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MISSOULA

by Erika Fredrickson

Up Front: Ganja goes gourmet with local menu of “medibles” Up Front: Budget woes end low-cost Victims Advisory Council Scope: Lebowski bash celebrates the Coen brothers’ cult classic


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


MISSOULA

by Erika Fredrickson

Up Front: Ganja goes gourmet with local menu of “medibles” Up Front: Budget woes end low-cost Victims Advisory Council Scope: Lebowski bash celebrates the Coen brothers’ cult classic


Missoula Independent

Page 2 March 11–March 18, 2010


nside Cover Story Over the past two decades, as other types of music found greater popularity among local audiences, Missoula metal has stayed mostly underground and insular. Call it the redheaded stepchild of the music scene. Call Cover photo by Cathrine L. Walters the bands and their diehard fans fringe dwellers. But the truth is, there are a lot of metal bands keeping the scene alive, and they deserve to be heard...........................................................................................14

Sean Kelly's features specials from around the world.

Lamb & Eggplant Penne Friday 3/12 @ 10pm

Sautéed lamb, roasted eggplant, onions, garlic & sun dried tomatoes, with an olive oil cream sauce, finished with feta cheese. Served with garlic bread.

Tom Catmull & the Clerics

Saturday 3/13 @ 8:30pm

News Letters Bison, climate change and oil .......................................................................4 The Week in Review Health care, stair climbers and Dennison’s salary .................6 Briefs Crustacean shells, caregivers and big game ....................................................6 Etc. Did Tester’s forest bill just get a second life?......................................................7 Up Front Local chef bakes full menu of “medibles”..................................................8 Up Front Budget issues end low-cost Victims Advisory Council...............................9 Ochenski Schweitzer wrong on hazardous waste, again ........................................10 Writers on the Range One man’s step from scientist to global activist .................11 Agenda WORD up.....................................................................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan The world’s best hen....................................................................19 Happiest Hour Harold’s Club .................................................................................20 Ask Ari Underwater wonder ....................................................................................21 8 Days a Week All rock horns, all the time .............................................................22 Mountain High Race Across the Sky........................................................................33 Scope Lebowski bash celebrates Coen brothers’ cult classic ..................................34 Noise Bitch, Maren Christensen, Vampire Weekend and Johnny Cash ...................35 Books Lyrical prose can’t save half-baked Blue Horse .............................................36 Film Off with 3-D’s head and, eventually, Alice’s ....................................................37 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................38

Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ..................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland EDITOR Skylar Browning ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Peter Kearns PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Matthew Frank, Alex Sakariassen COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Steven Kirst, Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold ADVERTISING & ADMIN COORDINATOR Hannah Smith EDITORIAL INTERN Kyle Lehman CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Chris LaTray, Ednor Therriault, Katie Kane, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Monday 3/15 8:30pm

8:30 Ray Grenfell 8:45 Peanut Butter & Didjeridui 9:00 Whiskey Whore 9:15 Balboas 9:30 Eliptikys 9:45 Judgement Hammer 10:00 De Profundis 10:15 Freetown Turnaround

TOP OF THE MIC ACTS 10:30 Whoatown 10:45 Ross Voorhees 11:00 Introspective Time Bandit 11:15 The Skurfs 11:30 Bottlerocket Blues 11:45 Pandamonium 12:00 The Short-Shuckin Sunnuva

Come down and support your friends.

Your vote counts!

Outlaw Music

Missoula In Motion congratulates the 2009 Best Practices Award Winners!

First Place:

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801

Second Place:

Honorable Mention:

Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2010 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Best Practices winners are leading the charge on reducing traffic congestion, air pollution and energy demand while contributing to community economic and individual health. Call Missoula In Motion to start a program in your workplace! 258-4961 • www.missoulainmotion.com Missoula Independent

Page 3 March 11–March 18, 2010


STREET TALK

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Asked Tuesday afternoon outside Albertsons on the corner of Russell Street and SW Higgins Avenue.

Q:

This week the Indy previews the Wilma’s celebration of the Coen brothers’ cult classic, The Big Lebowski. What’s your most cherished cult classic film? Follow-up: Jeff Bridges, who plays The Dude in the film, won his first Oscar at Sunday’s Academy Awards. Who were you rooting for or against during the broadcast?

Jennifer Kistler: The Big Lebowski is the best movie ever created. Not her kind of blue: I think it’s good that Avatar didn’t win. There are so many sci-fi movies out there that it was just another one in the book.

Zena Danielson: Sixteen Candles is my all-time fave. St. Elmo’s Fire, still burning: I like when they honored the old actors from past movies, and when the “Brat Pack” went on stage.

John Schmidt: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind because it deals with the strength of relationships and the question of whether you would give up everything to not remember them. Objection: I think Law Abiding Citizen should have been nominated and won for Best Movie.

The Buffalo Field Campaign has strongly opposed Montana Fish, Wildlife and Park’s (FWP) bison quarantine experiment at every step, knowing that bison have never transmitted brucellosis to livestock and that quarantine destroys the wild qualities that make these bison so unique. FWP ignored public input and proceeded anyway, falsely promising that after five years the survivors would be given happy homes on public and tribal lands. Five years later, with the FWP lease of the current quarantine pens due to expire, we learned that the agency, in fact, had no plan. Breaking trust with tribes, the public and the bison, FWP denied tribal proposals and refused to consider the thousands of public acres available in Montana. In a lastminute, back-room deal, Gov. Brian Schweitzer appealed to Ted Turner for a bailout (see “Helping the herd,” Feb. 25, 2010). Turner agreed to house the quarantined bison on his ranch in exchange for 75 percent of the Yellowstone calves born there. The deal sets the dangerous precedents of turning public wildlife into currency and transferring ownership of a cherished public resource to a private, forprofit corporation. The 88 formerly wild Yellowstone bison that now find themselves captive behind Turner’s fences were stolen from all of us. As long as they reside on Turner’s ranch they are off-limits to the public. But not everyone comes out on the short end of this deal. The Greater Yellowstone Coalition (GYC), an organization with close ties to Turner (he is listed as a board member on their most recent tax return) has been busy heaping praise on the deal. Perhaps GYC, who last year charged $1500 for exclusive tours of Turner’s ranch, will be one of the greatest beneficiaries. FWP now promises that after five more years, any surviving Yellowstone bison in Turner’s possession, along with the few offspring remaining after Turner takes his share, will be returned to the public. Given their track record, why should we believe them? Stephany Seay Buffalo Field Campaign West Yellowstone

Sounding the alarm

Claudia Quinlivan: The Wizard of Oz or Gone With the Wind. Too many flings: I didn’t watch much of it. I don’t like the new movies. There’s too much sex and violence and people flinging through the air.

Missoula Independent

Stolen bison

Page 4 March 11–March 18, 2010

James Balog is full of baloney (see “On the rocks,” Feb. 18, 2010). He’s just a photographer, evidently with no science education, who provides erroneous information. For example, he claims Greenland is melting. However, that’s a gross exaggeration— it’s only melting around the edges, which it has done in the past. It melted enough dur-

ing the Medieval Warm Period to allow Vikings to settle there and raise crops, until the Little Ice Age drove them out. The main ice sheet, with the vast majority of the ice, is in no danger of melting. The ice cores Balog cites actually reveal that increases in carbon dioxide occur hundreds of years after warming begins. The warming oceans release CO2 into the atmosphere. Balog suggests that the melting of snow and ice of Mt. Kilimanjaro is due to human-caused greenhouse warming. But researchers conclude that the real cause is

The 88 “ formerly wild Yellowstone bison that now find themselves captive behind Turner’s fences were stolen from

all of us.

deforestation of the lower slopes, which removes the source of moisture that falls as snow and ice at the upper elevations. Basically, Balog photographs natural occurrences, such as melting glaciers, in time-lapse mode, so he can attempt to frighten people. He’s just another misguided global warming alarmist. Roger Stang Missoula

Roasting Rehberg I recently received an e-mail from Rep. Denny Rehberg about the government spending $572,602,739 per day on interest from the national debt (which he helped to create since he was elected in 2000). He likes scaring me with big numbers, but here’s a number he’s afraid to talk about: $2,876,712,329 every day on oil imports. That’s right, it’s over five times higher than Rehberg’s scary number and it’s not “funny” money either—it’s real dollars right out of your pocket at the gas pumps. It’s energy jobs in Saudi Arabia instead of Montana, and it’s oil wars spilling American blood on foreign soil. Imported

oil costs us nearly $3 billion dollars every day; $350 billion a year bled out of our country in oil imports and another $700 billion in lost jobs. And what has your Montana representative done about it? Nothing. But he does want to cut Social Security for Montana’s seniors. Reforming entitlement is political code for taking away benefits earned by hard-working men and women, or putting the safety net in the hands of Wall Street. He also wants to destroy education by freezing “discretionary spending.” And the “hard-working Americans” Denny wants to lower taxes for are the same Wall Street bankers that nearly drove us into bankruptcy. Dennis McDonald has a real plan for an energy independent America: Clean coal, wind and natural gas for heavy trucks, and we can do it all in Montana! These are jobs for Montanans, jobs for Americans, and they don’t involve any more “oil wars.” Let’s tell Rehberg and his foreign oil buddies, “No thanks.” Jerry McDonald Thompson Falls

Buying health care A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision lets corporations spend unlimited amounts of their money to influence our elections. A public finance bill could remedy that imbalance of power that corporations now have over real people. Members of Congress prefer the present system because it favors incumbents— incumbents like Sen. Max Baucus, who received about $3 million from the health care industry and then did their bidding as chairman of the Senate Finance Committee. When his committee held an exploratory meeting to discuss the various health care bill options, Baucus would not allow advocates for a “public option” to be part of the meeting. A number of single-payer proponents still attended the gathering. When they stood up in the audience and expressed their support of the single-payer program, Baucus had them removed. That group is now called the “Baucus 8.” Many in that group were practicing physicians. Polls indicate that over 60 percent of voters support a public option. The same percentage of our nation’s doctors are in agreement. The health care bill that is now being discussed in the Senate represents a huge give-away to the health care industry—giving them up to three million new clients. People should control the process, not corporations and their subservient politicians. Gene Jack Cascade

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L


Missoula Independent

Page 5 March 11–March 18, 2010


WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, March 3

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Cathrine L. Walters

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Montana reports a more than $17 million underwriting loss, a symptom, the company says, of ever-rising health care costs. Still, the company, which insures some 250,000 people in Montana, says premiums are rising in 2010 by between 10 and 20 percent on average.

• Thursday, March 4 Montana Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester introduce legislation that would ban mining in the North Fork Flathead River Valley west of Glacier National Park. The ban is meant to reciprocate British Columbia’s decision last month to ban mining in the Canadian Flathead.

• Friday, March 5 The state Board of Regents grants University of Montana President George Dennison a nearly $75,000 raise six months before he is set to retire. Todd Buchanan is the sole board member to vote against the raise, which will increase the president’s pay to $280,000 a year.

• Saturday, March 6 The fourth-seeded Griz ride a game-high 22-point effort from senior guard Anthony Johnson to beat Northern Arizona in a Big Sky Conference quarterfinal game. The win marks the team’s first 20-win season since 2005.

• Sunday, March 7

Democratic congressional candidates, from left to right, Dennis McDonald, Melinda Gopher and Tyler Gernant speak at the Central Committee Meeting in the Missoula City Council Chambers March 9. Speeches focused on each candidate’s efforts to clinch the party’s nomination, and how each stacks up against Rep. Denny Rehberg, the Republican incumbent.

Flathead Amending annexation

Missoula Rural Fire District’s Kory Burgess sprints to the 73rd floor of Seattle’s Columbia Center in just over 11 minutes to claim his second consecutive Scott Firefighter Stairclimb title. Burgess’ effort bests an international field of over 1,500 firefighters, but falls 5.6 seconds short of his record-setting 2009 time.

• Monday, March 8 The Missoula City Council moves forward on the Miller Creek Road reconstruction project by awarding a contract valued at more than $2 million to the Missoula-based construction firm L.S. Jensen. The project will spruce up approximately 3,400 feet of Miller Creek Road from Briggs Street to Mockingbird Way, adding a roundabout, curbs and sidewalks.

• Tuesday, March 9 An envelope containing a suspicious powder bursts open in an office housing the Montana Department of Labor in Helena. The scare sends three Department of Labor workers and a Helena city police officer into isolation while a state lab tests the substance.

Kalispell has seen unprecedented growth over the past decade, doubling in both population and geographic area. But now that the boom has busted, the city turns to the task of rewriting annexation policies to avoid stretching its resources to the breaking point. “This is a time for reflection,” says Kalispell Planning Director Tom Jentz. The Kalispell City Council and planning board began a series of discussions on annexation in February, prompted by the Trumbull Creek development’s interest in becoming part of Kalispell. The development—like several subdivisions annexed in recent years—rests more than a mile beyond city limits, and would become another island of outlying property requiring city services at a high cost to local taxpayers. “It’s a very linear city,” Jentz says, “which makes it difficult to provide consistent police protection…It starts putting stresses on your service delivery.”

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Jentz maintains it’s long been in Kalispell’s best interests to accept such proposals despite mounting strain on police, fire and snowplow services. If not incorporated into the city, such developments are usually adopted by the county and contribute to an extensive “wall” of rural subdivisions, he says. “Kalispell in 2001 took the position that we needed to start working with this development community because we were getting totally surrounded by rural, county subdivisions,” Jentz says. “Pretty soon the city has no place to grow.” The Kalispell City Council recognizes the concern, but sees perhaps a greater need to shift focus toward city in-fill. Swaths of previously annexed land closer to Kalispell’s core remain largely undeveloped while scattered subdivisions farther out receive full city services. “If you look at our planning map, you can see how many of these huge subdivisions have already been approved and annexed to the city,” says Councilman Tim Kluesner. “And there’s not houseone built on them.” Last year’s abrupt halt in development activity

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Missoula Independent

Page 6 March 11–March 18, 2010

gave the city a much-needed opportunity to regroup and review its direction, addressing the previously unanswered question of how Kalispell ought to grow. “I would call it a reassessment,” Kluesner says. Alex Sakariassen

Marijuana Bank bounces caregiver The owners of Missoula Cannabis Caregivers received unexpectedly harsh news when First Interstate Bank notified the business that its accounts would be closed because the operation violates federal law. “It kind of puts us in a bad position,” says Sara Stevenson, who started the caregiver business in January with partner Robert Ekstedt. They run a storefront clinic on S. First Street in Hamilton. A letter received by Stevenson March 2 and obtained by the Independent details the bank’s position. “Due to a change in policy,” the letter read,


Inside

Letters

Briefs

“First Interstate Bank will no longer be able to maintain the above referenced checking account, therefore it will be closed in ten days. If the account has a negative balance, you have 10 days to bring it to a positive balance before closing, or we will turn it over for Collection.� First Interstate Bank Vice President Sue Larew says federal privacy regulations prohibit her from answering questions about Stevenson’s account. When asked the bank’s position on whether it would allow a registered caregiver to open an account, Larew said she would need to obtain a statement from her superior in Billings. That statement was not available before press time. According to Allen St. Pierre, director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), Stevenson’s situation with First Interstate is not unusual. Once the Obama administration announced last October that the federal government would defer to state medical marijuana laws, it created a boom in “ganjapreneurial� activity. “That has pretty much raised a green flag, if you will,� St. Pierre says. But the decision didn’t technically change the federal law. Thus, St. Pierre can see how national banks like First Interstate may be fearful of potential legal ramifications. He added that, considering the rate at which the medical marijuana industry is growing in Montana, other banks should be eager to open a new account for Stevenson. “The free market being what it is,� St. Pierre says, “there is a very good chance someone else is willing to do that business.� Jessica Mayrer

Pine beetles Shell serum shows promise Liquefied shrimp and crab shells shipped from Iceland could help thwart the pine beetles killing millions of trees across Montana and the West. Colorado researchers have developed a serum that contains chitosan, a substance primarily composed of the exoskeletons of crustaceans. Chitosan appears to increase a pine tree’s secretion of sap, which then impedes the beetles’ ability to eat into the tree’s inner bark, where they reproduce and spread fungal pathogens. The researchers prefer shells from Iceland for the serum because they’re mercury-free. AgriHouse, the Berthoud, Colo.-based agri-

Some books are hard to put down.

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

biotechnology company that holds a patent on the product, hopes its chitosan will be used by the U.S. Forest Service as it fights the pine-beetle epidemic across the West. Richard Stoner, president and CEO of AgriHouse, says a 2008 Forest Service study, conducted in Louisiana, demonstrated that the application of chitosan stimulates a 40 percent increase in pine resin secretion, but the agency stopped short of recommending the substance for widespread use. “In discussions with other researchers, including my science advisory board, we all realize that if you’re going to treat vast areas of acreage, you’re going to

have to spray it,� Stoner says. “So that’s where the Forest Service is saying more testing needs to be done. And that’s just the nature of the beast.� But it doesn’t appear much chitosan testing is being done. The agency isn’t testing it in Colorado, though it reportedly might start this summer in Idaho. Forest Service officials in Montana say they’re unaware of any testing happening here. Dave Tippets of the Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station, for one, expresses skepticism, wondering how often chitosan would have to be applied, and how much the process and the labor would cost. “It’s one thing if you’ve got six high-valued trees around your summer home up by Seeley Lake and you want to save them,� Tippets says. “It’s another thing if you’ve got millions of acres infested.� Matthew Frank

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Philippine flop Hamilton resident Bill Walker never expected to get swept up in an international big-game brouhaha. Before the hate e-mails from the Philippines began popping up in his inbox last month, the local educator thought he was simply expanding his side business of booking clients for exotic hunting outfitters. Adventures 411 has since been decried by animal rights blogs and Philippine media outlets for booking illegal hunting safaris on the island of Mindoro. It’s an unfair accusation, Walker says, since he doesn’t actually run the safaris and never even booked a client for one. “I’ve really got nothing to do with it,â€? he says, “except that I put [the offers] up online.â€? Walker, who closed Adventures 411 in late February for economic reasons after more than 20 years, says he added the $13,800 Philippine safaris to his website in December on behalf of Mindoro Safaris, a New York-based outfitter run by Jay T. Carlson. Walker says he contacted Carlson online late last year, believing the safaris offered a unique alternative to the Montana and Idaho trips he usually booked for clients. When the deal began to look increasingly “gray,â€? Walker removed the offer from his site. “I just took him at face value,â€? Walker says. “But once I got into the process, I had my doubts‌I didn’t want to get wrapped up in it.â€? Carlson, who spoke with the Independent by phone from New York, disputes Walker’s claim, saying he hasn’t offered the Mindoro hunting trips for about four years. He says Walker contacted him shortly before his company stopped offering the hunting trips, but the two haven’t spoken since. “I never followed through to tell him we weren’t doing that anymore,â€? Carlson says. “I never even thought about it anymore, and I didn’t realize until I started getting this round of hate e-mails.â€? But according to the online newsletter Hunting Report, Carlson led at least two clients on Mindoro Safaris trips in 2009. One of those clients reportedly shot a world record warty pig. A copy of the Adventures 411 web page, cached by Google on Feb. 24, states that Mindoro Safaris has two openings left for 2011 hunting trips and is taking deposits for 2012. Carlson now says he has no plans to guide a trip to the Philippines “anytime soon.â€? Alex Sakariassen

Salary increase approved last week by the Montana Board of Regents for University of Montana President George Dennison. The long-time president announced he’s retiring Aug. 15.

etc. When Harris Sherman, overseer of the U.S. Forest Service, stated in December that the logging mandate essential to Sen. Jon Tester’s forest bill was “likely unachievable and unsustainable,� a figurative snag (probably one killed by pine beetles) fell and blocked the bill’s path to passage. But this past weekend Sherman’s boss, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, swooped into Montana and appeared to drag that snag right out of the way. While in Montana at Tester’s invitation, Vilsack reportedly said the Obama administration could support the logging mandate in the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act as a “pilot project.� He said the bill is “absolutely in line with the goals of the administration,� and that there’s “a tremendous opportunity here.� That’s quite the 180, and it certainly bodes well for the bill. But are Vilsack’s off-the-cuff comments supposed to be taken as an official change in position? The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) doesn’t necessarily say so. “We all agree on the broad aims of Sen. Tester’s legislation,� a USDA spokesperson tells the Indy, “and USDA looks forward to continued conversations with the Senator and his staff to ensure the legislation works for Montana and the Forest Service. As Secretary Vilsack noted during his visit to Montana last weekend, we want to be careful about legislating forest management for all 153 national forests. But, we strongly support the collaborative approach to this legislation and understand the broad-based support the legislation has in Montana.� Not exactly effusive. Democrats and Republicans agree on the broadest aims of health care reform—lowering costs, streamlining the system—and that hasn’t led to a workable compromise. But still, it appears the administration has given Tester’s bill an opening. That’s more than our junior senator could say before Vilsack’s visit. So, what now? It looks like what’s already been a fairly ugly sausage-making process may get even uglier. After months of hashing out what Tester touts as a “Made in Montana� compromise among some state loggers, environmentalists and recreationists, followed by months of critique from all corners—including ours—Tester’s first big bill continues to sit in Washington, D.C., waiting to be reshaped by the world’s largest meat grinder. We’ll see if his “Made in Montana� label remains when it comes out the other end.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 March 11–March 18, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Ganja gourmet Local chef cooks up full menu of “medibles” by Matthew Frank

tration, says he’s able to manage his pain largely by eating Williams’ snacks. “The effects people are scared of just aren’t there,” Martin says. Adds Williams: “It’s a gateway off of drugs.” The benefits of eating medical marijuana may be clear to Martin and others, but the law surrounding medibles is anything but. The Montana Medical Marijuana Act defines usable marijuana as “any mixture or preparation of marijuana,” and allows caregivers to possess an ounce for each patient. A literal reading of the bill suggests that food products weighing more than an ounce, no matter how little actual marijuana they contain, are illegal for a medical marijuana patient to posses. “No court has come down and decided that’s the way it is, and it could probably vary from prosecutor to prosecutor…,” says Mark Long, chief of the state’s narcotics bureau. “But in my travels around the state, talking to groups and discussing this issue, it seems like everybody in law enforcement is pretty much on the side of ‘an ounce of food product is an ounce.’” To date, neither Long nor Daubert are aware of a ruling that’s tested how the state deals with patients or caregivers in possession of food products. Photo by Cathrine L. Walters That doesn’t change Long’s opinion that the weight of a baked good translates to Veteran chef Tim Williams lets a fresh batch of cannabis cookies cool in Montana Cannabis’ commercial kitchen in Missoula. Williams makes about usable marijuana. “Right, wrong or otherwise,” he 1,000 “medibles” a week, serving Montana Cannabis’ 300 patients around the state. says, “at least in our agency, that’s how we’re interpreting it.” Daubert says the issue will likely be— “I’m trying to take marijuana food Cannabis and the founder of Patients and from the pot brownie you bought at a Families United, the main group lobbying and needs to be—addressed by the 2011 Grateful Dead show to the kind of five- for medical marijuana rights in Helena. “It’s Montana Legislature. “I think we’re going to need to clarify course fine dining meal you’d get at actually a superior method for a great many that in a way that allows patients to use patients, particularly pain patients.” Spago,” he says. Count Sonny Martin among them. foods,” Daubert says. Williams, 32, who worked for restauIn any case, Williams will continue to rants around Chicago and Denver before Williams calls Martin his “guinea pig,” and moving to Montana, runs through the carte he shows up on a recent Friday to taste-test create cannabis concoctions in his kitchen, and they’ll continue to be gobbled up. du jour, all made with the pot butter and the vinaigrette inside Williams’ blender. “The people here in Missoula are lucky Martin, 27, has an extremely rare bone oil he makes at the Montana Cannabis kitchen on the corner of Orange and Third condition that causes cartilage to “just fall because I have a Twitter site,” he says. “Go streets: raspberry, balsamic and thyme off,” as he describes it. Since childhood, onto twitter.com and search ‘mtcannabisvinaigrette; pineapple, ginger, sesame and Martin has had his spine completely fused, baker.’ I type in what’s hot and ready—‘I’ve soy dressing; chocolate truffles with cherry an ankle fused and both knees replaced. got chocolate cherry chunks, I’ve got fresh and peppermint; and chocolate cherry For years he was prescribed heavy doses of peanut butter cookies.’ So if your favorite chunk, oatmeal raisin and peanut butter opiates to deal with the pain. That was until cookie is peanut butter, you can come and get ’em warm.” a year and a half ago. cookies. And patients do. In fact, Williams says “I had an honest conversation with On any other given day Williams might be cooking up cranberry and orange or [my doctor],” he recalls, “and I said, ‘This enough patients flock to his kitchen for banana and walnut muffins. Or a raspberry stuff is going to kill me. I know it is. I don’t piping hot pot food that he had to switch streusel. Or gluten-free blueberry coffee want to be on this anymore. I don’t want to from plastic bags to paper to prevent them cake. Or a diabetic-friendly version of his be on any pharmaceuticals anymore. The from melting. However tempting it may be, oatmeal raisin cookies. He even makes biggest favor you can do for me is not giv- though, Williams warns his patients to cheesecakes and pumpkin pies infused ing them to me and sign my paper.’ And refrain from eating more than one at a she said, ‘All right. I hear you. I’ll do that.’” time: He says they’re pretty darn potent. with cannabis. Now Martin, a student at the University “Those,” he says of the pies, “were big mfrank@missoulanews.com of Montana majoring in business adminison Thanksgiving and Halloween.” Tim Williams stands over a stove in a Missoula commercial kitchen and wrings and squeezes a bundle of red cheesecloth, and out oozes dark green juice laden with tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. The marijuana trimmings inside the cheesecloth had been simmering in a vat of butter for about 24 hours, and Williams will now use that butter to create an array of ganja goodies for hundreds of medical marijuana patients around Montana. But Williams, who holds a medical marijuana caregiver card and a culinary degree, isn’t just baking brownies.

Missoula Independent

Page 8 March 11–March 18, 2010

Just as Montana’s medical marijuana boom brought the industry out of clandestine grow rooms and onto main street, it’s also brought it into the kitchen, where chefs like Williams work to give patients more—and usually healthier—options for taking their medicine. Williams estimates he bakes about 1,000 “medibles” each week, serving Montana Cannabis’ roughly 300 registered patients around the state, including about 50 in Missoula. The baked goods typically cost $5 a piece. “A lot of physicians recommend eating marijuana,” says Tom Daubert of Montana


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Criminal cut Budget issues end low-cost Victims Advisory Council by Jessica Mayrer

Twenty-two-year-old Brooks Todd died about 15 minutes after the pickup truck he was riding in spun out of control, hit the guardrail and rolled off the road near Ruby Reservoir outside Alder in April 2002. The driver, Steve Atchison, who was drinking prior to the accident, left Todd at the scene with a broken neck and unable to breathe. “He left Brooks in the truck and he went and hid for 24 hours,� says Todd’s mother, Mardi Elford. Elford will never know if her son could have survived the accident had Atchison

ation of the Victim Information and Notification Everyday ( VINE) program, which now keeps victims apprised of offender incarceration status and location. The advocates also helped push to get the statewide sexual offender registry up and running, and encouraged DOC to create a letter bank, through which offenders can express remorse in written correspondence to victims. For Elford, “restorative justice� efforts like encouraging victim-offender dialogue not only helped her own griev-

Photo by Chad Harder

State budget cuts in Helena are forcing difficult decisions across the board, including the Department of Corrections’ elimination of the Crime Victims Advisory Council. Advocates say the council, which only cost taxpayers $5,700 last year, silences an important opportunity for the victim’s voice to be heard.

stayed to help. She says that possibility almost makes grieving harder as she continues to grapple with anger directed toward the young man who took her son away. Devastated by the loss, Elford’s marriage fell apart. As she struggled to piece her life back together, a probation officer put her in touch with Anita Richards, a long-time victims’ rights advocate. Richards suggested Elford join the Montana Crime Victims Advisory Council, which, until January, advised the Montana Department of Corrections (DOC) on victim-related concerns. The 13-member council, created in 1998, used a direct line to DOC to assist the agency in crafting policies and procedures, as well as propose legislation. Tanya Campbell, a council member who also works as Missoula County’s senior criminal victims’ advocate, says the advisory body specifically lobbied for the cre-

ing, but also allowed her to improve a flawed system. “It also made me see that there were things I could do for other people,� she says. “It was important work.� Elford uses the past tense because the DOC notified her in January that Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s office is eliminating the Crime Victims Advisory Council as part of the state’s budget cuts. The advisory council cost taxpayers just $5,700 in overhead last year, or approximately .000031 percent of the DOC’s $180 million budget. “We were just shocked that it came about so suddenly and without any warning,� says Elford. “It was just—boom—we got a letter in the mail.� Most of the council budget covered travel expenses for advocates who commuted from counties across the state to quarterly meetings in Helena. About $800 went toward meals and a small stipend dis-

tributed to voting members. Elford empathizes with state administrators struggling to balance a shrinking checkbook, but maintains the governor’s office could have done more to keep the council alive. “My biggest disappointment is that the governor and the budget director did not work with the council to see how they could reduce the cost,â€? she says. “I think everybody would have been happy if they could have just received even a part of their travel money‌Most of [the council members] are pretty doggone dedicated to what they do and helping people.â€? DOC Director Mike Ferriter says his agency notified Elford as soon as it saw the cut coming, and will continue to welcome the council members’ opinions, even if it’s in an unofficial capacity. “We’ll maintain our emphasis on victims. We know that crime victims sometimes feel forgotten,â€? he says. “They’re vocal and they should be. And we need to pay attention. And we will.â€? As the DOC trims $6.8 million off of its budget, Ferriter says he understands that the council’s expenses seem like a small slice of his overall operating budget. But the nature of this year’s financial crisis means saving wherever he can. “It all adds up,â€? Ferriter says. “These are tough calls right now.â€? Sarah Elliott, the governor’s communications director, notes the Victims Advisory Council is one of seven advisory bodies being eliminated, along with those tackling family health, homelessness and HIV. “We’re looking for ways to do more with less,â€? Elliott says. Elford, with the support of other council members, including Campbell, made a final appeal last week to an interim Legislative Finance Committee, but to no avail. State Sen. Dave Wanzenried, DMissoula, says little can be done even when the dollar amount is so small. “This is kind of like when the Titanic was going down and they were trying to do everything they could to keep it afloat,â€? says Wanzenried. That’s not good enough for Campbell and Elford. “This was one opportunity for the victim’s voice to be heard,â€? Campbell says. Elford adds the state’s thinking is shortsighted. There are lessons to be learned from people like her, who, even in their suffering, strive to curb future crime. “The main thing I think you’ll hear from a lot of victims,â€? she says, “is that you don’t want this happening to anybody else’s family.â€?

www.tanglesmt.com

275 W. Main St • 728-0343

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Missoula Independent

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36 LANES

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

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Missoula Independent

Page 10 March 11–March 18, 2010

Schweitzer gets it wrong on hazardous waste, again Back when Gov. Brian Schweitzer made his run for Conrad Burns’ seat in the U.S. Senate, he was full of fire and brimstone on how Burns was a corporate pawn. In fact, Schweitzer told a packed crowd at the Montana Wilderness Association’s annual meeting at the time that “the real treasure in Montana is the land, not what lies beneath it.” This week, from his bully pulpit as the chair of the Western Governors’ Association, and sounding more like a coal lobbyist than a governor, Schweitzer declared opposition to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulation of toxic ash produced by coalfired power plants, saying it should be left up to the states. Like last week, when the governor declared that using natural resource damage funds to move the Montana Historical Society to Butte would be a “win-win,” you have to wonder why Schweitzer just doesn’t seem to understand the very real problems associated with industrial hazardous waste. In his pronouncement this week, Schweitzer said if the EPA moved ahead with regulations to classify coal ash as hazardous waste it would undercut “effective regulation” by Western states. He was joined by fellow coal-booster, Utah Gov. Gary Herbert, who says such regulation would hurt coal-fired generation and wind up costing ratepayers more money. By this time in his tenure, it’s no secret that Schweitzer has become one of the biggest supporters of coal-fired energy in the nation. His pledge to protect the “real treasure” in Montana long ago forgotten, our governor decided to make a name for himself as a coal promoter, and did so with such vigor that the East Coast media dubbed him “The Coal Cowboy.” As many Montanans will recall, at first Schweitzer spent inordinate amounts of time and energy flying around the nation trying to convince people that the answer to our gross overconsumption of petroleum was to simply make liquid fuels such as diesel and jet fuel from coal. All it would take, we were told, is a $10 billion plant, an unproven technology of carbon capture and sequestration and, most importantly, Montana’s vast reserves of coal. We were assured that to kick off this wonderful new future for Montana as an energy colony for the nation, dignitaries from the Air Force would be flying into Great Falls in preparation for turning Malmstrom into a coal-to-liquids facility to produce fuel for the military. But that didn’t happen.

Deftly segueing into a new rap, the Coal Cowboy then turned to more conventional uses of coal—namely, burning it in traditional power plants. But in a laughable charade to convince us that coal could somehow be clean, he began to concentrate on where and how we could stuff millions of tons of carbon dioxide from coal plants underground.

Schweitzer “would have benefited from doing a little research on Colstrip’s leaking coal-ash ponds before talking about ‘effective regulation’ by

states.

To that end, he is willing to use Montanans on the Hi-Line as guinea pigs in an experiment to fill the area’s subterranean interstices with CO2 from a Canadian power plant. That hasn’t happened yet, either, but the Schweitzer schtick goes on and on. Now, he wants us to believe that states are capable of “effective regulation” of the 130 million tons of toxic coal ash produced annually from the nation’s more than 500 coal-fired power generation facilities. Most folks recall the environmental nightmare when 1.2 billion gallons of coal-ash sludge blew out of containment in Tennessee last year. Streams were destroyed, homes inundated with toxic sludge and the lives of nearby residents permanently altered. The long-term environmental damages are still being investigated and will take years and an estimated billion dollars to repair. According to an EPA report, the spill discharged 2.66 million pounds of arsenic, lead, mercury and other pollutants into the Amory River, which is more than the total water pollution output from all of the nation’s power plants the previous year.

But no need to look east to the disaster of Appalachia when we have our own coal-ash disaster right here in Montana. Schweitzer would have benefited from doing a little research on Colstrip’s leaking coal-ash ponds before talking about “effective regulation” by states. Had he done so, he would have discovered that Colstrip-area residents, many of whom work at the mines and associated power plants, have struggled for years with polluted wells and various health effects from the toxins—arsenic, mercury, lead, boron, sulfate, antimony and chromium, among others—that have seeped from Colstrip’s coal-ash ponds. Last year, in response to a 2003 lawsuit, the utilities that own the Colstrip plants paid a $25 million settlement to 57 Montanans who suffered a variety of coalash related damages. But that’s not the worst of it. According to Montana’s Department of Environmental Quality, which is supposed to be doing the “effective regulation” Schweitzer touts, the problem continues as the poisonous plumes spread despite the million-dollar pumpback systems installed by the utilities. Had the governor bothered to check, he would have found, as stated in a recent report by the Center for Public Integrity, that: “Montana lawmakers have actually loosened key protections preventing coal-ash contamination—first, by exempting on-site disposal from the state’s solid-waste regulations; second, by gutting a law meant to manage the siting of coal-fired power plants. Both acts have left the state’s Department of Environmental Quality with little authority over this waste.” And that’s the problem. State legislators and agencies can and do alter regulations and laws based on political and economic pressures. A federal regulatory structure by the EPA would ensure that states meet at least minimal standards for protection of health and the environment. Montanans are now seeing Schweitzer’s true colors in his continuing attempts to exploit the state’s energy resources to the max. His support for more pipelines, more transmission lines, more coal mining and oil drilling make earlier claims of “clean and green” laughable. In truth, those colors are more like a starling these days—coal black with a thin rainbow sheen of petroleum distillates. Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Life in full One man’s step from scientist to world-changing activist by Auden Schendler

In my office, I have a picture of a man testifying to Congress. He is haggard, with the look of someone under great strain. Behind him, engraved on the wall, is a quote from the book of Proverbs: “Where there is no vision, the people perish.” The man in the picture is NASA climatologist James Hansen, best known for bringing the danger of global climate change to the attention of the modern world in the 1980s, and widely considered the planet’s leading climatologist. Hansen has just published his first book: Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth About the Coming Climate Catastrophe and Our Last Chance to Save Humanity. As you’d expect, the book contains enough charts and graphs to choke a rhino. And there’s plenty of science, lots of it illuminating, even to jaded climate geeks like me. For example: How do we predict what a world with higher CO2 concentrations would look like? Do we use computers to create climate models? That’s one method, certainly. But we can find even more accurate information about what a warmed world will look like if we go back in time and rummage through the geologic record. The information we find there is extremely accurate. It shows that when it was only 1 degree Celsius warmer on average than now, the seas were several feet higher. Just 1 degree makes that much difference. The science is fascinating, especially when presented in the context of a 30-year effort to make our government understand the dire need for aggressive action. But in the end, Hansen’s book is about something else. It’s about how one should live a life; the book is as much about Hansen’s answer to this philosophical question as it is about climate change. Hansen is, on one hand, a remarkable man with an exceptional intellect, perhaps a once-in-a-millennium, perfectly timed comet of a person, like a Muhammad Ali or a Jonas Salk. On the other hand, he’s an everyman plagued with the same traits of

regret and disappointment with himself that the rest of us also share. In the 1970s, the world’s greatest climate scientist once froze up while giving an overhead slide presentation and had to simply sit down, humiliated. Then, after giving a talk to the Bush-Cheney White House, he agonized about whether he should have ignored the

Hansen is… “perhaps a oncein-a-millennium, perfectly timed comet of a person, like a Muhammad Ali or

a Jonas Salk.

cooling effects of aerosols because it gave Cheney an “out,” enabling him and others to make the specious argument that aerosols somehow balance out the billions of tons of CO2 emitted every year. Whatever his demons, Hansen repeatedly forces himself to do what he believes to be the right thing. Over and over, he swears that after one last effort to connect sound science to the policy it should inform, he’ll go back to the lab. Fortunately for us, he never does; his conviction overrules his reticence. This month, Hansen publicly defended Tim DeChristopher, the student who faces jail time for bidding on oil leases, without any money, to prevent drilling.

In his office, Hansen has a picture on the wall, too; it’s of Jackie Robinson and the legendary 1950s Dodgers. Robinson, a hero in another monumental human struggle, is known for doing the impossible. He didn’t just integrate baseball; he became famous for stealing home base— that consummate statement of daring and confidence. The task Hansen sets out for the reader—and for himself—in his book is similarly audacious: It is to take to the streets and save the planet. It’s a task of limitless difficulty, because it must overcome not only human inertia but also the fat-cat special interests and our glacially slow government. Hansen correctly notes that solving climate change is about solving money in politics, and that the future of democracy depends on addressing both. As he ends his book, Hansen tells us that he has just undergone surgery for prostate cancer. With his grandchildren, Sophie and Connor, he has also planted milkweed to attract monarch butterflies near his home. Working in the ancient Pennsylvania earth, accompanied by two breathing miracles of existence, Hansen must have felt the crushing beauty of the world, the weight of mortality, the brevity and preciousness of life. Hansen could have been content with just being a scientist. He could have done his work and felt—with justification—that he had contributed greatly to the world. This would have freed him from the personal attacks, the stress you can see plainly in his face, and the burden of being a living Cassandra, determined to try to change a world that stubbornly refuses to listen. But Hansen elected not to do that. He chose, instead, to be a great man.

LET BOOMSWAGGER HELP BRIGHTEN YOUR DAY!

Auden Schendler is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is the sustainability director for the Aspen Skiing Company in Colorado.

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Missoula Independent

Plus, all this month is March Makeup Madness: Buy any 3+ Bedhead Products and get 10% off! boomswaggersalon.blogspot.com

Page 11 March 11–March 18, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Life in full One man’s step from scientist to world-changing activist by Auden Schendler

In my office, I have a picture of a man testifying to Congress. He is haggard, with the look of someone under great strain. Behind him, engraved on the wall, is a quote from the book of Proverbs: “Where there is no vision, the people perish.” The man in the picture is NASA climatologist James Hansen, best known for bringing the danger of global climate change to the attention of the modern world in the 1980s, and widely considered the planet’s leading climatologist. Hansen has just published his first book: Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth About the Coming Climate Catastrophe and Our Last Chance to Save Humanity. As you’d expect, the book contains enough charts and graphs to choke a rhino. And there’s plenty of science, lots of it illuminating, even to jaded climate geeks like me. For example: How do we predict what a world with higher CO2 concentrations would look like? Do we use computers to create climate models? That’s one method, certainly. But we can find even more accurate information about what a warmed world will look like if we go back in time and rummage through the geologic record. The information we find there is extremely accurate. It shows that when it was only 1 degree Celsius warmer on average than now, the seas were several feet higher. Just 1 degree makes that much difference. The science is fascinating, especially when presented in the context of a 30-year effort to make our government understand the dire need for aggressive action. But in the end, Hansen’s book is about something else. It’s about how one should live a life; the book is as much about Hansen’s answer to this philosophical question as it is about climate change. Hansen is, on one hand, a remarkable man with an exceptional intellect, perhaps a once-in-a-millennium, perfectly timed comet of a person, like a Muhammad Ali or a Jonas Salk. On the other hand, he’s an everyman plagued with the same traits of

regret and disappointment with himself that the rest of us also share. In the 1970s, the world’s greatest climate scientist once froze up while giving an overhead slide presentation and had to simply sit down, humiliated. Then, after giving a talk to the Bush-Cheney White House, he agonized about whether he should have ignored the

Hansen is… “perhaps a oncein-a-millennium, perfectly timed comet of a person, like a Muhammad Ali or

a Jonas Salk.

cooling effects of aerosols because it gave Cheney an “out,” enabling him and others to make the specious argument that aerosols somehow balance out the billions of tons of CO2 emitted every year. Whatever his demons, Hansen repeatedly forces himself to do what he believes to be the right thing. Over and over, he swears that after one last effort to connect sound science to the policy it should inform, he’ll go back to the lab. Fortunately for us, he never does; his conviction overrules his reticence. This month, Hansen publicly defended Tim DeChristopher, the student who faces jail time for bidding on oil leases, without any money, to prevent drilling.

In his office, Hansen has a picture on the wall, too; it’s of Jackie Robinson and the legendary 1950s Dodgers. Robinson, a hero in another monumental human struggle, is known for doing the impossible. He didn’t just integrate baseball; he became famous for stealing home base— that consummate statement of daring and confidence. The task Hansen sets out for the reader—and for himself—in his book is similarly audacious: It is to take to the streets and save the planet. It’s a task of limitless difficulty, because it must overcome not only human inertia but also the fat-cat special interests and our glacially slow government. Hansen correctly notes that solving climate change is about solving money in politics, and that the future of democracy depends on addressing both. As he ends his book, Hansen tells us that he has just undergone surgery for prostate cancer. With his grandchildren, Sophie and Connor, he has also planted milkweed to attract monarch butterflies near his home. Working in the ancient Pennsylvania earth, accompanied by two breathing miracles of existence, Hansen must have felt the crushing beauty of the world, the weight of mortality, the brevity and preciousness of life. Hansen could have been content with just being a scientist. He could have done his work and felt—with justification—that he had contributed greatly to the world. This would have freed him from the personal attacks, the stress you can see plainly in his face, and the burden of being a living Cassandra, determined to try to change a world that stubbornly refuses to listen. But Hansen elected not to do that. He chose, instead, to be a great man.

LET BOOMSWAGGER HELP BRIGHTEN YOUR DAY!

Auden Schendler is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He is the sustainability director for the Aspen Skiing Company in Colorado.

Whether it's it's Whether new 'do 'do to to aa new get you you get ready for for ready spring, aa spring, perfect look look perfect for Prom Prom or or for just aa fresh fresh just take on on your your take signature signature style, we've we've style, got your your got back! back! Photo courtesy of

830-3192

830-3192 204SS3RD 3RDSTST 204

NEXTTO TOBERNICEʼS BERNICEʼS NEXT BAKERYON ONTHE THE BAKERY HIP STRIP HIP STRIP

Missoula Independent

Plus, all this month is March Makeup Madness: Buy any 3+ Bedhead Products and get 10% off! boomswaggersalon.blogspot.com

Page 11 March 11–March 18, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

S i n c e 1 9 8 6 , Wo m e n ’ s Opportunity & Resource Development Inc. ( WORD) has helped empower women in need. The local nonprofit offers programs that promote access to stable housing, better income and career growth, as well as offer support for families and schooling. They’ve done a lot for women in Missoula over the past 24 years, but the call for help hasn’t gone away. The organization’s upcoming Many Faces of Women art auction and fundraiser marks its largest public event of the year. The soiree aims to raise $10,000 in funds, and generate recognition for WORD’s McKinney Vento Program for homeless students and families. It’s also a celebration of Women’s History Month and a showcase of 30 local female artists.

As for the party, it’ll kick off with a silent auction. It’s followed by dinner from Florence’s Caffee Firenze, and a live auction of art from women like encaustic queen Leslie Van Stavern Millar and vibrant illustrator Courtney Blazon. After you’ve had your fill of the auction, stick around and bust a move at an after party that features choice tunes from Zootown DJ, a photo booth, raffle prizes and a cash bar. —Ira Sather-Olson

THURSDAY MARCH 11

preparation service for low income individuals offered by Montana Credit Unions for Community Development, from 9 AM–5 PM at Missoula homeWORD, 127 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 307. Appointments are required, so RSVP by calling Jim Auer at 531-2048.

Keep your ideology away from my body, please. NARAL Pro-Choice Montana and UM Students for Choice present a talk by journalist and author Michelle Goldberg titled “The Means of Reproduction: Sex, Power and the Future of the World”—which touches on reproductive rights and how right-wing extremism has an impact on women’s rights—at 5:30 PM in the South Ballroom at UM’s University Center. Free. Call 4422057 and visit prochoicemontana.org Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com. Quit stomping and start treading lightly with your carbon footprint during the Sustainable Business Council’s “Measure Up Missoula: The Case for Municipal Sustainability,” a presentation where UM associate prof Robin Saha discusses steps for reducing our city’s carbon footprint, as well as saving on energy costs and local climate action, starting at 6 PM at Office Solutions and Services, 1029 North Ave. W. Free. A social hour starts at 5:30 PM. Call 824-7336.

FRIDAY MARCH 12 If you know a woman who serves the community and creates peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all, consider nominating her for the YWCA’s Judy Wang Legacy Award, which will be awarded during the Salute to Women awards dinner on May 13. Nominations are due today. Visit ywcaofmissoula.org for a nomination form, or call 543-6691 with questions. Do your part to offer a family a place to stay when their child is in the hospital during the Red Shoe Ball, a fundraiser for Missoula’s Ronald McDonald House which features cocktails, dinner, an auction and a dance starting at 6 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. $75 person/$800 table of eight. Visit redshoeball.com for tickets or call 541-7646.

WORD hosts its Many Faces of Women fundraiser Friday, March 12, at 6 PM at Fort Missoula’s Heritage Hall, Building T-2, on Fort Missoula Road. $55 per person/$45 advance/$5 after-party only. Visit manyfacesofwomen.com and call Thea at 543-3550 ext. 238.

Keep activism alive during a young activist training hosted by the Montana Wilderness Association Ridgerunners, which runs from 10 AM–4:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Space is super limited, so register by calling Heather at 603-767-3125. Visit wildmontana.org.

SUNDAY MARCH 14 Missoula is a bona fide bike town. If you don’t have one already, you’ll be able to build your own recycled recumbent or four-wheel bike after you volunteer for two hours at Missoula Free Cycles, 732 S. First St. W., on Sundays at a TBA time. Call 800-809-0112 to RSVP.

MONDAY MARCH 15 Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

TUESDAY MARCH 16 Find the strength and will to survive in the company of others during a breast cancer support group at St. Francis Xavier Parish, 420 W. Pine, every first and third Tue. of the month at noon. Free. Call 329-5656. Do your part to help keep coal in the ground during a rally to save Otter Creek, which starts at noon at the XXXXs on North Higgins Avenue, and includes a march to the Higgins bridge. RSVP by contacting the Sierra C l u b ’ s B r a d H a s h a t 54 9 - 114 2 o r e - m a i l brad.hash@sierraclub.org. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for women every Tue. at 6:30 PM, where groups for Native women and children meet as well. New group members with children are asked to arrive at 6:15, without kids at 6:25. Free. Call 543-6691.

SATURDAY MARCH 13

WEDNESDAY MARCH 17

If you have compulsive-eating problems, seek help and support with others during a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous, which meets this and every Sat. at 9 AM on the second floor of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. Visit www.oa.org.

Fill your stomach with tasty brews in order to help create a peace park on Waterworks hill during a Community Unite pint night for the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center at the Kettlehouse Northside Taproom, 313 N. First St. W., from 5–8 PM. Free to attend. A portion of proceeds from each pint sold goes to the center and its development of the peace park. Call 728-1660.

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AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 March 11–March 18, 2010


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Police arrested a 17-year-old boy in College Station, Texas, for trying to pass a counterfeit $5 bill. Officials said the bogus bill had an “overwhelming number of imperfections,” appearing to have been made by gluing two sheets of paper together with images of the front and back of a $5 bill printed on either side. Further evidence that the bill consisted of two pieces of paper cropped and glued together was the observation that the front of the bill was longer than the back. A carjacking victim told authorities in Hayward, Calif., that his attacker choked him, drove off, then returned and resumed choking him until a witness intervened. Alameda County sheriff’s investigators immediately identified Ali Kimia, 32, as the suspect when witness and victim both mentioned the tattoos on his forehead. One over his right eye reads, “Why,” and one over his left eye reads, “Try.” HOMELAND INSECURITY - Secret Service computers work at only 60 percent capacity, according to a classified review that blamed the slow tempo on outdated systems and reliance on a computer mainframe dating to the 1980s. Although the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which oversees the Secret Service, conceded the existing hardware “is prone to failures” and the service’s “data environment is fragile and cannot sustain the tempo of current and future operational missions,” the DHS ignored an unofficial cost estimate to update the system of $187 million, allocating only $33 million and requesting only another $69 million. Department of Homeland Security officers lost 289 firearms—handguns, M-4 rifles and shotguns—from 2006 to 2008, according to the department’s inspector general. The report blamed officers entrusted with the weapons for failing to properly secure them. One was left unsecured in an idling vehicle at a convenience store where the gun and the vehicle were stolen while the officer was inside. Other officers left their firearms at fast-food restaurants, parking lots and a bowling alley. Local law enforcement organizations recovered 15 DHS firearms from felons, gang members, criminals, drug users and teenagers. PUZZLING EVIDENCE - Police who raided the home of South African drug lord Fadwaan “Fat” Murphy, 37, reported that while they were searching him, his strap-on penis fell off. Charged with possessing stolen property, Murphy disclosed at a bail hearing in a Cape Town magistrate’s court that he was technically a hermaphrodite named Hilary. He explained he was born with both male and female sexual organs but had surgery to remove the female parts. “I stand firm as a man, as a husband and as a father,” Murphy declared under oath, calling his condition “God’s decision.” He noted that at least he hadn’t “been born with two heads.” After Murphy’s admission, his mother said she tried to raise him as a girl, but “he wanted to wear pants.”

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ELECTRICITY RUNNING WILD - The Australian government warned that roofs fitted with the foil insulation it recommended for its energy-saving program are electrocuting people. Officials, who ordered a nationwide safety check of tens of thousands of roofs fitted with foil insulation it offered rebates for, blamed the deaths of four electricians on the metallic foil coming into contact with electrical cables and electrifying entire attics. A preliminary audit of 400 homes found that up to a dozen might pose a danger. REASONABLE EXPLANATION - Sheriff’s investigators in Travis County, Texas, who caught Anthony Marco Gigliotto, 17, with 150 photos of women, mostly clothed, including “a few upskirt photos,” said Gigliotto admitted taking the photos of 39 different women without their consent but explained he acted only because his high school wasn’t teaching students enough about sex. The Lake Travis Independent School District issued a prompt denial, calling the complaint about the lack of sex education “completely unfounded.”

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SECOND-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - Michael Phillips, 32, was teaching an NRA class in Orlando, Fla., to certify citizens to carry a concealed weapon when his gun accidentally went off, shooting student Robert Frauman Jr., 50, in the foot. NRA rules forbid bringing ammunition into safety classes. The class was taking place at Summit Church, but communications director, Kristy-Lee Lawley, said the class, the first of its kind at the church, wasn’t a church-sponsored event and added, “We won’t be having anything like that in our church in the future.”

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MENSA REJECT OF THE WEEK - John Yarrington, 23, agreed to act as a drug informant for police in Falmouth, Mass. After making a controlled drug purchase, Yarrington received $100 from the police and 10 minutes later was using the money to buy drugs—from the same dealer he helped set up, who was still under police surveillance. Officers arrested Yarrington and the dealer. “It’s a case of the dumb get dumber,” Detective Christopher Bartolomei said. SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - A shootout between Errol Parker Sr., 61, and Pittsburgh police began with an argument over a parking place. Police said they received a 911 call from a man complaining that Parker punched him and brandished a gun at him, then told the man to move his car from the space the man had just shoveled out so Parker could park his car there. When police arrived, they ordered Parker out of his house, but he fired two shots at them before surrendering. Milwaukee police charged apartment manager Jimmie Lamar Richardson, 52, with beating one of his tenant’s to death because the tenant locked himself out of his apartment. A witness told police that Richardson went into a rage and threw tenant Richard Bohannon against a wall and down one flight of stairs, then kicked him down a second flight of stairs.

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Page 13 March 11–March 18, 2010


by Erika Fredrickson

Matthew Bile plays lead guitar for local dark metal band Walking Corpse Syndrome.

n the early 1980s, a band called Prophecy would lug its gear onto the large corner stage at the Tijuana Cantina, plug into amps and play something no other band in Missoula was tapping into at the time: metal. The Tijuana Cantina, which stood across the street from the Top Hat on Front Street and had a Mexican restaurant above it, usually hosted pop cover bands. But on the nights that Prophecy took the stage, it was a different story. The band brought in its own big light setup, robust sound system and a riser to elevate the drum kit, and then delivered an assault of metal covers from bands like Kiss. Unlike most other local acts at the time, Prophecy also played a slew of originals like “Night of the Executioner” and “Killin’ Machine.” “We were the bad boys,” says Prophecy guitarist/singer Doug Koester. “We were rough around the edges. We were partying all night and livin’ it up in the bars. And when we put on a show, we put on a show like we were playing to 20,000 people.” In those days, you couldn’t walk into a Missoula bar or club and not hear a predictable string of radio pop blasting from the speakers. When live acts did play, they mostly covered Top 40 songs, too, from the Eurythemics’ “Here Comes the Rain Again” to Culture Club’s “Karma Chameleon.”

I

Missoula Independent

Prophecy stood out in a sea of jelly bracelets and Members Only jackets. Nationally, metal was going through a metamorphosis. Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath had

started it in the 1970s with blues stewed in heavy riffs. Bands like Judas Priest took the blues influences out, and the British Wave Metal bands like Mötorhead injected punk rock. Metallica made the speedy solos of thrash popular. But during

Page 14 March 11–March 18, 2010

Prophecy’s heyday on the local scene, glam metal was on the rise. “The big hair thing was going on in L.A. and bands were starting to get signed,” says Koester. “It was the beginning of Mötley Crüe and Ratt, so those were some of the bands we enjoyed.” At the same time, Koester remembers Missoula getting its first introduction to punk. Jeff Ament, who would later become the bassist for Pearl Jam, had just started hardcore punk trio Deranged Diction. The band’s musical style may have differed from Prophecy’s, but the two had one thing in common. “Because they and us both hated all the Top 40 stuff, we got along,” says Koester. “The punkers would come listen to us and we’d listen to the punkers. And we’d all trash the Top 40 bands when they were around.” For the time being, punk and metal appeared to be on equal footing. Both relatively new and definitely extreme, they shared the characteristics of outsiders: defiant, anti-establishment and loud. But the sideby-side status didn’t last long. Prophecy toured constantly around the northwest—in a camouflage school bus, no less—playing five or six times a week in clubs

and bars. They didn’t have day jobs. What little they did earn was enough for a group of rebellious 20-somethings to live off of. “That’s all we did. It wasn’t much money,” says Koester, “but at that time it was enough. And we were the heaviest thing playing the clubs. We put on a big show. We were going to be rock stars.” In 1987, MTV launched “Headbangers Ball,” a video and interview show focused exclusively on metal. By the time it was cancelled in 1995 (it reappeared sporadically in various lowgrade, late-night versions on MTV2 thereafter), metal had been surpassed by various other genres. Grunge mania was in full swing. Locally, punk had found a foothold in downtown venues like Trendz and, eventually, Jay’s Upstairs. Prophecy was long gone. But metal never died. Over the past few decades, while other types of music found widespread popularity among local audiences, metal—whether by nature or nurture—has stayed underground and insular. Call it the redheaded stepchild of the music scene. Call the bands and their diehard fans fringe dwellers. But the truth is, there are a lot of metal bands keeping the scene alive, playing in and around Missoula, who deserve to be heard. We think it’s time for an introduction.


scene—with other groups like War Cry and Die Sister Die— Thrash metal band Judgment Hammer among Jay’s much more seems out of place in the warm light of prominent, full-swing punk Liquid Planet, where the noise level never and garage rock scene. And goes above the hum of laptop computers and though none of the metalheads rustling newspapers, or the occasional whir say they were completely alienof a coffee grinder. Guitarist Jared Kiess ated, they all certainly noticed wears an old-school Testament T-shirt, faded a division—some nights more jeans and white high-top sneakers. Sid La than others. Tray’s big long hair hits past the shoulders of “There were some real conhis ripped jean jacket. Aaron Gericke wears a frontational points in the late Megadeth baseball cap, and Dustin Fugere, 1990s when we first started playwho has hair to his chin, sports an Iron ing at Jay’s,” says Tribble. “One Maiden shirt. It’s not that the quartet are night, we got into it. We were wildly out of place, but when they walk by, playing, and we had a whole customers definitely peek from behind their bunch of metalheads there, but books with curiosity. all of those punk guys are pretty Judgment Hammer is one of the relentless—respect for them, youngest metal bands in Montana—if not they’re tough as nails. It was a the youngest—with two of the members rough night. Fists got thrown. Photo by Cathrine L. Walters still in high school and the other two just But we were able to continue a few years graduated. Kiess and Gericke Local metal promoter Cheryl Fullerton booked shows for years at The played in a band called the Four Other Side, but that came to an end when Tom Read, the venue’s owner, playing there.” They persevered in part, Horsemen who, in 2007, rocked the died suddenly in May 2009. “Everybody felt comfortable there,” she says. he says, because of support Palace stage at local indie rock extrava- “Everybody knew everybody—kind of how Jay’s was for the punk scene, from soundman and Kiss fanatThe Other Side was for the metal scene. ” ganza Total Fest. Not just metalheads, but ic Justin Lawrence, who loves indie and folk rock fans seemed house feel: cigarette smoke curling through the air, a enthralled by the young band’s ability to pull off large drum set in the corner, a weathered leather couch metal but had his foot in the punk scene playing for thrash metal originals, with all the gratuitous guitar and a refrigerator stocked with Coors and Clamato for punk band Humpy. “Justin had our back,” adds Tribble. solos, headbanging and hair whipping of a red beers. When Jay’s Upstairs was shut down in 2003, the Metallica throwback. The band members are reflecting on Jay’s music scene dispersed. House parties sprung up, tem“Our influences are definitely old-school,” says Upstairs. Keller and Justin Tribble, both guitarists for Kiess. “Our main influence is old Metallica…and old Universal Choke Sign (UCS), played in a metal band porary warehouse venues popped up, and then disinalbums from Slayer, Anthrax, Exodus, Testament, called Tower back in the late 1990s. Per Carlson, tegrated. Metal bands started getting gigs at Buck’s Death Angel. We proclaim ourselves as the only UCS’s bassist, also played at Jay’s in a metal band Club, a remote venue off Brooks Street, while punk, garage and other indie rock shows stayed in the heart Montana thrash metal band.” called St. Rage. Together they made up a small metal of downtown. Judgment Hammer recently put out a debut album called Arbiter of Fate, full of speedy solos and driving, whirlwind riffs in songs like “Lightning War,” “Swift Justice” and “Brazen Serpent.” “We have songs about war and violence and swift justice, and there’s one about the blitzkrieg, and one kind of about Satan,” Kiess says with a devilish smile. “I mean, we do need a song about Satan. But I don’t focus on the lyrics. You just need a vessel for a melody. Who cares what the lyrics are.” Kiess says that he likes the fast, upbeat style of thrash, as opposed to some of the darker, downturned doom metal that’s been popular with new metal acts (aka nü metal). He says he’s noticed oldschool thrash bands emerging from places like California and Europe, but not Montana. “I don’t know if it’s just that the culture of our town is not suited to our kind of music,” says Kiess. “And the thing is, if somebody comes into town like the Sword—I mean, they opened up for Metallica— people have heard of them, and they’ll go. Maybe those people would like our stuff but they don’t want to give it a try because they don’t know who we are.” But the band has received support from outside the state. After Arbiter of Fate went up on Judgment Hammer’s MySpace page, the band got invited to play Thrasheggeddon II, a metal festival in Albuquerque, N.M., that showcases high-profile thrash bands. Judgment Hammer’s now looking forward to playing in front of hundreds rather than the five to 30 people they usually draw in Missoula.

Youth gone wild

Heaven and hell J.J. Keller passes around a bottle of Jägermeister at Universal Choke Sign’s practice room. It’s a spacious garage, located on Missoula’s Westside, with a club-

Cheryl Fullerton, UCS’s band manager, was drowning in a corporate job at the time. She’d grown up in Missoula listening to tapes of thrash bands like Nuclear Assault and Exodus. “I’ve always been drawn to that form of music and its angst,” she says. “We used to pull over when we had to go hang out with people who weren’t really into metal and get all of our headbanging out in the car back when we were young. You almost have a need for it. I was getting frustrated because there weren’t any shows to go to. It came down to the point where, if nobody else was going to do it, I was.” Fullerton started booking shows in Buck’s Club’s adjacent room, called The Other Side (formerly the Cowboy Bar). The 450-person space worked well for popular, national acts, but on nights when only a handful of people showed up, the emptiness was glaring—and costly. “My first show was bad,” she says. “You think that you’re going to do something and that automatically people are going to show up. It was the beginning of an education.” But Fullerton gradually began to turn the metal scene around. She started up a production company, Demonlily Entertainment, focused exclusively on metal shows. She began brokering national metal acts to hit Missoula, including Primer 55, Straightline Stitch and Psychostick, while slotting local bands to open. Some shows flopped and some scored, filling the venue from stage front to the back wall. Local bands got another boost when, in 2005, 96.3 The Blaze began promoting metal songs on the radio, in particular The Local 406 Show. UCS admits the arrangement began with a few inside connections at the station willing to help them out. Those connections led to radio play, and listeners eventually began requesting the band’s songs.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

In 2005, 96.3 The Blaze started promoting Universal Choke Sign’s songs on the radio. Support from the station and the emergence of events like the PBR Band of the Year contest led to more exposure for the metal group, which includes, from left to right, Per Carlson, J.J. Keller, Dayv Drake and Justin Tribble.

Missoula Independent

Page 15 March 11–March 18, 2010


we go out, we beat the streets, hand out fliers and we try to get as many people as possible.” The band’s homegrown approach almost always means it doesn’t make much money, if it even breaks even. Booking bars has become more difficult due to cheaper options like DJs and karaoke. Another problem, he says, is that even when they do book a gig, there are a lot more types of entertainment to choose from these days. “We have trouble getting people to log off ‘World of Warcraft’ to come see live music,” Bile says. “It’s not all gumdrops and lollypops like some people think it is. We really have to work hard. And we’re not the only band doing it.” WCS recently recorded its sophomore album, Narcissist, at local studio Buzz Records. It’s an amal-

ing, “If it’s too loud, you’re too old,” and launching into another song. But by then, the sound guy had shut off the PA. “The grandstands were full,” says frontman Corey Hayes. “There were old people in Rascal scooters, women pushing strollers. People stopped to listen. The special-needs kids were bobbing their heads. But I guess those [in charge] didn’t like how loud we were.” It doesn’t really faze the band members: getting the plug pulled, people misunderstanding the type of music they play—it’s all par for the course with metal, says Hayes. But finding venues where they didn’t have to censor themselves or quiet down or be asked to play covers was the band’s main goal.

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Undun has been asked to turn down, turn off or play something else during several live shows. Most recently, organizers at last year’s Western Montana Fair told the band to quiet down. “If it’s too loud, you’re too old,” guitarist Josh Warren recalls saying.

gam of death and groove metal, though the band prefers the term dark metal to describe the overall sound spawned by a patchwork of influences. Bile’s proud of the album—he calls it the band’s baby—but cautions against fans expecting the studio effort to replace WCS’s live shows. “Things can go wrong and things do go wrong live, and there’s more energy,” he says. “And sometimes it’s being pressed butt to nut with somebody else sweating your balls off, but you’re letting go and having fun. It’s never how it sounds on the album— sometimes it’s better and sometimes it’s worse, but god dammit you gotta take that chance.”

Rainbow in the dark The first time Undun was kicked off the stage was in 2000 at a cancer benefit show in Butte. According to guitarist Josh Warren, a promoter had invited the band to play the benefit, and the Montana Tech radio station had even advertised the show by playing some of the band’s heavier death metal songs. But when the group plugged in the amps and started pounding out some grinding riffs, the promoter wasn’t impressed. “We started playing,” says Warren, “and she comes over and says she doesn’t like what we’re playing. She wanted us to play ‘Sweet Home Alabama’ instead.” Clearly, she’d gotten the wrong idea. Since then, the band counts several times it’s been asked to turn down, turn off or play something else. The most recent example was at the Western Montana Fair, during a show sponsored by The Blaze. Three songs in, the sound operator told the band it would have to quiet down to appease some members of the fair committee. Warren recalls say-

In fact, even before The Other Side closed, Hayes had his eye on the Palace. The Palace/Badlander complex on the corner of Ryman and Broadway opened in May 2007, hosting rock shows with relative success. Looking for an opportunity, Hayes volunteered to help with security during the August 2008 Total Fest. “I kind of stuck around and started to nag [the owners] about doing metal shows there,” he says. “They wanted a huge deposit because they thought we weren’t going to draw a big enough crowd and, maybe, that somehow the place was going to get torn up.” Hayes persisted and ended up with a Thursday night show at the Palace called Metal Militia, just six months before The Other Side closed. He brought in big metal acts like Skeletonwitch. He hosted a benefit with Demonlily for the Watson Children’s Shelter, which featured heavy rock band Royal Bliss and several local metal acts. Lazerwolfs played a tribute show to Judas Priest. Project Independent, a statewide metal competition, made its home at the Palace. And Dimestock, an annual tribute show to Pantera’s late frontman Dimebag Darrel, which the Other Side used to host, spent its fourth year at the basement venue. All the while, new local metal bands sprung on the scene, including Beef Curtain, Maggedon and Doomfock, among many others. Colin Hickey, who books shows at the Palace and Badlander, says that recent Metal Militia nights have been slow. There’s a lull in metal bands touring to town, and metal DJs don’t bring in the crowds. “Metal Thursdays were great when real bands played,” Hickey says, “but off nights, when there were just metal DJs, it was horrible. No one showed up.” Hickey acknowledges the void The Other Side has created for metal bands. At The Other Side, you

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Missoula Independent

Page 17 March 11–March 18, 2010


Photo courtesy of Blessiddoom

Blessiddoom’s known for its elaborate live shows and stark political commentary. The group’s most recent album, Dystopia, suggests American citizens have lost their taste for independent thinking. “It also gets back to an important aspect of metal,” says drummer Pauli Doom, “which is defiance.”

could book a show on short notice. But for the Badlander and Palace, bands are booked three months in advance—at a minimum. And, unlike weeknights at The Other Side, he says, local metal bands are competing with indie rock, hip-hop and every touring act that comes into town. “We love to do metal shows,” says Hickey. “We’re a fan of them. My issue is booking.”

Piece of mind When the lights hit the stage, the piercing sound of air-raid sirens fills the room. Blessiddoom guitarist Russ Reel and his sister, bassist Sherri Reel Johnson, dive into chugging riffs and squealing false harmonics as a police beacon, decorated with two large American flags, flashes red behind them in the shadows. Backup singer Chelsi Raymond paces, while on either side of the stage two young women dubbed the “Daughters of Doom” dance scantily clad in goth gear. Suddenly, frontman Eddie Johnson saunters into the light dressed in an ATF uniform and sunglasses, his long blond hair snaking out from under a top hat. He yells to the crowd: “Get the fuck up,” and several people stick their rock horns in the air as drummer Pauli Doom’s pummeling double pedal kicks up the wall of heavy sound. “Attention citizens,” Johnson growls militantly, “please stand before your telestrator…and prepare…for the five…minute…hate!” That line, if you don’t recognize it, is a slight variation of one in George Orwell’s 1984. Blessiddoom’s police state props and Orwellian references reflect the band’s interest in American political commentary. The group’s most recent album, Dystopia, focuses on the view that American citizens have lost their taste for independent thinking. “In this country I think there is an addiction to the idea of being oppressed by the government,” says Johnson. “My sentiment is that there’s nothing more patriotic than to stand up and dissent. But I use the American flags as a positive symbol, like, ‘Guess what? We’re taking this back for ourselves.’”

Missoula Independent

Page 18 March 11–March 18, 2010

“It also gets back to an important aspect of metal, which is defiance,” adds Doom. “The [stage performance] also has a certain amount of shock value. And I’m not against shock value.” Blessiddoom plays a fusion of classic Judas Priest with Black Label Society’s chunky groove metal. Its style is a far cry from the cacophony and animalistic growling of, say, black metal bands, who are sometimes labeled devil worshippers (usually not true) or, in the case of a couple of Norwegian metal bands, cathedral burners and murderers (sometimes true). But people still get the wrong idea about Blessiddoom’s songs titled “Sepulchre” and “Could You (Sacrifice).” “Let me just say that there is no satanic grave robbing in our music,” laughs Doom. “And there’s no misogyny, which I think sometimes metal and other rock ’n’ roll can get tagged with.” Blessiddoom began playing shows at The Other Side in 2006, and the band’s opened for national touring acts like Skeletonwitch and Hemlock. The band often travels to Spokane or Great Falls, which has a thriving metal scene. But, unlike the Prophecy days, most independent bands like Blessiddoom can’t make much of a living wage off tours. “You can’t be in a metal band if you want to make money,” says Johnson. “Even some of the biggest names don’t make money. They go home after tour and they have day jobs.” In some places, like Missoula, it might come down to the fact that metal isn’t the genre of choice for music audiences. It’s just too loud, too dark, too raw, too something. But, for local metal bands that like the sinister, underground feel of it, sometimes that’s the point. “Some people will never understand the element of it being therapeutic for people who are outcasts or loners, who do have intelligent things to say,” says bassist Sherri. “I think a lot of metal bands do.” “It’s not easy,” adds Johnson. “You have to do it because you love it. And

because you can’t imagine your life without it.”

Ride the lightning Doug Koester walks through the door of the Independent office to drop off a copy of Prophecy’s 1984 eponymous album. The raised letters of “Prophecy” loom over the bright, bleeding red background of the cover, which was, oddly enough, designed by local artist Monte Dolack. Now, Koester looks quite different from the photo of him displayed on the back of the record. Instead of a sleeveless T-shirt, cool gaze and long feathered hair, he’s clean-cut, dressed in a nice suit and displays a warm smile. He’s now a fundraiser and regional manager for the American Heart Association. “Things change,” he says. “Back then it was like, ‘A real job? Are you kidding me?’” Koester still plays music, though it’s now for a country band called County Line, scheduled to open at the Wilma Theatre next month for national act Jake Owen. Koester says he’s content with his current band—he switched from guitar to bass—and he no longer cares about making it big. But he does recall the Prophecy days with fondness. “It was the edgy, it was the loud, it was the rebellious,” he says. “It was the inyour-face. We used to say, ‘Prophecy rocks your face off.’ It was that kind of feeling.” As much as things have changed since Koester shredded the stage at the Tijuana Cantina, many things remain the same. Local metal bands, whether they’re playing speed metal or sludgy doom chords, are still edgy, loud, rebellious and aimed at rocking your face off. And they’re still on the fringe of the local music scene. Koester knows it, and he’s tickled to finally have the genre’s local history, as well as the current stories, come to light. He just has one request when he drops off the old album: “When you play it, be sure you turn it up loud.” efredrickson@missoulanews.com


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The world’s best hen FLASHINTHEPAN With spring in the air, the backyard chicken farmer’s thoughts will often turn toward buying some new baby chicks to supplement his flock. Many hatcheries are happy to help, their catalogs offering an acid-trip’s worth of fraggle-headed, bell-bottomed, Easter-egg laying, purple-beaked poultry that would add color and personality to any flock. But amid this array of options there’s one breed I believe belongs in every diversified chicken portfolio: the large, regal, golden-hued bird known as the Buff Orpington. Buff Orpingtons are heavyset chickens of English descent. They’re quite fluffy, making them cold-tolerant to the point that in most American climates they will lay eggs all through the winter. Buff Orpingtons are excellent parents, showing a knack for and dedication to incubation and chick-rearing. But above all of these wonderful qualities, the breed’s greatest asset is its unrivalled knack for not getting killed. The importance of this trait is obvious, but can hardly be overstated, since there are so many creatures out there that will eagerly kill your chickens if they can. My first clue to the Buff Orpington’s talent for survival came years ago when a neighbor’s Siberian husky got into my chicken yard. The ladies ran around like chickens with their heads cut off while the dog pounced with lethal quickness, crushing each victim in its jaws before moving on to the next. Before anyone could stop the carnage, six hens were dead. The only survivors were Annabelle and Annabelle, two identical Buff Orpingtons who ran for the safety of the coop via a small door the husky couldn’t fit through. I had wondered for years if it was just coincidence that both survivors of the massacre were Buff Orpingtons, and the other day I got my answer. Having just dumped some half-rotten veggie parts for my (since restocked) flock to enjoy, I took a moment in the spring sunshine to savor the chorus of excited clucks and coos as they scratched around. That’s when Stinky the dog slipped through the open gate behind me.

by ARI LeVAUX

sive and skittish, doesn’t like to be tickled, and hates it when you walk around the coop at night. While different in temperament from the original Annabelles, Annabelle 2.0 shares their commonsense survival instincts. Many chickens like to hop up into trees at the end of the day and sleep outside. While it’s kind of cute, this behavior exposes them to predation by many nocturnal animals, and it gets old climbing up the tree every night to put the girls away. But Annabelle 2.0, like the original Annabelles, has no desire to roost anywhere but the coop. Like many hens, Annabelle 2.0 will occasionally get broody, a state in which all she wants to do is sit on eggs, day and night. Last time she got broody I slipped some fertilized eggs under her and she sat on them for three weeks straight. She wouldn’t get up to eat or drink, so I placed food and water dishes in her roosting box, at which point she pecked my hand and complained angrily. When the eggs hatched she was a dedicated mom, Photo by Ari LeVaux and woe to anyone who got too close to those chicks. Now that I live in a rural area I can have a roosto conclude that something in a Buff Orpington’s genetic programming compels it to head for the ter in the flock, a little guy named Napoleon who looks like he’s riding an elephant when he gets with coop during times of distress. After the husky massacre, only those two orig- the girls. Annabelle 2.0, despite the size imbalance, inal Annabelles remained. One was kidnapped and seems to be his favorite. And while Annabelle 2.0 did eaten by a raccoon while being detained in an her best to make his life miserable when I first unsecure location (long story), leaving the other brought him into the flock, Napoleon seems to have Annabelle as the sole member of my flock. She was finally brought out her soft side. After a recent elequite lonely until some new chicks I’d ordered to phant ride I watched them standing together under restock the flock were big enough to go outside. a tree. Annabelle 2.0 bent down and groomed the The chicks flocked to Annabelle’s warm, maternal feathers of his neck. Even though she doesn’t seem to like me, I love henliness, jumping up to grab food out of her Annabelle 2.0. There may be a few things I’d change, mouth. One of these new chicks was the Buff Orpington but she’s basically all a chicken farmer could hope that came to be known as Annabelle 2.0. She’s gold- for in a hen. She’s smart and tough, with strong famen orange, like the original Annabelles, but unlike ily values, and for these traits I thank the breeders those two sweethearts Annabelle 2.0 is a total bitch. who created the Buff Orpington. It’s truly the gold She’s the flock’s only member who won’t run toward standard of chickens, and every diversified poultry you as you approach the yard. She’s fiercely defen- portfolio should include gold like this. Stinky’s no killer, but she does like a good chase, especially if it ends with her nose up a chicken’s butt. It was a crazy scene: flying feathers, leaping bodies and loud expressions of anger and alarm from chickens and chicken farmer alike. The only one who kept cool was Annabelle 2.0, a Buff Orpington who walked up the ramp to the coop and waited out the storm. This response was so similar to that of the original Annabelles during the husky massacre I had

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West 728-1358 Where Myrtle Avenue ends at Bernice's, a tiny bakery sits as a veritable landmark to those who enjoy homestyle baked goods, strong coffee, community, and a variety of delicious treats. Join us for lunch if you'd like. Crazy delicious. Crazy cheap. 30 years and still baking. Open Every Day 6AM to 8PM. $ Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a "biga" (pronounced beega) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses local products, the freshest produce as well as

www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Great Food No Attitude. Mon-Fri

7am - 4pm (Breakfast ‘til Noon)

Sat & Sun

8am - 4pm (Breakfast all day)

531 S. Higgins

541-4622 www.justinshobnobcafe.com

MOVIE SHORTS artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) 541-BLUE www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours MondaySaturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$ The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 Dine-In, Drive-Thru, Delivery... Truly a Missoula find. Popular with the locals. Voted Missoula's best pizza. Everything from hand-tossed, thin-crust, stone deck pizza to wild salmon burri-

tos, free-range chicken, rice bowls, ribs, pasta, salads, soups, sandwiches & "Pizza by the Slice." And now offering gluten-free dough. Local brews on tap and wine by the glass. Open every day for lunch & dinner. $-$$

Shows, Summaries, & Times

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins • 728-8780 Celebrating 37 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

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Ciao Mambo 541 S. Higgins Ave. 543-0377 Ciao Mambo, at the end of the Hip Strip on 4th and Higgins, serves up fresh, classic, immigrant style Italian food seven days a week. Terrific service and an extensive domestic and Italian wine list. Try our Wednesday all you can eat Spaghetti! Dinner only and take out service available. Ciaomambo.com or 543-0377. $$-$$$

Missoula Independent

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the

Cold Stone Creamery Across from Costco on Reserve by TJ Maxx & Ross 549-5595 In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of ... ice cream! ColdStone is home-made, super-premium and more delicious than it should be, it seems! Cast your eyes on all our mix-ins and choose your favorites, be it for a cone, icecream cake or ice-cream sandwich! Many a fine folk will find ... It's a Great Day for Ice-Cream! $-$$ Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula's Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. Open Mon-Thurs 7am-8pm, Fri & Sat 8am4pm, Sun 8am-8pm. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted free-range chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm. $–$$ Harry Davids 2700 Paxson Street, Suite H • 830-3277 Kicking off in February is LIVE BAND KARAOKE and LADIES NIGHT at Harry David’s every Thursday night at 9:30pm. Drink specials for the Ladies! Part Karaoke / Part Dance night with the band Party Trained, this is your opportunity to sing like a rockstar with a live band backing you up – and it will be every Thursday! If Karaoke is not your thing – no problem the band will be playing in between karaoke songs to keep you on the dance floor! Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$ HuHot Mongolian Grill 3521 Brooks • 829-8888 At HuHot you’ll find dozens of meats, seafood, noodles, vegetables and homemade sauces for

the timid to the adventurous. Choose your favorites from the fresh food bars. You pick ‘em…we grill ‘em. We are as carnivore, vegetarian, diabetic, lo-salt and low-carb friendly as you want to be! Start with appetizers and end with desserts. You can even toast your own s’mores right at you table. A large selection of beer, wine and sake’ drinks available. Stop by for a great meal in a fun atmosphere. Kid and family friendly. Open daily at 11 AM. $-$$ Indulge Bakery 700 SW Higgins Ave. 544-4293 indulgebakery.wordpress.com Now open! Enjoy international flavors from baci di dama to pizzelles, gourmet cupcakes, scones and decadent cinnamon rolls. Specialty breads hot and fresh between 3 and 5pm daily. Open M-F 7am-6:30pm; Sat. 9am-4pm See us on Facebook! Call to find out more (406)523-3951. $ Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Not matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $-$$ Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch and we use no MSG products. Featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive hot and ice tea menu including bubble tea. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Free Tea Tasting second Saturday every month 4:30-5:30pm Open Mon-Sat, lunch an dinner. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. • 721-1312 www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. Special senior menu & a great kids’ menu. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$

HAPPIESTHOUR Harold’s Club Who you’re drinking with: “Local yokels,” Lanoue jokes. Mostly good-natured neighbors from Milltown and Bonner, with a few errant college kids thrown in.

Claim to fame: “I don’t know if it’s the beer on ice or the animal heads in the bubbles,” says bartender Jenny Regan. Or maybe it’s the annual New Year’s Day Ride from the Rhino to Harold’s. According to Regan, local motorcycle club Montana Legends makes the run every year, “snow or rain or shine.” Atmosphere: A bit loud on a recent midweek afternoon. The regulars are having a spirited conversation about car racing and Discovery Channel’s “Cash Cab.” Larry Lanoue just sips his drink, chatting off and on with Regan. He sums up the joint as clean, “but not white-glove clean.” Regan adds they still enforce the Code of the West. “Whoever orders the drink buys it,” she says. What you’re drinking: Patrons used to favor Jack Daniels, but today the popular drinks range from Bud Light to Maker’s Mark. One thing’s sure: There’s no such thing as a weak pour here.

What you’re talking about: Pool tournaments, fiddle jamborees, the 17year run of Solid Sound Karaoke at Harold’s every Friday night...the average conversation here rambles in that pleasant, homey way. Talk of the area’s best dive bars gives way to talk of the smoking ban gives way to the infractions at the Turah Pines Bar gives way to Lanoue’s stories from the military… How to find it: Head east through Milltown on Highway 200. Take a right on Owen Street after crossing the Blackfoot River and drive over the railroad tracks. —Alex Sakariassen Happiest Hour is a new column that celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

NOT JUST

SUSHI NIGHT EVERY MONDAY

403 N. HIGGINS AVE. • 549-7979

Missoula Independent

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WWW.SUSHIHANAMISSOULA.COM


Liquid Planet 223 N. Higgins Ave. • 541-4541 From Latté to Lassî, Water to Wine, Tea Cup to Tea Pot, Liquid Planet has the best beverage offering this side of Neptune -- with a special focus on allnatural, organic, and sustainability. Their distinctive and healthy smoothie menu is worth the visit too! Quick and delicious breakfast and lunch is always ready to go; pastries, croissants, bagels, breakfast burritos, wraps, salads, and soups. Open 8 am to 10 pm daily. $-$$ Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don't feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$ Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $6.95. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $6.95. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$. Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. 541-0231 Country French Specialties, Bison, Elk, Fresh Fish Daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Reservations recommended for the warm & inviting dining areas, or drop in for a quick bite in the wine bar. Now, you may go to our website Pearlcafe.US to make reservations or buy gift certificates, while there check out our gorgeous wedding and specialty cakes. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 46 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$

$…Under $5

Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal on our park side patio or within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues.-Sat. 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring locally produced specials as well as international cuisine and traditional Irish fare. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS, 100% SMOKE FREE. "Where the Gaelic and the Garlic Mix!" $-$$ The Stone of Accord 4951 N. Reserve St. 830-3210 Serving Award Winning Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners 7 days a week! All of your favorite Irish classics, plus a daily selection of Chef's specialties. A fully stocked bar, wine and liquor store and the Emerald Casino make The Stone of Accord the perfect place for an enjoyable meal. 6:30am-2:00am $-$$

March

COFFEE SPECIAL

Organic Earth & Sky Blend $9.75/lb. Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS

TEN SPOON opens a

NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Monday - Sunday 8a.m. - 3p.m. $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

$–$$…$5–$15

BUTTERFLY HERBS 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE

Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

TASTING ROOM! 4175 Rattlesnake Drive Missoula, MT • 549-8703

www.tenspoon.com

FRIDAYS 4 p.m.–8 p.m.

• Ten Spoon wine flights • wine by the glass (last call 7:30 p.m.) certified organic, made in Montana, no added sulfites

$$–$$$…$15 and over

ASKARI Underwater wonder What exactly is seaweed? It looks like a plant, but I’ve been told that it isn’t. Also, how can you tell which seaweed is good to eat? —Weed Lover

Q

The term “seaweed” refers to various multi-cellular species of red, green or brown algae that live in the ocean. According to the way taxonomists are currently drawing the lines, seaweed does not fall into the plant category. Nonetheless, it remains a close relative to the plants due to its use of the chlorophyll molecule to derive energy from the sun through photosynthesis. Plants and algae share a common ancestor, cyanobacteria (also known as blue green algae). Plants are generally more complex than seaweeds, with different anatomical structures. In terms of edibility, the only poisonous seaweed is lyngbya, also known as “Mermaid’s Hair.” It’s a bright green/brown mass of skinny strands that looks like severely uncombed hair.

A

But while the other 9,000 or so species of seaweed aren’t harmful (assuming they aren’t contaminated and all the scum is cleaned out of them), most species aren’t exceedingly tasty, either. When I’m swimming in the ocean I often munch on the seaweed I find, just to see how it tastes. The biggest complaints I can usually muster is that some types are tough, while others are unappetizingly slimy. But when I was living on the coast of Brazil I became familiar with the types of seaweed I most liked and would go collecting. Then I would rinse and boil the seaweed (to make it more tender) and make seaweed salads with dried shrimp, chili and sesame oil. My local friends thought I was crazy, and I thought they were crazy for not using this tasty, nutritious resource that’s floating out there free for the taking. Send your food and garden queries to flash@flashinthepan.net

Missoula Independent

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Arts & Entertainment listings March 11–March 18, 2010

days a week THURSDAY

THURSDAY October

29

March

11

Who doesn’t like pesticides slathered over their veggies? If you don’t, and you live in Milltown, Bonner, Riverside or East Missoula, consider getting a community garden plot with the Milltown Garden Patch, a nonprofit offering plots to citizens interested in growing their own organic produce. Applications are due March 30. Call 27-4053 and visit milltowngardenpatch.org If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Heidi Meili Steve Fetveit

The world is your kids’ oyster to crack during Afterschool Adventures: World of Wonders, a science-based discovery program for kids ages 5–8 at 3 PM at the Children’s Museum of Missoula, 225 W. Front St. $4.25/free under age 1. Call 541-PLAY or visit www.familiesfirstmontana.org.

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Put a smile on your face and a tune in your head—join guitarist Craig Wickham every Thu. from 5–7 PM at Red’s Wines & Blues in Kalispell. Free. Call 755-9463. Keep your ideology away from my body, please. NARAL Pro-Choice Montana and UM Students for Choice present a talk by journalist and author Michelle Goldberg titled “The Means of Reproduction: Sex, Power and the Future of the World”—which touches on reproductive rights and how right-wing extremism has an impact on women’s rights—at 5:30 PM in the South Ballroom at UM’s University Center. Free. Call 442-2057 and visit prochoicemontana.org end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 12, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

S

ALL DVDs

Watch out for drops of moose drool when Lindsay Sanders presents an opening for her exhibit, Lindsay Sanders: GRIDitude, with a reception Fri., March 12, from 5:30–8:30 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. Free. Call 5497555 and visit zootownarts.com.

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Climate change skeptics need not apply: Confront the root causes of climate change with creative conflict mediation by heading to a weekly meeting of Northern Rockies Rising Tide, an environmental/social justice organization which meets this and every Thu. at 6 PM at Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave. Free to attend. Visit northernrockiesrisingtide.wordpress.com. Quit stomping and start treading lightly during the Sustainable Business Council’s “Measure Up Missoula: The Case for Municipal Sustainability,” a presentation where UM associate prof Robin Saha discusses steps for reducing our city’s carbon footprint, as well as saving on energy costs and local climate action, starting at 6 PM at Office Solutions and Services, 1029 North Ave. W. Free. A social hour starts at 5:30 PM. Call 824-7336. Shred out during the Missoula Art Museum’s Teen Open Studio Night with Dustin Hoon: Metal Casting, where teens ages 13–18 learn the basics of DIY pewter casting under the guidance of Hoon (and perhaps with the backing soundtrack of Iron Maiden) from 6–8 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Also, feel free to bring your favorite Iron Maiden album to play. Call 728-0447.

Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. San Francisco’s Bassnectar brings his bottomheavy dubstep and breakbeat tunes to the Top Hat for a show at 9 PM. $25/$21 advance at Rockin Rudy’s and brownpapertickets.com. Opening support from Seattle’s American Werewolf, Missoula’s Kris Moon and Bozeman’s Oz. You can admire their china, but you can’t touch it: Wild China, featuring members of Def Cartel and Reverend Slanky, comes to funk you, or rock you, up and out when they play the Palace at 9 PM. $5. Newsfeed Anxiety and At Home in the Cosmos open.

be awarded during the Salute to Women awards dinner on May 13. Nominations are due today. Visit ywcaofmissoula.org for a nomination form, or call 543-6691 with questions. They coddle words like Missoula moms tend to their offspring: Poets Peter Gizzi and Elizabeth Willis, who are visiting writers with the UM’s President’s Writer-in-Residence program, present the craft talk “Tradition in the 21st Century,” from 1–2 PM in Room 210 of UM’s McGill Hall. Free. Call 243-5267.

nightlife She thumbs her nose at monochrome: The Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W., presents the exhibit Lindsay Sanders: GRIDitude, a collection of vivid works by UM journalism student Lindsay Sanders who uses oil on canvas to create altered portraits of her subjects, with an opening reception from 5:30–8:30 PM at the center. Free. Call 5497555 and visit zootownarts.com. Do your part to offer a family a place to stay when their child is in the hospital during the

Tanner Cundy shows us how the City of Roses rocks when he plays an acoustic rock set at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT.

Getting buzzed is always allowed: The Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave., presents Buzz Time Trivia, which starts at 7 PM this and every Thu. and features trivia plus specials on Jello shots and homemade pizzas. Free to attend. Call 549-4152.

This is sort of like food porn, so bring an appetite: The Missoula Public Library presents delectable tales about food from Garden City Harvest’s Josh Slotnick, KPAX’s Angela Marshall and Missoulian food writer Lori Grannis during another installment of its “adult story time,” which starts at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721–BOOK. An old coot listens to his past on tape and three people in urns hash out the details of a love affair, during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s An Evening of Beckett, which includes a rendition of Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, followed by Play, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

If your ears aren’t ringing after this, you are inhuman. Local metal-inspired surf band The Skurfs present “So Fresh and So Clean,” a show at 7 PM at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St., featuring their own tunes, plus music from Shahs, Whiskey Whore, BOB KAIN, Fat Kids, Treehouse, Pony Canon, the Chalfonts, Bright Northern Light, High Voltage, Pyro Spiders, Fire Water and the Unlikely Conspirators. $3. This one could be a tearjerker: The Missoula Public Library’s World-Wide Cinema Series continues with a documentary about New Orleans residents trying to reunite with their pets after Hurricane Katrina during a screening of the film Mine at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Middle schoolers create energetic mayhem—in a wholesome way—during Friday Night Hang Out: Middle School only, Energy Night, which runs from 7–10:30 PM at the City Life Community Center, 1515 Fairview Ave. $3. Open to grades 6–8 only. Call 532-1555. He makes his reeds beg for some action: Renowned saxophonist Azar Lawrence gets jazzy with pianist Benito Gonzalez, while drummer Lorca Hart slaps skins and bassist Craig Hall plucks all the right notes, during another installment of DalyJazz, which starts at 7 PM at 240 Daly Ave. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com.

Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night, begins its run with sign ups at 6:45 PM and trivia at 7 PM at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes drink specials by Bayern Brewery, prizes and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kateskins@gmail.com.

Don’t pass on this gas: The Peace and Justice Film Series continues with a screening of Split Estate—which follows a group of Colorado citizens putting up a fight against an industry that wants to drill for natural gas right near their homes—with a screening at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org.

Wheel’s Community Romp, which includes improvisational dance/theater games with facilitator Lizzi Juda, Turning the Wheel founder Alana Shaw, plus music by Nathan Zavalney from 7–8:30 PM at the Downtown Dance Collective, 121 W. Main St. $10 family/$4 person. Call 830-3285.

Two brothers go head to head over love, while another set of bros aim to off a slayer who murdered a good priest, during a screening of Brothers at 7 PM, followed by The Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day at 9:30 PM, at the University Center Theater. $7 double feature/$5 single feature/$4 double feature for students/$3 single feature for students. Call 243-5590.

Photo courtesy of Richard Hallman

Seattle’s Hell’s Belles takes schoolgirl fashion to heart when the all-female AC/DC tribute band plays Fri., March 12, at 9 PM at the Badlander. $15 presale at Ear Candy. Bozeman’s Out the Lights opens. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. He’ll cure your tremors with a sweet shot of country: Russ Nasset hits up the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., for a solo set this and every other Thu. at 10 PM. Free.

FRIDAY March

12

She’ll make your jaw drop in awe of her mad biking skills: Mountain bike champ Rebecca Rusch comes to Missoula for a screening of the film Race Across the Sky–which documents the Leadville Trail 100 bike race–starting at 7:30 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 children. Includes a free pre-party at 5:30 PM at Big Sky Bikes, 809 E. Front St. Visit outsidemedia.com.

Keep it green while saving some greenbacks during the Flathead Valley Green Building Guild’s “Build Green, Save Green” workshop, which features comments from three experts on financial incentives available to homeowners and contractors to create energy efficient projects, with the workshop running from 8 AM–12 PM at Kalispell’s Red Lion Inn, 20 N. Main St. Free. Panel discussions continue from 1:30–5 PM. Call Isaac at 250-7216.

Bowling and karaoke go together like several gin and tonics and a great memory during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

If you know a woman who serves the community and creates peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all, consider nominating her for the YWCA’s Judy Wang Legacy Award, which will

Red Shoe Ball, a fundraiser for Missoula’s Ronald McDonald House which features cocktails, dinner, an auction and a dance starting at 6 PM at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3720 N. Reserve St. $75 person/$800 table of eight. Visit redshoeball.com for tickets or call 541-7646. Help empower your fellow Garden City females while also downing a scrumptious meal and bidding on works of art from 30 local artists during WORD Inc.’s Many Faces of Women Art Auction and Fundraiser, which starts at 6 PM at Fort Missoula’s Heritage Hall, Building T-2 on Fort Missoula Road. An after party with Zootown DJ begins at 9:30 PM. $55/$45 advance/$5 after party only. Visit manyfacesofwomen.com and call Thea at 5433550 Ext. 238. (See Agenda in this issue.) You can stare, but not wear: Selvedge Studio, 509 S. Higgins Ave., continues its Project Selvedge fashion show from 6–9 PM at the studio. Free to attend. Call 541-7171. Spondees get spit and alliteration rules the night when poets Peter Gizzi and Elizabeth Willis, who are visiting writers with the UM President’s Writer-in-Residence program, present readings from their most recent work at 7 PM in the Dell Brown Room, in UM’s Turner Hall. Free. Call 243-5267. You never know what to expect, except for a rip-roarin’ good time, during Turning the

Missoula Independent

It’s von Bingen, not von Blingin’: The UM School of Music presents a night of student compositions during its Hildegard von Bingen Festival Concert, which starts at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall, in UM’s Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. An old coot recounts his last days and three people in urns hash out the details of a love affair, during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s An Evening of Beckett, which includes a rendition of Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, followed by Play, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. (See Spotlight in this issue.) The Fabulous Country Kings take your overripe fruits and use them as sheathes when they play country at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346. Duders, get ready for a night of White Russians, oat soda’s and lots of slacking. The Wilma Theatre presents “The Big Lebowski: The Next Round Robin,” a screening of the infamous Coen brothers comedy that features prizes for Best Dude, Best Walter, Best Valkyrie and other hijinks starting at 8 PM. $5. A pre-party starts at the theater at 7 PM. (See Scope in this issue.) Vagueness creates surprising results: Barb and Tom of Living Well play “a little bit of everything,” but probably not sludge metal, when they perform at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but pass-thehat donations welcome. Call 741-2361.

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In case you missed it in Missoula, you can still figure out where that Jay-Z song came from: The Hamilton Players presents its rendition of the musical Annie, which follows the life of an orphan determined to find her parents and features songs like “It’s the Hard Knock Life,” at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children 18 and under. Call 3759050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com for tickets. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ ridiculous at East Missoula’s Reno Casino and Cafe’s karaoke night, brought to you by Karaoke by Figmo, every Fri. and Sat. night at 9 PM. Free. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip-hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Be thankful the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. If you liked Tolkien’s mines of Khazad-dum, you’ll love tunneling through the AmVets Club, where DJDC rocks dance music to slay orcs to at 9 PM. Free. Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. Learn to sing “Dancing Queen” in tongues when Bassackwards Karaoke invades the Alcan Bar & Grill in Frenchtown, 16780 Beckwith St., every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 531-8327. Feel free to flail around like a rock star whilst busting out your best version of Hall and Oates’ “Kiss on My List” during karaoke at the Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, this and every Fri. at 9 PM. Free.

Venice Beach, Calif.’s Lukas Nelson and The Promise of the Real decapitates short band names and bleeds shades of indigo when they play crossover blues rock at 10 PM at the Top Hat. Cover TBA. Butter opens.

SATURDAY March

13

If you get as frustrated as I do when trying to complete your income taxes, don’t miss a free income tax preparation service for low income individuals offered by Montana Credit Unions for Community Development, from 9 AM–5 PM at Missoula homeWORD, 127 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 307. Appointments are required, so RSVP by calling Jim Auer at 531-2048. Keep activism alive during a young activist training hosted by the Montana Wilderness Association Ridgerunners, which runs from 10 AM–4:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Space is super limited, so register by calling Heather at 603-767-3125. Visit wildmontana.org. She’ll push your aesthetic boundaries, and you won’t mind. The Ravalli County Museum, 205 Bedford St. in Hamilton, presents a workshop with artist Cathryn Sugg on “The Creation of Fictive Space,” where you’ll focus on translating literary info, as well as use collage processes and materials from 10 AM–noon at the museum. Free. Attendees should come to class with a favored quotation from a literary source. RSVP by calling 363-3338 and visit brvhsmuseum.org.

Their deeds aren’t dirty, nor are they done dirt cheap: Seattle’s Hell’s Belles, an all-female AC/DC tribute band, shakes you all night long when they play the Badlander at 9 PM. $15 presale at Ear Candy. Bozeman’s Out the Lights opens.

Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Simple Writing/Creative Phrases” with Lori Mitchell. Free, but donations appreciated and accepted. Register by calling 549-5329 or visit livingartofmontana.org.

Indeed, “Princess Slay-ah” will slay you with her filthy bass tones. San Francisco’s Ana Sia scrambles up dubstep, glitch and her trademark “global slut psy-hop” when she plays the Palace at 9 PM. $12/$10 presale at Ear Candy. Special guest Conrad Hawkins opens.

Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Bowling commingles with a laser light show and some DJ tunage from Kaleidoscope Entertainment every Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 PM at Five Valleys Bowling Center, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4158.

Don’t pinch, just watch. The Ancient Order of Hibernians present its St. Patrick’s Day Parade, which starts at noon near the Iron Horse, and ends at Grizzly Grocery. Free to spectate.

If you don’t recognize a single tune they play, you’re un-American. Helena’s The Mighty Flick lights the crowd up with cover tunes from the 1960s up to the present when they play at 9:30 PM at the Elbow Room, 1025 Strand Ave. $1. Shane Clouse and Stomping Ground make your funny robotic moves a little more countrified when they play outlaw country at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Great Falls’ Voodoo Cadillac stylizes your frohawk into something teased and feathered when they play 1980s hair band tunes and current rock at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. One of these brothers needs a few birthday lashings: Voodoo Horseshoes shoots out psychedelically leaning roots and rock—and celebrates the birthday of their banjo slinger Toby— when they play at 9:30 PM at the Craggy Range Bar and Grill, 10 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free. DJ Mankiisi spins reggae between sets. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

Yes on the tofu, no on the corned beef. The Western Montana Vegetarian Society hosts another all you can eat vegetarian potluck with a “green theme” starting at noon at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Missoula, 102 McCleod Ave. Bring your own plant-based food item. $3 minimum donation if you attend without a dish. E-mail newdawnmt@gmail.com. Darko Butorac lets his passionate side roam free during Symphony Saturday at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St., when the local conductor hosts the program “Passion and Redemption” and discusses the parallels and paradoxes between works by composers like Wagner, Faure and newcomer Osvaldo Golijov starting at 1 PM. Free. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulartmuseum.org. Tarantulas and wacky uncles all get some artistic attention during the Missoula Art Museum’s Saturday Family Art Workshop: Portraits, where kids ages 6 and up create pictures of family members, friends or pets with pastel and color pencils from 1–2:30 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St. $5 per person, open to all ages. Children under age 7 need to be accompanied by an adult. Call 728-0447.

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Just don’t drink the water: The Watershed Education Network (WEN) presents a free community water monitoring training from 1–5 PM at the Greenough Park Pavillion, on the east side of the park in the lower Rattlesnake. Free. Includes an orientation to WEN, as well as instructions on how to measure chemical, biological and physical water quality parameters. Call 541-9287 and visit montanawatershed.org. Fly high, but not too high, during a weekend of acrobatic and partner yoga— a mixture of yoga, acrobatics and Thai massage—which starts with a beginners class from 1–4 PM at the Yoga Fitness Center, 123 W. Alder St. The workshop continues with a beginning/intermediate class at the Yoga Fitness Center at 1 PM Sun., March 14. $45 weekend/$25 per workshop/$20 per workshop with student ID. Call 728-6770. In case you missed it in Missoula, you can still figure out where that Jay-Z song came from: The Hamilton Players presents its rendition of the musical Annie, which follows the life of an orphan determined to find her parents and features songs like “It’s the Hard Knock Life,” at 2 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children 18 and under. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com for tickets. Those who’ve survived cancer are invited to bust playful, relaxing moves through games and gentle exercises during a “Workshop for Cancer Survivors,” a collaboration between Living Art of Montana and Turning the Wheel which runs from 3–4:30 PM at the Open Way Mindfulness Center, 702 Brooks St. Free. Call Lizzi Juda at 830-3285.

101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT. He makes his reeds beg for some action: Renowned saxophonist Azar Lawrence gets jazzy with pianist Benito Gonzalez, while drummer Lorca Hart slaps skins and bassist Craig Hall plucks all the right notes, during another installment of DalyJazz, which starts at 7 PM at 240 Daly Ave. $25, includes dinner and drinks. RSVP required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com. Two brothers go head to head over love, while another set of bros aim to off a

St. $5/$3 students, with higher donations also accepted. Call Pam Erickson at 363-1203. An old coot recounts his last days and three people in urns hash out the details of a love affair, during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s An Evening of Beckett, which includes a rendition of Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, followed by Play, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Jig yourself into a fury with the help of local fiddlers and guitarists without selling arms to Iran during a contra dance at the Kalispell Salvation Army

Imagine a play about a cheating husband, his wife and his mistress. You probably envision lots of shouting and arguments, punctuated by crying. Lots of crying.

Tom Catmull hopes you’ll quit probing him about the intricacies of The Large Haldron Collider when he plays a solo set of what’s likely to be Americana at the Bitter Root Brewery,

Missoula Independent

WHEN: Thu., March 11–Sat., March 13 at 7:30 PM and Wed., March 17–Sat., March 20 at 7:30 PM HOW MUCH: $15 Fri.–Sat. shows/$10 Wed.–Thu. shows MORE INFO: mtactors.com You can witness this slice of dramatic abstraction firsthand when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents “An Evening of Beckett,” which features Play, along with Krapp’s Last Tape. Much like Play, Krapp’s Last Tape is also in one act. It’s follows Krapp (Michael Murphy), pictured here,

slayer who murdered a good priest, during a screening of Brothers at 7 PM, followed by The Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day at 9:30 PM, at the University Center Theater. $7 double feature/$5 single feature/$4 double feature for students/$3 single feature for students. Call 243-5590. Dancers need artistic nourishment, too. Help raise money for UM dance students to head to the American College Dance Festival’s Northwest Regional Conference during a benefit dance concert—which includes work by students, staff, and renowned choreographer Bebe Miller—which starts at 7 PM at Hamilton’s River Street Dance Theatre, 421 N. Second

Page 26 March 11–March 18, 2010

Feel free to perform “Bella Ciao” by Mirah & The Black Cat Orchestra during karaoke night at 9 PM at the VFW but don’t be surprised if someone tells you we’re in Missoula, and so it’s time to start talking American. Free. Here’s your chance to get freaky on the dance floor. AmVets Club offers up DJDC and his dance music to the hungry horde at 9 PM. Free.

If you don’t recognize a single tune they play, you might be a commie. Helena’s The Mighty Flick lights the crowd up again with cover tunes from the 1960s up to the present when they play at 9:30 PM at the Elbow Room, 1025 Strand Ave. $1.

WHO: Montana Actors’ Theatre

WHERE: Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave.

Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

An unlikely combination of awesomeness: Local rapper Tonsofun sprays verbal heat while The River Creek Stream Boys take country licks away from hicks when they both play the Palace at 9 PM. $3.

Well, leave it to avant-garde Irish playwright Samuel Beckett to smash that notion with his aptly titled Play. It’s a one-act performance where a dishonest husband, his wife and his mistress sit in urns on a sparse stage as they discuss their viewpoints on the situation in fragmented language. I skimmed the text of the play, and I can tell you this: It’s probably one of the most abstract tales of love-gone-wrong that I’ve come across. And I dig it especially because it seems as entertaining as it is challenging.

Help kids build mad skills after school when you head to the ninth annual Fiesta for Flagship, a fundraiser for Missoula’s Flagship Program which features a Southwestern-themed dinner, as well as live and silent auctions starting at 6 PM at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $90 couple/$50 person. Get tickets at the door or by calling 532-9825. Visit flagshipprogram.org.

a CD release party at 8 PM at the Elks Lodge, 112 N. Pattee St. $10. Includes guest appearances by Matthew Marsolek, Jenn Adams, Lawrence Duncan and others. (See Noise in this issue.)

DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip-hop, electronic and other bass-heavy, booty-busting beats ‘til the bar closes, or at least until the vodka runs out, during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free.

beckett bravura

nightlife

Controversy and allegations of conspiracy mix with anger over health care reform, the media, land use, and other issues during a screening of Beneath the Beauty, a documentary filmed in Hamilton, which screens at 6 PM at Hamilton’s Eagles Lodge, 125 N. Second St. $5. Visit beneaththebeauty.com. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

The Fabulous Country Kings ask that you please remove any and all mold growing on your body before you attempt to bust a move when they play country at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W., at 8 PM. Free. Call 543-6346.

SPOTLIGHT

WHAT: “An Evening of Beckett”

You can bet your sweet rump there won’t be any obnoxious dudes vying to buy you drinks during Ladies’ Pottery Night, an artistic spin on ladies’ night, where women create bowls, dishware or sushi platters and enjoy complimentary wine and appetizers from 6–8 PM at the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W. $20, with 10 percent off all pottery. RSVP by calling 549-7555 and visit zootownarts.com

In case you missed it in Missoula, you can still figure out where that Jay-Z song came from: The Hamilton Players presents its rendition of the musical Annie, which follows the life of an orphan determined to find her parents and features songs like “It’s the Hard Knock Life,” at 8 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children 18 and under. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com for tickets.

The Whiskey Rebellion dreams of marinating your appendages in a mixture of crude oil, bourbon and phlegm when they play Americana and country at the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. a worn out 69-year-old man who listens to a tape of himself in his younger years as he prepares to record his last tape, presumably the final one before he dies. The overtone is dark, and the dialogue is minimal (save for the tape), but it’s a little more straightforward than Play. In the end, you can tell Krapp is ready to kick the can when he records himself in the present and utters that he “sat shivering in the park, drowned in dreams and burning to be gone.” Although both of these works are exercises in heady language and structure, those with an appreciation for theater on the edge should find plenty to chew on.

Church Gym, 110 Bountiful Drive in Kalispell, which starts with dancing at 7:30 PM. Features music by Left Side Brains with calling by Kathy Neff. $15 family/$7 adults and teens/free for non-dancers. Call Joe at 752-7469. He’s not a fan of paving nature: Chance McKinney and Cross Wire give conservationists something to smile about when the Missoula native and his band play country songs that touch on “Wildlife Conservation” and life when they play the University Theatre at 7:30 PM. $18/$16 advance/Free children 12 and under with an adult. Get tickets at all GrizTix outlets and griztix.com.

—Ira Sather-Olson

You’ll never be the owner of a lonely heart when Missoula’s Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., presents a dance with Heart to Heart playing from 8–11 PM at the center. $5. Call 543-7154. Betty Lou Cannon and Matt Fletcher indoctrinate haters with love whilst emancipating indentured ventriloquists when they play folk at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but passthe-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Maren Christensen and her Really Big Small Band emit thunderous waves of mellow vibes when they play folk with a world groove during

Great Falls’ Voodoo Cadillac prevents earwigs from boring into your brain with the almighty power of 1980s hair band and current rock when they play Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, at 9:30 PM. $2. Call 830-3277. The Tom Cats find the nearest pole to scratch when they play what’s bound to be rock at 9:30 PM at the Lucky Strike Bar, 1515 Dearborn Ave. Free. Call 549-4152. Fort Collins, Colo.’s WhiteWater Ramble shackles the legs of ravers and makes their glowsticks do the dancing when they play heel kickin’ bluegrass at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. Cottonwood Draw opens.

SUNDAY

14

March

At the intersection of heterogeneity and the delectable you’ll find UM’s International Culture and Food Festival, a food bazaar featuring tasty dishes from 20 regions of the world, as well as a culture show and other entertainment from noon–5 PM at UM’s University Center. $3/$2 children 12 and under. Call 243-5580.


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In case you missed it in Missoula, you can still figure out where that Jay-Z song came from: The Hamilton Players presents its rendition of the musical Annie, which follows the life of an orphan determined to find her parents and features songs like “It’s the Hard Knock Life,” at 2 PM at the Hamilton Playhouse, 100 Ricketts Road. $14/$8 children 18 and under. Call 375-9050 or visit hamiltonplayers.com for tickets. They’ve mastered the art of rapid finger movement. The Montana Piano Trio keeps their digits moving like mad during a guest artist recital, which starts at 3 PM in the Music Recital Hall, in UM’s Music Building. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880.

MONDAY

15

March

You bring the diversity, I’ll bring the party favors. UM presents its International Education Week Opening Ceremony, which features talks by Mehrdad Kia, Effie Koehn and others as well as a dance performance by Rashmeen Doowa, at noon in UM’s University Center Atrium. Free. Call 243-2288. Kids give Montucky an artistic shout out through watercolor paints and a crayon resist technique during the

ment features discussion on the organization’s equality campaign, and will touch on Missoula’s proposed anti-discrimination ordinance. Visit forwardmontana.org. What reason have you got for lying around the house watching the tube when Florence’s High Spirits offers Free Pool at 6 PM? Free. Call 273-9992. You’ve got another chance to connect the dots this evening when the VFW hosts bingo at 7 PM. Free. The Acousticals help medicate the masses by passing bluegrass through willing orifices when they play the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100, at 7 PM. Free.

A middle-aged woman’s decision to seclude herself at a family home in the wilderness reveals a host of family secrets and subsequent emotions when author Janet Kay reads from her novel Waters of the Dancing Sky at 4 PM at Seeley Lake’s Grizzly Trading Claw Company, 3187 Hwy. 83. Free. Call 677-0008.

nightlife They’ll give you more adjectives and transitive verbs than you can handle. UM’s Second Wind Reading Series continues with work by UM creative writing program director Prageeta Sharma, along with MFA student Dylan Mohr, starting at 6:30 PM at the Palace. Free. They rock old school: Musikanten Montana presents its Montana Early Music Festival with a concert featuring Kerry Krebill conducting soloists, an orchestra and a chorus at 7 PM at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. $20/free children. Call 543-5059 and visit musikantenmt.org. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Josh Farmer, the Freemole Quartet and DJ Mermaid. The Missoula Mendelssohn Club steeps you in crisp vocal harmonies when they play their 65th annual spring concert at 7:30 PM at the University Theatre. $10/$6 students. Includes guest spots from the Sons of Beaches, Lena and Abby Jarvie, as well as vocalists from the Bitterroot Valley. Call Donald Carey at 728-4294. Euchre is one of those games that goes great with beer because you can tell what the cards look like even if your vision is a little blurry. See what I mean, or try to anyway, tonight at Sean Kelly’s just-for-fun Euchre Tournament at 8 PM. Free. Impress your friends, significant other, or anyone who will listen when you rock the karaoke mic at Harry David’s, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, which is back in action with free karaoke at 9:30 PM, Sun.–Thu. each week. Call 830-3277.

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Photo courtesy of Graham Meyer

San Francisco’s Ana Sia taps into a binary stream when she plays dubstep, glitch and her trademark “global slut psy-hop” Fri., March 12, at 9 PM at the Palace. $12/$10 presale at Ear Candy. Conrad Hawkins opens. Zootown Arts Community Center’s “Little Artist Program: Mixed Media Mayhem and Marvelous Montana,” which runs from 1:30–2:30 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. $15. RSVP by calling 5497555 or visiting zootownarts.com. Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

nightlife Get your social wheels lubed with choice beverages and progressive politics during the return of Forward Montana’s Progressive Happy Hour, which runs from 5:30–7 PM at the Badlander. Free. This install-

Secrets, so many secrets: UM’s Le Cercle Francophone French club film festival continues with a screening of Un Secret, which follows a Jewish teen who discovers WWII wasn’t so great for his parents, with a screening at 7 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. E-mail lecerclefrancophone@hotmail.com. UM student Clint McBride lets his guitar get a buzz off of technology when he plays a student recital, which starts at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall, in UM’s Music Building. Free. Call 243-6880. Keep it as ethical and as green as can be when Yale Divinity School prof Willis Jenkins presents the lecture “Sustainability Ethics: Religion, Science and Cultural


Change,” at 7:30 PM at UM’s Urey North Underground Lecture Hall. Free. Call 243-6111. Like I said before, they rock it old school: Musikanten Montana continues its Montana Early Music Festival with a concert featuring guest baroque artists at 7:30 PM at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. $15/free children. Call 543-5059 and visit musikantenmt.org. Get orthogonal without getting pinched during the Lolo Square and Round Dance Center’s St. Patrick’s Day Dance, which starts at 8 PM at the center, 9955 Lolo Creek Road. Cost TBA. Call 273-0652. An artistic bout of sorts ought to tickle your musical fun glands during Top of the Mic, an open mic competition running this and every Mon. through the month of March (except for March 29) and into April, starting at 8:30 PM at Sean Kelly’s. Free. Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Mondays with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free.

TUESDAY

16

March

And you thought Montana was diverse: UM presents the lecture “Ethiopia: Land of Diversity,” a talk with Ethiopian profs Tsige GebreMariam and Masresha Fetene at noon in Room 332 of UM’s University Center. Free. Call 243-2288. Do your part to help keep coal in the ground during a rally to save Otter Creek, which starts at noon at the XXXXs on North Higgins Avenue, and includes a march to the Higgins bridge. RSVP by contacting the Sierra Club’s Brad Hash at 549-1142 or email brad.hash@sierraclub.org.

nightlife Quit saying, “Ouch!” and start saying, “That’s the spot!” during a free, noninvasive pain test for those with fibromyalgia to be conducted by the Foundation for Wellness Professionals at 5:30 PM at the Doubletree Hotel, 100 Madison St. Space is limited to the first 10 callers, so RSVP quick by calling 541-2281. Keep that credit card debt at bay: Missoula’s homeWORD presents its “Financial Fitness” workshop, a series of four classes which aim to help you effectively manage and understand your finances with the first class running from 6–8:30 PM at homeWORD, 127 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 307. $10 per person. Subsequent classes run at the same time on March 18, 23 and 25. Register by visiting homeword.org and call 532-HOME. See what lies ahead for Montana’s lawmakers in regards to the question of aid in dying during “Aid in Dying after the Baxter Decision: Ethical Challenges for Montana Legislators,” a panel

discussion on the Baxter v. Montana decision at 6:30 PM, in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-6605 and visit umt.edu/ethics. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson, and get buy-oneget-one-free drink tickets, during an open mic night every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. E-mail moorebeej@yahoo.com. This has nothing to do with tech support in India: The Rocky Mountain School of Photography presents the lecture “Printing and Outsourcing Your Digital Images” with speaker Kathy Eyster at 7 PM, in the quarry of the school, 210 N. Higgins Ave. Free. Call 543-0171 and visit rmsp.com. Let a bearded bard sweep you into the old school with some heady verbiage during the Missoula Public Library’s Everyone’s Shakespeare Reading Group, which meets at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Pianists Christopher Hahn and Karen Beres let their fingers do the talking, while Lance Drege and Robert Ledbetter bang on their own percussive instruments of choice, during a UM faculty and guest artist recital, which starts at 7:30 PM in the Music Recital Hall, in UM’s Music Building. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. A female pilot searches for an abducted 12-year-old while also delving into her dead mother’s past during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s rendition of Ellen McLaughlin’s Tongue of a Bird, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Masquer Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $14/$12 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit www.umtheatredance.org. Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? “Everything I Do (I Do It For You),” sung by crooner Bryan Adams, is the theme from what movie? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.)

High Voltage licks your fingers and asks that you figure out which electrical outlet has the best juice when they play folk grass at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. They aren’t trying to be like Paul Simon, they just like worldbeat: N e w Yo r k C i t y ’ s Va m p i r e Weekend mixes indie rock with various styles when it plays the Wilma Theatre at 9 PM. Show is sold out. (See Noise in this issue.)

Montana’s Greatest Snow Place

Only 90 Miles South of Missoula

WEDNESDAY

17

www.losttrail.com

March

Unfortunately, you won’t be able to get a corned beef milkshake when the Missoula Senior Center presents its St. Patrick’s Day lunch, which features corned beef and cabbage, and runs from 11:30 AM–12:30 PM at the center, 705 S. Higgins Ave. $5. Call 543-7154.

406.821.3211

Give the Middle East an intellectual shout out during “Yemen: Current Challenges,” a discussion with UM assistant prof Khaled Huthaily at noon in Room 303 of UM’s Old Journalism Building. Free. Call 243-2299. Oh yeah, I’m sure they’re totally up to snuff. UM presents “Health Systems in Conflict Zones: A Darfur Case Study,” a discussion with UM student Phillip Nel at 2 PM in Room 332 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2288.

nightlife Fill your stomach with tasty brews in order help create a peace park o n Wa t e r w o r k s h i l l d u r i n g a Community Unite pint night for the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center at the Kettlehouse Northside Taproom, 313 N. First St. W., from 5–8 PM. Free to attend. A portion of proceeds from each pint sold goes to the center and its development of the peace park. Call 728-1660.

The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678.

Get down in the digs of an old school copper magnate when The Daly Mansion, 251 Eastside Highway near Hamilton, hosts a St. Patrick’s Day Dinner in honor of Marcus Daly’s Irish heritage with dinner and dessert, a bar, storytelling, as well as music by the Montana Shamrockers starting at 5:30 PM at the mansion. $25, with tickets available at Chapter One Bookstore. Call 363-6004 ext. 3.

Rehash the music of others, or have the guts to play a few of your own, when the Canyon Creek Ramblers host an open mic night this and every Tue. at 9 PM at the Great Northern Bar & Grill, 27 Central Ave. in Whitefish. Free, with free beers for performers.

Develop eloquence in the face of inebriation, as well as impressive business contacts, when Toastmasters meets this, and every, Wed. at 6 PM in St. Patrick Hospital’s Duran Learning Center. Free. Call 728-9117.

DJ Brand One probes the fine grooves of wax while you liberate yourself with libations when he plays what’s likely to be hip-hop during Turntable Tuesday at the Palace at 9 PM. Free.

Bad Limerick’s feisty whistles make whetting your whistle that much easier when the Irish band plays a St. Patrick’s Day set at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton, at 6 PM. Free. Call 363-PINT.

Missoula Independent

Page 29 March 11–March 18, 2010


Pottery Classes beginning soon!

If you know the difference between His Knobs and His Knees, bring that skill to the Joker’s Wild Casino, 4829 N. Reserve St., where the Missoula Grass Roots Cribbage Club invites players both new and old to see how many ways they can get to that magical number 15 at 6:30 PM. Free. Call Rex at 360-3333. In case of emergency, break finger puppet: Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 6:30 PM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Call 543.0509

Organizational and sci-fi enthusiasts can satisfy both cravings by attending bimonthly meetings of MisCon, Montana’s longest running science fiction convention, the first and third Wednesdays of the month at 7 PM at Ruby’s Inn, 4825 N. Reserve St. Free. Call 544-7083. Touch me here, touch me there: Birds and Bees LLC, 1515 E. Broadway St., presents the sexual finesse workshop “Count Your Spots: Learn about those Mystical Erogenous Zones; The G-spot, P-spot and A-spot,” with instructor Billie Becker from 7–8:30 PM at Birds and Bees. $8, with a price reduction for bringing friends. Call 544-1019 and visit aboutsexuality.org.

A Jewish man agrees to help Nazis with a counterfeit op in order to stay out of a concentration camp during a screening of The Counterfeiters, which starts at 7 PM at the University Center Theater. Free. Call 243-2288. They’d rather toot at you than pinch y o u : Th e F l a t h e a d Va l l e y Community Band presents “A Celtic Celebration,” a concert featuring a number of tunes from the Emerald and British Isles which starts at 7 PM at Glacier High School, 375 Wolfpack Way in Kalispell. Free. Call Cathryn at 862-5457. A female pilot searches for an abducted 12-year-old while also delving into her dead mother’s past during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s rendition of Ellen McLaughlin’s Tongue of a Bird, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Masquer Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $14/$12 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit www.umtheatredance.org. An old coot listens to his past on tape and prepares to recount his last days in the present, and three people in urns hash out the details of a love affair, during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s An Evening of Beckett, which includes a rendition of Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, followed by Play, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S.

Higgins Ave. $10. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Hump day isn’t just for binge drinking anymore. It’s also a day for playing games of chance with other like-minded booze lovers when Sean Kelly’s presents Hump Day Bingo, this and every Wed. at 8 PM. Free. Call 542-1471. On second thought, maybe they will bust out a Black Sabbath cover. Georgia’s Indigo Girls bring it mellow but not yellow when they play their signature-style folk rock in order to raise awareness about Missoula’s Urban Demonstration Project at 8 PM at the University Theatre. $31 plus ticket fees at all GrizTix outlets and griztix.com. New York’s Bitch opens. (See Noise in this issue.) Jim Pettite wards off a potato famine with immense Irish-influenced riffs when he plays Gaelic music at the Symes Hotel in Hot Springs, 209 Wall St., at 8 PM. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The answer to this week’s trivia question: Bryan Adams’ song “Everything I Do (I Do It For You)”— which is an acquired taste, I might add—is the theme from the movie Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves.

SPOTLIGHT

bridging the gap

Filmmaker Nico Holthaus admits his newest documentary, Beneath the Beauty, pictured here, covers a lot of ground. “This is basically at least four different movies that we threw together, and the biggest trouble that we had was to make it cohesive,” says Holthaus, who’s based out of Tempe, Ariz. The political documentary revolves around Hamilton and Ravalli County and explores four hot-button issues. These include allegations by citizens of police brutality, ineptitude and political corruption, along with anger toward the local media. The two other issues Holthaus delves into deal with zoning and environmentalism, as well as the raging national health care debate. WHAT: Screening of Beneath the Beauty WHEN: Sat., March 13, at 6 PM WHERE: Hamilton’s Eagles Lodge, 125 N. Second St. HOW MUCH: $5 MORE INFO: beneaththebeauty.com If this seems like a multi-faceted, slightly convoluted cinematic beast, it is. Holthaus spent several hours interviewing a swath of city and county residents who vary in political allegiance from far left to far right. Editor Chris Valentine then sliced the footage into a film that’s just over two hours long, for a documentary that comes across like a series of point counterpoint conversations. “It’s basically one conversation…that’s how we weave all these stories together,” Holthaus explains.

Missoula Independent

Page 30 March 11–March 18, 2010

But don’t expect to be sitting through a talkfest when watching Beneath the Beauty. The movie is interspersed with musical vignettes from local music mavens like Joan Zen, John Floridis and Tom Catmull and the Clerics. If you peek into Holthaus’ cinematic background, that shouldn’t come as a surprise. His first documentary, Mill Ave Inc., is about music. Specifically, it details how Tempe’s live music scene was affected by the corporate takeover of the city’s Mill Avenue District. In fact, it was that movie which got Holthaus up to the Bitterroot in the first place—a few people in Hamilton contacted him after watching Mill Ave Inc., and he soon made his way up to the valley to see what the hubbub was about. In the process of making Beneath the Beauty, Holthaus says he’s had a least one big aim. “One of my goals with this movie was to get extreme left and extreme right, extreme poor and rich, talking to one another,” he says. —Ira Sather-Olson


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 BISCUIT

Biscuit is the product of a broken home, and he'd really like to have a family again. He loves people, will tolerate other dogs, but definitely requires a home that is cat-free. There are probably lots of those around!

549-3934 B.B.

ROXIE

Roxie is a big dog with a big personality. She doesn't necessarily love every other dog in the world, so she might do best as an only pet, but she does love attention from people.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

CHEX

This fellow looks like he's all Lab, except for some waviness in his coat. Whatever he is, he's a great dog, as well as being quite handsome! He's ready to have a family to love.

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

C H I L LY

We named him Chilly because he is such a cool cat. He's big and handsome, with a personality to match his good looks. He'd make a great addition to almost any home!

The shelter staff unanimously agree, this is one heck of a cute dog! B.B. is supposedly a Shih-Tzu/Rottweiler X, and I hate to say it, but that's sort of what he looks like! Whether with his irresistible under-bite, scruffy curly coat, or just his happy-go-lucky bounce, B.B. will win over your heart for sure!

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

MISTER

Mister is a Persian cat with hair the color of silver and eyes like emeralds. He was terribly matted when he came to the shelter and had to be shaved, but he's on his way to being quite handsome again. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

PEPE LEPEW

Pepe doesn't really look like a skunk, but he'd obviously had a close encounter with one before he came to the shelter. He was a bit aromatic then, but now this sweet guy is all spiffed up and ready for a new home.

DAISY

Daisy and Shadow are both middle aged, friendly, housetrained dogs that should be enjoying their prime in a home with a loving family. Instead they are homeless. It would be so easy to bring home one of these two! Flowers for every bride. Affordable flowers with an artistic flair. The Flower Bed Behind Vann's Appliances in the old yellow church building.

The Flower Bed 2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

XENA

Xena has been feeling lost and misplaced lately. Her owner of nine years recently died and she has never felt so alone. It was just the two of them for years and now's she's more than just a little overwhelmed with all the cats here.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

SHADOW

Shadow has had some serious rotten luck lately. First his housemate Daisy and he were brought to us. Then he was adopted, but only for a few days. Due to a family emergency, and through no fault of his own, he was returned, crushed dreams and all!

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

PEACHES

Peaches is as content as they come, happy just being around you. She loves attention but won't impose; instead she'll wait by your side until the moment’s right. She would love the chance to accompany you.

Improving Lives One Dog & Cat at a Time Missoula’s Unique Alternative for Dog & Cat Supplies

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 517 S. Higgins • 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street

ROSIE

Can you believe this beautiful face is spending her days in a shelter, still?? Rosie is far too proper to show it, but she knows she doesn't belong here! She bides her time napping and allowing us to brush her gorgeous locks.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 EMMA

My name is Emma and I have been at the shelter for a very long time. A person found me as a small cat inside of a woodpile and brought me to AniMeals so I could find a nice home. Well, I’m still here!

THE COUNT

Hello there! I am The Count! I was found wandering Missoula during a cold snap. The people who found me brought me to AniMeals to make sure I was taken care of and kept warm. I get along well with others and would love to go to a home where I could be an indoor/outdoor cat.

PEPPER

My name is Pepper. I was previously adopted from a shelter in Oregon, and my owners had to give me up to AniMeals here in Montana. I would love to go to a home where I could see the Big Sky Country, but will be ok having a place just to call home.

TIMBER

My name is Timber and as you can see I am quite the Big Boy!!! I have been here at AniMeals for quite some time. I would love to go to a home that can pamper me. I still have many years to come and would love to spend them being the center of attention with my new forever family! Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

Missoula Independent

Page 31 March 11–March 18, 2010


Beer Drinkers’ Profile “Running Smooth"

Matt & Jason

The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Be sure you’ve downed enough pitchers of PBR in order to have the courage to sing “Sound Of Da Police” by KRS-One (believe me, the beer helps), during Kraptastic Karaoke at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. You can touch their “Spare Parts,” but only for a spontaneous shot of whiskey. EOTO brings their live and improvised brand of dubstep, electro and house to blarney stoners when they play the Palace at 9 PM. $10. Known V and DJ Mikee Sev open.

What brings you to the 'Horse today? We like this spot for lunch: nice atmosphere with big windows and high ceilings, good food and pretty nice people. It's a great place to go before we "get back at it.” Sounds like you're ready to get busy. What do you guys do? We work for RML, Inc., a utility contractor. So we're getting the tools ready to roll. It should get busy in the next month. Beer of Choice? Cold Smoke, with lemon.

Miller Creek lets you suck down a mixture of Irish spirits and coagulated pork blood when they play a mix of rock, jam, country and perhaps a touch of electronic at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA.

THURSDAY

18

March Wear your green at the 'Horse for Saint Patrick's Day (Don't forget the parade.) Then settle in for MARCH MADNESS.

Something New Is Always Happening At The Horse 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866

Keep the grub in your grumbling stomach local during Garden City Harvest’s Wintergreens, a familystyle dinner in celebration of local food that also includes a live pie and cake auction emceed by Mayor John Engen which starts at 6 PM Sun., March 21 at the Welcoma Club, 3108 Clark St. $20 door/$15

advance until Thu. March 18. The event will sell out, so call 523-3663 to reserve a spot. If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. She gives bad sentences the boot: UM MFA student Lehua M. Taitano is the literary star of the night when she reads from her MerriamFrontier Award winning manuscript from 4–5 PM in the poetry corner, on the fifth floor of UM’s Marueen and Mike Mansfield Library. Free. Call 243-5267.

nightlife Perfect those jazz hands while absorbing photos and documents of American jazz legends traveling the world as cultural ambassadors during Jam Session: America’s Jazz Ambassadors Embrace the World, the Montana Museum of Art and Culture’s newest exhibit in UM’s Paxson and Meloy Galleries which features an opening reception from 5–7 PM in the lobby of UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 243-2019. Also includes a performance by pianist David Morgenroth. It looks digital, but it’s nowhere near any binary code. The Missoula Art Museum presents Artini: Peaks, where you can peruse artist Griff Williams’ impressively painted and enormous works, hear him talk about his process, as well as shake a leg to Dead Hipster DJs Mike Gill and Chris Baumann from 5:30–9 PM at the Missoula Art Museum, 335 N. Pattee St. Free. Williams’ talk starts at 6 PM. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org. Controversy and allegations of conspiracy mix with anger over health care reform, the media, land use, and other issues during a screening of Beneath the Beauty, a documentary filmed in Hamilton, which screens at 6 PM at Libby’s The Dome Theater, 602 Mineral Ave. $6. Visit beneaththebeauty.com. (See Spotlight in this issue.)

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Page 32 March 11–March 18, 2010

Leisure suit plus beer goggles not r e q u i r e d : Tr i v i a l B e e r s u i t , Missoula’s newest trivia night, begins its run with sign ups at 6:45 PM and trivia at 7 PM at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes drink specials by Bayern Brewery, prizes and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kateskins@gmail.com. Just say no to pre-emptive strikes: Flathead Valley Community College’s Honor Symposium presents the talk “Military Intervention and Diplomatic Relations” with Karen Adams, a prof in UM’s political science department, which starts at 7 PM in the FVCC Theatre of the college’s Arts and Technology Building, 777 Grandview Drive in Kalispell. Free. Call 756-3864. See what life is like for low-wage South and Southeast Asian workers

on U.S. military bases in Iraq, along with the plight of two Western Shoshone sisters, during a screening of Someone Else’s War, followed by American Outrage, starting at 7 PM in the University Center Theater. Free. Visit peaceandjusticefilms.org. A female pilot searches for an abducted 12-year-old while also delving into her dead mother’s past during the UM School of Theatre and Dance’s rendition of Ellen McLaughlin’s Tongue of a Bird, with a performance at 7:30 PM in the Masquer Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center. $14/$12 seniors and students/$8 children 12 and under. Call 243-4581 for tickets or visit www.umtheatredance.org. An old coot listens to his past on tape and prepares to recount his last days in the present, and three people in urns hash out the details of a love affair, during the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s An Evening of Beckett, which includes a rendition of Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, followed by Play, with a performance at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $10. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Bowling and karaoke go together like several gin and tonics and a great memory during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. Now’s your time to juggle a beat with your feet in a cavernous setting when DJ DC rocks the AmVets Club with hits starting at 9 PM. Free. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptopfueled hip-hop, crunk, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets the booties bumpin’ and the feet stompin’ at 9 PM. $3. Asheville, N.C.’s Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band aims for rears to sway when they play funk at the Palace at 9 PM. $10. Packages of margarine miraculously fall from the sky and yodeling becomes a national sport when Kalamazoo, Mich.’s Greensky Bluegrass plays smokin’ bluegrass and folk at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cover TBA. The Lil’ Smokies open. If you like bass and like dancing to bass-heavy electronic music, I’d suggest checking out two shows this week from two San Franciscans in the know: Bassnectar and Ana Sia. Google their names for samples. You won’t be disappointed. Until then, keep me in the know of your own thumpin’ happenings by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., March 12, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


My car broke down a few weeks ago, so I’ve been busy keeping the seat of my bicycle warm. It’s been a nice change, especially when the weather is agreeable. But as much as I love two wheelin’ it, I’ll likely never come close to the skills of Rebecca Rusch, a three-time, 24hour solo mountain biking world champion. She’s what I’d call hardcore. For real. On Thu., March 11, you can witness just how amazing she is on a bike, and meet her in person, during a screening of Race Across the Sky—a documentary about the Leadville Trail 100, one of the most intense bike races around—at 7:30 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $10/$5 children, with all proceeds going to benefit the International Mountain Bike Association. A free, special pre-screening party occurs at 5:30 PM at Big Sky Bikes, 809 E. Front St. Don’t sleep on it. Visit outsidemedia.com. Moving on. You best have a good ‘tude for this one: The Rocky Mountaineers’ Steve Niday plans to kick it backcountry style Thu., March 11–Mon., March 15, during a climbing jaunt to Miche Wabun Basin in Glacier National Park. The trip totals 36 miles, and it looks like it’s for experienced climbers, but call Steve at 721-3790 to get the lowdown and make plans. Visit rockymountaineers.com for more specifics. On that note, two other Rocky Mountaineers trips occur this weekend, but lack of space means you should check out the their website, which gives all the details. If you’re all about fire, then get fired up on Sat., March 13, so you can zoom to the Bitterroot Wildfire Contractors Association Fireline Safety Class and Pack Test, which starts at 8:30 AM at the Corvallis Grange. $80. The pack test follows at Corvallis High School at 1:45 PM. Visit bitterrootwildfire.com for specifics or call 523-7887. Then again, you could feed your addiction to pedaling when you join Missoulians on Bicycles Sat., March 13, at 10 AM for the Happy Trails to Stevi: Big Loop ride. Meet at Missoula’s KMart at 10 AM, or drive thee down to the Conoco in Lolo and get there by 10:30. Call Lech at 207-1225 and visit missoulabike.org. They have another trip

on Sun., March 14, but space is scarce so check their website. Sat., March 13, is also a time when you can breathe in and breathe out heavily for fun during Run Wild Missoula’s Run for the Luck of It, a St. Patrick’s Day-themed 5k run/walk that starts at 11:15 AM at Sean Kelly’s, 130 W. Pine St. $20/$18 Run Wild Missoula members. And yes, you will get a free beer after the race, but I’d recommend wearing green, unless you want spectators to pinch you. Grab a registration form and more info at runwildmissoula.org. Building a sled, racing it over a jump and winning something wicked for your efforts (maybe a case of Red Bull?) is what’s up Sat., March 13, during Red Bull’s Schlittentag competition, which starts with onsite building at 1 PM, followed by sledding at 5 PM, at Montana Snowbowl, 1700 Snowbowl Road. Free. Visit redbullusa.com/schlittentag.

“Rad Reptiles,” where you and your kid aged 5 and up learn about and meet a handful of reptiles at the History Center, 120 Hickory St. $2 child/free members. Call 327-0405. Hoot it up with some birders on Sat., March 13, when the Five Valleys Audubon Society hosts a cross-country ski trip to Lolo Pass to listen for owls. Free. Meet to carpool at 4 PM at the west end of Rosauer’s parking lot, 2350 S. Reserve St. Bring skis, warm clothing and a lunch, and call Larry Weeks at 549-5632 with questions. Visit fvamissoula.org. On Mon., March 15, get your bull trout protection appreciation on by submitting comments for proposed bull trout critical habitat designations that are specific to western Montana. Comments are due today, so click to regulations.gov for the proposal, and submit your comments online at sierrasportsmen.org. Call the local chapter of the Sierra Club at 549-1142 with questions. After you’ve submitted your comments on Mon., March 15, hightail it over the UM’s Outdoor program, in the Fitness and Rec Center, to get brawny in the mountains by signing up for an intermediate mountaineering overnight class. $115. The class runs Sat., March 20–Sun. March 21, with a pre-trip meeting Thu., March 18 at 5 PM. Call 243-5172. See caverns in a whole new dimension on Wed., March 17, during a meeting of the Northern Rocky Mountain Grotto of the National Speleological Society, which hosts the program “Wilderness Caving in 3-D” and meets at 7 PM at Pipestone Mountaineering, 129 W. Front St. Free. Visit caves.org/grotto/nrmg/Home.html. Finally, those outdoors enthusiasts over at Missoula Parks and Rec wanted me to let you know about two events of interest on Thu., March 18. The first is to remind you that it’s the final day to sign up for a snowshoe adventure at Marshall Photo by Cathrine L. Walters Mountain, which occurs Sat., March 20, from 10 AM–3 PM. $12. The jaunt is for those aged 12 and up, and covers backcountry terFor something entirely different and watery on Sat., March 13, join rains, avalanche awareness and plenty more. Call 721-PARK to registhe Watershed Education Network’s (WEN) free community water ter and visit missoulaparks.org. The second event is a fly tying class monitoring training session, which runs from 1–5 PM. Meet taught by experts at Missoulian Angler Fly Shop, 401 S. Orange St., members of WEN at the Greenough Park Pavilion Area, and get ready which starts at 7 PM. $7. The class is open for those aged 12 and up. to soak up how to measure chemical, biological and physical water RSVP by calling 721-PARK. quality parameters. Visit montanawatershed.org and call 541-9287. Until next time, pedal hard my brothers and sisters. Scaly and slithery things are bound to be around Sat., March 13, during the Montana Natural History Center’s Saturday Kids’ Activity calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 33 March 11–March 18, 2010


scope

The Dude abides

Missoula Independent

Lebowski bash celebrates the Coen brothers’ cult classic by Bob Wire

“I catch something new almost every time,” he says. For some movies, like Schindler’s List, once is ments. The Wilma’s upstairs bar will be serving White enough, thank you very much. Others, like The Matrix or Russians exclusively, says Easton, and Lebowski achievers “The last time I watched it, in the ‘shomer Shabbos’ scene, Blade Runner, reward you with new insights or details can enjoy an actual bowling lane in the theater. Just don’t when Donnie asks Walter how he gets around on Shabbos if he can’t drive, he pronounces it ‘shammus.’ I never step over the foul line, Smokey. each time you watch them. Easton, an engineer with the Rocky Mountain noticed that before.” And then there’s The Big Lebowski. Like a smooth But he’s sure it was no mere slip-up. The Coens are White Russian, Lebowski can be enjoyed frequently, its Development Group, has been a fan of Ethan and Joel particular blend of flavors always delicious and satisfying Coen’s work since their first films, Blood Simple and notorious for their control and precision, and no movement is spontaneous, no scrap of dialogue is ad-libbed. In in ways that are hard to describe. Its sweetness carries a Raising Arizona. Lebowski, this is all the more astonishing when you watch “I love ’em all,” he says. hefty punch, though, and it always leaves you just a little Lebowski is weird, though, even for them. He and the Dude, trying not to spill his Caucasian (“Hey, man, bit woozy. Fans of the 1998 Coen brothers’ cult comedy gather Wishcamper, one of the owners of the Wilma, cooked up there’s a beverage here!”) while being bum-rushed into the back of Mr. Lebowski’s limo. frequently at Lebowski Fests His stuttering, stumbling attempt across the country, where to explain that “some new shit has they suck down oat sodas come to light” is a masterful per(beers) and Caucasians formance by Bridges, our genera(White Russians, the Dude’s tion’s most naturalistic actor favorite loudmouth soup) working in his most iconic role. and pepper each other with While Lebowski wasn’t nominatendless quotes from the ed for even a single Oscar, it was movie while dressed like gratifying to see Bridges receive their favorite characters. A his long-deserved Best Actor first-ever renegade version hardware at the Academy Awards of these quirky confabs will last Sunday for Crazy Heart. take place March 12 at the Lebowski is more than a Wilma Theatre in Missoula. straight-up yukfest, though. Eli Organizers Joe Easton and Bierwag, a Lebowski devotee who Rick Wishcamper are calling works at a Missoula television it “The Big Lebowski: The production outfit, appreciates the Next Round Robin (I Can dark edge of the film. He’s been a Get You a Toe).” Obviously, diehard fan since he first saw the they’re not into the whole movie in 1998. brevity thing. “It was an immediate home The event’s name run,” he says. “We watched comes from a scene in the Chinatown in our [University of movie where tightly wound Montana] Intro to Media Arts Vietnam vet Walter (John class one day, and The Big Goodman) is explaining to Lebowski the next,” Bierwag said. his laid-back buddy the “Then we could see how Dude ( Jeff Bridges), that Lebowski has a lot of the film noir some kidnappers, who sent elements. It’s a film noir wrapped them a toe supposedly up in a comedy.” snipped from the foot of a The Coen brothers themhostage, are mere amateurs. selves have acknowledged as “Oh, I can get you a much, saying that The Big toe, believe me…” says Lebowski, right down to its title, Walter, “Hell, I can get you a is an homage to The Big Sleep, the toe by three o’clock this Raymond Chandler noir classic. afternoon. With nail polPhoto by Chad Harder ish.” Costumes are encourSuch aspects will be discussed aged, and I imagine you Caucasians will flow freely at the Wilma Theatre’s celebration of the Coen brothers’ cult long and loud at Friday’s event. might see a few random classic. In addition to The Dude’s signature drink, “The Big Lebowski: The Next Round Robin But I’d rather flunk social studies (I Can Get You a Toe)” features a screening of the film, an in-theater bowling alley and a toes. than over-think it. Best to just dig costume contest. The Big Lebowski is a the two hours of movie bliss on its three-ring circus of aggressively odd characters, so the their own festival just for kicks. own terms, as it careens from broad slapstick to nuanced “Ninety percent of everything Rick and I do is just to highbrow humor with the velocity of a hurled bowling opportunity for costume ideas is virtually limitless. Easton recounts one Lebowski Fest he attended where a partici- make other people laugh,” says Easton. “Seeing it on the ball, scattering all the pins of conventional comedy and pant showed up dressed as a Korean soldier, carrying a big screen will be funny. We’ll laugh out loud because predictable plotlines in the process. pair of mannequin legs. Even hardcore fans of the movie other people are laughing out loud.” Hey, I’m not tryin’ to bust your friggin’ agates here, I have lots of friends who toss off Lebowski quotes but “The Next Round Robin” is a mandatory party for all had to think hard before they came up with the reference: the wheelchair-bound Mr. Lebowski telling the Dude that like so many briefcases full of dirty undies thrown off a Lebowski fans, or just anyone who wants to see the rug he doesn’t complain, “even though a Chinaman took my wooden bridge. Most would agree that Lebowski lines are that ties the whole room together. somehow a cut above quotes from other comedy icons legs in Korea.” “The Big Lebowski: The Next Round Robin” preSuch inspiration will be rewarded at Friday’s event, as like, say, Caddyshack or The Blues Brothers. Easton and I party starts at the Wilma Theatre Friday, March 12 at they’ll be giving out Lebowski-appropriate prizes during discussed the source of the appeal, and how Lebowski— 7 PM, and the movie shows at 8 PM. $5. the movie’s intermission for Best Dude, Best Walter, Most or any movie—could hold up so well under repeated Arcane Costume and a few other Lebowskian achieve- viewings. arts@missoulanews.com

Page 34 March 11–March 18, 2010


Noise

Books

Bitch Blasted

Short Story Records

Blasted is a breakup album, but not in a sad, selfpitying way. Bitch kicks it off with “Kitchen,” layering poppy hooks with “Na-na-nas” reminiscent of the kind of celebratory, clappy style of Matt & Kim and Paul Simon. But Bitch, as her name might suggest, sharpens the poppy filling with dagger-edged observations and bursts of badass rocker growls. On the song’s bright breakdown she sings with rebellious good humor, “But my whistle gets so hot, which makes me get all fired up, which makes you want to fuck me, but oh so hard to love me.” You can hear 1970s metal roots on “Open Up,” à la Jimi Hendrix on “Kiss the Sky.” The title track showcas-

Maren Christensen Finally Red Graciemae Records

Maren Christensen’s 2006 album, Ready for You Now, was a compilation about finding one’s way in the world. On her new release, Finally Red, Christensen seems to be a lot closer to finding— and making—her own way, as suggested by the lyrics, “We’ve got to live in the world the way we want it to be,” or “I know what I want—know who I am.” An appealing array of countrified world beats—including a little zydeco and a hint of samba—combine with

Vampire Weekend Contra XL

I still don’t fully understand the venom spewed toward current sensation Vampire Weekend. Is it the meteoric rise, from Ivy League classmates in 2006 to Spin cover boys in 2008? Is it the preppy pastel sweaters and suburban-centric lyrics? Is it the fact that a bunch of white kids are playing African percussion? Is it the fact they sing about silly things like commas, Cape Cod and collegiate grief? As an unabashed fan of Vampire Weekend’s debut EP, the subsequent full release, and every one of its infectiously perky tracks, I’m left at a loss for all the haters. (And there are scores of haters.) But following the band’s equally perky and, at least by some, hated sophomore effort, I’ve at least developed a theory for

Johnny Cash American VI: Ain’t No Grave American/Lost Highway

I’ve never been so sad about a musician’s death as I was with that of Johnny Cash. The release of Ain’t No Grave, his second posthumous album, comes six and a half years after the “Man in Black” died. The aptly titled release and sixth recording from producer Rick Rubin’s American Recordings series gives the eerie sense that Cash is still singing

Film

Movie Shorts

es Bitch’s dramatic violin skills, and on “Cats Kills” she fiddles her way through a tribal sounding hillbilly jig that sidetracks into a soulful tribute to “Home on the Range.” Some songs like “Lost You” are completely flat and unmemorable, but mostly Blasted has all the striking, catchy power to enchant fans of Bright Eyes or Tegan and Sara. It’s one of my favorite musical discoveries in months. Anyone who crosses sunshine pop with Joan Jett snarling and glam rock riffs is all right by me. (Erika Fredrickson) Bitch opens for the Indigo Girls at the University Theatre Wednesday, March 17, at 8 PM. $34. straightforward folk for a diverse yet well-balanced selection. While Christensen’s lyrics on occasion can seem too earnest, for the most part they’re clever and well-written, whether jubilant or pensive. The full name of this ensemble of players is Maren Christensen and Her Really Big Small Band, which gives a good idea of the sonic variety and depth of talent on this recording. The standard guitar/bass/drums/vocals quintet is joined by accordion, flute and rain stick, a refreshing alternative to standard folk recordings. (Although, the soprano sax seems somewhat out of place.) Finally Red is about growth and strength in life, but it’s equally about musical growth and strength, which Christensen has certainly developed. (Melissa Mylchreest) Maren Christensen plays a CD release show at the Elks Club Saturday, March 13, at 8 PM. $10. the backlash. Vampire Weekend keeps its content at a comfortable distance, unwilling to reveal whatever may really affect the band. Whereas Kings of Leon can be mercilessly— and deservedly—ripped for being a little too emotionally accessible (we get it, they could use somebody) and, thus, deemed cheesy mainstream pop, Vampire Weekend keeps anything resembling real emotion at arm’s length. Whereas some find that annoyingly vapid, I embrace the escape. And Contra, starting with a fantastically irreverent opener about an obscure Latin American alcoholic beverage, is definitely another worthwhile escape. (Skylar Browning) Vampire Weekend plays the Wilma Theatre Tuesday, March 16, at 8 PM. The show is sold out. from the beyond. Like all Cash’s American recordings, the songs are mostly covers. The title track, originally sung by Claude Ely in 1953, is a haunting mix of deep piano chords, minor key guitar picking and drums that evoke the marching of feet on dirt, like a ghostly chain gang. Cash revives Sheryl Crow’s gritty 1996 war song “Redemption Day,” making it his own. “I Corinthians 15:55,” the only Cash original, is a sweet hymnal, but it’s songs like “Cool Water” by Bob Nolan, and “Satisfied Mind,” made popular by Porter Wagoner, that get at the heart of Cash’s lifelong struggle between faith and human pitfalls. It’s not the best of his American albums, not like Solitary Man or Unchained, but it’s still powerful. The songs seem inextricably linked to Cash’s absence now, in a way that illuminates how larger-than-life he truly was. (Erika Fredrickson)

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Missoula Independent

Page 35 March 11–March 18, 2010


Scope

Noise

Books

Film

Movie Shorts

Times Run 3/12 - 3/18

Good will hunting

Cinemas, Live Music & Theater

The Big Lebowski One Night Only, Fri (3/12) at 8:00

A Single Man

(R)

Lyrical prose can’t save half-baked Blue Horse

Nightly at 7 & 9 Sun matinee at 1 & 3

The Last Station Nightly at 7, Sun matinee at 1, Will NOT show Fri (3/12) or Tues (3/16)

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (R)

Missoula Independent

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave.

Nightly at 9 Sun matinee at 3, Will NOT show Fri (3/12) or Tues (3/16)

Downtown Missoula

www.thewilma.com

406-728-2521

Page 36 March 11–March 18, 2010

by Azita Osanloo

Instead of giving the story some much-needed Since 2003, the highly acclaimed online literary journal, Narrative Magazine, has been commit- depth, the passage (and another one that echoes it) ted to advancing the literary arts in the digital age. only serves to remind the reader, as if in a footnote, And, until very recently, Narrative has been almost that the very tension that brought us into the story is still extant (lest we forget). exclusively online, pubThough Bass closes the lishing only their thricestory with an epiphany yearly magazines in hard Robert has regarding his copy. In late 2009, doomed marriage (making Narrative Library, the pubboth actual and symbolic lishing arm of the online use of the novella’s titular journal, published the first “blue horse”), it feels in a series of hardcopy tacked on, as though Bass novellas by Montana had written himself into a author Rick Bass. The Blue corner from which he Horse is a brief, 50-page needed to escape. account of a bird-hunting trip in northern Montana In other places in the between two old friends. novella, Bass’ prose is hamAt its best, the novella is a pered by the use of the lyrical, even haunting omniscient point of view. read, full of pregnant It’s an unlikely choice for a silences and empty short novella to begin with, desires. It is also, however, and only succeeds here as a confounding read, one a means for his authorial plagued by an over-bearvoice to intrude into the ing authorial voice and a narrative in some places half-baked narrative, makand to confuse the reader ing this an inauspicious The Blue Horse in others. In one passage, beginning to Narrative Rick Bass when Robert and Jack are Librar y ’s first in-print paperback, Narrative Library being shown the painstakseries. ingly made handicrafts cre56 pages, $11.95 ated by a woman whose The story centers on family (and religious sect) Robert and Jack, both in their early 40s, as they embark on their annual owns the land on which the two men are about to pheasant-hunting trip in the late autumn. While Jack hunt, Bass writes: “Both men understood instinctiveis newly married and “still wandering about in such ly what a tremendous amount of work must be a state of wonder and disbelief at his good fortune,” involved in the unmaking and remaking, if it was Robert has been married for 20 years to Jennifer and enough to upset even this woman, for whom work soberly attempts to come to grips with the reality was but prayer. As if, for once, she had gotten in too that, perhaps, he and his wife simply don’t love one deep—had found a task beyond her.” another anymore: “...because a love for each other It’s a difficult leap of faith to believe, as Bass no longer leapt wild and unbidden from their writes, that both men “instinctively” made the exact hearts, it seemed to them that they were being car- same series of conclusions about the nature of the ried relentlessly forward to an undesirable though woman’s work and its implications on her relationunnamed destination. They couldn’t see a way out. ship with work and prayer. What’s really being Perhaps there wasn’t one.” injected into the prose is Bass’ own emotions, comThe tension in Robert’s marriage purportedly municated too heavy-handedly with an awkward provides the narrative crux to the novella, as we are and inefficient use of the omniscient point of view. supposed to believe that the inevitable dissolution Certainly, Bass is—as he has always been—most of the marriage hangs in the air, despite the escapist at home in the unperturbed forest, and his prose in pleasures of the pheasant hunt. The problem is that The Blue Horse shows it. Not many authors can deftwhat ought to have worked as a narrative anchor ly depict action while extolling the virtues of a beaufeels more like an afterthought, rendering the tiful setting, and Bass manages this with his signapotential seed of domestic ennui as nothing more ture agility and grace. The best scenes in this short than a narrative conceit that gets Bass’ characters to work are the ones when Bass is simply describing where he really wants them: among chokecherry (without injecting any authorial opinion) the bushes, giant cottonwoods and magnificently col- actions of two old friends hunting in the woods with ored pheasants just waiting to be shot. In one pas- their dogs. Invariably, though, with only a partially sage, Robert notices he “had thought of Jennifer, formed narrative pull, this novella remains an and their predicament…only twice during the unconvincing, seemingly unfinished, read. morning’s hunt and both times had pushed the thought away.” arts@missoulanews.com


Scope

Noise

Books

Film

Movie Shorts

romatherapy Sale

In a hole Off with 3-D’s head and, eventually, Alice’s by Andy Smetanka

I love the song and dance they give you at a 3-D movie when you tell them you brought your own glasses. The pair you neglected to “recycle” in the big plastic bin outside the theater last time because you thought, hey, next time I won’t need another pair and I’ll save two dollars. You’re welcome, wallet! You’re welcome, Earth! “Sorry, it’s just there’s a $2 surcharge on the movie because of the high production costs. But you get the glasses.” Listen, girlie, one feels like saying, knuckles whitening ever so slightly around one’s redundant 3-D glasses. But you can’t fight city hall. A practical understanding of economy, not to mention ecology, is likewise redundant here: yes deposit, no return. And then

chase scenes more breathtaking. You have to wonder what it holds for the future of pornography. And imagine what will happen when, if they haven’t already, Hollywood’s tech-nerds learn to pull this most lucrative of dimensions out of already-existing movies? George Lucas will make another billion dollars re-issuing Star Wars. Likewise Peter Jackson, and perhaps soon afterwards I shall live to see a childhood wish fulfilled: being able to see down TV ladies’ blouses by standing over the TV and looking down at an angle. Purists will defend the threatened second dimension as passionately as they once denounced the colorizing of black and white movies. Is 3-D the new talkie? People don’t often realize what a horrible impact sound initially had on the art of

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they rub it in during the previews, chirpily urging you to “recycle” your glasses as you leave the theater. What do they do with them all? Melt them down to make new 3-D glasses? Send them to Africa? Um, sell them again? And high production costs? You’ve got to be kidding me. I don’t recall Kevin Costner insisting I cough up extra to bail him out of Waterworld. Cry me a river, Pixar and Dreamworks. Why are your high production costs suddenly my problem? I don’t know enough about the new 3-D process to say with certainty that this “surcharge” is a scam, but I suspect it is. Anyway, I paid the stupid thing and took the second pair of glasses. The kids love to wear them, particularly for running into things at high speeds. It also occurred to me that if I wore two pairs I might be able to see into the fourth dimension during the movie, although I forgot to test this hypothesis. They are kind of fun. When the cue comes on the screen for the audience to please put on its glasses, you rub elbows across 60 years with a bygone era, almost feel as though you could be sitting in one of those iconic photos of 1950s moviegoers in dresses and smart suits wearing 3-D glasses. Then the first thing you see in 3-D is a cat food commercial. Then the usual passel of interchangeable Pixar/Dreamworks trailers with droll rodents and tomboy heroines with snarky attitudes and freakishly adult bodies. Oh, surprise, a new Toy Story in 3-D. Then a trailer for an upcoming Kenny Chesney concert movie in 3-D. Then a Phish concert movie in—wait for it—3-D. That’s when it comes home to you that the new 3D is more than just a fad. Lots of people want this experience, or can be made to want it, in more ways than just to make horror movies slightly scarier and

film when it was introduced in the late ’20s. The most lackluster scripts were rushed into production to meet the demand for talkies, talkies, talkies. Already-finished silent pictures were hastily encumbered with crude soundtracks, a process called “goat-glanding” after a medical fad of the ti— What’s that? Oh, right, Alice in Wonderland. Well, I didn’t much care for Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland. Technically it’s everything you’d expect, and pointless. Burton is hardly an artist in need of another dimension; in fact, the sudden availability of this third dimension in some ways reveals the limits of an imagination that once seemed limitless in just two. 3-D almost feels like an afterthought here: a latter-day goat-glanding. Burton doesn’t exploit the medium as shamelessly as some, which is a relief in a way, but isn’t exploitation the whole point of 3-D? Our first glimpse of Wonderland is almost winceinducing, so crammed is it with Burtonian bric-a-brac. To be fair, I have to wear my 3-D glasses over my regular glasses, so maybe I’m not getting the optimal effect. But there was just nothing in this movie I was interested in seeing. I really don’t see what others do in Johnny Depp—the new “madcap” Johnny Depp. Me, I never forget for a second that I’m watching Depp being a hambone, and whatever blips of enjoyment I get from his post-Pirates performances they never seem commensurate with the amount of energy they require to watch. Burton, too, is an increasingly formulaic filmmaker, his recent oeuvre noteworthy only for diminishing returns on what once seemed so magical. Alice in Wonderland continues at the Carmike 10 in 3-D and the Village 6 in regular ol’ 2-D. arts@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 37 March 11–March 18, 2010


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK A SINGLE MAN Colin Firth plays a professor circa 1962 who’s suffering severe depression after the death of his partner, Matthew Goode. In the meantime, his encounters with a Spanish immigrant, a drama queen and a student send him off course. Wilma Theatre: 7 and 9, with Sun matinees at 1 and 3. GREEN ZONE Matt Damon gets his war on as a chief warrant officer during the early days of the war in Iraq. He’s on an unsuccessful hunt for WMDs, and wants to know why people keep dropping like flies. But can he track down a confidential media source in order to find out the truth of the matter? Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:05 and 10 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1, 4, 7 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. REMEMBER ME Rob Pattinson plays a slightly introverted rebel who has a crappy relationship with his less-than-stellar dad Pierce Brosnan. But when Emilie de Ravin comes into his life, Pattinson starts to come out of his shell. Carmike 10: 4:35, 7:15 and 9:55 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:55. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:30, 4:10, 7:05 and 9:50 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

Books

Fri.–Thu. at 1:10, 4:35 and 8 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. THE BIG LEBOWSKI Jeffrey “The Dude” Lebowski is an exceptional L.A. slacker who’s mistaken for a millionaire, making him the target of two angry mobsters. The one-night-only showing celebrates bowling, White Russians and memorable quotes. Wilma Theatre: Friday, March 12, at 8.

Film

Movie Shorts

shows at 1:45 and 4:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:30, 4:20, 7:25 and 9:45 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. CRAZY HEART Jeff Bridges plays a hard-drinkin’ country singer down on his luck, low on dough, and relegated to playing the small town circuit. But things might turn around for the better during a chance meeting with music journalist Maggie Gyllenhaal.

“Who are you calling Spencer Pratt?” She’s Out of My League opens Friday at the Village 6.

SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE Jay Baruchel plays an airport security guard, a “nice guy” who just can’t seem to find a girl—that’s until he meets foxy Alice Eve. Will Eve go for the seemingly average Baruchel, or leave him in the dust? Village 6: 7:20 and 9:50 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:45 and 4:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:05, 4:25, 7:15 and 9:50 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45.

NOW PLAYING ALICE IN WONDERLAND Tim Burton makes his 3-D mark in this phantasmagorical classic, which features Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska and Anne Hathaway. Carmike 10: 4:20, 6:10, 7, 8:45 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sun. shows at 1, 1:30 and 3:35. Village 6 in 2-D: 7 and 9:35 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1:30 and 4:20. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at noon, 1:15, 2:30, 4, 5, 7:40 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sat. shows at 10:20 and midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 2, 3:30, 4:30, 6, 8:40 and 9:40 with additional Tue.–Wed. show at 7. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9. AVATAR Sam Worthington gets a 3-D makeover as he plays an ex-Marine whose alien body and human mind is sent to pillage a new planet for its resources, but does a chance encounter with a female humanoid help keep his eyes on the bounty? Carmike 10: 4:30 and 8 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell:

Missoula Independent

Noise

THE BLIND SIDE Sandra Bullock plays an upper-crust mom who takes in a homeless teen and helps him realize his dreams of playing pigskin. Carmike 10: 7:10 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:25. BROOKLYN’S FINEST Richard Gere, Ethan Hawke and Don Cheadle play three Brookyln police officers who start wavering from their duties due to job burn out, lack of money, and shady alliances with drug kingpins like Wesley Snipes. When all three of them end up in the midst of a massive drug operation, who decides to uphold the law of the land? Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 10 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:20, 3:30, 6:30 and 9:25 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 4:15 and 7:20. COP OUT Bruce Willis and Tracy Morgan play two cops on the hunt for a missing baseball card worth some bills. Along the way, the buds get caught up saving a lovely Latina, while also asking a stoned out Seann William Scott for some help tracking down the elusive piece of memorabilia. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1, 4:15, 7:10 and 9:35 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:15. THE CRAZIES Timothy Olyphant plays a sheriff in a small town where people are going bonkers and croaking after something rancid contaminates their water supply. Can Olyphant, his wife Radha Mitchell, and others survive against their zombified peers? Village 6: 7:20 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun.

Page 38 March 11–March 18, 2010

Village 6: 7 and 10 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10 with an additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Thu. at 1:20, 4, 6:45 and 9:20 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. DEAR JOHN Amanda Seyfried falls for Special Forces soldier Channing Tatum after running into him at the beach. Things go well until Tatum gets deployed, again and again. Does distance make Seyfried’s heart fonder, or does she grow cold and ditch her unavailable warrior? Village 6: 7 and 9:35 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 4. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, 3:25, 6:50 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:25, 6:50 and 9:30. THE IMAGINARIUM OF DR. PARNASSUS Terry Gilliam doses us with surrealism in this fantasy story where Christopher Plummer plays a theater troupe leader who strikes a deal with devilish Tom Waits. Along the way, Heath Ledger, Johnny Depp, Colin Farrell and Jude Law show up. Wilma Theatre: 9, with Sun. matinees 3. No shows Friday, March 12, and Tuesday, March 16. THE LAST STATION Christopher Plummer gets suited up and bearded up as Leo Tolstoy in this biopic about the raging sparks that flew during the last tumultuous years of his marriage. Wilma Theatre: 7, with Sun. matinees at 1. No shows Friday, March 12, and Tuesday, March 16. THE LOVELY BONES Peter Jackson leaps back to the screen sans aliens, wizards and hobbits in a story about a brutally murdered teen who keeps watch over her family

in an elysian, “in-between” world. Can she keep her desire for retribution under wraps, or will she let her killer get caught? Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 6:50 and 9:30 with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:45. PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF Logan Lerman is a troublesome high schooler whose life takes a wicked shift when he finds out he’s the son of Poseidon. This in turn means he’s a demigod who has to halt warring gods bent on destruction, as well as save his mom Catherine Keener. Includes guest spots by Uma Thurmun and Pierce Brosnan. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7:05 and 9:50 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Wed. at 1:10, 4:05, 6:55 and 9:40 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Thu. at 1:10 and 4:05 only. SHUTTER ISLAND Martin Scorcese bounces back to the screen in a story where Leonardo DiCaprio and Mark Ruffalo play federal agents on the hunt for a batty murderer who disappeared from a remote institution for the criminally insane. After a few days in the nuthouse, though, DiCaprio starts acting a little loco, too. Carmike 10: 4:05, 7:10 and 10:15 with additional Fri.–Sun. show at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:45 and 9:15 with additional Sat.–Sun. show at 3 and no 9:15 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 3:35, 6:35 and 9:30 with additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:15, 4:20 and 7:25. Entertainer in Ronan: 4, 6:50 and 9:25. STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE: THE BERRYFEST PRINCESS MOVIE Strawberry Shortcake enlists the help of some buds in order to make sure an upcoming spring festival and parade goes off without a hitch in this animated kids’ flick. Village 6: 1 only Sat.–Sun. THE TOOTH FAIRY Dwayne Johnson plays a cynical hockey player who has no qualms about dispelling myths to eager ears, but everything changes when he gets summoned to the joyous job of sticking money under the pillows of toothless children. Village 6: 7:30 and 9:50 with additional Sat.–Sun. shows at 1 and 4:30. VALENTINE’S DAY Your heart might just sink with sadness or lift with elation in this story about a diverse group of Los Angelenos—including Jessica Alba, Ashton Kutcher and Julia Roberts—as they experience heartbreak, romance and all those other love-induced feelings on that day single people love to hate. Carmike 10: 4:20 and 10. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:30, 3:45, 6:40 and 9:35 with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight and Mon.–Thu. at 1:05, 3:45, 6:40 and 9:35. Capsule reviews by Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., March 12. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


Missoula Independent

Page 39 March 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 18, 2010


M I S S O U L A

Independent

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Mar. 11–Mar. 18, 2010

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Table of contents Advice Goddess . . . Freewill Astrology . Crossword . . . . . . . Home Page . . . . . . This Modern World

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Still have my number? We met a few years back and I've had a crush on you this whole time. You're the best looking guy in town. For serious. I hear you're newly single, and I'd like us to get together! Woman to Man March 4th

I Saw You – Again! I saw you downtown doing jumping jacks by the X's in your purple jumpsuit. I knew I'd seen you around before, but I didn't expect this. What's up with the jumpsuit? Man saw Man March 5th

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themix.bigskypress.com Swap & Sale on Saturday, April 17th. This is a consignment sale. Receive an 80/20 cash split, or 110% of the selling price in Trail Head store credit. Drop off your canoes, kayaks, rafts and related accessories between 9am-Noon. The sale will take place between Noon-3pm, and pickups will be between 3 & 4pm. For questions or more information, please call the Trail Head at 543-6966 or vist trailheadmontana.com WANTED: Girlfriend, SWF. 30-45, nonsmoking, non-drinking, no

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WEDNESDAYS & FRIDAYS ~ Free Reiki Share (All Levels) + Reiki Level 1 Weekly Reiki Share + Beginners Training ON FEB. 10 & FEB 17 @ Union Place Apts., 2500 Great Northern Ave. (Behind Target). Space is limited, get specific directions when you RSVP. Drop in any time during this event, leave early if you need to, we try to make it easy for you to fit us into your life. Be Sure To

RSVP To Reserve a Comfy Cozy Recliner. 5:30pm- Chat & Snack 6:00pm- Beginner Instruction Starts 7:00pm- All Level Share Starts 9:pm- Close. SPACE IS LIMITED PLEASE RSVP @ dianne.getbetternow@gmail.com or call 1800-809-0112

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ADVICE GODDESS

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

By Amy Alkon

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THICK AND TIRED OF IT In the two years I’ve been with my boyfriend, I’ve gained 40 pounds. I was unemployed, got lazy, blah, blah, blah. I’ve been trying to slim down without success, probably because I feel so bad about myself now. But, is it normal for a man to withdraw all affection when his partner gains weight? My boyfriend hasn’t kissed me or had sex with me in over a year. He won’t even put his arm around me. He’ll hug me if I ask him, but that’s all. Aren’t you supposed to love your partner for who they are, even if they gain weight or get cancer and have chemo and lose their hair? I’m certain he isn’t cheating, and he says he doesn’t want to break up. But, say I lose weight, and he regains interest. Can I ever forgive him for what he’s put me through? —Fatty With A Dream In two years, you’ve put on the equivalent of a 5-year-old child about to outgrow his car seat. That isn’t going up a dress size; it’s going up a tent size. Love might be blind, but male lust usually has a weight limit. There are those guys who are fatty fanciers, but a guy who got together with you 40 pounds ago probably isn’t one of them. Male sexuality is highly visual. Women tend to feel superior for not caring as much about looks, but we’re all just acting on marching orders from our genes. While most women are picky about men’s height, women across cultures prioritize finding a partner with money and mojo. In other words, a big compromise for you probably isn’t having sex with a fat guy, but sticking with a guy who quits his high-powered job to become a Hare Krishna and sell flowers at the airport. Yeah, sure, “real women have curves,” but these days, far too many real women’s curves also have folds. The sad thing is, if you’re like so many Fatty Pattys desperately trying to lose weight, you’ve probably been approaching it all wrong—thanks to the advice of your doctor, Dr. Oz, much of the medical establishment, and numerous supposed scientists at prestigious universities. It’s actually obscene how many “authorities” lazily and intransigently promote hearsay-based dietary medicine; for example, claiming saturated fat consumption causes heart disease when the evidence for that simply doesn’t exist. For actual evidence-based science on losing weight, sans hunger and suffering, turn to Dr. Michael Eades’ blog at proteinpower.com and to investigative science journalist Gary Taubes’ exhaustively researched book “Good Calories, Bad

Calories.” Taubes shows that it’s carbohydrates—sugar, flour, and easily digested starches like potatoes—that drive the excess insulin secretion that puts on fat. Per Taubes’ title, it seems a calorie is not a calorie, and the fewer carbs you eat, the slinkier you will be. If this sounds like the Atkins Diet, that’s because it basically is. As Taubes told me, “Doctors have been saying Atkins is a quack for so long, they never bothered to check whether he actually got the science right. Unfortunately, he did and they didn’t.” I’ll let your friends go on about how your boyfriend’s a horrible person, and how love should transcend all. The reality is, it often doesn’t. Besides, you didn’t get cancer; you got a trough of Haagen-Dazs, stuck your snout in, and didn’t look up for two years straight. Now, maybe your boyfriend’s affection strike is utterly unconnected to your weight, but chances are, he’s angry and resentful that he’s got a girlfriend whose panties are beginning to resemble a parasail. So, why isn’t he putting his arms through the leg slots and sailing off a tall building to safety? Maybe he still loves you; maybe he’s too lazy to leave. Or, maybe he’s trying to drive you away because he feels bad about breaking up over your looks—or even suggesting you step down as International Hausfrau of Pancakes: “Hey, Buffet Queen, either lose your 40 pounds or wave goodbye to my 175.” Since gaining 40 pounds isn’t “Got a little absent-minded while holding a bag of Doritos,” it seems it wasn’t an empty stomach you were trying to fill. Clearly, you not only need to lose weight but to deal with why you packed it on. Whether your boyfriend will come around and whether you’ll forgive him is anyone’s guess. Whether you’re willing to put up with a boyfriend who won’t put out—not even a hug, without being asked—is the looming question at present. Whatever you decide, it helps to accept that, as a woman, you need to do the very best you can with what you have. Sure, inner beauty counts for a lot, but it isn’t slimming. And while the average guy doesn’t want Kate Moss, he isn’t into Kate Moose, either.

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

All the farmers should have church on the their farms every Sunday. For all the people I’ve worked for, I’ve had no money for myself. It is all for them. The most I made was $3,000 a year. OM Tents for Haiti On January 12, a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck southern Haiti killing over 200,000 people, displacing 1.1 million and destroying over 100,000 homes. Tents For Haiti is a project that collects “like new” tents to help displaced families. With the upcoming rainy season, and the threat of unstable structures, families are without shelter and need your help. Please donate a clean tent with all working parts and a small diagram of what the tent should look like to help the families in Haiti. Donations can be made at the Trail Head in Missoula.

VOLUNTEERS WORD is seeking volunteer tutors for homeless and at-risk children, K8, in Missoula. Make a difference and donate 1-2 hours/week! Contact Kimberly Apryle at 543-3550x227 or visit www.wordinc.org.

INSTRUCTION ANIYSA Middle Eastern Dance Classes and Supplies. Call 2730368. www.aniysa.com ASSISTANT / TEACHERS’ AIDE, P/T, Msla. Missoula area nonprofit is seeking part time Assistant/Teachers’ Aide for afternoon and evening shift. Will assist teachers with implementation of planned lessons and classroom activities, while providing quality care for preschool aged children. Will be cleaning during evening. Must be dependable, empathetic, willing to take on tasks and be respectful of diversity of children and their families. Will be working in a team environment; need to be able to work effectively with other staff, management, parents and children. Must be groomed for public contact and have good written and verbal communication skills. Requires minimum of Early Childhood Education/Training or at least 6

months experience in early childhood education. Must have a high school diploma or GED. Will attend 1 meeting a month in evening hours and annual training conducted in evening hours. Will be caring for 2 to 5 year olds. Mon-Fri from 2:30 to 5:30 pm and 6 pm - 8 pm for about 25 hours per week. Pay is $7.25/hour. HIRING AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. #2977065 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Bartender Trainees. No experience necessary. Make up to $40 an hour in wages and tips. Meet new people, work in an exciting atmosphere EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.AwardMakeUp School.com 310-364-0665 Free Advice! We’ll Help You Choose A Program Or Degree To Get Your Career & Your Life On Track. Call Collegebound Network Today! 1877-892-2642 TODDLER LEAD TEACHER F/T, Msla. Missoula area nonprofit is seeking a full time Infant/Toddler Teacher. Will plan and implement lessons and classroom activities, while providing quality care for children 2 years of age. Must be dependable, empathetic, willing to take on tasks and be respectful of diversity of children and their families. Will be working in a team environment; need to be able to work effectively with other staff, management, parents and children. Must be groomed for public contact and have good written and verbal communication skills. Requires minimum of 12 credits in Early Childhood Education (ECE) and 1 to 2 years Infant/Toddler teaching experience; prefer ECE degree. Must have a high school diploma or GED. Will work Monday-Friday, days shift, for 37 hours per week; will attend 1 meeting a month in evening hours and annual training conducted in evening hours. Pay is $9-$10/hour, depending on experience, plus benefits. HIRING AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. #2977066 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching

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Bennett’s Music Studio

Guitar, banjo,mandolin and bass lessons. Rentals available.

bennettsmusicstudio.com 721-0190

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PET OF THE WEEK Wobs It’s taken only days for Wobs to capture all our hearts. Her spirit is infectious! As a kitten she was diagnosed with Cerebellar Hyporplasia, which basically means she’s deaf, and walks with a wobble! It couldn’t be less of a disability for her though. She is super smart, and even eats out of an interactive toy. She spends hours entertaining herself, and as it happens anyone watching on! She’s a special girl with a true love for life, and I know she will make someone very happy! For more information call the Humane Society at 549-HSWM.

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BODY, MIND & SPIRIT Acupuncture Easing withdrawal from tobacco/alcohol/drugs, pain, stress management. Counseling. Sliding fee scale. Licensed acupuncturist. 5432220 Beginning Herbal MedicineMaking: Herbal Oils and Salves* Britta Blodorn: Clinical Herbalist, Medicine-Maker, Plant Lover In this hands on class, we will learn how to prepare medicinal infused herbal oils and salves. Britta will discuss the healing properties of medicinal plants and cover various methods of preparation. March 11th Thursday 7-9 pm Cost: $20, optional $5 product fee per class BodyTalk, Therapeutic Swedish Massage and Arvigo Technique of Maya Abdominal Massage. 18 yrs experience. Moondance Healing Therapies/Rosie Smith, NCMT, CBP 240-9103 Escape With Massage $50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie 406-543-2220

MASCULINE, EXPERIENCED FULL BODY MASSAGE FOR MEN IN MISSOULA. Mark(406)728-2629 Paradigm Reiki Balancing and Healing Session- $40 5490289 PENIS ENLARGEMENT. FDA Medical Vacuum Pumps. Gain 1-3 inches permanently. Testosterone, Viagra, Cialis. Free Brochures. 619-294-7777 http://www.drjoelkaplan.com (discounts available) Ten Percent Solution: Affordable Medical Weight Management Come in to register for free physical. River City Family Health 742 Kensington 5428090

pare. – Kenko YoshidaFACT & FICTION 220 N. HIGGINS AND ON CAMPUS WANTED: Girlfriend, SWF. 3045, nonsmoking, non-drinking, no drugs to help build YOUR own home. Honest, upfront & true. Call 529-0193 Wholistic Choices Massage Therapy. Neuromuscular Massage $45/hour. Anna 4930025

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EMPLOYMENT GENERAL 3 Downtown Facilities Staff Needed: Missoula Downtown Association hiring for event setup & other Downtown projects. PT Apr-Oct. $8.50/hr. 543-4238/ missouladown town.com for more info. Submit cover letter, resume, 3 references to 218 E. Main St, C; Msla MT 59802 or via email to mda@missouladowntown.com by March 26. ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking full-time Customer Service Representatives for in bound calls only for Missoula company. #2977057 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Exch. student coordinator Coordinators are needed in the Missoula area to work with host families, exchange students and high schools. Have fun and get paid as an independent contractor.For more information contact Nancy 866-675-3977 or treez@tds.net.

GOVERNMENT JOBS: Earn $12 to $48 / Hour. Full Medical Benefits & Paid Training. Clerical, Administrative, Health Care, Law Enforcement, Construction, Park Service, more! Call 7 days. 1-800858-0701 x2005 GREAT CAREER OPPORTUNITY in Montana’s service of first choice. Earn more with the skills you have. Learn more of the skills you need. In the Montana Army National Guard, you will build the skills you need for a civilian career, while developing the leadership skills you need to take your career to the next level. Benefits: $50,000 Loan Repayment Program. Montgomery GI Bill. Up to 100% tuition assistance for college. Medical & dental benefits. Starting at $13.00/hr. Paid job skill training. Call 1-800GO-GUARD. NATIONAL GUARD Part-time job...Full-time benefits GREENHOUSE NURSERY LABORERS F/T, P/T, Msla. Knowledgeable plant lover needed for this GENERAL LABORER/SALES position at a local nursery & greenhouse in Missoula. 2977072 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 HABILITATION AIDES, F/T, Msla. Employer is seeking both full & part time HABILITATION AIDES to work with adults with developmental dis-

abilities. Duties are primarily assisting with daily activities, providing social interaction. Applicants must have experience with people with developmental disabilities. Must have high school diploma or GED and valid Montana driver’s license. Full and part-time positions available. Job description available at Missoula Job Service Front desk. Starting wage is $9.02/hour. #2977058 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Hamilton Farmer’s Market Info booth staff, Part-time. Begins March 29th. Call Job Service for more info 363-1822. HOUSEKEEPER, P/T, Jackson Hot Springs. Lodge in Jackson Hot Springs, MT is seeking to fulfill a Housekeeper position. Qualified candidate must have an eye for detail, job duties will also include maintenance of laundry facilities and inventory. DAYS/Shifts: Dependent upon occupancy level. WAGE: $7.25/hr (can usually clean 2-3 cabins/hr). Housing possible/negotiable. #2977054 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 HOUSEKEEPER/LAUNDRY, P/T, Msla. Local skilled nursing & assisted living center is seeking 1 to 2 housekeepers. #2977049 Miss oula Workforce Center 728-7060

HOUSEKEEPERS, P/T,F/T, Msla. Needed ASAP! Local motel seeks both full-time and part-time HOUSEKEEPERS to work 20-40 hours per week. Employer will train! Duties include cleaning guest rooms - vacuum, dust, change linens and clean bathrooms. Shifts are mornings (10:00am) and end when the work is finished. Work days will vary. Pay starts at $7.25 per hour with possibility of increase pay upon proven ability. #2977050 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 Mystery Shoppers earn up to $150 Day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was called “the most famous actress the world has ever known.” She did a few films in the early days of the cinema, but most of her work was in the theater. At age 70, she played the role of the 13-year-old Juliet in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. I commend her on her refusal to act her age, and recommend that you make a comparable effort in the coming weeks. For example, if you’re in your twenties, try something you thought you wouldn’t do until you were at a very ripe age. If you’re over 50, be 25 for a while. It’s an excellent time to do this kind of time-traveling. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You might have to use primitive means to accomplish modern wonders. It may be necessary to hearken back to what worked in the past in order to serve the brightest vision of the future. Take your cue from Luis Soriano, a saintly teacher who carries a library of 120 books on the back of a donkey as he meanders around the back country of Columbia, helping poor kids learn how to read. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Humans have been baking and eating bread for at least 5,000 years. But it wasn’t until the 20th century that anyone figured out a fast and easy way to cut it into thin, precise pieces. Then Otto Rohwedder, who had been working on the project for 16 years, produced a machine that cut a loaf into individual slices. I bring him to your attention, Gemini, because I think you are in a phase of your life when you could very possibly create an innovation that would be as intimately revolutionary as Rohwedder’s was for the masses. In fact, why aren’t you working on it right now?

EMPLOYMENT PERSONAL CAREGIVER, F/T, P/T Msla. Compassionate part-time Personal Caregiver needed to work in a home living center. Pay starts at $9.50/hour or more depending on experience. #2977063. Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 SERVICE ADVISOR, F/T, Msla. A SERVICE ADVISOR with excellent customer service skills is needed to work in an automotive repair shop. #2977055 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 STATE OF MONTANA POSITIONS, FT & PT, Various locations throughout Montana: Want to serve Montana citizens? Positions are available for locations throughout the state. Access the state job listings at: http://mt.gov/statejobs/statejobs.asp

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In order to heal deep-seated problems, people may need to engage in long-term psychotherapy, patiently chipping away at their mental blocks for many years. But some lucky sufferers get their neuroses zapped virtually overnight, either with the help of a monumental event that shocks them out of their malaise or through the work of a brilliant healer who uses a few strokes of kamikaze compassion to creatively destroy their deluded fixations. I think you’re now a candidate for this type of correction, Cancerian.

TELLER, P/T, Msla. Local bank is seeking a part-time TELLER. This position requires a minimum of 3 months of previous teller or cash handling experience. #2977053 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): To discover the most useful truths, you will have to peek behind the curtains and root around to see what’s cloaked in the dark and maybe even explore messes you’d rather not touch. What complicates your task is that the fake truths may be extra loud and shiny, distracting you from the down and dirty stuff with their relentless come-ons. But I have confidence in your ability to outmaneuver the propaganda, Leo. You shall know the hype, and knowing the hype will set you free.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The evil geniuses of the advertising industry are hard at work in their labs dreaming up seductive new mojo to artificially stimulate your consumer lusts. Meanwhile, the media’s relentless campaign to get you to believe in debilitating fantasies and divert you from doing what’s really good for you has reached a fever pitch. And here’s the triple whammy: Even more than usual, some of your relatives and cohorts are angling to convince you that what pleases them is what pleases you. So is there any hope that you will be able to hone in on what truly excites you? (It’s especially important that you do so right now.) The answer, in my opinion, is a qualified yes—IF you’re willing to conduct intensive research into the idiosyncratic secrets of what makes you happy; and IF you’re not scared to discover who you are when you’re turned on all the way.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you were living in Greece in the fifth century B.C., I’d urge you to bathe in the healing spring at the shrine of Asklepios in Athens. If you were in 19th-century France, I’d recommend that you trek to the sacred shrine at Lourdes—being sure to crawl the last half-mile on your hands and knees—and sip from the curative waters there. But since you’re a busy 21stcentury sophisticate and may have a limited belief in miracles, I’ll simply suggest that you visit the most interesting tree you know and spill a bottle of pristine water over your head as you confess your sins and ask the sky for forgiveness and sing songs that purify you to the bone.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It’s quite possible that the nature of consciousness is in the midst of a fundamental transformation. The human race seems to be getting more empathetic, more compassionate, and even more psychic. Many of us are having experiences that were previously thought to be the province of mystics, such as epiphanies that give us visceral perceptions of the interconnectedness of all life. Even as some traditional religions lose members and devolve into cartoony fundamentalism, there are ever-increasing numbers of intelligent seekers who cultivate a more discerning spiritual awareness outside the decrepit frameworks. If you haven’t been on this bandwagon, Scorpio, now’s a good time to jump on. If you’re already on board, get ready for an accelerated ride.

Wldlnd Fire WTR TNDR/ PTBLE H20 TRCK OPR, ON CALL Msla Area. Wildland Fire WATER TENDER OPERATOR and/or POTABLE WATER TRUCK OPERATOR needed! Applicants MUST HAVE ALL of the following qualifications to apply: current CDL with tanker endorsement and DOT Medical exam, FFT2 credentials, 2010 Light Walk Test and 2010 Standards for Potable Driver. #2977075 Missoula Workforce Center 7287060 Work exchange Buddhist center, Redwood Coast, CA. Room, board, stipend, classes, must like to work hard & have interest in spiritual development www.yeshede. org/volunteer.html books@ratnaling.org 510- 809-2014

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): This week you’ll be working overtime while you sleep. Your dreaming mind will be playing around with solutions to your waking mind’s dilemmas. Your ally, the wild conjurer in the ramshackle diamond-encrusted sanctuary at the edge of the deep dark forest, will be spinning out medicine stories and rounding up help for you. So of course you should keep a pen and notebook by your bed to record the dreams that come. I suggest that you also try to keep the first part of your mornings free of busy work so you can integrate the full impact of the nights’ gifts. And don’t despair if you can’t actually remember any of your nocturnal adventures. Their tasty after-images will remain with you subliminally, giving your logical mind an intuitive edge.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There’ll be an abundance of unambiguous choices for you to make in the coming days. I’m not implying they’ll be easy, just that the different alternatives will be clearly delineated. To get you warmed up for your hopefully crisp decisions, I’ve compiled a few exercises. Pick one of each of these pairs: 1. exacting homework or free-form research; 2. pitiless logic or generous fantasies; 3. precise and disciplined communication or heedless self-expression; 4. grazing like a contented sheep or rambling like a restless mountain goat.



AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Among Eastern religions, some traditions preach the value of getting rid of your desires. To be righteously attuned to current cosmic rhythms, however, I think you should rebel against that ideal, and instead cultivate a whole host of excellent desires. Use your imagination, please! Here are a few I highly recommend: a desire for a revelation or experience that will steer you away from becoming more like a machine; a desire for a fresh blast of purity from a primal source; a desire for an imaginary pet snake that teaches you how to be more playful with your libidinous energy; and a desire for a jolt of unexpected beauty that reminds you how important it is to always keep a part of your mind untamed.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I used to have an acupuncturist who, as she poked me with needles, liked to talk about her understanding of Chinese medicine. Once she told me that every human being needs a “heart protector,” which is a body function that’s “like a holy warrior who serves as the queen’s devoted ally.” But the heart protector is not something you’re born with. You’ve got to grow it by building your fortitude and taking care of your body. I think the heart protector will be an apt metaphor for you to play with in the coming weeks, Pisces. It’s going to be an excellent time for you to cultivate any part of your life that gives your heart joy, strength, peace, and integrity.

PROFESSIONAL CASE MANAGER - MEN’S UNIT, F/T, Msla. Seeking a full-time CASE MANAGER to instruct and coordinate assigned residents to obtain employment. #2977070 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 ENHANCED SUPERVISION OFFICER, F/T, Msla Seeking a full-time, permanent ENHANCED SUPERVISION OFFICER. #2977071 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 PROGRAM MANAGER II F/T, Msla Program Manager II needed to direct & supervise all aspects of daily functioning of a mental health group home. #2977073 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

SKILLED LABOR ENGINE BOSSES, Msla Area, ON CALL ENGINE BOSSES needed for crews on Type 3, 4, & Type 6 Eng ines, Weed Wash Station, Air-Ops Trailer, and Mobile Fill Station for wildland fires. #2977077 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 FABRICATORS, F/T, St. Regis. St. Regis, MT lumber mill is seeking experienced fabricators for a temporary position that could work into full-time. Prefer experience with industrial machinery. Will be installing additional sawmill to existing facility. This is not a training position. Pay is dependent on experience. Drug test is mandatory. #2977059 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 IRRIGATOR, F/T, Frenchtown. Large area ranch requires experienced IRRIGATOR for full-time seasonal position 05/15/2009 09/01/2009. #2977062 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 IRRIGATOR, F/T, Msla. Large area ranch requires experienced IRRIGATOR for full-time position, 5/15/10-10/01/10. #2977061 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Independent Publishing, publishers of the Missoula Independent and Montana Headwall, a new quarterly outdoor recreation magazine, seeks a professional, highly motivated Advertising Director. The successful candidate will be responsible for motivating, coaching and inspiring our dynamic sales team. In addition, you’ll be tasked with handling several house accounts and bringing in new business from high-profile local, regional and national accounts. We’d prefer at least 5 years of ad sales management experience, but we’re open to being convinced that your unique and impressive mix of skills is a good fit for our needs. Send resume, including salary expectations, to:

lfoland@missoulanews.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 March 11 – March 18, 2010

or PO Box 8275, Missoula MT 59807. EOE

LUMBER GRADER, F/T, Seeley Lake. Lumber Mill in Seeley Lake is seeking an experience lumber grader. #2977051 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

www.bluemountain clinic.org. Send letter of interest and resume to Jenesy Dahl at 610 N. California St. Missoula, MT 59801 or jenesyd@bluemountainclinic.org.

MILLWRIGHTS, F/T St. Regis. St. Regis, MT lumber mill is seeking experienced millwrights for a temporary position that could work into full-time. Prefer experience with industrial machinery. Will be installing additional sawmill to existing facility. This is not a training position. Pay is dependent on experience. Drug test is mandatory. #2977060 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

NIGHT SHIFT SUPERVISOR and Staff RN’s for the Mental Health Nursing Care Center in Lewistown, MT. Supv’s compensation $21.85 to $22.85, plus additional $1.50/hr night shift incentive. 12 hour shifts. Staff RN compensation: $20.35 to $21.35/hr with possible $1.50/hr night shift incentive and $1.00/hr Charge Nurse Assignment. 8 and 12 hour shifts. For information call 406-5387451 or contact any Job Service Office. Closing 3/25/10

OWNER OPERATORS: Your hard work, along with our great rates, miles and dispatch = Success! Montana based refrigerated carrier. Call 406-266-4210 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs & refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Fin ancial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Msla, 1-800-545-4546 WILDLAND FIRE FUEL TRUCK DRIVER ON Call, Msla area, FUEL FIRE TRUCK OPERATOR needed for wild land fires. #2977074 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060 WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS ON CALL, Msla Area WILDLAND FIRE FIGHTERS needed: FFT1 or FFT2. Looking for crew to man Type 3, 4 and Type 6 Engines, Weed Wash Station, Air-Ops Trailer, and Mobile Fill Station for wildland Fires. #2977076 Missoula Workforce Center 728-7060

TRAINING/ INSTRUCTION Wildland Fire Training, Basic and Refresher. 406-543-0013

HEALTH CAREERS FT LPN/RMA for Primary Care Blue Mountain Clinic is seeking a full time LPN or Registered Medical Assistant for a primary care outpatient setting. A strong work ethic, training in primary care support and a positive attitude are essential qualifications for the ideal candidate. Benefits package including health insurance provided. Hourly wage based on experience. Info. about BMC:

SALES Montana’s Premier Bike Shop We are now accepting applications for our service and sales positions. Qualified applicants please send resume with references to info@montanacy cling.com or mail to P.O. Box 23309 Billings MT 59102 Retail Sales Professional Al’s Furniture is seeking a professional, outgoing person to join our sales team. We offer a generous commission structure, on-going training, great benefits, including paid time off, employee paid health insurance, employee discount, and a beautiful work environment. If you have the drive and desire to succeed, and love to work with people, we’d love to talk to you. Please mail your resume to 1600 North Ave. W, Missoula, MT 59801 or email to alsfurniturestore@gmail.com.

OPPORTUNITIES ALL CASH VENDING! Earn up to $800/Day Potential? Your own local vending route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy for $9,995. 1-888-776-3068 ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 part-time to $7,500/month full-time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-800-330-8446 MYSTERY SHOPPERS. Earn Up To $150 Per Day. Undercover Shoppers Needed to Judge Retail & Dining Establishments. No Exper ience Req’d. Call 1-877-463-7909

Journalism Instructors The School of Journalism at The University of Montana seeks letters of interest from journalists and media professionals to teach classes that are occasionally available in introductory photojournalism, introductory video production, and video and audio reporting and production. Significant professional journalism experience is required. Send letter of application, resume and samples of work to Peggy Kuhr, Dean, School of Journalism, The University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812. ADA/EOE/AA/Veteran’s Preference Employer


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PUBLIC NOTICES MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARINGThe Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Wednesday, March 17th, 2010, at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, Room 201, at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, Montana. Missoula County Growth Policy 2005 Update: Amendments proposed Due to changes in state law, Missoula County’s Rural Initiatives Office has been directed to develop minor amendments to the County’s 2005 Growth Policy dealing with sand and gravel extraction and the Wildland Urban Interface. The amendments are proposed to be adopted as an appendix to the Growth Policy after review by the Planning Board and the County Commissioners through the public hearing process. The Planning Board conducted a public hearing on the proposed amendments on February 2, 2010 and made formal recommenda-

tions on the amendments to the County Commissioners. The Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the proposals and Planning Board recommendations on March 17th at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of the County Courthouse annex at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The amendments and Planning Board recommendations are available for review and can be obtained at the Rural Initiatives office, on-line at www.co.missoula.mt.us/rural or via email at: ri@co.missoula.mt.us. Call 258-3432 if you need further assistance accessing a copy. Comments should be directed to ri@co.missoula.mt.us or Missoula County Rural Initiatives, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-3432. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARINGThe Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Wednesday, March 17th, 2010, at 1:30 p.m. in the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, Room 201, at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, Montana. Missoula County Growth Policy 2005 Update: Amendments proposed Due to changes in state law, Missoula County’s Rural Initiatives Office has been directed to develop minor amendments to the County’s 2005 Growth Policy dealing with sand and gravel extraction and the Wildland Urban Interface. The amendments are proposed to be adopted as an appendix to the Growth Policy after review by the Planning Board and the County Commissioners through the public hearing process. The Planning Board conducted a public hearing on the proposed amendments on February 2, 2010 and made formal recommenda-

tions on the amendments to the County Commissioners. The Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the proposals and Planning Board recommendations on March 17th at 1:30 p.m. in Room 201 of the County Courthouse annex at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The amendments and Planning Board recommendations are available for review and can be obtained at the Rural Initiatives office, on-line at www.co.missoula.mt.us/rural or via email at: ri@co.missoula.mt.us. Call 258-3432 if you need further assistance accessing a copy. Comments should be directed to ri@co.missoula.mt.us or Missoula County Rural Initiatives, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-3432. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARING The Missoula Board of County Commissioners will conduct a hearing on the proposed expenditure of Open Space Bond proceeds on the following project: 1. Madsen Rock Creek Conservation Easement A hearing on a proposal to use $40,000 in Open Space bond funding towards the purchase of a conservation easement on 157 acres of land in the Rock Creek area. The applicant is Fred Madsen/Four Bar M Ranch, LLC., represented by Five Valleys Land Trust. The proposed match is approximately $2.75 for every dollar of open space funding expended. The Commissioners will conduct the hearing at 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 24, 2010, in Room 201 of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 W Broadway, Missoula, Montana. Any person wishing to be heard on the matter may speak at the hearing and/or submit written or other materials to the

Commissioners at the hearing or by mail, fax or personal delivery to the Commissioners at their offices in the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, FAX (406) 721-4043. Copies of the proposed project are available for public inspection at the Missoula County Office of Rural Initiatives, 317 Woody, Missoula, Montana. Telephone 2583432; or you may contact Pat O’Herren in Rural Initiatives at 258-4981. If anyone attending any of these meetings needs special assistance, please provide advance notice by calling 258-3422. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services. MISSOULA COUNTY GOVERNMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS DESIGN, AND CONSTRUCTION DETAILSFOR Upper Miller Creek Road Reconstruction Missoula County will be advertising a contract for the design for the reconstruction of a 2.0

mile segment of Upper Miller Creek Road beginning at Mockingbird Way and terminating in the vicinity of Linda Vista Boulevard. This project is funded in part by the Western Federal Lands Division of the Federal Highway Administration. The estimated cost of the project is $2.4 Million. Contingent upon this award, the Missoula County Board of Commissioners is soliciting proposals for the following work items: 1. Preliminary and Final design and project preparation. Final design, specifications and bid documents to be completed by September 1, 2010. 2. The project shall be designed to meet ADA, AASHTO and Missoula County geometric standards. The typical cross section shall include a width of 36 feet (back of curb to back of curb) with bike lanes on both sides and a sidewalk on one side. 3. Preparation of plans and specifications. 4. Preparation of construction specifications and bid documents. 5. Assist the County with the bid tabulations and bid award. 6. Provide

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full project management and administration services during the project. 7. Provide Construction Management services. 8. Assist the County staff with day to day questions. 9. Any other items that the County may add to the project. 10. A complete Bill of Materials for every material designed for removing and replacing the bridge. 11. An Engineering Cost Estimate of the above-listed work items. 12. A schedule showing all work activities including engineering. 13. A Bid Form in spreadsheet format, showing (1) Specified Work Items, Units of Measurement, and Planned or Designed Measurements, and (2) Open Cells for insertion, by construction contractor, of Unit Bid Cost and Total Item Bid Cost. The County Engineer will prepare the construction contract. The County Engineer will insert the finalized List of Specifications, detailed Construction Drawings, and the Bid Form, from the selected Engineering Consultant, into the contract documents, where appropriate. The County Engineer will retain the Engineering Cost Estimate for later comparison to construction bids. The County Engineer will perform all engineering and administrative functions that MDT requires, to include: Contract preparation, printing, advertising, review of bids, and contract award; Conduct of a Pre-work Conference with the successful bidder; Issuance of a Notice to Proceed; Inspection of the project (in conjunction with project inspection by the selected Engineering Consultant); Issuance of Contract Modifications and Change Orders to the contractor; (in conjunction with project inspection by the selected Engineering Consultant); Issuance of Progress Payments to the contractor; Review and acceptance of contractor’s Pay Reports; Interview of contractor’s employees to ensure workers’ knowledge of pay scale, EEO practices and policies, employee grievance procedures, etc.; Final Acceptance and Payment to the contractor for the project. Payment terms with the selected Engineering Consultant will be negotiated. Missoula County Department of Public Works has on-file the following documents and drawings that will be made available to the successful Engineering Consultant: Topographic Information to 1’ intervals. Right of way maps. Responses to this Request for Proposals should be a maximum of 15 pages long excluding resumes and should include: 1. the Engineering Consultant’s legal name, address, and telephone number; 2. the principal(s) of the firm and their experience and qualifications;3. the firm’s overall qualifications and experience, with references; 4. the experience and qualifications of the staff to be assigned to the project; 5.

a description of the firm’s prior experience, including any similar projects, size of community, location, total construction cost, and name of a knowledgeable local official regarding the firm’s performance. Include at least three references; 6. description of the firm’s current work activities, how these would be coordinated with this project, and the firm’s anticipated availability during the term of the project; and 7. a proposed work plan and schedule for activities to be performed. Respondents will be evaluated according to the following factors: 1. Quality of the Proposal 10 % 2. Firm’s overall Qualifications, including references 10 % 3. Experience and Qualifications of the staff to be assigned 35 % 4. Availability and Capacity of the staff to be assigned 40 % 5. Proposed work plan and schedules for activities to be performed 5 %. The selection of the Engineering Consultant to perform the work will be based on an evaluation of the written responses. Award will be made to the most qualified Consultant whose proposal is deemed most advantageous to Missoula County, all factors considered. Unsuccessful Consultants will be notified in writing as soon as possible. Questions should be directed to Gregory H. Robertson, P.E., AICP, Director of Public works, at (406) 2584818. Responses should be directed to Gregory H. Robertson, P.E., AICP, Director of Public Works; Office of Public Works, Missoula County; 6089 Training Drive; Missoula, MT 59808. One digital copy in the form of a CD in PDF format of your response must be received by Missoula County Public Works at 6089 Training Dr., Missoula, MT 59808 no later than Tuesday, March 30, 2010 by 3 p.m. Responses must be clearly labeled “Upper Miller Creek Road Reconstruction Project Proposal”. Respondents may review the County’s files, drawings, and engineering reports for this bridge by visiting the Missoula County Office of Public Works (address above) during regular office hours. Copies of these items will be made available to the successful Engineering Consultant. This solicitation is being offered in accordance with state requirements governing procurement of professional services. Accordingly, the Missoula County Board of Commissioners reserves the right to negotiate an agreement based on fair and reasonable compensation for the scope of work and services proposed, as well as the right to reject any and all responses deemed unqualified, unsatisfactory, or inappropriate. DBE Goals: There are no DBE/WBE goals for this work, but firms are strongly encouraged to utilize DBE firms if applicable. A Montana certified DBE Consultant list is available and can be

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found on the MDT web page, http://www.mdt. mt.gov/business/contracting/civil/dbe.shtml Nondiscrimintation Compliance: Consultants will be subject to Federal and Montana nondiscrimination laws and regulations (see attached notice). MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Cause No. DR-10-193 Dept. No. 4 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of Kari Jo Cranney, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Kari Jo Cranney to Kari Jo Matthews. The hearing will be on March 30th, 2010 at 1:30 p.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. DATED: February 17, 2010. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Amy M. Day, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause No. DR-10-73 Honorable Robert L. Deschamps, III Presiding SUMMONS IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF ALEXANDRA ANDRE-BUSEMAN, Petitioner, and MICHAEL KIRKLAND, Respondent. STATE OF MONTANA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE NAMED RESPONDENT: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to respond to the Petition for Declaration of Invalidity of Marriage as filed in the office of the Clerk of Court, a copy of which is hereby served upon you, and to file your response and serve a copy thereof upon Petitioner’s attorney within 20 days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the date of service; and in case of your failure to appear or respond, judgment will be taken against you by default, for the relief demanded in the Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court the 27th day of January, 2010. (SEAL) /s/ Shirley Faust, Clerk of District Court By: Bobbi Hamline, Deputy Clerk MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-28 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RALPH SIDNEY WARD, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed CoPersonal Representatives of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Michael S. Ward and Suzanne M. Gonstad, the Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, in care of Tipp & Buley, 2200 Brooks, PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 2nd day of March, 2010. /s/ Michael S. Ward, Personal Representative /s/ Suzanne M. Gonstad, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 1 Probate No. DP-10-29 NOTICE OF HEARING OF PETITION FOR FORMAL PROBATE OF WILL, DETERMINATION OF TESTACY AND HEIRS AND APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JERRY GRANT GREENOUGH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Lana Greenough has filed in the above Court and cause a Petition for the formal probate of the Will of Jerry Grant Greenough, deceased, for determination of testacy and heirs, an dfor the appointment of Lana Greenough as Personal Representative of said Will and estate. For further information, the Petition, as filed, may be examined in the office of the clerk of the above Court. Hearing upon said Petition will be held in said Court at the courtroom in the courthouse at Missoula, Montana, on the 31st day of March, 2010, at the hour of 1:30 o’clock p.m. at which time all interested persons may appear and object. Dated this 23rd day of February, 2010. /s/ Lana Greenough, PO Box 321, 51 St. Regis Street, St. Regis, MT 59866 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Case No. DV-10-137 NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED NAME CHANGE In the Matter of the Name Change of, Justin Lee Smith, Petitioner. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT Petitioner, Justin Lee Smith, has petitioned the District Court for the Fourth Judicial District for a change of name from Justin Lee Smith to Justin Lee Edwards, and the petition for name change will be heard by a District Court Judge on the 8th day of April, 2010 at 9:00 a.m., in the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, in courtroom number 2 South. At any time before the hearing, objections may be filed by any person who can demonstrate good reasons against the change of name. DATED this 12th day of February, 2010. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of Court By: Maria A. Cassidy, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 3 Probate No. DP-10-25 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PAMELA A. MOTTA, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All

persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Jon Garvin, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806, or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled Court. DATED this 23rd day of February, 2010. /s/ Jon Garvin, Personal Representative MONTANA TWENTY-FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, RAVALLI COUNTY, Department No. 2 Cause Probate No. DP-1014 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EARL KENT II, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Nichole Lee Kent, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, in care of Thiel Law Office, PLLC, 315 West Pine, PO Box 8125, Missoula, Montana 59807, or filed with the Clerk of the aboveentitled court. DATED March 4, 2010. /s/ Nichole Lee Kent, Personal Representative NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER DEED OF TRUST. TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 1. Notice is hereby given to the public and to the following: Thomas Bruce Maclay, 8337 Lamar Trail, Lolo, MT 59847 Bitterroot Trails, LLC, 17005 Old Highway 93, Florence, MT 59833 Thomas Bruce Maclay a/k/a Thomas B. Maclay, Tom B. Maclay and Tom Maclay, 17000 Old Highway 93, Florence, MT 59833 Lynn Louise Jacobsen Maclay, c/o Evonne Smith Wells, 222 East Pine, PO Box 9410, Missoula, MT 59807 Bank of Montana, 125 Bank Street, Missoula, MT 59802 Missoula County Treasurer, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802-4216. 2. Property. This Notice concerns the following described real property (the “Property”) located at 17000 Old US Highway 93, Lolo, Montana 59847, and more particularly described as follows: Tract 1 of Certificate Survey No. 4449, located in the SE1/4SW1/4 of Section 14, Township 11 North, Range 20 West, Principal Meridian, Missoula County, Montana. 3. Loans Secured by the Property. First Interstate Bank made a loan to Bitterroot Trails, LLC. Thomas Bruce Maclay executed a Commercial Guaranty to guarantee payment and satisfaction of the indebtedness of Bitterroot Trails, LLC to First Interstate Bank. Thomas Bruce Maclay also executed a Deed of Trust (described below) to secure payment and satisfaction of the loan obligation. a. Loan No. 1401615858 i. Deed of Trust. Grantor Thomas Bruce Maclay executed and delivered to First Interstate Bank (beneficiary) a Deed of Trust described as follows: Date: September 12, 2007 Grantor: Thomas Bruce Maclay Original Trustee: Western Title & Escrow Lender/Beneficiary: First Interstate Bank. Recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana as follows: Date: September 18, 2007 Book/Page: Book 805, page 1341, Document No. 200724335 ii. Substitute Trustee. The following was substituted as Trustee: Dean A. Stensland, Boone Karlberg, PC, 201 West Main, Suite 300, PO Box 9199, Missoula, MT 59807-9199 Telephone: (406) 543-6646 Facsimile: (406) 549-6804 by a written document recorded in the records of Missoula County, Montana as follows: Dated: October 15, 2009 Recorded: October 19, 2009 Document No. 200925243 Book/Page: Book 849 of Micro Records at Page 491. iii. Promissory Note. The Deed of Trust was given to secure payment of a Promissory Note in the original amount of Two Hundred Twenty Seven Thousand Five Hundred Thirty One Dollars and Fifty Cents ($227,531.50) from Bitterroot Trails, LLC to First Interstate Bank. A Change in Terms Agreement was executed by Bitterroot Trails, LLC on March 18, 2008, which extended the maturity date of the loan to September 12, 2008. A subsequent Change in Terms Agreement was executed by Bitterroot Trails, LLC on December 17, 2008, which extended the maturity date of the loan to March 12, 2009. iv. Default. Thomas Bruce Maclay and Bitterroot Trails, LLC have defaulted under the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust. Thomas Bruce Maclay and Bitterroot Trails, LLC are in default due to failure to pay all principal, interests, fees and costs not yet paid on the maturity date of March 12, 2009. v. Amount Owing. The amount owing on the Promissory Note is as follows: Principal: $227,531.50 Interest Through 11/30/09: $18,446.41 Late Charges: $191.16 Fee Balance through 11/30/09: $1,849.22 Trustee’s Sale Guarantee: $914.77 Property Taxes through 2008: $2,961.92 Interest continues to accrue on the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust at the daily rate of $60.7789 from December 1, 2009 until paid. The total balance due on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is the sum of the above items, plus attorney fees and costs allowed by law. The exact amount owing as of the date of sale will be provided upon request made to the undersigned prior to the date of said sale. vi. Acceleration. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust has previously elected to consider all principal and interest immediately due and payable in consequence of the default of Thomas Bruce Maclay and Bitterroot Trails, LLC under the Promissory Note, Commercial Guaranty and Deed of Trust. 4. Notice of Sale. Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust and the Trustee hereby elect to


PUBLIC NOTICES sell or cause to be sold the Property described above to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. The sale will be held at the following date, time and place: Date: April 20, 2010 Time: 10:00 a.m. Place: Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT The Trustee will sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder, in cash, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of the sale. DATED the 2nd day of December, 2009. /s/ Dean A. Stensland, Successor Trustee. STATE OF MONTANA): COUNTY OF MISSOULA) This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 2nd day of December, 2009, by Dean A. Stensland. (SEAL) /s/ A. Melissa Otis, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: August 15, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 09/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200725637, Bk. 806, Pg. 790 and re-recorded on October 25, 2007 as Instrument No. 200728089, Bk. 807, Pg. 1449, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Kristin D. Marshall, a single person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Parcel I: Tract 5A-2A of Certificate of Survey No. 2582, located in the W 1/2 of Section 27, Township 15 North, Range 21 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana. Parcel II: A 60’ right-of-way for roadway purposes and for the installation and maintenance of utilities over the 60’ private road and public utility easement shown on Certificate of Survey No. 1155, which extends from the above-described real property to the county road. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 03/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 8, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $390,441.76. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $356,238.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 20, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.05994) 1002.130901-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/19/05, recorded as Instrument No. 200521653, Bk 758, Pg 830, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Domenic R. Sette, Jr. was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow Corp was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow Corp as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 3, Block 3, of El Mar Estates Phase 4, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for Wells Fargo Home Equity Trust 2005-3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly

installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 02/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 12, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $199,263.04. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $180,613.60, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 25, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.04463) 1002.126531-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/11/08, recorded as Instrument No. 200819053, Bk. 824, Pg. 1035, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Jodey J. Richards and Rebecca A. Richards, husband and wife was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Tract 17AA tract of land located within the East one-half of Section 8, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M., Missoula County, Montana, and more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of Section 8, Township 14 North, Range 20 West, P.M.; thence S. 17 degrees 48’ 46” W., 2317.20 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence S. 49 degrees 05’ 06” E., 736.76 feet to a point on a curve to the right with a radius of 70.00 feet; thence clockwise along said curve an arc distance of 162.79 feet; thence S. 84 degrees 09’ 32” W., 520.74 feet; thence N. 00 degrees 00’ 00” E., 658.06 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 09/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 11, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $195,209.19. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $185,253.57, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 25, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.09955) 1002.144620-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 08/19/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200331389, Bk 715, Pg 1138, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mikeal Piediscalzzi and Kindra Piediscalzzi, as joint tenants with right of survivorship was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mann Financial Inc. d/b/a Mann Mortgage was Beneficiary and Insured Titles, LLC. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Insured Titles, LLC. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 13 in Block 7 of Lakeview Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200917474, Bk 843, Pg 1116, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 19, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $120,228.71. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $110,409.96, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on June 1, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.05635) 1002.129408-FEI

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/05/03, recorded as Instrument No. 200320548, Bk 708, Pg 1169, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which John L. Cross, a married person and Lei Ann Cross was Grantor, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Atract of land located in and being a portion of Lots 1 and 2 in Section 26, Township 15 North, Range 20 West, P.M.M., Missoula County, Montana, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the point where the original centerline of the highway intersects the Flathead Indian Reservation Boundary line, said point bears S. 53 degrees 13’51’’E., 281.32 feet from the intersection of the Indian Boundary line and the North line of said Section 26; thence S. 43 degrees 47’ W., 298.35 feet; thence N. 47 degrees 57’ 25’’ W., 139.02 feet; thence N 43 degrees 47’ E., 285.5 feet to a point on the Flathead Indian Reservation Boundary line; thence S. 53 degrees 13’ 51’’ E., along said boundary line a distance of 140.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 06/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of January 4, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $71,327.96. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $67,173.02, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West

Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on May 17, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of aucMissoula County Government

All Sales final.

Missoula County is currently accepting applications from governmental or health and human service non-profit organizations that provide basic/critical needs assistance to at-risk populations in the Missoula area. For more information or to receive a Community-Based Organization (CBO) application form, please call 258-3712. Applications may be picked up at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT, or on the web,

http://www.co.missoula.mt.us/opgweb/Grants/.

The deadline for submittal is Wednesday, April 14, 2010.

"Who Wants Crabs?"–we got 'em right here!

by Matt Jones

MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF HEARING The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following item on Tuesday, March 16, 2010, at 7:00 p.m. in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on this item on April 7, 2010, at 6:00 p.m. in Room 201 of the County Courthouse annex located at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, Montana. North Lolo Growth Policy Update and Rural Special Zoning District The Missoula County Rural Initiatives Office has been working with landowners in the North Lolo area on a proposal to replace the North Lolo

CLARK FORK STORAGE

will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following unit(s): 75, 107, and 211. Units can contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds, other misc household goods, vehicles & trailers. These units may be viewed starting March 15, 2010 by appt only by calling 541-7919. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 3505 Clark Fork Way, Missoula, MT 59808 prior to March 18, 2010, 4:00 P.M. Buyer's bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale.

d s

interim zoning due to expire on May 30, 2010. The proposal to replace the North Lolo interim zoning includes both a growth policy amendment to the 2002 Lolo Regional Plan and a zoning proposal for a rural special zoning district. The North Lolo area is approximately 900 acres in size. The triangular area is located immediately south of Bird Lane. It is bounded by Ridgeway Drive to the south and Highway 93 to the east. The growth policy amendment proposes changes in land use designations to reflect historical uses and increases in residential densities for some properties in this area. The North Lolo Rural Special Zoning District calls for a mix of residential and mixed use zoning classifications that would implement the land use designations called for in the growth policy amendment. It also establishes a specific set of general requirements, nonconforming use provisions, and conditional use requirements. See Map O for the North Lolo area, which is the only area affected by the growth policy amendment and zoning proposal. The growth policy amendment and zoning proposal for the North Lolo area is available for public and agency comment. It can be viewed at www.co.missoula .mt.us./rural. It is also available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants (City Hall, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula), Missoula County Rural Initiatives (office location: 317 Woody Street, Missoula), Missoula County Commissioners Office and the Missoula County Clerk and Recorders Office (Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W. Broadway, Missoula). Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. Comments may be directed to Missoula County Rural Initiatives at 200 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802 or via email to ri@co.missoula.mt.us. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-3432. Missoula County will provide auxiliary aids and services.

ACROSS 1 Luge, e.g. 5 Cindy Brady's impediment 9 Large battery size 14 Auto racer Yarborough 15 Hydrox rival 16 Dog-___ (like some book pages) 17 Getting from ___ (achieving a goal) 18 Crabby holiday figure? 20 2010 Jude Law thriller 22 Small jazz combo 23 "___ Jacques" 24 "See ya" 25 Go off on a tirade 29 How some bonds are valued 32 2009 movie subtitled "The Rise of Cobra" 33 Crabby protest song? 38 Dangerous, as some driving conditions 39 Al fresco 40 Kal ___ pet foods 41 Crabby dogs? 44 Sewing machine inventor Howe 45 "Would you like to swing on ___..." 46 Guitarist Lofgren 47 Word before club or mail 49 "Robinson Crusoe" author Daniel 53 Long swimmers 55 Term that may trigger an emotional response 57 Crabby villain? 61 Prefix in some drinks 62 It's made letter writing a dying art 63 Come down 64 School whose mascot is Bruin Bear 65 2002 M. Night Shyamalan film 66 Has a right to 67 "Marketplace Money" radio host Vigeland

Last week’s solution

DOWN 1 Wolf (down) 2 "See ya" 3 Get hitched quick 4 TV anchor Norville 5 Get the highest score, in golf 6 It was once ruled by a shah 7 Capitol Hill figure: abbr. 8 Word before break or training 9 Prefix meaning "one-tenth" 10 Related to dietary intake 11 Memorable time period 12 ___ Alcindor, aka Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 13 Mormon gp. 19 "Beds ___ Burning" (Midnight Oil hit song) 21 Shower figures 24 "Percy Jackson & The Olympians" actor Pierce 26 "Is this some kind of ___?" 27 Six-time All-Star Garciaparra 28 Frigid temperature range 30 Professor in Clue 31 ___Vista (search engine) 32 Lobbed weapon 33 Add more lanes to 34 Bacteria in some food poisoning 35 1976 Sally Field title role 36 They get the royal treatment 37 Fix a manuscript 42 Accesses gradually 43 It's far from "a little off the top" 47 Swine ___ 48 Elroy's dog 50 Friction, e.g. 51 Some exams 52 Ferber and Krabappel, for two 54 Letter-shaped building wings 55 Arcade game need 56 Coffee dispensers 57 Electric guitarist Paul 58 Big label 59 Couch ___ (recurring visual opener on "The Simpsons") 60 Hem and ___

©2010 Jonesin' Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0458

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 March 11 – March 18, 2010


HOME PAGE

Know the Story, Not Just the Numbers By Brint Wahlberg, 2010 MOR President The year-end statistics have been out for a while and the analysis of them is getting to be old news. Hard as it is to believe, we are quickly heading toward the end of the first quarter of 2010 when we will begin to analyze this year’s numbers. Besides the numbers, what are the stories coming out of the market from REALTORS® who interact with buyers and sellers every day? It is still unclear as to the final impact that short sales and foreclosures are having on the Missoula market. Both are occurring, although it is difficult to track specific numbers. One reason that makes these trends difficult to track can be demonstrated with the example of a house that is in pre-foreclosure but sells before the actual foreclosure process occurs. It is unknown if that sale is a short sale as well, and the only information required is that a preforeclosure home has sold. What happens in between these events

is the real story and is something the numbers can’t tell. But short sale or foreclosure may not be the only two options for a property. There is increased activity reported in lease options, whereby a seller leases the property for a period of time, giving the lessee the option to purchase. This requires documents different from a rental agreement and both parties will want to make sure that they have the paperwork in place that protects their individual interests. Another story that the numbers can’t tell is how the current market measures against the same time last year. Politically, a new administration was in office. TARP (Troubled Assets Relief Program) money had been released but its affect was not yet clear and the income tax credits were not in place. The numbers may indicate that there is more market activity, but it begs the question

1st Time Homebuyer Special

MLS# 10001313

927 Johnson, Missoula

$550,000

32975 Finley Point, Polson, MT

MLS# 10000044

New Listing • AFFORDABLE! • Practically new green-built Westside home • Exposed beam, vaulted ceiling • www.1412philips.com

• 2 Bed, 1.5 Bath, Garage • New roof 11/2009 • Sealed driveway 8/2009 • New paint, fenced backyard

MLS# 10000609

2224 Roy Drive Missoula

$145,000 MLS# 10000763

1412 Philips St. Missoula

JAY GETZ

Hank Trotter

jay.getz@prumt.com www.JayGetzMissoula.com

hank@prudentialmissoula.com

Pat McCormick pat@properties2000.com • www.properties2000.com

406-728-2621

matt@clarkforkrealty.com www.ahomeinmissoula.com

NEW LISTING

$219,900

206 Bentley Park Missoula

Matt Rosbarsky

jbooher@montana.com

• 3 bed, 1 bath Craftsman Style Home • Wood floors, Large Living rm • Newer roof, Vinyl Windows, & Metal Siding • Updated electrical, fenced yard w/fruit trees

240-SOLD (7653)

MLS# 10000136

543-8644

FEATURED LISTING

MLS#10000677

$179,500

Jake Booher

406-239-8622 bbangs@bigsky.net

925 2nd Street, West Riverside

• 2 Bed, 1 Bath, 2 Car Garage • New wood floors • Covered front porch • Fenced yard, beautiful patio

• 3Bed/2 Bath Flathead Lake Cabin • Basement sleeps 5 • Great views • Property on lake - 50 Ft shore frontage

Bill Bangs

$174,900

NEW LISTING

FEATURED LISTING

• Central location • Great, fenced yard • Newer furnace, gas range • Washer & dryer included

$164,900

as to whether this is the result of normal market function and pentup demand or whether it is driven by buyers eager to take advantage of the low interest rates and tax credits. Don Hewitt, the late producer of CBS’s 60 Minutes, when asked about his success, said “Tell me a story” and made that the title of his autobiography. Buyers and sellers in today’s real estate market could take a lesson from Mr. Hewitt. If you want to successfully complete a real estate transaction in the Missoula market, it’s important to know the story, not just the numbers, and understand how that story meshes with your own. It’s important that the stories come from within the market, not a general analysis from the nightly news. Get the local story from local professionals. Missoula has some of the best.

(406) 214-4016

406-360-7991

RE/MAX Realty Consultants LLC

Contact Jeff Ellis • sales associate O: 406-203-4143 • C: 406-529-5087

Models open 11:30 - 5pm • Thurs-Mon; by appointment only Tues & Wed. Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 March 11 – March 18, 2010

Walk to restaurants, shops, & theater. FHA & VA Financing Available


PUBLIC NOTICES tion may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwest trustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.06887) 1002.133046-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 10, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 4 of Corrected Plat of El Dorado, a plated subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official plat of record in Book 13 of Plats at Page 9. Ashley Miller, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated September 21, 2007 and Recorded September 21, 2007 in Book 806, Page 109, as Document No. 200724956. The beneficial interest is currently held by Primary Capital Advisors LC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has

declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,125.35, beginning November 1, 2008, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 15, 2009 is $172,443.94 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $8,967.56, and other fees and expenses advanced of $3,260.54, plus accruing interest at the rate of $31.01 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the

sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION

OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 30, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On December 30, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 ASAP# 3473062 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010, 03/25/2010

historic building. Low VOC paint, on-site recycling center. Coin ops, elevator, AC, storage, no pets. All utilities pd. 2 bdrm: $575/mo Quiet, end unit on top floor. Studio: $450/mo End unit. Orchard Gardens, 210 N. Grove St. Low VOC paint, on-site recycling, solar, garden plots. Patio/balcony, parking, coin ops, elevator, AC, storage, no pets. All utilities pd. 2 bdrm: $650 1 bdrm: $550 Must meet income restrictions. Call MHA Management 549-4113

HOUSES

good light and private bathroom. $400/mo + 1/3 utilities. Deposit required. One cat already lives here, so no more pets please. Call 406-865-0436 or 312-504-9844

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on May 10, 2010, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 40 OF SUNNY MEADOWS NO. 2. A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Keith AWalt and Michelle L Walt, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an

obligation owed to Community BankMissoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 16, 2005 and Recorded on December 21, 2005 under Document # 200533821, in Bk-766, Pg-469. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. as successor in interest to ABN Amro Mortgage Group Inc., f/k/a ABN Amro Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,406.22, beginning September 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of December 28, 2009 is $186,300.85 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $4,837.43, late charges in the amount of $866.72, escrow advances of $189.24, and other fees and expenses advanced of $265.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $32.54 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and

protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to

the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: December 31, 2009 Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA County of Stark On December 31, 2009, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. Teri Lynn Steckler Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 09/22/2012 ASAP# 3476718 03/11/2010, 03/18/2010, 03/25/2010

West - just four blocks from the mall! It has a great kitchen w/ dining room - perfect for entertaining and a great fully fenced backyard perfect for a dog! Also includes brand new energy efficient LG washer and dryer. This is a great house and you’ll love living in it. $1,295 per month. $1,295 security deposit. 12 month lease. Dogs OK with references and $150 fee. Sorry, no cats. You pay water, electric, and gas. Owner pays sewer and garbage. Contact Peter with questions: 206-930-2823

COMMERCIAL

1100 /mo depending on terms. Leased parking available. Call 532-4663 x17.

RENTALS APARTMENTS 1024 Stephens #11 2bd/1ba, offstreet parking, new furnace, storage $650. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 109 Turner Ct. #2 2bd/1ba Pet? Hook-ups, off-street parking $650. Grizzly Property Management. 542-2060. 2030 S 7th St 2bd/1ba, xtra storage, gas fireplace, new flooring/ paint, $825/mo. All utilities pd. 2212 North: studio, full kitchen, bath w/shower, dog welcome, $465, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpm-mt.com 3320 Great Northern ApartmentsRent $495-$570 up to 2 cats considered w/ additional deposit/ documents. 721-8990 503 S. 5th Street E. #B Spacious upper level 3bd 1ba Apt within walking distance to the U. $895. Missoula Property Management. 251-8500 721 Palmer. 3 bdrm 1 bath gas heat washer and dryer hookup and off street parking. Rent $750 721-8990 Quiet, private, partly furnished 1 bedroom. 8 miles from town with river view. No smoking, no pets, very responsible. $550 includes utilities, satellite TV, high-speed Internet. 273-2382

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-877-7353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

2341 Kemp: 2-bedroom, by the mall, flower bed, built-ins, yard, $625, GCPM, 549-6106, gcpmmt.com ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com Room for Rent Looking for a quiet and neat person to share 3 bedroom home with friendly and clean roomies. We are late twenties/early thirties into gardening, cooking, and (mellow) conscientious lifestyles. In a friendly neighborhood near Downtown/Good Food Store/Clark Fork River trail. Biking distance to University. W/D, large yard, garden space. Avai lable room is downstairs and has

Jane's Place

Hot Springs, MT • $65 & up pets welcome

janesplacemontana@gmail.com

Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

SUSTAINABLE APTS SUSTAINABLE APTS Lenox Flats, 307 Woody St. Sustainably remodeled

1601 South Ave West • 542-2060 grizzlypm.com

GardenCity

Property Management

For available rentals:

www.gcpm-mt.com

Leasing Office Located 4200 Expressway Onsite at Missoula, MT 59808 CRESTVIEW APARTMENTS

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Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website!

MISSOULA No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 2809 Great Northern • 251-8500 Check out our always in demand rental units at www.rentinmissoula.com



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1,000 SF, Main St., wood floors, great lighting, visibility, parking

543-8723 Join the Montana Landlord's Association

www.alpharealestate.com

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707

2 BD Apt 4301 Birdie Ct. $660/mo. 2 BD Duplex 2131 Carol Ann Ct. $780/mo. 2 BD Apt Uncle Robert Lane $575/mo. Visit our website at

MONTANA CRESTVIEW 406-327-1212

Expect the best from

30 years in Missoula

SUSTSTAINABLE OFFICE SPACE 300 W Broadway. Great office space in sustainably remodeled historic building, 648 sq ft, Asking $900 –

1&2

New Lease Special Call us about FREE rent!

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

RELAX! Renter? Owner? We’ve got you covered. Professional, competitive property management. PLUM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 406-493-1349 jenniferplum@live.com

This is a great newer 3 bedroom house centrally located in Missoula at 2116 North Ave.

422 Madison • 549-6106

Vacation Rental/Night/Week/Month

406-546-0404

SUPER SWEET STUDIO. Cottage near McCormick Park on Riverfront Foot Path. Porcelain tile floor, gas fireplace, vaulted ceiling, clawfoot tub, large shared yard. Walk to downtown & UM. $785 includes utilities. 543-1516

Office Space Available Downtown/Hip Strip Missoula: Suite 200, 180 South Third West, 1,000 sq. ft. available for $1,000 per month, second floor, historic, lots of light, call 406-543-6681

10 chapters in Montana! MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES: •Current MT Landlord/tenant handbook •Residence & mobile home rental forms Gene Thompson president

(406) 250-0729 www.mlaonline.org

www.fidelityproperty.com

Professional Property Management

Find your new home with PPM ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

406-721-8990

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 March 11 – March 18, 2010


REAL ESTATE bath. Anne Jablonski - Winder mere Real Estate - 546-5816

HOMES FOR SALE

3BD/1 Ba Nice home on 3 city lots with privacy fenced yard in Alberton, $125,000 Kevin & Monica Ray of Access Realty at 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

1,2,3 bedroom homes with money to help first time homebuyers. 3278787 porticorealestate.com 10250 Valley Grove Dr., Lolo MLS# 902264 - $299,000 Beautiful 2 bed, 2 bath log home 5 minutes from Missoula Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

3BD/2BD home, vaulted ceilings, two-car garage, large patio, nature trail 45 minutes from Missoula. $240,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com

131 S. Higgins 6-4 & 6-5 MLS#907544 - $389,000 Luxury 6th floor condo in historic Wilma Building. Upscale living in the heart of Missoula. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

3BD/3BA Luxury Home on 10 acres, 4 car garage, huge tiled walk-in shower, soaking tub, office/den, timber-framed cathedral ceilings $688,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com

2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. $129,900. MLS#906610. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Windermere RE. Text:44133 Message: 12594 for pics

4 Bedroom, cedar home on 11 acres, double garage. Private location with lots of surrounding trees. $349,900 MLS#901764 Janet 532-7903 or Robin 2406503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Msg:12886 for pics

2663 Stratford, Target Range MLS#907889 - $216,000 Well maintained 3 bed, 2 bath ranch. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

4322 Capy Ln. - MLS#904419 $435,000 Wonderful executive style home on 1 acre lot. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

3 Bd/ 2 Bth home w/ open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, views of Bitterroots. 1 Mile S. of Florence, views all around. Porch swing. Hot tub, and storage shed are all included. 333 Martin Lane. $249,900 MLS# 10000160 JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811

4BD home, 39.5 acres. Certainteed siding, radiant heat, fireplace, wildlife, gravel pit! $824,900 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185 www.YourMT.com 5 Bed/2 Bath in Bonner. New wood laminate floor. Large kitchen w/ island. Fenced yard in front w/ private deck area in back. New roof. Mature trees. $219,900 MLS#906641. Windermere RE Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 Text:44133 Message:12591 for pics.

3 Bed/2.5 Bath w/ large open living room & kitchen with separate dining area that leads onto deck. Master suite with private bath, walk in closet and extra closet! Yard is private & low maintenance. Garage/shop heated w/ alley access. 321 Speedway Ave. MLS# 10001025 • $224,900. JoyEarls @windermere.com 531-9811

5999 Cunningham Ct., Florence MLS#905057 $390,000 Beautiful 3 bed, 4 bath home on 3 acres. Just minutes from Missoula. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

3322 B Connery Way MLS#908163 - $191,000 Unique 3 level condo. 2 bds, plus loft & 3

928 Elm St. - MLS#904910 $229,000 Great rental property in lower Rattlesnake. Turn key & low maintenance. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 Affordable Lewis & Clark area home with wood floors, 90% eff. furnace, updated wiring, 2 bed, 1 bath, and garage. 2121 Park, Missoula. $198,900. MLS# 10001157. Pat McCormick, 240SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com Affordable, nice, newer home in central Missoula with 3 br, only $174,500, 1947 12th St 3278787 porticorealestate.com AMAZING HOME OVERLOOKING ALBERTON GORGE. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Double Garage, Vaulted Ceilings, Spectacular Views from inside and out, Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub, Decks & Patios, and much more. $395,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy9 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED TARGET RANGE HOME. WALK TO THE RIVER. 4 Bdr/2 Bath, 4 Carg

Garage, Sun Room with Hot Tub, great family room with full wet bar and much more. $334,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy11 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com BEST NGHBRHOOD IN MISSOULA! $272,000 – 307 Hickory Street LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! Walk or bike to the Osprey Ball Park, Currents, MoBash Skate Park, the River Trail, Downtown, Orange Street Food Farm and Good Food Store! Best neighborhood in Missoula! 4 BD/2 BATH House with LARGE yard, mature Maple trees, water-wise landscaping. The house has been recently remodeled with lots of custom, creative touches. Tile, wood, glass block. Nice appliances. Large kitchen, dining room, living room, 2 mud rooms and single car garage. This house has positive chi and is a must see! Call for an appointment. 406-549-1958

321 Speedway Avenue MLS# 10001025 • $224,900

Indoor parking, large heated shop, 3 bed, 2.5 bath. Possibly Great For... • First Time Home Buyer • Rural Development • Student Housing

Joy Earls 531-9811

joyearls.mywindermere.com 1255 sq ft, 3 bd/2 ba one level townhomes.

6112 Rains Place/Mullan Rd West Includes radiant $169,000 heated floors, garage, fire suppression sprinklers, covered back porch.

$695,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

MLS#905531 - $129,000 2.25 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

EXECUTIVE HOME ON 1.03 ACRES IN THE LOLO CREEK VALLEY. 4 Bdr/3 Bath, Main floor master suite, great room, family room & rec room, formal and casual dining rooms, great mountain and valley views. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy20 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Immaculate home in a great neighborhood. 3 bdrms, sauna, nice yard, 135 Kensington 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

New land/home package in Riverwalk Estates. No steps, concrete entrances with covered porch & patio. 3 bed/2 bath/double garage. 6605 Kiki Court W., Missoula. Starting at $299,970. MLS#903596. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811

Great house with hardwood floors and big backyard, 3 bdr., updates. 933 Woodford 327-8787 porticorealestate.com

Lot 2 Georgetown Vista Manor -

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM HOME ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Bath, 3.3 Acres, slate and hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, guest quarters, heated double garage,

CUTE ROSE PARK/SLANT STREETS NEIGHBORHOOD BUNGALOW. 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2+ bonus rooms, hardwood floors, arched doorways, built-ins, single garage, fenced yard, mostly finished base-

RICE TEAM

Lot 1 Georgetown Vista Manor MLS#905530 - $109,000 2.87 acres in Georgetown Lake with easy year round access. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816

NEWER LEWIS & CLARK NEIGHBORHOOD HOME. 4 Bdr/2.5 Bath, double garage, hardwood floors, 9’ + ceilings, stainless steel

358 Mari Court, Msla $305,900 • MLS# 908482 Beautiful Home Granite counters, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, stone fireplace. Built-in lockers off garage entrance, lots of storage, 2 hot water heaters, RV pad, RV dump and a hot & cold water spicket, backyard adjourns a park.

3631 Brandon Way, Msla $269,900 • MLS# 908640 Large 5 BD Home 5BD/2BA home in a great neighborhood with a 2 car garage. Lots of storage, finished basement, kitchen updates.

Rochelle Glasgow

544-7507 Janet Rice 532-7903 Robin Rice 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com www.missoulahomesonline.com

Anna Nooney

glasgow@montana.com www.rochelleglasgow.com

BA, RLS, GRI

Cell: 406-544-8413 AnnaNoooney@Windermere.com

www.BuyInMissoula.com Missoula Proper ties

1500 W Broadway, suite A Missoula

On the corner of Broadway and Russell

100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION. For the past 4 years. Give us a Try!

Shelly Evans 544-8570 Jodie Hooker 239-7588 Jerry Hogan 546-7270 Kevin Plumage 240-2009

Joy Earls

ment, and much more. $249,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

2663 Stratford MLS 907889 - $212,000.

10250 Valley Grove MLS #902264 $299,000

Bonus to Buyers = sale will include Home Inspection paid by Sellers.

Engineered Log Home Modern Kitchen w/Concrete Counters

1839 W. Central • $189,900

Fifties style home located on Missoula's South side. No through traffic on this street and just a short distance to the mall, stores and Park. Home has been used as an owner occupied rental for years and features 2 bedrooms 1 bath on the main level with an additional 2 bedrooms 1 bath and full kitchen downstairs. The enormous 2 car garage has room for all your toys. MLS # 100000047

Motivated Sellers

2+ acres each bare land

330 N. Easy St. • $195,900 Wonderful location at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. Home has been well cared for, many updates. It is over 1,000 sq. ft. and has a large garage plus a huge storage shed. There is a master bedroom, 2 additional bedrooms. Large yard bordering open space and lovely views of the mountains. Property has access to river front park. MLS# 907496

Lot 1 & Lot 2 Georgetown Vista - MLS# 905530 & 905531 - $109,000 & $129,000

CALL ABOUT MY COMMERCIAL LISTINGS

Two 5 acre parcels

15 minutes from Missoula with nice building sites and access to the Blackfoot River. $149,000 for either 5 acre parcel or buy both for $285,000. MLS# 902286

Mary Mar ry REALTOR®, Broker

Finalist

Cell 406-544-2125 • mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 March 11 – March 18, 2010

For more details visit: MoveMontana.com


REAL ESTATE

appliances, and much more. $279,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy5 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com NHN Applegate & Prarie Rd., Helena - MLS#809493 $2,500,000 - Great investment to get in at the very beginning of a cemetery development. Anne Jablonski - Windermere Real Estate - 546-5816 Nice, spacious home in South Hills close to Chief Charlo, updated kitchen $224,900 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Older Home with Vintage charm in great central Missoula neighborhood. 321 Tremont 327-8787 porticorealestate.com One owner - built 10 years ago! 5 acres & a 4 bedroom home on a branch of the Clark Fork. 2.5 acres with water, trout & ducks. House sits towards water. Private showings only. 3720 S. 3rd W. $679,999, MLS#906926. JoyEarls@windermere.com 531-9811

Past Bitterroot Parade of Homes winner NEW 4 BD/3BA with many upgrades Alder cabinets, Large Master Suite, Tile, & Views of the Bitterroots $344,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com Price Reduction! Beautiful home with views of the Mission Mountains! 4BD/2BA. Hardwood floors, fireplace, loft over the family room, basement, large carport and private deck! $199,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com Set up for Horses 5bd/3ba 3700+sf home on 3+ acres set up for horses. Frenchtown School District. 406.360.6113 Must see to appreciate all the ammenaties!! SOUTH HILLS CONDO WITH A SINGLE GARAGE . 2 Bdr/2 Bath, 2 balconies. great views, master with walk-in closet & master bath, laundry, and much more. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy18 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

SOUTH HILLS HOME 2 BLOCKS FROM CHIEF CHARLO SCHOOL . 4 Bdr/2 Bath, deck, double car garage, family room, large laundry/utility room, and much more. $199,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy2 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com University area home, 3 bd, 2 ba, nice studio apartment above garage. 616 E Sussex 327-8787 porticorealestate.com University home only 2 blocks from campus and 1 block from Bonner Park. No parking permits needed. Gorgeous, huge corner lot with large trees. 4 bedrooms all above ground with 3 baths & an extra kitchen too! 501 Hastings, MLS# 10001050 $399,900 JoyEarls @windermere.com 531-9811 Upper Rattlesnake Home with 2 Fireplaces, 2 Bedrooms, 2 Bonus Rooms, 2 Baths $279,900 3278787 porticorealestate.com

$319,900. 5501 Bonanza. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

LAND FOR SALE 1-1/3 ACRES-360 Views-Lolo GORGEOUS 360 Views on this 1-1/3 Acres Lot...11/2 Miles South of Lolo, turn at Old Hwy 93 straight up Rowan Rd turn left on Penny Lane - Well in with pump, septic approved, all utilities at site...Minutes from upcoming Ski Resort and 20 Minutes from Missoula...Build your Dream Home!!! $105,000 (406)251-4362. 19,602 SQ FT lot in Mullan Road area with great views. Sewer stubbed to the lot. Close to river access, golf and shopping $79,999 MLS# 908063 riceteam@windermere.com Janet 532-7903 or

Robin 240-6503. Text:44133 Msg:12890 for pics 3.5 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. Great location less that 3 miles from I-90. Awesome building spot overlooking creek and with valley/mountain views. Builder available. $185,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy14 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com 5BD/3BA 3,000+ sq. ft. Lolo home on 15.6 Acres, updated kitchen, cozy fireplace, $415,000 Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185 www.YourMT.com Beautiful park-like setting, private trout ponds, nature trail, stunning views. Lots start at $39,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406-207-1185. www.YourMT.com

Bring your house plans!! 2 Lots available in the Rattlesnake. Views and Privacy. Lot D; 13956 sq ft. Tract 1A; 25,263 sq ft. $165,000/each. Pat McCormick, 240-SOLD (7653). pat@properties2000.com

income potential and priced to sell! $220,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

Nice 1 acre lot, beautiful country setting west of Missoula. City Sewer available. Great view. $99,999. MLS#908159. Janet 532-7903 or Robin 240-6503 riceteam@windermere.com. Text:44133 Message:12885 for pics

OUT OF TOWN

COMMERCIAL DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great

800 square foot cabin near hunting, fishing, and skiing in beautiful Haugan, MT. $83,000. Kevin & Monica Ray at Access Realty 406207-1185. www.YourMT.com HAWAI’I REAL ESTATE ~ BUYER’S MARKET Average temperature in the 70’s ~ year-round sunsets Susie Spielman, RS, Windermere C&H Properties. Cell: 808-640-3100 or E-mail: susie.spielman@hawaiiantel.net 20 years experience. FREE INFO~NO PRESSURE~NO OBLIGATION

Well cared for 4 bed, 2.5 bath home w/ hot tub, A/C, & UG sprinklers. Near parks and trails.

48 Acres, Privacy & Mtn Views! • 3 bd/2 bth single level home • 1 bdrm guest qtrs/apt • 3 stall barn, corrals & tack room • 3 garages, wrap-around drive

927 Johnson, Missoula

$599,000 • MLS# 286616 Trudy Samuelson, Broker 406.360.5860 • trudy@blackfoot.net mvproperties@blackfoot.net

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 March 11 – March 18, 2010


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701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188


celebrates 40 years of changing children's lives!

Join us Friday, March 19,

A fundraiser for the Friends of Arlee School. 1 mile Fun Run • 5K • 10K All contributions go toward improving the quality of education opportunity for students in Arlee. Early registration encouraged! For info or to register: arl3335@blackfoot.net or www.buttercuprun.com

Image from card available at Rudy's.

for a special evening of cocktails, dinner, silent and live auctions. Tickets, info or to view auction items: bbbsmissoula.org or 406.721.2380

Buttercup Run 2010

WORLD HEADQUARTERS

RECORD HEAVEN

CDs - Gifts - Jewelry - Clothing • 237 Blaine • 542-0077

Vinyl - Recorders - Turntables • 821 S. Higgins • 542-1104


Missoula Independent