30. Fighting Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:25, 4:20, 7:25 and 9:55. Ghosts of Girlfriends Past Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 2:25, 4:40, 7:20 and 9:50 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:50, 4:30, 7:20 and 9:50. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:20 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Monsters Vs. Aliens 3D Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at noon, 2:10 and 4:25 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35 and 3:55. Obsessed Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in

Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 7 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and at the Showboat in Polson at 4:15, 7 and 9:30. State of Play Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:20 and 6:55. X-Men Origins: Wolverine Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:10, 3:10, 4:10, 6:10, 7:10, 9:10 and 9:45 with Fri.–Sun. shows at 12:10. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:20 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45 and at the Entertainer in Ronan at 4, 7 and 9:15. Capsule reviews by Jonas Ehudin and Anne Pastore. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., May 15. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6—541-7469; W i l m a — 72 8 - 2 5 2 1 ; P h a r a o h p l e x i n H a m i l t o n — 9 61- F I L M ; R ox y Tw i n i n H a m i l t o n — 3 6 3 - 5 141 . S t a d i u m 14 i n Kalispell—752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish—862-3130.


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Amy Alkon

PERSONALS Ready to meet great new people?

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LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE SWF, 50, N/S, enjoys the wide open spaces, road trips, contemplating nature’s beauty, taking long walks, biking, swimming, socializing with friends. Seeking friendly man, 45-55, for friend282465 @ Geri ship, maybe more.



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HAPPY BUT LONELY DWF, 49, business-owner w/2 children and 2 dogs. Enjoys the outdoors, barbecues, gardening, cooking. Seeking SM who’s a natural leader in a relationship yet understands his woman’s intellect 297238 @ delightand capability. ful1



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Get more: ❖ Check out www.missoulapersonals.com to find more great new people ❖ See the @ symbol in an ad? That means the advertiser has a profile (and maybe even a picture!) at www.missoulapersonals.com ❖ Meet more new people using text messaging on your cell phone. Text “mistxt” to 23578 to learn more. ❖ Need help? Some tips? Email CustomerService@PlacePersonal.com or call 1-617-450-8773

Free Ads: Free ads placed in this section are not guaranteed- to run every week. Be sure to renew your ad frequently to keep it fresh. Guidelines: Personals are for adults 18 or over seeking monogamous relationships. To ensure your safety, carefully screen all responses and have first meetings occur in a public place. This publication reserves the right to edit, revise, or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content of or replies to any ad. Not all ads have corresponding voice messages. To review our complete guidelines, call (617) 425-2636

0512

MISSOULA AREA?

HOT SERIAL My boyfriend wants to marry me. I love him, but settling down with one person seriously concerns me. The only times I ever feel like getting married are fleeting moments when I feel insecure. I love serial monogamy. I’m 36, and have enjoyed these consistently fulfilling two-year relationships since high school. It is so exciting. If the person just puts their hand on my knee, I almost die of ecstasy! I relish every moment, everything they say and do, their every quirk and nuance. Developing these relationships into solid, communicative, balanced partnerships is rewarding, but after about two years, while I love the person and know them so well...well, I know them so well! The sparks have faded. Still, how long can I keep this up? Should I settle down? I don’t want kids, so don’t factor that in. —Unsettled There comes a time in a girl’s life when she’s looking for that special dozen. If only you could see how miserable serial dating is making you. Just reread your words: “It is so exciting! …I almost die of ecstasy.” (Almost dying of ecstasy is so overrated.) Surely, you’d be happier if only you’d get the white dress and get with the program: “We’re gathered here today to join two people, one of whom is scared out of her pantyhose that she’ll end up an old cougar preying on recent college graduates in a bar.” You’ll be a hard woman to propose to, considering you’re only tempted to get fitted for the old ball and chain during “fleeting moments” when you feel insecure. What’s the guy supposed to do, wait till he notices you gnawing your cuticles, and really quick, drop down on one knee? And what then? While many couples these days do write their own vows, “till dull do us part” probably isn’t going to fly. Yet, this seems to be what works for you, not because you’re a commitmentphobe, but because you’re a commitment realist. That’s why you walk the walk (right out the door when it gets boring), unlike those who only talk the talk: “If you love something, set it free…” but if you really love something, make sure it gets bogged down with a bunch of legal hassles if it ever tries to leave. The path you’re taking isn’t without risks. As helpful marriage-minded types have surely informed you, you could die alone and be eaten by your cat. Of course, if you marry, you

could still die alone and be eaten by your cat. Even worse, you could die alone while you’re still very much alive and married. And yes, some women have an increasingly hard time finding dates as they get older. This doesn’t mean all women will. Because men value youth and beauty, you need to stay in shape and take care of your skin. (Forget the $300 ampules of hydrogenated sheep urine; just be sure your sunblock protects, not only against UVB, but the UVA rays that make skin look like Sacagawea’s moccasin.) Your attitude, of course, is a strong selling point: A guy can keep the ring, his genetic material, and the granite countertops; you’ll stick around as long as the fun outweighs the unfun. At some point, chasing newness may start getting old. That would be your cue to seek a more predictable form of novelty—like marveling at how the same old man always manages to keep it fresh: every night, coming up with hours of new and irritating throatclearing noises. “Honey, is that you?” you call from the kitchen, “Or has a wounded brontosaurus slipped into the living room?”

GNARLY AND ME This girl I’m seeing is great in so many ways, but I’m not a fan of dogs, and she has the worst kind—small, yappy, needy and smelly. I’m turned off and grossed out that she lets it sleep in the bed and “kiss her face,” and basically caters to its every need. I know I sound petty, but I’m seriously considering backing out. —Disgusted Nothing makes a guy want to kiss a girl like seeing that a dog got in there first. I know, I know, a dog’s mouth is cleaner than…the dumpster behind the fast-food Chinese place? Dog owners typically claim otherwise—sometimes, at the moment you’re observing that a dog’s tongue can go all sorts of places a human’s can’t. This relationship might’ve had a chance if her dog were some old mutt that occasionally wandered in from the yard. Instead, it’s essentially a loud, smelly article of clothing she never takes off. Considering the strength of your disgust, backing out is anything but petty. In the future, inquire about pet ownership early on, and steer clear of any girl who hears the term “doggie style” and gets all excited about dressing little Trixie up as a bee. Got a problem? Write Amy A l k o n , 171 P i e r A v e , # 2 8 0 , Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice Amy@aol.com

Missoula Independent Page 39 May 14–May 21, 2009


Scope Noise Books DVD Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

PERSONALS

Free Will A strology by ROB BREZSNY

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The people of future generations will win many a liberty of which we do not yet even feel the want,” said German philosopher Max Stirner. That bracing prediction has special meaning for you right now, Taurus. According to my astrological analysis, you are just becoming aware of freedoms that have not previously been on your radar screen. And as soon as you register the full impact of what they entail and how much fun they would be, you’ll be wildly motivated to bring them into your life.

Ready to meet great new people?

IMPORTANT NUMBERS:





LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Rob Brezsny: I really didn’t like a recent horoscope you wrote for me. I’m a Leo, and although your oracle was sort of true, I didn’t want it to be true, and furthermore I didn’t want to lend my belief energy to help make it true. So I went hunting among the other signs, hoping to find a different horoscope that appealed more to the healthiest aspect of my fantasy life. I settled on the ‘scope for Cancer, as it piqued my interest with just the right hopeful twist, and provided a highly motivating kick in the butt. Thanks! - Picky Choosy.” Dear Picky Choosy: I approve of your efforts. These days I would love all of my Leo readers to be as imperious as you’ve been in gathering only the influences you want, and shedding the rest.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The scenario I’m about to describe is likely to happen only in your dreams or fantasies, not your actual waking life. But it will later have a correlation in your waking life, and perhaps will be instrumental in preparing you mentally and emotionally for the triumph you’ll be able to accomplish in your waking life. So here it is, the mythic tale that I foresee unfolding in the subtle realms: A python will slither up and begin to coil around you. With an apparently irrational instinct that turns out to be quite smart, you will hiss loudly and then bite the snake, causing it to slip away and leave you alone.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to my analysis of the omens, you would really benefit from a baptism right about now. Consider these questions as you design the ritual. Should you seek the help of a religious official, or do it yourself? Should the baptism be conducted in a Christian, pagan, Jewish, atheist, Buddhist, Hollywood, or free-form style? Is it enough just to sprinkle your head or should you go for full immersion? And if you choose the latter, will the dunking be more authentic if it’s in a frigid river rather than a warm bath? These issues are for you to decide, not me. I insist only on this: Let the holy water wash you free of guilt, remorse, and any habit of mind that tricks you into being mean or careless toward yourself.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): After actor Woody Harrelson allegedly assaulted a paparazzo at New York’s La Guardia Airport, he issued a press release claiming it was an honest mistake. He had just completed filming Zombieland, a film in which his character had to relentlessly fight off zombies. It was understandable, he reasoned, that he mistook the pushy photographer for a zombie and naturally felt compelled to defend himself forcefully. As you shift back and forth between reality bubbles in the coming week, Scorpio, make sure you don’t make a similar error. Keep clearly in mind that the laws of nature in one bubble may be quite different from the laws in the others. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’m not necessarily saying you fell into a hole a while back, but if you did, the time is right to extricate yourself. Your strength is returning and help is in the neighborhood. Likewise, I’m not making an authoritative pronouncement that you did indeed cast a little curse on yourself during a careless moment. But if something like that did occur, you’re entering an excellent phase to undo the mistake. You’re awakening to how you went awry, and that’s the first crucial step in correcting for the messy consequences.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “There are two things to aim at in life,” wrote essayist Logan Pearsall Smith. “First to get what you want, and after that to enjoy it. Only the wisest of mankind achieve the second.” You are currently in a position, however, to accomplish that magical second aim, Capricorn. More than ever before, you have the power to want what you actually have…to enjoy the fruits of your labors…to take your attention off the struggle so that you may fully love the experiences your struggle has earned you.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Scientists find previously unknown species of plants and animals all the time, usually consisting of tiny populations in remote locations. But the latest addition to the great catalog of life is a species whose members number in the millions and cover a huge swath of Ethiopia. It’s a tree that botanists have never had a name for until now: Acacia fumosa. Unlike other acacias, it produces pink blooms in the dry season instead of yellow or pink flowers in the wet season. I predict that you will soon have a comparable experience, Aquarius: You’ll “discover” and identify a unique wellspring that has been around forever but unknown to you. As you tap into its charms, I trust that you will make up for lost time.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In her column “Word Fugitives” in The Atlantic, Barbara Wallraff asked her readers to coin terms or phrases that would mean “the unfortunate telling of a story that one realizes too late is ill-suited to the occasion.” The best ideas were “blabberghasted,” “tale of whoa,” and “put my faux paw in my mouth.” I’ll warn you to be wary of this behavior in the coming week, Pisces. You’re likely to be unusually articulate, and your urge to express yourself may be extraordinarily pressing. That could make you susceptible to running your mouth. But as long as you monitor yourself for signs that you’re about to go too far, I bet your fluency will serve you very well.

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TIRED OLD DREAMER SWM, 62, 5’8’’, 145lbs, would love to meet the woman of my dreams, 39-60. 308421 Call me, let’s connect!



ARE WE A MATCH? SWM, 43, 5’5’’, 187lbs, brown/green, enjoys music, walks, camping, fishing. Seeking similar SW/BF, 20-40. 274411



COOL GUY WM, 5’11”, 185lbs, medium build, likes working out, playing sports, having fun, more. Looking for WF, 18-35, who enjoys 275442 the same.



GIVE ME A CHANCE SM, 39, 6’2’’, 225lbs, light smoker, no children, medium build, likes fly-fishing, hunting, camping. Seeking SF, 18277072 45.



LET’S GIVE IT A SHOT SWM, 52, 5’8’’, N/S, athletic build, loves spicy food, boating, waterskiing, hunting, fishing, camping. Seeking SWF, 35281682 52, for friendship or more.



SEEKING DIVERSITY SWM, 43, intelligent, attractive, welltraveled, fit, clean-cut, blond/blue, successful, seeking slender, attractive A/B/ BF, 30-45, for dining, travel, cooking, 281407 intelligent conversation.



HARDWORKING Native American male, 48, 5’9”, 160lbs, brown/brown, medium build, works out, likes the park, biking, fishing, horseback riding, more. Seeking female, 25-48, for 282438 dating.



LET’S HAVE SOME FUN Fit SWM, early 40s, looking for discreet encounters with ladies, 40-55. Please be Escorts slim. Married ladies are welcome. Will 291122 answer all replies.

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SEEKING FRIENDS Female, 44, looking for friends, age open, who enjoys the outdoors, wildlife, the country scenery, hiking, fishing, camping. Friendship, companionship, and getting to know each other! 307262

SWEET & DISCRETE

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SWM, 43, straight, privately submissive, desires female top for friendship, fun, possible long-term relationship. 313521



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OTHER JOIN US Bi couple, middle-aged, into pretty much anything, looking for the same, or select singles, who would like to share 291876 life’s pleasures with us.



READY FOR YOU WM, 5’11”, 180lbs, dark/blue, likes partying and having a lot of sex. Give me a 273361 call if interested.



JUST FOR FUN Male looking for a female to get together and have some fun with. Not interested 281153 in a relationship.



HI LADIES! Attractive male in search of no-strings, discreet afternoon fun. Are you up for it? 281777



WANT SOMETHING NEW WM want to try anything new and is game for something different. If inter282388 ested, give me a call.

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CONSTRUCTION WORKER SWM, 44, 5’10’’, 200lbs, seeks funloving woman who enjoys interesting conversation, needs a little excitement 282735 in her life!



NEWS FLASH! Attractive, single Native American guy, early 40s, seeks adventurous Native American beauty, 25-40, for love, harmony, honesty, balance and much more, 282900 if fate leads us that way.



OUTDOOR ENTHUSIAST SWM, 42, 5’10’’, 165lbs, fit, active professional, N/S, N/D, seeking SWF, 25-39, who enjoys the outdoors, hiking, biking, fly fishing and traveling, for friendship 285175 or more.



LET’S TALK WM, N/S, N/D, looking for female, 35-42, for companionship that may possibly lead to a relationship. Someone who likes bowling, playing pool and more. 284641



LOOKING FOR LOVE I just turned 35. I’m fairly athletic. Not much dating background. I’m sort of a loner. I just think that it is time to share 292623 my life with someone.



SPRING IS ALMOST HERE SWM, 26, 155lbs, 5’8’’, hazel eyes, looking for someone who likes the outdoors, hiking, camping, fishing, and has a nerdy side. Seeking a stable, drama-free LTR with the right person. Can’t wait to 309362 hear from you.



LOOKING FOR YOU SM, 30’s, clean-cut, easygoing guy seeks companion, friend, hopefully long-term. Family-oriented and likes outdoor ac269315 tivities. How about you?



FUN & OUTGOING SM loves to go on walks, enjoys spending time outdoors, likes fishing, camping. Looking for SWF, same interests, for friendship and possibly more. 277330



LET’S TALK SWM, 48, 6’, clean-shaven, independent contractor, seeks SM, 25-60, to spend some time together. Let’s talk! 292718



WANT TO TRY WM, 6’1”, 145lbs, brown/brown, wants to get together with a smooth man for some no-strings fun. A plus if you go 283737 both ways.



Missoula Independent Page 40 April 9–April 16, 2009

LET’S GET TOGETHER SM, very oral and loves to receive, would love to meet singles and couples, males and females. ALso into toys and what307658 ever else you would like.

Call 1-900-226-1232

LOOKING FOR LOVE SWM, 18, 6’, short black hair, wears glasses, looking for SM, 18-21, to hang 294712 out with and get to know.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.



Answer an ad:

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’m providing you with three metaphorical brainteasers. I hope they will help you work your chutzpah back into shape now that you’re on the road to recovery. 1. Was your fright attack provoked by a venomous snake or by a garden hose that resembled a venomous snake? 2. After your pratfall, when you heard one hand clapping, did you regard it as an unforgivable insult or a humorous teaching? 3. When your healing crisis finally climaxed in a cure, was the catalyst a placebo or real medicine? Please answer these riddles even if you’ve already begun to feel fine again. It’ll help ensure that the healing will last a long time. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The joke goes like this: “Why is a math book so sad? Because it has so many problems.” But of course that’s a distortion of the truth. In fact, the math book loves its problems. Its problems are its reason for being. Besides that, all of its problems are interesting challenges, not frustrating curses. Best of all, every problem has a definite answer, and all the answers are provided in the back of the book. Now here’s the most excellent news of all, Cancerian: I think you’ll be like a math book in the coming weeks.

OPEN-MINDED FUN SWM, 52, 5’9’’, 190lbs, brown/blue, clean-cut, fit, D/D-free, easygoing, laidback, not into games, seeks SM, 18-55, 296853 for adult fun.

*charges may apply

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Some people will never learn anything because they understand everything too soon,” wrote Alexander Pope. Most of us have been guilty of that sin: jumping to conclusions so quickly that we don’t bother to keep listening for the full revelation. My sense is that this behavior has become even more common in recent years because we’re inundated by fragments of slapdash information mixed with blips of superficial analysis and echoed hearsay. But please avoid falling prey to the syndrome in the coming week, Aries. More than ever before, you need to gather raw data thoroughly, weigh the evidence with great deliberation, and come to careful understandings.



WAITING FOR YOUR CALL GWM, 25, 6’1’’, 235lbs, seeks outgoing, gregarious, stable GWM for dating and romance. I enjoy movies, dining, bowl305105 ing.



866.399.5979

18+

0512


CLASSIFIEDS Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation Non-Denominational 1-800-475-0876 HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888-5832101. www.continentalacademy.com LIVE POKER TOURNAMENT! Todd Brunson Montana Challenge at the Lodge at Whitefish Lake. May 14th, 15th and main event of the 16th. Meet and play with Todd Brunson, Hoyt Corkins and others. For information phone John Boyle 250-1306

Saturday September 12th at Caras Park. Need vendors & volunteers. Go to

missoulahempfest.com to sign up or contact us to volunteer.

The Multi Item Store LLC 1358 1/2 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

To Give Away

Bulletin Board

MAKE MONEY NOW! LEARN TO BARTEND TODAY. Montana Bartending Academy Get the Job You want in the Service Industry Learn how to: Increase your tips, Attract more customers, Manage alcohol responsibly within the law, Effectively write a resume, Communicate successfully in a job interview, Be a faster & more efficient mixologist BECOME AN EXCEPTIONAL BARTENDER!!! Guaranteed Job Placement Assistance upon Completion CLASSES FILLING FAST. CALL 880-1206 or E-MAIL mba@bresnan.net TODAY FOR SCHEDULING & DETAILS

THE GREEN ECO SHOW. www.greenecoshow.com August 22-23, 9-5. Missoula Fairgrounds. Fashion Show, Music, Speakers, Organic Food. Sponsor: Herman’s Eco Inc. Anna 846-1252

Medical Cannabis Certification in Missoula 541-8090

LindyParadiseTravel.com

Over age 50 with a claim for SSA Disability Benefits? Learn how we can help you and save you money. Disability Law Group 1-800-4530191

Like learning how to ride a bike

543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

Need a Plan B? Shop with Cash Back! Get Tax Advantages!

CREATE YOUR OWN STIMULUS PACKAGE

FREE DOG! My name is Jackson. I’m looking for a new home with a kind, loving family who can give me LOTS of attention. I was 2 yrs old on April 17th. I’ve had all of my shots, I am neutered and I’ve been chipped. Call 406-676-3106 or 406-253-6493

Announcements Bush has been lowered in the Bible and the dictionary. And I hear that Cuban families are being shot at with 50 caliber guns. They need to get out within 24 hours. OM

Lindy Plakke

(406) 239-1410

Pet of the Week

Volunteers AniMeals is looking for volunteers! AniMeals is a non-profit animal food bank and no-kill adoption center. We are looking for volunteers to help with fundraising, office work, deliveries and giving our animals some love and attention. Please contact Kelli at (406) 7214710 or info@animeals.net. Help feed hungry animals!

Ryan Ryan’s adorable, slightly squished face immediately sets him apart from the rest. Once he has your attention, he insists on showing off his talents. It’s particularly entertaining to watch him play with his mouse toys. Come to the Humane Society of Western Montana, 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Sat. 12-5p.m. or call us at 549-HSWM

Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area.

If you are a Medical Marijuana Card Holder you are invited to join an open space meeting. When: Saturday, May 23rd 12-5pm Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Accidents & Personal Injury Over 17 years experience. Call immediately for a FREE consultation.

541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

Employment

Employment

ASSISTANT MANAGER FOR RECRUITING, F/T, Msla. US Census Bureau is seeking a local Assistant Manager for Recruiting (AMR) for the Missoula area. #2975443 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060

FULL-TIME WEATHERIZATION CREW WORKER POSITIONS. District 6 Human Resources Development Council. For application and job description, HRDC at (406)535-7488. Open until filled. EOE

and light prep; exp helpful but not required; hourly + tips; send your resume to Kitchen Help, PO Box 9094, Missoula, MT 59807 NO PHONE CALLS

! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 BOOKKEEPER, P/T, Msla. A nonprofit in Missoula is seeking a permanent, part-time BOOKKEEPER. Duties include processing membership payments and reminders. #2975439 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 COMMERCIAL CLEANER, P/T, Msla. Missoula cleaning service is seeking two part time cleaners. #2975456 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 CUSTOMER SERVICE TEAM MEMBER, F/T & P/T, Msla. Seeking a highly organized, part-time experienced CUSTOMER SERVICE TEAM MEMBER. #2975463 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 DELIVERY DRIVERS, F/T & P/T, Msla. Seeking two Delivery Drivers to deliver contracted delivery route. #2975462 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Fun

Opportunity

Mackenzie River Pizza Co Grant Creek Is hiring Servers and Cooks with great personalities that want to have FUN at work! Apply in person, you can download an application on our web site; www.mackenzieriverpizza.com 5210 Grant Creek Rd See Devin, EOE $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home. CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 150 www.easywork-greatpay.com HOTEL HOUSEKEEPERS, F/T & P/T, Msla. Missoula hotel is seeking HOUSEKEEPERS. #2975448 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 INSURANCE BILLING CLERK, F/T, Msla. Health Center has opening for a FT Medicaid billing clerk. #2975449 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Kitchen Helper Needed Two Sisters Catering needs a part time kitchen helper; dishwashing

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 National Org. Now Hiring. Gov’t contractor, Avg starting pay $20$25/hr, $60K/yr incl. Federal Ben/OT, Paid Training & Vacations, Retirement, No Exp Necessary. 1888-334-5038 PORTABLE TOILET SERVICE DRIVER, F/T, Msla. #2975442 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 PROJECT MANAGER, F/T, Msla. MUST BE WILLING TO TRAVEL IN MONTANA. #2975460 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 RELIEF HOUSE MANAGER DETOX TECH, P/T, Msla. #2975454. Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout

Farm workers and laborers.

Announcements

Fletch Law, PLLC

Employment

Where: 314 N 1st St, Missoula Who: Medical marijuana patients and caregivers with valid state cards. What: Show your card to enter. No agenda besides the one we collaborate to create upon arrival. www.montananorml.org

Corp. Veenstra Dairy, Hagerman, ID 83332. Wanted experienced farm workers and labor. Corp. four (4) temporary positions from 06/05/2009 – 03/05/2010 to plant, cultivate, and harvest alfalfa. Till soil and apply fertilizer; transplant, weed crops. Work schedule 8am-4pm Monday –Friday. Employer guarantee ? of contract period, starting w/arrival at work site. Employer provides tools, supplies & equipment at no cost to worker; inbound & outbound transportation & subsistence to origin upon 50% completion or subsequent legal employment. $ 8.79 hr + board & board if worker cannot return to residence. Must have 1 months experience and verifiable reference. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency office-using job listing numbers: 1344311

Pl a c e yo u r c l a s s i f i e d a d . Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115



Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Deadline: Monday at 5PM

Missoula Independent Page 41 May 14–May 21, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

Global travel. Paid graduate education. Great salary & benefits. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952

NORCO Products, 4985 Blue Mountain Road, Missoula, Montana 59804 We DRUG Test.

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068

OUTREACH MANAGER. Wild Rockies Field Institute. 3/4 time position with benefits responsible for selling field courses to students, Potential for FTE. Full announcement at www.wrfi.net.

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANT MANAGER FOR TECHNOLOGY, F/T, Msla. US Census Bureau is seeking a local Assistant Manager for Technology (AMT) for the Missoula area. #2975444 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES for college grads. Elite career.

SKILLED LABOR Production Labor Furniture Manufacturer needs Production Laborers (Temp/Full-Time) Apply:

Youth Homes is hiring a Development Assistant to work with and support developing and implementing marketing and fundraising efforts. We are seeking a candidate with computer, grant writing, communications and organizing skills. Tasks include: clerical work, event organizing, working with satellite programs and coordinating volunteers. This position requires travel to Hamilton weekly and reports directly to the Development Director. Candidate must have solid moral character and prefers a bachelor’s degree in marketing, business, communications or a related field. A minimum of 2 yrs work experience as well as work related to communications and databases. Non profit exp preferred. Submit cover letter, resume and list of 4 references to Liesel Marron, Human Resource Coordinator, online at www.youthhomes.com or by mail to PO Box 7616, Msla, MT 59807-7616. EOE. Closes 5/27.

A Missoula, Montana based company is seeking professionals with the following skills: NABCEP Certification or Journeyman/Masters Electrician, RESENET-HERS Rater, NAHB Green Bldg Verifier, HVAC design experience, LEED-AP. Experience in solar PV design and installation, solar thermal design and installation required. Knowledge and experience with general building and construction management. This position will oversee all solar PV and solar thermal designs and installations as well as serve as a coleader in marketing, management and team leadership roles of the company. Candidate must have ability to communicate with engineers, architects, GC's, owners, electrical inspectors and utility engineers in a professional manner. Sustainable Building Systems, LLC is a multifaceted green energy business offering our clients building analysis and recommendations for cost effective strategies for energy use reduction. We offer a progressive and rewarding work environment with opportunities to take an active role in transitioning towards more sustainable building operation practices. Salary and Benefits DOE. Please send resume and cover letter to: dpoteet@sustainablebuildingsystems.com

NOW HIRING No exp needed. Good pay and benefits paid training, promotions, and regular raises. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044 PAID APPRENTICE HS grads ages 17-34. Electronics, engineering, communications, etc. Great benefits. Relocation avail. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 THE NAVY IS HIRING Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days vacation/yr, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 877-4756289 U.S. NAVY Launch a career today. Advanced paid training, medical/dental, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044 Wildland Fire Training, Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS F/T RN $42,328 TO $44,408 DOE, NOC and Charge differential. State of MT Employee Benefit Pkg. Mental Health Nursing Care Center, 800 Casino Creek Dr., Lewistown, MT 59457. (406)5387451

$600 WEEKLY POTENTIAL$$$ Helping the Government PT. No Experience, No Selling. Call: 1888-213-5225 Ad Code L-5. EARN UP TO $500 WEEKLY! Assembling Various Products. No exp! Easy work! Part-time or fulltime. Call: 1-888-335-9661 Ad Code: X35 PT/FT Positions as Movie Extras Register for a 90-day Guarantee Make up to $300/day - Call our agents 24/7 at 1-800-605-5901

WORK WANTED

Instruction

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

Bennett’s Music Studio

EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.MediaMakeupArtists .com 310-364-0665

Turn off your TV and turn on your life. Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

721-0190

www.bennettsmusicstudio.com

Reiki is a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing.

R e i k i I n t e g r a t i v e M e d i c i n e, 2620 Radio Way, Missoula

Learn Reiki Yourself! Reiki One Class June 6th 9am-6pm Cost: $130 CALL FOR MORE INFO • 360-9153

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Body/Mind/ Spirit

10-15 hours/we ek to

$1000+ /month working from home.

OPPORTUNTIES

Flexible Hours.

100% RECESSION PROOF! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your

yourfre edomoffice.com

Fre e online training.

A special classifieds section highlighting businesses dedicated to promoting a sustainable world. SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTING For More Information Contact: John K. Faust, MBA Pacific West Financial Group • Custom Portfolios 700 SW Higgins, Suite 100A • Shareholder Advocacy Missoula, MT 59803 • Community Investing (406) 543-0708 • Screening johnfaust@pwfinancial.net Securities offered through Pacific West Securities, Inc. • Member FINRA/SIPC Advisory services provided through Pacific West Financial Consultants, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor.

7th Annual Sustainability Tour “Green in Today’s Economy” Saturday, June 13th Tickets on Sale May 27th! • Scooterville Montana • Rockin Rudy’s homeWORD Office • 127 N. Higgins, Suite 303

Guided Moped Tour: Enjoy a $25 full day scooter rental, guided by homeWORD staff. Tickets available at Scooterville. Limited Room! Guided Bicycle Tour: Get those legs moving for $10 a person. Cyclist meet at the Co-op. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s. Free for Kids under 12! Guided Bus Tour: For an intimate tour experience, jump on the bus for $20 a person. Tickets available at homeWORD. Limited Room! Self Guided Tour: Grab your friends for a Self Guided Tour economically priced at $10 a person. Tickets available at Rockin Rudy’s. Free for Kids under 12! Join us as we tour homes that showcase efforts made to reduce impact, reuse materials and recycle waste in cost effective ways. See examples of native landscaping, food storage, universal design, energy conservation, salvaged materials, chicken coops, community design and lots more! Contact Camarin: camarin@homeword.org Call 406-532-4663 x13 www.homeword.org

Tremolite-Actinolite Series Asbestos

Asbestos & Lead removal specialists Remediation & Restoration Services 406-549-8489 • montanaabatement.com

Missoula Independent Page 42 May 14–May 21, 2009

LLC

REIKI SESSION $60.00 BY APPOINTMENT

FARRIER / VETERINARIAN COUPLE moving to area & seeking housing and/or work situation on ranch. Hard-working, low maintenance. Many possibilities. 413273-3235

LEARN TO TEACH AND TURN

Instruction


CLASSIFIEDS Instruction

T'ai Chi

728-0918 missoulataichi.com

Body/Mind/ Spirit Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 543-2220

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Body/Mind/ Spirit

5842. Come see our local store and Art Gallery! Open M-F 10-7, weekends by appointment, and First Fridays 5-10pm.

without drugs or alcohol. Call 800-652-9619.

LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 www.astrologymontana.org

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220 MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629 Professional Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Suffering with anxiety or depression? Think no one understands? Lucinda Bassett does. Get her free tape that will stop the suffering

BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 years experience. Moondance Massage/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Carla Green Massage, NCTMB 13 years, 211 N.Higgins #403, 4 0 6 - 3 6 0 - 8 7 4 6 www.CarlaGreenMassage.com

Black Bear Naturopathic Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Hypnosis & Imager y * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

728-5693 • Mar y Place MSW, CHT, GIS

Local Medical Cannabis Certifications

www.blackbearnaturopaths.com

Call for appointment 541- 8090 742 Kensington

521 S. 2nd St. W. Missoula, MT

(intersection of Kensington & Bow)

542-2147

Eco-Friendly Dry Cleaners

Powered • A rge nti n

Loca

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

SPECIAL

KRISTA • 542-2978 at Cutting Crew 220 Ryman St.

e

• Check-ups • Same Day Appt's • Bio-Identical Hormones • Medical Weight loss

541-8090 We take Insurance Medicare Medicaid Deni Llovet, FNP • 742 Kensington Corner of Bow & Kensington

rivercityfamilyhealth.com

S e mad and •H

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS!! 146 Woodford St. 728-1948

HAIRCUT

le

In gr

Bike s• t n

l F re s h

ie ed

$15

ty

Laundromats • WI-FI Free Non-Phosphate Laundry Soap Clean & Comfortable

Body/Mind/ Spirit

We make it personal

May 30 & 31

Dr. Christine White, ND

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Affordable • Quality • Personal

IV Micronutrient Therapy

Healthy Hummingbird Massage & Art Center! Warehouse Mall: 725 W. Alder, Suite 27. Regular Rates: $55/hr, $75/1.5hr, Students: $35/hr, $55/1.5hr. Erica: 396-6868, Souta: 207-6269, Mary: 596-

GREEN HANGER

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Clark Fork River Market • Saturdays 8-1 Downtown Tonight • Thursdays 5:30-8:30

www.empanadalady.com • 728-2030 coupon: get your 2nd eMpanada at half-price

Buying, selling, building and remodeling is what we love to do. Let us do it for you! Jeannette Williams & Walt Redfield Photo by Jessica Franks

Williams Real Estate 406.239.2049

Redfield Construction 406.239.2206

jeannettewilliamsrealestate.com

redfield@montana.com

Missoula Independent Page 43 May 14–May 21, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Body/Mind/ Spirit

Congregations

The Goods

Electronics

Music

Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 542-8090

Peace happens... One heart at a time.

Pool Table, new still boxed, solid hardwood, 1 inch slate, retails $4500, sell $1495, 207-9029

Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 4930025

DISH NETWORK. Satellite TV systems installed FREE this week! First month FREE! No bank account needed! No $$$ down needed! (866)689-0523. Call now for details!

ACCESS MUSIC. Mail Order Prices. Guitar Strings: Buy One Set, Get One Set Free. Two Free Guitar Lessons With Purchase Of Guitar, Mandolin Or Banjo. 728-5014. Corner Of Orange & Third. accessguitar.com

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

PROTECT YOUR FAMILY. Get a free GE alarm system with no installation fee and no equipment cost. Most homeowners will receive an insurance discount as well. Mention this ad and get 2 free keychain remotes! Promotional code: A02087 - Call 888-951-5158

Voice Lessons! Great summer activity for kids! I am a trained vocalist who offers early childhood voice lessons. I create a supportive and fun learning environment! I also offer beginner to intermediate lessons for ages 13 and up! Please call Brittney Stocker for more information 406-531-7370.

The Goods

I'm ! ing v o M

Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

B o d y C a re By Michelle

1920 Brooks • 549-1729

I'm Moving to S u m m i t C h i ro p r a c t i c w i t h D r. C u rt S o l a r i

Full size futon: $50. New Sears push lawnmower: $75. Leave message at 728-2704

2 4 0 9 D e a r b o rn S t e . I

Hot Tub Brand New Never used, six seats, warranty, loaded, retails $7,800, SELL $3450, 2079029

crystallimit.com

TEN PERCENT SOLUTION Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical

742 Kensington • 542-8090

Adoption PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

BOZEMAN ANTIQUE SHOW, May 16th & 17th, Bozeman Fairgrounds. Antiques dealers from four states. Furniture, primitives, collectibles! Saturday 10am-6pm, Sunday 11am-4pm. Information 406-586-5033

Auctions

Gemstones, Jewelry & Beads

549-0777

Antique

A Touch of Class NEW TO YOU

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owning delinquent storage rent for the 64, 80, 82, following units:6 83, 92, 101, 233, 274, 336, 337, 377 and 568. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods including office furniture, desks, baby strollers, car storage carrier, office phone system, boxes & boxes of old rare book collections, file cabinets, TV & stereos. These units may be Tuesday, May viewed startingT 26, 2009 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 prior to Thursday, May 28, 2009, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted

Sporting Goods

11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

WE NEED USED GUNS

Paying top dollar for rifles, pistols, revolvers and assault rifles. We buy, sell, trade & consign guns, plus FREE appraisls. We also buy Ruana Knives. Brady’s Sportsman’s Surplus Trempers Shopping Center 406-721-5500 Open 7 days a week www.bradyssportsmansurplus.com

Custom

I spy... Missoula! Where am I?

Fly Rods

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

549-6214 GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name laptops & desktops. Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. It’s yours NOW - Call 800-803-8819

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287

Furniture

MISSOULA’S NEW GO TO PLACE FOR Mother’s Day Gifts. 2935 Stockyard Rd. Unit K2 406.542.1202

Queen or King Pillowtop Mattress Set, Brand new, still packaged, Queen $269, King $389, 207-9029

The Multi Item Store LLC

New & Used

Books Collectibles Antiques 1358 1/2 W. Broadway Missoula • MT

rodsbyjay@gmail.com

10 - 6pm • Tue - Sat • 406-382-0272

HIKING, BIKING, CAMPING AND BOATING

Clothing

Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments 111 S. 3rd W.

Be the first to Email us the answer & WIN a FREE 30 Minute Massage at:

Healthy Hummingbird 725 W Alder St, Suite 27

207-6269 Email: frontdesk@missoulanews.com Subject: I Spy

A NEW COMPUTER NOW!!!! Brand Name laptops & desktops Bad or NO Credit- No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. It’s yours NOW- Call 800961-7754 DIRECTV Satellite TV Special Offer: Save $21/month for one year, Free HD-DVR, Plus 3 Free months of HBO/Starz/Showtime! Call Expert Satellite. 1-888-246-1956 (credit card required)

Missoula Independent Page 44 May 14–May 21, 2009

1706 Brooks Missoula, MT Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

Pets & Animals

LDR Kennel

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES: Sable, Black Tricolor, B/W Party color & Blacks. Family raised, well-socialized. $200 & up. Ready May 20th. (406)374-2250 LARGE SELECTION of yearling and 2-year-old Angus bulls for sale. Complete information, many calving ease, delivery available. Contact Clint Stevenson (406)3669023, Ryan Hughes (406)5811873 or Darrell Stevenson (406)423-7500 PRIVATE TREATY. Registered Angus yearling bulls. Super dispositions, low birth weights, great EPDs. Priced for commercial breeder. Fertility tested. West edge of Billings. Gnerer Angus (406)2598205 Silver Lab Puppies! AKC Silver, Charcoal, & Chocolate Lab Puppies! Ready August 10th! (406)-387-4007 http://www.highmountainsilvers.com

Garage Sale Yard Sale 301 W. Sussex Ave Everything must go, lots of kitchen stuff. Enjoy Huckleberry Lemonade and cookies, while you shop. Saturday May 16th 7am5pm.

Wanted to Buy CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794

1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252

WANTED: MINERAL INTERESTS. Experienced Family Owned Oil Production & Exploration Co. We’ll help you monetize your Mineral Assets. Send details to P.O. Box 8946, Denver, CO 80201

Music

Automotive

'00 Buick LeSabre Must See! (#9163LB)

$3,999 '98 Saturn SC2 Only 78k miles (#9152KA)

$4,995 '04 Pontiac Grand Am Only 59k miles (#8505LB)

Thrift Stores

721-6056

Electronics

541-7533

GET A NEW COMPUTER! Brand Name laptops & desktops Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. CALL NOW 1-800-816-2232

(corner Burns & Broadway)

543-0176

Outlaw Music

Largest Selection of Electric & Acoustic Guitars in Western Montana

EAGLE SELF STORAGE

Antiques & Treasures The Goods

Computers

Automotive

$6,888 '04 Olds Alero 65K Miles (#91358)

$7,978 '02 Mazda Millenia Fast and Gorgeous (#9134LA)

$8,995 '08 Harley Davidson Sportster XL 1200 (#9141LA)

$8,888 '98 Jeep Wrangler 4x4 Hard top (#9121B)

$9,875 Flanagan’s J e e p • M a z d a • L i n c o l n • M e rc u r y

Family owned & operated since 1974

1700 Stephens Missoula • 406.721.1381

www.flanaganmotors.com


CLASSIFIEDS Automotive

Automotive

Automotive

DOMESTIC

‘08 Smart Car fortwo passion cabrio (stk9108LA), 6k miles, orange $17,988 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

MOTORCYCLES

‘02 Chrysler PT Cruiser Limited, 5spd, air.....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 ‘07 Dodge Caliber SXT (stk9070LA), 7k miles, black, $ 1 3 , 9 9 8 w w w. f l a n a g a n motors.com 406-721-1381

‘08 Ford Focus Sedan (stk8550LA), 8k miles, white, $12,999 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

2001 FORD WAGON 83K. Good condition! $4,700 OBO. Call 605-484-1860.

IMPORTS ‘99 Nissan Maxima, 4dr, auto, air.....$5,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 ‘02 Subaru Outback Wagon, auto, air, 4x4.....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 5438269 Did You Know We Sell Tires? We Sell All Sizes, Imports and Domestic www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

SOLD

‘05 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean edition (stk 8332B), 55k miles, white, $ 1 7 , 8 8 8 w w w. f l a n a g a n motors.com 406-721-1381

‘08 Suzuki Forenza Sedan (stk9119LA), only 15 miles, silver, $ 1 1 , 9 2 5 w w w. f l a n a g a n motors.com 406-721-1381

SOLD

‘07 INFINITI G35 Coupe (stk9073la), Gorgeous & Fast, $21,995 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

‘07 Kia Rio LX, auto, air.....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE INC. AND SALES See us for your service needs and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS, SAABS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

08 Harley Davidson XL 1200L Sportster Only 1,800 miles, windshield, pipes www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘04 Honda 450R (stk8601LC). Motocross ready, runs great! $4400 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

SOLD

REPAIR & SERVICE Did You Know Your Oil Change at Flanagan’s includes a complimentary car wash? www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

WE DO WARRANTY WORK! Dodge, Chrysler, Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, Mazda & Jeep www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

‘06 Toyota Corolla Sedan (stk8114B), 53k miles, maroon, $ 1 1 , 9 9 7 w w w. f l a n a g a n motors.com 406-721-1381

‘06 Toyota Matrix HB (stk8445C), 15k miles, tan, $15,788 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

SPORT UTILITY ‘06 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited FWD (stk8270C), 74k miles, black, $ 1 3 , 7 8 4 w w w. f l a n a g a n motors.com 406-721-1381

‘01 Honda CRV, 4dr, 4x4, auto .....$7,995 Jim’s Cars 1801 W. Broadway 543-8269 1995 Honda Civic DX Well-maintained ‘95 Honda Civic. 2 door, FWD, 5-speed manual transmission. 183K miles, mostly highway. AM/FM/CD player. Comes with snow tires on wheels. $2300 obo.

‘06 Harley Davidson H-D FLTRI (stk9098LA), 4k miles, purple, $16,888 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

Automotive

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus & All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300 www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Car of the Week!

NOTHING OVER

$7,995! Here Are Just Some Of The Cars On Our Lot! '07 Kia Rio LX, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '06 Ford Taurus SE, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '05 Ford Taurus, low miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '04 Olds Alero, 2 door, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '04 Buick Century, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '03 Pontiac Grand Prix, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '03 Ford Focus Wagon, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Mercury Sable GS, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '03 Mercury Sable, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '03 Mercury Grand Marquis GS, loaded! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '03 Olds Alero, 4dr, V6, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '02 Chrysler PT Cruiser Limited, 5spd, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '02 Subaru Outback Wagon, auto, air, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '02 Chev Cavalier LS Sport, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '02 Saturn, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '01 Honda CRV, 4dr, 4x4, auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Chrysler PT Cruiser, touring edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '01 GMC Sonoma X-Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, V8, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Ford Ranger Supercab Stepside, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '01 Dodge 1/2T, short, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '01 Ford Cargo Van E-250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '01 Pontiac Grand Prix GT, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '00 Chevy 1/2T X-Cab 4x4, Z-71 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '00 Jeep Cherokee Sport, auto, air, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '00 Ford Ranger, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '00 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '00 Plymouth Grand Voyager, 4dr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '99 Nissan Maxima, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '99 Toyota Camry, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Ford F250, V10, utility box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,995 '99 Chevy 1/2T X-Cab, 3dr, auto, air, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,995 '99 Honda CVR, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,995 '99 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '99 Plymouth Voyager Minivan, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '98 Buick Century, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '97 Saturn Wagon, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '97 Chevy Tahoe, 4dr, 1 owner, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '97 Buick Regal GS, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '96 GMC Yukon, 4dr, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Dodge Dakota Club Cab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Chevy 1/2T 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '95 Ford F-250 Supercab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,995 '94 Mercury Sable, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '94 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, Concourse, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '94 Mercury Grand Marquis, 4dr, auto, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '94 Ford F-150 Supercab, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,995 '93 Ford Explorer, 2dr, 4x4, 5spd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,495 '92 Chevy Suburban 3/4T, 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 '91 Lincoln Towncar, loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 CLOSED SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS

Jim's Cars

WE FINANCE

1801 W. Broadway • 543-8269 '03 Ford Focus Wagon, auto, air.....$6,995

Nothing over $7,995!

Jim's Cars

WE FINANCE

1801 W. Broadway 543-8269

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from Missoula County Public Works to work within the Butler and LaValle Creek floodplain. The project is located in Sections 32 & 33, Township 14N, Range 20W and includes the replacement of the Deschamps Lane bridge.. The primary purpose of Floodplain Development Permits is to promote the public health, safety, and general welfare, to minimize flood losses in areas subject to flood hazards, and to promote wise use of the floodplain. Copies of the full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application # 0912 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., June 5, 2009. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 258-4841 for more information.

Engineering, Inc., of Missoula, Montana, the engineer for the District. A complete copy of the Resolution of Intention (the “Resolution”) is on file with the County Clerk and Recorder which more specifically describes the nature of the Improvements, the boundaries and the area included in the District, the location of the Improvements and other matters pertaining thereto and further particulars. The Improvements consist of the design, engineering and construction of improvements to a community water system in the Lewis and Clark Subdivision to include replacing water lines, water mains, installing water meters, retrofitting the pump station discharge piping, and related improvements. The County proposes to issue Bonds in the principal amount of $180,000 to the State of Montana Revolving Fund Loan Drinking Water Program (the “SRF Program”) to pay a portion of the costs of the Improvements. The costs of the Improvements in excess of the Bonds will be paid from: a DNRC Renewable Resource Grant, general obligation notes of the County, available funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and available funds of the County. The Bonds are to be payable from special assessments to be levied against property in the District, which property will be specially benefited by the Improvements, in an amount not less than $180,000. All properties in the District will be assessed for their proportionate share of the costs of the Improvements. The total estimated cost of the Improvements to be financed from the proceeds of the Bonds is $180,000, and shall be assessed against each lot, tract or parcel of land in the District equally, such that each of the 42 lots, tracts or parcels in the District shall be assessed $4,285.71. The County has previously created Maintenance District No. 8918 (the “Maintenance District”) for the maintenance of the Water System. It is the intent of this Board to maintain the Maintenance District for the purpose of assessing the costs of maintaining, preserving or repairing the Water System and Improvements in accordance with the provisions of Sections 7-122161 through 7-12-2163, M.C.A. Maintenance includes but is not limited to: services provided for operations (water testing, reading meters) and maintenance of the water and wastewater facilities and equipment (repair of water main, meters, well house, etc.). The County currently assesses $19,999.98 for maintenance costs on an equal lot basis on all lots, tracts, and parcels in the District and the current assessment is $476.19 per lot per year. The County does not anticipate an increase in the maintenance costs as a result of the creation of the District. Each year the County will determine the annual costs for the maintenance of the Improvements and may adjust the annual maintenance assessment in accordance with Section 7-12-2162, M.C.A., after public hearing On Wednesday, June 10, 2009, at 1:30 p.m., in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 2nd Floor, Room 201, Missoula, Montana, the Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing and pass upon all written protests against the creation or extension of the District, or the making of Improvements that may be filed in the period hereinafter described. Written protests against the creation or extension of the District and the making of the Improvements may be filed by an agent, person, firm or corporation owning real property within the proposed District whose property is liable to be assessed for the Improvements. Such protest must be in writing, identify the property in the District owned by the protestor and be signed by all owners of the property. Such protests must be delivered to the County Clerk and Recorder, Missoula County Courthouse Annex, Missoula, Montana not later than 5:00 p.m., M.T., on Monday, June 8, 2009. Further information regarding the proposed District or the Bonds or other matters in respect thereof may be obtained from John Manion, HDR Engineering, Inc., 1715 South Reserve Street, Suite C, Missoula, Montana 59801, Phone (406) 5322212 or Amy Rose, Missoula County RSID Office, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, Montana or by telephone at (406) 258-3723. Dated: April 30, 2009 BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM-

MISSIONERS OF THE MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA /s/ Vickie Zeier, Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT FLOODPLAIN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION The Office of Planning & Grants has received a floodplain application from Mr. Kirk Scrafford to work within the Bitterroot River floodplain. The project is located in Section 26 Township 11N Range 20W and includes the excavation of a new pond. The pond is proposed to be excavated on a separate parcel adjacent (West) of a parcel previously authorized under permit #07-10. The primary purpose of Floodplain Development Permits is to promote the public health, safety, and general welfare, to minimize flood losses in areas subject to flood hazards, and to promote wise use of the floodplain. Copies of the full applications are available for review in the Office of Planning and Grants in City Hall.. Written comments from anyone interested in County floodplain permit application # 09-13 may be submitted prior to 5:00 p.m., May 29, 2009. Address comments to the Floodplain Administrator, Office of Planning & Grants, 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT 59802 or call 2584841 for more information. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF PASSAGE OF RESOLUTION RELATING TO RURAL SPECIAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO.8496; DECLARING IT TO BE THE INTENTION OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS TO CREATE THE DISTRICT FOR THE PURPOSE OF UNDERTAKING CERTAIN LOCAL IMPROVEMENTS AND FINANCING THE COSTS THEREOF AND INCIDENTAL THERETO THROUGH THE ISSUANCE OF RURAL SPECIAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT BONDS SECURED BY THE COUNTY’S RURAL SPECIAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT REVOLVING FUND AND TO CREATE DISTRICT NO. 8918 FOR THE PURPOSE OF MAINTAINING THE IMPROVEMENTS MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on April 30, 2009, the Board of County Commissioners of Missoula County, Montana (the “County”), adopted a Resolution of Intention to Create Rural Special Improvement District No. 8496 (the “District”) for the purpose paying a portion of the costs of improvements to a community water system in the Lewis and Clark Subdivision, in Missoula County, Montana (the “Improvements”), including costs associated with the sale and the security of rural special improvement district bonds of the County drawn on the District in the amount of $180,000 (the “Bonds”), the creation and administration of the District and the funding of a deposit to the County’s Rural Special Improvement District Revolving Fund (the “Revolving Fund”). It is also the intention of this Board to create and establish in the County under Montana Code Annotated, Title 7, Chapter 12, Part 21 (the “Act”), a rural special improvement maintenance district (the “Maintenance District”) for the purpose of maintaining the Improvements. The Improvements shall be constructed and installed pursuant to plans and specifications prepared and approved by HDR

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT PUBLIC NOTICE The Missoula County Tax Appeal Board will be in session from July 1 through December 31, 2009 for the business of hearing appeals. Any taxpayer who disagrees with the appraised value may file an appeal with the Missoula County Tax Appeal Board on or before the second Monday in June or 30 days from the receipt of notice of classification and appraisal or notice to change valuation (assessment notice) whichever is later. If you have not received a notice of classification an appraisal, consider the first Monday in June as the deadline to file an appeal. It is possible that not all taxpayers will receive an assessment notice. Appeal forms are available at the Department of Revenue’s Office, 2681 Palmer, Suite I, Missoula, 59808. Dated this 8th day of May, 2009. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Missoula County Clerk & Recorder/Treasurer MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-09-329 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., As Trustee For The Certification Of Soundview Home Loan Trust 2007-opt5, Asset-backed Certificates, Series 2007-opt5, Plaintiff, v. Crystal Alcorn and Jeremy Alcorn, Defendents. THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT, CRYSTAL ALCORN: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in the action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an action rescinding a Trustee’s Sale and Trustee’s Deed, and reinstating a Note and Deed of Trust covering property situated in Missoula County, Montana, and described as follows: Lot 11 of Bitterroot Meadows Phase II, a Platte Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded Plat thereof. WITNESS my hand and sale of said Court, this 27th day of April, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Gayle Johnston, Deputy Clerk. Dated this 21st day of April, 2009. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 38 Second Avenue East, Dickinson, ND 58601. Tel: (701)227-1841 MT BAR ID #2429. /s/ Charles J. Peterson, Attorney for the Plaintiff MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-09-507 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Steven Hamilton Gunderson, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Steven Hamilton Gunderson, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Steven Hamilton Gunderson to William Steven Hamilton, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 19th day of May, 2009 at 11:00 a.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana in courtroom number 2S. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 16th day of April, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Richard Goodwin, Deputy MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-52 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF BERYL G. RIGHTER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Ronald Righter has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Ronald Righter, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, PC. 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 6th day of April, 2009. GEISZLER & FROINES, PC. /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorneys for the Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DP-09-77 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT ALBERT SHEA, a/k/a ALBERT ROBERT SHEA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above named estate. All persons having claims against the said Deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Colleen Donnelly Shea, Personal Representative, 13445 Crystal Creek, Turah, Montana 59825, or filed with the Clerk of Court of the above-named court. Dated this 28th day of April, 2009. /s/ Colleen Donnelly Shea, Personal Representative

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 45 May 14–May 21, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Cause No. DV-09-308 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Jimy Dee Murphy, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Jimy Dee Murphy, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Jimy Dee Murphy to Kyani Dee Murphy, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 20th day of May, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana in courtroom number 1. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 15th day of April, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Gayle Johnon, Deputy

NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Shaun Fleming Gunderson, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Shaun Fleming Gunderson, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Shaun Fleming Gunderson to Shaun Fleming Hamilton, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 3rd day of June, 2009 at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana in courtroom number 1. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 16th day of April, 2009. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Karen Johnson, Deputy

RICHARD GRIMES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be either mailed to Deanna Grimes, the personal representative, return receipt requested, c/o Attorney John W. Hart, Rossbach Hart, P.C., PO Box 8988, Missoula, MT 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 7th day of May, 2009. /s/ Deanna Grimes, Personal Representative

your natural child, A.M.M., pursuant to Mont. Code Ann. Sec. 42-2-605 (1)(g)(2), and the termination of your parental rights, and the consent of the natural mother, Norma of the natural mother, Norma Jean Baldwin, being on file with the above-entitled Court, this Citation issues to advise you that on the 2nd day of June, 2009, at 1:30 o’clock p.m. or as soon thereafter as Counsel may be heard, the Petition for Adoption will be brought for consideration by this Court as to granting the adoption as requested and that you are to appear before the above-entitled Court on that date and time above noted, if you so desire to present testimony and evidence, if any your have, why the adoption should not be granted. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a waiver of the individual’s interests in custody of the child and will result in the Court’s termination of the individual’s rights to the child. DATED this 23rd day of April, 2009. /s/ Douglas G. Harkin, District Court Judge

Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DA-09-20 CITATION IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF: BRITTANY JEAN MADERA, Minor Child. GREETINGS FROM THE STATE OF MONTANA TO: Frankie Miquel Madera. A Petition having been filed in the above-entitled matter by Cory James Baldwin, for the adoption of your natural child, B.J.M., pursuant to Mont. Code Ann. Sec. 42-2-605 (1)(g)(2), and the termination of your parental rights, and the consent of the natural mother, Norma of the natural mother, Norma Jean Baldwin, being on file with the above-entitled Court, this Citation issues to advise you that on the 2nd day of June, 2009, at 1:30 o’clock p.m. or as soon thereafter as Counsel may be heard, the Petition for Adoption will be brought for consideration by this Court as to granting the adoption as requested and that you are to appear before the aboveentitled Court on that date and time above noted, if you so desire to present testimony and evidence, if any your have, why the adoption should not be granted. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a waiver of the individual’s interests in cus-

tody of the child and will result in the Court’s termination of the individual’s rights to the child. DATED this 23rd day of April, 2009. /s/ Douglas G. Harkin, District Court Judge

monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 11, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $220,561.02. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $213,466.52, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 21, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.01949) 1002.114754-FEI

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-09-506

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Probate No. DP-09-61 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DA-09-19 CITATION IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF: ANTHONY MICHAEL MADERA, Minor Child. GREETINGS FROM THE STATE OF MONTANA TO: Frankie Miquel Madera. A Petition having been filed in the above-entitled matter by Cory James Baldwin, for the adoption of

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY

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MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-09-72 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RUTH C. FASSETT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Lester N. Fassett has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Lester N. Fassett, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Timothy D. Geiszler, GEISZLER & FROINES, P.C., 619 Southwest Higgins, Suite K, Missoula, Montana 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 1st day of May, 2009. GEISZLER & FROINES, P.C. /s/ Timothy D. Geiszler, Attorney for Personal Representatives MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DV-09-185 NOTICE OF NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Petition for Change of Name of the minor child of: Rachel Romanelli, Petitioner. TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED HEREIN: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a verified Petition for Name Change of Kate L. O’Connell to obtain an order of the Court granted leave to assume the name of Kate L. Romanelli, will be presented to the above-entitled Court, at the Missoula County Courthouse at, Missoula, Montana, on Tuesday the 2nd day of June at 1:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, and that at such time, application will be made for the relief sought in the said Petition. DATED this 20th day of April, 2009. WELLS & MCKITTRICK, P.C. /s/ Jamie J. McKittrick Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the Missoula County Public Works Department at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula MT 59808, until 10:00 am, Tuesday, May 19, 2009, at which time bids will be opened and read in the Public Works Conference Room for the purpose of constructing a walkway and bicycle path, approximately 1.0 miles in length, adjacent to the Roman Creek Road near Frenchtown, MT, from the intersection with the Frenchtown Frontage Road. The project will involve earthwork excavation and embankment, crushed sub-base and base rock, asphalt surfacing, topsoil, and seeding. All work is to be performed in accordance with the plans and specifications on file in the Office of the Bids Department, Missoula County Public Works Office, Missoula, Montana and shall be performed under the supervision of the County Engineer or his designated representative. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Office of Public Works at 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. A Pre-bid showing of the project will be held on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 10:00 am. This is not a mandatory meeting, but all prospective bidders are strongly encouraged to attend. The County Engineer will meet prospective bidders at the intersection of Frenchtown Frontage Road and Roman Creek Road. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for work on Roman Creek Road Walkway, Control Number 6407 SOLICITATION NO. 0905-01” and addressed to: Missoula County Bids Department Missoula County Public Works 6089 Training Drive Missoula, MT 59808 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/19/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200701738, Bk-790, Pg1276, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Harold E. Nelson & Katheryn A. Nelson, as joint tenants was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Mortgage LLC was Beneficiary and Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 14 in Block 2 of New Meadows, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/08 installment payment and all

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 10/17/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200628950, Book 786, Page 1143, modified by Instrument 200827802, Book 830, page 1390, recorded 12-23-08, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Thomas W. McAnally, married and Larinda R. McAnally, married was Grantor, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and American Title & Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded American Title & Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 in Block 3 of Seeley Lake Estates according to the Official Plat thereof, recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula, Montana. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 16, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $378,548.14. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $360,190.21, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on July 24, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.17458) 1002.115144-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/21/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200731020, Book 809, Page 921, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kory Knie was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for First Horizon Home Loans was Beneficiary and First American Title was


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Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5D of Crestview Heights Phase IIIA, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of March 26, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $210,204.97. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $199,323.71, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on August 4, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.18764) 1002.116157-FEI

Company. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,123.24, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 15, 2009 is $166,200.17 principal, interest at the rate of 4.125% now totaling $4,262.13, late charges in the amount of $937.42, escrow advances of $799.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $85.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.78 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’ s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’ s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’ s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: March 2, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 586021097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On March 2, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3091629 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009, 05/28/2009

TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M. MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Parcel Il: TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENTFOR THE INGRESS AND EGRESS ACROSS THE NORTHEASTERLY, 60 FEET OF TRACTS 34, 35, 36, 37 AND 38 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1605 Lance E. Roeske, as Grantor(s), conveyed ‘said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 14, 2006 and Recorded July 21, 2006 in Book 779, Page 451, as Document No, 20031 7960. The beneficial interest is currently held by American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,189.59, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent,,...monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 28, 2009 is $318,001.81 principal, interest at the rate of 7.125% now totaling $11,328.84, late charges in the amount of $328.44, and other fees and expenses advanced of $134.20, plus accruing $62.08 per diem, late interest at the rate of charges, and other costs and fees that, maybe advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real ;property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person,. including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents; ‘(valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied...as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s. fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had `no’ default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 1 5 days for any reason, and in the event ,.of’ a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 25, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the going instrument _ and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. JESSICA M HOPKINS Notary Public State of North Dakota My Commission Exp. Dec. 24, 2014 ASAP# 3084024 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 30, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTH 80 FEET OF LOTS 17 AND 18 IN BLOCK 38 OF DALY’S ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF IN BOOK 1 OF PLATS AT PAGE 79. Troy Patten, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 14, 2003 and recorded October 20, 2003 at 4:21 o’clock P.M., in Book 720, Page 627, as Document No. 200340163. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC fka GMAC Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $889.47, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 20, 2009 is $111,711.30 principal, interest at the rate of 5.5% now totaling $2,367.87, late charges in the amount of $308.52, escrow advances of $254.66, suspense balance of $174.24 and other fees and expenses advanced of $56.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $16.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’ s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’ s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’ s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 19, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 19,

2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same.JOAN MEIER Notary Public Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota My Commission Expires February 23, 2013 ASAP# 3076532 04/30/2009, 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009

payments due in the amount of $2,099.65, beginning July 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of March 23, 2009 is $215,605.06 principal, interest at the rate of 9.4750% now totaling $16552.73, late charges in the amount of $908.60, escrow advances of $920.05, and other fees and expenses advanced of $341.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $55.97 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied,

as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 25, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3084034 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009

C r o s s w o r d s

Jonesin’

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 10, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: All that certain parcel of land situate in the County of Missoula, State of Montana, being known and designated as Lot 17 in Block 9 of West View Addition, a Platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Plat thereof. Tax ID 1792959 Jeremy M. Fabich and Brandi Lee Fabich, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First Montana Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust Dated February 15, 2005 and Recorded February 26, 2005 at 3:15 o’clock P.M. in Book 748, Page 726, under Document No. 200504480. The beneficial interest is currently held by EverHome Mortgage

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Parcel l: TRACT 33A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 3448 LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF` SECTION 29 AND THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 32,

“Pig Out”–external appearances count.

by Matt Jones

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 7 of Emma Dickinson Homesites, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, According to the Official Recorded A.P.N.: 1122403 Joseph U. Kirschten and Kimberly D. Kirschten, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 24, 2007 and Recorded September 6, 2007 in Book No. 805 Page 304, under Document No. 20073298. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly

Missoula County Government Notice of Correction In a public notice printed on May 7th, 2009 the levels of lead and copper reported for the El Mar Estates/New Meadow Water System were incorrect. Below are the corrected measurements: Annual Drinking Water Quality Report El Mar Estates/New Meadow Water System • RSID Parameter Date 90th % Value Units Action level Source of Contamination Lead 9/04/02 <5 Ppb 15 Household Plumbing Copper 9/04/02 0.09 Ppm 1.3 Household Plumbing In a public notice printed on May 7th, 2009 the levels of lead, copper, nitrate, fluoride and barium reported for the Sunset Water System were incorrect. Below are the corrected measurements: Annual Drinking Water Quality Report Sunset West Water System • RSID 8925 PWSID#MT0001857 Parameter Date 90th % Value Units Action level Source of Contamination Lead 6/04/08 2 Ppb 15 Household Plumbing Copper 6/04/08 0.50 Ppm 1.3 Household Plumbing Contaminant Violat Sample Highe ion Date st Y/N Level Detec ted Nitrate+nitrite N 1/07/08 0.49 as N

Fluoride

N

Barium

N

Test Results Unit MCLG MCLG Measurem ent

Ppm

10

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits. 1/17/07 0.15 Ppm 4 4 Erosion of natural deposits 1/17/07 0.2 Ppm 2 2 Erosion of natural deposits Toluene was not detected in Sunset West Water

ACROSS

19 Cupcake topper for some girls' birthday parties 21 Tour gp.? 24 Golden ___ Golf (bar video game) 25 Surround-sound device 26 Daniel Craig role 28 "___ Hope" (1980s ABC soap) 31 Laura of "Jurassic Park" 32 Brothers with a 2009 movie 34 Get ideas 36 Baked ham garnish

41 Salami style 42 Parting word 44 "QuiÈn ___?" 47 Misogynistic Beastie Boys song 50 Twist the statistics 51 Seizes by force 53 Org. that publishes Physician Specialty Codes 55 ___ out a living 56 Sausage or mushrooms, e.g. 60 Schick product

DOWN

22 Gwyneth Paltrow's website 23 ABBA member ___-Frid Lyngstad 27 Song that elicits images of "Top Gun" 29 How some stocks are sold 30 Stars' org. 33 "What'd I tell ya?" 35 "From my cold, dead hands" gp. 37 Far-from-calm feeling 38 "In Seed Comes Fruit" band ___ Dog Pondering 39 Company with a current web ad featuring naked runners 40 Word after band or film 43 Director Boll of 2005's "Alone in the Dark" 44 Toyota sports cars 45 Cheese in a bagel flavor 46 Game show device

48 They were big in the '70s 49 Vanquishes, medieval-style 52 "___-Time Lover" (Stevie Wonder song) 54 Colony dweller 57 Selects 58 Co. leader 59 Sandwich served with tzatziki 62 Deferential gesture 63 "___ seen worse..." 64 ___-Y (today's twentysomething crowd)

1 Lozenge ingredient 5 Rob of "Brothers & Sisters" 9 Clinton's veep 13 Baldwin of "The Departed" 14 In the blink ___ eye 15 Kuwaiti currency 16 Pick some date fruit off the tree 18 "Oh no!" in Norwegian areas of the Midwest

1 Kill mosquitos outdoors, perhaps 2 Wrigley Field's st. 3 Not alt 4 Letters on old Soviet rockets 5 Temporary ride 6 Like some singing in grade school assemblies 7 The ___ look (stick-skinny fashion trend) 8 Many a Caltech grad 9 They may be placed in a higher class 10 Flaming 11 Gilda of the original SNL cast 12 Christopher Paolini book 15 Check for prints 17 First aid box 20 "Evening Shade" narrator Davis 21 Popular lunchbox sandwich, for short

Likely Source of Contamination

10

61 How your waistline may get if you pig out? 65 99, e.g. 66 Prefix with commuting 67 Fox News contributor Karl 68 A little bit pissed 69 Tire leak sound 70 Ben's comedy costar

Last week’s solution

©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0414.

Missoula Independent Page 47 May 14–May 21, 2009


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MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DA-09-21 CITATION IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF: FRANKI MIQUEL MADERA, Minor Child. GREETINGS FROM THE STATE OF MONTANA TO: Frankie Miquel Madera. A Petition having been filed in the above-entitled matter by Cory James Baldwin, for the adoption of your natural child, F.M.M., pursuant to Mont. Code Ann. Sec. 42-2-605 (1)(g)(2), and the termination of your parental rights, and the consent of the natural mother, Norma of the natural mother, Norma Jean Baldwin, being on file with the above-entitled Court, this Citation issues to advise you that on the 2nd day of June, 2009, at 1:30 o’clock p.m. or as soon thereafter as Counsel may be heard, the Petition for Adoption will be brought for consideration by this Court as to granting the adoption as requested and that you are to appear before the above-entitled Court on that date and time above noted, if you so desire to present testimony and evidence, if any your have, why the adoption should not be granted. Your failure to appear at the hearing constitutes a waiver of the individual’s interests in custody of the child and will result in the Court’s termination of the individual’s rights to the child. DATED this 23rd day of April, 2009. /s/ Douglas G. Harkin, District Court Judge

be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 2/25/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. JOAN MEIER Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 2/23/2013 ASAP# 3084918 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009

Meridian, Montana, Missoula County, Montana Mark Esping & Ann Margaret Esping, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 9, 2007 and Recorded May 14, 2007 in Book 797, Page 356, as Document No. 20071 1760. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage Inc. successor by merger to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Misssoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,336.50, beginning October 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 13, 2009 is $305,293.82 principal, interest at the rate of 6.1250% now totaling $8406.12, late charges in the amount of $376.68, escrow advances of $52.64, and other fees and expenses advanced of $52.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $51.23 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 17, 2009 ASAP# 3072779 04/30/2009, 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009

excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 17, 2009 Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On 2/17/09, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. JESSICA M. HOPKINS Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 ASAP# 3071659 04/30/2009, 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009

then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’ s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 18, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 18, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3074372 04/30/2009, 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009

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MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-09-69 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MONTY G. BOWMAN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Robert Raymond Bowman has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Robert Raymond Bowman, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of CUNNINGHAM LAW OFFICE, 818 West Central Avenue, Suite 1, Missoula, MT 59801 or filed the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 20th day of April, 2009. CUNNINGHAM LAW OFFICE /s/ Kyle D. Cunningham, Attorney for Personal Representative, Robert Raymond Bowman NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 22G of AMENDED PLAT OF COBBAN & DINSMORE’S ORCHARD HOMES NO. 3, LOT 22, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Parcel ID #5837498 Mary Kristin Richard, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by May 29, 2007 at 3:49 o’clock P.M. under Document No. 200713173 The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. * Book 798 of Micro Records at Page 259 The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,063.49, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 20, 2009 is $133,800.72 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $3222.83, late charges in the amount of $167.44, escrow advances of $279.78, and other fees and expenses advanced of $984.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $22.91 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on July 6, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 23 of Addition to Thayer’s Country Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Bryan Volkmann and Bridgett Volkman, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Pinnacle Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 16, 2006 and recorded on March 22, 2006 at 2:43 o’clock P.M., in Book 770, Page 1337, under Document No 200606343. The beneficial interest is currently held by LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Ownit Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-4. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,403.01, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 27, 2009 is $190,433.20 principal, interest at the rate of 7.875% now totaling $7,710.44, late charges in the amount of $335.61, escrow advances of $1,661.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $290.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $41.09 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: February 25, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On February 25, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3084858 05/07/2009, 05/14/2009, 05/21/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 29, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Misssoula County, Montana: Parcel 17 of Certificate of Survey No. 351, a parcel of land located in the Southeast one-quarter of the Northwest one-quarter and the Northeast one-quarter of the Southwest one-quarter of Section 13, Township 15 North, Range 22 West, Principal

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 29, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 5 of Allen Acres, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof Gary S Wiser, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 16, 2006 and recorded June 21, 2006 in Book 777, Page 377, under Document No. 200615004. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc., successor by merger to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $3,642.16, beginning June 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 27, 2009 is $408,443.08 principal, interest at the rate of 6.8750% now totaling $23,060.61, late charges in the amount of $1232.64, escrow advances of $4997.74, suspense balance of $ and other fees and expenses advanced of $2484.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $76.93 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary,

Missoula Independent Page 48 May 14–May 21, 2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on June 29, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Unit B-1 of ISLAND PARK OVERLOOK CONDOMINIUMS, a condominium complex as shown and defined in the Condominium Declaration of the Montana Unit Ownership Act, and survey map and set of plans recorded as Condo #113 in records of Missoula Montana and according to the Condominium Declaration and together with its exhibits as recorded on May 17, 2006 in Book 774 of Micro Records at Page 709 and Bylaws of said Condominium recorded in Book 774 of Micro Records at Page 711. Together with an undivided 5.88% interest in the common areas and facilities appertaining to said units, as defined in the Declaration and as defined in the plan’s specifications attached thereto Further together with such Unit’s interest in the restricted common areas appertaining to such unit as set forth and defined in the Declaration and the plan/exhibit attached thereto Zachary E. Smith, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated May 16, 2007 and recorded May 18, 2007 in Book 797 of Micro Records at Page 859, Document No. 200712263. The beneficial interest is currently held by Aurora Loan Services, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,022.11, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of February 8, 2009 is $112,602.19 principal, interest at the rate of 9.075% now totaling $5,305.27, late charges in the amount of $212.83, escrow advances of $338.54, and other fees and expenses advanced of $36.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.39 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not

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OPEN DAILY: PUBLISHERS NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1800-929-2611

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MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

1333 Toole #C-13 $132,500 2bed/2bath newer condo close to downtown. KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

& Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

two-car garage, large patio. Private ponds, 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

ALBERTON AREA HOME ON 3 ACRES. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, bonus room, great views, lots of space, just 30 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

new furnace and more, $149,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

1400 Burns St 1,2 & bedrooms $99,500-$159,500. Affordable, brand new condos! Open House MF 11-1 KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 1902 Pine Tree Hollow - Thompson Falls Newer, spacious 2bdrm/2bath, edge of town & gorgeous! $148,500 KD Dickinson Portico Real Estate 240-5227 2BD home, 2.9 acres near Hamilton. Large garage, open floorplan, laundry/mudroom, peaceful setting. $210,000. Kevin

3 Bed / 2 Bath in Potomac area. Covered deck, fenced acreage and great views. $275, 000. MLS# 902389. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message:12592 for pics 3 Bed/2.5 Bath house in Stevensville with 2 bdrm rental & 2 car garage. Separate 4 car garage with large shop. 1.3 landscaped acres. $299,900 MLS#900811. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12881 for pics 3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings,

4 BD/2BA home, ready-to-finish basement. 17-foot ceilings, office/den, master suite, 2-car garage. 44 Ranch, $297,000! Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 4 Bed/2 Bath Remodeled, new roof, new heating & AC, many upgrades, large corner lot. 639 South Ave. W. $252,500. 546-2177 4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $329,900 MLS#901764 Janet 5327903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12886 for pics 4800 SQ FT MULLAN RD AREA HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, great floor plan, family room with wet bar, vaulted ceilings, and more, $448,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

Lower Rattlesnake Home 1133 Harrison • $295,000 2 bdr/1 bath, bonus room, beautiful views in amazing spot, 2+ lots, hardwood floors, gas fireplace, large vinyl window, unfinished basement, fenced, lots of updates.

www.mindypalmer.com

721-5187 or 327-8757

For Lease • 1001 SW Higgins, Suite 104

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net 5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $239,900 MLS#900845. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12882 for pics 832 Cherry St. $239,500 Lower Rattlesnake - 2bed/1bath, brand new kitchen & bath, garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227

Professional office space in the Panorama Park Building. 1,335+ sq. ft., 2 offices, large reception area, bathroom and kitchen. Could easily be converted into more office spaces. $1,650 a month. Most

Utilities Paid • Broker Owned

Two 5 acre parcels 15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $159,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $299,000.

Mary Mar ry REALTOR®, Broker Office 406-728-9295 • Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

RentalsApartments

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838 Stoddard - 3bdrm +1 bonus, huge yard, west side, tons of room. $234,900. KD Dickinson - Portico Real Estate 240-5227 921 S 4th St W. $249,500 McCormick Park - 2bed/1bath & bonus room, classy upgrades, dble garage KD Dickinson – Portico Real Estate – (406) 240-5227 A Career in Real Estate with Access Realty, we offer training, great commission splite and support. 406544-3098 www.AccessRealty.net

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BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED NORTH SIDE HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, fenced yard, detached garage, covered porch, hardwood floors, and more, $199,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, bonus rooms, great deck and mountain and valley views, large sauna, just 20 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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IMMACULATE LEWIS & CLARK AREA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, hardwood floors, new roof, large fenced back yard, lots of windows, $198,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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Newly remodeled 2BD Clark Fork Riverfront retreat! Open floorplan, large deck, hardwood floors. $275,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689 UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, single attached garage, new flooring, interior paint, updated kitchen,

Homes for Sale

Joy Earls University Charmer 737 Evans, Missoula $399,870 MLS#902594

www.mindypalmer.com

UPDATED POTOMAC AREA HOME ON 16.5 ACRES.3 Bdr/2 Bath, Open floor plan, deck and covered porch, very private and quiet, $273,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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Well-maintained 3BD house, 45 minutes from Missoula, hardwood floors, storage shed, updated appliances. $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-2071185. www.AccessRealty.net We buy fixer-uppers! Call us to find out more. 880-7249.

Condos / Townhomes Affordable Home Ownership STOP RENTING! At $107,500 the price of home ownership is possible and you may qualify for down payment assistance. Low income guidelines apply. Call for info. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths! Nice! 1421 Eaton St. #28, Missoula $107,500. Call Sharon Scarborough at Prudential Montana Real Estate 329-2034.

Manufactured Homes FROM $38,887. New Modular Homes, *No Money Down* if you own your land. $8,000 Tax Credit. Champion Homes. 303-573-0067 Free brochure and price sheet. www.coloradofactorymodulars.com

Lorin & Amy Peterson

a father daughter team

Homes for Sale

Visit my website for more pictures and other listings…

Charming 1925 U home. 2003 remodel on 2 lush lots w/gardens, fruit trees and arbor, 4 beds, 2 baths + country kitchen. Rare find in amazing spot.

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com RICE TEAM Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com Open House 1-4 Sunday 5/17/09 8875 Marigold Ct., Missoula • 2 Bd/ 2 Bath on large lot • 2 car garage, deck & patio • $219,900 • MLS# 808738 Text:44133 Message: 12593 for pics

• Wishard View lots (20+acres) • Meadows & Trees near Potomac • One has a pole barn • Plenty of room for horses or cows • Financing available oac • $169,000-$199,900 MLS# 900454 Text:44133 Message:12888 for pics

• NEW LISTING! • 3 Bd Cedar log home on 20 acres • 3 decks / 2 covered • Large garage w/ shop area • $850,000 • MLS# 903288 Text:44133 Message: 12885 for pics

Open House 1-4 Sunday 5/17/09 2019B 7th, Missoula • 3 Bed/1.5 Bath/Single garage • Private deck & fenced yard • Close to bus route and bike trails • $174,000 • MLS# 903274 Text:44133 Message: 12889 for pics

Commercial

Commercial

Polson Restaurant Bistro “class act” Isabels •Seller retiring •Turn key. •Fully equipped bistro •Convert to other enterprises?

Amy 532-9287 Lorin 532-9223

Hwy 93 Polson Now $237,000

Wilma Mixon-Hall • 883-3346

SavoirFaireProperties.com

www.LorinAndAmy.com

2300 Regent, Suites 205-206-207 Three Wonderful 3 year old commercial Condos, one with reception area, conference room, production space, and 6 work cubicals. There are 2 more additional condo units with added work areas, and separate entrances. All 3 condo’s comes with 10 deeded parking spaces. Suites 205 and 206 can be sold separately for $240,000. Suite 207 sold separately is $510,000. All 3 sold together, priced at $745,000. MLS: 901538 & 901542 & 901535. www.2300regentcondos.com

For all your home mortgage needs call

Lisa Triepke lisa@landlmortgage.com

370-7050 Purchase Refinance Construction 1st Time Home Buyer Programs 2nd Mortgages

514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

Downtown Restaurant For Sale #228,1092

Fabulous downtown locale 247 W. Front • Missoula includes 11 parking spaces! Seats 36+, outside seating, basement with lots of storage. Long time established Missoula restaurant with cabaret license included. $150,000 MLS# 901625

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Missoula Independent Page 49 May 14–May 21, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Land for Sale

Land for Sale

Land for Sale

Land for Sale

Mortgage & Financial

1/2 acre in Mullan Road area with great views. Sewer stubbed to the lot. Close to river access, golf and shopping $109,900 MLS# 801617 riceteam@windermere.com Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503. Text:44133 Message:12887 for pics

Sapphires. Appraised $127,500 each. $864,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.AccessRealty.net

Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

$159/mo. 1-800-843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com

Mountain West Mortgage. Best Mortgage Loan Products. 35 Years experience. John Timmons 406543-8945 Lic #6,7

20,000 SQ FOOT LOT IN GREAT ALBERTON LOCATION. 0.46 acres with all utilities present, zoned residential with potential for commercial re-zoning, $79,000. Prudential

5 ACRES OF UNZONED LAND ON LOLO CREEK. 320’ of creek frontage, 2 40x60 buildings with 17 storage units and office space, caboose, large shop/commercial building, 2 mobiles, easy Hwy 93 access, $575,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

20 Lot Bitterroot Subdivision, 42 acres, views of Bitterroots &

www.mindypalmer.com

www.mindypalmer.com

America’s Best Buy! Where in the U.S. can you own 20 acres, 30 minutes from major Texas city? Only $15,900. $0 Down,

Missoula • 549-3353 | Hamilton • 363-4450

Carrie A Greer REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC®, ABR® 880-6592 • Carrie@GreaterMontanaRE.com CarrieAGreer.com Specializing in: New Construction

Bridget Bowers REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 207-5387 • Bridget@GreaterMontanaRE.com BitterrootMontanaProperties.com Specializing in: Homes with Acreage

Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.RiverRidgeMT.com

Out of Town 800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.AccessRealty.net

OWE 10K OR MORE to the IRS? Need Tax Relief? Call Effectur NOW for a FREE Consultation. We can help! 800-989-0518 REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 70% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-9994809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

Classic Rattlesnake New LOW Price

$369,900 Let's hear it for curb appeal!!! Familiar Rattlesnake classic with nearly a 1/2 acre fully landscaped lot! Newly remodeled in 2008, this home features 4bed/2bath of luxurious living...all within a 1 mile from downtown and the university. HURRY... at this new low price, it won't last long!

MLS#900687

546-0768

Justin Armintrout - Realtor

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 239-7588 • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaMultiFamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 544-8570 • Shelly@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

6402 Lower Miller Creek Road $288,500 • MLS# 903173 3BD/2BA in Maloney Ranch area. One level, family room, large lot w/ fenced yard.

2387 Classic Court $185,900 • MLS# 900739 2BD/1.5BA in central, quiet location with fenced yard & covered patio.

Priscilla Brockmeyer | 370.7689 www.TourMineralCounty.com

our Mineral County May 15, 4-7pm

May 16, 10-4pm

Featuring Mineral County and its Building Industry Tour Starts at Superior Color & Lumber Admission is Free Free Refreshments & Give-aways Free Prize Drawing

Register to win a free: i-Pod • Digital Camera • Lodging and Dinner for 2 at Forest Grove Lodge • A Wine Set • Gift Baskets • Gift Certificates and More! Visit www.TourMineralCounty.com for a list of homes and a map. Free Tour books will be available at Superior Color & Lumber.

Mullan Trail Bank, Turner Sign Arts, Iron Mountain Graphics, Superior Color & Lumber, Advantage Porta Potty, Mineral County Chamber of Commerce, Forest Grove Lodge, Home Interiors, Inc., Haskins Excavating, Superior Septic, Mineral Community Hospital, Bugless Pest Control, E&S Plumbing, Culligan, Wells Fargo

Missoula Independent Page 50 May 14–May 21, 2009


Prairie Hills Natural Chuck Tender Steak

$3.59 lb.

Painted Hills Natural Boneless Ribeye Steak

$8.59 lb.

All Natural Boneless Pork Sirloin Steak

$1.89 lb.

Positive Is How I Live Bumper Sticker

$1.99 each

Flathead Hot House Cucumbers

99¢ each

Organic Bananas

79¢ lb.

Costa Rica Gold Pineapple

89¢ lb.

Hot House Tomatoes

99¢ lb.

L & A Pomegranate Cranberry Delight

$1.29 32 oz.

Long Life Organic Green Tea Bags

$2.09 20 count

Corazona Potato Chips

$1.59 6 oz. bag

Loacker Chocolate Wafers

$1.99 8.8 oz.

Happy Camper California Wines

$4.99 .75 liter

Newcastle Brown or Heineken

$12.99 12 pack

Sierra Nevada or Deschutes

$11.99 12 pack

Natural Directions Organic Peanut Butter

$2.79 18 oz.

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 Missoula Independent Page 51 May 14–May 21, 2009



Missoula Independent