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Independent MISSOULA

Vol. 20, No. 10 • March 5–March 12, 2009

Western Montana’s Weekly Journal of People, Politics and Culture

Lawmakers pledged to fix the state’s embattled Department of Environmental Quality during this session, but may be making a mess instead. So why isn’t DEQ Director Richard Opper speaking up? by Patrick M. Klemz

Scope: Politics and race collide with poet Thomas Sayers Ellis Theater: UM’s Buried Child unearths a method to the madness Up Front: Mixed martial arts fights its way to the mainstream


BETTY’S DIVINE 521 S. Higgins, 721-4777 The Matoon Art Show. This brother sister combo displays a variety of art techniques. Larkin utilizes spray paint, markers, pens, and colored pencil on plywood and canvas. Primarily a stencilist, he takes his inspiration from everything from movies to sports to models. Willow works with acrylic paints on canvases of multiple sizes, her inspirations being primarily based in the fashion realm. Music provided by DJ Tak 45. Mucho vino and cookies. 5-8pm. BLACKBIRD KID SHOP 525 S. Higgins, 543-2899 Please join us this Friday, March 6th, for an art opening by The Missoula Community School and live music that your kids will love by Andrew Hunt. 5-8pm- Yummy snacks and wine. BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 N. Higgins, 728-8780 Please join Butterfly Herbs for March's First Friday celebration as we present current works from 18-year-old Missoula local Emily Jenne. Emily is a Hellgate Senior, and this will be her first solo show. Her work has been featured at the Missoula Art Museum and the Missoula WORD auction. The exhibit will extend through the month of March with a First Friday opening event on March 6th from 5-8pm. CATALYST 111 N. Higgins, 542-1337 Visit us after First Friday's Art Walk. Enjoy local art and our 100% seasonal and local dinner menu at our monthly First Friday event. Dinner served 7 PM to 10 PM.

CUTTING CREW 220 Ryman St., 529-2085 A polaroid slide show by Peter Kearns and new paintings by Kat Ahlstrom. 5pm - 8pm. THE GREEN LIGHT 128 W. Alder, 541-8623 2 For 1 at The Green Light this First Friday, March 6th. Lauren Varney, co-director and co-founder of Home Resource is showing his work with the work of artist Jack Boyd. Both artists use salvaged material in their work, creating pieces that are as beautiful as they are functional. 5-8pm. HEALTHY HUMMINGBIRD MASSAGE & ARTS CENTER 725 Alder, Suite 27, 207-6269 Join us for our grand opening and First Friday celebration! Featuring art from Gavin Hudgeons, Patti Jo Ruegamer, Becky Kramer, Brenda Edwards, David Dragonfly and more. Live acoustic music from Amanda Cevallos and Birdsmile Home. Great art, great music and good food will be enjoyed Friday, March 6th, from 5-10. www.healthyhummingbird.com. MISS ZULA’S 111 N. Higgins, 541-7376 The acrylic paintings of Kristy Dana Gish will brighten any room of your home because of the vivid color scheme she uses. Her paintings are contemporary and span from landscapes to heavily textured abstracts. This show will have something for everyone. An artist reception will be held Friday, March 6, from 5-8pm during Missoula's First Friday celebration.

MONTANA ART AND FRAMING 709 Ronan St., 541-7100 Ten oil stick paintings from the “Bear Series” by Nancy Erickson, oil paintings by Stephanie Frostad, new digital photographs by Christofer Autio, and watercolor paintings tucked away for the last 30 years by Don Mundt. A First Friday opening is on March 6th from 5 to 9 pm and special gallery hours from 9 to 4 pm on Saturday, March 7th. MONTE DOLACK GALLERY 139 W. Front St., 549-3248 Join us Friday, March 6th, from 5-8pm for a retrospective look at several years’ worth of original paintings, limited edition prints and fine art posters by Monte Dolack and Mary Beth Percival. Also on view will be the jewelry of Marlene Dolack. Open weekdays 10-5:30 and Saturday 11-5. www.dolack.com. WHOOPING CRONES GALLERY 508 E. Broadway, 721-3042 The Whooping Crones Gallery is showing “Sleepless Nights and Day Dreams” Masks by Michel Colville, Myra Ducharme, Kathi Quick and others. Continuing paper sculptures by Kerry Nagel. Show runs through March 28th. First Friday Artist reception Friday, March 6th 5~8 pm. ZOË 229 E. Front St., 541-9400 Last First Friday at Zoe. Featuring a reading and book signing by local poet extradinaire, Sheryl Noethe. Come at 6 - reading will begin at 6:45. Join us for a lively evening with refreshments.

Get in touch with your inner artist New Location Grand Opening

Free Massages, Beverages, Food, Live Music, and Art! 5pm-11pm

First Friday Gallery Walks!

725 Alder, Suite 27 • 207-6269

Miss Zula’s 111 North Higgins 542-1337

First Friday Dinner Served 7 to 10 PM

Featuring the art of Kristy Dana Gish 111 N Higgins Missoula, MT • 541-7376

Reading & book signing by Sheryl Noethe

Zöe

Custom matting and framing "First Friday Gallery Opening" 10 Bears by Nancy Erickson Oil paintings by Stephanie Frostad Digital images by Chris Autio Watercolors by Don Mundt

“...I cannot begin to tell you how deeply moved and lifted away I was by your very deeply personal work...” —Martin Sheen 229 East Front St. Missoula Independent

541-9400

Page 2 March 5–March 12, 2009

709 RONAN STREET

406-541-7100 • Missoula, MT 59801


nside Cover Story Responding to particularly appalling delays in the approval of gravel pit operations, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle pledged to fix the state’s Department of Environmental Quality’s permitting division during the current legislative session. A truckload of proCover illustration by Kou Moua posed reform bills began appearing before the session started. The renewed interest, however, has failed to translate into a budget windfall for DEQ. The result could be a mess. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Friday 3/6 • 9pm

Russ Nasset & the Revelators Thursday 3/12 • 9pm

Bob Wire

Friday 3/13 • 9pm

News

Letters Raising the curtain on local theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Week in Review Walgreens gets robbed again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Briefs Chickasaw votes, vetoes and protecting protesters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Etc. Why are there more HIV/AIDS patients in Missoula? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Up Front Mixed martial arts fights its way to the mainstream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Ochenski New attorney general abandons Bush policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Writers on the Range It’s time to cowboy up on climate change . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Agenda Celebrating International Women’s Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Landslide

Saturday 3/14 • 8pm

St. Practice Day

2009

Arts & Entertainment

Flash in the Pan Soup without tears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 8 Days a Week Some of them include sleep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Mountain High Be mindful of burning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Scope Politics and race collide with poet Thomas Sayers Ellis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Noise Little Brazil, Ladyfinger (ne), Donavon Frankenreiter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Gary Jules & the Group Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Theater Buried Child unearths a method to the madness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Film Snyder delivers the Watchmen we already know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Exclusives Street Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 In Other News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Independent Personals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 The Advice Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Free Will Astrolog y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 This Modern World. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

following the Parade Live music by Malarkey

SUNDAY 8PM FREE Euchre Tournament

THURSDAY 3/5

MONDAY 10PM

TUESDAY 7:30PM



Fat Tire Pub Trivia

Open Mic Night with Mike Avery!

Doors @ 9pm, Cover $5 w/Griz Card, $7 without, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

Izabella with Luau Cinder

PUBLISHER Matt Gibson GENERAL MANAGER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Jonas Ehudin STAFF REPORTERS Patrick Klemz, Jesse Froehling, Matthew Frank PHOTO INTERN Ashley Sears COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Jenn Stewart ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Carolyn Bartlett, Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Hannah Smith, Scott Woodall CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER Miriam Mick CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Jennifer Savage, Caitlin Copple, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Jessie McQuillan, Brad Tyer, Katie Kane

FRIDAY 3/6

Doors @ 9pm, Cover $TBD, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

Judas Priest Tribute with The

Lazerwolfs SATURDAY 3/7

Phone number: 406-543-6609

Doors @ 9pm, Cover $TBD, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

Ladyfinger (ne)

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801

Featuring the entire British Steel Album

with 1090 Club & Little Brazil More Information TBA THURSDAY 3/12

Doors @ 9pm, Tickets $13 advance or $15 Day of show, 18+, ($2 surcharge under 21)

FISHBONE www.ticketswest.com • www.myspace.com/fishboneisredhot.com

Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

Wed. 7pm • Fri. 7pm Sat. 4 & 8pm

Missoula Independent

March Special: $2 Stoli

Page 3 March 5–March 12, 2009


STREET TALK

by Ashley Sears

Asked Monday morning at the trailhead to “The M” at the base of Mount Sentinel.

Q:

Montana’s air and water quality standards appear to be taking quite a hit in the 2009 Legislature. Do you believe Montana’s laws are so strict that they prevent reasonable resource development? Follow-up: What would you do if you were told that an electrical transmission line was to be built above your home?

Nic Brouillard: I think every system of government has room for improvement, and a lot of those laws are outdated. We don’t want to sacrifice air and water quality standards for anything, but there has to be room for commerce and development. Squeaky wheel: I’d probably go down to the commissioners’ office and find out if it needed to be there. If it did I’d swallow my pride, and if not I’d bitch about it.

Amy Hartz: I honestly don’t think they’re that strict. At least in Missoula they’re not that bad. Fight the power: Actually, I live out in the country in Buxton, outside Butte, and they wanted to build a huge electrical line through our ranch because they just put up a big subdivision nearby. It’s terrible. We’re fighting it right now but it’s really hard when you’re fighting a big electrical company. We had a petition and wrote letters but there’s just nothing more we can do. It’s really terrible.

Tyler Shorter: I don’t think you can have strict enough laws when it comes to air and water quality. Movin’ man: I’d be pissed! And would probably move out of my house.

Bruce Midget: No, I don’t think they’re strict enough in most cases. My friends come out to Montana for fishing and they’re absolutely appalled by some of the conditions. Knowledge is power: Well, I’d find out what kind of procedures I’d need to go through in order to stop it and what organizations could help.

Missoula Independent

Page 4 March 5–March 12, 2009

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Raising the curtain Is it possible that this week’s courageous production of Edward Albee’s play The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? could be the most important piece of theater presented for Missoula audiences during this season? Certainly. Among other things, The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? questions our culture’s morality in a spirit similar to that which Albee described in response to criticism of another of his works, The American Dream (1960). “This play is an examination of the American Scene, an attack on the substitution of artificial for real values in our society, a condemnation of complacency, cruelty, emasculation and vacuity; it is a stand against the fiction that everything in this slipping land of ours is peachykeen.” Can this week’s production of the work of a three-time Drama Desk Award Winner, three-time Tony Award Winner and three-time Pulitzer Prize Winner, hope to achieve its rightful place of significance if the culture of critics in our community limits its scope of this acclaimed dramatic work to its gossamer veil of “taboo themes” and most easily noticeable plot devices? Certainly not. As Neil LaBute asserts in his play, The Shape of Things, there has got to be a line between creating art and just needing attention. Missoula audiences are wont to agree with him. So, news articles that do not actually educate audiences, other than to leave them with the impression that they might be uncomfortable after an evening of theater, can lead many to be understandably resistant to take part in the event. I believe that the level of thoughtful commitment that I witness being given to this production—and many others of late—warrants an equal deepening of critical perspective from our journalistic society. Granted, it is extremely difficult for many a theater artist to articulate his or her process and its magnitude until involvement in the production of a work such as The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? has ended, because the vicissitude inherent to realism lends itself to the sense of uncertainty that is central to the expe-

rience of participating in live theater. This self-defeating habit of guarded secrecy is something that I have lately been challenging my friends and colleagues in the theater, as well as myself,

“As Neil LaBute asserts in his play, The Shape of Things, there has got to be a line between creating art and just needing attention. Missoula audiences are wont to agree with

him.

he mentions in his nickellbag.com blog that he “gets thanks from [theater artists] for marking the legitimacy of their efforts with [his] thoughts,” and the emergence of Erika Fredrickson’s deeply reflective interest in theater is an emboldening inspiration to the dynamism that exists at the core of every creative artist. This local advancement in criticism must be sustained. It is a vital facet and steward of the continual professional development and social consequence of Missoula’s theater artists. Chris Torma Missoula

Consumer rip-off This letter is in regards to the double tax and fees on light trucks and cars that is imposed every time a vehicle changes ownership. There is no allowance for taxes and fees already paid for that year. House Bill 187 will correct this $5.2 million per year consumer rip-off. This bill passed second reading by a 65–34 vote, but was referred to House Appropriations, where I fear that it will die by lack of action. This same legislation was killed by non-action in the last session. Please contact Reps. Hands, Henry, Malek, Reinhart, Sands and McAlpin and urge them to change their vote to “yes” on this consumer protection legislation. Gerry Devlin Miles City

Thanking Tester to break. For it is unreasonable to insist on a greater and more vital degree of thoughtful criticism from our community unless we are willing to put forward to its journalists news of our creative ideas and speak with candor about the authenticity of the work that we are doing from moment to moment. I am encouraged to have noticed a boon of insightful analysis published in the Independent and the Missoulian since I returned to my hometown three years ago. Joe Nickell is spot-on when

The American Legion applauds Democratic Sen. Jon Tester for supporting S. 423, the Veterans Health Care Budget Reform and Transparency Act of 2009. This legislation is supported by nearly every major veterans’ service organization in the United States. When enacted, S. 423 will help achieve timely, predictable and sufficient VA medical care funding. The American Legion salutes Senator Tester for his steadfast support of this critical veterans’ issue. David Rehbein Washington, D.C

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Motion explores the science of movement through exhibits including an interactive hang glider simulator, a giant turntable from the San Francisco Exploratorium, and other hands-on experiences where your family can experiment with gravity, waves, and friction.

SPRING BREAK SCIENCE SMORGASBORD Spring Break workshops will be held Monday-Friday from 9 am4pm for ages 8-12. Cost is $45 per day or $195 for the whole week. Registration required in advance. Here is a list of the smorgasbord samplings: Monday, 3/30: ROCKIN’ RUBE GOLDBERG MACHINES Explore the physics of motion. Build over-engineered apparatuses that perform simple tasks in complex ways.

For a limited time, buy one air/hotel package and the second person flies free* from Bozeman, Billings, Great Falls, Kalispell and Missoula! Packages available with over 50 of Las Vegas’ most exciting hotels.

(702) 505-8888 *Offer based on a buy one (1) air/hotel package, get one (1) round-trip companion airfare for free. Minimum two (2) night, two (2) person air/hotel package required. Companion travel must be on same itinerary as regular fare passenger. Must be purchased by March 18, 2009 for travel between April 1 and Sept. 30, 2009. Prices do not include PFC, segment tax or Sept. 11 security fee of up to $10.60 per segment. A segment is one take-off and one landing. A convenience fee of $13.50 per passenger will apply when booked on allegiantair.com. A convenience fee of $13.50 per passenger, plus $10.00 per segment, will apply when purchased through Allegiant Air call centers. When purchased at time of booking, a fee of $15 for first checked bag and $25 for second checked bag will apply per person, per segment. If purchased at flight check-in, a fee of $25 for the first checked bag and $35 for the second checked bag per person, per segment will apply. In all cases additional higher fees will apply for three or more checked bags. Fare rules, routes and schedules are subject to change without notice. Restrictions apply. Offer not valid on previously purchased tickets.

Tuesday, 3/31: ROBOTIC CITY PART 1 Use MIT-created PICO Cricket robots to create a virtual city with moving parts and creatures. Wednesday, 4/1 : ROBOTIC CITY PART 2 Build onto the city’s framework and create new structures and systems. Students do not need to enroll both days. Thursday, 4/2: THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF WEATHER Launch a weather balloon that collects important atmospheric data and learn about exciting weather phenomena. Friday, 4/3: ART AND MOTION Create random and calculated art pieces using exhibits on the floor and created machines.

............................. PUBLIC HOURS AND ACTIVITIES Thursday 3:30 pm-7:00 pm Saturday and Sunday 11:00 am-4:30 pm.

Thursday, 3/5 ROCKET ROLL 3:30 pm-7:00 pm. Design and build a rocket--how far will your's fly?

Saturday, 3/7 LIGHT PAINTING 1:00 am-4:30 pm. Draw pictures in the air with LEDs and capture your art on digital film. A favorite for adults!

Sunday, 3/8 CENTER OF MASS AND GRAVITY 1:00 pm-4:30 pm. How does the distribution of mass affect an object? Find out at the Discovery Bench!

............................. BIRTHDAYS Hey kids – Have an unforgettable Super Science Birthday Party at spectrUM Discovery Area. DIRECTIONS From Arthur Ave., turn east onto Beckwith Ave. toward Mt. Sentinel and onto The University of Montana campus. Turn left at Mansfield Ave. and into the parking lot. ADMISSION $3.50 for those 4 years of age and older. Children 3 and younger are free. Free parking all day Saturday and Sunday, and Thursday after 5:00 pm. WWW.UMT.EDU/SPECTRUM T/ 243.4828

Missoula Independent

Page 5 March 5–March 12, 2009


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, February 25

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Ashley Sears

A private plane carrying the remains of Lt. Col. Gary Derby arrives at Billings Logan International Airport. Derby, 44, died Feb. 9 in Mosul after being wounded by an improvised explosive device, according to the Department of Defense.

• Thursday, February 26 Weeks after a Montana judge found BNSF liable for a massive brownfield in the Flathead, state Attorney General Steve Bullock issues a report accusing the railway of overcharging local grain producers. According to the report, Montanans pay about $3,454 per carload, more than farmers in neighboring states.

• Friday, February 27 The Missoula Maulers book early tee times after the Yellowstone Quake eliminate the local skaters from the Northern Pacific Hockey League playoffs with a 3-2 victory at Glacier Ice Rink. Yellowstone forward Cody Suder scores 1:38 into overtime, completing a 3-0 series sweep of the Maulers.

• Saturday, February 28 Iconic radio newscaster Paul Harvey dies at age 90. Harvey landed his first radio gig with KGVO Radio in Missoula in 1941. Before long he was reportedly fired by then-owner Art Mosby for his “silly-sounding delivery” and advised to go into sales instead.

• Sunday, March 1 Canadian trucker James Scott allegedly sets fire to several cars at the Crossroads Travel Plaza early this morning, causing nearly $340,000 in damages and nearly killing two people sleeping in a nearby cab. Prosecutors charge Scott with arson and criminal endangerment.

• Monday, March 2 Missoula County officials learn during a budget review meeting that the general fund is projected to be $336,000 in the red by the end of the year. Officials attribute the shortfall in part to investment earnings falling about $200,000 short of projections.

• Tuesday, March 3 For the third time in a month, an armed robber enters the Walgreens on N. Reserve Street seeking cash and prescription drugs. The suspect is described as a white male in his early 20s, approximately 5-feet-10 and weighing 150–175 pounds. Police believe the same man may be responsible for all three robberies.

A Bohemian waxwing plucks a mountain ash berry and heads for a perch Monday afternoon on the University of Montana campus. Thousands of the nomadic songbirds congregate this time of year in Missoula, where massive flocks scavenge dried berries before returning to Canada’s northern forests in the summer.

Business

Dropped call U.S. District Court Judge Donald Molloy recently dissolved an injunction against a Lolo telemarketer accused by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) of scamming hundreds of out-of-state customers. In the order, Molloy calls evidence presented by FTC “weak” and states that, if the trial were to occur today, the feds would seem unlikely to succeed on the merits of their claims. Federal attorneys filed the lawsuit against U.S. Magazine Service and owner Jason Ellsworth of Hamilton on May 13, quickly securing an injunction and a freeze on Ellsworth’s assets without posting bond (see “Boundary call,” July 31, 2008). The telemarketer’s attorney, Hank Waters, says prosecutors used the best of FTC’s evidence to try and maintain the injunction. “They’ve already kind of shot their load with the judge,” Waters says. “My guess is their supervisors didn’t know how bad the case was going.” The FTC’s complaint accuses the company

of luring customers into frontloaded payment plans with promises of sweepstakes prizes and then refusing cancellation requests—a violation of the Telemarketing Sales Rule. Molloy agreed with Ellsworth that while recorded sales calls show representatives refusing cancellation, the FTC’s evidence fails to prove the violations stemmed from company policy, rather than the actions of a few employees. Twenty customer affidavits and roughly 200 complaints constituted the rest of FTC’s evidence, but in many of those cases Molloy determined the complainants either agreed to the payment plans or received a refund. The lawsuit remains before the district court, though it appears prosecutors must now expand upon the body of evidence if they hope to succeed. The Spokane Better Business Bureau and the Montana Department of Justice compiled much of the documentation used against U.S. Magazine Service. State attorneys have no standing in the case itself since the telemarketing firm solicits only out-of-state clients. Charles Harwood, regional director of the FTC, says discovery is ongoing. The case is

scheduled for trial in early 2010. Patrick M. Klemz

Abortion

Protection for protesters An incident outside Missoula’s Blue Mountain Clinic in September 2007 involving an anti-abortion protester and a volunteer patient escort has prompted Jim Shockley, R-Victor, to introduce a bill to protect protesters. The “reverse bubble bill” would counterbalance 2005’s “bubble bill,” which made obstructing access to a health care facility a crime and established an eight-foot buffer around a person entering or leaving a facility. Shockley’s proposal, Senate Bill 497, would effectively establish the same eight-foot buffer around protesters to protect their right to demonstrate. It unanimously passed the Senate Judiciary Committee last week. According to city court records, protester Cathy Kulonis was charged with disorderly conduct for blocking the pathway of volunteer escort Carol Marsh outside Blue Mountain

ACE ROGERS Great Friend, Wonderful Human. Goodbye . . .

127 S. 4th West Missoula • 728-1747 Missoula Independent

Page 6 March 5–March 12, 2009


Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Clinic on September 12, 2007. But it was Marsh who initiated contact, allegedly inadvertently. The case was dismissed. As clinic director Anita Kuennen describes the incident, Marsh was forced to step off the sidewalk to avoid Kulonis and “lost her balance and brushed up against her.” Shockley—the attorney who represented Kulonis—says the “brushed up against” was more of a “plowing into.” In any case, he concluded protesters need a buffer, too. But Kuennen believes the bill isn’t necessary. “It’s a reactionary attempt to claim that there’s some kind of need for them to be protected in their demonstration,” she says. “Honestly, I think it’s a bogus attempt at trying to make it seem like we’re the aggressors in the situation, where the clinic has really taken a very proactive stance to not engage and not escalate the situation.” The proposed bill is even more bizarre, Kuennen adds, considering how amiable she and other Blue Mountain staffers are toward repeat protesters, and vice versa. She likens the relationship to the classic “Wolf and Sheepdog” Warner Bros. cartoon, in which the characters greet each other: “Mornin’ Sam.” “Good morning Ralph.” “We do that,” Kuennen says. “That’s how (we) interact every week.” Matthew Frank

Dogs

Engen’s first veto For the first time in his role as Missoula’s mayor, John Engen vetoed a City Council resolution. The resolution in question, which originally passed on Feb. 23, designated the Jacob’s Island Bark Park, the Tower Street conservation area, the northern portion of Playfair Park and the city-owned portion of Mt. Sentinel as “voice restraint” areas for dog owners. It was the second of two options provided by the Parks and Rec Department, with the first also including the North Hills and Mt. Jumbo. That first option reflected a two-year-old Parks

Ochenski

Range

and Rec policy that was never updated in the city ordinance. City code says that all dogs must be on a leash unless otherwise designated. When City Council decided to vote for the second option, dog owners howled over what appeared to be a change in policy on the North Hills and Mt. Jumbo.

In a letter to the City Council, Engen outlined his reasons behind the veto. He noted that City Attorney Jim Nugent recommends that any areas designated as voice restraint should be listed in the ordinance and not determined by a resolution. He also pointed out that the city is beginning work on a conservation lands management plan that would have to jibe with the dog ordinance. Lastly, in a nod to the budding controversy, he wrote that “as elected officials, we owe it to our community to be open minded and to listen to further discussion.” “This is not dogs gone wild,” Engen told City Council when he publicly announced his veto March 2. “This is about trying to find a reasonable compromise.” Until the compromise is reached, Engen told the council that the city’s policy will return to the status quo, meaning dogs can continue to run unleashed on the North Hills and Mt. Jumbo. Jesse Froehling

Agenda

News Quirks

BY THE NUMBERS

$12,000

Chickasaw

A one-vote swing When City Council voted on the annexation of the controversial Chickasaw Place subdivision March 2, most members voted without hesitation. But Ward 2 Councilmember Pam Walzer, who had backed the measure in committee, looked torn as her name was called. She paused for a breath, then voted against the development, which would have allowed a new subdivision on prime Missoula soil. The annexation failed, 7-5, one vote short of the super-majority required to pass. “It was to me a lose-lose situation,” said Walzer a day after the decision. “No matter how I voted, there would be consequences that could be quite extreme.” Wa l z e r c o m m e n d e d Chickasaw developer George Lake for offering to protect three acres of agricultural land on the plot north of Seventh Street. But ultimately she felt the importance of locally grown food in our communities and the rural appeal of the Orchard Homes neighborhood won out. “I did not vote to deny annexation to encourage one house per acre,” she said. “All that’s doing is supporting McMansions.” However, as subdivisions spring up, Walzer said adjacent landowners sometimes decide to move. Occasionally, they sell their land to other developers who create more subdivisions. And sometimes, those subdivisions, like Lake’s, stand on prime agricultural land. “When do we say enough is enough?” Walzer said. “I guess last night, I said, ‘Enough.’” Kristin Smith, who works for Lake’s planning agency, says her client hasn’t made a decision about the future of his land. “You can imagine if you were in his shoes, it would be pretty frustrating,” she says. “I don’t think [the council] left him with many options other than turning to the county.” Jesse Froehling

Amount Russell Athletic paid to produce Griz Gear before the University of Montana cancelled the contract over alleged workers rights violations. Students for Economic and Social Justice lobbied UM for weeks to sever ties with the company before administrators made the announcement March 3.

etc. The last time local HIV/AIDS treatment made headlines, it took an Elton John fundraising controversy to call attention to the issue. You may remember how things played out last March: The University of Montana, in an effort to woo the pop star back to the Adams Center, offered to raise $75,000 for the Elton John AIDS Foundation. The move irked local advocates, who stressed just how much Missoula patients could use some of that money. The sides eventually compromised, with John’s foundation redirecting $20,000 to local groups. Exactly a year later, there’s more news that underscores the needs of local HIV/AIDS organizations: Missoula’s Partnership Health Clinic reports a startling increase of 17 new HIV/AIDS diagnoses across western Montana last year, including eight in Missoula County. That’s about three times what had been the norm since the clinic opened in 2002. “It’s not like there’s an infection outbreak so much as a diagnosis outbreak,” says Partnership’s Mary Jane Nealon. “It’s a very good thing.” Nealon largely attributes the new diagnoses to organizations like the Missoula AIDS Council and Montana Gay Men’s Task Force, which are actively encouraging and enabling more people to be tested. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control have normalized the testing procedure. Christa Weathers, prevention coordinator for the Missoula AIDS Council, says it’s pretty simple: more awareness begets more testing begets more diagnoses. The Montana Gay Men’s Task Force, for instance, has recently targeted gay and bisexual men who primarily use the Internet to hook up for sex by promoting rapid HIV/AIDS testing on sites like craigslist.org, manhunt.net and gay.com. Director David Herrera says the campaign is part of a national effort to target high-risk individuals who don’t normally consider getting tested. “The worst thing for us to think about is that there are people in town or in the area who don’t know they’re infected,” Nealon says. While the number of new HIV/AIDS patients shows progress, it also puts a strain on local organizations. Nealon says Partnership relies on treatment funding from the Ryan White Care Act, the largest federally funded program for people living with HIV/AIDS. Those funds have dried up, leaving the clinic to rely entirely on local United Way donations— totaling $68,000 for HIV/AIDS treatment since 2003—until the end of this fiscal year. That’s hardly Elton John money, but just goes to show how much these organizations rely on precious local funds.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 March 5–March 12, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

King of the ring Mixed martial arts fights its way to the mainstream

RD OF THE MO KBI NT C LA

H

B

by Jesse Froehling

Our March Blackbirds Of The Month: Silas and Ruben! Please join us this Friday for an art opening by The Missoula Community School and live music that your kids will love by Andrew Hunt. 5-8pm––Yummy snacks and wine.

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VOTED BEST SPORTS BAR YEAR AFTER YEAR Missoula Independent

Page 8 March 5–March 12, 2009

For years, politics and public senti- Corti, the advising and activity class direc“The fighters are true athletes,” says ment relegated local mixed martial arts tor at the Department of Human Powers, “and not some guy who just (MMA) events to venues like Rock Creek Performance, met Powers through one of rolled out of the bar.” Lodge, the Clinton roadside attraction the department’s community partnerThe true athletes, as Powers describes best known for hosting the infamous ships. She says the program already them, will be on display March 21 at the Testicle Festival. At capacity, Rock offered classes in Tai Chi, Judo, Tae Adams Center. The event’s promoter, Creek’s summertime fights draw Kwando and Capoeira, and she was Brian Deets of Bozeman’s Fightforce, says impressed by Powers’ approach to teach- that although he’s been associated with approximately 1,700 spectators. MMA for the past 20 years, the Adams But now, corporate sponsorship and ing MMA. Center event is the first of its mainstream media attention kind in Missoula. have boosted the sport’s “In terms of reputability, legitimacy and created a it’s definitely a step up,” says boon for Missoula’s MMA Deets. enthusiasts. The University Mary Muse, executive of Montana introduced a director of the Adams new MMA class this semester Center, says she “doesn’t see through the Department of any red flags” with “Missoula Human Performance, and Mayhem” and views it as an later this month the Adams opportunity to diversify her Center will host its first-ever venue’s offerings. MMA event. Organizers of the 13-fight lineup, dubbed “The way I look at my “Missoula Mayhem,” say the responsibility is that it’s not arena is prepared to seat as my job to make value judgmany as 5,500 general ments—I don’t mean that as a admission fans and 400 backhand to the event,” she guests at premium ringside says. “It’s like any other onand floor tables—more than campus production.” three times Rock Creek However, Muse does Lodge’s capacity. apply a universal set of crite“The popularity worldria to event organizers hopwide is just huge now,” says ing to rent out the Adams Matthew Powers, co-owner Center. For instance: Is the of Rock Creek Lodge and promoter who is putting on the instructor of UM’s new the event credible? Does he MMA course. “Two of the have appropriate insurance? last [Ultimate Fighting Does he have a good busiChampionships] have been ness structure in place? Does overseas, and they sell out his business practice mitigate every time they put on an the university’s liability? Photo by Chad Harder event.” “Those kinds of things I MMA fights allow for Matt Powers, the instructor of UM’s new MMA class, do take very seriously, and both striking and grappling shows his students how to set up a submission move when you look at an event such as mixed martial arts, techniques, and include called an arm bar. those are very pertinent quesfull-contact combat while “So much of me doing these classes tions,” Muse says. “And I will say that I standing and on the ground. The sport received harsh criticism in the 1990s for depends on the instructors themselves,” have had inquiries from other mixed marits intense bloodshed and lack of rules— she says. “He really wants to teach this tial arts groups and oftentimes I’ve found John McCain famously called it “human sport so people understand what the that as I’ve outlined my criteria and met cockfighting” on the U.S. Senate floor in deal is behind it. It’s not, ‘Let’s brawl in with them, they don’t ever call back.” Once Muse scheduled the event, 1996—but gained legitimacy by institut- Missoula.’” ing new regulations and creating legitiIn a recent Thursday afternoon Deets turned his attention to promotion mate sanctioning bodies. In the last five class, Powers squatted over a volunteer and ticket sales. He says he’s sold eight of years, MMA surpassed boxing in popu- inside UM’s Schreiber Gymnasium 10 ringside tables for $500 each and most larity based on television ratings and while leading a group of 15 students of the floor tables, which cost $400. pay-per-view purchases. For instance, through the specifics of a submission Deets says he doesn’t have sales figures UFC 94, the sport’s most recent mar- move. The move, called an “arm bar,” for general admission tickets, but notes quee event, attracted 1.3 million PPV looks innocent until Powers deftly most attendees buy tickets at the door on customers on Jan. 31, or about 50,000 maneuvers his hamstring over the vol- fight night. He’s hoping to meet or more than boxing’s premier December unteer’s face and bends the volunteer’s exceed the attendance from the last fight bout between Oscar De La Hoya and arms against his shoulders. Then it he promoted—February’s “Butte Brawl Manny Pacquiao. looks painful. However, Powers points 6” at the Butte Civic Center. That event The sport’s popularity—and the rep- out that the arm bar is an apt represen- drew more than 2,400 fans, the most to utation of local proponents like Powers— tation of the sport as a whole—more of date for a Montana MMA event. led UM administrators to add the new a technician’s chess match than a barMMA course this semester. Adrienne room scuffle. jfroehling@missoulanews.com


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Hooray for Holder New attorney general abandons Bush policies American citizens in military prisons without legal representation and without bringing charges against them. That shameful era has ended, according to Holder, who put it bluntly in his own words: “Too often over the past decade, the fight against terrorism has been viewed as a zero-sum battle with our civil liberties. Not only is that school of thought misguided, I fear that in actuality it does more harm than good.” Adding to the new era of transparency, the Justice Department also revealed that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) had destroyed 92 videotapes of prisoner interrogations. Amrit

Granted, it’s “ tough to know the facts when the agency in question destroys the evidence that could prove or disprove

the facts.

Singh, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, said, “The large number of videotapes destroyed confirms that the agency engaged in a systematic attempt to hide evidence of its illegal interrogations and to evade the court’s order.” Because the CIA destroyed the tapes rather than turn them over to the Justice Department, Singh contends that the agency should be held in contempt of court for noncompliance. The CIA, however, apparently still getting used to the idea that it’s a whole new ballgame now, told reporters: “If anyone thinks it’s agency policy to impede the enforcement of American law, they simply don’t know the facts.” Granted, it’s tough to know the facts when the agency in question destroys the evidence that could prove or disprove the facts. It’s also tough to ferret out the facts when the Bush administration claimed such tapes never even existed. But now, with Bush and his arrogant and corrupt cronies out of the White House, those facts are

finally coming to light. As Holder testified during his Senate confirmation hearings, “No one is above the law”— and that would appear to include the government intelligence agencies implicated in the illegal actions. This comes on top of yet another recent announcement by Holder that the Justice Department would also quit raiding clinics and patients in states that had adopted medical marijuana laws. For thousands of Montanans, this is great news. Even though Montana’s voters approved legalizing medical marijuana by the highest percentage of any state—62 percent—legal actions by federal authorities have hampered the ability of Montanans to legally comply with the laws adopted by our own citizens. Tom Daubert heads the medical marijuana group Montana Patients and Families United and has a bill to expand Montana’s medical marijuana law to include such maladies as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Daubert applauded the Holder decision and hopes the new attorney general will consider moving further on the issue. “He should cut DEA funding entirely for anything to do with medical marijuana in states and restrict the use of federal drug task force funding in relation to medical marijuana,” says Daubert. “He should also install science-based policies in the Veteran’s Administration to allow VA doctors to make medical marijuana recommendations, eliminate the policy that allows loss of all veteran benefits to those who test positive for marijuana, and clarify that federal funding of clinics, hospitals and related facilities does not require bans on physician recommendations for medical marijuana.” Finally, Daubert suggests Holder “follow the recommendations from the Drug Enforcement Agency’s own administrative law judges to remove marijuana from being listed as a Schedule 1 substance.” Whether Daubert’s recommendations become policy remains to be seen, but Holder and the Obama administration are undeniably moving in the right direction on the issue. Moreover, Holder is shining a light on transparency in government, truthfulness from public agencies and the rejection of the torture policies of the Bush era. And for that, we should all be thankful.

Yo Adrienne

A tidal wave of economic gloom and doom from Washington, D.C., has dominated the public’s attention in recent weeks—and few would disagree that it’s downright depressing. But news this week of actions taken by new U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder brings hope to our country. In the first weeks of the Obama administration, the actions of the Justice Department raised more than a few eyebrows. Instead of the change we were promised, the agency defended some of the Bush administration’s policies on wiretapping and shipping prisoners to secret jails in foreign lands for harsh interrogation. But this week the attorney general showed where the new administration stands on these thorny issues by releasing a series of legal opinions drafted nearly eight years ago by Bush’s Office of Legal Counsel. The content of the memos is enlightening about the manner in which President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney looked at both the powers of the executive branch and the applicability of the U.S. Constitution and existing law to the exercise of that power. According to an Associated Press article the legal memos, many of which were issued only weeks after the 9/11 attacks, “reiterated in page after page of documents that the president had broad authority to set aside constitutional rights,” including Fourth Amendment protections against unwarranted search and seizure, “as long as the president was combating terrorism.” Bush’s Deputy Assistant Attorney General John Yoo wrote in an October 23, 2001, memo that “First Amendment speech and press rights may also be subordinated to the overriding need to wage war successfully. The current campaign against terrorism may require even broader exercises of federal power domestically.” Only days later, Yoo added to the opinion by suggesting changes in existing laws on wiretapping because, as the AP article reports, “the government’s interest in keeping the nation safe following the terrorist attacks might justify warrantless searches.” These opinions, as expressed through the series of memos, provided the support the Bush administration sought for a whole host of despicable practices. This includes sending suspects to Guantanamo prison, where they were submitted to interrogation techniques that are normally regarded as torture, reading U.S. citizens’ e-mails without warrants, and even detaining

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Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 9 March 5–March 12, 2009


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406.550.2267 Missoula Independent

Page 10 March 5–March 12, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Sheena

Tax time The country needs to cowboy up on climate change by Auden Schendler

There’s a saying here in the West when you’re sniveling too much. The term is “cowboy up,” and it means, “Suck it up.” It’s “buck up, little camper” for grownups. Here’s a sample use: If you’re a cowhand who just tore a thumb off in a roping accident, you need to cowboy up and bite on a stick while Aunt Thelma stitches you with her vet kit. A contemporary example of the need to cowboy up occurs, in of all places, the politics of climate change. Here’s how: It’s seen as gospel these days that to mention the T-word (taxes) is political suicide. Nowhere is this truer than in the world of climate policy, where virtually all politicos recognize the need to put a price on carbon dioxide emissions to control climate. But few are willing to buck up and talk about taxing carbon, a simple solution to climate change. A carbon tax is one of two approaches we might use to make it more expensive to pollute, adding a levy to anything that causes carbon dioxide emissions, whether from fuel, natural gas or electricity. There are some nifty ways to get at this without hurting the little guy. For example, you might jack the price of gas up to $10 a gallon but reduce income tax proportionately. You can incentivize people away from gasoline, without making them starve or miss their rent payments. The other option is called “cap and trade.” Under this scheme, total allowable CO2 emission would be capped at, say, current levels. But this ceiling on emissions would drop every year, and everyone would have to reduce their emissions accordingly or be forced to pay by buying pollution permits. If a polluting enterprise can’t affordably reduce its emissions, it would simply have to buy more permits. If it can easily reduce emissions, it might be able sell the credit for emissions reduction beyond the requirement of the cap to another polluter. Pick the cheaper option. The idea here is that those who can most cost-

MisSOULa Properties

Comer Winterer CRS, GRI, CRB, Broker

effectively cut emissions would do so first. This is the only policy scheme that is getting any traction in Washington, and it’s widely understood that forthcoming climate legislation will include cap and trade. There’s a problem, though. Cap and trade requires that major polluters such as electric utilities and big industries measure and report their emissions. That’s where things get messy. In huge multinational corporations or in massive utilities, it’s tough to figure out what you’re emitting. For example: I work for a ski resort,

Without CIA “assistance, the public is literally being tortured into confessing that we need real, workable solutions to climate

change.

a miniscule business relative to what we’ll be regulating under cap and trade. We made a good-faith effort to track our emissions, tallying utility bills and diesel usage, gasoline purchases and propane consumption. Three years into our audited cap-and-trade commitment through the Chicago Climate Exchange—an early, voluntary effort at cap and trade—we discovered we hadn’t been counting fuel from part of the company.

As Homer Simpson would say: “Doh!” If we failed to accurately track our emissions—doing it voluntarily and in good faith and with a third-party auditor—what will happen when a multinational corporation tries to Enron or Madoff the system? This doesn’t even address the fact that cap and trade creates a huge, unwieldy bureaucracy to measure, audit and regulate the beast. A carbon tax avoids all this messiness. The European Union early on demonstrated the problems with cap and trade. They grossly overestimated existing emissions, issued too many permits and caused the price of carbon—the cost of emitting a ton of carbon dioxide—to crash. Carbon trading often resembled, to use a tired analogy, the Wild West. That’s why we need to cowboy up and stop whining that carbon taxation is politically impossible. Taxes bring us some of the best things our society has to offer—schools and bridges, scholarships and clean water. Moreover, American political opinion about climate change might be changing. Without CIA assistance, the public is literally being tortured into confessing that we need real, workable solutions to climate change. Increasing floods, storms, wildfires, beetle infestations and droughts—all predicted by climate models—are taking us to the breaking point. If our politicians are finally tough enough to withstand these calamities and then rebuild cities like New Orleans, surely they’re tough enough to utter the words “carbon tax.” Auden Schendler is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He directs sustainability programs for the Aspen Skiing Co. and is the author of the new book, Getting Green Done: Hard Truths from the Front Lines of the Sustainability Revolution.

239-3624 prudentialmissoula.com

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3150 Paul Lane Nicely updated Linda Vista home. 3 bed, 2.5 baths, new floors, carpet, light fixtures & more. Home sits on 1/2 acre lot with U/G sprinklers & invisible fencing. A great buy! $242,900 MLS# 901119 Tracy Staats 880-4644

1685 Sunflower Upper Rattlesnake home with 2 bed, 1 bath & 2 bonus rooms downstairs. Large fenced yard, double attached garage & in a nice neighborhood. $244,900 MLS# 901196 Shannon Hilliard 239-8350

1640 Sunflower Lovely Upper Rattlesnake home. 3 bed, 2 bath home on large, landscaped lawn & in a great neighborhood. Close to downtown, University & the wilderness. $299,000 MLS# 809546 Kelly Archibald-Wilson 546-6067

10 Columbine Great Rattlesnake home on a quiet dead end street. This 4 bed, 2 bath home has the Jumbo trail system out the front door & is a quick walk to the creek. A must see! $329,000 MLS# 807958 Mike Schmitt 544-7912

27 Wildground Don’t miss this 4 bed, 3 bath home with great views from the tops of the mountains. Big rooms, mature landscaping, hot tub, decks, & full finished basement with wet bar. $339,000 MLS# 901162 David Kuhnle 370-3188

1403 Dickinson Meticulously designed home w/exceptional views. Enjoy the low maintenance amenities of condo-style living, while preserving your own sense of space & privacy. A must see! $385,000 MLS# 900083 Gia Randono 529-0068

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©2008 An independentlly owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliate, Inc. is a registered service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. Photo by Chad Harder

Missoula Independent

Page 11 March 5–March 12, 2009


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Every March 8, International Women’s Day is celebrated around the world with educational events, film screenings, demonstrations and more. Of course, a celebration of women’s struggles for equality and human rights could hardly fit in just one day, which brings us to this week’s happenings. From warm-up events like Friday’s kick-off parade and Saturday’s WORD Faces of Women Fundraiser to Sunday’s film screenings and speakers at the Crystal Theatre, this week spotlights women’s work and status around the world. Further on in women’s week, NARAL Pro-Choice Montana provides a fitting bookend called VOICES.POWER.POLITICS, which this year features an address by political and feminist blogger Rebecca Traister, pictured above. A senior writer for Salon.com, Traister has written for Elle, The

Nation and The New York Times, to name a few. When UM’s Students for Choice brings Traister to the University Center Theatre this week, her presentation highlights the roles of gender and sexism in the 2008 elections. Last year’s event, which featured a presentation by author and blogger Jessica Valenti, drew a crowd of over 300 people, so you’re advised to arrive early for what’s become a yearly outreach event for not only young women, but for everyone in the Missoula area as well. —Jonas Ehudin

Thu. 5 March

experts—NorthWestern Energy’s Bob Rowe, Public Service Commissioner Gail Gutsche and attorney Chuck Magraw—adds spark to City Club Missoula’s next forum, Montana’s Energy Outlook: Policy and Practice. $16/$11 members/$5 forum-only option. RSVP 546-6643.

The UM Peace and Justice Film Series continues at 5:30 and 7:30 PM in the UM University Center Theater, where screenings of Walkout— a look at a series of Chicano student-led high school walkouts in 1968 to protest academic prejudice and school conditions—are followed by discussions. Free, donations appreciated. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org.

Fri. 6 March Dress up in your favorite feminist regalia—interpret as you will—and get to the XXXXs at the north end of Higgins Avenue by 6:45 PM to meet up for the 7 PM International Women’s Day Parade, which ambles south to the Florence Building lobby for an evening of speakers sponsored by WVE, WORD, Montana Women Vote, the Poverello Center and the YWCA. Free. Call 543-6691.

Sat. 6 March Celebrate 20 years of WORD’s Futures Program and help them continue for another several decades when you attend their Many Faces of Women Fundraiser, which includes a fast-paced live art auction, a silent auction, dinner, dancing and a mad dash for dessert and begins at 5:30 PM at the Doubletree Hotel. $35 through March 6/$45 on March 7/$350 per table of 10. RSVP manyfacesofwomen.com or 543-3550.

Sun. 8 March So far, the speakers include professor Anya Jabour, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau and YWCA national coordinating board chair Tracy Lakatua when the YWCA presents a film and live presentation regarding Women’s Rights in Montana and Elsewhere at 3 PM in the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-6691.

Mon. 9 March The Holiday Inn-Downtown at the Park’s the place to be at 11:30 AM, as a panel of three

VOICES.POWER.POLITICS, presented by NARAL Pro-Choice Montana and UM’s Students for Choice, presents “Gender and Sexism in the 2008 Election: An Evening with Rebecca Traister” at 7 PM on Thu., Mar. 12, in UM’s University Center Ballroom. Free.

Tue. 10 March Three weeks of construction instruction await as the six-session course “Building with Habitat” begins at 6 PM at the UM College of Technology and continues to meet every Tue. and Thu. through Mar. 19. Free. RSVP habitatmsla.org or 549-8210. Help unseat Denny Rehberg at 7 PM in the meeting room at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, where the Missoula County Democrats host Montana Democratic Party Chairman Dennis McDonald, a rancher from Melville who’s looking into taking on the long-seated Rep. Free. Call 546-9144.

Thu. 12 March Dive deep into the teenage mind when the sixth annual Ravalli County Prevention Conference begins at 9 AM at Hamilton’s St. Francis Parish Center, 411 S. Fifth St., where keynote speakers Michael Mann and Dannette Wollersheim help us all help kids steer clear of nasty habits. Free. Call 375-9588. This month’s Real Meals for Women event begins with food prep at 5 PM at the Orchard Homes Community Center, 210 N. Grove St., and clean up is done by 9 with leftovers and recipe cards for you to take home. $7/obo, EBT accepted. RSVP ASAP 546-4697. Learn more about their campaigns involving fair trade, indigenous rights and Colombia in general when you attend the next Community Action for Justice in the Americas (CAJA) meeting, which goes down at 6:30 PM at the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 3635292 or visit cajistas.blogspot.com.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 March 5–March 12, 2009


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - A German teenager caught shoplifting in Verden found himself in even more trouble because the address he gave police turned out to be the home of one of the investigating officers. “It was a complete coincidence,” a police official told Reuters after the 18-year-old boy admitted lying. “The thief gave that address because he’d once lived in the house. The policeman was the guy who moved in afterwards.” When Allahmanamjad Barbel, 21, walked into a police station in Barnstable, Mass., asking for help removing a pair of handcuffs, he explained that his sister had slipped them on him at a child’s birthday party as a prank. The Cape Cod Times reported that before confirming his story, officers ran a check and, according to Sgt. Sean Sweeney, discovered Barbel had at least four outstanding warrants. He was promptly arrested. IN-AND-OUT UPS & DOWNS - Eighteen years after Russia stopped giving medals to women who bore at least 10 children to serve the nation, the government has resumed rewarding fertility. Facing a potentially disastrous population decline, the government launched a publicity campaign urging people to have larger families. In a live television broadcast from the Kremlin, President Dmitry Medvedev awarded the Order of Parental Glory to eight families he congratulated for “setting an example for all society.” Following an announcement that Singapore would double government spending on incentives to boost the birthrate, lawmaker Loo Choon Yong told the legislature that because people were not taking advantage of their free time to produce more babies, more of them should work six days a week instead of five. “We should accept that as a people, our procreation talent is not our forte,” Loo said. LOOPHOLE OF THE WEEK - Cleveland attorney Blake Dickson appealed a ticket he received for a violation recorded by one of the city’s 41 red-light and speed cameras by pointing out the law specifies that the “owner of the vehicle shall be eligible for the penalty.” Dickson was ticketed for driving a leased vehicle and argued in Ohio district court that “the lessee of the vehicle is not liable under this Cleveland code section.” He won. VICTIMLESS CRIMES - David Kocmit, 27, told Cleveland police he was attacked outside a strip club by three black men who called him a racial slur and then beat him. He suffered a broken leg and was taken to the hospital. The Plain Dealer reported that detectives investigating the incident as a felonious assault and hate crime reviewed surveillance tape and determined that Kocmit was not assaulted but broke his leg when he slipped and fell in the parking lot. “We don’t need to fabricate racial strife,” police Lt. Thomas Stacho said. “There is enough of it in America and in Greater Cleveland.” A 17-year-old boy who lost his right hand and leg in an explosion told police in Latrobe, Pa., that the blast occurred in his backpack after unknown people threatened him. Investigators said the boy later admitted he had been playing with a large firecracker in his grandmother’s house and kept lighting and extinguishing the fuse. When the fuse wouldn’t go out, police said he put the firework between his thighs and covered it with his right hand to muffle the explosion. Police summoned to a store in Kingston, Ontario, found a man with “a very swollen lip, a bloody nose, maybe a broken nose,” according to Staff Sgt. Mike Attwood. The 34-year-old man said two men had jumped him and beat him while trying to steal his wallet. After he gave a detailed description of the attackers, police launched a search for the pair but found no one. Then they began to notice inconsistencies in the man’s story. Under questioning, he admitted concocting the story, saying he beat himself to get a day off from work. “I can only assume,” Attwood told the Whig-Standard after the man was charged with public mischief, “that they didn’t have a great sick plan where he works.” FIRE WHEN READY - The father of a 9-year-old boy admitted shooting his son in the buttocks with a BB gun at their home in Dane County, Wis. Sheriff’s Detective William Hendrickson said the father explained he was trying to watch television, but the boy was standing in front of the TV blocking his view and didn’t move when told to. Madison’s Capital Times reported the 36-year-old man said he happened to be holding a BB gun resembling an M-16 assault rifle, so he aimed at the boy’s rear pocket, which he thought would provide more padding, and fired. After being hit, the criminal complaint said, the boy “jumped somewhat and moved away from the TV.” The Arkansas House approved a bill allowing concealed handguns in churches. The measure, which passed 57-42 and headed to the Senate, removes churches and other houses of worship from the list of private places where concealed handguns are banned, leaving only bars. The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Beverly Pyle, who told the Associated Press she introduced the measure after a series of church shootings across the country, said individual churches would be permitted to decide whether to allow the concealed guns. Nathan Perry, a Baptist preacher in Fordyce, presented legislators with a petition from 40 preachers who support the bill. “It’s not about gun rights,” he insisted. “It’s about church rights.” NO-REBATE POLICY - An Ontario Superior Court judge ruled that Pasqualino Cornelio must continue paying child support to his ex-wife, even though DNA tests prove he isn’t the biological father of her 16-year-old twins. The couple separated 10 years ago. Cornelio accused his wife of providing “incomplete and misleading information” about an extramarital affair that led him to believe he was the twins’ biological father. Anciolina Cornelio told the court she couldn’t remember having an affair, blaming the memory lapse on medication she was taking at the time. “While the failure of Ms. Cornelio to disclose to her husband the fact that she had an extramarital affair and that the twins might not be his biological children may well have been a moral wrong against Mr. Cornelio,” Justice Katherine van Rensburg wrote, “it is a wrong that does not afford him a legal remedy to recover child support he has already paid, and that does not permit him to stop paying child support.”

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Missoula Independent

Page 13 March 5–March 12, 2009


I

n fall 2005, the city of Missoula and a private developer initiated permitting with state and federal governments to transform the contaminated Champion logging yard into new urban infill. In three-and-ahalf years, from the submittal of applications to final approval of soil reclamation on Feb. 9, project managers estimate construction crews were able to complete only four months of actual shovel work. “You had a lot of different greasy spots on the earth,” says Chris Cerquone, engineering consultant for the cleanup. “Each one of those had their own little plan, their own little process and their own little reports to get closure.” The plans, processes and reports, filed by the applicants with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), ate up the bulk of time. The cash-strapped state agency had just one person working through the

mountain of paperwork required for the project. Local government officials who regularly work with DEQ say grueling permitting delays are simply part of the reclamation business in Montana. “There are some things that DEQ is struggling with and some of that’s resource-based. They don’t have a lot of funding,” says Missoula brownfields coordinator Kisha Schlegel. Across the board, DEQ finds itself completely backlogged with permit applications piled onto a growing heap by the burgeoning state energy industries. Last summer, the release of a critical legislative audit highlighted an obvious lack of resources within the permitting division of DEQ and blamed the problem partly on agency leadership. Although DEQ Director Richard Opper considers some of the audit’s conclusions unfair, he admits regulators were slow to react to perceived growth

in certain natural extraction industries. Still, he asserts the main source of the permitting backlog remains DEQ’s woeful funding situation. “DEQ is an agency that has been systematically starved of resources by a legislature that hates us,” Opper says. “We’ve been denied, denied, denied and then they hammer us for not getting permits out faster. The problem is a legacy of historic underfunding.” Responding to particularly appalling delays in the approval of gravel pit operations, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle pledged to fix DEQ’s permitting division during the current legislative session. A truckload of proposed reform bills began appearing before the session started. The renewed interest, however, has failed to translate into a budget windfall for DEQ. Anne Hedges, a lobbyist with the Montana Environmental Information Center (MEIC), believes the Republican-

controlled 61st Legislature will intentionally starve DEQ to ensure failure. “This legislature is toxic,” she says. “If the governor asks for more money so many of them will scream bloody murder that he’s bloating state government at the expense of the taxpayer.” Reforming the gravel permitting process also proved a lesser concern to the 2009 Legislature. In February, lawmakers tabled bills strengthening DEQ’s regulatory powers over gravel pit operators by setting concrete standards for air and water quality. The proposed laws aimed to curb contention between communities and the opencut industry, as exemplified by the proposed Knife River pit in Lolo. A committee bill is still in the works that would put a tax in place to fund two more staffers for DEQ using a fee system proposed by the Montana Contractors’ Association.

Lawmakers pledged to fix the state’s embattled Department of Environmental Quality during this session, but may be making a mess instead. So why isn’t DEQ Director Richard Opper speaking up? by Patrick M. Klemz

Photo by Chad Harder

“DEQ is an agency that has been systematically starved of resources by a legislature that hates us,” says Richard Opper, the agency’s director. “We’ve been denied, denied, denied and then they hammer us for not getting permits out faster.”

Missoula Independent

Page 14 March 5–March 12, 2009


Photo by Chad Harder

“From a development point of view, the regulators are constantly upping the ante, but that’s the history of environmental protection,” says Tom Power, a natural resources economist at the University of Montana. “To blame the whole thing on environmental groups appealing things, and to take the right to legally appeal the actions of state environmental officers, just seems to be a wild overreach.”

With gravel cast out of the center ring, legislators opted instead to promote state energy development by stripping down the permit and appeal processes for natural resources extraction and power generation. The most controversial bills promise to accelerate the authorization of major projects across a number of industries. Legislative attention seems keyed on one industry in particular—coal-fired power generation, which was thrust to the fore by the recent high-profile demise of the Highwood Generating Station near Great Falls. DEQ—the state’s principal environmental regulator—would stand to lose much of its decision-making authority on major development projects if the GOP’s legislation succeeds. Yet, on nearly all issues of reform, including those related to Highwood, the agency remains deathly quiet on the legislative floor.

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n Feb. 2, Southern Montana Electric cancelled its plans to build the Highwood Generating Station in rural Cascade County. The announcement concluded a three-year battle between would-be neighbors of the 250-megawatt coal plant and a coalition of four electric cooperatives, who ultimately failed to push the facility’s air quality permit past citizen

appeals. The investment group eventually decided to build a natural gas plant instead (with just less than half the power capacity) and blamed environmentalists for scuttling its coal plans. Not long after, Republican legislators used Southern’s tale of woe to stump for a series of bills stripping down the appeals process afforded state residents under the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA). Southern testified at many of those legislative hearings complaining of environmental interests effectively wielding Montana’s onerous regulatory laws against Highwood. “Our power plant has been the focus of unending litigation and changing permitting requirements,” Southern’s lobbyist, Candace Payne, told a House committee on Feb. 18. “An outside investor looking at our state would certainly recognize that the current permitting process in Montana is fraught with peril.” The GOP’s most aggressive bills cover quite a bit of ground. Senate Bill 440, introduced by Kelly Gebhardt, RRoundup, exempts air quality permits from MEPA. Conrad Republican Llew Jones’ House Bill 483 is one of two proposed laws removing various “choke points” from the review process by limiting who can appeal environmental decisions and when they can do it. Jumping the aisle, Butte Democrat

Jim Keane drafted Senate Bill 417, which alters the language of conservation laws to prevent regulators from denying a permit based on environmental review. All of the proposed legislation aims to disarm DEQ’s review process and the system of citizen oversight, and all of it enjoyed a momentum boost when Highwood foundered. The plant itself became the sacrificial lamb that furthered the deregulation cause. Opper and DEQ have taken no official position on any of the bills, choosing instead to seek amendments behind the scenes. In an interview with the Independent, Opper defended the agency’s strategy, arguing too much DEQ presence would only further antagonize Republican lawmakers already fuming over Highwood. Although reluctant to address specific legislation, the director spoke in generalities about the air permitting process currently under fire in the Capitol. Fundamentally, Opper challenges the core belief that the air quality standards set by Montana are pushing energy development to Wyoming, Idaho and the Dakotas. “I don’t think our air quality program is broken at all. Wyoming is always held up as this model of prodevelopment, but we’ve got tighter statutory timeframes than they do,” Opper says. “If the lege chose to shorten our timeframes, we would not be able to come out with a defensible permit because we wouldn’t be able to get the work done we need to put in to make sure the facility is going to protect public health and the environment. Nothing wastes time like a shortcut.” Opper notes that it’s not just the DEQ’s permitting process that’s drawing fire, but also the citizen appeals that follow many agency decisions. Southern and legislators sympathetic to DEQ’s plight blame a group of local and national environmental groups for the problems inherent under MEPA and state permitting laws. They accuse MEIC, the Northern Plains Resource Council and other groups involved in litigation on development projects of using lawsuits to maliciously tie up plant permits until the financiers surrender. MEIC largely discredited the GOP’s case with a February audit showing that of 1,210 air permits issued by DEQ, only six faced appeals and industry initiated half of those. Opponents of the deregulation agenda allege that Republicans just want undue reckoning for Highwood. Nevertheless, the bills limiting the appeals process passed their houses of origin by comfortable margins after minor amendments. Proposed legislation imposing time restrictions on DEQ permit review and weakening state environmental standards has been similarly successful. Republicans admit the sheer number of appeals hardly appears over-

whelming, but say one only has to look at the list of failed projects to see the intent of certain environmental groups. “Yes, there’s not a ton relative to the number of permits out there, but there are some very well targeted appeals and litigation,” says Jones, the sponsor of HB 483. “And they seem to be fairly effective if your goal is preventing these plants from coming online.” Whether an indicator or an anomaly, Highwood certainly succeeded in swinging some moderate opinion toward regulatory reform. Former Sen. J.D. Lynch of Butte supported MEPA and many of Montana’s environmental protection laws when first enacted, but considers Highwood’s defeat a clear abuse of the law’s intentions. “When I voted for those in the 1970s or ’80s, I never imagined that they were going to be just used as tools to obstruct any progress in our state,” Lynch said during a Feb. 18 Senate committee hearing. Environmentalists like Brianna Randall of the Clark Fork Coalition say Highwood’s failure overshadowed any attempt at making substantive policy. Many conservation groups lament that much of the GOP’s deregulation agenda will be hard to keep off the governor’s desk. “Highwood created this perfect storm of fervor to fix the appeal process when really it doesn’t need to be fixed,” Randall says.

Photo by Chad Harder

“This legislature is toxic,” says Anne Hedges, a lobbyist with the Montana Environmental Information Center (MEIC). “If the governor asks for more money so many of them will scream bloody murder that he’s bloating state government at the expense of the taxpayer.”

Missoula Independent

Page 15 March 5–March 12, 2009


T

hough the entire affair transpired in plain sight, accounts of what happened to the Highwood Generating Station follow two very different storylines. Industry’s version takes place in a courtroom, while the litigant’s story describes a field on the high plains where co-op officials tried to sneak in a smoke-belching coal plant without drawing attention. “The public did not know where this Highwood Generating Station was going to be located until after the environmental impact statement was published,” complains Art Dolman, a selfstyled historic preservationist from Great Falls who says the proposed plant would have disturbed a pioneer portage road. By any account, economic change in the coal industry dealt a serious blow to the financial viability of the plant under its original design. But the point of debate stems from whether countless obstructionist appeals of Southern’s permit applications effectively drove away potential investors. “Even if you win the lawsuit, you lose the battle because the project is no longer feasible in a lot of cases,” argues Jason Toddhunter, who says the members of his organization, the Montana Logging Association, have

been fighting “nuisance” lawsuits for decades. “A lot of times the litigants risk nothing through the Equal Access to Justice Act. We’re the ones who are risking everything.” Several decades ago, Sen. Greg Hinkle, R-Thompson Falls, received a pink slip from the lumber mill where he worked—a product, he says, of frivolous lawsuits against the company by environmentalists. Now Hinkle wants to require anyone looking to throw the emergency break on major development through the courts or Board of Environmental Review to post a substantial bond. “I talked to many folks who are really upset at the fact that timber sales in our area would be stopped by different groups or individuals and that it didn’t cost them a whole lot to stop this natural resources development,” Hinkle said during the hearing for Senate Bill 288. “So I decided that if I was elected to this body that I would create a bill that would level the playing field.” Hinkle’s law, if it passes the legislature, would put a financial obstacle in place to prevent frivolous appeals and lawsuits. Those protesting the development project and halting its progress would essentially surrender the bond if the appeal fails. Hinkle argues it’s only fair considering natural resources investors often commit millions of dol-

Photo by Chad Harder

Responding to particularly appalling delays in the approval of gravel pit operations, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle pledged to fix DEQ’s permitting division during the current legislative session. The renewed interest, however, has failed to translate into a budget windfall for DEQ.

lars to plans like Highwood only to watch their permits expire while the nuisance appeals keep coming. “I think that trend needs to change,” he says. “There’s too many jobs at stake.” Ironically, if passed, SB 288 will probably end up in court itself. Many environmental groups are already questioning the bill’s constitutionality. So much for stifling litigation. “The state would be saying, ‘You have a right to a healthy environment, but you have to pay for it.’ I don’t think that’s constitutional,” says Matt Clifford, former staff attorney for the Clark Fork Coalition. “I don’t think the legislature cares if what it passes is constitutional. They just let the courts strike it down and then call the judges liberal.” Environmentalists also strongly disagree that lawsuits against major projects like Highwood are ever cheap, easy or frivolous. Whether Highwood, the “poster child” of SB 288, to quote Southern’s own lobbyist, makes for an appropriate case study is another question altogether. Despite the numerous appeals of Highwood’s permits, not a single appellant actually sought an injunction on construction of the plant. Tom Power, a natural resources economist at the University of Montana, doesn’t buy that citizen appeals or lawsuits actually felled Highwood. “It was an unusual combination of events, but the economics started eroding fairly quickly,” he explains. According to Power, Highwood plans emerged at a time when northcentral Montanans found themselves frustrated with the area’s dominant power utility, NorthWestern Energy. Taking advantage of newfound deregulation, he says, the coalition behind the proposed plant came up with an ambitious 250-megawatt facility to solve a relatively small power need. Highwood then—like many coal-fired power plants—struggled mightily to secure

the necessary $790 million in financing with greater federal greenhouse gas regulation right around the corner. “From a development point of view, the regulators are constantly upping the ante, but that’s the history of environmental protection,” Power says. “To blame the whole thing on environmental groups appealing things, and to take the right to legally appeal the actions of state environmental officers, just seems to be a wild overreach.” As for the state environmental officers, DEQ took no position on Hinkle’s bill or other legislation designed to shorten timeframes on and restrict access to the appeals process. Opper says citizen appeals have often been instrumental in catching agency oversights, but recognizes the potential for abuse. “The air quality permits are good for 18 months, so somebody can appeal and the clock still ticks. That gives appellants the ability to run out the clock,” Opper says. “Part of the tactic is to run out the clock. I mean, let’s be honest about that.”

I

n Hinkle’s hometown of Thompson Falls, a group of investors received a permit from DEQ in 2001 to build a coaland wood waste-burning plant on the banks of the Clark Fork River. After securing the needed permit amendment, they instead built a coal plant with ramshackle boiler parts. The facility failed to meet emission standards and a $1.9 million fine issued by the agency in 2006 put the operation out of business. On Feb. 6 of this year, DEQ issued a new permit to the plant’s new owners, who some Thompson Falls residents say hired the violators of the old permit to run the facility for them. DEQ responded that, by rule, it cannot take history into account when issuing permits to anyone. As long as the plant can meet emission thresholds in the future, Opper says, the past is irrelevant.

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Area conservationists can’t help but wonder why the 2009 Legislature isn’t interested in that kind of regulatory reform. “I wish there were three strikes and you’re out for these guys as well,” says Cesar Hernandez, a local environmentalist. Wayzata Investment Partners, the Minneapolis hedge fund that purchased the plant from its bankrupt founders, hung up twice when the Independent called to ask who was running the facility. A cursory search of the company revealed that the federal Securities Exchange Commission filed suit against Wayzata in February based on consumer claims of investment fraud. “The law has not allowed DEQ to effectively take into account the environmental violation history—the bad actor status—of the plant and its owners. These guys could literally be the worst criminals in the world but when they come around to get a permit, DEQ is going to treat them like anybody else,” says Clifford, the former Clark Fork Coalition attorney who helped environmentalists fight the first permit in court. “DEQ hands permits out like candy to people who are frankly willing to violate them.” When it comes to making changes to the laws that govern its practices, DEQ prefers a back seat, deferring to the logic that the visible presence of regulators in policymaking would ill serve environmental interests in Montana. In fact, the agency’s prime

legislative agenda this session involves imposing fees on gravel pits to finance more permitting staff— something even industry supports. And, even on that issue, DEQ keeps out of sight. “The way that we thought we’d be successful in getting more resources is to not have our name on the bill. It works like a charm so far,” Opper says. From the agency’s standpoint, staffing remains the priority, especially as new avenues of natural resource development—like coalbed methane extraction—continue to grow. Still, the biggest burden on DEQ resources is gravel pits. Even with the recent construction slowdown, the expected surge in transportation spending under the federal stimulus promises a healthy amount of quarrying in 2009. Seen in that light, the proposed gravelpermitting fix currently before the legislature appears little more than a Band-Aid. Some wonder, considering the circumstances, why the agency isn’t more proactive on its own behalf. “I listen to Opper and Opper says the industry is their client. I couldn’t disagree more,” Hedges says. “They are not a proactive group of individuals. Bureaucrats are cautious people by their very nature. They don’t want to be perceived as doing something new. “You had so many years of [Govs. Marc] Racicot and [Judy] Martz where they weren’t allowed to be creative and where they weren’t allowed to be per-

ceived as even remotely aggressive, and that became their mindset.” Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s administration claims progress with DEQ, believing the agency has evolved since the governorships of Racicot and Martz. Citing one example, Opper says DEQ now strives to continually update the reclamation bonds on hard rock mines. By keeping better track of declining digs, Opper hopes to curb Montana’s sordid history of calving environmental disasters like the Zortman-Landusky gold mine and, of course, Libby. But even on this front, the administrative changes seem a far cry from the new day Schweitzer promised in 2004. Case in point: An ongoing envi-

ronmentalist lawsuit against the DEQ charges its reclamation bond on a soon-to-shutter silver mine near Troy won’t cover the cost of cleanup. The Schweitzer administration still has plenty of time to make good on its promises to revitalize DEQ, but not without confronting the pro-development hoi polloi and, by extension, their Republican allies. Opper concedes that in many ways he simply can’t win. “Nobody is ever going to be liked in this job,” he says, “because you’re either doing way too much or way too little.” pklemz@missoulanews.com

Photo by Chad Harder

DEQ permitted Thompson River Power investors in 2001 to build a coal- and wood waste-burning plant along the Clark Fork River. The company instead constructed a coal plant with ramshackle boiler parts. The facility failed to meet emission standards and a $1.9 million fine in 2006 put the operation out of business.

the $$–$$$...$15 and over The Keep Restaurant 102 Ben Hogan Dr. 728-5132 Steak - Seafood - Fine Wines and Spirits. Serving dinner 5pm-10pm seven days a week. Cocktail hour Mon-Thur 5pm-6pm in our fireside lounge. The ideal setting for weddings, receptions, and rehearsal dinners. Dates still available in 2009, call today. For dinner reservations call 728-5132. www.thekeeprestaurant.com $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Bird Restaurant & Wine Bar 111 N. Higgins Ave. 549-2906 A hidden culinary treasure in the Historic Florence Hotel. Treat yourself to a sensuous dining experience, service, cuisine and ambiance delivered with creative and elegant detail. Seasonal menus featuring the freshest ingredients. New wine bar open Monday - Saturday, 5:00 - 10:30. Enter through the Florence Building lobby. $$-$$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. 549-2790 Enjoy the warm ambience of our cozy neighborhood bistro with an urban feel. Our chefs transport flavors from Europe and the

Mediterranean offering a creative New American twist on classic fare. Featuring the freshest ingredients from local growers. Serving lunch Tuesday through Sat. 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tuesday through Sun. 5:00close. Beer and wine available. $$–$$$. Sushi Bar & Japanese Cuisine 549-7979 Corner of Pine & Higgins Located in beautiful Downtown Missoula, serving traditional Japanese cuisine and exquisite sushi. Sushi Hana offers a variety of traditional and local favorites, including nigirisushi, maki-sushi rolls and sashimi. In addition, we offer Tempura, Teriyaki and appetizers with a delicious assortment of sauces. Expanded selection of sakes, beer and wine. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. $$–$$$

$–$$...$5–$15 Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street • 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzone, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using "biga" (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Now featuring our winter menu. Lunch and dinner, Mon.-Sat. $-$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula Find. Popular with the locals. Voted best Pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone-deck pizza to wild salmon burritos, free-range chicken, rice & noodle bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups & sandwiches, "Pizza by the Slice." Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for both lunch & dinner. $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave 721-6033 Missoula “Original” Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups,

salads, baked goods and an espresso bar til close. Mon thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm. www.thinkfft.com $-$$

Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, losalt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$

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Noodle Express 2000 W. Broadway 541-7333 Featuring a mixture of non-traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Polynesian contemporary dishes. Phone ahead ordering is enhanced with a convenient PickUp window. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. MF 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

The Mustard Seed Asian Café Located outside Southgate Mall Paxson St. Entrance 542-7333 Contemporary Asian Cuisine served in our all new bistro atmosphere. Original recipes and fresh ingredients combined from Japanese, Chinese, Polynesian, and Southeast Asian influences to appeal to American palates. Full menu available in our non-smoking bar. Fresh daily desserts, microbrews, fine wines & signature drinks. Take out & delivery available. $$–$$$.

Missoula Independent

Page 17 March 5–March 12, 2009


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Posh Chocolat 119 South Higgins 543-2566 Next to the Historic Wilma Building in downtown Missoula. The chocolate lovers paradise is now also a great place for lunch. With a total remodel, serving freshly made sweet and savory crepes, delicious quiches, soups, seasonal salads and artisanal European style pastries. And don't forget what's been keeping us busy since 2005; stop in and try our single origin, 100% Ecuadorian, hand crafted Truffles. www.poshchocolat.com. $-$$ The Press Box 835 E Broadway 721-1212 Enjoy our breakfast special, Monday through Friday, 7 AM to noon. We have great pizza, burgers & appetizers, and more! 21 beers on tap. Continually voted best sports bar in Missoula. Enjoy any game, any time at The Press Box. pressboxsportsbar.com. $-$$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Open for Lunch and Dinner! Check out our new menu: Sesame House Salad, Soba Vegetable Pasta, Warm Brie Salad, the Dubliner, Eggplant Parmesan Sandwich, and Great Italian Pastas. Irish favorites, too: Pasties, Fish and Chips & Shepherd’s Pie. “where the Gaelic and the Garlic mix!!” $-$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made

Missoula Independent

from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 12 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$

botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Vietnam Noodle 2100 Stephens 542-8299 A true Vietnamese dining experience! Enjoy our authentic beef noodle soup, spring rolls, pad thai, Vietnamese style hot & sour soup, noodle soup bowls & daily lunch/soup combo specials. We suggest that you also try our new stuffed hot peppers. For your cooking pleasure at home, we have an Asian grocery next to our restaurant! Get a free meal on your birthday when you bring 5 or more friends. $-$$

Bucks Club 1805 Regent 543-7436 Missoula’s best Food & Drink Values. 2-for-1 food specials daily. Eat the legend. Burgers for a buck. Over 1,000,000 sold. Great Breakfast served daily. If you go away hungry, don’t blame us. Mon.–Sat. Open 7 AM and Sunday 8 AM. $

Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$...Under $5 Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 36 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and

Page 18 March 5–March 12, 2009

Bucks Club

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 Cold Stone Creamery, the ultimate ice cream experience! Our smooth and creamy ice cream is made fresh daily using our secret recipe. Come in for our weekday specials. Get $5 off ice cream cakes with your business card. Get Gift Cards any time. Treat yourself to a 10minute vacation at Cold Stone Creamery. $-$$ Le Petit Outre 129 South 4th West 543-3311 Twelve thousand pounds of oven mass…Bread of integrity, pastry of distinction, yes indeed, European hand-crafted baked goods, Pain de Campagne, Ciabatta, Cocodrillo, Pain au Chocolat, Palmiers, and Brioche. Several more baked options and the finest espresso available. Please find our goods at the finest grocers across Missoula. Saturday 8-3, Sunday 8-2, Monday-Friday 7-6. $

Bitterroot Valley Main Street Cafe 363-4567 upstairs 217 Main St. Hamilton Danielle Dupuy presents...A little taste of France in the Bitterroot. Serving Gourmet French American Cuisine. As of January 13, introducing Le Petits Plats menu (small plates) to enjoy with premium wines & European beers. Also featuring a tapas menu (small bites) and a cheese and dessert menu is also available. Serving dinners only Tues.-Sat. 5-9pm. Reservations.


by Ari LeVaux

Soup without tears French onion soup was the last meal Julia Child ate before she died in 2004. Perhaps it was a premonition, the earthy flavors of concentrated onion-root wafting from the underworld and foreshadowing her descent. And while it generally won’t kill you, a good batch of French onion soup can induce a lot of tears before it takes you to heaven. Like many French recipes Child helped popularize, French onion soup is a simple dish, essentially a fancy version of peasant food commonly made with inexpensive, locally available ingredients. Legend has it that King Louie XV invented French onion soup after arriving at a hunting cabin and finding only onions, wine and butter. But the reality is that these ingredients were what stocked the average farmer’s larder on an average winter day. “I didn’t have to go to the store for anything,” said my friend El Camino, who made French onion soup the other day. “It worked out great.” The price tag makes homemade French onion soup a good option when money is tight, and its rich, warming and concentrated flavor makes it good wintertime food. All things considered, now might be a good time for some French onion soup. El Camino traded with a farmer friend for a big batch of organic onions. He packed away the good ones for storage, removed the softer specimens, and ended up with 14 pounds, which he decided to preserve as frozen portions of French onion soup. “I ran out of tears,” he says of his adventure cutting all those onions. According to El Camino, the secret to good French onion soup is to slowly oven-roast the onions in butter. This gently concentrates the sweetness of the onions without burning them. Doing so in the oven, and not the stovetop, slows the process and provides some cushion against over-browning, as you don’t have to watch it like

Ask Ari:

Down on the farm

Dear Flash, About eight years ago my wife and I bought some riverfront property. Rather than build a McMansion on the property, we wanted to become farmers. We really tried to do everything right. We made a buffer next to the river and have enhanced riparian vegetation to prevent erosion of the farmland. We pay a living wage and provide a product—fruit—that the local community seems to appreciate. By buying the land and farming it we have saved it from one kind of development but created another. I’m sure some folks paying big bucks for a guided fishing trip have commented, “What kind of trash would build a place like that?”

Q

You can find the Cooks Illustrated recipe that El Camino did wonders with at cookography.com. But I’m partial to an old James Beard recipe that’s nearly the same at heart, right down to caramelizing the onions in the oven rather than on the stovetop, but is more conversational and less like a laboratory protocol. The recipe is called “Onion Soup without Tears,” because the onions are only cut in halves, and not laboriously sliced or chopped. This minimizes the cook’s exposure to the onion fumes. Beard suggests: “Set the oven to 400 degrees. Peel the onions [4 medium sized, yellow] and cut them in half from tip to root, then lay them in a roasting tin and add the butter [2 tablespoons], salt and some pepper. Roast until they are tender and soft, and toasted dark brown here and there. You might have to turn them now and again.” One note: The only thing I would add to Beard’s recipe is to back the temperature down to 250 or 275 once the oven is pre-heated, and slowly caramelize the onions at that temperature. “Cut the onions into thick segments,” the recipe continues. “Put them in a saucepan with the wine [1 glass, white] and bring to the boil. Let the wine bubble until it almost disappears (you just want the flavor, not the alcohol), then pour in the stock [6 cups, beef or vegetable]. Bring to the boil and simmer for about 20 minutes. Photo by Chad Harder “Just before you want to serve the soup, When I tasted his soup, the bottom dropped out make the cheese croutes. Cut the loaf into thin in my mouth. I was tasting the sweet fragrance of the slices and toast lightly on one side under a hot earth, first concentrated into the form of onion grill (broiler). Turn them over and sprinkle with bulbs, and concentrated again into the brown broth. the grated cheese. Get the soup hot, ladle it into I enjoyed the bread and cheese in creating the bowls and float the cheese croutes on top. Place finished presentation of the dish, but at the same the bowls under a hot grill (broiler) and leave time they were a bit of a distraction. The onion until the cheese melts. Eat immediately, whilst the soup itself was the soul in that bowl, and that’s cheese is still stringy and molten.” El Camino added thyme to his soup as well, where I really wanted to focus. The recipe El Camino used was a modified and I’ll vouch for that being a good thing. There version of a Cooks Illustrated recipe that, as is the are a lot of variations on the simple equation of way of that magazine, is detailed to the point of wine, onions and butter. It’s a good thing winter—and onions—lasts so long. being micro-managerial. a hawk like you do when browning onions on a stovetop. “I tasted the onions after a few hours, and they were sweet like fruit,” El Camino said. “I couldn’t believe it. I kind of wish I’d served it like that, but I kept going ’til it was mahogany brown, like it says in Cooks Illustrated.” He served his soup oven-baked with a slice of bread and sliced Gruyere on top, in individual clay pots he scored at Goodwill that morning.

The answer is white trash trying to farm. Now comes the Big Sky Rivers Act. If this becomes law in its present form we no longer control the destiny of the land near the river, which is the only land we can build infrastructure on. To do anything on this land, we would have to apply for a variance to an as-yet-to-be-determined local government official. I had a previous life where I dealt extensively with regulators and government officials and I guarantee you don’t want your destiny determined by government officials making political decisions. It’s also possible that if our infrastructure were damaged, we would not be able to rebuild it. What’s a poor farmer to do? —Fruit Guy

We're the Perfect Place to Sit, Sip, Meet and Eat. Sun thru Thurs 7am - 8pm Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm

540 Daly Ave • 721-6033

Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. www.thinkfft.com Across from the U of M campus.

You want a great My understanding is that The Big Sky Rivers Act, which would call for buffers of streamside areas and protections to riparian habitat immediately adjacent, would exempt areas that have sewer or onsite wastewater management facilities, existing structures and agricultural uses. But this is an important point and bears watching as the bill continues to be crafted. While some forms of agriculture, like raising livestock, can threaten water quality with runoff, small family farms like yours can and should be an important component of riparian habitat.

A

newspaper. . . and you want it

for FREE!

Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net.

Missoula Independent

Page 19 March 5–March 12, 2009


8

days a week

THURSDAY

05

March

Volunteers are needed to serve as docents and helpers as the Missoula Art Museum’s 22nd Annual Fifth Grade Art Experience, which takes place through March—attend a discussion with exhibiting artist Mary Ann Papanek-Miller at 5 PM to begin your training. Free. Call 728-0447. Put your wee beastie’s flailing to good use when you sign them up for the ongoing Y Music Dance Therapy Group for kids aged 6–9, which teaches ways to use your body to manage big feelings, soothe tattered nerves and develop social skills, and meets every Thu. at 5 PM at the YMCA, 3000 S. Russell St. $16 per session/four session minimum. Call 721-YMCA or visit ymcamissoula.org.

nightlife The UM Peace and Justice Film Series continues at 5:30 and 7:30 PM in the UM University Center Theater, where screenings of Walkout—a look at a series of Chicano student-led high school walkouts in 1968 to protest academic prejudice and school conditions—are followed by discussions. Free, donations appreciated. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. An eight-week workshop offers a chance for people who’ve had cancer, dubbed Cancer, Courage and Creativity, takes place at 5:30 PM every Thu. through Apr. 30 at Living Art’s Reserve Street studios. Free, donations appreciated. RSVP 549-5329 or ysteinprograms@livingartofmontana.org. All genres are encouraged—excepting, perhaps, death metal—every Thu. at 5:30 PM at Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 1/2 South Ave. W., where musicians bring their noise makers and synergy builds a joyful sound during the Tangled Tones Pickin’ Circle. Free. Call 396-3352.

Take your first crack at wheel throwing when Stumptown Art Studio, 145 Central Ave. in Whitefish, presents the class Mud in Motion at 6 PM. $75. Call 862-5929 or visit stumptownartstudio.org. See what it means to be a full-time rider when the film Seasons, which follows seven top mountain bike riders through 12 months of sick tracks, screens at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. Free. Call 243-5172. The Sapphire Arabian Horse Club invites the horse set to attend their monthly meeting at 7 PM at the Stevensville Feed & Farm conference room, where attorney and member Brenda Wahler presents the program “Equine Liability Laws for Horse Owners.” Free. Call 544-2926. Learn to make slippery elm lozenges, ear oil, dream pillows and an herbal healing salve when Katrina Farnum presents the class Herbs for Kids, which has nothing to do with Initiative 2, at 7 PM at Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Third St. W. $30. Call 728-0543. An open mic night by any other name: Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, hosts a Local Artist Showcase—for which you’re instructed to sign-up by 10 AM on Wed.—at 7 PM. Free. Call 541-8643. Dark family secrets, alcoholism and generalized lunacy make for an excellent time when the UM Department of Drama/Dance present Sam Shepard’s Buried Child at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Masquer Theatre, and you’re encouraged not to bring the kids. $14/$12 students and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 2434581. (See Theater in this issue.) Instead of entering into a long-term conflict with 50 Cent, take in a show from someone who has: L.A.-bred and Dre-sponsored—for a while, at least—The Game brings his fluid style to the Wilma Theatre at 8 PM. $25/$23.50 advance. Acceptable sexuality and marital flexibility weather a storm of deviance

Arts & Entertainment listings March 5–March 12, 2009

when Red-Headed Angel Productions and Montana Rep Missoula stage Edward Albee’s The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/Whatever you make in an hour/$5 student rush at 7:30. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Let it all hang out—well, maybe not all of it—during L.I.V. Karaoke’s Ladies’ Night at the High Spirits in Florence starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-9992. 5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 22. Nope, it’s not another set of Hugo’s numbers, it’s the meeting dates in March for the class Fundamentals of Whitewater Kayaking, which begins at 8:30 PM in UM’s Griz pool. $155 includes gear, instruction and pool use. RSVP 243-5172. Bowling and karaoke go together like fruit bats and fart boots during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Missoula’s industrial midsection gets a touch funkier when Izabella and Luau Cinder play the Other Side, 1100 W. Strand Ave., at 9 PM. $7/$5 with Griz card. As America’s musical talent is drawn magnetically to Austin, Texas right about now for the South by Southwest Music Festival, you’re the big winner, as they all need places to rest along the way: Missouri’s poppy folksters The Foundry Field Recordings entertain the Palace Lounge with locals Red States—formerly Blue Orpheus—at 9 PM. $5. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 6, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

Photo courtesy of Anni Lopponen

The only Dust Bowl he’s ever known was the one he lost under the passenger’s seat. Hank III takes the Wilma Theatre crowd mudboggin’ through outlaw country, punk, metal and more with his band Assjack, after an opening set from Those Poor Bastards at 8 PM on Sat., March 7. $19/$17.50 advance.

WINNER: 1979 PULITZER PRIZE FOR DRAMA

www.umtheatredance.org

SAM SHEPARD’S A savagely funny American classsic!

P.T. Tip of the week: Next step to improving your balance: stand on uneven surface with your feet close together. If this is easy, try closing your eyes. AUDIENCE DISCRETION ADVISED: DISTURBING SUBJECT MATTER AND LANGUAGE

FEB. 24-28, MAR. • 7:30PM PM MARCH 3-7 •3-7 7:30

MASQUER THEATRE TALKBACK: AFTER FEB. 27 PERFORMANCE PARTV BOX OFFICE: 243-4581 HOURS: 11:30-5:30 M-F

Our handmade futons are just as well-made and just as natural. H A N D M A D E

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Missoula Independent

F U TO N S

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Page 20 March 5–March 12, 2009

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Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, krunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. A Front Street tradition is reborn with the return of Candlelight Acoustics, an every-Thursday event at the Top Hat featuring singer-songwriters sharing their gifts in the luminous glow at 9 PM. The doors open at 5, and this week, Andrea Harsell inhabits the spotlight. Free. Call 728-9865. Here’s a better reason than stray ping pong balls for you to get on

stage: The Union Club and Teri Llovet host Jammin’ at the Union, an open mic/jam night, every Thu. at 9 PM, so bring that axe and get to work. Free. Whether you prefer your reggae along the lines of soulful acoustic or booming dancehall, Kingston, Jamaica’s Anthony B has the riddims to keep you moving, evidence of comes at 10 PM in the Elk’s Lodge’s upstairs ballroom. $15.

FRIDAY

06

March

Poet Thomas Sayers Ellis presents the public craft talk “The Widescreen Matrimony of Prose and Poetic Dictions” at 1 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building as part of the Creative Writing Department’s Spring Reading Series. Free. Call 2435267. (See Scope in this issue.)

Featuring: Regional Wine and Beer, Hors d'oeuvres, Desserts, Musical Entertainment, Silent and Live Auctions and lots of FUN!

Saturday, March 7th, 6:00 PM Missoula Children's Theater

SPOTLIGHT horny lovers

Tickets are $45 each available at Worden's Market and Rockin Rudy's For more info and tickets contact Kathy at 406-244-5800 or email: missoulachorus@hotmail.com

Sure, you’re a good and decent Missoula liberal, but just how deeply does that current run? Playwright Edward Albee didn’t have the hub of five valleys in mind when he wrote The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?, but his assertions and ethical dilemmas possess the same gravity for us as they do for his characters. At the core of the work is the notion that no matter how open-minded and tolerant you consider yourself, there’s a limit beyond which you suddenly turn conservative. Yes, Missoula, you’re also a bunch of Photo by Ashley Sears conservatives. Shocking, I know, but when Rick Martino and Carmen Corona star in The Goat, or faced with subject matter like sexual Who is Sylvia? deviance—try adultery, incest and/or besThe play’s four principals are a study in variation, tiality on for size, as Albee’s characters do—the result isn’t always the continuity of laissez-faire with some displaying marital virtue and faith while others are getting googly-eyed around the livestock. thinking. They interact and respond to one another’s fetishes, and lack thereof, all to some fairly devastating WHAT: The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? effects.

WHEN: Thu., March 5–Sat., March 7, 8 PM WHERE: Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. HOW MUCH: $15, or your hourly wage/ $5 student rush at 7:30

For audiences well versed, at least theoretically, in matters of sexual revolution, The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? will no doubt raise a slew of relevant issues and questions—about family, society and human spirit—to take home. —Jonas Ehudin

Who will Oliver be? DIRECTED BY Michael McGill

Sunday, March 8 12–3 P.M. CHILDREN (ages 8–18) and 3–6 P.M. ADULTS NEEDED:

Large cast of singers, actors and dancers. Families encouraged to audition.

PERFORMANCE DATES: April 30–May 3–10, 2009 MCT Inc. 200 N. Adams St. (Third floor; use Main Street entrance) 728-1911 SHOW SPONSORED IN PART BY:

Missoula Independent

Lambros Real Estate, E.R.A.; DIRECTV

Page 21 March 5–March 12, 2009


5SEITTOPAY YOURDUES

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Can you find Mayor John Engen in this image? Me, neither. “Run, I� is part of Mary Ann Papanek-Miller’s exhibit A Snowman Cares for Our Memory of Water, for which the Missoula Art Museum hosts an opening reception at 5 PM on Fri., March 6, with a gallery talk by Papanek-Miller at 7. Free. Call 728-0447.

Boys aged 7–13 can express that excess energy in an aesthetic way every Fri. at 3:30 PM, when the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W., presents their Boys’ Art Group and encourages artsy exploration of the gross and the weird in a variety of media. $65/four classes. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com. Montana author Cookie Grimes reads from and signs her children’s book Jake the Cow Horse at 4 PM at Fact & Fiction in the UM Bookstore. Free. Call 243-1234. The Dark Room, 135 N. Higgins Ave., presents an exhibit of photography by Brian Herbel at 5 PM. Free. The Top Hat inaugurates a new monthly habit featuring art and music every First Friday, and they begin today at 5 PM. Free. Get thee to the Artists’ Shop, 304 N. Higgins Ave., at 5 PM for two exhibits of photography: A Sense of Place by Pam Voth and The Quiet Landscape by Jane Goffe. Free. Paintings, illustrations and mixedmedia pieces grace the Butterfly Herbs Art Wall as RISD-bound Hellgate High School senior Emily Jenne hosts a First Friday opening for her exhibit at 5 PM. Free. When the Missoula Art Museum hosts an opening reception for the exhibit A Snowman Cares for Our Memory of Water at 5 PM, you’ll want to stick around for exhibiting artist Mary Ann Papanek-Miller’s 7 PM gallery talk. Free. Call 728-0447. Manipulated photographs comprise the exhibit Colors of the West by Marshall Delano, which is presented along with new works by painters Troy Collins, Wesley Drake, Caleb Meyer and Scott Switzer at

Missoula Independent

Page 22 March 5–March 12, 2009

5 PM at the Dana Gallery, 246 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-3154. Like watching a flight of passenger pigeons just before their extinction, the exhibit Instant Gratification: Polaroid Art by Peter Kearns—full disclosure: He’s the Indy’s advertising director—pays homage to that dying form at 5 PM at the Cutting Crew, 220 Ryman St. Free. Visit peterkearns.com. A new era of health dawns at 5 PM, when the grand opening of the Healthy Hummingbird Massage & Healing Arts Center, 725 W. Alder St., Ste. 27, features free 10-minute massages, art, food, drink and splendidly balanced company until 8 PM. Free. Visit healthyhummingbird.com. Framed India ink drawings and encaustics on wood panels comprise Diatom Universe, an exhibit by Leslie Millar that’s inspired by the microscopic glass skeletons of single-celled organisms, which opens at 5 PM at The Catalyst, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Free. If the MAM auction was a bit out of your league—whatever that means— check out a rare collection of works, including oil stick paintings by Nancy Erickson, oil paintings by Stephanie Frostad, digital photographs by Chris Autio and watercolor paintings by Don Mundt, from 5–9 PM at Montana Art and Framing, 709 Ronan St. Free. Call 541-7100. A cornucopia of wine and cookies means you must be at Betty’s Divine, where a joint show by siblings Larkin and Willow Matoon— stencils for the former, fashion for the latter—is most graciously hosted at 5 PM. Free. Call 721-4777. The Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., hosts a First Friday


exhibit by the students of the Missoula International School from 5–8 PM. Free. Photographer Mie Ahmt compared the garbage of Missoula with that of Kabul, Afghanistan, and the result is her exhibit Garbage Galore, which opens at 5 PM at Zootown Brew, 121 W. Broadway. Free. After closing briefly in December for a flood of biblical proportions, Trout River Coffee, 211 W. Front St., reopens for a show of pastels by Indy copy editor Sam Dwyer, with music provided by Dylan Dwyer and Eric Hutchins, at 5 PM. Free. From one-of-a-kind cards to encyclopedia cover panel art and reclaimed cloth hippie pockets—not to mention paintings, sculpture and collage— exhibiting artist IMUR uses salvaged materials to hypnotize attendees at 5 PM at the Western Montana Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 127 N. Higgins Ave., Ste. 202. Free. Call 543-2224. The Ceretana Gallery, 801 Sherwood Ave., presents A Curator’s Dream, an exhibit comprised of recent works by Patricia Thornton, Jonathan Marquis and Adelaide Every, as well as a slew of additional work either gifted or unretrieved by local artists, at 5 PM. Free. Quick, what’s a three-word Portuguese term for “season to taste?” The answer’s also the name of an exhibit of scenic contrasts by Charles Deutch, which opens at 5 PM at La

Parrilla, 130 W. Broadway. Free. Oh, the term’s “A Estação Provar.” Photographer Alan Graham McQuillan presents recent reprints of images made in 1968 in an exhibit titled Ireland 40 Years Ago at 5 PM at Big Sky Embroidery, 610 S. Higgins Ave. Free. New West, in the alley near 415 N. Higgins Ave., hosts an opening for Somethings, an exhibit by Ericka Schenk, at 5 PM. Free. Subject your mind to more than one “surreal view of the world put together piece by piece” when Computer Central, 136 E. Broadway, hosts an opening reception for the exhibit Decoupage by Clint Weis at 5:30 PM. Free. Support the Guatemalan indigenous community of Nebaj that housed them when 20 UM students presents a Benefit Photography Exhibit, which also features live music and a raffle of Guatemalan handicrafts, at 5:30 PM at Dauphine’s Cafe, 130 E. Broadway. Admission free/Photographs $20–40. (See Spotlight in this issue.) New works by Trey Hill are up for optical grabbing when the Clay Studio, 1106-A Hawthorne St., hosts an opening reception at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 543-0509.

nightlife Attention: Project Selvedge needs more participants, so they’ve dropped the entry fee. It’s not too late to get in on the action, so call 5417171 or visit the Selvedge Studio,

Chase away the winter blues with a dose of color– visit ARTfusion!

509 S. Higgins Ave., where you can take in round one of that Missoula fashion cornerstone at 6 PM. Free. Help launch the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “Right to Know” campaign in Montana when the Begleiter Photography Studio, 223 W. Front St., hosts an opening of Steven Begleiter’s exhibit of black-and-white portraits, Every Woman Matters: Portraits of Montana Women Living with Disabilities, at 6 PM. Free. Call 243-4956. Dress up in your favorite feminist regalia—interpret as you will—and get to the XXXXs at the north end of Higgins Avenue by 6:45 PM to meet up for the 7 PM International Women’s Day Parade, which ambles south to the Florence Building lobby for an evening of speakers sponsored by WVE, WORD, Montana Women Vote, the Poverello Center and the YWCA. Free. Call 543-6691. As part of the UM Creative Writing Department’s Spring Reading Series, poet Thomas Sayers Ellis reads some of his work at 7 PM in the Dell Brown Room of UM’s Turner Hall. Free. Call 243-5267. (See Scope in this issue.) Big Sky singer-songwriter Danny McIntosh helps ensure you imbibe your fair share of tannins when he plays at 7:30 PM at Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Take in an all ages aural experience in the ZACC basement, 235 N. First St. W., where Brooklyn experimental musicologists These Are Powers play with

B r i d g e b u i l d e r, T h e E l e c t r i c Dandelion, Deny the Dinosaur? and Knot Knocked UP! at 7:30 PM. $5. Cut out of those galleries on time, as the UM Jazz Bands present a concert at 7:30 PM in UM’s University Theatre. $10/$5 student and seniors. Call 243-6880. Dark family secrets, alcoholism and generalized lunacy make for an excellent time when the UM Department of Drama/Dance present Sam Shepard’s Buried Child at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Masquer Theatre, and you’re encouraged not to bring the kids. $14/$12 students and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 2434581. (See Theater in this issue.) The Whitefish Theatre Company, 1 C e n t r a l Av e . , p r e s e n t s E d w a r d Albee’s 1962 groundbreaking drama Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at 7:30 PM. $14/$10 students and seniors. Call 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Get to the Eagles Lodge in Kalispell at 8 PM if you want a shot at a fine show from the Graveyard Girl Scouts, Out the Lights, Tonight We Ride and the Virus Invaders III. $5. UM’s Physical Therapy Student Association raises funds for a friend in need with the 8 PM party Kegs for Cancer! at The Loft, 424 N. Higgins Ave., which features raffle prizes from Betty’s Divine, the Good Food Store and other local stores, complimentary beverage and live music by Sho-Down at 9. $10.

As winter draws toward a close, Missoula’s Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., thaws out the dance floor and invites you to enjoy the Wild Coyotes at 8 PM. Free. Call 207-0498. Acceptable sexuality and marital flexibility weather a storm of deviance when Red-Headed Angel Productions and Montana Rep Missoula stage Edward Albee’s The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? at 8 PM at the Crystal Th e a t r e , 515 S . H i g g i n s Av e . $15/Whatever you make in an hour/$5 student rush at 7:30. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Look for a little life, love and laughter when Donavon Frankenreiter eases your apprehensions with honest feel-good rock at 8:30 PM in the Wilma Theatre, once Gary Jules gets the audience fitly warmed. $22/$20 advance. (See Noise in this issue.) Club Q, Aural Fixation and KBGA present Club DarQ, a chance to rave with high-energy electro-pop, psy trance and hardhouse spun by DJs NERO, ir8prim8, Tobin and Dubba-U from 9 PM–3 AM in the Elk’s Lodge basement. $5, use the Front Street entrance. Your weekly dose of funky rock and bluesy soul comes in a jumbo value pack when Zeppo, MT plays the Union Club at 9 PM. Free. You’ve got more than your fair share of dance moves to bust out at 9 PM, when Blue Rock Shop plays the High Spirits in Florence. Free.

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Missoula Independent

Page 23 March 5–March 12, 2009


Gear up for International Women’s Day with all-female AC/DC tribute group Hell’s Belles—many insist they’re even better than the real thing—when they play the Badlander at 9 PM with openers Secret Powers. $15 at Ear Candy. Stay up late, but get there early to avoid the cover: The Palace Lounge presents the Afterhours Social Club with DJs Brand One, Kris Moon and Fleege teaming up on the steel wheels all the way into the 3:30 AM hour. Free until 1 AM/$3 thereafter. If you’re ready to thrash harder than a headless rooster, get to The Other Side at 9 PM, when Lazerwolfs present a non-ironic, costume-free musical tribute to Judas Priest—they’re temporarily adopting a second guitarist for historical accuracy—after openers Helliana and Thetan Revival sharpen the crowd’s axes. $5/$7 under 21. Be thankful that the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Release your inner Kool Moe Dee when Larry’s Six Mile Casino and Cafe in Huson presents an evening with Grayhound Karaoke at 9 PM. Free. Call 546-8978. When the Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., turns over the sound system to a live DJ every Fri. at 9 PM, all you’ve got to remember is to turn south after taking exit 89 from I90. Free. Call 370-3200. Bring that needs-to-get-shook booty to Sean Kelly’s, where Russ Nasset and the Revelators deliver what you’re looking for at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY

07

March

The UM Physical Therapy Student Association keeps the fundraising spirit alive with their All-You-CanEat Pancake Breakfast and BustA-Gut 5K Race, which begins with registration at 7:30 AM at Christ the King Church, 1400 Gerald Ave., and continues with breakfast at 8 and the race at 9. Eat before or after you run, or don’t run at all. $10 to eat and run/$5 breakfast only/4 meals for $15/Free under 6. Call 243-4753. If the MAM auction was a bit out of your league—whatever that means— check out a rare collection of works, including oil stick paintings by Nancy Erickson, oil paintings by Stephanie Frostad, digital photographs by Chris Autio and watercolor paintings by Don Mundt, from 9 AM–4 PM at Montana Art and Framing, 709 Ronan St. Free. Call 541-7100. Enjoy a weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise when you bring yourself to the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St., for Saturday Morning Nia every Sat. at 9 AM. $10. Call 360-8763 or 541-7240. To keep overhead low and encourage interactions and friendships, the Missoula Community Food Coop, 1500 Burns St. on the Westside, is open only to members EXCEPT

Missoula Independent

from 10 AM–3 PM on the first Sat. of every month, when Public Shop offers you a chance to stock up on fresh and local food, taste samples and learn more about how easy and affordable it is to become a member. Free. Call 728-2369. Author Donna Love reads from and signs her book Henry the Impatient Heron at 10 AM at Waldenbooks in Southgate Mall. Free. Beginners and the experienced alike will find nuggets worth incorporating when Bev Gluckert presents the class Collagraph Printmaking at 10:30 AM, but be sure to bring some flat, textural material to use in your prints. $50/$45 members. Call 728-0447. Hamilton’s Chapter One Book Store, 252 Main St., hosts a signing event for five self-published Montana authors—Dan Pence, Cookie

you’ve got a chance to get the inside scoop when Y Music presents “Conversation with Darko: Inside the Verdi Requiem” at 1 PM at the Missoula Art Museum. Free. Young people with sharp noses and hearty appetites for fish will feel especially at home at 2 PM when the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St., presents the Saturday Kids’ Activity Whole Lotta Herons, wherein author Donna Love reads her book Henry the Impatient Heron before leading a great blue art activity. $2/members free. Call 327-0405. Hanna Hannan and community guests present the six-week adultsonly course Nicaraguan Pottery and Clay: Hand Building every Sat. through April 11, at 3 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $80/six-

at Fort Missoula’s Heritage Hall, where you can get your grub on, swap tall tales, win big in the raffles and auctions and help conserve wildlife habitat and hunting traditions. $20, includes admission and one-year membership/Free under 16. Call 543-3144 or e-mail hellgatewildlife@yahoo.com. Satisfy that thirst for something beyond ordinary wine at the Hidden Legend Winery, at Sheafman corner and Highway 93 S., where the honey wine flows and the local music rolls every Sat. at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 363-6323. The Missoula Community Chorus holds their third annual Vintage on Broadway fundraising auction at 6 PM at the MCT Center for Performing Arts, where our best and brightest local wine and beer makers offer their wares in exchange for your sup-

SPOTLIGHT payback When somebody takes you in and makes you feel at home, your obligation as a guest is to somehow get them back. That’s the motivation behind a fundraising show of photography presented by a group of UM students with the Environmental Studies program. Last summer, professor Dan Spencer accompanied the cadre as they spent two weeks in Guatemala’s indigenous community of Nebaj, inserting themselves into the daily life of their hosts as they played, planted, wove and learned. The environmental and economic realities of life in Nebaj, which became clear to the students during their stay, prompted them to raise money as a means of giving thanks. The images that comprise the show range from bustling market scenes to squadrons of children cap-

WHAT: Benefit Art Show for Nebaj, Guatemala WHEN: Fri., March 6, 5 PM WHERE: Dauphine’s Café, 130 E. Broadway HOW MUCH: Admission free/ Photographs $20–40

Grimes, Anne Hassett, Virginia Bolen and Donna Love—at 11 AM, with plenty of books for everyone, so no shoving. Free. Call 363-5220. In addition to the chance to purchase a hot date, the Women’s Fair and Bachelor Bid for Cancer Awareness—which takes place from 11 AM–5 PM in the UM University Center Ballroom—offers free acupuncture and tongue diagnosis by Bitter Root Acupuncture and Herbarium. Free, unless you buy yourself some man-date. Practice your rapid eye movement when you check out all that’s new during a Ten Minute Tour every Sat. at noon at the Missoula Art Museum. Free. Call 728-0447. Give the pencil-chewing a rest when you attend a Stress Relief Workshop led by Gail O’Phaelan at 1 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 541-1100. A week before it’s performed by the Missoula Symphony Orchestra,

Page 24 March 5–March 12, 2009

“Morning in Saquil Grande,” by Emily Buck.

tured in those never-quite-still poses, and they’re all for sale. In addition to the photographs, a collection of Guatemalan handicrafts the group brought back also helps raise funds, and live music rounds out the event. If you’re looking for a way to extend your First Friday’s philanthropic reach, consider Dauphine’s Café an anchor of your downtown stroll.

week course. Call 549-7555 or visit zootownarts.com. Montana’s newest brewery— Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St. in Stevensville—hopes you’ll wash down that beer with a show by Shane Clouse at 5 PM. Free. Call 777-0680.

nightlife Celebrate 20 years of WORD’s Futures Program and help them continue for another several decades when you attend their Many Faces of Women Fundraiser, which includes a fast-paced live art auction, a silent auction, dinner, dancing and a mad dash for dessert and begins at 5:30 PM at the Doubletree Hotel. $35 through March 6/$45 on March 7/$350 per table of 10. RSVP manyfacesofwomen.com or 543-3550. Come for the camaraderie, stay for the wild game buffet: The Hellgate Hunters and Anglers host their third annual Wild Night for Wildlife at 5:30 PM

—Jonas Ehudin port of homegrown choral music. $45 at Rockin Rudy’s and Worden’s Market. Call 244-5800. Flathead Valley due Betty and the Boy put their honed folk sensibilities on display, while reserving the right to honor requests as well, at 7 PM at Zootown Brew, 121 W. Broadway. $2. The UM Department of Music presents a student recital by oboist Kati Fallon at 7:30 PM in UM’s Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880. The lessons begin at 7:30 PM when the Missoula Folklore Society throws a Contra Dance in the Union Hall, where the honest-to-goodness party starts at 8 with music from Skippin’ A Groove and calling by Bev Young. $8/$6 members. Call 543-6508. Dark family secrets, alcoholism and generalized lunacy make for an excellent time when the UM Department of Drama/Dance present Sam Shepard’s Buried Child at 7:30 PM in the UM PARTV Center’s Masquer

Theatre, and you’re encouraged not to bring the kids. $14/$12 students and seniors/$8 under 13. Call 2434581. (See Theater in this issue.) The Whitefish Theatre Company, 1 C e n t r a l Av e . , p r e s e n t s E d w a r d Albee’s 1962 groundbreaking drama Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at 7:30 PM. $14/$10 students and seniors. Call 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Support the good work of Bitterroot Ecological Awareness Resources (BEAR) by pegging your pants and getting to Hamilton’s Eagles Lodge, 125 N. Second St., at 8 PM for an Awesome ’80s Dance Party, where costume, breakdance and Twister contests, a raffle, a fine spread of ’80s appetizers and more await. $12/ $20 couples. Grandspawn of a legend, Shelton Hank Williams III—aka Hank III, or just III—leads Assjack in the re-affirmation of the power of outlaw country—with insistent supporting acting by heavy metal and punk influences—at 8 PM on a Wilma Theatre stage shared with Those Poor Bastards. $19/$17.50 advance. L.I.V. Karaoke night, which starts at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., is proof that it’s hard to soar with, oh, well... nevermind. Free. Call 531-7800. As winter draws toward a close, Missoula’s Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., thaws out the dance floor and invites you to enjoy the Wild Coyotes at 8 PM. Free. Call 207-0498. Acceptable sexuality and marital flexibility weather a storm of deviance when Red-Headed Angel Productions and Montana Rep Missoula stage Edward Albee’s The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? at 8 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/Whatever you make in an hour/$5 student rush at 7:30. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. You’re sobriety’s bound to get washed downstream when The Flood Band plays the Union Club at 9 PM. Free. After Blue Rock Shop plays a 9 PM show at Florence’s High Spirits—that’s two gigs in two days—you’ll be hard pressed to remember exactly where you left your underclothing. Free. Dig the power and raucous glory of Birthday Suits, who play the Badlander with Victory Smokes and Deny the Dinosaur? at 9 PM. $5. Engage in a renewing of the Top Hat’s funk when Def Cartel—which contains some of your favorite members of Reverend Slanky—lays a new foundation of soul beginning at 9 PM. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. Rock music ranging from punk to metal and back toward indie fills the joint when Little Brazil and Ladyfinger (ne) play The Other Side with Billings’ 1090 Club at 9 PM. $7. (See Noise in this issue.) The Frenchtown Club, 15155 Demers St., lets the karaoke genie out of the bottle at 9 PM. Turn south after taking exit 89 from I-90. Free. Call 370-3200. Feel free to perform during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if nobody offers you a record contract, what with these trying economic times and all... Free.


If you get nervous in front of crowds, just imagine they’re all naked at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo at 9 PM. Free. Support the efforts of the wee local farmers of the DeSmet School Garden when you attend a benefit show with door prizes, a raffle and seed-sowin’ sounds by The Pebble Light, Butter and The Wartime Blues at 9:30 PM in the Palace Lounge. $5. If you loved the music in the old Ritz, you’ll be thrilled to know that DJ Concave brings that same flava to Boomer’s Pub every Sat. at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 531-1510. DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SUNDAY

08

March

Sunday brunch at 10 AM with jazz from Three of a Kind is classy so don’t just roll out of bed and head into the Blue Canyon Kitchen & Tavern, located in the Hilton Garden Inn at 3720 N. Reserve Street. Free. The MCT Community Theatre holds auditions for their upcoming production of Oliver beginning at noon for people under 19, with adult auditions to follow at 3. A large cast is needed, so bring the whole family. Call 728-1911. Peripatetic squeeze-boxers find harmony when the Five Valley Accordion Jam—which also welcomes guitars and banjos—presents three hours of great music for dancing and listening at 1 PM at the High Spirits in Florence. $4/$3 members. So far, the speakers include professor Anya Jabour, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau and YWCA national coordinating board chair Tracy Lakatua when the YWCA presents a film and live presentation regarding Women’s Rights in Montana and Elsewhere at 3 PM in the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-6691.

The UM Department of Music presents a student recital by cellist Marie Pettit at 7:30 PM in UM’s Music Recital Hall. Free. Call 243-6880. The Whitefish Theatre Company, 1 Central Ave., presents Edward Albee’s 1962 groundbreaking drama Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at 7:30 PM. $14/$10 students and seniors. Call 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs at 9 PM with a live jazz band at 10. Free. Hear ye, hear ye: AmVets Club offers a new spin on karaoke night, and it’s known as “Jheryoake.” Delve into the mystery at 9 PM, when Happy Hour gets the crowd loose until 10. Free. Hate smoky pool halls? No sweat— and no smoke: Head underground when The Palace, 147 W. Broadway, features a rotating cast of Random Rock DJs at 9 PM every Sun. Free.

MONDAY

09

March

Whether you take the lunch option or not, the Holiday Inn-Downtown at the Park’s the place to be at 11:30 AM, as a panel of three experts— NorthWestern Energy’s Bob Rowe, Public Service Commissioner Gail Gutsche and attorney Chuck Magraw—adds spark to City Club Missoula’s next forum, Montana’s Energy Outlook: Policy and Practice. $16/$11 members/$5 forum-only option. RSVP 546-6643. Drink specials have long been the lubricant for political maneuvering, and tonight the tradition continues at 5 PM, when Forward Montana’s Progressive Happy Hour gets to the heart of matters at the Badlander. Call 542-VOTE.

nightlife What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. Ann Higgins offers two levels of Belly Dance lessons every Mon. through Mar. 9, at the Wellness Center: At 6:30 PM, it’s time for continuing students, with beginning lessons to follow at 7:30. $36 for six weeks/$25 hospital employees and family/$8 drop-in. Call 273-0368. Get this: Every Mon., Lolo’s Square Dance Center, 9555 Highway 12, begins with beginners’ lessons at 6:30 PM and then moves into full square dance party mode at 8. First two beginners’ sessions free/$4 thereafter. Call 273-0141. You’ll know you’re in the right place when your ears are soothed by the mellifluous vibes of Larry Hirshberg, who plays the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave., at 7 PM. Free. Call 549-2906. The Nature Conservancy’s Brian Martin provides a road map for ecosystem salvation in Room L14 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building, where his presentation “Natural History and Conservation of the Great American Prairie” begins at 7 PM. Free. Inclusivity’s the name of the game— no, really—at the next Great Old Broads for Wilderness meeting, wherein new projects and old victories will surely be discussed, at 7 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Visit greatoldbroads.org or e-mail westernglass@aol.com. Try some acrobatics on for size when Cathy Clark presents six weeks of Lindy Hop Workshop every Mon. at 7 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 5417240 for pricing. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. There’s a meditation group at Osel Shen Phen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center, 441 Woodworth Ave., where sadhana practice, visualization and mantra recitation cleanse the doors of perception at 7 PM. Call 543-2207.

Give us your

BEST! Every year our readers painstakingly complete their ballots, we diligently count 'em and then we devo te an entire issue to showcasing the BEST OF MISSOU LA. This year we invite you to showcase your own self by submitting an artistic take on Best of Missoula for publication in that issue. In other words, show us what “Best of Missoula”means to you. It could be a painting, a photograph, a drawing, etc., but it must somehow incorporate the Missoula Independen t and it must somehow be totally awesome.

GET

Published!

Our panel of esteemed judges (OK, some of the Indy staff) will evaluate the entries and select the best to be published in our

July 9th Best of Missoula issue Submission FORMATS: AL ART EPS • ORIGIN • JPEG • F IF T • F • PD

ENTRY DEADLINE: April 30, 2009

UM’s Italian Club presents one screening of Danielle Luchetti’s Ginger and Cinnamon, an “unpretentious romp about a 14-year-old determined to lose her virginity on a Greek isle,” in the UM University Center Theater at 3 PM and another on Mon., March 9, at 7 PM in the same place. Free, sponsored by the National Italian American Foundation (niaf.org).

Entries may be submitted via email to m LFoland@missoulanews.co or delivered to MT 59801 317 S. Orange, Missoula

CONTEST

The Whitefish Theatre Company, 1 C e n t r a l Av e . , p r e s e n t s E d w a r d Albee’s 1962 groundbreaking drama Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at 4 PM. $14/$10 students and seniors. Call 862-5371 or visit whitefishtheatreco.org.

RULES

original work, it has not been copied from others, and Entrants represent and warrant that their submission is their it does not violate the rights of any other person or entry. Independent and will not be acknowledged or returned. All entry materials become the property of the Missoula of the entrant, but entry in this contest constitutes property the remain shall on submissi any in t The copyrigh further compensation or attribution, to use the without consent, and on permissi l perpetua le, entrant's irrevocab advertising, commercial and publicity purposes , editorial for state and city and name submission and the entrant's and all media now in existence or hereinafter any in sponsor, the by ed authoriz by the sponsor and/or others t in the submission. Sponsor and/or others copyrigh the of duration the created, throughout the world, for the submission. Each entrant releases and modify and adapt, edit, to authorized by the sponsor shall have the right or administration of the contest, their ent developm the with d discharges the sponsor, the judges, any party associate subsidiaries, sister companies, or affiliates from any and employees, agents or representatives or any of their parents, limitation, legal claims, costs, injuries, losses or all liability in connection with the contest, including without kind. any of actions or demand , damages

nightlife Ignore the stitches left in your side by those other readings, as the Second Wind Reading Series delivers the sweet sounds of fiction by Erin Brown, Anne Marie Wirth-Cauchon and Kate Ristow to your hungry ears at 5:30 PM in the Palace Lounge. Free.

CALLING ALL : S T S I T R A LOCAL

Just outside Southgate Mall, Paxson St. Entrance, Off Brooks • 542-SEED Missoula Independent

Page 25 March 5–March 12, 2009


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VANS

The Wild Mercy Reading Series, a side project of UM’s Environmental Studies department, presents Kalie Jo Rider and Tim Gibbins at 7:30 PM at the Missoulian Angler, 401 S. Orange St. Free. Experience momentum, balance, and timing tuned with a strong drummer-dancer connection every Mon. at 7:30 PM with West African Sabar dance class at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W., across from Hawthorne Elementary. $10. Call 721-3854 and drum up directions at terangaarts.googlepages.com. At Be Here Now Sangha you can learn the basics of meditation every Mon. night at 7:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Open to all religions and levels of practice. Free, but donations appreciated. All the way from Olympia, Wash., RVIVR parks their pop punk caravan at 8 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W., where they promote their new 7” release Life Moves with more than a little local support by the Infernal Machine and other guests. Cover TBA. Unite the clans with Geneva Bybee, who presents Tribal Fusion Bellydance at 8 PM every Mon. and Wed. at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. Call 541-7240 for pricing. For once in your life, leave the bar with a slightly thicker wallet with DJ Hickey’s Rawk and Roll Bingo Night every Mon. from 8:30 PM until midnight at the Badlander. $1 per card, and the opening round’s always free. The Milkcrate Mechanic keeps the groove fine tuned when he presents random music for random people, featuring rotating DJs and acts, free pool and mad krunk every Mon. at 9 PM at the Palace Lounge. Free. Bring some functional calendar software to Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery at 9:30 PM, and see if you can convince my boss to finally make the switch. Free.

TUESDAY March

10

If they’re under 24 months old, bring the kiddos to the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., where Families First’s Family Motion offers a yoga regimen for you and yours at 11 AM. $4.25/Free for members. RSVP 541-PLAY.

You can almost taste the nurturing environment when La Leche League meets at 11:30 AM in the Missoula Public Library’s large meeting room to discuss “The Art of Breastfeeding.” Free. Call 549-1779 or 721-6111. Find strength and the will to fight at the Breast Cancer Support Group, which meets at noon each Tue. at St. Francis Xavier Church, 420 W. Pine St. Free. In a course inspired by two exhibiting artists’ work, students aged 6–11 can create sculptures and collage paintings that use the stuff and things of everyday life every Tue. through March 24, at 4 PM at the Missoula Art Museum. $40/$36 members. Call 728-0447. Get in on the ground floor, and prepare for the upcoming building season, when the board room of the Missoula Public Library hosts the informational extravaganza “Habitat for Humanity 101” at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 549-8210.

nightlife It’s Tuesday, and you ate your last dust bunny for breakfast, so why not Dine With the Elks from 5:30–7 PM? This week, chicken cordon bleu, rice pilaf, green bean amandine, the salad bar and cheesecake with strawberries compliment the flashy pianizing of Adrienne Dussault. $9 per plate. RSVP 549-0542.

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406.550.2267 Missoula Independent

Page 26 March 5–March 12, 2009


Remember, kids: Burning is a big decision. Nobody’s more on point about this issue than your Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC), who aim to keep those natural resources from becoming charred and not-quiteso-useful. The 2009 general burning season began Sun., March 1, but before you run off to torch anything that’s not bolted down, consider this: Burning permits are both required and free in Missoula County, and you’re responsible throughout the life of your burn pile. You can score a permit at your nearest fire station, Forest Service or DNRC office, and more info’s available at mcfpa.org. On the opposite end of the elemental spectrum, we have water. The Watershed Education Network (WEN) currently offers crucial steam monitoring trainings so I urge you all to consider this opportunity. Attend one of two WEN Community Stream Monitoring Trainings, which begin with a meeting at the Greenough Park Pavilion: Choose from Sun., March 8, at 1 PM, and/or Thu., March 12, at 3 PM. They’re free, super informative and supply you with the skills to keep a watchful eye on one of our most fragile, if fireresistant, natural resources. Call 541-9287, e-mail water@montanawatershed.org, or visit montanawatershed.org. One last note before I set you loose: Stevensville’s Clearwater Farm urgently seeks your involvement as a volunteer, intern or member of their upcoming Community Supported Agriculture season. Work is available in Stevi and Corvallis, people with all levels of expertise are welcomed and they just can’t wait to hear from you. Call Sandy at 370-0808 or Traci at 381-1960. We last left off at this week’s entry point: On Thu., March 5, you can vicariously experience the life of a year-round mountain biker when the film Seasons screens at 7 PM in UM’s Urey Lecture Hall. It’s free, so the decision’s been made for you. Looking for something a bit more hands-on? The Audubon Society obliges with the third in their series of Advanced Birding

Christ the King Church, 1400 Gerald Ave., on Sat., March 7. You’re invited to take on whatever part(s) of the event you’d like, and in any order, so call 243-4753, or just show up. Two days of snowboard madness—sponsored by our very own Edge of the World Board Shop—ensue when Montana Snowbowl hosts the 21st annual Snowboard Jam on Sat., March 7, and Sun., March 8, with registration starting at 9 AM in the bar. It costs $10 per day to enter, and you can get more info when you call 549-9777, or visit edgeoworld.com/zoo. Missoulians on Bicycles rolls back into their seasonal spotlight with two rides offered this weekend. On Sat., March 7, meet at 10 AM at the old 4-B’s parking lot (corner of Brooks and Reserve streets) for a 25-mile ride around Blue Mountain and Big Flat. Call Ken at 239-9754. That night, be sure to drink plenty of electrolytes and down massive bowls of pasta, as that same rough posse invites you to meet at 10 AM on Sun., March 8, in the Eastgate parking lot for the 25-mile Tour de Turah. Call Katie at 7218540. And don’t forget to set your clocks ahead one hour on Sat. night. In between those rides, you’ve a chance to support wild animals and your ability to hunt them when you attend the Hellgate Hunters and Anglers’ Wild Night for Wildlife at 5:30 PM at Fort Missoula’s Heritage Hall on Sat., March 7. The wild game buffet tastes as good as conserving habitat and heritage feels. $20 includes a one-year membership. Call 543-3144 or e-mail hellgatewildlife@yahoo.com. Now that your blood’s pumping, settle down a bit with the Montana Native Plant Society, which presents the talk Photo by Chad Harder “Natural History and Conservation of the Great American Prairie” by Brain Martin during their meeting at 7 PM on Mon., March 9, in Room L14 of UM’s Gallagher equipment and instruction and you’re encouraged to call 243-5172. And if ArtWalk’s not your idea of a proper Friday, that’s fine. In that Business Building. Free. Another chance to boost your brain comes on Wed., March 11, case, head up to the Whitefish Mountain Resort, where the final event in their Night Riders Park Series—the Best Trick as the Montana Natural History Center hosts Forest Service Championships—begins with registration at 4 PM on Fri., botanist Steve Shelly, whose lecture “Orchids and Other Rare March 6. Once the inspections are through, you’ll have a shot at Plants of Montana” begins at 7 PM. It’s geared toward adults, showing the gathered portion of humanity just exactly how fly you can costs $4 and you can call 327-0405. And as always, there are more happenings, but no more space. be. Please wear a helmet. Call 862-2900 or visit skiwhitefish.com. They say opposites attract, which is the only way this next event Until next week, go on and burn one down, but for Pete’s sake, get a even comes close to making sense. UM’s mad Physical Therapy permit first. students sponsor the All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast and calendar@missoulanews.com Bust-A-Gut 5k Race starting with registration at 7:30 AM at workshops: At 7 PM on Thu., March 5, join Steve Hoffman at the Fish, Wildlife & Parks office on Spurgin Road for the class “Raptors.” The class runs $15, and you’re to call Larry at 5495632 to register. Instead, select something a bit more physical when you dip into UM’s Grizzly Pool, where at 8 PM on Thu., March 5, the Fundamentals of Whitewater Kayaking course begins. Additional class meetings take place on March 10, 12, 17, 19 and 22, the $155 covers pool use,

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Missoula Independent

Page 27 March 5–March 12, 2009


YWCA Missoula and the UM Multicultural Alliance

to raise money for GUTS! A girls’ leadership project of the YWCA girls leadership project

and the Breast Cancer Research Fund

When:

Where:

Tickets:

Wed., March 18 UC Theater, $5 students with 6 pm: auction U of M ID, $10 general 7 pm: films Tickets & Info: 543.6691, ywcaofmissoula.org or 1130 W. Broadway M-F 8-5

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Missoula Independent

Page 28 March 5–March 12, 2009

Every Tue. at 5:30 PM, Intermediate Bellydance/World Fusion meets at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., but be warned that prior dance experience is recommended. $7. Call 531-3000. Jody Mosher offers another weekly dose of playful, happy and fantastic cardiovascular exercise—aka Nia— every Tue. at 5:30 PM at the Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. First class free/$6 each thereafter. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Tue. at 6 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets in room 109 at the Providence Center, 902 N. Orange St. Free. Call 327-7834. Three weeks of construction instruction await as the six-session course “Building with Habitat” begins at 6 PM at the UM College of Technology and continues to meet every Tue. and Thu. through Mar. 19. Free, but applications are due Fri., Feb. 27, so visit habitatmsla.org or call 549-8210. Don’t it make your green grass blue? The pickin’ circle begins at 6 PM, and house pickers Pinegrass play at 9:30 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA. Call 728-9865. Margarete de Soleil assists you in pushing the possibilities of drawing when she presents the four-week class Drawing: Wet and Dry Media, which meets every Tue. at 6 PM through Mar. 24. $50/$45 members. Call 728-0447. It’s a spicy good time when the Downtown Dance Collective’s Heather Adams presents beginning salsa dance lessons at 6 PM, followed by intermediate/advanced at 7, every Tue. at the Badlander. $5 suggested donation. The YWCA of Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691. See to your chakras’ proper education with Beginner Bellydance for Sixth–Eighth Grade every Tue. at 6:30 PM at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave., Ste. B. $7. Call 207-8302. A single bracelet does not jingle: Unity Dance and Drum’s all-levels West African Dance Class meets every Tue. evening at 6:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10/class or $35/four classes. Call 549-7933. Help unseat Denny Rehberg at 7 PM in the meeting room at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, where the Missoula County Democrats host Montana Democratic Party Chairman Dennis McDonald, a rancher from Melville who’s looking into taking on the long-seated Rep. Free. Call 546-9144. UM’s Wilderness Institute sponsors their annual Wilderness Lecture Series, which continues with Paul Alaback’s 7 PM lecture “Sea Voyage on the Alaskan Coast: Retracing the Harriman Expedition of 1899 and Exploring a Century of Change” in Room 106 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 2436956 or visit www.cfc.umt.edu/wi. Author Alan Weltzein reads from and signs his books, The Norman

Maclean Reader and A Father and an Island at 7 PM at Hamilton’s Chapter One Book Store, 252 Main St. Free. Call 363-5220. The UM Community Lecture Series, which carries the title “Hidden Montana: Dispelling Myths,” presents UM political science professor Jim Lopach, whose lecture “Jeannette We Hardly Knew Ye” begins at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Series: $20/$15 UM alumni/$10 students. Call 243-5211 or visit grizalum.com. Details are murky, but if you’re interested in taking part in some BodyCentered Creative Expression every Tue. at 7 PM, call 543-4414 for location and more details. Cover TBA. Before you go dousing yourself with patchouli again, let Katrina Farnum teach you some finer points with her presentation Using Essential Oils at 7 PM at Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 728-0543. Get down to the UM Music Recital Hall, where a Faculty Recital by soprano Anne Basinski raises anxiety among champagne flutes at 7:30 PM. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. The UM Spring Dance Showcase offers two programs of high-energy innovations wherein 35 dancers pretty much cover the movement spectrum: Program I takes place at 7:30 PM in UM PARTV Center’s Open Space. $8/$5 required students. Call 243-4581. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What concise bit of fortune cookie wisdom—affixed to his monitor by the inimitable Corporal Calendar—guides the Comrade in his every calendularly decision? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) You’ve practiced in front of the mirror long enough—head to the High Spirits in Florence, where open mic night features a drum set, amps, mics and recording equipment and awaits you and your axe at 8 PM. Free. Call 273-9992 to reserve your spot. As their Winters and Losers Tour winds its way around America, Grieves, Soulcrate Music and MC Type make a pit stop at the Badlander, where their proprietary punk hip hop blend treats the place right starting at 9 PM. $5/$7 under 21. The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. Be your own American Idol during “Jheryoake”—that’s karaoke with Jerry Reeb—every Tue. at 9 PM—with Happy Hour until 10—at the AmVets Club. Free. DJs Karl K, Dillon and Cosmic Diva play music for the irie-hearted every Tue. at 9 PM when Reggae Night overstands all your troubles at the Badlander. Free. L.I.V. Karaoke night gives your larynx a weekly workout with a 9:30

PM sesh at the Elbow Room. Free. Call 531-7800. Your weekly supply of DJ Concave jumps 50 percent as he holds down the tables at Boomer’s Pub every Tue. at 9:30 PM. Free. Call 531-1510.

WEDNESDAY

11

March

If you’ve retained the moral high ground, safely share the painful emotions and gain strength and perspective on your partner’s affair(s) during a meeting of the newly forming Beyond Affairs Network, which promises anonymity and a focus on healing. Contact mslamtban@yahoo.com for location and time, or visit beyondaffairs.com. If you can toddle, you can play: The Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., presents Toddler Playgroup at 11 AM, so bring the wee beasties for a chance to network and socialize. $4.25/members free. Call 541-PLAY. Men don pumps and put a spring in their steps at noon in UM’s University Center, where Walk a Mile in Her Shoes raises awareness and resistance to rape, sexual assault and gender violence. Get in on the action when you call 243-6429. It’s healthier than heroin: Lunchtime Junkies Jogging and Walking Club offers a one-hour community run and training session every Wed. through April 22, so meet at noon at Currents Aquatic Center in McCormick Park. $10. RSVP 721-PARK or 552-6266. Montana’s newest brewery— Blacksmith Brewing Company, 114 Main St. in Stevensville—hopes you’ll wash down that beer with a show by Mike Bader at 5 PM. Free. Call 777-0680.

nightlife Combine a relaxed and supportive atmosphere with live models in their birthday suits—18 and over only, please—and you’ve got the Missoula Art Museum’s Hump Day Figure Drawing group every Wed. from 6–8 PM. $7/$5 members. Call 728-0447. Learn to bump and grind, shimmy and shake and strut your stuff like a pro every Wed. evening at 6 PM during a Burlesque Dance Class at the Belly Tent Dance Studio, 2016 Strand Ave. Call Kelli Neumeyer at 531-2482. Green Drinks, the monthly meetup for the eco-boozy set, begins at 7 PM at Sean Kelly’s, where you might find a job, make a friend, develop a plan for world domination or simply find joy at the bottom of a pint glass. Free. UM’s Multicultural Film Series presents Persepolis, the animated tale of a free-thinking woman’s coming of age in the wake of the Iranian Revolution, at 7 PM in UM’s University Center Theater. Free. Call 243-5776. Missoula wordsmith Sheryl Noethe presents a poetry reading and signing—featuring her collection As Is—at 7 PM at Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 721-2881.


Adults are the primary audience for a talk titled “Orchids and Other Rare Plants of Montana” by Forest Service botanist Steve Shelly, which begins at 7 PM at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. $4 suggested donation. Call 327-0405. Before you go dousing yourself with patchouli again, let Katrina Farnum teach you some finer points with her presentation Using Essential Oils at 7 PM at Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 728-0543. The UM Spring Dance Showcase offers two programs of high-energy innovations wherein 35 dancers pretty much cover the movement spectrum: Program II takes place at 7:30 PM in UM PARTV Center’s Open Space. $8/$5 required students. Call 243-4581. Ladies of the night unite and head underground as the Palace Lounge presents Leather & Lace at 9 PM, which features DJs hAuli, The Mermaid, Molly McFunk, The Siren and Lady Stuff N Such spinning dark electro, ebm, industrial, minimal and more while dominatrix performances ensure maximum titillation. Dressing up is encouraged, but no one will be turned away for lack of chaps. Free. Dead Hipster presents Death By Quiz, a hard-hitting monthly trivia contest with teams competing in eight rounds of questions—including two music rounds—for wads of cash, prizes, drink tickets and the like at 9 PM. Free. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s Corporal-we-hardlyknew-ye trivia question: My guiding light each week is the monitormounted phrase, “The capacity for delight is the gift of paying attention.” Do with it what you will. Spit the gorf out of your taorht with Bassackwards Karaoke every Wed. at 9 PM at Deano’s Casino on North Reserve Street. Free. Call 531-8327. L.I.V. Karaoke puts the crowd in high spirits at the High Spirits in Florence starting at 9 PM. Free. Call 273-9992. This Missoula legend has nothing to do with ground beef: Wasted Wednesday at the Top Hat offers unlimited tap beer and M-Group at 10 PM and the wisdom you’ll gain is worth the $7 cover many times over. Call 728-9865.

THURSDAY

12

March

Dive deep into the teenage mind when the sixth annual Ravalli County Prevention Conference begins at 9 AM at Hamilton’s St. Francis Parish Center, 411 S. Fifth St., where keynote speakers Michael Mann and Dannette Wollersheim help us all help kids steer clear of nasty habits. Free. Call 375-9588. Explore movement as an avenue for deeper self-understanding every Thu. at 9 AM when Hillary Funk Welzenbach hosts an Authentic

Movement Group at Teranga Arts School, 2926 S. Third St. W. $25/session. RSVP 541-2662. Kids aged 1.5–4, and, of course, their parents, are invited to explore the way the groove penetrates and unites us all when Tangled Tones Music Studio, 2005 South Ave. W., presents Rhythm Tykes every Thu. at 10 AM through Feb. 12. $40 for five weeks/$10 drop-in. RSVP 3963352 or visit tangledtones.com.

plies, tour the galleries for inspiration and craft something magnificent during Teen Open Studio Night at the Missoula Art Museum at 6 PM. Free. Call 728-0447 ext. 230. Learn more about their campaigns involving fair trade, indigenous rights and Colombia in general when you attend the next Community Action for Justice in the Americas (CAJA) meeting, which goes down at 6:30 PM at the Jeannette Rankin

blogger Rebecca Traister. Free. (See Agenda in this issue.) An open mic night by any other name: Lake Missoula Cellars, 5646 W. Harrier, hosts a Local Artist Showcase—for which you’re instructed to sign-up by 10 AM on Wed.—at 7 PM. Free. Call 541-8643. In conjunction with the Fri., March 13, opening of the photography exhibit Amazonia at the ZACC, UM’s Urey Lecture Hall hosts Paulo Sotero, whose lecture, “Brazil and the Amazon: A Rising Environmental Power,” begins at 7 PM. Free. Dr. Freiss, a naturopathic physician with the Golgi Clinic, offers up a defense of fever with his presentation, “How Hot is Too Hot?: What Parents Should Know About Children’s Fevers” at 7 PM at Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 728-0543. Leave it to the Ninemile Working Group to host Carleen Gonder, whose 7 PM presentation Wildlife Forensics: A Key Tool to Fight Poaching goes down at the historic Ninemile Ranger Station in Huson. Free. Call 626-4587. When the Roxy Theater invites you to their monthly Natural History Night, you’d better believe they know which side their popcorn’s buttered on. Or something like that. Anyway, at 7 PM, enjoy a double feature with Satoyama: Japan’s Secret Water Garden and Norfolk Broads. $5. Call 728-9380 or visit wildlifefilms.org. The UM Spring Dance Showcase offers two programs of high-energy innovations wherein 35 dancers pretty much cover the movement spectrum: Program I takes place at 7:30 PM in UM PARTV Center’s Open Space. $8/$5 required students. Call 243-4581.

Acoustics, an every-Thursday event at the Top Hat featuring singer-songwriters sharing their gifts in the luminous glow at 9 PM. Free. Call 728-9865. Here’s a better reason than stray ping pong balls for you to get on stage: The Union Club and Teri Llovet host Jammin’ at the Union, an open mic/jam night, every Thu. at 9 PM, so bring that axe and get to work. Free. As per contractual stipulations, Sean Kelly’s erects padded walls around the stage when Bob Wire busts out a solo show at 9:30 PM. Cover TBA. Call 542-1471. Again, my people, you hold in your hands a paper calendar of limited length. Actually, you’ll notice that from week to week the size of the calendar changes. This has to do with forces beyond my control, and only rarely corresponds with the amount of great music, art and theatre events in any given week. I do my best to include the most important stuff each week—read: yours— and I ask for your forgiveness and understanding should a favorite event end up on the editorial floor. Please don’t rely on this calendar as your sole outreach tool. Once we have those e-newspapers they keep talking about, size will truly no longer matter. Oh, how I long for that day, Until then, do as you’ve always done: Send your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 6, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Comrade Calendar c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

nightlife America’s premier nose MC. The Winters and Losers Tour brings multidimensional hip hop from Grieves, pictured, Soulcrate Music and MC Type to the Badlander on Tue., March 10, at 9 PM. $5/$7 under 21.

School’s out early, which means it’s time for the Teen Zine Club, which meets every Thu. at 2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First Ave. W., for the continuing adventures of the self-publishing and somewhat famous. $10 per month. Call 2397718 or e-mail info@slumgullion.org. Give your kids something to strive for when the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St., offers the program Afterschool Adventures: Playdate with an Artist at 3 PM. $4.25/members free. Call 541-PLAY. This month’s Real Meals for Women event begins with food prep at 5 PM at the Orchard Homes Community Center, 210 N. Grove St., and clean up is done by 9 with leftovers and recipe cards for you to take home. $7/obo, EBT accepted. RSVP ASAP 546-4697. The UM Peace and Justice Film Series continues at 5:30 and 7:30 PM in the UM University Center Theater, where screenings of Maxed Out: Hard Times, Easy Credit and the Era of Predatory Lenders—a country-crossing look at everyday Americans dealing with credit card debt—are followed by discussions. Free, donations appreciated. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. Budding artists between the ages of 13 and 18 can experiment with sup-

Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 363-5292 or visit cajistas.blogspot.com. Help UM’s Students for Choice inspire the next generation of prochoice leaders at 7 PM in UM’s University Center Ballroom, where VOICES.POWER.POLITICS features the presentation “Gender and Sexism in the 2008 Elections” with Salon.com political and feminist

Lying ass bitch or not, you’re warmly invited to The Other Side, where Fishbone takes absolutely no flack at 9 PM. $15/$13 advance. The heavens open, the price of well drinks plummets and a tsunami of pure unabashed booty dancing hails your arrival every Thu. at the Badlander, where Dead Hipster DJ Night rewards you with rock, indie, krunk, pop and more at 9 PM. $2. Missoula’s most ballady balladeer, Russ Nasset, graciously picks up a gig at the Old Post Pub, playing every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free. A Front Street tradition is reborn with the return of Candlelight

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Missoula Independent

Page 29 March 5–March 12, 2009


scope

Color coded Politics and race collide with poet Thomas Sayers Ellis by Erika Fredrickson

In “The Obama Hour,” Thomas Sayers Ellis writes: “Finally one of us is properly/positioned to run. By ‘us’ I mean, Black/by ‘positioned’ I mean White/and by ‘run’ I mean Race and its varied speeds of darkness.” In “Skin, Inc.” Ellis employs writing terms—“punctuation,” “margins,” “conjugate”—to comment on color. Ellis, an African-American poet who grew up in Washington, D.C., and earned his master’s degree from Brown University, writes primarily about politics of race. But his work is not just about the politics, he says. He prefers playing with the sound of certain language and making poetry something more than just words on a page. Poetry, he says, should be learned through the body. The University of Montana hosts Ellis this week as its Richard Hugo Visiting Poet. As part of his stay, Ellis, who currently teaches at Sarah Lawrence

Ellis: I’m going to read a lot of poems about race when I’m [in Missoula]. But I have never been bothered by the facts of America. That has never prevented me from an onward struggle of the mind so I always welcome myself in those places. And I’m never uncomfortable…I know what America is. And this is a really interesting time in American history. But what is the true identity of the era in which we live and how can that be worked into art? My poems attempt to worry things out of their hiding places…but I try to have a good time even when I’m saying some difficult things. Writing should be a syntactical pleasure. What I’m trying to say is, there is [race], yes, and then there’s the exchange of stories, yes, and then there’s a thing that poetics itself can also do. Indy: What have you learned from your students over the years?

lifestyle,” or “Hip hop is a lifestyle.” Well, I think that’s perhaps true of the poetic temperament too. I try to teach [my students] courageousness in language…I want them to be the thumb of their generation, to have the advantage of what’s come before them. I just don’t think students tend to learn poetry with their body enough…They write a thing, they lay the thing on the table and it’s like we’re in an operating room. Poetry doesn’t belong to the poem. Poetry belongs to all of the beautiful nuances in the world. It’s in all things passionate and all things passionately practiced. I give my kids “The Wasteland” [to read] and they look at me like I’m crazy because it’s been removed [emotionally] through translation and transparency it’s undergone. But they have to find a way to see that it once existed in many nuances, so that they can come back to this flat thing that’s attempting not to be flat. Indy: Missoula typically hosts readings from “writers of the West,” mostly white men and women. You will definitely bring a different perspective. What’s it like teaching at Sarah Lawrence or coming to a place like Montana?

Ellis: Language is always changing. Language is not finished. Language is the thing that if you stay connected to it like I do, eat it enough, carry it with you enough, it will rejuvenate you. I don’t mean “save you” in a religious sense, but it will save you from a certain kind of dogma or mundane boring existence. Everyone says you are what you eat. The alphabets, they fill you because they don’t stay the same. And young people, as you watch them grow and you watch them change language and language change them, that’s an amazing thing to see. But if you don’t stay open to it, if you close the door behind your students and stop breathing, if you only teach outward and you don’t teach inward, you’re gonna miss that. And I’m so trying not to miss that.

Thomas Sayers Ellis teaches poetry at Sarah Lawrence College and currently serves as UM’s Richard Hugo Visiting Poet.

College in upstate New York, will read from his forthcoming book of poems, Breakfast and Blackfist: Notes for Black Poets, and teach a public craft class entitled “The Widescreen Matrimony of Prose and Poetic Dictions.” The Indy spoke with Ellis about his upcoming visit, football, literary ghosts and being black in America. Indy: How has your writing changed thematically or stylistically over the years? Ellis: I had wanted to be a football player and for one reason or another equated writing with running. Prosody itself and prose always need movement, always need motion, always need something other than meaning. And meaning can be made by a lovely progression, a progression that provides pleasure to the mind and pleasure to the body. I was watching TV today and someone was quoting Roosevelt who said, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself,” and I was thinking about how that line has repeating sounds in it, how it resurrects itself to create something that’s memorable. It’s what we call schema or pattern or the nucleus of the form. It’s no different than, “It was the best of times, it was the

Missoula Independent

worst of times.” It’s no different from “Eeny, meeny, miny, moe.” Indy: Some people assume poetry is superfluous to the world around us. How do you respond to that? Ellis: By the time we’re five or six, the world starts to take the pieces away from us and push us into certain boxes and say, “What do you want to be?” and, “You’re a straight male this or you’re a gay this.” After the world does all of that to you, poetry is one of the things that can help you fix and repair all of that, though it can’t do it by itself. What I find to be the most transformative is in the actual writing. That’s when the nation of the imagination is at it’s most governmental. Indy: You have a reputation for conducting lively classes. Ellis: People are always saying “Rock ’n’ roll is a

Page 30 March 5–March 12, 2009

Thomas Sayers Ellis gives a public craft talk at UM’s Gallagher Building 123 Friday, March 6, at 1 PM and a reading in the Dell Brown Room at 7 PM. Free. efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

Little Brazil Son

Anodyne Records

Narrative concept albums can be a tricky endeavor. One weak link and even Pink Floyd couldn’t keep the musical chain from falling to pieces. Omaha’s Little Brazil bites off a lot with Son, the group’s upcoming third album and first from Anodyne. The question is can they choke it down? Frontman Landon Hedges at least proves himself capable of selecting a compelling lyrical subject. Formerly of Conor Oberst’s Desaparacidos, Hedges spins a semi-fictional tale about a boy/man

Ladyfinger (ne) Dusk

Saddle Creek

Since their beginnings nearly a decade ago, Ladyfinger (ne) has defied definition, a fact that stems not from an identity crisis but an unwillingness to pander to any particular fan base. Their sound is distinctive and consistent, walking a thin, meandering line between punk, post-hardcore, ’70s metal and the occasional nod to emo sentiment if not the sound. This place-proud band (from Omaha, Neb., hence the “ne”) offers 10 raucous tunes on this sophomore album, fueled by angst-ridden lyrics and choppy guitar riffs backed by a rock-solid rhythm section. Drummer Pat Oakes is especially noteworthy. His hard-driving beats create a clean, staccato presence behind Chris Machmuller’s throaty vocals

Donavon Frankenreiter

Pass It Around Lost Highway

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past six months, you’ve certainly heard Donavon Frankenreiter’s “Life, Love & Laughter” on the radio at least once and it’s probably been stuck in your head at least that many times. The undeniably catchy first track sets the tone for Pass it Around, an upbeat album with a laid-back, California coastal summertime attitude. Despite being heavily produced, Frankenreiter’s songs manage an organic homegrown feel, unapologetically similar to the

Gary Jules & the Group Rules Bird

Down Up Down Music

Gary Jules has made short work of the music industry’s “keep out” approach to virtual unknowns. Musical spots on Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko and an episode of TV drama “Grey’s Anatomy” bought Jules a one-way ticket to the favored lists of top music mags. And he’s used the foothold to rise from L.A. basement studios to a European tour with Bob Dylan. Bird reaffirms that while he’s won the loyalty of The Man, he isn’t afraid to keep doing what he loves. With an impressive vocal range and soft, morninglight acoustics, Jules proves he’s more in touch with folk and country roots than most three-minute indie rants. Each song on Bird launches a new story, a

struggling through the trappings of love and life. Little Brazil pushes the main character from resentful son to loving father to mournful divorcé with your standard indie guitar and organ mastery. Little Brazil keeps the chain from breaking chiefly through a sense of immediacy. Son is told through figures in life’s rearview mirror, but the emotions resonate from the moment unfolding and not the moment remembered. And in turning to a middle school diary rather than analytical hindsight, Hedges follows the Golden Rule for any writer: Show, don’t tell. Little Brazil follows that rule, providing a spoonful of gold that helps Son go down smooth. (Alex Sakariassen) Little Brazil plays The Other Side Saturday, March 7, at 9 PM with 1090 Club and Ladyfinger (ne). $7. and searing guitar. Stylistic versatility from song to song isn’t a strong point, but a close listen reveals a range of themes. “A.D.D.” explores childhood’s trials, ampedup ballad “Plans” sincerely laments a love that “never went anywhere…just disappeared,” and cynical “Let’s Get Married” suggests if “you can pretend that you want me around, then we should ignore all the facts and get married.” The album’s gem is “Little Things,” a melodic, radio-ready tune that will appeal to listeners from all of Ladyfinger (ne)’s many genres. (Melissa Mylchreest) Ladyfinger (ne) plays The Other Side Saturday, March 7, at 9 PM with Little Brazil and 1090 Club. $7. sound of friend and fellow surfer-songster Jack Johnson, as well as Ben Harper, who sings on the title track. The boldly mustachioed Frankenreiter draws subtly on a wide variety of influences—’70s disco, funk, R&B and mariachi—to create a signature sound that conjures the images of “a big blue ocean to the right of me, mountain peaks to the left, open road in front of me” that he mentions in “Come With Me.” And, while his music is fairly mainstream and shamelessly user-friendly, listeners of every ilk will likely enjoy heeding that song’s title, embarking on a 10-tune aural vacation to Frankenreiter’s world of sun, sand and good times. (Melissa Mylchreest) Donavon Frankenreiter plays the Wilma Theatre Friday, March 6, at 8:30 PM with Gary Jules & the Group Rules. $22/$20 advance. new cast of characters, a new narrator—beginning, middle and end nine times over. Lyrics sparkle as much as the voice peddling them, drawn from some everywhere in Jules’ mind. He could have dreamt up his music in the bayous of Louisiana or on the bays of California. Inspiration and theme are borrowed from the vast North American continent, not simply a playground in his backyard. Though Jules stays true to the style that won him higher acclaim, Bird breaths a sigh of relief for brighter horizons. As Jules croons in his albumender, “The old days are gone/hallelujah.” (Alex Sakariassen) Gary Jules & the Group Rules opens for Donavon Frankenreiter at the Wilma Theatre Friday, March 6, at 8:30 PM. $22/$20 advance.

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Missoula Independent

Page 32 March 5–March 12, 2009

by Erika Fredrickson

The idea of the American dream as a dim and unearth itself. And it does, of course, both figuraugly reality often seeps through the subtext of the- tively and literally. Kurt Smith’s Dodge looks a bit like a dying John ater, but few plays do it with the same visceral trauma and frightening surrealism as Sam Shepard’s Malkovich. The portrayal—in his horrendous coughBuried Child. Like David Lynch’s Mullholland Dr. or ing and poisonous remarks—is a bull’s-eye of a man a good portion of Rod Serling’s “The Twilight Zone” gone sour. Michelle Green plays Halie with muffled series, any linear narrative or specific storyline fades hysteria, so disconcerting that you’re afraid she into the background of a larger symbolic message. might explode. Both gain momentum by the third Lynch, for instance, begins Mullholland Dr. with the act, where Halie actually appears and becomes even perky and innocent Betty, only to have her reappear more off-kilter. halfway through the film as Diane, a suicidal, runThe real drama ensues when Tilden’s son, Vince, down mess. No logical explanation suffices. But you shows up. Up until then, the play seems like the story can at least make some symbolic sense of things— of a family gone mad, but perhaps not completely Diane could represent reality, perhaps, and Betty the inhuman. But the family’s inability to recognize Hollywood dream. or remember Vince Whatever your intersends Buried Child pretation, it’s hard to off into the realm of take Lynch literally. Mullholland Dr. or And that’s the prob“The Twilight Zone.” lem with Lynch—you Identity crisis benever really know comes literal. And what’s going on. I when Vince begins to love his work, but he recognize himself in tends to be somethe faces of this dilapthing akin to an idated family, the endearing alcoholic transformation feels Photo by Ashley Sears relative—his devotion far from reality, more to an AA-type clarity like the magic of an Clockwise from left, Andreja Marie Bourke, Paul during a film’s first half Chirico, Michelle Green and Kurt Smith star in archetype fable. collapses later under a UM’s Buried Child. Jim Badock plays hooch-induced downVince with an almost ward spiral. determined sadness, which easily descends into Which brings me to Shepard’s Buried Child. outrage and, finally, acceptance of his lot in life. Even in all its alarming surrealism, even as each act Shelly, Vince’s city girlfriend, plays the archetypal burrows deeper into the realm of madness, this play outsider, the one the audience relates to because seems to slowly reveal itself in all its symbolic repre- she reveals not only the secret but digs up the sentation as the myth of the wholesome American metaphorical dirt of the American family failure. family. The current University of Montana produc- And since every other character is two sandwiches tion, directed by Ezra LeBank, festers in all the glory short of a picnic, Shelly’s emergence provides of a dark comedy. Comedy, yes, because it does some relief that someone’s finally there to call a make you laugh, but dark because every bit of laugh- spade a spade. Andreja Marie Bourke plays Shelly ter comes more from uneasiness. with solid street-smart defiance and natural manDodge, the patriarch of the family, languishes on nerisms. In some ways, she’s almost like a characthe couch with cigarettes and whiskey waiting to die, ter from a different story—an edgy HBO series, it seems—a death conceived either through bad perhaps—suddenly plopped down into an allegohabits or by sheer exhaustion from the shrill voice of ry. Bourke plays up Shelly’s harsh humor—she his wife, Halie, who belittles him, cheats on him and makes fun of the country folk stereotype before robs him of peace and quiet. finding it in disarray—without ever really losing the Halie, who is only a voice in the first act, swings audience’s sympathies even if, under other cirher mood wildly from dramatic whimsy to knife- cumstances, her rabbit coat and heavy makeup sharp disappointment to extreme grief for one of her might indicate superficiality. sons—the football star, war hero and perfect child Mostly, the cast pulls off Buried Child with strikwhose death seems to be one part of the family’s ing adeptness. At times, characters like Tilden (Pete unraveling. Betcher) and Father Dewis (Adam Elliot) fade in the Tilden, a son who’s still alive, appears in the liv- chaos, their moral and mental states so nebulous ing room with ears of corn, unperturbed by Dodge’s that they seem like whispers. But in all, the mysteradamant insistence that corn hasn’t grown in the ies of why the play spirals further and further into backyard for decades. Tilden’s childlike demeanor absurdity clear up by the end into a picture of what seems like a mental disability but also as though he’s happens when the American dream turns into a from another time or planet. And Bradley, the other nightmare. son, stews in his own emasculation from having a Buried Child continues at the Masquer prosthetic leg. Theatre inside UM’s PARTV Center Thursday, No one is right in the head. The farmhouse they March 5, through Saturday, March 7, at 7:30 PM. live in crumbles around them. And all along, from $14. the beginning, you’re waiting for the other shoe to drop, waiting for the buried child part of the story to efredrickson@missoulanews.com


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology Times Run 3/6 - 3/12

Visual resistance

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Snyder delivers a familiar Watchmen

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“From the visionary director of 300,” trumpets the promotional tagline for Watchmen, to which I could only respond, “Really?” Zack Snyder translated Frank Miller’s gritty graphic novel to great boxoffice success a few years ago, but could you call his achievement “visionary?” The word, it seems, presumes a creative perspective that allows someone to see in the source material what no one else could possibly see. What Snyder had done with 300 seemed more like a case of seeing what everyone else had already seen in the source material, and then getting the hell out of the way.

efficient piece of visual storytelling—the kind of thing that’s almost demanded when you’re adapting a work that originally appeared as a 12-issue comic-book series. The key word being “almost.” For the most part, Snyder—and screenwriters David Hayter (X-Men) and Alex Tse—cling to their source material, making sure that every sub-plot and bit of back-story fits somewhere in their 167-minute running time. There’s the extended story of how physicist Jon Osterman became the matter-manipulating living weapon Dr. Manhattan, and the investigation that

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This is the challenge faced by any filmmaker adapting a beloved piece of pop literature. Fans already know what they think this world looks like—and in the case of an illustrated work like Watchmen, that’s even truer. Chris Columbus plodded through two scrupulously faithful Harry Potter films, aware that any deviation would be met with bleats of protest; ditto Catherine Hardwicke and last year’s much-anticipated Twilight. You probably don’t want a visionary director when it comes to pleasing devotees of a work that they already consider visionary. What you want, really, is a competent hack. And, after 20 years of stops and starts in bringing this project to the screen, competent hackwork is mostly what Snyder delivers in tackling the landmark work by writer Alan Moore (unaccredited in the film due to an ongoing dispute with the publisher) and artist Dave Gibbons. Set primarily in an alternate-future 1985—where Richard Nixon is serving practically as president-for-life, and the Cold War still rages—it posits an America with a rich history of costumed superheroes. But their exploits have been outlawed, leaving the few remaining “masks” to re-channel their energies. Nite Owl (Patrick Wilson) has settled into a flabby, dissatisfied middle age. The “world’s smartest man,” Ozymandias (Matthew Goode), works with the nigh-omnipotent Dr. Manhattan (Billy Crudup) on an alternative energy source. And the borderline-nuts Rorschach (Jackie Earle Haley) continues to prowl the night, investigating the death of The Comedian (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) as part of a conspiracy to kill off superheroes. Snyder kicks things off with tremendous promise, shifting from the killing of The Comedian to a credits sequence that lays out 40 years of history—including the legacy of a groundbreaking team of 1940s superheroes—in a series of arresting tableaux. It’s a tremendously

permanently twisted Rorschach’s sense of justice. Some of the most striking images are cribbed completely from Gibbons’ art, like a shot of the Martian landscape featuring a crater formation in the shape of Watchmen’s iconic smiley face. When it comes to potentially alienating the fan-boys and fan-girls, Snyder risks nothing. In a way, though, that’s actually a fairly risky choice. As constructed, Watchmen isn’t exactly heavy on ass-kicking superhero action, though there are a few elaborate fight sequences here. Moore was interested in using the notion of costumed vigilantes to explore nothing less than the fundamental nature of humanity, and what it means to save the world. This is a surprisingly talky, philosophically inclined narrative, and Snyder maintains a clean through-line to understanding Watchmen’s big ideas. Talky, philosophically inclined narratives do, however, require a certain level of skill in the cast, and here Watchmen proves pretty shaky. Haley makes for a terrific uncompromising Rorschach, and Crudup effectively conveys Dr. Manhattan’s ethereal distance from humanity. But Malin Akerman merely looks fetching in Silk Spectre’s skintight latex, while Goode plays Ozymandias with an excessive smugness that’s too one-note. A truly visionary director might have thought about casting actors with more dramatic heft, but maybe that’s not the first thing on your mind when you’ve got an assignment like Watchmen. Those who aren’t hard-core fans get to see the adaptation that the hard-core fans demanded—one where there’s no room for a director to make anything “visionary,” because he’s too worried about making a mistake. Watchmen opens at the Carmike 10 Friday, March 6. arts@missoulanews.com

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Page 33 March 5–March 12, 2009


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OPENING THIS WEEK All Along When a man deals with his midlife crisis by physically entering his daydreams, he seeks the help of a therapist to trace the source of his ruminations and get on with his life. Not Yet Rated. Opening Mon., March 9, at the Carmike 10 at 1 and 7. Watchmen In this highly anticipated adaptation of the celebrated mid-’80s graphic novel, a group of retired superheroes reunites after the murder of one of their own to investigate a nefarious plot that holds the future of humanity at stake. Really, a blurb can’t do this complex story justice—just go see it. Rated R. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:30, 7, 8 and 10:25 with Fri.–Sat. shows at 11:30, Fri.–Sun. matinees at noon, 1 and 3:30 and no shows Sun. after 9 and at the Village 6 at 7 and 10:25 with Sat.–Sun. shows at noon and 3:30 and no Sun. shows after 7. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3.

band plays gigs, chums around with fans and busts out one never-before-heard song. Rated G. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 5:45, 7:40 and 9:35 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at noon, 1:55 and 3:50 and no shows Sun. after 9. Let the Right One In In this subtitled Swedish film, bully-fodder Oscar gains courage as he develops a friendship with new neighbor Eli, a mysterious girl whose superhuman abilities stem from the fact that she’s a vampire. Rated R. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9 with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3 and no Fri. or Sat. shows. Milk Sean Penn, Josh Brolin and Emile Hirsch tell the tale of the rise and tragic death of America’s first openly gay elected official, Harvey Milk. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1.

Bollywood stars, who carry the weight of this welledited tale of a Mumbai street urchin’s surprising success on a TV game show. Rated R. Showing nightly at the Wilma Theatre at 7 and 9:10 with Sun. matinees at 1 and 3:10. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li With her bionic gams, Chun-Li was always my favorite Street Fighter character. This screen adaptation of the 1987 arcade game takes us to Bangkok, where a gargantuan showdown between supernaturally endowed scrappers determines the fate of the world. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 4:30, 7:30 and 9:40 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and no Sun. shows after 7. Taken Liam Neeson is a retired CIA agent who turns into a “crime-fighting machine” when his

NOW PLAYING Confessions of a Shopaholic Isla Fischer (Definitely, Maybe), a good-time lovin’ New Yorker who’s honed her shopping skills to the point of massive debt, spends the duration of this film in a quest for employment by her favorite glamour magazine. Save me the aisle seat. And a barf bag. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:10, 7 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15 and no shows Sun. after 9. Coraline 3D Based upon Neil Gaiman’s book, this film follows a little girl whose discovery of an alternate universe behind a door in her house leads eventually to dark realizations. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:15, 7 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and no shows Sun. after 9. Doubt Meryl Streep, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams star in this screen adaptation of John Patrick Shanley’s play concerning political upheaval and blind accusation in a 1960s Bronx Catholic church. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Fired Up High school buds and football comrades Shawn and Nick decide to join the cheerleading squad and lead their new posse to victory. Or score. Whatever. Rated PG-13. Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Carmike 10 at 1. Friday the 13th The counselors of Crystal Lake Summer Camp are up to their usual shenanigans—you know, taking axes to the head and whatnot—in this remake of the precedent-setting 1980 horror flick. Rated R. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 4 and no shows Sun. after 9. Gran Torino Clint Eastwood’s a racist and curmudgeonly Korean War vet who warms to his Hmong neighbors once he accepts humanity’s four universal connections: beer, guns, cars and payback. Rated R. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:35 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4 and no shows Sun. after 9. He’s Just Not That Into You Ben Affleck, Jennifer Aniston, Drew Barrymore and Jennifer Connelly struggle to figure out why he/she says they’ll call, and then doesn’t. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 7 and 9:50 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 4 and no shows Sun. after 9. The International Interpol agent Clive Owen pulls the assignment of his life when he’s partnered with Assistant District Attorney Naomi Watts in a globe-spanning attempt to indict the world’s largest bank for high crimes. No bailout here, folks. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 9:40 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 4 and no Sun. shows after 7. Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience Immerse your soul in a tepid bath of three-dimensional musicality as this moment’s hottest boy

Missoula Independent

Hell, no sense in wasting an opportunity. Watchmen opens Friday at the Carmike 10 and Village 6.

New in Town Renée Zellweger is a powerful Miami businesswoman who’s transferred to some podunk town, where an unexpected romance with none other than Harry Connick Jr. proves quite distracting. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Paul Blart: Mall Cop In lieu of brute force, unarmed New Jersey security guard Kevin James must use all his wit and brainpower to save his beloved workplace from a gang of terrorist/thieves à la Die Hard. Rated PG. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:15, 7:15 and 9:25 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15 and no shows Sun. after 9. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 PM show on Sun. Push Telekinetic Chris Evans and seer Dakota Fanning battle a government agency bent upon mutating humans into a psychic army. This film is totally not an X-Men rip-off. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 6:50 and 9:10 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. The Reader Kate Winslet and Ralph Fiennes star in this film about a man in post-WWII Germany who learns that his former lover stands accused of Nazi war crimes. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7 and 9:50 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4 and no Sun. shows after 7. Remarkable Power Kevin Nealon and Tom Arnold tell the tale of a late-night talk show host who draws half of Hollywood into his scheme to save his program and avenge his wife’s affair. Not rated. Showing Sat. at the Carmike 10 at 4. Slumdog Millionaire Danny Boyle (Trainspotting) directs a cast of

Page 34 March 5–March 12, 2009

daughter is kidnapped in Paris by Albanian sex slave traders. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Village 6 at 4:20, 7:05 and 9:20 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and no Sun. shows after 7. Also playing at the Pharaohplex in Hamilton at 7 and 9 with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail Tyler Perry reprises his role as combative granny Madea, whose high-speed highway hi-jinks land her in the poky, where she takes a young inmate (Keshia Knight Pulliam) under her considerable wing. Rated PG-13. Showing at the Carmike 10 at 4:15, 7 and 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and no shows Sun. after 9. Underworld: Rise of the Lycans In the prequel to the Underworld franchise, Michael Sheen’s a werewolf in love with vampire Bill Nighy’s daughter in this tale of immortal and star-crossed love. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 9:50 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 4 and no 9:50 show on Sun. The Wrestler Director Darren Aronofsky spins a different kind of addiction tale as Mickey Rourke plays an aging pro wrestler who struggles to find meaning in his life. Rated R. Showing at the Village 6 at 7 with Sat.–Sun. shows at 1.

FLATHEAD SHOWTIMES Coraline 3D Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:20, 2:40, 5:05, 7:20 and 9:45 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:40, 4:25, 7:20 and 9:45. Confessions of a Shopaholic Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:25 and 4:10. Fired Up Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 7:30 and 9:40.

Gran Torino Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:05, 3:55, 6:45 and 9:40. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 6:45 and 9:15 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. He’s Just Not That Into You Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 9:05. Hotel for Dogs This star-flecked film—Lisa Kudrow, Kevin Dillon, and Don Cheadle, to name a few—follows two orphans who force their dog—and any other strays they can round up—to squat an abandoned hotel. Shortly thereafter, the dogs organize a chapter of Food Not Bombs. Rated PG. Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 2:25 and 4:45 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:50 and 4:35. The International Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 9:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 12:15. Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:05, 2:15, 4:30, 7:05 and 9:15 and Mon.–Thu. at 2:15, 4:30, 7:05 and 9:15. Paul Blart: Mall Cop Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:25, 2:30, 4:40 and 6:55 and Mon.–Thu. at 2, 4:20 and 6:55. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:15, 6:45 and 9:15 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45 and at the Entertainer in Ronan at 4, 7 and 9:10. The Pink Panther 2 Steve Martin returns as bumbling Inspector Clouseau, who faces consternation from John Cleese’s Inspector Dreyfus in this sequel to the 2006 installment of this cross-generational crowd-pleasing franchise. Rated PG. Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 2:50, 4:55 and 7:15 and Mon.–Thu. at 2:05, 4:15 and 7:15. Push Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 6:50 and 9:25. The Reader Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:45, 3:45, 6:55 and 9:35 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:45, 6:55 and 9:35. Slumdog Millionaire Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:50, 3:40, 6:40 and 9:20 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 3:50, 6:40 and 9:20. Also playing at the Showboat in Polson at 4:15, 6:50 and 9:15. Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:10, 2:35, 5:10, 7:35 and 9:55 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:35, 4, 7:35 and 9:55. Taken Showing Fri.–Sun. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:25 and 9:30 and Mon.–Thu. at 1:45, 4:05, 6:55 and 9:10. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4, 7 and 9 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Watchmen Showing Fri.–Thu. at the Stadium 14 in Kalispell at 1:30, 3, 4:30, 5:45, 7, 8 and 9:15 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at noon. Also playing at the Mountain in Whitefish at 4:30 and 7:30 with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and at the Showboat in Polson at 4 and 7:15. Capsule reviews by Jonas Ehudin. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., March 6. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6—541-7469; Wilma—728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton—961-FILM; Roxy Twin in Hamilton— 363-5141. Stadium 14 in Kalispell—752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish—862-3130.


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

Amy Alkon

PERSONALS Ready to meet great new people?

WOMEN SEEKING EASYGOING WOMAN DWPF, 42, 5’6”, mother of three, average build, N/S, seeks SM, 35-58, for friendship, possible romance. I love camping, fishing, boating, hiking, bowling, dancing, movies. 255023



CALL ME Native American SF, 36, brown/brown, looking for a SM, 30-50, for friendship, companionship and possibly more. 257440



SEEKING THAT COWBOY Attractive, young-at-heart, sensitive, openminded, adventurous, honest SWF, 43, N/S, enjoys shopping, the outdoors, world travel, fine dining, red wine. Seeking great guy, 40-55, to share life together. 271910 @ padminiji



WELL-EDUCATED WF, 40s, hard-working, would like to find someone who enjoys camping, swimming, walks, movies, watching some sports, flea markets and more. Must have a great sense of humor. 258823



TALK TO ME SF, 36, looking for an open-minded male who like to enjoy life and try new things. 258915



FARM WOMAN SWF, 53, love the rural life, honest, kind personality, seeks SM, 52-66, to share activities, skiing, outdoor activities, traveling, cooking and more. 273964 @ winterphylli



ATTRACTIVE & FIT SWF, 68, enjoys hiking, camping, skiing, snow-shoeing, gardening, travel, dining, quiet evenings at home. Seeking kind, conscious man to share life’s simple pleasures. 263816



EASYGOING, SILLY, SINCERE Sarcastic, cynical SWF, 30, 5’6’’, hard-working, into gardening, movies, dining, travel, road trips, poetry, arts and crafts. Seeking SM, 30-50, similar interests. 274193



ARCHETYPAL WILD WOMAN SWF, 27, seeks fellow mindful outdoor enthusiast to get out of town with and explore springtime wilderness! Hike, bike, boat, climb, hand glide, etc. 285159 @ montuckywoman



SWEET CHEEKS! SWF, 25, 5’7’’, brown/green, affectionate, outgoing, loves music, movies. Searching for Prince Charming, 27-35. Must be familyoriented, dedicated, honest, willing to show me true love is possible. 274172



SOUND LIKE YOU? SWF, 46, 5’5’’, working mother of two, looking for a man, 37-53, who enjoys golfing, swimming, boating, rafting, skiing, movies, time at home, etc. 277049

HAPPY BUT LONELY DWF, 49, business-owner w/2 children and 2 dogs. Enjoys the outdoors, barbecues, gardening, cooking. Seeking SM who’s a natural leader in a relationship yet understands his woman’s intellect and capability. 297238 @ delightful1



WHERE THE BROTHERS AT? BBW, 36, green-eyed sweetie, seeks faithful, kind, intelligent BM, 35-48, for friendship, possible LTR. Enjoy movies, long walks, dancing and much more! 296424



ARE YOU THE ONE? SWF, 32, mother of three, passionate, honest, sincere, believes the key to any good time is good company and conversation. Seeking similar SWM, 37-45. 301196



NEW TO THE AREA SWF, 22, very easygoing, likes traveling, music, the outdoors and more. Seeking a nice guy, 21-28, for possible LTR. 294161 @ NDgirl86



SWEET KIND WOMAN SF, 32, 5’5”, brown hair, blue eyes, N/S, N/ kids, likes to go out and see movies, read books, watch tv. Seeking a nice gentleman, 37-40, to share fun times, romance and maybe more. 305444



LOVES HORSES SF, 29, 5’8”, 130lbs, never married, no children, seeks athletic, animal-loving, outdoorsy, witty, comical, handsome prince to sweep this princess off her feet. Is that too much to ask? 261002



ARE YOU THE ONE FOR ME? Very open, honest and easygoing SWCF, 32, strawberry blonde/hazel, 5’7”. Looking for a SM, 31-38, fir friendship and possibly more. 275764 @ denbdon



BEAUTIFUL GREEN EYES SWF, 32, N/S, light drinker, has cats, likes horror movies, music, more. Would like to meet secure WM for friendship first. Let’s have fun together. 277876



MUST LIKE DOGS WF, 27, looking for a professional male, 26-35, who enjoys animals, outdoors activities and enjoying what the city has to offer. 278828



I THINK LOVE STILL EXISTS Honest, caring, loving SWF, young-looking 56, seeks strong, confidnet gentleman, 5375, to be my best friend, lover, playmate, and partner in the dance of life. The next step is yours. 291187 @ ladybluwater



SO MUCH TO KNOW... about me. Liberal WF, 5’6”, red/hazel, very active, loves horses, likes biking, hiking, reading, watching sports. Seeking very active, secure WM, 45-58, with a good sense of humor. 286734



INDUSTRIOUS MAN WANTED Attractive, fit, health-conscious SWF, 62, 5’4’’, 120lbs, loves reading books, camping, exploring. Looking for SW/BM, 57-72, for possible relationship. 292410



LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE SWF, 50, N/S, enjoys the wide open spaces, road trips, contemplating nature’s beauty, taking long walks, biking, swimming, socializing with friends. Seeking friendly man, 45-55, for friendship, maybe more. 282465 @ Geri



NEW TO MONTANA Attractive SWF, 45, 5’8’’, long auburn hair, green eyes, seeks wonderful guy, 30-50, who is honest, sincere, enjoys nature, the arts, music, animals. 295494



SEEKING A NICE GUY SWF, 50, seeks friendly, secure man, 64-75, who is ready for a sweet change. Let’s build a friendship and enjoy the simple pleasures in life. 297307



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LOOKING FOR YOU? SWF, 46, enjoys golf, skiing, travel, movies and a good micro-brew. Looking for nice, fun-loving man, 37-53, who’ll share his interests, humor, thoughts and then... who knows? 277047



I’M SHY AT FIRST... but I warm up quickly. Honest, caring, affectionate, hard-working gal, 34, N/S, kids at home, enjoys outdoors, Nascar, animals, movies, camping, pool, darts. Seeking honest, employed SM, 34-46. No games. 279293 @ MickyB



WIDOW NEEDS COMPANIONSHIP SF, 62, independent, enjoys computers, television, camping, traveling, friends and family. Seeking SM, 55-72, with similar interests, for possible LTR. 287419 @ PatsyMontana



ACTIVE LIFESTYLE SWF, 52, N/S, enjoys travel, antiques. Seeking SWF, 48-58, N/S, for sincere friendship, possibly more. 305226



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MEN SEEKING



SEEKING SOMEONE NEW Active, hard-working SWF, 33, open-minded, honest, enjoys watching horror movies, doting on my cats. Will share my great sense of humor with the right SWM, 25-37. Friendship first, possible relationship. 291395 @ nachomomma50

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS:

GOOD-LOOKING FELLA Active SWM, 25, 5’7’’, 190lbs, nice blue eyes, athletic build, seeks compassionate, active SF, 18-34, who enjoys the outdoors, exercise and more. 308460



TIRED OLD DREAMER SWM, 62, 5’8’’, 145lbs, would love to meet the woman of my dreams, 39-60. Call me, let’s connect! 308421



SEEKING NICE PERSON SWM, 20, 6’3”, 200lbs, blond/green, in shape, looking for a WF, 18-30, to hang out and have fun with, maybe leading to more. 288398



LET’S GET TOGETHER SWM, 47, 5’9’’, 175lbs, hard-working, nonsmoker, non-drinker, loves the outdoors. Looking for SF, 35-50, for friendship, dating and more. 294605



TALK TO YOU SOON DWM, 44, 6’1”, 220lbs, good-looking, dark/ dark, enjoys Grizzlies games, dining out, movies, golf and more. Seeking a SF, 40-48, attractive, who enjoys the same. 457273



MUSICIAN WM, one daughter, plays the fiddle, has a dog, enjoys watching movies, art, outdoors, coffee shops, more. Seeking SF, 18-40, who shares these and other interests. 260375



LET’S HOOK UP! Male, 22, 5’5’’, 138lbs, smoker, seeks woman, 18-30, who enjoys bowling, snowboarding, video games, tv and movies. 263228



GET TO KNOW ME! SWM, 37, 5’9’’, 175lbs, light brown/blue, likes movies, sports, music, beach walks. Seeking SW/HF, 25-40, same interests. 263635



SOMEONE TO TALK TO SWM, 38, 6’, brownish-blond/blue, smoker, likes golf, hiking, rafting, seeks WF, 25-45, to share my life. 263932



ARE YOU READY? SWM, 46, 5’9”, slim build, N/S, likes country and rock-n-roll, fishing, animals, camping, taking walks. Seeking SWF, 35-50, N/S, for friendship, possible romance. 270593



ARE WE A MATCH? SWM, 43, 5’5’’, 187lbs, brown/green, enjoys music, walks, camping, fishing. Seeking similar SW/BF, 20-40. 274411



Get more: ❖ Check out www.missoulapersonals. com to find more great new people ❖ See the @ symbol in an ad? That means the advertiser has a profile (and maybe even a picture!) at www.missoulapersonals.com ❖ Meet more new people using text messaging on your cell phone. Text “mistxt” to 23578 to learn more. ❖ Need help? Some tips? Call 1-800-252-0920 Free Ads: Free ads placed in this section are not guaranteed- to run every week. Be sure to renew your ad frequently to keep it fresh. Guidelines: Personals are for adults 18 or over seeking monogamous relationships. To ensure your safety, carefully screen all responses and have first meetings occur in a public place. This publication reserves the right to edit, revise, or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content of or replies to any ad. Not all ads have corresponding voice messages. To review our complete guidelines, call (617) 425-2636

0303

MISSOULA AREA?

HERE COMES THE GLOOM I’m a single father and grad student in my mid20s. Lately, I’ve been feeling very lonely, and even jealous of married friends who are happily enjoying family life while I’m missing out. My son’s mother split four years ago, but I’ve been reluctant to date because she lied and cheated so much, and I’m afraid of ending up with another like her. I have trouble finding girlfriends anyway because women my age usually aren’t interested in stepping into a family situation. Even finding dates is a problem because I don’t want to meet a chick at a bar, and there aren’t many girls in my profession (forestry). But, say I do meet somebody. I don’t know how to keep myself from wanting to get serious quickly because I have this romantic notion that I’ll find that true love. —Really Single Dad Miserable single father seeks partner. Undercapitalized, lonely, angry, self-pitying, and desperate. Oh yeah, and enjoys long walks on the beach. It’s understandable that you feel life kicked you in the teeth, but you need to acknowledge your part in the deal: closing your eyes while standing in front of a giant swinging shoe. Your son’s mother “lied and cheated so much” because she’s a liar and a cheater, not because you brought some nice, honest woman home from the factory, and one morning in the kitchen her nose started smoking and she began burping up big black lies. Your desperation—”I’ll wither and die if I don’t find true love in the next 20 minutes!”—is what’s setting you up for a repeat. You avoid that the same way you could’ve avoided ending up with your ex: by forcing yourself to slow down and pay attention to whether a woman’s the wife and mommy type (or even the nice type)—and way before you let the sperm roam free in eggland. “True love” is Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny for grownups. Supposedly, you just sit down next to the right person at the bar, and from then on, all you’ll have to do is lie around basking in the happily ever after. People in their 20s who haven’t had much relationship experience are particularly prone to buying into sappythink like “love cures everything.” Actually, love doesn’t cure anything, but Erythromycin will get rid of any number of ugly bugs. While the only chicks you’re likely to meet on the job are those with

beaks, presumably you’re in a field you love. You’ve also got a kid who needs you. Focus on having happy days with him, and try to expand your definition of family to people you treat like family who act like family to you. Put your energy into making friends and creating a social network; ideally, with other single parents. Start or join a babysitting co-op, and you can ask women on dates that don’t involve coming by your place to watch your kid put a bean up his nose. Make your life happy, and women will be more likely to want to join you in it. At the same time, you really need to be realistic. This isn’t to say there’s zero chance of you finding somebody now, but ironically, your best chance takes making peace with the fact that “Hi, I have lots of student loans and a kid, wanna go out with me?” is likely to be met with “Thanks, but I’ve got my eye on that guy over there with the raging herpes.”

Asleep On The Sob I just broke up with my boyfriend. He was self-centered, and we had our share of problems. Still, we dated almost six months, and I feel nothing—no sadness, no anxiety; just a little relief. What’s with me? I’ve always been so depressed when I’ve broken up with somebody (mainly guys I cared for who cheated on me). —Comfortably Numb No, it never plays out this way in movies and songs. As Elton John put it, “Love lies bleeding,” not “Apathy sits around yawning, then contemplates turning off the lights, crawling under the covers, and hoping the gloom will descend.” It is pretty unglamorous to go through a breakup and be all ho-hum about it. But, it isn’t like you can’t cry; you just don’t feel like it this time, probably because the guy never did anything more egregious than being self-centered and tiresome. While feeling nothing probably makes you worry that the relationship didn’t mean much of anything, it could become very meaningful if you use it as a reminder to choose better and get out of bad relationships faster. And, if you can do that, you shouldn’t be feeling nothing; in fact, it’s cause to do as they did in a famous movie: Make a dress out of the drapes and skip through the Alps singing. Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail Advice A m y @ a o l . c o m ( w w w. a d v i c e goddess.com)

Missoula Independent page 35 March 5–March 12, 2009


Scope Noise Theater Film Movie Shorts Advice Astrology

PERSONALS

Free Will A strology by ROB BREZSNY

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your key theme for the week is “Healthy Obsessions.” Not “Melodramatic Compulsions” or “Exhausting Crazes” or “Manias That Make You Seem Interesting to Casual Bystanders,” but “Healthy Obsessions.” To carry out your assignment in the right way, you will have to take really good care of yourself as you concentrate extravagantly on tasks that fill you with zeal. This may require you to rebel against the influences of role models, both in your actual life and in the movies you’ve seen, who act as if getting sick and imbalanced is an integral part of being true to one’s genius. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The closest modern relative of the Tyrannosaurus rex may be the chicken, says geneticist John Asara. He came to this conclusion after studying traces of tissue from a 68-million-year-old bone of the king of dinosaurs. I invite you to draw inspiration from this theory, Gemini. Try the following thought experiment. Envision a couple of monstrous influences from your past—big bad meanies who hurt you or scared you. Imagine they were like Tyrannosaurus rexes back then. Close your eyes and see their faces glaring from the beast’s skull. But then imagine that in the intervening months and years they have devolved and shrunk. Picture them now as clucking chickens pecking at seeds in the dirt. Can you see their faces at the top of their bobbing, feathery bodies?



CANCER (June 21-July 22): Scientists and fundamentalist Christians don’t share much common ground, but one thing most of them agree on devoutly: There’s no such thing as reincarnation. Now I’m pleased to be able to offer you the chance to rebel against their dogmatic delusion. You see, Cancerian, it’s an excellent time to try out the hypothesis that you have lived many times before and will live many times again. For one week, act as if it were true, and see how it changes the way you feel, think, and act. What if everything you do has repercussions forever?



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): This horoscope presents three clues for you to work with. Here’s the first: I know a psychotherapist’s son who, while growing up, rarely received the benefits of his father’s psychological expertise. “The shoemaker’s child has no shoes,” my friend says. Here’s your second clue: In the Bible’s book of Mark, Jesus declares, “A prophet is not without honor, except in his own country, and among his own relatives, and in his own house.” The third clue: A neurologist of my acquaintance suffers from migraine headaches that he has been unable to cure. Now, Leo, I invite you to meditate on how these alienations may reflect situations that you’re experiencing. If they sound familiar, take action. It’s prime time to heal them.



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): One reason I’ve been put on this earth is to expose you to a kind of astrology that doesn’t crush your free will, but instead clarifies your choices. In this horoscope, for instance, I’ll crisply delineate your options so that you may decide upon a bold course of action that’s most in tune with your highest values. Study the following multiple-choice query, then briskly flex your freedom of choice. Would you rather have love: 1. knock the wind out of one of your illusions, thereby exposing the truth about what you really want; 2. not exactly kick you in the butt, but more like pinch and spank you there, inspiring you to revise your ideas about what it means to be close to someone; 3. spin you around in dizzying yet oddly pleasurable circles, shaking up your notions about how to keep intimacy both interestingly unpredictable and soothingly stable.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Cartoonist Gary Larson defines luposlipaphobia as the fear of being pursued by timber wolves around a kitchen table while wearing socks on a newlywaxed floor. According to my reading of the astrological omens, there is a real danger you could fall victim to that deluded phobia. And it is definitely a delusion. No timber wolves will be in your immediate future. If you hope to avoid this mistaken anxiety, as well as other equally irrelevant and unproductive superstitions, you should have a nice long talk with yourself as soon as you finish reading this. Be very clear and strict and rational as you explain how important it is to be very clear and strict and rational right now.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Maybe you shouldn’t mend your supposedly “evil” ways if your “evil” ways are about to mutate into a fascinating new approach to goodness. Maybe the very quality that has threatened to cause your downfall has now become the key to your upgrade. And maybe the thing that has made you most nervous about yourself about yourself will soon start ripening into a beautiful asset that will activate reserves of life energy you didn’t know you could have at your disposal.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian Jakob Dylan has created a solid musical career for himself. He’s a bit defensive, however, about the possibility that the fame of his father, Bob Dylan, has played a role in his success. His contracts specify that he should never be called “Bob Dylan’s son.” I understand his longing to have his work be judged on its own merits, and I sympathize with his urge to be independent of his heritage. But in the coming weeks, Sagittarius, I advise just the opposite approach for you. You will place yourself in alignment with cosmic rhythms by expansively acknowledging all of the influences that have helped you become the person you want to be.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Throx.com sells you socks in threes, so if you lose one you have an extra to take its place. Their ingenious marketing plan resembles the approach of some romance-addicts I know, who always date two or three people just in case they get dumped by one of them. No bouts of loneliness to worry about! Which brings us to my main advice for you this week, Capricorn: Have a back-up plan. Keep an alternative handy. Make sure you won’t run out of the stuff you really need.



Ready to meet great new people?

IMPORTANT NUMBERS: Answer an ad: It’s only $2.19/minute. Must be 18+,

GIVE ME A CHANCE SM, 39, 6’2’’, 225lbs, light smoker, no children, medium build, likes fly-fishing, hunting, camping. Seeking SF, 18-45. 277072



LET’S GIVE IT A SHOT SWM, 52, 5’8’’, N/S, athletic build, loves spicy food, boating, waterskiing, hunting, fishing, camping. Seeking SWF, 35-52, for friendship or more. 281682



HARDWORKING Native American male, 48, 5’9”, 160lbs, brown/brown, medium build, works out, likes the park, biking, fishing, horseback riding, more. Seeking female, 25-48, for dating. 282438



CONSTRUCTION WORKER SWM, 44, 5’10’’, 200lbs, seeks fun-loving woman who enjoys interesting conversation, needs a little excitement in her life! 282735



NEWS FLASH! Attractive, single Native American guy, early 40s, seeks adventurous Native American beauty, 25-40, for love, harmony, honesty, balance and much more, if fate leads us that way. 282900



OUTDOOR ENTHUSIAST SWM, 42, 5’10’’, 165lbs, fit, active professional, N/S, N/D, seeking SWF, 25-39, who enjoys the outdoors, hiking, biking, fly fishing and traveling, for friendship or more. 285175



LOOKING FOR LOVE SWM, 18, 6’, short black hair, wears glasses, looking for SM, 18-21, to hang out with and get to know. 294712



WAITING FOR YOUR CALL GWM, 25, 6’1’’, 235lbs, seeks outgoing, gregarious, stable GWM for dating and romance. I enjoy movies, dining, bowling. 305105



FRIENDS SEEKING FRIENDS Female, 44, looking for friends, age open, who enjoys the outdoors, wildlife, the country scenery, hiking, fishing, camping. Friendship, companionship, and getting to know each other! 307262



LET’S TALK WM, 5’6”, 125lbs, reddish-brown/blue, nice tattoos, enjoys hiking, walks, bike rides, theater, dining out, time with friends and family, more. Seeking someone for friendship. 299138



OTHER HI LADIES! Attractive male in search of no-strings, discreet afternoon fun. Are you up for it? 281777



JOIN US Bi couple, middle-aged, into pretty much anything, looking for the same, or select singles, who would like to share life’s pleasures with us. 291876

WANT SOMETHING NEW WM want to try anything new and is game for something different. If interested, give me a call. 282388



OPEN-MINDED FUN SWM, 52, 5’9’’, 190lbs, brown/blue, cleancut, fit, D/D-free, easygoing, laid-back, not into games, seeks SM, 18-55, for adult fun. 296853



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LET’S TALK WM, N/S, N/D, looking for female, 35-42, for companionship that may possibly lead to a relationship. Someone who likes bowling, playing pool and more. 284641



LET’S TALK American-Indian SM, 45, 5’3’’, 190lbs, likes long walks, wishing on stars. Looking for SF, 35-40, for friendship or more. 289174



WANTS COMPANIONSHIP Retired widower, 72, financially secure, enjoys golf, fishing, family, cruises, camping, gardening, my two poodles. Seeking relationship with similar lady, 50-67. 290376



LET’S HAVE SOME FUN Fit SWM, early 40s, looking for discreet encounters with ladies, 40-55. Please be slim. Married ladies are welcome. Will answer all replies. 291122



SENSE OF HUMOR SWM, 44, 6’2’’, looking for outgoing SWF, 30-50, light drinker ok, who enjoys sports, outdoors, animals, kids, camping, fishing. 291953



LET’S GIVE IT A TRY! SM, 62, N/S, slim build, likes fishing, lounging around at home. Looking for SM, age open. 292992



DO YOU CANOE? SWM, 50, athletic, N/S, N/D, seeks SWF, 3050, for canoeing, fly-fishing, camping. Let’s meet! 292008





LET’S GET TOGETHER SWM, new to the area, 31, 170lbs, brown/ green, nice build. Looking to meet a nice girl to spend some of my time with. Let’s enjoy the simple things in life. 297422

Missoula Independent page 36 March 5–March 12, 2009

NOW HIRING



CATCH ME IF YOU CAN! SWM, 65, 6’, 215lbs, N/S, social drinker, active, semi-retired businessman, likes outdoors, country music, dancing, hunting, traveling. Seeking SW/HF, 45-70, who’s kind, caring, in shape, for dating, possible LTR. 295947

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

WANT TO TRY WM, 6’1”, 145lbs, brown/brown, wants to get together with a smooth man for some no-strings fun. A plus if you go both ways. 283737



SEEKING DIVERSITY SWM, 43, intelligent, attractive, well-traveled, fit, clean-cut, blond/blue, successful, seeking slender, attractive A/B/BF, 30-45, for dining, travel, cooking, intelligent conversation. 281407

829-6394



Call 1-800-710-8737 Answer some simple questions to create your ad



Escort Referral Service

JUST FOR FUN Male looking for a female to get together and have some fun with. Not interested in a relationship. 281153

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COOL GUY WM, 5’11”, 185lbs, medium build, likes working out, playing sports, having fun, more. Looking for WF, 18-35, who enjoys the same. 275442

SWEET & DISCRETE



or: Call 1-800-560-5115, and use a majorcredit or debit card

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): My Chevy got stolen in San Francisco on a January night some years ago. The thief broke a window and smashed his way into the steering column with a tire iron to get to the ignition wires. Eventually the cops recovered the car and returned it to me. But no repair shop could ever completely fix the transmission, and though the car sort of worked for another 18 months, I was never able to shift it into reverse again. Driving a vehicle that only moved forward presented problems that required creative solutions. It was an apt metaphor for my life at the time, when I found it impossible to go backward in any way. I suspect it will also be one of your operative metaphors in the coming months, Aquarius. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “The biggest human temptation is to settle for too little,” wrote the spiritual activist Thomas Merton. Judging from your current astrological omens, I suspect that’s a warning you should heed. The time has come for you to consider the possibility that you aren’t thinking big enough . . . that you need to actively rebel against the voices telling you to sit back and accept your comfortable limitations. In a sense, the cosmos is giving you a poetic license to ask for more.



READY FOR YOU WM, 5’11”, 180lbs, dark/blue, likes partying and having a lot of sex. Give me a call if interested. 273361

Call 1-900-226-1232

MEN SEEKING

LET’S GET TOGETHER SM, very oral and loves to receive, would love to meet singles and couples, males and females. ALso into toys and whatever else you would like. 307658

*charges may apply

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “You never want a serious crisis to go to waste,” said Rahm Emanuel, President Obama’s chief of staff. “It’s an opportunity to do things that you think you could not do before.” While your crisis is nowhere near as pressing as those faced by Obama’s team, Aries, I recommend that you adopt a similar attitude in the coming days. Just assume that any breakdowns you experience will allow you to make breakthroughs that were previously impossible. Take advantage of a spiritual emergency to accomplish a spiritual emergence. As you deal with a scary trial, use it as an impetus to find a sacred trail.



DON’T WANT TO BE ALONE... for the holidays. WM, 41, 5’11”, 220lbs, blond/blue, business owner, wants to meet WF, 30-45, who likes to have a good time. 300473





LOOKING FOR ROMANCE SWM, 33, 5’11”, slim and fit Christian, seeks mature, sincere SWF, ages 20-45, for dating and possible LTR. I love movies, cats, reading, staying up late, playing board games, doing dinner and a show, romance, and more. 306560



LET’S TALK SWM, 48, 6’, clean-shaven, independent contractor, seeks SM, 25-60, to spend some time together. Let’s talk! 292718



866.399.5979

18+

0303


CLASSIFIEDS Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board

Easier than sorting your socks

543-2972 missoulavalleyrecycling.com

Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board

To Give Away

A PROFESSIONAL, WINNING RESUME WILL BE YOURS...When Rainmaker Resumes writes it! Our powerful resumes will get you a job interview...guaranteed! Call today for a free consultation, 546.8244

Montana 549-8489 www.montanaabatement.com Look for us in the Sustainifieds.

CAMPER: fits full-sized, long-bed pickup. Pick up at 322 Cumberland in Lolo.

MAKE MONEY NOW! LEARN TO BARTEND TODAY. Montana Bartending Academy Get the Job You want in the Service Industry Learn how to: Increase your tips, Attract more customers, Manage alcohol responsibly within the law, Effectively write a resume, Communicate successfully in a job interview, Be a faster & more efficient mixologist BECOME AN EXCEPTIONAL BARTENDER!!! Guaranteed Job Placement Assistance upon Completion CLASSES FILLING FAST. CALL 880-1206 or E-MAIL mba@bresnan.net TODAY FOR SCHEDULING & DETAILS

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS in 111 alternative newspapers like this one. Over 6 million circulation every week for $1200. No adult ads. Call Stephanie at 202-289-8484.

The Multi Item Store LLC 1358 1/2 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

FREE BOOK End Time Events Book of Revelation Non-Denominational 1-800-475-0876 HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast, Affordable & Accredited FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-888-5832 1 0 1 . www.continentalacademy.com I thought asbestos was banned and then removed from schools years ago? Abatement Contractors of

LOTS & LOTS OF CLOTHES! All sizes. Please call 728-0889

Announcements PLEASE HELP OUR HOMELESS CATS! You may borrow humane traps from the Humane Society or from me to trap stray cats and get them to safety. Subject to illnesses and injuries, they need our help. Spaying and neutering does not solve the problem for these creatures who must scavenge for survival and who need to get out of the cold! Call the Humane Society to borrow a trap at 549-3934 or write to Phyllis for a free tip sheet on how to humanely trap stray cats: P.O. Box 343, Clinton, MT 59825.

Freedom 2 Travel 4U (406) 239-6245 Joanne (Meyer) Fryer

2nd Annual

Fletch Law, PLLC

Wine, Chocolate & Coffee Tasting

Steve M. Fletcher Attorney at Law

Missoula Community School

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541-7307 www.fletchlaw.net

Taste Trifecta:

Silent Auction & Live Jazz Lake Missoula Cellars 5646 W. Harrier, Missoula

Saturday, March 14, 7-10PM Tickets: $25 For more information call 542-2833

REGISTER FOR FREE TRIP

Your "LOCAL" online travel agents REGISTER FOR FREE TRIP

Lindy Plakke (406) 239-1410 Lindy Paradise Travel

Help make our community a safer place. Shane Plainwoman

Josh Volk

Sponsored By:

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OFFENSE: Violation of probation following conviction for Possession of Dangerous Drugs.

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AGE: 28 HEIGHT: 5 FT 9” HAIR COLOR: Black EYE COLOR: Brown

OFFENSE: Failure to register as a Sex Offender.

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If a suspect is sighted, do not approach or attempt to apprehend them. If you have information regarding either of these two suspects, contact the United States Marshals Service at (406) 247-7030 or Local Law Enforcement.

Announcements Project Healing Waters needs fly tying vises, tools, and materials, as well as used fly rods, reels, lines, and other fly fishing equipment which you no longer have a need for. Project Healing Waters is a volunteer program to help our disabled veterans have a chance to do something that takes them outdoors and gives them a sense of accomplishment. They are taught to tie flies, cast a fly rod and then taken to local waters to fish. The results have been extremely rewarding, giving new confidence and hope to our veterans. To learn more fully about this program go to http://www.projecthealingwaters.org/html/testimonials.html E-mail healingh20water@gmail.com, subject: Project Healing Waters Donation. Stop all marriages in western Montana until someone wants to marry me. We could get a house. OM 327-7859

Volunteers AniMeals is looking for volunteers! AniMeals is a nonprofit animal food bank and no-kill adoption center. We are looking for volunteers to help with anything from socializing with the animals, office help, special events and delivery. If you are interested in helping AniMeals please call (406) 721-4710 and ask for Kelli or email us with any questions at info@animeals.net You can always check us out on the web at www.animeals.com. Our hours are Monday-Wednesday from 8:00am5:00pm, Thursday-Friday from 8:00am-7:00pm and Saturday from 11:00am-5:00pm. Help AniMeals feed hungry animals, make a difference in an animals life. Looking for a volunteer position in your community? Visit the Western Montana Volunteer Center web site at www.volunteer.umt.edu for openings around the area. Partners Hospice Seeks Volunteers For Training. Partners Hospice and Palliative Care Services, Missoula’s only nonprofit Hospice, seeks volunteers to serve in a variety of capacities including companionship for patients who are at the end of life, respite for caregivers and administrative duties in the office. Hospice volunteering is a rich and rewarding experience, and compassionate, dependable individuals are encouraged to apply. Training, offered twice a year, provides participants an exploration of hospice services from physical, spiritual and emotional perspectives. Training is scheduled for March 10th-26th, Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:00 to 9:00 pm. To apply for training or learn more about hospice volunteering, call Judy White at 327-3657, or email whitej@partnersinhomecare.org

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Pet of the Week

Whiskers & Waffles You would never be able to tell by looking at these lovely ladies, but they are thirteen! Don’t tell them I told you though, they think they are much younger. They are both declawed and love spending their time on your lap, it helps if you have two laps at home! They also love being brushed! All that we ask is that they go home together. Come spend some time with these two at the Humane Society of Western Montana, 5930 Highway 93 S. Tues.-Sat. 12-5p.m. or call us @ 549-HSWM. Visit our website, www.myhswm.org for more information on all our adoptable animals.

Employment A Missoula landscape maintenance co. is looking for skilled crew to join our team. For full job description and details to apply, email naturesbest_532@msn.com or call 406549-1196. Deadline: March 6, 09. ASSISTANT RETAIL STORE MANAGER, FT, Msla. Employer is seeking an experienced ASSISTANT RETAIL STORE MANAGER. Prior experience in women’s clothing industry preferred, but not required. Employer does require applicants to have at least 3 years of experience in the retail sales trade, managerial experience is considered a plus. Duties would include: Sales and customer service to all customers; Performing all functions of management which include store operations, personnel, merchandising and visual; Lifting up to 40 lbs and using equipment such as hammers, ladders, merchandising hardware, etc; Act as Manager in absence of store manager. Willingness to work flexible schedule including nights and weekends, Sunday night floor sets, before and after hours meetings. Operate POS register system with proficiency. Hours and days to be discussed at interview. Starting pay will be $9.00 plus, DOE plus 401k, medical benefits. #2975040 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278

Place your classified ad. Walk it. 317 S. Orange



Talk it. 543-6609 x121 or x115



Send it. Post it. classified@missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Deadline: Monday at 5PM

Missoula Independent Page 37 March 5–March 12, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

BUSINESS BROKER, Murphy Business & Financial Corporation is looking for individuals to market & sell local businesses. Financial, business, accounting, brokerage, sales backgrounds well suited. Will train. Excellent income potential. Send resume to: 610 N. Montana St. #10 Dillon, MT 59725

JOBS, JOBS, JOBS. Part-time job! Full-time BENEFITS-to include medical and dental. If you are 17-42 years old, The Montana Army National Guard has many positions available starting at over $10.00/hr. $20,000 Enlistment Bonus, $80,000 for College Education. $20,000 for Prior Service. For more information call 1-800-G0-GUARD

TREATMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN, FT, Msla. Treatment Service Technician needed to perform routine duties for the protection, care and supervision of adolescent clients receiving services in a residential setting. The primary responsibility is the close supervision of clients who are emotionally challenged, implementing treatment plans/interventions and ensuring programmatic structure and residential supervision. Provides direct communication between shifts to ensure consistency of programming and acts as a lead staff during weekend shifts. Requires a High School Diploma or GED; experience in human services preferred. The employee will be required to undergo training and pass testing in H.E.L.P. and First Aid/CPR. Requires a Montana Driver’s License. Clean motor vehicle record preferred. Will work Monday through Thursday 3 pm to 11 pm for about 35 hours per week. Pay $9.75/hr. Benefits after 6 months: holiday & paid leave, travel allowances, health/life insurance, supplemental insurance, 401K retirement, flexible spending account & direct deposit. CLOSES 03/09/09 @5pm. #2975060 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060

Grants/Outreach Coordinator Ecology Project International, an international nonprofit science education organization based in Missoula, Montana, is currently seeking a Grants and Outreach Coordinator to support EPI’s fundraising efforts. The position may be 25-40 hours per week (depending on the skills and desire of applicant) and is based in Missoula. Responsibilities include all aspects of grant writing, including foundation research, inquires, proposal writing, and reporting; creating written materials for donors and prospects; and outreaching to media to support individual and foundation giving. The position requires strong written communication skills. See complete job description at http://www.ecologyproject.org/en glish/about_epi/jobs.html To apply send a cover letter (including preferred schedule), grant writing sample, and resume to info@ecologyproject.org by March 11th, 2009.

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION

offer:Biz stdnt Ass’tn Well trained, creative, intelligent, motivated, fun, business entrepreneuralship senior looking for experience with a small business.I can help your small business grow! Great deal for amount of talents(I don’t need insur. retir,etc). Diverse interests so just give me a call with any business venture! 406-490-6405-Marcus

EMPLOYMENT & TRAINING ASSISTANT, PT, Msla. Seeking an Employment and Training Assistant to join the Northwest Montana team based out of Missoula. Program serves people age 55 and older, low income and unemployed. ALL APPLICANTS FOR THIS JOB ARE REQUIRED TO MEET THESE CRITERIA! Duties include marketing and recruitment, enrollment of participants, Service Strategy development, job and Community Service Assignment development, building employer relationships, networking, making public presentations, tracking participant progress and providing excellent customer service. Must be professional, organized, possess good communication skills, be able to work independently, complete accurate paperwork, adapt to change, and have reliable transportation. Will work 28 hours per week, weekdays. Pay and schedule to be discussed at interview. #2975032 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 FIREFIGHTERS WANTED Paid training, good salary, $$ for school, regular raises, benefits, retirement. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289 GOVT JOBS HS grads ages 1734. Financial security, great benefits, paid training, 30 days vacation/yr, travel. Call Mon-Fri (877)475-6289 GRILL COOKS, FT-PT, Msla. A local restaurant is seeking full and parttime permanent GRILL COOKS for a restaurant/gift shop operation. Must be able to bring a number of order items together in an eye-pleasing way in a timely, efficient manner. Must also be adept at keeping up with the flow of business, following set recipes and using equipment and utensils to your advantage. Ensure effective communication with other kitchen staff while maintaining a clean work environment. Restaurant is open 6 AM to 10 PM (Sunday - Thursday) and 6 AM to 11 PM (Friday and Saturday) and shifts will vary. Wage is dependent on experience. Up to three raises possible during your first year. Employer does background checks. #2975059 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home. CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 150 www.easywork-greatpay.com

Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Experience not required. Call 877-308-1186 PICKUP TRUCK & COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED. Deliver RV trailers and commercial trucks and buses to all 48 states and Canada. Log onto www.RVdeliveryjobs.com RECEPTIONIST, PT, Msla. Employer is seeking a part-time RECEPTIONIST. Prefer strong computer knowledge; Outlook, QuickBooks, QuickBooks POS & Excel. Looking for someone with excellent telephone and customer service skills. Duties include answering phones, cashiering, computer data entry and title work. Work days will vary, Monday through Saturday (Monday’s 3PM - 6PM and Saturday’s 9AM - 3PM). Saturday’s a MUST. Pay is $7.00 per hour. 90 day probationary period. #2975058 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Retail Sales Help Wanted. We are looking for a key person to join our sales staff. Knowledge of outdoor gear and clothing a must. Do you ski, raft, climb, Canoe, Backpack, or just love being outside. We may have the job for you. Pay sucks (better than Unemployment), benefits are limited to great deals on gear. Might be the best job you ever have. Send us a copy of you resume. PO box 7788 Missoula MT 58907 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp STYLISTS, FT, Msla. Opportunity for full or part time Stylist positions in local salons with opportunity for benefits, advancement and bonuses, two Missoula locations to choose. Qualifications: must be licensed as Cosmetologist or a Barber in Montana. Duties: cut, style, shampoo, perm. Hrs/days: full or part time, 40 hrs/week (if desired), various days, various shifts, store open 7 days a week. Wage: start at $8.00 per hour with incentive bonus available. Benefits: to be explained by employer. #2975064 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

Visitor Service Technician Frenchtown, FT, Partial description: Works with state park visitors as a uniformed department representative to enhance the recreation experience: greets visitors, answers questions, provides park information, directs park use and ensures visitor safety. Collects park user fees and visitation data and prepares weekly remittance reports. Performs minor grounds and facility maintenance duties to ensure parks meet cleanliness and safety standards. These duties will include, but are not limited to; picking up litter, emptying garbage, installing and maintaining signage, cleaning toilets and restrooms, cutting weeds and mowing grass. Coordinates with supervisor on tasks to be performed. #9806686 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

PROFESSIONAL A growing Missoula landscape maintenance/snow removal Co. is looking for a highly motivated and skilled person to lead our team. Full job description and details to apply, email naturesbest_532@msn.com or call 549-1196. Deadline: March 11, 2009 ASSISTANT FINANCE DIRECTOR, FT, Msla. City of Missoula is seeking a regular, full-time ASSISTANT FINANCE DIRECTOR. Will work under general direction and oversee the supervision of the Finance Office functions for the City of Missoula. A Bachelor’s degree in accounting, financial management, public administration or related field, plus five years of accounting and finance experience utilizing a computerized accounting system, with at least two years of supervisory experience. Governmental accounting experience preferred. #2975036 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Grants/Outreach Coordinator Ecology Project International, an international nonprofit science education organization based in Missoula, Montana, is currently seeking a Grants and Outreach Coordinator to support EPI’s fundraising efforts. The position may be 25-40 hours per week (depending on the skills and desire of applicant) and is based in Missoula. Responsibilities include all aspects of grant writing, including foundation research, inquires, proposal writing, and reporting; creating written materials for donors and prospects; and outreaching to media to support individual and foundation giving. The position requires strong written communication skills. See complete job description at http://www.ecologyproject.org/en glish/about_epi/jobs.html To apply send a cover letter (including preferred schedule), grant writing sample, and resume to info@ecologyproject.org by March 11th, 2009.

Missoula Independent Page 38 March 5–March 12, 2009

SOUTHEASTERN MONTANA DAILY seeks full-time general assignment reporter. Send resume, clips to: Marla Prell, Miles City Star, P.O. Box 1216, Miles City, MT 59301; mceditor@midrivers.com

SKILLED LABOR DRIVERS-NOW HIRING! Must have Class A-CDL with double/triple trailer endorsement for NO LESS than 6 months. Must have been employed as a CDL driver within the last 30 days. Regional runs and home weekly. Call today! (866)400-5636. www.SwiftTruckingJobs.com LICENSED JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN, FT, Msla. Area employer needs a JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN that is licensed to work in Montana. Must have journeymanlevel experience in commercial and residential wiring. Duties would include wiring residential and commercial projects, following wiring diagrams, other duties as required. Must have driver’s license and insurable driving record. This is a fulltime, permanent position. Work days would be Monday-Friday, and daytime hours to be discussed with the employer. Wages are $20$25/hour, depending on experience. Full benefit package. #2975057 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 TRAILER MECHANIC/LOT ATTENDANT, PT, Msla. A Missoula employer needs PART-TIME TRAILER MECHANIC/LOT ATTENDANT. Trailer Mechanics need to know all the aspects of trailer installation, fabrication & repair. Welding and wiring experience is required for the Trailer Mechanic. Lot attendant work will be maintaining appearance of lot and vehicles. Work week vary and hours will be between 8:30am - 5:00pm. Position will normally be 20+ hours/week. Position is open immediately. Rate of pay depends on experience. #2975045 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 TRUCK DRIVER - TANKER, FT, Msla. Employer is seeking full-time Tanker Truck Driver. Must have Class A CDL with Doubles, Triples, Hazmat and Air Brakes endorsements. Don’t apply if you do not already have all of the endorsements. Must also have a clean driving record. Looking for clean cut driver to fit into company culture. Wages will be dependent on the type of material and distance hauled. Products hauled include chemicals for water treatment plants and hot oil. Haul to Salt Lake City requires overnight stay. Home every other night. Paying $.30/mile plus payment for load & unload time. Looking to fill ASAP. Benefits included. #2975052 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-545-4546

CHEF APPRENTICE Get paid to learn. Medical/dental, 30 days vacation/yr, $ for school. No exp needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-437-6044 CONSTRUCTION CAREERS U.S. NAVY. Paid training, financial security, medical/dental, vacation, retirement. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 800-887-0952 Wildland Fire Training, Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS CERTIFIED NURSE AIDE OR PCA, FT-PT, Msla. Employer is seeking fulltime and part-time Certified Nurse Aides or PCAs with certificate. Parttime will be working up to 20 hours per week, full-time up to 40 hours per week. Hours are somewhat flexible. Need own vehicle to get to different job sites. Starting pay will be $10.50 an hour. Medical and Dental after probationary period. #2975054 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

ARE YOU A CARING PERSON? Western Montana Mental Health seeks caring adults to provide stable homes for adults with serious mental i l l n e s s . $ 1 0 0 0 m o n t h l y, tax-free stipend, plus $400 r o o m a n d b o a r d p a i d by boarder. Training and support provided. State licensing required. No history of abuse or neglect. For more information call Naomi:

406-532-9741

OPPORTUNTIES 100% RECESSION PROOF! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 $600 WEEKLY POTENTIAL$$$ Helping the Government PT. No Experience, No Selling. Call: 1888-213-5225 Ad Code L-5.

SALES REP FOR INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMPANY. We bring businesses together to trade with one another locally and nationwide. I’ll show you in the field how we earn $800/week and up in front, while building a second residual income as well. Men or women call 208765-3612 WORK FROM HOME! Make money representing large “Go Green” company. Call for details: 406-3692245

Employment

Product launch makes history • The perfect opportunity • No overhead • Customized supplement based on personal DNA • Unbelivable income potential • Become an affiliate or customer

406-218-9071 mygenewize.com/jfowler

HOPE, CHANGE AND OPPORTUNITY FOR ORDINARY PEOPLE!! What's your financial back-up plan if your job gets cut?! We can Help!! We have a Personal Development Audio Program and referral Business Opportunity that anyone can do at www.tomdanley.com. Russ ID# 1865 says it's the perfect business because of it's low cost and having been in business for 11 years. A Christian Business that costs but $25.00 a month and a "Wealthy up-line Group in the Business will mail out thousands of postcards, to help you succeed at making $320+ a month that can eventu-

ally be a $48,000 a month residual income." THIS IS A REALISTIC OPPORTUNITY THAT YOU CAN DO!! Profit First led by Lee Taylor (1-262-662-5109, 8:00 to 11:00 CST) recruits nearly half of the new recruits into the Tom Danley CD Program. Once joining you get 2 newsletters a month, 2 messages on CD and a wealth of support from your upline, join immediately at www.wealthyupline.ws and remember Russ ID# 1865 is your sponsor. Free Audio information at 1-212-990-6532

Independent legals save your clients

money!

Be your own boss.... Earn extra income representing a skin care company with superior, botanically-based products. Work along side your current job. Generous compensation plan; incredible training; management positions available; salons and spas welcome. (406) 207-7366. CONTRACT SALESPERSONS to sell aerial photography of farms on commission basis, $5,000$8,000/month. Proven product and earnings. Travel required; sales experience preferred. 1-877-882-3566 DATA ENTRY PROCESSORS Needed! Earn $3,500-$5,000 Weekly Working from Home! Guaranteed Paychecks! No Experience Necessary! Positions Available Today! Register Online Now! www.DataPositions.com

LEARN TO TURN 10-15 hours/week to

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Call us 543-6609


GREEN HANGER

A special classifieds page highlighting businesses dedicated to promoting a sustainable world.

Eco-Friendly Dry Cleaners Laundromats • WI-FI Free Laundry Soap Clean & Comfortable

Dave Dillon Owner

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS!! 146 Woodford St. 728-1948

960 E. Broadway 728-1919

Save on energy costs through sustainable building & remodeling

Redfield Construction

239-2206 • redfield@montana.com

Now offering solar electricity design & installation

Pleasant View Gem

ER

UND

How does asbestos cause health problems?

T AC NTR O C

Vermiculite Insulation

3 Bed/ 2 Bath/ Double Garage. Well maintained, maintenance free, one-level living. Wide streets, sidewalks, nearby parks & services, on bus route. Priced well below other "PV'ers".

Different Grades of Vermiculite

ASBESTOS

MLS#809351 • $210,000 3812 England, Missoula, MT

If products containing asbestos are disturbed, fibers are released into the air and inhaled into the lungs causing lung diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer, or mesothelioma. For more information contact…

406.239.2049 Broker/Owner

jeannettewilliamsrealestate.com

Asbestos & Lead removal specialists • Remediation & Restoration Services

406-549-8489 • montanaabatement.com

Missoula Independent Page 39 March 5–March 12, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Instruction

Instruction

ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com

Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.MediaMakeupArtists .com 310-364-0665

EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class.

Piano Lessons All ages and levels. 721-8947

Reiki is a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing.

Reiki Integrative Medicine, LLC 2620 Radio Way, Missoula REIKI SESSION $60.00 BY APPOINTMENT

Learn Reiki Yourself! Reiki One Class March 7th 9am-6pm Cost: $120 CALL FOR MORE INFO • 360-9153 Turn off your TV and turn on your life.

Bennett’s Music Studio Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

721-0190

www.bennettsmusicstudio.com

POTTERY CLASSES All levels Classes begin in March theCLAYSTUDIOofMISSOULA

406.543.0509

T'ai Chi 728-0918

Body/Mind/ Spirit Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220

Body/Mind/ Spirit thereafter. Nia every Saturday morning at the Downtown Dance Collective, 9 – 10 am, 121 W. Main St. Enjoy playful and fantastic cardiovascular exercise. $10/class. Professional Massage $50. Swedish, Deep Tissue, and Rain Drop Therapy. Gift Certificates. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Swedish and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. Rosie Smith/Moondance Massage 240-9103 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 4930025 Carla Green Massage, NCTMB 13 years, 211 N.Higgins #403, 4 0 6 - 3 6 0 - 8 7 4 6 www.CarlaGreenMassage.com

$15

HAIRCUT

SPECIAL

at Cutting Crew 220 Ryman St.

Nia Classes Nia every Tuesday at Teranga Arts School, 5:30 – 6:30 pm, 2926 S 3rd W, across from Hawthorne Elementary School. Come experience the fun and joy of movement. First class free, $6/class

CMT for 20 years $40/hour

Jill Morris

543-2542

Hypnosis & Imager y * Smoking * Weight * Negative self-talk * Stress * Depression * Empower yourself

728-5693 • Mar y Place

The Goods Garden SEED in a Box Great Gift Idea! Not only be prepared for any emergency, have seed on the shelf for the spring planting! Give that gardener in your life an Unique gift. KIDS pack with MAGIC BEANS, watch in amazement when the leaves of the beans rea; ld “I LOVE YOU”. A wonderful gift, that helps feed a large family for months during the spring and summer! www.abceeds.com Lolo Locker Hog Sale, half or whole, $1.49/lb. cut & wrapped. 273-3876 Natural Grain Fed Montana Beef, half or whole, $1.99/lb. Cut & wrapped. Lolo Locker 273-3876

It’s O.K. - stash happens B o d y C a re By Michelle Waxing • Facials

Massage $35/hr Professional Services Only A F u l l B o d y A ff a i r

Lolo 406-270-3230

Tapestries Galore! The Multi Item Store • 1358 1/2 W Broadway (corner of Burns & Broadway) 10-6pm Tues-Sat 406-382-0272

Most of us quit going to church for the same reasons you did. Then we found...

546 South Ave. W. Missoula 728-0187 Sundays: 11 am

A Touch of Class NEW TO YOU Antiques & Treasures

SILENT AUCTION. March 6th from 10:00-1:00. Unit 1640 Montana Street. All items stored in storage barn #6. Mike Daricek at 1640 Montana Street. All items sold “as is”

What are proper methods for managing asbestos? Abatement Contractors of Montana 549-8489 www.montanaabatement.com Look for us in the Sustainifieds.

Buy/Sell/Trade

Consignments 111 S. 3rd W.

721-6056

Custom Fly Rods

543-0176 rodsbyjay@gmail.com Little Canyon Shooting spring hunting specials - 10 hens $100, 10 roosters $150. Pheasant eggs, chicks and incubators for sale. Peck Idaho 208-486-6235

Construction Steel Buildings #1. Recession Discounted. Some below Cost to Site. Call for Availability www.scg-grp.com Source#01S Phone: 406-545-4580

Quality Gear • Great Prices

11705 Hwy 93 South, Lolo • 273-7750

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Crystal Limit HUGE selection of

Gemstones, Jewerly & Beads

1920 Brooks • 549-1729 crystallimit.com

I spy... Missoula! Where am I?

Massage Therapist Swedish, Deep Tissue, & Hot Stone

543-0717 • 3101 S. Russell • Missoula

542-2147 www.blackbearnaturopaths.com

521 S. 2nd St. W. Missoula, MT Missoula Independent Page 40 March 5–March 12, 2009

Thrift Stores 1136 West Broadway 549.1610 920 Kensington 541.3210 1221 Helen Ave 728.9252 Music ACCESS MUSIC. Mail Order Prices. Guitar Strings: Buy One Set, Get One Set Free. Two Free Guitar Lessons With Purchase Of Guitar, Mandolin Or Banjo. 728-5014. Corner Of Orange & Third. accessguitar.com DIRECTOR - Men’s A cappella Chorus - Barber Shop Harmony Society. Tuesdays 7:30 - 9:30. 5312142 FREE PRODUCTION & Career Consulting For Musicians & Video Producers. Limited Time Offer. Call Greg Walter @ Montana Digital Audio Now Offering Mobile Recording Services. 207-2585

Outlaw Music

541-7533

Largest Selection of Guitars in Western Montana Open Mon. 12pm-6pm Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm • Sat. 11am-6pm

Computers

Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. CALL NOW 1-800-8162232

Pets and Animals CENTRAL MONTANA GELBVIEH GENETICS BULL SALE selling 85 Gelbvieh, Balancer, and Angus, March 28th, Lewistown Livestock Auction, 1pm. For Catalog call Dave Kalina 406-464-2331

LDR Kennel

RECOMPUTE COMPUTERS Starting Prices: PCs $40. Monitors $20. Laptops $195. 1337 West Broadway. 543-8287.

549-6214

406-546-5999 ldrkennel.com

Furniture

Black Bear Naturopathic

Dr. Christine White, ND

M-F 10-5:30 • Sat 11-3 543-1555

EVEN MACS ARE COMPUTERS! Need help with yours? Clarke Consulting

Misty's Tanning & Ultimate Salon

IV Micronutrient Therapy

(next to Baskin Robbins on Brooks)

DISH NETWORK. Satellite TV systems installed FREE this week! First month FREE! No bank account needed! No $$$ down needed! (866)689-0523. Call now for details!

GET A NEW COMPUTER! Brand Name laptops & desktops

Naturopathic Family Practice Medicine

Puddin's Place

Children's Boutique New & gently used children's clothing 800 Kensington

724 Burlington Ave.

Electronics

GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name laptops & desktops. Bad or NO Credit - No Problem. Smallest weekly payments available. It’s yours NOW - Call 800-803-8819

Fenesa Dussault, CMT

Clothing

Auctions

The Sports Exchange

Congregations

missoulataichi.com

Check us out on the web.

Antiques

Sporting Goods

MSW, CHT, GIS

Adoption

Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406543-2220

Join us at MEADOWSWEET HERBS for our fourth annual Herbal Studies Program: Herbal Foundations - an in-depth program in herbal medicine. Wednesdays, May 20th thru Sept 9th, 2009. Call 728-0543.

A Must Feel!

KRISTA • 529.2085

LOVE ASTROLOGY? FREE Monthly Conference Calls, all levels welcome! (406) 552-4477 www.astrologymontana.org

MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629

Body/Mind/ Spirit

Be the first to Email us the answer & WIN a $15 gift certificate to:

Missoula Academy of T'ai Chi Ch'uan missoulataichi.com • 543-6609

Email: frontdesk@missoulanews.com Subject: I Spy

NEW Twin mattress only, $78. Full Sets, $158. Queen sets, $178 King sets, $288. Futon frames $99. Bunkbeds, $159. 529-8185 or 721-7378

The Multi Item Store LLC 1358 1/2 W. Broadway corner of Burns & Broadway Missoula, MT 10-6pm • Tue-Sat • 406-382-0272

Wanted to Buy CASH PAID for a 30 cal. M1 carbine 821-3038 or 370-8794 CASH PAID for old wrist watches, pocket watches and parts. Keith’s Watch Shop. 406-821-3038 OR 406-370-8794 Want to purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

4508, ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA; THENCE S53’33’101’E ALONG SAID NORTHERLY LINE, 61.12 FEET TO A POINT OF THE WESTERLY LINE OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN SAID BOOK 626 MICRO, PAGE 0344, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON A NON-TANGENT CURVE CONCAVE NORTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 1281.06 FEET, A RADIAL LINE TO LAST SAID POINT BEARS S54’30’08”E; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY AND NORTHERLY ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN SAID BOOK 626 MICRO, PAGE 0344 AND ITS NORTHERLY PROLONGATION THROUGH TRACTS 1 AND 2 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 4295, ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA THE FOLLOWING TWO (2) COURSES: 1) ALONG SAID TANGENT CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 31’54’51” AN ARC LENGTH OF 713.56 FEET; 2) N03’35’01”E, 1428.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTAINING 1.65 ACRES MORE OR LESS. The abandonment of this county road by both the City of Missoula and County of Missoula is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. The City of Missoula and the County of Missoula have jurisdiction over the road easement to be vacated due to the agreement by the County of Missoula to transfer their interest in “Miller Creek Road” to the City of Missoula. 2. Some of the land and owners directly affected reside in the city and some in the county. 3. The portion of the public right-of-way that this petition requests be vacated does not provide exclusive access to any private land, as there is a present roadway operating called Miller Creek Road. 4. The County/City has a standard 60-foot roadway entitled Miller Creek Road (See Attached Exhibit B) without the use of the road easement to be vacated. 5. The portion of the public right-of-way that this petition requests be vacated is relatively short and isolated and has no purpose in the current planned improvements of Miller Creek Road, and would not in the future, since the road narrows again at Briggs and as it progresses up Lower and Upper Miller Creek Roads. 6. The portion of the public right-of-way that this petition requests be vacated had been abandoned in favor of the current roadway operating called Miller Creek Road (See Attached Exhibit B) a. The record books showing the road easement in question were removed from the County Clerk and Recorder’s Office for at least 50 years, if not 100 years. b. The County/City intended to destroy the books containing the record of this road easement. c. The County/City granted subdivision permits and allowed housing to be built within the easement to be vacated. d. The County/City did not consult or incorporate this road easement when significant changes were planned to Miller Creek Road. e. The County/City did not mention the road easement regarding the Miller Creek Road project until August of 2008, over a year after the City had represented its intention not to cause harm to landowners’ properties during the remodeling of Miller Creek Road. 7. The damage to private property owners, and liability of the city for their damages, outweighs any interest the County/City may have in maintaining the road easement to be vacated. a. The County/City has a duty to keep all public easement records available to the public. b. The County/City breached this duty by allowing the public record of the road easement to be vacated to disappear for up to 100 years. c. Property owners, relying on the public record, built property improvements, including homes, within this easement. d. Consequently, all of the homeowners along the easement to be vacated will suffer considerable harm in terms of use and resale of their properties if the easement is

not vacated. A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at their regular meeting on March 18, 2009 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier, Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder, 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3241 Date: February 19, 2009

Missoula County – Request for Proposals Missoula County seeks proposals from qualified consulting firms that specialize in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to assist the Rural Initiatives Department in data analysis and suitability modeling. Two major products from this project will be a conservation resource inventory map that is created to consolidate information about resources across Missoula County, particularly resources associated with water, wildlife, culture and recreation, and working lands. This map will then be used to develop a priority lands map that will include public input and is anticipated to be used as a tool in countywide planning processes. Proposals will be accepted until 5:00PM, March 20, 2009. Interested firms may obtain a complete project description on Missoula County’s website http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/bidsandproposals/bidandproposals.htm or by contacting Carly Walker, (406)258-4869, cwalker@co.missoula.mt.us.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

C r o s s w o r d s

Jonesin’

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to vacate the herein described right-of-way, which runs parallel and is duplicative of the current Miller Creek Road (as defined in legal description below and located in Missoula County) And further described in the Road Book of the Missoula County Department of Public Works Surveying Division and shown on the attached Exhibit A as: The area to be abandoned is that portion of land described in the following legal description and not currently being used as the county road known as Miller Creek Road (found in Legend of attached map designated as “Portion of City Annexed per City Resolutions No. 6179, 6287, and 7184”) and designated in the Legend on the attached illustration as “portion of public highway easement per Book 155 Deeds, Page 60 lying westerly of present city limits” and “portion of public highway easement per Commissioner’s Journal, Book G, Page 410 lying westerly of present city limits. A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE EAST HALF OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 12 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA; MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SW 1/4 NE 1/4) OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE S03’21J09”W ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SW _ NE _), 147.50 FEET; THENCE PERPENDICULAR TO LAST SAID LINE N86’38’51”W, 33.20 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN BOOK 626 MICRO, PAGE 0344 ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, LAST SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING N86’38’51” W, 26.80 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN COMMISSIONER’S JOURNAL BOOK G, PAGE 410, ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA; THENCE SOUTHERLY AND SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN SAID COMMISSIONER’S JOURNAL BOOK G, PAGE 410 THE FOLLOWING TWO (2) COURSES: 1) S03’21’09”W, 1572.12 FEET; 2) S26”32’47” W, 575.20 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY LINE OF TRACT 4-A OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO.

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-09-30 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARY E. FOSHAG, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either by mailed to Burt Foshag, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 6425 Linda Vista Blvd., Missoula, MT 59803 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 1st day of March, 2009. /s/ Burt Foshag, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-09-24 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF DONALD R. MORAVEC, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Joan Billingsley has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Joan Billingsley, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Benjamin T. Cory, PO Box 7099, Missoula, Montana 59807-7099, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 13th day of February, 2009. CROWLEY FLECK PLLP, 305 South Fourth St. East, Missoula, MT 59807-7099. /s/ Benjamin T. Cory, Attorneys for Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DP-09-29 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JEAN G. LIEN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Tim Lien, Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o GIBSON LAW OFFICES, PLLC, 4110 Weeping Willow Drive, Missoula, Montana 59803, or filed with the Clerk of the abovenamed Court. DATED this 17th day of February, 2009. /s/ Tim Lien, Personal Representative

Public Notice continues on page 43

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

“Slash of Inspiration”–you have to draw the line somewhere.

by Matt Jones

Service Directory 





    

PERSONAL CHEF





  

MISCELLANEOUS

Personal Chef Service Delicious, Healthy Dining in the comfort of your own home. We e k l y, M o n t h l y, S p e c i a l Ocasions. The SAUCY Chef 531-3292

APPLIANCES Now Recycling!

3207 W. Broadway

Non-Medical Senior Care! Do you need assistance with a loved one or friend? DRIVING 65 is a bonded, non-medical senior care company, that can provide quality non-medical services for seniors and those in need, in an environment of their choosing, which will allow them to live a safe, happy and independent life. Call DRIVING 65 at 406-546-8857 TODAY!

9-5 • M-F 9-12 • Saturday Radiators - Auto Batteries - Milk Jugs - Pop & Water Plastic - Phone Books & Shredding Services

WINDOWS



We pay market rate for metal & cardboard!

Sh

e elt

r Des

ig

Your local yurt company

ns

(406) 295-4661 shelterdesigns.net

Drive a little, save a lot! Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 • 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc. "Let us tend your den" Is it dangerous to have asbestos containing materials in my school? Abatement Contractors of Montana 549-8489 www.montanaabatement.com Look for us in the Sustainifieds.

Trying to get social security disability? It can be overwhelming. Call Rennie Frank, an experienced advocate offering comprehensive representation.

542-5101 CABINETRY

PLUMBING

NEW ERA

880-6211

Commercial or Residential ImprovingYourOutlook.com

PLUMBING & HEATING Missoula's Alternative Plumber

Your Source For:

MOVING/HAULING Small Haul: no minimum size load, estates, yard, delivery, clean up. Free estimates. 360-9572

CARPENTRY

STORAGE SHEDS Montana Shed Builders Affordable, Durable, Delivered

406-546-1246

ACROSS 1 Geodesic dome designer's monogram 4 "This ___ unfair!" 8 River of AragÛn 12 "In the Valley of ___" (2007 Tommy Lee Jones film) 14 It may be seen before 69 15 Frequent-___ miles 16 Doody 17 1963 Peter Weiss play set in the French Revolution

DOWN 1 Train once more 2 DuBois of "A Streetcar Named Desire" 3 1997 identity switch movie with John Travolta and Nicolas Cage 4 End of perfection? 5 Strong and unwavering 6 Pol Palin 7 Delivers a speech 8 Golfer Ernie 9 Mayim who played TV's "Blossom" 10 Cut down 11 Freight train section that carries mined rocks 13 It begins "cube," but not "circle" 15 1986 thriller starring Bryan Brown

• Tankless Water Heaters • Solar Hot Water • Ground Source Heat

PAINTING

C ORNERSTONE PAINTING

Licensed Insured

My 35 years of experience mean less cost for you and a higher quality finished product. Interior & Exterior FREE Estimates - Why wait?

546-5541

543-6465 newerapandh.com NEED A PLUMBER? No job too small. Experienced MT licensed plumber. 24 hour service, 7 day a week. Save $$$Quality 100% garanteed. Call 529-0964.

19 Unique items or people 21 House paint ingredient 22 Jean-___ Picard 23 "Back in Black" rockers 24 "What a fun ride!" 25 Flexible mineral 26 Count in a grocery store? 28 Billiards variation with 15 red balls 30 Publishing magnate with a famous mansion, familiarly 31 Sphere 33 Emilio Estevez, to Martin Sheen

34 2008 historical drama 39 She may get sheared 40 "___ is me!" 41 Glass of public radio 44 Chevy models produced in every decade since the 1950s 48 Jack's first landlord, on "Three's Company" 51 It's measured in pennies 52 Sith opponent 54 Variety of most car radios 55 Scissor Sisters lead singer ___

Matronic 56 Punctuation mark with two dots 57 DC public transportation 58 Category or aisle in some music stores 61 ___ gum (thickener in toothpastes) 62 Allied landing site of WWII 63 Robert ___ (Civil War general) 64 Wile E. Coyote's supplier 65 Sir's counterpart 66 Coarse file 67 Prefix for "plunk"

and Brian Dennehy 18 More microscopic 20 Khaled Hosseini's Bay Area alma mater, for short 25 Stereo divided by two 27 Get downsized, like many in the recession, unfortunately 29 Losing tic-tac-toe line 32 Like some old TV sets, in want ads 35 "The ___ Housewives of Orange County" 36 Wise bird 37 Possible winners 38 TV drama centered around a plastic surgery clinic 42 Draw up a new draft of a document

43 One whose business is protection 44 Stuck 45 Tomorrow, in Tijuana 46 Former catcher and 12-time All-Star Mike 47 Vendor 49 Door-busting tool 50 Alpha's counterpart 53 Childbirth assistant 56 Abbr. on an envelope to be sent to a third party 59 "Invader ___" (former Nickelodeon cartoon) 60 Back-to-school mo.

(editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0404. Last week’s solution

©2008 Jonesin' Crosswords

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Page 41 March 5–March 12, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Automotive

Automotive

DOMESTIC

‘05 Mazda 6i #8479B Was $13,995 Now $12,999 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

2008 Chevrolet AVEO LT automatic, 1.6 / 4 cyl. $10,495 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2006 Chevrolet Impala Super Sport automatic 8cyl, 5.3 $13,995 RONAN DODGE 406676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 1997 Chrysler LHS automatic, 3.5, V-6 24V, $5,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM ‘08 Ford Focus 8K Miles #8550LA Was $15,995 Now $13,987 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

‘94 Lincoln Mark VIII. Well maintained, 150,000 hwy miles, leather, 10 stack CD, moonroof, $4,395. 406-560-5455

'03 Pontiac Grand Prix SE

Was $9,995

Now $7,978

#85136B

'06 Nissan Sentra #8611B

'06 Toyota Corolla #8114B

'04 Liberty Sport #8610LA

'05 PT Cruiser Convertible #8624LA

'06 Scion XB

Was $12,995

Now $10,779 Was $13,999

‘05 PT Cruiser Convertible #8624LA Was $14,995 Now $12,495 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

Was $12,995

Now $12,444 Was $14,995

Now $12,495 Was $12,995

'07 Hyundai Elantra 7K Miles #8554LA

'05 Mazda 6i

Was $13,995

Now $12,898 Was $13,995

Now $12,999

#8479B

'08 Ford Focus 8K Miles #8550LA

'08 Mazda 3

Was $15,995

Now $13,987 Was $15,995

Now $14,444

#8543LA

'06 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited FWD #8270zc

'07 Jeep Patriot Sport 4x4 #9035LA

Was $16,995

Now $14,777 Was $17,995

Now $16,888

'08 Suzuki Grand Vitara AWD 9K Miles Was $17,995

Now $16,994

#9003LA

'05 Subaru Outback 3.0 LL Bean AWD

Was $18,995

Now $17,992

#8332B

'07 Honda Accord LX 18K Miles #8173B

'09 Mazda Tribute AWD 2K Miles #8445B

'07 Honda Civic SI 13K Miles #8396B

'05 Toyota Avalon 44K Miles

Was $19,995

Now $17,993 Was $22,595

Now $19,993 Was $20,995

I Buy Hondas/Acuras/ Toyotas/Lexus & All Other Japanese Cars & Trucks. Nice Or Ugly, Running Or Not. Also buying VWs too!

327-0300

200 6 Scion XB Price:

$12,655 Mileage: 49,074 Stock# 9012 LB 2 Year 100,000 mile Drive Train Warranty Included

‘06 Scion XB #9021LB Was 12,995 Now $11,988 w w w. f l a n a g a n m o t o r s . c o m 406721-1381

GoPed Standup Scooter G230RC. 30+ MPH. Paid $800 new. Asking $300/OBO. 381-3561 ‘05 Subaru Outback 3.0 LL Bean AWD #8332B Was $18,995 Now $17,992 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

IMPORTS ‘07 Hyundai Elantra 7K Miles #8554LA Was $13,995 Now $12,898 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

Automotive

Car of the Week!

‘06 Nissan Sentra #8611B Was $12,995 Now $10,779 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

‘97 Toyota Camry #8451B Was $6,995 Now $5,444 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

Now $11,997

Automotive

‘08 Mazda 3 #8543LA Was $15,995 Now $14,444 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

‘06 Toyota Corolla #8114B Was $13,999 Now $11,997 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

Now $12,655

#9021LB

#9056LB

‘03 Pontiac Grand Prix SE #85136B Was $9,995 Now $7,978 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

Automotive

2006 Volkswagon JETTA 5 spd manual, 2.5, 5 CYL. $11,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM

PICKUP TRUCKS 2008 Chevrolet Colorado 5 spd manual $11,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Women: Free Car Care Clinic PROTECT YOURSELF FROM AUTO REPAIR RIP-OFF ARTISTS

March 28th • 9am to Noon At Transolution 4500 Transolution Lane M-F 8-5:30 • 406-721-6109 tranpro1@qwestoffice.net

Attendees receive an automotive repair guide & coupons for automotive related services. Refreshments provided.

Space is limited - early contact is recommended.

lable Avaiat

Flanagan’s J e e p • M a z d a • L i n c o l n • M e rc u r y

406.721.1381 • flanaganmotors.com 1998 Chevrolet 2500 automatic, 8cyl. 5.3 $6,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2006 Dodge Dakota SLT Automatic $16,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2009 Dodge RAM 1500 SLT Automatic with Overdrive $18,995 RONAN DODGE 406676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 1997 Ford F150 Extended cab, topper, CD, great condition. 95,000 miles $5,995. FIRM 2418188 or 826-5715 1995 Ford F-150 XLT Automatic with Overdrive $6,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM

CULVER’S FOREIGN CAR SERVICE INC. AND SALES See us for your service needs and used vehicle inspections WE BUY SUBARUS, SAABS AND TOYOTAS FOR RECONDITIONING AND RESALE 2302 McDonald 721- 5857 Proudly SERVICING MISSOULA SINCE 1978

4X4 1999 Dodge Dakota 4x4 Automatic with $5,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2005 Jeep Wrangler Unltd. 6 spd manual, 4.0, 6 cyl., $17,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2000 TOYOTA 4RUNNER SR5. V6, auto, remote start. 208K. Looks & runs great! MUST SELL. $4500/OBO. 406-880-3636

‘06 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited FWD #8270zc Was $16,995 Now $14,777 www.flanaganmotors.com 406-721-1381

‘07 Jeep Patriot Sport 4x4 #9035LA Was $17,995 Now $16,444 www.flanagan motors.com 406-721-1381

‘04 Liberty Sport #8610LA Was $12,995 Now $12,444 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

SPORT UTILITY 2007 Chevrolet Trailblazer automatic, w/ overdrive, 4.2, 6cyl., $14,995 RONAN DODGE 406676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2008 Chrysler Pacifica Touring automatic, 4.0, 6 cyl. $17,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2006 Dodge DURANGO SXT Automatic $12,495 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2008 Dodge DURANGO SLT Automatic $17,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM ‘04 Honda Pilot EX-L #8650LA Was $17,995 Now $15,888 www.flanaganmotors.com 406721-1381

VANS 2008 Chrysler Town & Country LX Automatic $14,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2006 Dodge GRAND CARAVAN SE Automatic $9,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2007 Dodge GRAND CARAVAN SE Automatic $11,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM 2008 Dodge GRAND CARAVAN SE Automatic $14,995 RONAN DODGE 406-676-5811 RONANDODGE.COM

www.missoulanews.com www.missoulanews.com

Now $19,994 Was $23,995

Now $21,993

Flanagan’s J e e p • M a z d a • L i n c o l n • M e rc u r y

Family owned & operated since 1974

1700 Stephens Missoula • 406.721.1381

www.flanaganmotors.com Missoula Independent Page 42 March 5–March 12, 2009

4/30/09

332 S. Orange St. www.midas.com Mon-Fri 7:30-6, Sat. 8-4 90 Days Same as Cash OAC


CLASSIFIEDS IN ARS E E Y 34 SAM T H E AT I O N LOC

M A RC H M A D N E S S ON NEW & USED V E H I C L E S $4 S R

DE 9 DO LIV WN ER S!

D C A N D E R N o Re a s o n a b l e E S U GU N I T C O f f e r Re f u s e d ! ./ OA S TA R MO 0 $10

New Dodge 1500 Reg Cab 4x4 Special Purchase STARTING AT $16,995 SAVE $10,465 5 In Stock!

09 Dodge 1500 Quad Cab SLT 4x4 WAS $34,145

2009 Dodge 3500 Diesel WAS $44,820

NOW $25,995 SAVE $8,150

*

LIFETIME WARRANTY

*

LIFETIME WARRANTY

NOW $13,995 SAVE $3,545

*

LIFETIME WARRANTY

* WAS $19,225

LEATHER, LOADED NOW $19,495 SAVE $3,520

WAS $23,015

*

LIFETIME WARRANTY

NOW $32,995 SAVE $11,825

New Jeep Patriot

09 Dodge Avenger

08 Chrysler PT Cruiser WAS $17,540

W HE E'R ST RE E AY TO* !!! !

*

LIFETIME WARRANTY

*

NOW $15,495 SAVE $3,730

= M U S T F I N A N C E W I T H C H RY S L E R

E M P L OY E E P R I C I N G YO U PAY W H AT T H E E M P L O Y E E S P AY ! P L U S 0 % + R E BAT E S WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD, MONTANA'S LARGEST INDEPENDENT DEALERSHIP New Chrysler Sebring Convertible Limited Was $34,125 Now $25,995 Save $10,130 $49 Down $349 A Month OAC* 147c New Dodge Dakota 4x4 Extended Cab Was $32,025 Now $21,995 Save $10,030 $354 A Month OAC*

New Jeep Liberty 4x4 Was $25,540 Now $19,495 Save $6,045 $49 Down $313 A Month OAC* New Dodge Caliber Was $19,840 Now $14,995 Save $4,845 $49 Down $239 A Month OAC*

New Chrysler PT Cruiser Was $17,540 Now $12,995 Save $4,545 $49 Down $209 A month OAC* New Jeep Grand Cherokee Was $33,105 Now $22,495 Save $10,610 $49 Down $362 A Month OAC*

New JeepLiberty Limited 4x4 Sky Top Was $31,780 Now $23,995 Save $7,785 $49 Down $386 OAC* New Chrysler PT Cruiser Touring Heated Seats, Moon Roof, Loaded Was $21,750 Now $15,995 Save $5,755 $49 Down $259 OAC*

DIESELS IN STOCK NOW! $49 DOWN DELIVERS!

LEASE RETURNS

08 DODGE RAM 1500

08 Dodge 1500 QuadCab 4x4 $18,995

Was $14,995 Now $10,995 Save $4,500

08 Chevrolet Colorado 4x4 Was $17,995 Now $11,995 Save $6,000 07 Ford Ranger XCab 4x4 Was $17,995 Now $14,695 Save $3,330 06 Toyota Tacoma QuadCab 4x4 Was $25,995 Now $22,995 Save $3,000 06DodgeRam2500Diesel QuadCab 4x4 Was $28,995 Now $26,995 Save $2,000 04 Ford F150 XCab 4x4 V8 Was $17,995 Now $15,995 Save $2,000 03 Ford F150 Lariat, 4x4 Was $14,995 Now $12,995 Save $2,000 03 Dodge 2500 Diesel 5spd QuadCab 4x4 $15,995 04 Ford F350, Diesel, Crew Cab, 4x4 Was $18,995 Now $16,495 Save $2,500 98 Chevrolet XCab Diesel 4x4 Was $10,995 Now $6,895 Save $4,000

08 Hyundai Accent, 4 Door

Was $18,995 Now $14,995 Save $4,000 09 Ford Fusion Sedan Was $17,995 Now $15,495 Save $2,500 08 Hyundai Accent Sedan Was $11,995 Now $7,995 Save $3,000 08 Hyundai Elantra Sedan Was $12,995 Now $10,995 Save $2,000

Was $11,995 Now $8,495 Save 3,500 08 PT Cruiser

$199 mo.

Was $12,995 Now $11,495 Save $1,500 07 Hyundai Sonata

$249 mo.

Was $14,995 Now $12,995 Save $2,000 06 Pontiac G6 GTP

$379 mo.

Was $15,995 Now $10,995 Save $4,000 06 Chrysler 300 Touring

$449 mo.

Was $18,995 Now $15,995 Save $3,000 05 Hyundai Accent

$269 mo.

Was $7,995 Now $5,995 Save $2,000 05 Kia Rio Sedan

$219 mo.

Was $8,995 Now $6,995 Save $2,000 04 Pontiac Sunfire Coupe

$269 mo.

Was $9,995 Now $6,995 Save $3,000 04 Chevy Malibu Sedan LTD

$413 mo.

Was $9,995 Now $7,995 Save $2,000 03 Ford Focus ZX3

$159 mo.

Was $9,995 Now $7,995 Save $2,000

$175 mo. $179 mo. $129 mo. $199 mo. $217 mo. $189 mo. $266 mo. $129 mo. $139 mo. $139 mo. $157 mo. $159 mo.

08 Suzuki XL7, 8 Pass., 4x4 $249 mo.

Starting at $16,995 08 Dodge Durango SLT 4x4

$249 mo.

Was $19,995 Now $15,995 Save $4,000 08 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo

$175 mo.

Was $19,995 Now $16,995 Save $3,000 08 Jeep Liberty Sport 4X4

$185 mo.

PIERCE

Was $19,995 Now $15,495 Save $4,500

*10% cash or trade equity, 72 months, $49 down OAC

08 Nissan Rogue, 4x4 Was $19,995 Now $16,995 Save $3,000 08 Chrysler Pacifica, AWD Was $19,995 Now $16,995 Save $3,000 08 Suzuki Grand Vitara XLS 4x4 Was $19,995 Now $14,995 Save $5,000 07 Chevrolet Trail Blazer Was $17,995 Now $15,495 Save $2,500 06 Suzuki Grand Vitara 4x4 Was $17,995 Now $12,995 Save $5,000 06 Dodge Durango SLT 4x4 Was $16,995 Now $12,995 Save $4,000 05 Chrylser Pacifica AWD Was $10,995 Now $9,995 Save $1,000 05 Jeep Wrangler 4x4 Was $18,995 Now $15,995 Save $3,000

$279 mo. $269 mo. $249 mo. $239 mo. $214 mo. $214 mo. $189 mo. $214 mo.

VANS 08 Chrysler Town & Country Was $19,995 Now $14,995 Save $5,000 07 Dodge Caravan Was $13,995 Now $10,995 Save $3,000 07 Chrysler Town & Country Was $13,995 Now $10,995 Save $3,000 05 Sedona LX Van

SUV’S

CARS 09 Hyundai Sonata Sedan

08 Chevy Aveo, 4 Door Was $11,995 Now $9,495

$314 mo.

*

*

08 Dodge Avenger

Was $32,995 Now $28,995 Save $4,000

STARTING AT $14,995

STARTING AT $17,495

*

$479 mo.

$249.95 mo.

$289.00 mo.

STARTING AT $19,495

Starting at $28,995 Payments at

4X4, AUTO, LOW MILES , WELL EQUIPPED

SUNROOF, CD, LOW MILES 2 AVAILABLE

$319.99 mo.

08 Dodge 2500 Diesel QuadCab 4x4

08 JEEP LIBERTY

08 NISSAN MAXIMA SE

4X4 V8 QUAD CAB, LOW MILES, LONG BOX

PICKUPS

LEASE RETURNS WITH FACTORY $49 DOWN DELIVERS! WARRANTY AT NO CHARGE

$249 mo. $189 mo. $189 mo. $165 mo.

Was $10,995 Now $8,495 Save $2,500 $279 mo. $279 mo. $279 mo. $259 mo.

Over 20 Vans In Stock Payments Starting At $100 Per Month!

$49 $49 DOWN DOWN DELIVERS! DELIVERS!

MONTANA'S LARGEST INDEPENDENT DODGE DEALERSHIP 45 MINUTES FROM THE WYE • BEAUTIFUL SCENIC DRIVE

CALL RONAN DODGE HOTLINE

(406) 676-5811 O R V I S I T W W W. R O N A N D O D G E . C O M LIFETIME WARRANTY ON NEW GAS PICKUPS, JEEP, CHRYSLER & DODGE CARS (DIESELS, CABIN CHASSIS & SRT VEHICLES EXCLUDED) 716753

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-09-28 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HOMER D. SICKELS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either b mailed to Carol S. Williams, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 17t day of February, 2009. /s/ Carol Jean Williams, a/k/a Carol S. Williams, Personal Representative

December 16, 2008, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and Acknowledged to me that he executed the same Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/201 1 ASAP# 2999718 02/26/2009, 03/05/2009, 03/12/2009

standing principal balance of $190,760.81, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 18, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all nonmonetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.28075) 1002.108434-FEI

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Probate No. DP-09-15 Dept. No. 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF NAN C. FRIESEN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Charlotte Nelson, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 2707 Queen, Missoula, MT 59801 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 27th day of January, 2009. /s/ Charlotte Nelson, Personal Representative NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE 27 9026M TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 27, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 12B OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 1720, LOCATED IN THE S 1 /2 OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 14 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. BEING THE SAME FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED FROM BEVERKY A WALKER VERWORN TO ROGER D HART JR AND KAREN S HART JOINT TENANTS DATED 11/09/1998 RECORDED ON 11 /16/1998 IN BOOK 562, PAGE 0803 IN MISSOULA COUNTY RECORDS, STATE OF MT Roger D Hart Jr. & Karen S Hart, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Finiti Title, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Citifinancial, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 3, 2007 and Recorded on April 5, 2007 in Book 794, Page 1374, as Document No. 200708077. The beneficial interest is currently held by Citifinancial, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 10, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,789.70, beginning August 16, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 5, 2008 is $245,157.22 principal, interest at the rate of 8.0040% now totaling $7,426.31, late charges in the amount of $0.00, escrow advances of $0.00, suspense balance of $0.00 and other fees and expenses advanced of $345.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $52.92 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the safe. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10TH day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: December 16, 2008 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 On

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/11/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200701583 Book 790, Page 1121, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Shawn Diehl, married Deanna Diehl was Grantor, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and American Title & Escrow was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded American Title & Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the NE 1/4 of Section 28, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as Tract 20A2B of Certificate of Survey No. 3013. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200810524 Book 818, Page 900, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 2, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $222,327.07. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $219,675.89, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 15, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USA-Foreclosure.com. (TS# 7037.17301) 1002.108095-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 05/01/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200610260, Book 773, Page 1009, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Patti Royer was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for EquiFirst Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Company of Montana was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Company of Montana as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3A of Cobban and Dinsmore’s Orchard Tracts, Lot 8 and Longpre Addition, Lot 1, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Structured Asset Securities Corporation Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, 2006EQ1. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 07/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 7, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $201,570.83. This amount includes the out-

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING THE MISSOULA COUNTY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT

will be conducting a public hearing at 7:00 p . m . , We d n e s d a y, March 18, 2009, in Missoula City Council C h a m b e r s , 1 4 0 W. Pine, Missoula, MT, on the following item: 1. A request by Meadowgold Dairies t o a l l o w o ff - s t r e e t loading in the front yard at property located off of Sandpiper Drive, legally described as Lot C of Snail Space Lots. The subject property is zoned “Missoula Development Park, Light Industry”. See map F.

If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling the O ff i c e o f P l a n n i n g a n d Grants at 258-4657. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. For a complete legal description or additional information regarding the variance requests you may contact Jamie Erbacher at the same number or by e-mail at jerbacher@co. missoula.mt.us.

Missoula Independent Page 43 March 5–March 12, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/06/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200805786 Book 815, Page 361, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Blake F. Bushman, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 of Ponda Rosa Acres, a platted subdivision in Missoula, Montana, according to the official recorded plat of record in Book 8 of Plats at Pages 25 and 26. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 14, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $365,049.77. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $355,417.26, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 26, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19273) 1002.108964-FEI

was $136,656.74. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $131,999.60, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 22, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.28501) 1002.108700-FEI

pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.19334) 1002.108693-FEI

and Witchuda N Hoover, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to National Settlement Services/Rocky Mount, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 19, 2006 and recorded on August 17, 2006 at 8:31 o’clock A.M., in Book 781, Page 246, under Document No 200620832. The beneficial interest is currently held by HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 8, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $4,224.25, beginning December 1, 2007, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 31, 2008 is $238,786.04 principal, interest at the rate of 10.45% now totaling $35,321.82, late charges in the amount of $3,073.69, and other fees and expenses advanced of $125.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $68.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: December 18, 2008 Charles J. Peterson MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On December 18, 2008, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3014239 03/05/2009, 03/12/2009, 03/19/2009

amount of $2,682.95, beginning June 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 18, 2008 is $301,304.29 principal, interest at the rate of 6.7500% now totaling $12,811.13, late charges in the amount of $703.71, escrow advances of $2,513.09, and other fees and expenses advanced of $67.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $55.72 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: December 19, 2008 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 State of North Dakota County of Stark On December 19, 2008, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson , Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Nicole Schafer Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 03/28/2011 ASAP# 3014548 03/05/2009, 03/12/2009, 03/19/2009

remaining balance due under the terms of the Deed of Trust and Note and elected to sell the interest of Rodney W. Utigard and Mary Jo Utigard, the original Grantors, their successors and assigns, in and to the aforedescribed property, subject to all easements, restrictions, encumbrances or convenants existing of record oror evident on the property at the time of sale to satisfy the remaining obligation owed. Beneficiary has directed Anne Blanche Adams, as Successor Trustee, to commence such sale proceedings. Those with an interest in the property and who appear from the public record to be entitled to notification of these proceedings are: Occupants, 109 West Artemos Drive, Missoula, MT 59803. Rodney W. Utigard, 109 West Artemos Drive, Missoula, MT 59803. Mary Jo Utigard, 109 West Artemos Drive, Missoula, MT 59803. Successor Trustee is unaware of any party in possession or claiming right to possession to the subject property other than those persons noticed herein. DATED this 6th day of January, 2009. /s/ Anne Blanche Adams, Successor Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA) :ss. County of Missoula). This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 6th day of January, 2009, by Anne Blanche Adams, Successor Trustee. (SEAL) /s/ Susan Marshall, Notary Public for the State of Montana. Residing at: Missoula, Montana. My commission expires: March 17, 2011

JOHNSON, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Barbara A. Johnson has been appointed Personal Representative of the the Estate of Joseph Alfred Johnson. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Barbara A. Johnson, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Cunningham Law Office, 818 West Central, Suite 1, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 24th day of February, 2009. /s/ Kyle D. Cunningham, Attorney for Personal Representative, Barbara A. Johnson

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 04/07/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200507978 Book 750, Page 611, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Keith E. Kominek, married man was Grantor, Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis was Beneficiary and Chicago Title Insurance Co. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Chicago Title Insurance Co. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 6, 7, 8 and the East one-half of Lot 9, Lots 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 in Block 16 of the Townsite of Frenchtown, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Also, a strip, piece or parcel of land in the Northwest onequarter of the Southwest one-quarter of Section 35, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, Montana Principal Meridian, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the point where the West line of said Northwest one-quarter of the Southwest one-quarter of Section 35 intersects the South line of Mullan Road; thence running Southeasterly along the said South line of Mullan Road 66 feet; thence Southwesterly 93 feet to the West line of said Section 35; thence North on the West line of Section 35, 107 feet to the Place of Beginning. Recording reference: Book 735 Micro Records, at Page 1518 less and except that portion conveyed in Bargain and Sale Deed recorded in Book 189 of Deeds at Page 268. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for BSABS 2005-AC3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 12, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/30/97, recorded as Instrument No. 9721844 Book 518, Page 926, and modified by Agreement recorded 5/14/2007 as Instrument No. 200711704 Book 797, Page 300, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Barbara A. Larsen, a single person was Grantor, Norwest Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and Insured Titles Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 5: A parcel of land located in and a portion of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 25, Township 16 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Section 25, a fence corner; thence S. 00 degrees 14’57” W., along the East line of said Section 25, a distance of 1119.00 feet to a set rebar on the West rightof-way of a road, said point being the true point of beginning; thence continuing S. 00 degrees 14’57” W., along said Section line and along said right-of-way, a distance of 200.00 feet to a set rebar; thence S. 64 degrees 39’01” W., 1471.43 feet to a set rebar on the West line of the Southeast onequarter of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 25; thence N. 00 degrees 06’52” E., along said West line of the Southeast onequarter of the Northeast one-quarter, a distance of 455.84 feet to a set rebar; thence N. 74 degrees 17’06” E., 1381.34 feet to the true point of beginning, as shown on deed. Exhibit No. 2798, filed December 7, 1971, records of Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. , beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to . Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 12, 2009, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $92,162.25. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $88,377.90, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 22, 2009 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale,

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on April 27, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 5 in Block 2 of Webber Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to official recorded plat thereof. Kristy Tripp and Benjamin Tripp, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated June 13, 2007 and recorded June 18, 2007 at 11:58 o’clock A.M. in Book 799, Page 766 as Document No. 200715233. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 15, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,146.74, beginning September 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 30, 2008 is $280,517.28 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5% now totaling $7,526.58, late charges in the amount of $538.50, escrow advances of $824.44, suspense balance of $1109.75 and other fees and expenses advanced of $54.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $49.9551 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid in cash at the time of sale. The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. Dated: December 17, 2008 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On December 17, 2008, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3000853 02/26/2009, 03/05/2009, 03/12/2009 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 8, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES, IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TO WIT: LOT 16 OF HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE APN IS SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS 1220208; SOURCE OF TITLE IS BOOK 735, PAGE 961 (RECORDED 07/06/04) Gerald H Hoover

Missoula Independent Page 44 March 5–March 12, 2009

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 8, 2009, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: A tract of land located in the SE1/4SW1/4 of Section 32, Township 13 North, Range 19 West P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of Lot 7, Block 2 Country Homes Addition No. 2, an official subdivision of Missoula County, Montana, said point of beginning being a found iron pin; thence N.89º51’E., along the South boundary of said Country Homes Addition No. 2, a distance of 180.50 feet to an iron pin; thence S.0º09’E., along the West boundary of the property described in Missoula County Book 21 of Deeds at page 1248, a distance of 75.70 feet to an iron pin; thence S.89º51’W., a distance of 180.50 feet to an iron pin on the East boundary of Lot 4, County Homes Addition, an official subdivision of Missoula County, Montana; thence N.0º09’ West along the East boundary of said Lot 4, a distance of 75.70 feet to the point of beginning. RECORDING REFERENCE: Book 102 of Micro Records at page 1333. Elizabeth F. Marsh, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 13, 2005 and Recorded October 10, 2005 under Book 762 in Page 788 as Document No. 200527542. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated December 15, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. A default has occurred in the performance of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. Pursuant to 71-1-301, et seq. of the Montana Code Annotated, the undersigned hereby gives notice of a trustee’s sale to be held on the 13th day of May, 2009, at 1:00 o’clock p.m., on the steps of the Courthouse of Missoula County located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, of the following described real property located in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 17A1 OF FARVIEWS HOMESITES, BLOCK D, LOTS 6A1, 8A1 AND 17A1, AN AMENDED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Rodney W. Utigard and Mary Jo Utigard, as Grantors, conveyed the abovedescribed real property, and the improvements situated thereon, if any, to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Wealthbridge Mortgage Corporation, who was designated as Lender in Deed of Trust dated February 23, 2007 and recorded on March 6, 2007 as Document No. 200705216 in Book 793 at Page 31 of the official records of Missoula County, Montana (“Deed of Trust”). HSBC Mortgage Services, Inc., was appointed as successor servicer in a Corporate Assignment of Deed of Trust dated October 24, 2008 and recorded on November 5, 2008 as Document No. 200824991 in Book 828 at Page 1377 of the official records of Missoula County, Montana (“Assignment”). Anne Blanche Adams, a licensed Montana attorney, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee dated November 11, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. Rodney W. Utigard and Mary Jo Utigard have defaulted in the performance of the said Deed of Trust and associated Note by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $3,754.23 for the month of July, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property of loan. As of October 11, 2008 the sum of $17,731.04 is past due. As of October 11, 2008, the principal balance due was the sum of $462,957.92 principal, plus $24,808.24 accrued interest, with interest continuing to accrue on the principal at the rate set out in the Note, which is currently 8.99% per annum, and other fees and expenses that may be advanced. The Beneficiary may disburse any amounts as may be required to protect Beneficiary’s interest. If Beneficiary elects to make such disbursements, sums paid shall become additional indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust. In accordance with the provisions of the Deed of Trust and Note, the Beneficiary has elected to accelerate the full

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-09-23 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOSEPHY ALFRED

MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-09-27 Douglas G. Harkin. NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF FRANK J. KNOLL, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either by mailed to DAWNETTA L. MACE, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th Street East, Missoula, ;MT 59801 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court.

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PUBLISHERS NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18.

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This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1800-929-2611

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Commercial Space for lease: 229 East Front Street, Between The Trail Head and Pearl Café. 1639 total Sq feet. Includes shared bathrooms w/ Trail Head. Newly renovated, original wood floors great high ceilings. Aggressive downtown lease rate. For info call Todd 544-9331

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Roommates Nice room for rent. Utilities included. $365.00/month plus deposit. 520 River Street. Call Mark 207-1990

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RentalsHouses 1423 S. 4th St- 3bed/2bath fenced yard, garage near bike trail & Good Food Store. $1250 Call Devan @ Prudential Missoula 2411408 Looking for a rental? Visit www.prudentialmissoula.com for list of available rentals. www.caras-properties.com. Studio4 Bedrooms available. Utilities Paid? Specials? Pets? Storage Units, Retail, Office, Warehouse available. 543-9798

roomate needed Share comfortable house with two young professionals and dog. House is great; we are quiet & clean and hoping to find the same! 400/month 546-2307

Homes for Sale 3 Bed/2 Bath house in Stevensville with rental & 2 car attached garage. Separate 4 car garage with bath stubbed in. Possible split when annexed. $299,900 MLS#900811. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12881 for pics 3 bed/2 bath manufactured home on nice lot with large covered porch. 2231 W Kent, Missoula. $89,900. MLS#900417. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE Text:44133 Message:12597 for pics 4800 SQ FT MULLAN RD AREA HOME ON 1 ACRE. 5 Bdr/3 Bath, great floor plan, family room with wet bar, vaulted ceilings, and more, $480,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen with island. Fenced yard in front

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Homes for Sale with private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $239,900 MLS#900845. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 Text:44133 Message:12882 for pics 5bdrm, 2 baths, centrally located with hardwood floors large fenced yard and 2 fireplaces. $275,000 MLS 809246 Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12596 for pics ALBERTON AREA HOME ON 3 ACRES. 3 Bdr/3 Bath, bonus room, great views, lots of space, just 30 minutes to Missoula. $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED NORTH SIDE HOME. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, fenced yard, detached garage, covered porch, hardwood floors, and more, $199,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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Buying or Selling? Call Priscilla Brockmeyer at Prudential Missoula Properties. 370-7689 www.priscillabrockmeyer.com

20,000 SQ FOOT LOT IN GREAT ALBERTON LOCATION. 0.46 acres with all utilities present, zoned residential with potential for commercial re-zoning, $79,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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5 ACRES OF UNZONED LAND ON LOLO CREEK. 320’ of creek frontage, 2 40x60 buildings with 17 storage units and office space, caboose, large shop/commercial building, 2 mobiles, easy Hwy 93 access, $740,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

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Homes for Sale

www.mindypalmer.com

Frenchtown Schools, 2 bdrm, 2bath, family room and bonus room. Pellet Stove, deck, patio, double attached garage. $239,900 MLS# 808738. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12594 for pics GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

GORGEOUS TARGET RANGE HOME FROM THE 2008 PARADE OF HOMES. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, beautiful design, old-world craftsmanship, $468,500. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

For Lease • 1001 SW Higgins, Suite 104

Priced Reduced! Large family home on 1.2 Acres. $285,000. Call Lara 406-531-5582 UPDATED CENTRAL MISSOULA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, single attached garage, new flooring, interior paint, updated kitchen, new furnace and more, $149,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at... View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byowner missoula.com OR call 550-3077

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Joy Earls • SUNDAY---REMEMBER TO SPRING AHEAD FOR DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME!!! Visit my website for listings and pictures...

• THEN CALL ME TO WORK WITH YOU THIS SPRING!!! • I LOOK FORWARD TO HELPING YOU WITH YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS…….

Joy Earls • 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com RICE TEAM Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Professional office space in the Panorama Park Building. 1,335+ sq. ft., 2 offices, large reception area, bathroom and kitchen. Could easily be converted into more office spaces. $1,650 a month. Broker Owned 544-2125

Mary Mar ry REALTOR®, Broker Office 406-728-9295 • Cell 406-544-2125 mmarry@bigsky.net

• Centrally located 3 bdrm 2.5 bath • Wood and tile floors • Double attached garage • Landscaped, UG sprinklers • $191,900 • MLS# 809722 Text:44133 Message: 12591 for pics

• Reduced 3 Bed/2 Bath • Manufactured on foundation • Large covered deck • Single attached garage • $103,900 • MLS# 809491 Text:44133 Message: 12598 for pics

• 3 Bd/3 Bth - Horse Property • Lower level apartment • Pole barn, Paved rd, Fenced yd • 11 Acres - Potomac, MT • $299,900 • MLS# 806576 Text:44133 Message: 12885 for pics

• Remodeled 3 Bd/ 1 Bath • Single detached garage • Fenced yard • Drummond, MT • $89,900 • MLS# 808575 Text:44133 Message: 12883 for pics

548 Edith • Missoula

www.mindypalmer.com

Price reduced: $185,900 - 2 story in a cul de sac, central neighborhood with large yards, raised beds and 2 car garage. Priscilla @ Pru Missoula 370.7689

#228,1092

TEXAS LAND -0- Down! 20-acre Ranches, Near El Paso. Beautiful Mountain Views. Road Access. Surveyed. $15,900. $159/mo. Money Back Guarantee. Owner Financing. 1-800-843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com

Missoula • 549-3353 | Hamilton • 363-4450

JUST LISTED - IMMACULATE LEWIS & CLARK AREA HOME. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, single level, hardwood floors, new roof, large fenced back yard, lots of windows, $204,900. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

514 W. Spruce • Missoula 406.327.8777

Choteau. $920,000. www.fbrealty.com

www.mindypalmer.com

FLORENCE AREA HOME ON 2 ACRES. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, very private and quiet, great views, 3 car garage, outdoor sauna, large deck and more, $295,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

Mortgage & Financial

Lisa Triepke lisa@landlmortgage.com

www.mindypalmer.com

FORT BENTON REALTY, LLP (800)406-0946. 380 acres plus 560 acre State Lease with two homes, MH, farm, outbuildings, grain storage, pivot and wheel line irrigation. $1,700,000. 920 acres CRP and pasture plus 120 acre State Lease located NW of

Mortgage & Financial

For all your home mortgage needs call

FLORENCE AREA HOME IN A GORGEOUS SETTING ON 5 ACRES. 2 Bdr/2 Bath, outbuildings, 3 wells, close to river & fishing access, great views, $219,000. Prudential Montana. Call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696 or view photos and virtual tours at...

www.mindypalmer.com

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Mortgage & Financial

Land for Sale

Jodie L Hooker REALTOR®, QSC®, GRI®, ABR® 239-7588 • Jodie@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaMultiFamily.com Specializing in: Multi-Famliy Properties Perfect for the buyer who wants to live in the slant street area, but can't afford it! Live in one, rent the other to help with mortgage. Recently remodeled (2) 2 bed, 1 bath units. Main floor & upper unit. Rents are $725 for each unit. W/D hookups in basement. Fenced corner lot, detached garage, presently rented month to month. $235,000 • Agent Owned

Shelly Evans REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 544-8570 • Shelly@GreaterMontanaRE.com MissoulaValleyHomes.com Specializing in: 1st Time Homebuyers

Carrie A Greer REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC®, ABR® 880-6592 • Carrie@GreaterMontanaRE.com CarrieAGreer.com Specializing in: Condos/Townhomes

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Missoula Properties

Rochelle Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com

Bridget Bowers REALTOR®, PSC®, QSC® 207-5387 • Bridget@GreaterMontanaRE.com BitterrootMontanaProperties.com Specializing in: Homes with Acreage

Missoula Independent Page 45 March 5–March 12, 2009


CLASSIFIEDS Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Condos/ Townhomes

Condos/ Townhomes

Condos/ Townhomes

Condos/ Townhomes

Mortgage & Financial BURIED IN CREDIT CARD DEBT? We can save you thousands and lower your monthly payments. Call Debt Relief hotline for your free consultation. 1-800-399-3560 CASH FOR GOLD! We buy Gold, Silver, Platinum. Get Cash NOW! Highest Payouts - Satisfaction Guaranteed 1-877-548-1550 In today’s economy most people have credit card debt. Credit Card Rescue has the solution. Get out of debt in months not years - save thousands. Call 866-910-5252 Mountain West Mortgage. Best Mortgage Loan Products. 35 Years experience. John Timmons 406543-8945 Lic #6,7 REAL ESTATE LOANS Up to 70% LTV. We specialize in “NonBankable Deals” Hard money lending with a conscience. We also buy Private Notes & Mortgages. Creative Finance & Investments, LLC. 406-721-1444; 800-9994809. Info@creative-finance.com MT Lic.#000203. 619 SW Higgins, Ste O, Missoula, MT 59803

Homes for Sale www.classiccourt.com

Price reduction! $185,900 2 story home with nice fenced yard. Central location. Priscilla Brockmeyer

370.7689

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Mortgage & Financial

Mortgage & Financial

Lorin & Amy Peterson

a father daughter team

Amy 532-9287 Lorin 532-9223 www.LorinAndAmy.com

Mortgage & Financial

Missoula Independent Page 46 March 5–March 12, 2009




Bella Sauvage Day Spa $10 off original Eminence Organic Facial Now includes green & white tea towel soak and antioxidant eye treatment.

629 Woody (1 block west of the Depot) www.bellasauvage.com 541.9032

No rate increase for 2008 tax preparation Free electronic filing

James A. McNay CPA, PC

20% discount for clients laid off in 2008

1800 S. Reserve Suite A Missoula MT 59801 • 406-721-3091 Present coupon to receive these special offers

Buy One Get One

Half Off

FREE CONSULTATION Essure - Permanent birth control unlike any other.

No more worrying about unplanned pregnacy

Schedule an Essure procedure and receive your consultation FREE.

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Dr. Valerie Knudsen, MD, FACOG, FAC Real Expertise • Real Understanding

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Procedure done in our office

406.327.4395 • www.drknudsen.com

“YES, WE CAN!” COUPON SPECIAL $85/person/day Lifts and Lodging (3 night minimum) or within 48 hours of arrival book $99/room/night

El Diablo Ingredients made fresh daily 1429 S. Higgins Ave 728-9529

800-862-6094 or 406-862-6098/www.kandaharlodge.com (some restrictions apply; please inquire)

$5

off

a purchase of $15 or more!

YWCA Missoula and the UM Multicultural Alliance

When: Wed., March 18 6 pm: auction 7 pm: films

Where: UC Theater, U of M

Spring is Here!

Tickets: $5 students with ID, $10 general

Great Selection of Spring Clothing in Stock. Russell Square • Missoula Mon-Sat 10-5 • 406-829-8808

to raise money for GUTS! A girls’ leadership project of the YWCA and the Breast Cancer Research Fund

girls leadership project

Tickets & Info: 543.6691, ywcaofmissoula.org or 1130 W. Broadway M-F 8-5

Bathing Beauties Beads In the heart of the mountains, on the shores of the Great Bead Sea.

Jewelry making supplies &Hundreds of hand-made, OFF 3/5-3/31 one of a kind Jewelry pieces 501 S. Higgins (On the Hip Strip) 543-0018 • 7 Days a Week 10-6

25%



Missoula Independent Page 47 March 5–March 12, 2009


Missoula Independent 3/5 - 3/12/09  

News, art and entertainment in western Montana