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Scope: Writer Steven Rinella takes aim at new television series Up Front: Child porn downloader poaches local Wi-Fi Ochenski: Assessing signs of another bureaucratic slowdown


Welcome to the Missoula Independent’s e-edition! You can now read the paper online just as if you had it in your hot little hands. Here are some quick tips for using our e-edition: For the best viewing experience, you’ll want to have the latest version of FLASH installed. If you don’t have it, you can download it for free at: http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/. FLIPPING PAGES: Turn pages by clicking on the far right or the far left of the page. You can also navigate your way through the pages with the bottom thumbnails. ZOOMING: Click on the page to zoom in; click again to zoom out. CONTACT: Any questions or concerns, please email us at frontdesk@missoulanews.com


Scope: Writer Steven Rinella takes aim at new television series Up Front: Child porn downloader poaches local Wi-Fi Ochenski: Assessing signs of another bureaucratic slowdown


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SKI JORING Skiers and horses in the same venue? You bet. Check out an exciting weekend of this daring sport, January 28-30. Need a place to stay? JANUARY WHITE SALE: Buy 2 days lift and lodging and the 3rd is free* Buy 3 days lift and lodging and the 4th is free* *Valid 1/2/11 - 1/30/11. Based on availability, not valid with other offers. Restrictions may apply.

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Missoula Independent

Page 2 January 20 – January 27, 2011


nside Cover Story The ongoing debate over the “big rig” transportation project through Idaho and Montana proposed by Canadian ExxonMobil subsidiary Imperial Oil has fractured communities, with some residents hopeful of new jobs and others fearful of what precedent the proposals could set. But one fact stands: Regardless of whether all of these loads ever roll, they’ve already made an indelible mark along every stretch of the route................14

Monday is now open mic with Mike Avery @ 10pm

Cover illustration by Kou Moua

News Letters Governor and guns, spending cuts and backing Furshong .........................4 The Week in Review Subdivision nixed, Big Sky High stabbing and MLK Day .......6 Briefs Food co-op expands, spear hunting and replacing the Maclay Bridge...........6 Etc. Moves by the new Bitterroot County Commission unnerving ...........................7 Up Front Child porn raid serves as lesson to lock Wi-Fi networks...........................8 Ochenski Assessing signs of another bureaucratic slowdown ..................................9 Writers on the Range When bumper stickers mask our commonalities ...............11 Agenda Save the Children director discusses Haiti. ................................................12

Arts & Entertainment Flash in the Pan The international languages of food............................................19 Happiest Hour The Missoula Club..........................................................................20 8 Days a Week Hitch a ride on the big rigs.............................................................22 Mountain High Skip Horner presents “Hot Water and Cold Hell” ........................29 Scope Outdoors writer Steven Rinella takes aim at new television series ..............30 Noise Eric John Kaiser, Voodoo Horseshoes, NiT GrIT and Ghostface Killah.........31 Books Proulx’s Bird Cloud suffers setbacks.............................................................32 Film The King’s Speech makes every word count ....................................................33 Movie Shorts Independent takes on current films..................................................34

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Exclusives Street Talk ..................................................................................................................4 In Other News..........................................................................................................13 Classifieds ...............................................................................................................C-1 The Advice Goddess ..............................................................................................C-2 Free Will Astrolog y................................................................................................C-4 Crossword Puzzle ..................................................................................................C-7 This Modern World..............................................................................................C-11

PUBLISHER Lynne Foland PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Joe Weston CIRCULATION & BUSINESS MANAGER Adrian Vatoussis ARTS EDITOR Erika Fredrickson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Matthew Frank PHOTO EDITOR Chad Harder CALENDAR EDITOR Ira Sather-Olson STAFF REPORTERS Jessica Mayrer, Alex Sakariassen CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Skylar Browning COPY EDITORS Samantha Dwyer, David Merrill ART DIRECTOR Kou Moua PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jenn Stewart, Jonathan Marquis ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Carolyn Bartlett ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chris Melton, Sasha Perrin, Alecia Goff, Rhonda Urbanski, Steven Kirst SENIOR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE Tami Johnson CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Teal Kenny FRONT DESK Lorie Rustvold CONTRIBUTORS Ari LeVaux, George Ochenski, Nick Davis, Andy Smetanka, Jay Stevens, Dave Loos, Ednor Therriault, Ali Gadbow, Azita Osanloo, Cathrine L. Walters, Anne Medley, Jesse Froehling

Mailing address: P.O. Box 8275 Missoula, MT 59807 Street address: 317 S. Orange St. Missoula, MT 59801 Phone number: 406-543-6609 Fax number: 406-543-4367 E-mail address: independent@missoulanews.com

President: Matt Gibson The Missoula Independent is a registered trademark of Independent Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2011 by Independent Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinting in whole or in part is forbidden except by permission of Independent Publishing, Inc.

Missoula Independent

Page 3 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

STREET TALK

by Chad Harder

Put down the gun, Gov.

Asked Tuesday afternoon near the Missoula County Courthouse.

Q:

This week the Independent looks into the practice of accessing the Internet via other people’s wireless connections. How often do you poach Wi-Fi? Follow: What’s the worst thing you’ve ever been accused of doing?

Madison Garner: I don’t use others’ Internet at all, really. We have Internet at the house, and I use it on campus, but I’m paying for that. Defaced: Probably just being accused of hacking into somebody’s Facebook account, spreading rumors on the Internet and talking crap about people. No, it’s not true. I don’t even know how to hack into Facebook profiles.

Favoring Furshong Shannon McNabb: The only time I rely on someone else’s connection is when I’m at a coffee shop or a place with free Wi-Fi. I don’t really agree with stealing others’ service. It’s really a breach of privacy and you’re risking trouble. Owning up: The worst thing I was ever accused of was drinking and driving, and I absolutely did it and I deserved the consequence. But I no longer drink at all; I’ve been sober for three years. Really, for me, it’s all about taking responsibility for your actions, and being a part of the solution.

Greg Swinger: Well, I don’t use computers at all, except for developing pictures from my digital camera. I never really got into it. My wife just does it. So I guess I’d say I don’t steal any Internet. Indented servant: When I was a kid I got accused of denting my dad’s new truck. It really was my brother who did it, but I took the heat for it. The punishment was I couldn’t get my drivers’ license till I was 16.

Louis Wagner: Constantly. If not at the library, then at the college. If not at the college, then at the job center. If not there, then the Pov, or at a bar, or on somebody else’s laptop. Sleepin’ around: Probably sleeping with this guy’s wife. My girlfriend’s constantly accusing me of doing that.

Missoula Independent

What is the governor doing holding a rifle in his office? (See “Schweitzer’s last stand,” Jan. 13, 2011.) Please tell me he is telling you a hunting story. No, no mention of that in the caption. Oh, I see clever play on your title “Schweitzer’s last stand.” No. That is a really offensive depiction and I am so sorry the governor took part in that representation. If Gov. Schweitzer requested this picture, I want to know. In light of the shooting in Tucson, this is a horrible idea, no matter what your clever story line is. Even without the shooting of a member of Congress in her hometown last week, America has had too much violent rhetoric. It would be nice to foster respect and model non-violent communication. There is a subliminal message in the photo: “It’s my way or the highway—or I’ll shoot you.” This is a really, really bad message. Sarah Lane Missoula

As a resident of Ward 2, I want to urge City Council to fill the vacant seat with Gabriel Furshong. Gabe is eloquent, hard working and, most importantly, he knows how to listen. I have known Gabe for years as a friend and a colleague. We work together in the world of public lands advocacy and stewardship. For three years I’ve worked for the Montana Conservation Corps as a field coordinator and we’ve collaborated with Gabe’s employer, the Montana Wilderness Association, on a few occasions. On one of those occasions, Gabe delivered a presentation on the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act to a knowledgeable and experienced group of field workers who had spent most of the summer working in places impacted by the bill. We had an audience of more than 20 people and Gabe was hammered with questions from folks with many different opinions. I was struck by how intently Gabe listened and tried to understand their individual points of view, even though he had no doubt heard these questions and concerns before at similar events. He then answered each question honestly, validating the questioner’s point of view before offering his own opinion. Ward 2 is an incredibly diverse ward encompassing Grant Creek, North Reserve and the Westside. What we need is someone who is energized to talk with people, listen, understand different points of view and bring groups together. Gabe is a social person who has a track record of working with people of diverse ideologies to get something done. In a time of partisan divides and gridlock in national and state politics, Gabe will bring Missoula real collaboration and

community unification. Mike Schaedel Missoula

Spending cuts too deep On day eight of the Montana Legislature, partisan politics resulted in drastic cuts to human services, education and state infrastructure. Over $30 million in health and human services, over $70 million in education funding—all gone with little public input, little consideration of lost federal funding, little consideration of the real human cost to Montana communities and families. Cuts to Medicaid alone could

a time “ofInpartisan divides and gridlock in national and state politics, Gabriel Furshong will bring Missoula real collaboration and community

unification.

impact almost 3,000 jobs across Montana— nurses, doctors and other service providers. Cuts to preventative healthcare, such as family planning, foster care services, disability services and prescription drug coverage for seniors, will result in higher costs in other programs. With so many legislators brand-new to this process, why would they enact cuts before even understanding the programs at stake, the cost of human lives and the effects on Montana’s economy? At a time when revenue is increasing, our economy is recovering, and our state has substantial “cash in the bank,” these drastic cuts make no sense.

Legislators are entrusted with making critical decisions that affect our families, our communities and our collective future. The cuts are not only unnecessary, but expensive. Making a political point to the detriment of our children, our seniors and our disabled citizens is unconscionable. Stacey Anderson Planned Parenthood of Montana Helena

Quit coal Neither Montana nor the world needs more new coal (see “Coal coaxing,” Jan. 13, 2011). In difficult economic times, when political officials look for ways to garner votes, create jobs and balance budgets, they promise new coal as a quick fix, and they tend to believe lobbyists who say coal developers need tax and regulatory breaks. However, it is irresponsible to encourage these companies to mine here, because they destroy the environment and don’t restore the land to its original use. During the Otter Creek coal hearings, the Land Board said state agencies will “protect us from bad coal development.” Hogwash. Because politicians gut the regulations and cut the funding, state agencies have neither the institutional and political will, nor the funds to “protect” Montana from industrial abuse. More than 37,000 acres have been disturbed by coal mining in Montana and only about 50 acres—only about a tenth of one percent—have come close to full reclamation. Ask folks around Colstrip about aquifers that have been ruined by leaking coal ash storage ponds, and ranches with dead cows and poisoned wells. You will hear from them that for the last 30 years, state agencies have simply protected industry. Politicians and industry continue the hollow cry of “we need these jobs” to excuse misuse of our natural resources. Coal is a short-term industry that leaves us with polluted water and damaged landscapes. The money these companies make tearing up Montana goes to their shareholders, not to our local economy, and Montana is left with huge bills to fix the messes. In contrast, farming and ranching, tourism and alternative energy all provide sustainable and reliable sources of jobs and financial security. However, they also depend on a clean and healthful Montana. Tell your legislators and the governor not to gut our environmental laws. Ask them to protect Montana, not big coal! Janet McMillan Greenough Correction: In last week’s issue, we identified Rep. Jon Sesso as representing Helena, when in fact Sesso hails from Butte. The Indy regrets the error.

etters Policy: The Missoula Independent welcomes hate mail, love letters and general correspondence. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number for confirmation, though we’ll publish only your name and city. Anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. Preference is given to letters addressing the contents of the Independent. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Send correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Missoula Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801, or via e-mail: editor@missoulanews.com.

L

Page 4 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Missoula Independent

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WEEK IN REVIEW • Wednesday, January 12

Inside

Letters

Briefs

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

Agenda

VIEWFINDER

News Quirks by Chad Harder

The Missoula Board of County Commissioners rejects a proposed 59-lot subdivision on John Richard’s 199-acre Clearwater Meadows Ranch about a mile west of Clearwater Junction. The board cites impacts to wildlife and wildlife habitat, as well the lower densities suggested in the recently approved Seeley Lake Regional Plan.

• Thursday, January 13 After reportedly doing doughnuts in the River City Grill parking lot in Bonner, Gregory Gonstad, 27, heads toward East Missoula, and in attempting to pass a car, he drives up a hill and flips his pickup. Law enforcement arrives to find Gonstad trapped— and drinking a beer. Gonstad already had four DUIs and one pending.

• Friday, January 14 Missoula County sheriff’s deputies arrest a 16-yearold boy suspected of stabbing in the stomach a Big Sky High School student while a group of boys were smoking about three blocks away from the school. The suspect, whose name has not been released, is jailed on preliminary charges of felony assault with a weapon.

• Saturday, January 15 Griz fans flock to Southgate Mall to get an autograph from Marc Mariani, the former University of Montana wide receiver who made the Pro Bowl this season after setting a Tennessee Titans franchise record for kick return yards. Mariani, a seventh-round draft pick, is one of four rookies on the Pro Bowl roster.

• Sunday, January 16 A Montana Rail Link train slams into a car near the intersection at North and Garfield streets. The driver of the car, a Missoula man in his 30s, didn’t hear the oncoming train because, according to police, he was blaring music. He was uninjured.

• Monday, January 17 In Helena, nearly 50 supporters of the Montana Human Rights Network from across the state descend on the State Capitol to mark Martin Luther King Jr. Day and lobby legislators to support equal rights for all people regardless of gender, sexual orientation or ethnicity.

• Tuesday, January 18 The Montana House gives initial approval of a bill that would ban illegal immigrants from receiving workers’ compensation benefits. But The Associated Press reports that only eight of more than 8,000 claims filed with the Montana State Fund in 2010 had a suspicious Social Security number.

After gathering in Caras Park to honor Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy Monday evening, a crowd of nearly 200 marched through Missoula to the First United Methodist Church. Speaker and pastor Amy Carter called on community members to reject anti-gay harassment, especially in schools: “We need to confront the bullying with love,” she said.

Westside Food co-op expands Two weeks ago, the Missoula Community Food Co-op opened the doors of its expanded new digs on Burns Street, a bright and airy grocery store that makes the old 450-square-foot space seem like a broom closet by comparison. “A year ago [we] were repairing broken windows from kids throwing rocks through them,” said co-op board member Jack Rowan during a recent walk-through with Jerry Petasek and Hermina Harold of the North-Missoula Community Development Corporation (NMCDC). “And so in just a year’s time it’s really transformed into a completely different building.” The renovation, a partnership between the coop and NMCDC, was made possible by a $950,000 federal appropriation secured by Montana’s congressional delegation nearly two years ago. Beyond the co-op, which specializes in bulk goods and local produce, the former FedEx warehouse will soon house a café and community kitchen.

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“It’s more than just another grocery store in Missoula,” Rowan said. “We see this as a real community resource and a big part of trying to revitalize the Westside neighborhood.” As two men worked on the new windows in the soon-to-be café, Rowan explained that the co-op is raising additional money in a rather unorthodox way—taking out a loan from its roughly 200 active members. The approach allows the co-op to borrow at a rate less than banks typically offer, and gives member-lenders a higher rate of return—at least 4 percent—than most CDs and savings accounts. So far, the co-op’s raised more than $25,000 of the $45,000 it needs, and is extending the offer to all Missoulians. The money will be used for landscaping and equipment—like the shelving and refrigerators the co-op recently salvaged when Linens ’n Things and Walmart discarded them—among other costs. In addition to its grocery and café businesses, come June the co-op, in conjunction with the Missoula Food Bank and Garden City Harvest, will begin a summer meals program for area kids. “We have many, many hopes for this little proj-

ect,” Harold said. Added Petasek: “1.52 acres of pure hope.” Matthew Frank

Real estate Feeling for the bottom The Missoula Organization of Realtors (MOR) has tallied its 2010 market data, and the number of home sales in the urban area has dropped 42 percent since the peak in 2006, while home values have dropped nearly 7 percent since 2007. But not every Missoula homeowner has reason to be depressed. Larry Swanson, economist with the Center for the Rocky Mountain West, points out that it’s the high end of the market that continues to absorb the brunt of the housing downturn, while homeowners on the lower end are, relatively speaking, sitting pretty. “What some people think is that home values are falling,” Swanson says. “No, when you get into those low and moderate ranges, they’re not falling, they’re holding. But we’re losing the upper side of the market. So [the median home price], that scale, gets shifted.”


Inside

Letters

Briefs

MOR’s data shows the median home price in 2010 was $202,500, down from $208,000 in 2009 and $216,950 in 2007. It counts the number of sales at 830, down from 913 in 2009 and 1,443 in 2006. Beyond the bifurcated market, there are other nuances the raw data miss. Perhaps most notably, the low-end market got stirred in the first half of 2010 by the federal first-time homebuyer tax credit. When the credit expired, Missoula’s median home price stood at $197,250, according to MOR President Brint Whalberg. In the subsequent months, market activity became more balanced across the price spectrum, boosting the median home price as low-end volume dropped without the federal incentive, Whalberg explains. In any event, Missoula’s market, however flat, may have arrived at a “sustainable” level of annual sales, Whalberg says. “On a monthly basis it’s going to be fascinating to track over the next six months, because that’s going to give us a real clear picture,” Whalberg says. “If we see the median price continuing to be lower than it was last year, that’s going to show that we’re going to see values continue to slide down. But if it stays at it or above it, it’s a good holding pattern, and it’s going to show that maybe we’re seeing a little value recovery in our market.” Matthew Frank

Up Front

Ochenski

Range

“Our question is: Ethically, can you kill an elk with a hand-thrown spear?” asks Tony Jones, president of the Ravalli County Fish and Wildlife Association. “We don’t think so.” This isn’t the first time Montana has considered legislation allowing the use of primitive weapons. Perkins was involved in an effort in the 1980s to legalize atlatl hunting for the first two days of the archery season. The measure died on the table, Perkins recalls. The atlatl has made a steady comeback since the 1980s. The World Atlatl Association says the technology is “part of the current surge in recreational interest in ‘primitive skills.’” Groups conduct atlatl com-

Legislature Going primitive For Bob Perkins of Manhattan, Mont., there’s a single natural ability that has placed humans at the top of the food chain for thousands of years. It’s not our “big, bulgy brains,” he says. Perkins chalks up our continued survival as omnivores to one evolutionary edge: Our ability to throw stuff. “That’s one of the first things babies learn to do is throw stuff, and that’s their first experience in direct control over their local environment,” says Perkins, whose status as the world’s foremost expert in the ancient dart-throwing atlatl has earned him the nickname Atlatl Bob. “This is big in human development.” That ability became a hot topic in the Montana Legislature last week when Sen. Greg Hinkle, RThompson Falls, introduced a bill legalizing handthrown spear hunting. The legislation proved popular with the Senate Fish and Game Committee, which felt the only change needed was an amendment specifying when spear hunting could occur. But some sportsmen remain wary.

petitions worldwide; Perkins helped found the annual Montana Atlatl Mammoth Hunt more than 20 years ago. “It’s gaining popularity steadily worldwide, and in Montana,” Perkins says. Minnesota Vikings defensive end Jared Allen brought spear hunting into the limelight last year when he appeared on the television program Relentless Pursuit. Allen successfully speared an elk from a tree platform, then issued a spirited on-camera warning to other wildlife: “All you bears out there, watch out. You’re next.” It’s displays like that that have Jones concerned about both traditional spears and the more sophisticated atlatl. “How do you regulate it?” Jones wonders, pointing out the lack of guidelines offered in Hinkle’s bill. “It’s a nightmare…And we don’t want to see another black eye for hunters.” Alex Sakariassen

Agenda

News Quirks

Transportation Residents riled over Maclay Bridge A group of roughly two dozen Target Range homeowners last week accused Missoula County of moving forward on plans to replace the historic Maclay Bridge south of Missoula without gathering sufficient public comment. “I think they thought it was going to be a done deal,” says Missoula attorney and Blue Mountain Road resident Helen Orendain. The newly formed Maclay Bridge Alliance asserted in a Jan. 13 letter to Missoula County Commissioners that the governing body is not adequately weighing pros and cons of replacing the 76year-old one-lane bridge. The commissioners must sign off on a memorandum of understanding with the Montana Department of Transportation to set the project into motion. Of particular concern for the alliance is a plan originally proposed in 1994 that involves extending South Avenue by building a wider bridge that would be constructed over the Bitterroot River about a half mile from the Maclay Bridge. If a new bridge is built extending South Avenue, or if the Maclay Bridge is replaced, alliance members believe traffic would greatly increase, and the rural character of the area forever altered. “We haven’t found any justification at all from the county for why they want to build this thing,” says alliance member Bob Schweitzer. “There’s no complaint from the folks who live out there.” County officials point to data kept by the Federal Highway Administration that labels the Maclay Bridge, erected in 1935, as “structurally deficient” as a primary reason to build a new bridge. However, Federal Highway Administration Spokeswoman Nancy Singer says many variables— like the fact that the Maclay Bridge has only one lane–will help shape whether or not a bridge is considered deficient. “It doesn’t necessarily mean that it is structurally unsafe,” Singer says. Missoula County Commission Chair Jean Curtiss says the public will be given ample opportunity to weigh in. But because it takes a significant amount of time to get multiple stakeholders and funding sources on board, the governing body is now working proactively to investigate its options. “What we’re doing now is looking at whether or not Maclay Bridge needs a replacement, and, if so, where,” Curtiss says. “We have not made up our mind on anything.” Jessica Mayrer

sustainable building supply & design

BY THE NUMBERS

20

Bills in the 2011 Montana Legislature aimed at strengthening DUI laws, including HB 18, a proposal aimed at trying minors who cause fatalities while driving drunk as adults.

etc.

The new all-Republican Ravalli County Commission has had an interesting first few weeks in office. They’ve made some dramatic and contentious gestures to push the kind of limited and localized brand of government conservative voters nationwide cried out for during last fall’s general election. But to their opponents, they look ill-informed and overreaching. With the Bitterroot Valley’s long history of anti-government sentiment, we’ve been watching these developments from a distance, wondering just how far alterations to county policy will go. The commission’s first official act on Jan. 3 was to announce its intention to repeal a rewrite to local subdivision regulations hurriedly passed by the previous Democrat-controlled commission only 10 days earlier. Bitterroot residents on the left have since voiced concerns that this will lead to an abandonment of subdivision regulations and zoning. But fresh-face Commissioner Matt Kanenwisher says nothing could be further from the truth. “There certainly were a lot of things about [the regulations] that the sitting commission now thinks are steps forward,” Kanenwisher says. “The question is, do you keep what you have now and then start changing it…or do you go back to what we had 10 days ago and complete the document before we implement it?” In another provocative move early this week the commission took up a staff comment policy outlining how and when non-elected county employees can publicly talk about governmental affairs. “What they’re simply looking at is a chain of command in an effort to make sure the information we release is correct,” says Ravalli County Human Resources Director Robert Jenni. “What they don’t want is, for example, a janitor commenting on county policy that they may not have knowledge of.” Fellow newbie Commissioner Suzy Foss says the commission isn’t implementing gag orders, but merely trying to establish a more structured public process. But Kanenwisher understands that the county’s history with the far right may lead to misinterpretation of the new commission’s intentions. Take the recent training session four commissioners attended, hosted by the nonprofit American Stewards of Liberty, which teaches that county governments are “equal, not subordinate.” Such language sounds suspiciously like right-wing claptrap. “I had somebody the other day ask, ‘Are you talking about secession?’ Well, no, wow, that’s quite a jump,” Kanenwisher says. But it looks like they’re playing with fire. County planner John Lavey resigned the same day the new commission announced plans to repeal the subdivision updates. He initially cited frustration with the move, but later recanted his statement in the Ravalli Republic.

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Missoula Independent

Page 7 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Cyber sneaks Child porn raid serves as lesson to lock Wi-Fi networks by Jessica Mayrer

“You’re definitely guilty until you prove yourself otherwise.” Detective T.J. McDermott of the Missoula County Sheriff ’s Department says no charges have been filed against Adkins or her roommates. He acknowledges no illegal material was found on the seized computers, which were returned three and a half weeks after the raid. “Once we knew no evidence of child pornography was discovered on any computers that we had seized,” McDermott says, “we did our best to get that property returned as soon as possible.” McDermott is a member of the federally funded Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force. He says he’s sympathetic to Adkins’ concerns, but sexual abuse of children—prerequisite in the production of child pornography—is something law enforcement takes very seriously. “We have a duty to investigate it,” McDermott says. “In doing so, we don’t have a lot of luck just talking to people and asking if they are downloading child pornography. Therefore, we follow all the legal guidelines. We obtain search warrants to enter property and seize any item that could possibly contain Photo by Chad Harder evidence.” Law enforcement now suspects Alerted that somebody had used her home’s unsecured wireless connection to what the roommates first guessed— download child pornography, police seized University of Montana student that someone accessed illegal images Shannon Adkins’ computer three weeks before finals. from outside Adkins’ home via her she recalls, thinking the visit was a prank. weren’t yet convinced that was the case. wireless Internet connection that the landAdkins, 39, is glad she didn’t say that, When law enforcement left, they took with lord hadn’t password-protected. The because when she peered upstairs several them four computers they sent to a Helena incident highlights the prudence of police officers stood at the top of the stair- crime lab for forensic analysis. locking wireless connections. However, case, guns drawn. They pointed a flashlight Problem was, Adkins, a Native McDermott says the Phillips Street case in her face. American Studies major, was heading into stands out as unusual. He recalls only one “There was just a pile of dudes at the the final stretch of fall semester and had other recent circumstance in which law top of the stairs,” she says. “It was like a two papers saved on the seized laptop. She enforcement tracked illegal images downsmall-town version of SWAT.” was forced to explain to her professors why loaded by someone outside of a household Police told Adkins they had obtained a she was unable to complete projects on via an unsecured wireless connection. warrant to search the house after discover- time. That said, police say savvy viewers of ing someone had downloaded illegal child “I had to tell them that I got raided for child porn are employing tactics to mainpornography from her home’s wireless child porn and I didn’t have a computer,” tain anonymity, like, for instance, using Internet service. she says. “Just to have to go in there and say wireless hot spots in public places to evade “I was like, ‘It ain’t me, pal,’” Adkins that, that’s icky. Who wants to say that? Not law enforcement scrutiny. In fact, recalls telling detectives. me.” McDermott believes the suspect who Her two roommates, including Adkins is angry. The incident left her accessed Adkins’ Wi-Fi also downloaded Leonard Solis, who was home when police unnerved for weeks. She asserts law illegal images from at least one local public arrived, denied wrongdoing, too. However, enforcement could have allowed her to, at wireless connection. Solis, 26, who has a criminal record for a minimum, download her schoolwork. “It’s certainly a hurdle for law enforcedriving under the influence and keeps a And she maintains police could have simply ment,” McDermott says. stash of legal pornography in his bedroom, knocked on the door to ask what was going As for Adkins and Solis, they’ve locked was shaken by the unexpected visit. on, rather than charging in with guns their wireless network. “Here I am, a mid-20s male with a drawn. “It’s mostly about principle,” she says. criminal background and I’ve got a stack jmayrer@missoulanews.com University of Montana senior Shannon Adkins was training her puppy to walk on a newly acquired treadmill in the basement of her Phillips Street home Nov. 22 when she heard voices in the hallway upstairs. She thought a friend had stopped by to visit. Then she heard a man holler, “Come out with your hands up!” “I almost said, ‘If you are so big and bad why don’t you come here and get me?’”

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Missoula Independent

Page 8 January 20 – January 27, 2011

of porn in my room,” Solis says. “It was scary, man.” Law enforcement separated the two roommates, interrogated them and searched the house. During the police interviews, it became increasingly apparent, to the roommates at least, that someone outside of their home had been using their unsecured wireless connection to download illegal images. However, police


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Two Ways to Shape up for the New Year and Valentines’ Day!

Past is prologue

through February 15th

Will “The Great Slowdown” of the late ’80s repeat itself? It’s the third week of the 2011 legislative session, and so far things are moving at a crawl. With more than 2,000 bill draft requests in the hopper—many of which were dropped in some time ago—seasoned legislative observers are wondering why so few bills are actually popping out. The reason might be found by looking back 22 years to the one-term governorship of Stan Stephens. Stephens was elected governor in 1988—a year in which the Republicans had a fruitful electoral season not unlike last year’s. Political newcomer Conrad Burns defeated Democratic U.S. Sen. John Melcher. Stephens defeated former Democratic Gov. Tom Judge, who was making a comeback bid. And Republicans took control of the state Senate. Democrats held the House with a twovote majority. Unlike recent Montana governors, Stephens came to office with a wealth of legislative experience and had a very good idea of how much money the state was spending and how. He had campaigned on a pledge to cut state government spending. If that sounds familiar, it should, since both the Republicans and their Tea Party pals ran on basically the same platform, which carried them to victory in November’s election. Those with good memories will recall that the ’80s were not particularly good years for either the state or national economies, and state government was strapped for revenue. Outgoing governor Ted Schwinden, a Democrat, had basically robbed—or sought to rob—every possible pot of money to keep the state afloat. If that, too, sounds familiar, it’s with good reason, because the current successor to the office, Democrat Brian Schweitzer, is doing the same thing. The reality is that while it’s very, very easy to talk about cutting government spending, “trimming fat” and finding “waste and abuse,” it really isn’t all that easy pulling it off. Just as our current Legislature is struggling to try and put together a balanced budget, and will continue to struggle over the next three months, so too did the 1989 session, which coincided with Stephens’ first year in office. Nonetheless, Stephens, despite having to deal with the slim Democratic majority in the House, determinedly sought drastic cuts. But as those who have worked in the political arena for any amount of time know, the physics of politics is real—for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The reaction to Stephens’ budget-

cutting efforts soon became apparent. Stephens told state employees he was going to cut their pay, reduce their numbers and “streamline” their procedures, and that was translated to “more work to do with fewer, less well-paid workers to do it.”

The reality is “that while it’s very, very easy to talk about cutting government spending, ‘trimming fat’ and finding ‘waste and abuse,’ it really isn’t all that easy pulling

it off.

Having enjoyed decades of Democratic governors, strong unions and equitable pay schedules, thousands of state employees were suddenly facing an unfamiliar and unwanted future. As they say in the game, “employee morale” plunged, and little by little, almost undetectably, the entire productivity of state government declined in “The Great Slowdown.” And who could blame them? How excited and ambitious did anyone expect state employees to be when they had become targeted by their own governor and legislative bodies rather than praised for their work? By the time the 1989 Legislature was complete, the public, like the state employees, took offense to the entire process. As noted in a 1989 Associated Press article, a poll conducted by the University of Montana Bureau of Business and Economic Research gave Stephens a miserable 30 percent approval rating, with 43 percent disapproving of the job he was doing as governor. Even worse,

the Legislature managed only 29 percent approval with a whopping 53 percent disapproval. Ironically, 1989 was Montana’s Statehood Centennial—but that year’s Legislature was not to be celebrated. Eventually, Stephens took refuge in his office. In the words of political watchers of the time, he “bunkered up” for the remainder of his four-year term and did not seek re-election. Jump forward 22 years to the 2011 session. Once again Montana is riding rough fiscal waters, once again a governor is trying to find any and all possible ways to balance the budget. And once again, the Republicans are on a rampage and have proposed cuts ranging from 510 percent or higher for state employees. It is also important to remember that these same state employees have had their wages frozen for two years already and, even under Gov. Schweitzer’s proposal, won’t see a 1 percent increase until next year. The 3 percent raise Schweitzer has proposed—but that may not survive the session—won’t even kick in till 2013. It is against this backdrop that the Republican-dominated Legislature takes the stage. With an overwhelming 68-32 majority in the House and a very solid 2822 majority in the Senate, the Republicans are vowing to slash government spending. Add to that the proposal by Sen. Dave Lewis, R-Helena, to cap state salaries at twice the average Montana household income and you have a disgruntled and de-energized pool of state workers who are again being told to do more with less. So how does this tie into the snail’s pace of the 2011 session? Well, how enthusiastic would you be about crafting measures that threaten your own livelihood, give polluters a free hand with the environment, outlaw personal choice, overturn citizen-passed initiatives, or gut the Montana Constitution’s guarantee of a clean and healthful environment? Not very. It’s totally possible that speculation about another “Great Slowdown” in response to the Republican efforts to chop state government is off base. Perhaps there’s no decline in productivity and the session is simply moving slowly because there are so many inexperienced legislators. But it’s also possible— and logical—that it is real. We have, after all, seen it before.

Buy an unlimited monthly yoga pass from Inner Harmony Yoga and get 20% off any organic yoga clothing item at The Green Light Apparel & Home Decor

301 N. Higgins Ave Downtown Missoula 406.541.0080 www.greenlightmt.com

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214 E. Main St, Ste. B Downtown Missoula 406.581.4093 www.yogainmissoula.co

Helena’s George Ochenski rattles the cage of the political establishment as a political analyst for the Independent. Contact Ochenski at opinion@missoulanews.com.

Missoula Independent

Page 9 January 20 – January 27, 2011


These pets may be adopted at Missoula Animal Control

These pets may be adopted at the Humane Society of Western Montana

541-7387 J O H N H E N RY

Most of our dogs have only one name, but this big, sweet fellow is special enough to deserve two. He's a gentle dog who gets along with everyone and would really like to have someone to call his own.

549-3934 LEBOWSKI

He's big, handsome, and very sure of himself, so his name just had to be Lebowski! This is a truly outstanding cat in both looks and personality, and any family would be lucky to have him join them. The Dude abides!

Flowers for every bride.

ZOEY

4-year-old Zoey is looking for a person who can keep up with her both physically and mentally. This sweet, active and intelligent girl loves attention and lots of it! To put it simply, her perfect companion would be energetic, smart and have lots and lots of time for her.

GLORIA

Glorious 5-year-old Gloria is a kitty who is truly beautiful inside and out. Her emerald green eyes are so beautiful and bright that they seem to glow. Her calm quiet meows and gentle nuzzles are enough to make even the worst day seem not so bad!

In Trouble or in Love? The Flower Bed has affordable flowers for all your needs.

Southgate Mall Missoula (406) 541-2886 • MTSmiles.com Open Evenings & Saturdays

ALEXIS

She has a silky coat, outstanding whiskers and ear tufts, and even though she's just a kitten, she's already a champion when it comes to purring. We think she's just what people have in mind when they want a kitten!

The Flower Bed 2405 McDonald Ave. 721-9233

VICTORIA

Although white is the most common color in cats' coats, it's rare to find one that is completely white all over. Victoria is a petite, regal lady with a true white-assnow coat, which is the perfect setting for her lovely blue eyes. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

2420 W Broadway 2310 Brooks 3075 N Reserve 6149 Mullan Rd

CALLIOPE

Calliope is a calico cat with the independent attitude we have come to expect from cats with this coloring. She'll be a loyal companion, but it will always be on her own terms. Her adoption fee has been sponsored by the woman who found her.

To sponsor a pet call 543-6609

LIONEL

Some people may not believe this, but Lionel is a cat who loves dogs! He is truly a kitty who refuses to judge an animal based on its species, but by the content of its character. Lionel would love nothing more than to share his calm, peaceful personality with his forever family.

1600 S. 3rd W. 541-FOOD

MABEL

Mabel is a sweet 2-yearold hound mix. Mabel is laid back and has a kind heart. She is in the market for a family who can promise that she will finally be loved and cared for. Mabel loves kids and dogs.

www.missoulafoodbank.org Improving Lives One Pet at a Time

For more info, please call 549-0543

Missoula’s Unique Alternative for pet Supplies

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

CELIA

We have several black cats at the shelter, but Celia is probably the most quiet and shy. She may sometimes seem unfriendly, but we think that happens simply because she's a bit timid around new people. Get to know her, and then she's a gem!

www.gofetchDOG.com - 728-2275 627 Woody • 3275 N. Reserve Street Corner of 39th and Russell in Russell Square

CHOPPER

This 1-year-old Chihuahua mix likes to take his time getting to know new people, but once he does, he’ll be your cute loyal companion forever. This spunky guy is looking for a forever home where he can curl up in a lap and be admired forever.

MON - SAT 10-9 • SUN 11-6 721-5140 www.shopsouthgate.com

TIPPY

Need a hug? Tippy gives them out for free. This 2year-old handsome boy would love to discover what it feels like to be a cherished pet. He can only wonder if there is a person out there who is as loving as he is. Come meet truly magnificent Tippy at the Humane Society.

237 Blaine • 542-0077

These pets may be adopted at AniMeals 721-4710 D O L LY

Dolly’s story is no fairy tale, but the ending could be. This beautiful little girl came from a hoarding situation where she had to fight for her food. Every day was a struggle to survive. She was found bedraggled and extremely underweight.

BEVERLY

They threw her out of the car and sped off in a cloud of dust and gravel. Beverly was devastated that her family would do such a thing. She didn’t know what to do or where to go….and the kids in the neighborhood pelted her with rocks every time they saw her.

THOMAS O’MALLEY

Thomas has been thrown from pillar to post in his short lifetime. He doesn’t understand the lack of commitment he has experienced and he doesn’t give his trust easily because of it. There is nothing wrong with Thomas, the defect is a human one.

COCO

In her desperate attempt to seek refuge from the raindrops that pelted her malnourished body, Coco found herself underneath the only source of shelter in sight—an old box on the ground next to an overflowing garbage bin. Help us nourish Missoula Donate now at

www.missoulafoodbank.org

Missoula Independent

A Nice Little Bead Store In A Nice Little Town

For more info, please call 549-0543

105 Ravalli St Suite G, Stevensville, MT 59870 406.777.2141

Missoula Food Bank 219 S. 3rd St. W.

Page 10 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

First impressions When bumper stickers mask our commonalities By Christy Aschwanden

My husband and I were driving home from cross-country skiing on western Colorado’s Grand Mesa when the SUV in front of us slid off the road and sank into bumper-high snow. We pulled over and stopped, but quickly realized that there was nothing we could do to help. No amount of pushing was going to get the woman’s SUV out of that deep snow, and our little Honda was too small to tow it out. Just as we were about to drive down the road in search of cell phone reception so we could call for a tow truck, another SUV came up the road. The driver quickly hit his brakes and pulled a U-turn. The man who emerged from the vehicle in a parka and work clothes was maybe 60 years old, with a face whose lines suggested age, but also good humor and kindness. “That’s some real trouble that you’ve got there,” he told the driver, a middle-aged woman whose preteen son sat restlessly at shotgun. We exchanged fewer than a dozen words when the man pulled out a tow rope and hitched it to the woman’s bumper. Then he got in his SUV and backed it closer so he could connect the rope to his hitch and yank her out. That’s when I saw his bumper stickers. “100% ANTI-OBAMA,” read one. Another sticker displayed the name “Barack Obama” with one of those little-boy cartoon characters pissing on the letters. I felt myself growing hot with anger. The man got back in his vehicle and

slowly pulled forward. His tow rope began to stretch, but the stuck SUV wasn’t moving. My husband and I gave him a look—this was hopeless. But the man kept moving his vehicle forward, the tension in the rope growing visibly tighter until one of the loops

country “isOurneedlessly fractured, and during this encounter it hit me that I’m part of the

problem.

snapped. That’s it, I thought, she’s not going anywhere. But just then the man hit the gas and the woman’s SUV barreled forward onto the road, free at last. We all thanked each other, smiling. Our country is needlessly fractured, and during this encounter it hit me that I’m

part of the problem. If I’d encountered this guy on the road, I would have thought, “What a jerk.” The mere sight of his bumper stickers would have given me license to turn this generous man into a nameless, faceless “other.” But during our brief encounter, he was nothing but altruistic and generous. Up close, I felt his humanity, and in that moment of shared purpose, our commonalities felt bigger than our differences. And so I made a choice—to put aside ideology and allow myself to experience the kindness of this fellow human being. My interaction with this stranger was utterly unremarkable. Across America, and especially in the rural West, ordinary people with differing views manage to work together for common goals every day. It’s a shame that we allow political pundits and fear mongers to divvy us up into us versus them. I will probably never agree with this man’s politics, but I found much to admire about him as an individual. I still think his bumper stickers were crude and disrespectful, and it pains me to see such vitriol aimed at a president I support and admire. But I also know for a few minutes on that cold winter afternoon, an anonymous rightwinger and this bleeding-heart liberal put differences aside to help a stranger.

WANTED for robbery, rustling, and sour notes.

Christy Aschwanden is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). She is a freelance writer in Cedaredge, Colorado.

Saddle up for a Wild West Family Concert and help the Missoula Symphony Orchestra chase down an offbeat outlaw. Bad Bart is on the loose! This calls for Deputy Darko Butorac and his band of 70 musicians. He’ll give each instrument a shot and then show kids and parents alike how symphonic music can tell a blazing, smoking, heart-stopping story. Darko Butorac, Music Director • Plus a Surprise Guest Friday, January 28, 7 PM • The University Theatre Tickets: $8 • Online at missoulasymphony.org Call 721-3194 or visit 320 East Main Street

Missoula Independent

Page 11 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

Our handmade futons are just as natural, and so cozy you won’t want to leave. H A N D M A D E

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It’s been just over a year since a 7.0-magnitude earthquake ravaged the impoverished country of Haiti. While conditions in the country have since improved, the nonprofit organization Save the Children—which provides food, medical care and schooling for kids in need—notes in a recent report that “the needs of the country’s children, in particular, remain urgent.” You can get a better grasp of the situation this week when Carolyn Miles, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Save the Children, visits town to talk in-depth about the challenges facing children and women in Haiti and in other developing countries around the world. Her talk will include an assessment of Haiti and its

THURSDAY JANUARY 20

. G E T L O S T.

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Missoula’s Board of County Commissioners announces that it seeks applicants for a new Missoula County Fairgrounds Advisory Committee. Applications are available at the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W. Broadway St., and online at co.missoula.mt.us/ mbcc.forms.htm. Applications are due by 5 PM Fri., Jan. 28.

FRIDAY JANUARY 21 Families can get help narrowing their search for quality child care, and find out if they qualify for assistance, with Child Care Assistance, which is offered by Child Care Resources from 8 AM–5 PM Mon.-Fri. at its office, on the lower level of 105 E. Pine St. Free. Call 728-6446 and visit childcareresources.org. Missoula’s County Commissioners are looking for a few good volunteers to apply for a position on the Missoula Consolidated Planning Board. Grab applications at the Missoula County Courthouse Annex, 200 W. Broadway St., or online at co.missoula.mt.us/mcbcc/ forms.htm. Applications are due by 5 PM on Feb. 4. Call 258-4877.

progress towards stability, and will shed light on Save the Children’s success in addressing global health and education issues. Miles also plans to discuss her organization’s efforts to provide emergency assistance during natural disasters and wartime conflicts, as well as initiatives that aim to increase economic opportunities. –Ira Sather-Olson The World Affairs Council (WAC) of Montana presents “Women and Children at Risk: Haiti and The Developing World,” on Wed., Jan. 26, at 7 PM in the University Center Ballroom. $5/free f o r s t u d e n t s a n d WAC m e m b e r s . Vi s i t montanaworldaffairs.org.

sexual assault, including groups for American Indian women and teens, every Tue. staring with dinner at 5:30 PM, followed by meetings at 6:30 PM. Free. Those with children are asked to arrive at 6:15. Call 543-6691 for more info and visit ywcaofmissoula.org/?q=node/57. The Missoula International School, 1100 Harrison St., presents an informational meeting on its bilingual education program starting at 6:30 PM. Free. Visit mismt.org. Those who live in the Franklin to Fort Neighborhood are hereby invited to attend the Franklin to Fort Neighborhood Council Meeting, starting at 7 PM at the Missoula Friends Meeting Hall, 1861 S. 12th St. W. Free. Visit missoula-neighborhoods.org. Those who have problems with anorexia or bulimia can find a shoulder to lean on during a meeting of Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous, which meets this and every Tue. at 7:30 PM in the Memorial Room of St. Paul Lutheran Church, 202 Brooks St. Free. E-mail abamissoula@gmail.com.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 26

UM’s College of Technology announces that it’s offering free college prep classes for qualified veterans, including courses in math, writing and basic computer skills, starting on Feb. 7. Orientation takes place at 5 PM on Feb. 7 in the College of Technology’s dining room, 909 South Ave. W. For more info or to enroll, call 877-356-VETS.

First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St., hosts Project Homeless Connect, an event for those who are homeless or those worried about becoming homeless that features medical, dental and eye care, a warm meal, clothing, hair cuts, mental health counseling, legal advice, housing assistance, employment counseling and other services, from 10 AM–3 PM. Free. Call 258-4980.

SATURDAY JANUARY 22

Sorry dude, no munchies provided. The Missoula County Commissioners currently seek volunteers to serve on the Marijuana Initiative Oversight Committee. Grab an application at the Missoula County Courthouse annex, 200 W. Broadway St., or online at co.missoula.mt.us/mcbcc/forms.htm. Applications are due by 5 PM on Wed., Jan. 26. Call 258-4877.

Enjoy a game of b-ball and support a local no-kill animal adoption center when UM presents a 50/50 raffle for AniMeals during the UM vs. Montana State men’s basketball game, which begins at 7 PM at the Adams Center. Visit griztix.com for ticket info.

MONDAY JANUARY 24 Veterans can find support with trained facilitator Chris Poloynis every Mon. at 2 PM, when PTSD group Spartans Honour meets at the Missoula Veterans Affairs Clinic, 2687 Palmer St. Free. Call 829-5400.

TUESDAY JANUARY 25 You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at Joseph’s Coat, 116 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 549-1419. Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for survivors of domestic violence and

Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. Free to attend. A portion of the proceeds from each pint sold goes to a different organization each week. Visit kettlehouse.com. UM celebrates the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with “Conner, King, Kennedy: Birmingham Icons Tell the Civil Rights Story,” a talk with author Glenn Eskew that begins at 7:30 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-2088.

AGENDA is dedicated to upcoming events embodying activism, outreach and public participation. Send your who/what/when/where and why to AGENDA, c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange, Missoula, MT 59801. You can also e-mail entries to calendar@missoulanews.com or send a fax to (406) 543-4367. AGENDA’s deadline for editorial consideration is 10 days prior to the issue in which you’d like your information to be included. When possible, please include appropriate photos/artwork.

Missoula Independent

Page 12 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Grizzly Athletics This Week TODAY

Inside Letters Briefs Up Front Ochenski Range Agenda News Quirks

I N OTHER N EWS Curious but true news items from around the world

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN - Police said two men making their getaway after an armed robbery in Orange County, Fla., tried to distract authorities from pursuing them by reporting a carjacking. The vehicle they described, however, was the same white Honda Accord they were driving. Law enforcement officers spotted it and arrested the suspects, charging them with filing a false report in addition to the armed robbery charge. (Orlando’s WFTV-TV) During a traffic stop in Great Falls, Mont., Jonothan Ray Gonsalez, who had three outstanding warrants for his arrest, told police his name was Timothy Michael Koop Jr. The officer learned that Timothy Michael Koop Jr. was also wanted and arrested Gonsalez. When he told authorities his real name, they added a charge of issuing a false report. (Great Falls Tribune) Smoking-Class Heroes - Mark Moody, 40, was taking a cigarette break on the window ledge of his second-floor apartment and talking on his cell phone when two New York City police officers stopped and asked if he intended to commit suicide. He explained the ledge was his regular smoking spot and pointed out that he was only 12 feet off the ground and would probably just sprain his ankle if he jumped. The officers insisted he come down anyway. When he refused, they summoned three ambulances and four other patrol cars, broke down Moody’s door and took him to a hospital psychiatric ward for observation. The on-duty psychiatrist interviewed him briefly, concluded he was sane, apologized and released him. Moody, who happens to be a lawyer, filed a $400,000 lawsuit against the city and the officers. (New York Post) New Zealand’s Gambling Commission ruled that a suburban Wellington pub could operate video poker machines in an outdoor area where smoking is allowed. The Department of Internal Affairs had tried to ban the machines, citing a link between smoking and problem gambling. The Gambling Commission said that the ban would have interfered “with the enjoyment of customers carry out lawful activities”—smoking and gambling. (New Zealand’s TV 3) SLIGHTEST PROVOCATION - Police said Anthony Rapoport beat his aunt to death with a baseball bat at the home they shared in Wilmette, Ill., after a series of minor disputes that began when the two argued over the type of doughnuts that Nancee Rapoport, 49, wanted her nephew to buy. Later, she reported he had hidden her cell phone. Police who responded to the call said Anthony Rapoport told them he was “tired of being nagged.” A subsequent call reported seeing Nancee Rapoport’s bludgeoned body on the kitchen floor. (Chicago Tribune)

VS UM Students get in free to all events with a Griz card. Griz Kids Childcare available for all basketball games!: $3 per child. Did you know that Grizzly Athletics offers special ticket prices for groups who come to Griz and Lady Griz Basketball games? To learn about how your office, team, club, or organization can spend an affordable night at Dahlberg Arena, please call 243-2250. For tickets visit the Adams Center Box Office, Griztix.com, or call 243-4051

Thursday, January 20th @ 7pm vs. Idaho State - UM Staff Appreciation Day - Promotions include: The Dairy Queen T-shirt Toss - Halftime Entertainment: Hoops For Hounds – Watch as the Humane Society of Western Montana showcases some of their adoptable pets. - UM Pep Band, Spirit Squad, and Monte

GRIZ-CAT BASKETBALL SATURDAY!! Saturday, January 22nd 2pm

VS

- UM Student Group Competition - Promotions include: Allegiant Airplane Toss, Allegiant Student Giveaway Flight Package, Coca-Cola Mattress Pile, Coca-Cola Tuition Stimulus, and Show for Dough. - Halftime Entertainment: The Super Skippers! - UM Pep Band, Spirit Squad, Monte, and Mo

5pm

Fan Appreciation Tailgate

In appreciation to the best fans in the state, there will be a Griz Fan Appreciation Tailgate in the West Auxiliary Gym of the Adams Center starting at 5pm. Hot dogs and beer will be served for $1 each. (Soda served for free). Gear up to cheer on the Griz right before they take on the Cats!! You must have a men’s Griz-Cat basketball ticket for admission into the tailgate.

7pm

VS

- Promotions include: Allegiant Student Giveaway Flight Package, Karl Tyler $500 Student Tuition Prize, Coca-Cola Dash for Cash, and Show for Dough. - Halftime Entertainment: The UM Spirit Squad! – The UM Cheer Squad and the UM Dance Team will participate together in a special joint halftime performance. - UM Pep Band, Spirit Squad, Monte, and Mo

Police charged Tony Morris, 37, with using a crowbar to beat his brother, Thomas Morris, 41, while they were visiting their mother in Akron, Ohio, after the two argued because Tony thought Thomas had taken a bite out of a piece of chicken and placed it back in the frying pan. Tony tossed the half-eaten piece of chicken at Thomas, who suggested they go outside and handle their dispute like men. Tony grabbed the crowbar and charged after Thomas, who ran outside but slipped on the icy porch. Tony then struck him several times in the head. Their 57-year-old mother, who called 911, admitted to police that she ate the chicken. (The Akron Beacon Journal) Police responding to an assault in Redding, Calif., at 4 a.m. reported that the incident began when a woman saw her neighbor empty a cat litter box in the woman’s front yard. The woman responded by pouring her own cat’s litter box over the neighbor’s car, whereupon the neighbor pushed the woman to the ground. Both women called the police, who said they have a long-standing dispute. (Redding’s The Record Searchlight) SILVER LINING - New York City authorities credit a post-Christmas blizzard with saving the life of Vangelis “Angelos” Kapatos, 26, who tried to commit suicide on Jan. 2 by jumping from his ninth-floor apartment window. Police said he landed on top of a mountain of trash bags that had been piling up since nearly 2.5 feet of snow fell on Dec. 26. (New York Post) FIRST-AMENDMENT FOLLIES - Ohio’s Department of Rehabilitation and Correction changed its rules to shorten the last words of condemned prisoners after Michael Beuke, 48, took 17 minutes to make his final statement before he was executed. He spent the time reciting the rosary, apologizing and saying prayers. “The warden may impose reasonable restrictions on the content and length of the statement,” the new rules state. “The warden may also terminate a statement that he or she believes is intentionally offensive to the witness.” Dale Baich, Beuke’s public defender and a witness at the execution, insisted his client “did not filibuster.” Ohio had allowed unlimited statements after a 1999 lawsuit challenged the existing policy, which permitted only a written statement to be read after an inmate’s death. Kentucky and Washington both impose a two-minute limit. Virginia allows statements but begins the execution a few seconds later, even if the inmate hasn’t finished. (Columbus Dispatch) NO-REST ROOM - Jacqueline Cutright, 70, told police she was in the bathroom of her Akron, Ohio, home around 2 a.m. when a man wearing a clown mask threw open the bathroom door and threatened her with a knife. “I was on the commode,” she said, “so it was kind of a surprise.” The intruder demanded money, took some cash and costume jewelry, then fled in Cutright’s 1991 Ford Escort. He made it to the end of the street before rolling the car twice, according to police responding to Cutright’s 911 call. Officers detained Cory Buckey, 22, who confessed after a knife fell from his pants pocket. (Akron’s WJW-TV) A woman at a rural home in Winona County, Minn., said Nicholas Patrick Hodge, 31, stormed into the home around 2:40 a.m. and demanded property he insisted someone inside owed him. He sat on a toilet in the kitchen and refused to move, according to sheriff’s Investigator Kraig Glover, who said Hodge eventually did leave. Glover added, “I’m not sure why they had a toilet in the kitchen.” (Winona Daily News) REASONABLE EXPLANATION - After Raymond Hartley Jr., 28, was caught using a fake penis-and-bladder device during a court-ordered drug test, he told a judge in Northampton County, Pa., he strapped on the Whizzinator only because probation officers kept making fun of the size of his real penis. Judge Michael Koury Jr. rejected Hartley’s explanation and sentenced him to prison for violating probation. (Allentown’s The Morning Call)

Missoula Independent

Page 13 January 20 – January 27, 2011


“Fighting them in Montana means they have made it through the defenses of all our other compatriots, in Portland and Seattle and Eugene, in Kooskia and Clearwater. Making it all the way to the pass means the last stand is here.” —Rick Bass, The Heart of the Monster

R

oughly a year ago, residents along the pristine roadways between Idaho’s Port of Lewiston and Montana’s Port of Sweetgrass began hearing whispers of an unprecedented, large-scale transportation project by Canadian ExxonMobil subsidiary Imperial Oil. Residents on the Clearwater and Lochsa rivers reported witnessing roadwidening projects on stretches of Highway 12 and raised power lines with little explanation. By the time Imperial Oil hosted its first public meetings in spring 2010 to introduce the particulars of its Kearl Module Transportation Project (KMTP), many people in Idaho were incensed. Folks just over the border in Missoula—where ExxonMobil officials appeared at Meadow Hill School on April 29, 2010, to take comments on their own environmental assessment (EA)— proved equally angry about and confused by the proposal. The KMTP is an almost inconceivable act to anyone who regularly drives Imperial Oil’s proposed route on highways 12, 200, 287 and 89. The largest of the corporation’s 207 oversized loads, destined for the controversial Alberta tar sands mining operation, are three stories tall, longer than a hockey rink and 200,000 pounds heavier

than the Statue of Liberty. The first 200 miles of road snake around tight corners and up steep inclines, frequently bordered on one side by sheer cliffs and on the other by a sudden drop toward the Clearwater and the Lochsa. Once over Lolo Pass, the loads will navigate their way down Reserve Street in Missoula before following the famed Blackfoot River up to Roger’s Pass and the Rocky Mountain Front. The loads will crawl at 10 to 30 miles per hour while taking up both lanes of highway, and all movement is scheduled to occur between the hours of 11 p.m. and 5:30 a.m., presumably when locals are asleep. Shortly after Imperial Oil introduced its proposal, ConocoPhillips came forward with a similar request to transport two coke drums in four oversized pieces from the Port of Lewiston to its refinery in Billings. The request generated a legal firestorm in Idaho last August when 1,700 citizens signed and delivered a petition to the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD). The petition led to a protracted courtroom battle against ITD’s approval of ConocoPhillips’ oversized load permits. News of another high-and-wide proposal—this one from Korean state-run oil corporation Harvest Energy—surfaced late last fall, strengthening

fears of highways 12 and 200 becoming a permanent industrial corridor. Imperial Oil has maintained from the outset that the KMTP promises an estimated $67.8 million in economic activity in Montana—including $11.4 million for road modifications and the construction of 53 new turnouts, and $21.6 million for utility relocations. Gov. Brian Schweitzer embraced the project on that premise, as has Idaho Gov. Butch Otter. Some business owners and local officials in both states welcome the big rigs for the financial boost they might provide; Powell County this month became the first county in Montana to take an official stance in support of the KTMP. Despite efforts to garner some support, opposition to what’s now popularly known as the “heavy haul” has grown fast in a short time. Missoula alone boasts three organizations all dedicated to stopping the big rigs. A sister group in Idaho spearheaded by more than a dozen Highway 12 residents held ConocoPhillips in an expensive legal tangle that lasted six months, and intends to do the same if and when Imperial Oil’s permits are approved. Montana writers Rick Bass and David James Duncan recently released an activist book titled The Heart of the Monster, a

249-page condemnation of Imperial Oil’s bid pulled together in roughly one month. This week, ITD officially issued ConocoPhillips the necessary permits to begin hauling two loads on Feb. 1. The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT), which stated last month that it would follow ITD’s lead, won’t be far behind in issuing its own permits. Opposition leaders in Idaho are now scrambling with their legal counsel, Boisebased Advocates for the West, to decide how they can proceed in court. Their counterparts in Missoula plan to host demonstrations as the loads pass through, and for months have been exploring other options to resist the heavy haul. With ConocoPhillips likely hitting the road in mere days, and with Imperial Oil awaiting its turn, the hopes and fears expressed by fractured communities along the route will soon reach a crescendo. But already, these oversized loads have made an indelible mark along every stretch of the route.

THE PORT OF LEWISTON Port of Lewiston Manager David Doeringsfeld sits in a spacious conference room just a few hundred yards from where dozens of oversized loads are currently stored for two major oil corporations. He

FROM ECONOMIC OPTIMISM TO OUTRIGHT OPPOSITION, BIG OIL’S PROPOSED “HEAVY HAUL” HAS DIVIDED CITIES AND TOWNS ALONG THE ROUTE. story and photos by Alex Sakariassen

A number of the modules Imperial Oil intends to transport from Idaho through Montana now line the edge of the container yard at the Port of Lewiston, awaiting oversized permits from both states. The loads take up two lanes of highway, are longer than a hockey rink and weigh 200,000 pounds more than the Statue of Liberty.

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spins an uplifting tale of job creation and job salvation here in Lewiston resulting directly from the presence of Imperial Oil and ConocoPhillips. Without their business, he says the port would have laid off its container yard personnel this winter. “The river system is down right now for almost a three and a half month period,” Doeringsfeld says. “If it weren’t for the storage and working with Imperial and Conoco right now, we would have had to lay off all the employees with our container yard operations because right now there’s just limited rail service through the port while locks are being repaired on the Columbia-Snake River system…This has allowed us to keep our people employed during that period of time.” Specifically, Doeringsfeld says the business has directly saved five jobs in the port’s container yard. ConocoPhillips’ four shipments–coke drums destined for the company’s refinery in Billings—arrived in late May last year. More than 30 of Imperial Oil’s Erector Set-like modules showed up four months later, and now line the edge of the container yard. The profit for the port from ExxonMobil alone totals $80,000 a month, Doeringsfeld says. “I think the majority of the residents of the area recognize the benefits,” he says. “Activity fosters activity, and when you’re able to bring in a new business such as this, there’s the potential of job creation not just in the short term but in the long term.” Those jobs could include engineers hired to work on electrical components and welders contracted for metal work, he adds. But Doeringsfeld’s story isn’t entirely positive. The number of containers handled by the Port of Lewiston has dropped dramatically over the past decade, as has the amount of wheat transported annually from the country’s grain belt through the port to markets in Asia. Lewiston processed 675,596 containers in 2007, according to the port’s historic shipping report. That total fell to 388,957 in 2010. The decline is mostly attributed to increased use of railways to ports farther west like Seattle, Doeringsfeld says. And with the Columbia and Snake rivers closed through late March for lock repairs on three dams, barge business is at present non-existent. To make up for tumbling revenues, Doeringsfeld has been marketing the port as a gateway to a valuable yet relatively undiscovered oversized shipping corridor—primarily utilizing Highway 12—that ties the Pacific Rim to Canada and the interior United States. “Utilizing this route as a viable alternative has only been recently ‘discovered’ by logistics companies representing companies who have oversized equipment destined for the interiors of Canada and the U.S. Midwest,” the port’s website states in a section titled “Columbia-Snake Corridor and Highway 12: The West Coast Alternative.” “The carbon footprint, transportation, permitting and strategic planning costs of utilizing this route [are] significantly less than shipping through alternate marine routes importing into the United States with the same destination.”

Doeringsfeld adds that in 2009, he and representatives from the Port of Vancouver attended a conference in Calgary with the intention of directly promoting the heavy haul corridor to natural resource development corporations. The Port of Lewiston has effectively incorporated roadways east of its docks in this mass marketing strategy, earning the ire of residents, business owners, agency officials and environmental activists across the U.S. and Canada. “It is my opinion that authorizing these loads will ultimately lead to future additional proposals,” Rick Brazell, Forest Service supervisor for the Clearwater National Forest, stated in a letter to Idaho Transportation Department Director Jim Carpenter in September 2010. “And while one or two projects might be tolerated, more frequent occurrences of such loads are not the experience people traveling, living, working, and recreating on U.S. Highway 12 expect.” Doeringsfeld respects the rights of those opposing the loads to voice their concerns. Yet he questions the actual impact the heavy haul—or the establishment of the permanent oversized corridor he feels could save the port—will have on residents, small businesses and the environment. These loads will pass through by night, he says, and by day will only occupy two turnouts along the entire 202-mile stretch of Highway 12. He acknowledges that a portion of that roadway bears the federal designation of a wild and scenic byway, but believes that designation “does not trump that it’s also a corridor for commerce.” “A lot of times I see in the media stories that it’s a scenic byway that Lewis and Clark [used],” Doeringsfeld says. “Well, let’s go back. Why was Lewis and Clark there in the first place? Thomas Jefferson sent them out on an expedition to find a waterway to promote commerce

The Idaho Transportation Department approved oversized permits this week for the four loads belonging to ConocoPhillips. The coke drums are destined for the corporation’s refinery in Billings, and will utilize scenic highway corridors popularly used by tourists in Idaho and Montana.

east and west in the United States. I’d throw out there that Lewis and Clark would be pretty darn happy that the mission that they were sent out on is helping to come to fruition 100 [sic] years after their expedition.” Highway 12 resident Linwood Laughy, one of the intervenors in the legal battle against the ConocoPhillips loads, doesn’t quite share Doeringsfeld’s historical analysis. Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark nearly died, he says, when the Corps of Discovery crossed the Bitterroot Mountains into Idaho in the winter of 1805—205 years ago. “One of the biggest disappointments of the captains, as well as of the president, was that there was no passage,” Laughy says. “That’s one of the things

Highway 12 follows the Clearwater and Lochsa rivers from the Port of Lewiston to Lolo Pass. This narrow, windy riverside road was designated a scenic byway by the state of Idaho in 1989. It is also one of only 31 AllAmerican Roads recognized by the U.S. Department of Transportation.

that they were looking for, and they discovered it didn’t exist. The country was simply too rugged for that. It seems to me that’s the same situation today.”

HIGHWAY 12 The view from Laughy’s back porch two miles east of Kooskia overlooks an open stretch of the middle fork of the Clearwater River, which Congress selected as one of eight waterways nationwide to include in the 1968 Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. The federal protections promised under the act were supplemented in 1989 when the state of Idaho declared Highway 12 a scenic byway, and complemented even further with an All-American Road designation in 2005. In Laughy’s eyes, the shipments ConocoPhillips and Imperial Oil propose to move along this route fly in the face of those longstanding protections. “I don’t know many places you can go sit at seven in the morning and watch the sun come up on a white sand beach that’s 150 yards long beside a river that’s so clear you can drink out of it, and be the only person on the beach,” Laughy says. “To think that we’re going to sell that out to giant international corporations for nothing? I mean, I wouldn’t sell it for anything, but it seems ludicrous to us. It’s just not right.” Laughy and his wife, Borg Hendrickson, first became aware of the proposed heavy haul in spring 2010. The revelation came when the power went out and Laughy drove down the road to investigate, a story the retiree is fond of telling. “I saw these guys down there putting a new [power] pole in,” Laughy says. “It was a couple hours after the outage, so I pulled over and asked ‘How long before the power goes back on?’ They said pretty soon, and I said, ‘Nice new pole.’ They said, ‘Yeah, we’re raising all the power lines to 30 feet.’” The surprise and confusion generated among locals by the unexplained advanced measures taken to accommo-

Missoula Independent

date the heavy haul prompted Laughy to dig deeper. The more he and Hendrickson learned, Laughy says, the more worried they became. Their reservations about the apparent secrecy of the project eventually prompted them to file a petition last summer against Idaho’s permitting of the ConocoPhillips loads. “The oil companies came in and met with various groups, county commissioners and so forth,” Laughy says of the first string of public meetings early last year. “The message was essentially, ‘Hey, this is going to be good for you. You’re going to like this. It’s just going to be this one time, we’re going to do it at night, you’ll hardly know we’re here and we’ll drop a little money along the way. And besides, we’re not asking.’ There was that undertone. ‘This is a courtesy call. We’re here to inform you.’” Laughy and his fellow concerned citizens near Kooskia banded together as the grassroots opposition movement Fighting Goliath last summer. They’ve worked to collect their own data concerning the dimensions and condition of Highway 12— Laughy spent many days on the road with a tape measure recording road widths—to develop a baseline with which to monitor the loads when they do go through. The greatest fear at present is that one of the oversized shipments will slip off the road and into the river while navigating the hairpin turns along the scenic byway. Concern that such an accident could pose major consequences for fisheries extends from residents to Nez Perce tribal members. As Nez Perce Tribal Attorney Darren Williams says, “If one of these falls in the water, you could potentially have just created an artificial dam on the Lochsa River instantly, which would not be good.” ConocoPhillips stated for nearly nine months that such an accident would require the use of a 500-ton crane trucked in from Spokane (the nearest cranes fitting ConocoPhillips’ need are

Page 15 January 20 – January 27, 2011


WASHINGTON

actually located as far away as Salt Lake tribe “opposes the Kearl Module City). Emmert International changed its Transportation Project.” The Confederated tune last month, however, declaring that Salish and Kootenai Tribes (SKT) issued a any equipment that falls in the river will similar statement last summer. “These areas remain of great imporbe ruined and cut up as salvage. Imperial tance to our people,” SKT Council Oil has yet to issue any similar change. “If a company seeking an over-legal Chairman Bud Moran wrote to MDT permit fails to demonstrate a trip can be Director Jim Lynch. “Our use of them is made safely, without risk to roads and guaranteed by treaty. Federal and state bridges and with minimal disruption to governments bear a trust responsibility traffic and emergency services, the trans- to safeguard those rights. From the portation department has the legal Lochsa River to the Rocky Mountain authority to deny the permit,” ITD says of Front, literally dozens of our traditional placenames line the planned route. Many its ability to deny future proposals. Mammoet, the Dutch corporation of these names are rooted in our creation charged with transporting the 207 mega- stories, reflecting the spiritual imporloads for Imperial Oil, has repeatedly stated tance of these places.” Access to the wild and scenic in public meetings that the odds one of its shipments of equipment will go off the Clearwater and Lochsa rivers may prove a road are slim. Yet Mammoet has experi- short term casualty to the heavy haul, but enced two accidents involving oversized others on Highway 12 worry about the loads just in the last seven months. One long term implications of the Port of Linwood Laughy’s back porch overlooks a pristine stretch of the midImperial Oil shipment went off a highway Lewiston’s push to establish a permanent dle fork of the Clearwater River along Highway 12. He filed a lawsuit near Whiting, Ind., in late July last year, rup- oversized corridor. Steve Pankey, an asso- over Idaho’s approval of the ConocoPhillips shipments last year. turing a fire hydrant and creating low water ciate broker with Idaho Country vision, and dramatically increased the pre- up completely destroying the property base, which will also impact our county pressure and contamination problems for Properties in Kooskia and 30-year veteran miums on real estate upriver of Kooskia. Now Pankey believes those ease- tax base,” Pankey says. “It’s going to be nearby residents for two days. Roughly one of the real estate market, says even the month later, a second Mammoet load went project proposals themselves could ments will be rendered moot by constant like dominoes.” into a roadside ditch in Alberta; the driver, prove devastating for property values on oversized load traffic. “I can’t give you a number, but when MISSOULA who had to be extricated from the vehicle Highway 12. “Real estate values can be impacted these loads start moving along there and by emergency personnel, suffered a broken When Imperial Oil first began releasleg. Both accidents occurred in sunny positively or negatively from just rumors, somebody comes along and looks at ing details of its KMTP, Missoula quickly let alone the actual fact,” Pankey says. “If property up there and I tell them we’ll became a hotbed for opposition to the weather on dry, wide, flat roads. “Crooked Fork, the bridge over these in fact start hauling 200 some have these loads at night and probably oversized loads. Students with the Crooked Fork, has that curve and University of Montana’s Climate has a 12.5 percent slope,” Laughy Action Now, already abreast of the CANADA says, singling out a bridge just a few environmental injustices occurring 214 miles away from Lolo Pass as an at the Alberta tar sands, joined forces 213 example of the challenges big rig with local residents in the hastily Cut Bank handlers will face. “If there’s any ice constructed No Shipments Network. 358 on that at all and you’re not going a Northern Rockies Rising Tide 44 reasonable speed, you just start slid(NRRT), a band of climate change 89 ing. I’ve been in that situation with a activists advocating direct action, Choteau wreck one time. I started to slow simultaneously took up the effort to down and was going to stop, and I stop the KMTP by whatever means Great Falls just felt my rig going sideways. necessary. NRRT leader Nick Stocks 287 15 Those things can only go five miles says the group’s primary role has an hour. What if it’s slick?” been as a “sounding board and 200 Missoula Fighting Goliath successfully receptor” for community action, IDAHO Bonner 93 stalled ConocoPhillips shipments for including conducting some sort of 90 Helena 12 months with repeated petitions to “nonviolent civil disobedience ITD, and already has petitions filed around the trucks.” Lewiston 15 12 against Imperial Oil’s permits in case “People are pissed,” says Zack Kooskia they are approved. The group continPorter, former president of Climate Butte ues to unearth ever more troubling Action Now and current campaign Towns information regarding the big rig proModule Transportation Route coordinator for All Against the Haul, Return Route for Empty Tailers posals. Laughy recently discovered a coalition rooted in the No Return Route for Trailers less than 10 feet wide that the oversized load permits Shipments Network. “I hear every Route Direction approved by ITD for ConocoPhillips day someone new telling me, ‘You State Boundary last November—before his group call me when those trucks are petitioned for a contested hearing— rolling. I’m going to lie down in the include a stipulation that the ship- The proposed route for Imperial Oil’s Kearl Module Transportation Project cov- road.’ It’s amazing how little work ers roughly 500 miles of highway through Idaho and Montana, cutting through ping company, Emmert International, pristine scenic corridors and bisecting small towns in the dead of night on we have to do to recruit endorseis authorized to “barricade the their way to ExxonMobil’s Kearl Oil Sands project in Alberta. ments for our campaign and volunapproved turnouts for exclusive use teers who are willing to hit the for the wide loads up to 24 hours in loads, it will have in my opinion a nega- during the day…that isn’t what they want streets and do door-to-door work. This advance for each move.” Such barricades tive impact on property values…As to come to this area to enjoy and spend issue sells itself, more than anything I’ve would restrict access to public lands for much as half of their value could be lost.” their major dollars for,” Pankey says. ever worked on before.” A portion of that value lies in scenic The same will certainly be true for the recreating public, and could infringe Missoula County residents have on salmon fishing access rights guaran- easements many property owners opted property values all along the route, picked apart and criticized Imperial Oil’s teed to the Nez Perce Tribe under treaty by into after Highway 12 won its scenic Pankey continues. And the losses, which proposal in letters to local media, on byway designation. The easements will only add to a weak real estate market online comment boards and at public the federal government. General concerns over treaty rights and ensured the views from riverside proper- on Highway 12, won’t stop at premiums meetings hosted by MDT. Late last April, cultural and natural resources prompted ties within the wild and scenic corridor for scenic easements. hundreds showed up to press Imperial “Our prices are down anyway from Oil executives and representatives from the Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee would remain protected from future comto issue a resolution in July 2010 stating the mercial development or residential subdi- the highs, but we sure don’t want to end Mammoet on the potential impacts to

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local businesses, energy and sewer infrastructures, emergency services and the environment. They were offered sweeping assurances that life and public safety would not be interrupted, but the promises from MDT and Imperial Oil—at least in the eyes of individuals like Porter—suffered for a lack of adequate details. Even government officials in Missoula recognize the potential detriments the community faces if Imperial Oil and ConocoPhillips are allowed to pass down Highway 12 through Lolo and up Reserve Street to Interstate 90. The Missoula Board of County Commissioners submitted a letter to Tom Martin with MDT’s environmental services bureau last May highlighting its top 10 concerns regarding Imperial Oil’s EA. That list included a point that “the document fails to portray the true economic impact to local businesses, tourism and employment. Especially lacking are the effects to the transportation and timber products industry that are so important to our economy.” The Missoula City Council weighed in as well, voting unanimously in late November to increase the city’s oversized load fee from $100 to $200 per load. Dozens of citizens showed up to the meeting in support of the council’s move. However, as in Idaho, the primary concern among Missoulians has been the precedent these loads could set for a permanent high-and-wide corridor. The route as presently mapped would see oversized traffic utilizing Reserve Street to access the interstate and highways beyond. Lynch began issuing promises last year that Imperial Oil and ConocoPhillips would set no such precedent, but his previous statements in 2009 contradict his current stance. “We are actually setting the stage for a high-wide corridor through the state of Montana to be used, probably for things that we haven’t even imagined yet,” Lynch stated before the Montana Legislature’s Revenue and Transportation Interim Committee in September 2009. “Who would have imagined this would be proposed? Can we only think what might be coming down the line?” Lynch followed that statement by explaining that the proposed route was not MDT’s idea but Imperial Oil’s, and that the potential for a permanent corridor necessitated public involvement. But critics question why it took an additional nine months for details of the KMTP to be presented to the public. Those heading the opposition also feel that the infrastructure preparations required for the ConocoPhillips and Imperial Oil loads suggest years of careful planning. “It’s a testament to the corporate control of government in this country, along the same lines as the Supreme Court decision that allows for unlimited corporate campaign contributions,” Porter says. “Exxon is the wealthiest corporation in the world, and they were clearly hatching this plan years ago.” All Against the Haul focuses a considerable portion of its campaign to outreach, disseminating information in the interests


spawning beds in rivers like the Lochsa and Selway. But as an avid fly-fisherman with a fondness for nearby getaways, his interests in protecting Missoula’s backyard factor greatly into his desire to see the oversized loads stopped. He remembers taking a PBS film crew working on a wild salmon documentary to a 600-foot cliff overlooking a tributary of the Lochsa. “As [the cameraman] is setting up his camera, this four-foot beautiful silver wild female salmon came ripping down into the redd, turned her body sideways so her whole body shown like a knife blade,” Duncan says. “She started using her body to dig a redd for her young. She’s using the backbone of the continent. She’d climbed 4,500 feet and she’d come 650 miles, and it’s so moving to see that. The film crew immediately starts worrying, ‘Well, what if a bear comes out and gets her?’ And I said, ‘Then the bear gets a meal. That’s how it’s supposed to happen.’”

HIGHWAY 200

Local author and environmentalist David James Duncan recently took opposition to the heavy haul up a notch, penning an activist book with fellow writer Rick Bass called The Heart of the Monster. “It’s a mindset that doesn’t value human history, human culture, anything alive,” Duncan says of the oil corporations behind the big rig proposals.

of creating more widespread awareness of the heavy haul in the region and across the country. With that goal in mind, the group decided in its infancy to pull together an activist book outlining not just the sketchy backstory of the KMTP, but the grim details emerging from Imperial Oil’s final destination in Alberta. After significant finagling, Porter and his cohorts managed to sign renowned authors David James Duncan and Rick Bass to the project. All Against the Haul independently published and marketed The Heart of the Monster last month, and Porter says copies of the book have since been purchased online by readers as far away as Seattle and the East Coast. “Montana has marketed itself, and people come here from all over the country in droves because they want to go flyfishing, they want to hike in wild areas, they want to see Glacier, they want to see Yellowstone, they want to drive on twolane highways through beautiful forest and not have the canopy cut from over the highway as has already happened along this route,” says Duncan, a native of the Columbia-Snake River country and longtime wild salmon activist. “They don’t want the old cottonwood trees in the middle of Choteau cut so ExxonMobil can run a 30-foot-tall piece of shit through their town. What the hell?” Duncan’s home, like Laughy’s, rests within plain sight of Highway 12 and the heavy haul. He lives just a few miles up Lolo Creek from Traveler’s Rest, where Lewis and Clark camped both before and after reaching the Pacific Ocean. The ridgeline visible from his writing studio was used by the Nez Perce to bypass Captain C.C. Rawn’s troops at Fort Fizzle

just prior to the Battle of the Big Hole in 1877. Duncan says the entire region is rich in cultural history that major oil corporations seem to have no regard for. “It’s a mindset that doesn’t value human history, human culture, anything alive,” Duncan says. “It’s just money worship, blind oil and money worship. And I don’t think that’ll stand in this state. People in this state still care.” Duncan likens the fight against the heavy haul to the mid-1990s battle against an Arizona copper company’s bid to open a cyanide heap-leach gold mine on the Blackfoot River. The operation came with promises of job creation and economic activity for rural towns outside of Missoula, but environmental activists successfully sponsored a voter initiative in 1998 banning the use of cyanide heapleach mining statewide. Attempts by the mining community to overturn the ban failed in 2004. “Montana was the home of the first cyanide heap-leach gold mine ever, and we have banned that technology from this state,” Duncan says. “Once the people see some of the damages, once we suffer a little more, I think there will be a citizen rebellion that could result. The tar sands is going to get a lot of bad press in the coming decades…In Montana, it could be as simple as, ‘We want to shut this corridor. We don’t want to be the traffic route between the Alberta tar sands and the Pacific Rim nations.’” Much of Duncan’s opposition to the heavy haul stems from his decades of rankling against the four major dams on the lower Snake River, which he says prevent wild salmon from reaching historic

Public fervor regarding the big rigs boiled over once again last Thursday night, this time at St. Anne’s Catholic Church off Highway 200 in Bonner. The details of the KMTP elicited gasps of surprise from many of the roughly 50 locals gathered in the meeting room, revealing that not everyone along the route has heard of Imperial Oil’s plans. Much of the information provided by the three citizen panelists—brought together by the Bonner-Milltown community group Friends of Two Rivers—was identical to that offered by MDT and Imperial Oil representatives nearly a year ago in Missoula, Lincoln and Cut Bank. “Their decisions are not motivated by malice,” panelist and former MDT attorney Robert Gentry said of the three oil corporations seeking oversized permits in Montana. “But neither are they motivated by conscience.”

Bonner marks the separation between ConocoPhillips’ four coke drum loads and the 207 modules proposed by Imperial Oil. From here, ConocoPhillips will head east through central Montana to the corporation’s refinery in Billings. Imperial Oil— and, presumably, Harvest Energy—will roll north and east up Highway 200 on their way to the tar sands near Fort McMurray, Alberta. But regardless of the company, residents at the Bonner meeting scoffed at the notion of turning the road through their town into an industrial corridor. The absence of any representatives from ConocoPhillips or Imperial Oil didn’t speak well for the proposals either. Both respectfully declined invitations to the meeting via e-mail (read aloud to those gathered), with ConocoPhillips adding that they’d been working with MDT on their proposal for three years. The most telling empty chair, however, was that set aside for a representative from MDT. Porter says the department received an invitation to the meeting in early December but failed to send any response. MDT Director Jim Lynch could not be reached for comment by phone or e-mail. Porter hopes to see that silence change as opposition leaders push for several more public meetings along the Blackfoot River. The testimony provided by one of the panelists, University of Montana senior research professor and 40-year economist Steve Seninger, did little to calm public apprehensions. Specifically, Seninger outlined that the job creation pitch Imperial Oil has used is faulty. Most of the 82 fulltime jobs the KMTP will create are lowwage, low-skill positions for traffic flaggers and pilot car drivers. The new work for road maintenance and turnout construction will simply employ contractors who are already working, Seninger said, and the law enforcement escorts called for in the proposal will only require a salary bump for existing state and county employees.

“You don’t have to be an economist to know that’s really not an employment machine,” Seninger said. Seninger compared the limited job creation to the potential job losses the state will face if Imperial Oil rides through. He pointed to research by UM to highlight Montana’s top five tourism attractions, in order: mountains and forests, Yellowstone Park, open space and land, rivers and Glacier Park. Tourism employs 33,000 people statewide, Seninger said, and in Missoula County alone tourism and outdoor recreation account for 3,100 jobs annually. Yet conservation experts have struggled to find any real or potential environmental impacts to the Blackfoot River on which to hang their own opposition. Montana Trout Unlimited Executive Director Bruce Farling says he’s so far been unable to come up with a tangible environmental concern resulting from the heavy haul. “I’ve looked at this thing and I’ve thought about it a lot and I’m having a hard time finding a really significant nexus to, say, fish habitat issues or water quality,” Farling says. “Personally, me and a whole bunch of people think this is a really, really bad idea. But relative to our mission of conservation and restoration of cold water habitats, we’ve got bigger problems.” The main problem commonly accepted among residents of the lower Blackfoot—and Farling—is a change in the culture of Highway 200. Farling says Imperial Oil’s proposal will turn the pristine valley into “an industrial traffic corridor versus what it is now, which is a working landscape with a bunch of recreation.” Greenough resident and official Big Blackfoot Riverkeeper Jerry O’Connell describes the opposition to the heavy haul as “unanimous until you get to Lincoln.” “We’re trading what makes this state great—a spectacular, beautiful country

Imperial Oil and ConocoPhillips claim that by shipping their oversized loads at night, they’ll avoid impacting local businesses. But SuzAnne Miller, co-owner of Lolo’s Dunrovin Ranch, says that’s just not true. During a recent meeting in Bonner, she explained that her ranch offers guests a night at a Forest Service lookout off Highway 12 for a crash-course in astronomy.

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canyon drive with beautiful vistas and water—and we’re allowing it to be degraded and deluded by commerce that is wrong on so many levels,” O’Connell says. Last spring, MDT stated it would issue a decision on Imperial Oil’s environmental assessment for the KMTP in summer 2010. (ITD told the Independent that “an environmental assessment is not required by either federal or Idaho law for the potential issuance of permits to ConocoPhillips or ExxonMobil.”) But Montana is now months overdue with a ruling, a development that has generated mixed feelings among those on the heavy haul route. “I hope one of the reasons is that the officials who are going to make the decision here are thinking a lot harder about it than they would have a year ago,” Farling says, adding that the KMTP is under more of a “microscope” than other road projects due to widespread public concern. “When we signed off on a letter at least to the federal entities involved in this, [we said] we want really good environmental analysis done before there’s approval for this.” The harsh views of Imperial Oil’s heavy haul bid evaporate further up the Blackfoot, specifically in Lincoln. Although the loads will travel straight through the center of town, business owners have welcomed the proposal for the assumed economic boost it will bring. Restaurants and hotels maintain the Mammoet’s rig drivers and shipping personnel will stop in for food and rest while their loads are parked outside of Lincoln. Former Lewis and Clark County Commission Chairman Mike Murray told the Indy last May that the only consternation generated by the big rigs’ midnight rides would be among senior citizens who might have to stay up late to watch them drive by.

“I think that there’s a kind of mentality in Lincoln, Augusta, rural areas that we need all the jobs we can get in Montana,” says Derek Brown, Murray’s successor as commission chairman. “There’s some financial benefit from this, but they have no reason to oppose someone using public roads in a responsible manner that helps other people with jobs.” As for the potential impacts to tourism along the upper Blackfoot and beyond, Brown says the new pullouts constructed for Imperial Oil could actually benefit the visitor experience. “I don’t see the downside,” Brown says. “Maybe I’m not out there looking, but I don’t see a lot of people cruising around at three o’clock in the morning looking at the beauty of the Front.”

THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN FRONT Once over Roger’s Pass, Imperial Oil’s modules will crawl at low speeds through Lewis and Clark, Teton, Pondera and Toole counties, past ranch spreads and farm fields whose pastoral beauty is already dotted with hundreds of oil derricks. They’ll roll through the sleepy Montana towns of Augusta and Choteau—homes to popular summer rodeos and bases of operation for dozens of outfitters—in the dead of night. And it’s here that organized, grassroots opposition falls completely off the heavy haul map. “The general population doesn’t have any concerns,” says Teton County Commissioner Jim Hodgskiss. “There might be a few out there, but as a whole the population is eagerly anticipating them. It’s going to be novel, I think, seeing those big loads come through. And it’s going to be a pretty significant impact to the local economy because one of the places they’re going to park is just south of Choteau here.

Imperial Oil’s last stop in the United States will be Montana’s Port of Sweetgrass. From here, the corporation’s modules will crawl through Alberta to ExxonMobil’s Kearl Tar Sands project—an oil extraction site strip-mining millions of acres of boreal forest.

“There’s only 6,000 people in our county,” Hodgskiss continues, “so anytime you interject a little outside money, it’s got to have a positive effect.” Hodgskiss and Brown both note that representatives from Imperial Oil have proven extremely accommodating when it comes to public concerns in Lincoln and other rural towns. During the first string of public meetings last spring, Brown remembers one Augusta area resident voicing opposition to the location of a heavy haul turnout. Imperial Oil, rather than disturb the individual’s home nearby, opted to move the turnout site farther down the highway. “What I perceive occurring is that there is an opposition to them using the roads because of the end use, and that’s a political statement,” Brown says. “That’s not something I feel we should be involved with at this level.”

Hodgskiss offers a similar hypothesis for the dramatic change in popular sentiment on the east side of the Divide. Imperial Oil has addressed the potential disruption to emergency services by employing highway patrolmen or local sheriff ’s personnel to escort the loads and communicate by radio with ambulances, allowing Mammoet drivers plenty of time to pull over. Imperial Oil will have to trim 21 cottonwood trees in Choteau to accommodate the loads, but Hodgskiss believes “they’ve got a pretty good game plan.” “It’s just a different mindset over here,” he says of the Front. “We have some oil and gas production going now, and it’s kind of my personal feeling that the main opposition to those big loads is not the loads themselves but where they’re going with them, to the tar sands. I’d rather buy my oil coming out of Canada than the Middle East.”

PORT OF SWEETGRASS

The Kearl Module Transportation Project would transport massive modules right through the center of several small Montana towns, including Choteau. Yet county officials claim the public is eager to see these loads roll through, and no organized opposition to the heavy haul has cropped up in these rural communities.

Missoula Independent

Page 18 January 20 – January 27, 2011

There isn’t much at the Port of Sweetgrass but a shuttered café, a dutyfree shop and the Canadian border. A busy afternoon amounts to a handful of Hutterites browsing the shop’s wine and perfume selections. A few hundred yards away, the unassuming line of customs check stations are all that stand between Montana and Imperial Oil’s final destination, Alberta. Officials here are almost mute on the subject of the KMTP, predicting no impacts whatsoever to Imperial Oil’s last stop in America. “The shipments will be processed like any other wide-load, commercial shipment that is transiting through the U.S. to a foreign destination,” says U.S. Customs and Border Protection Area Port Director Daniel Escobedo. “We do not expect port operations to be impacted by these shipments.” But if opposition to the heavy haul dies suddenly at Lincoln, it picks up again inside the Canadian border. Here the tar sands have caused untold devastation to the natural environment as 10.6 million acres of boreal forest are swallowed up by the Kearl Project’s tailings ponds, strip-

mining pits and processing plants. Critics consider the tar sands the single dirtiest method of oil extraction employed today, calling for the separation and dilution of bitumen from sandy soil deposits. The process uses up to four gallons of fresh water to extract a single gallon of crude oil, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), and requires large amounts of natural gas to power the steam-based operation. Environmental groups, First Nations activists and celebrities like film director James Cameron have loudly decried the Kearl Project for years. Endangered fisheries, polluted groundwater and increasing cases of rare cancers among tribal communities downstream from the tar sands on the Athabasca River rank among the top issues raised by Kearl Project opponents. A study conducted by the NRDC estimated that the tar sands tailings ponds could kill as many as 166 million migratory birds over the next 20 to 30 years. Yet the Kearl tar sands still account for roughly 60 percent of Alberta’s total oil production. “Animals are dying, disappearing, and being mutated by the poisons dumped into our river systems,” wrote a group of youth from three indigenous First Nations in a 2009 letter to U.S. Sen. John Kerry. “Once we have destroyed these fragile ecosystems we will have also destroyed our peoples and trampled our treaty rights.” Duncan, Laughy and scores of others question the sustainability of the Port of Lewiston’s dream, not just for its role in accommodating the tar sands, but for the impacts its actions will have on the region’s communities, economies and natural assets. “What’s been good for the Port of Lewiston has been horrible for the entire rest of the Pacific Northwest, and never more so than now,” Duncan says. “Now that the Port of Lewiston is trying to be a conduit connecting the Pacific Rim nations to the tar sands, never has that port so sorely needed to be shut down. That place is a disaster for the rest of the region.” asakariassen@missoulanews.com


dish The international languages of food the

FLASHINTHEPAN My English-Italian dictionary kept letting me down, just when I needed it the most—in front of menus in northern Italy last month. My Italian was good enough that I knew trofie was not truffle, as someone at the table had suggested, and to glean from the waiter that it was in fact a kind of local pasta. I had to order it to understand the narrow, twisted shape of the noodles. Common food words like pasta, pesce, prosciutto and limoncello are easy enough to translate, but how does the novice find meaning in the likes of imbrogliata di carciofi? It turns out to be young, spiny, Ligurian artichokes fried gently in oil with garlic and parsley, then smothered with scrambled eggs and sprinkled with grated parmigiano. But good luck understanding the waiter’s attempts to explain that. The only thing I understood was parmigiano. I recently acquired a book that would have made my Italian travels much more gastronomically satisfying. The Slow Food Dictionary to Regional Italian Cooking contains all the Italian food words that your pocket dictionary is too small to include—as well as some that are so obscure they probably wouldn’t make the cut even if space were no issue, such as roveja: “A small wild legume with a dark brown, reddish or dark green skin, which has been grown for centuries, first records dating back to 1545. Grown on the high slopes of the Monti Sibillini, it used to be, along with lentils, one of the [Umbrian] staples. Though it has almost disappeared from the table, it is highly nutritious and an excellent ingredient in soups and on bread. Ground into flour it can be used to make a type of polenta, which is traditionally served with anchovies.” I find information like this good to know, even if I never get around to using it. In addition to being essential to hungry travelers and enjoyable to armchair epicureans, the book is also an example of something that, in my perfect world, would exist everywhere. Imagine a book along similar lines devoted to the vocabulary of regional American cuisines. The Deep South would hold particular interest for me. It’s the one part of the country where I’ve never spent any time, and I’m completely fascinated by

the cuisine: a mix of African, Native American, French, Spanish and Caribbean. I would certainly devour a dictionary of southern food if I had one. Ideally such a volume would not only explain the words, but also give advice on where to find what they represent. In the town of Espanola in northern New Mexico, for example, there are places where you can find chicos—oven-dried sweet corn kernels—on the menu. I like them in soup, like

Bernice’s Bakery 190 South 3rd West • 728-1358 Nothing says Bernice’s like the cold, grey months of January. Come in, sit quietly, or share a table with friends in our warm and cozy dining room. Enjoy a cup of joe, a slice of cake, or a breakfast pastry as the sun beams in through our large glass windows. Want a healthy lunch? Come by in the afternoon and try a salad sampler or Bernice’s own Garlic Hummus Sandwich on our Honey Whole Wheat Bread. Bless you all in 2011, Bernice. Biga Pizza 241 W. Main Street 728-2579 Biga Pizza offers a modern, downtown dining environment combined with traditional brick oven pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, specials and desserts. All dough is made using a “biga” (pronounced bee-ga) which is a time-honored Italian method of bread making. Biga Pizza uses

coupon & receive

2 for 1

entrée

by ARI LeVAUX

of equal or lesser value

You’re eating the years of trial and error that went into determining that the toast of day-old bread is best for this dish. I’d never heard of lesser calamint, aka mountain mint or basil thyme. It’s named after the Greek Kalos, the fabled king of serpents whose glance was fatal. That doesn’t exactly make me want to put it on my fish, but the herb is widely known as a medicinal, and reportedly tastes like a cross between oregano and mint. Seeds

expires 2/6/2011

www.thinkfft.com Mon-Thurs 7am - 8pm • Fri & Sat 7am - 4pm Sun 8am - 8pm • 540 Daly Ave • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe. Across from the U of M campus.

Photo by Ari LeVaux

posole, and baked with pinto beans. The celebration of and obsession with regional cuisines and variations is a big part of what makes European food so interesting to me. Consider Opi ca’ nipitedda: “Bream with lesser calamint. Traditional recipe of the fishing village of Ognina [on-yeen-na] in the province of Catania. The fish are stewed in a covered pot with oil, onion, garlic, potatoes, sprigs of lesser calamint and water. Eaten with toasted day-old bread. Sicily.” When you eat a dish like this, you’re eating Sicilian culture and history, the sweat of shepherds gathering lesser calamint in the hills, of fishermen catching bream, and of farmers digging potatoes.

are available online, and I’m going to try some. Another herb I’d never heard of before flipping through this book is orapa, known as Good King Henry in English. Orapa is a relative to quinoa and lambs-quarter, and is sometimes described as a perennial version of its close cousin spinach. In orapi e fagioli it’s cooked with beans, oil, garlic, and chili pepper, and served with pieces of bread and grated pecorino Romano cheese. It’s also eaten in frittatas. Since it does well in shade, Good King Henry sounds like a good candidate for a certain shaded dirt patch by our house. If we can get some going I’ll cook it with some pinto beans, and maybe some

local products, the freshest produce as well as artisan meats and cheeses. Featuring seasonal menus. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Beer & Wine available. $-$$

Outdoor Patio. Parties and special events can be enjoyed in the Bison Room. Hours: Tavern hours Monday-Saturday 3pm11pm, Sunday 3pm-10pm . Dining Room hours MondaySaturday 5pm-10pm, Sunday 4pm-9pm. $$-$$$

LISTINGS $…Under $5 $–$$…$5–$15 $$–$$$…$15 and over

Bring in this

Black Cat Bake Shop 2000 West Broadway (next to Noodles Express) 542-9043 Come try Missoula’s newest coffee house & bakery. Try our signature buttery morning buns, scones, cinnamon rolls, huckleberry coffee cake, & organic artisan breads. We also offer a variety of cakes, French pastries, & full coffee menu. (Banquet room available for morning meetings.) Tues - Sat. $-$$ Blue Canyon Kitchen 3720 N. Reserve 541-BLUE (adjacent to the Hilton Garden Inn) www.bluecanyonrestaurant.com We offer creatively-prepared American cooking served in the comfortable elegance of their lodge restaurant featuring unique dining rooms. Kick back in the Tavern; relish the cowboy chic and culinary creations in the great room; visit with the chefs and dine in the kitchen or enjoy the fresh air on the

The Bridge Pizza Corner of S. 4th & S. Higgins Ave. 542-0002 A popular local eatery on Missoula’s Hip Strip. Featuring handcrafted artisan brick oven pizza, pasta, sandwiches, soups, & salads made with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Missoula’s place for pizza by the slice. A unique selection of regional microbrews and gourmet sodas. Dine-in, drive-thru, & delivery. Open everyday 11 to late. $-$$

Bring in this coupon & receive:

2 for 1 entrée of equal or lesser value expires 1/30/11

Butterfly Herbs 232 N. Higgins 728-8780 Celebrating 38 years of great coffees and teas. Truly the “essence of Missoula.” Offering fresh coffees, teas (Evening in Missoula), bulk spices and botanicals, fine toiletries & gifts. Our cafe features homemade soups, fresh salads, and coffee ice cream specialties. In the heart of historic downtown, we are Missoula’s first and favorite Espresso Bar. Open 7 Days. $

Missoula Independent

Page 19 January 20 – January 27, 2011


the

dish

Doc’s Gourmet Sandwiches 214 N. Higgins Ave. • 542-7414 Doc’s is an extremely popular gathering spot for diners who appreciate the great ambiance, personal service and generous sandwiches made with the freshest ingredients. Whether you’re heading out for a power lunch, meeting friends or family or just grabbing a quick takeout, Doc’s is always an excellent choice. Delivery service within a 3 mile radius. Family Dental Group Southgate Mall • 541-2886 What is the difference between a cleaning and scaling? A cleaning is for routine prevention and removes material at or above the gum line. Scaling goes below the gum line. This is treatment, not prevention because the materials that were above the gum line are now causing disease below the gum line and these materials have to be removed. Food For Thought 540 Daly Ave. • 721-6033 Missoula’s Original Coffeehouse/Cafe located across from the U of M campus. Serving breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Also serving cold sandwiches, soups, salads, with baked goods and an espresso bar till close. WE DELIVER On Campus & to the area between Beckwith, Higgins & 5th Street. Delivery hours: M-F 11-2. $-$$ Good Food Store 1600 South 3rd West • 541-FOOD Our Deli features all natural made-to-order sandwiches, soup & salad bar, olive & antipasto bar, fresh deli salads, hot entrees, rotisserie-roasted cage free chickens, fresh juice, smoothies, organic espresso and dessert. Enjoy your meal in our spacious seating area or at an outdoor table. Open every day 7am - 10pm $-$$

Iza Asian Restaurant 529 S. Higgins Ave. • 830-3237 www.izarestaurant.com All our menu items are made from scratch, featuring dishes from Thailand, Japan, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, and Malaysia. Extensive tea menu. Missoula's Original Bubble Teas. Beer, Wine and Sake available. Join us in our Asian themed dining room for a wonderful IZA experience. Jazz Wednesdays starting at 7pm. Lunch 11:30-3:00, Happy Hour 3-6, Dinner 5 - close. $-$$ Jakers 3515 Brooks St. www.jakers.com Every occasion is a celebration at Jakers. Enjoy our two for one Happy Hour throughout the week in a fun, casual atmosphere. Hungry? Try our hand cut steaks, small plate menu and our vegetarian & gluten free entrees. For reservations or take out call 721-1312. $$-$$$ Korean Bar-B-Que & Sushi 3075 N. Reserve • 327-0731 We invite you to visit our contemporary Korean-Japanese restaurant and enjoy it’s warm atmosphere. Full Sushi Bar. Korean bar-b-que at your table. Beer and Wine. $$-$$$ Oil & Vinegar Southgate Mall • 549-7800 Mon.-Sat. 10:00 AM-9:00 PM Sun. 11:00 AM6:00 PM. With a visit to Oil & Vinegar, you will discover an international selection of over 40 estate-produced oils & vinegars suspended in glass amphora-shaped containers on a dramatic backlit wall. Guests can sample the varieties and select from various shapes & sizes of bottles to have filled with an “on-tap” product of choice.

Hob Nob on Higgins 531 S. Higgins • 541-4622 Come visit our friendly staff & experience Missoula’s best little breakfast & lunch spot. All our food is made from scratch, we feature homemade corn beef hash, sourdough pancakes, sandwiches, salads, espresso & desserts. We also offer catering. www.justinshobnobcafe.com MC/V $-$$

Orange Street Food Farm 701 S. Orange St. 543-3188 Don’t feel like cooking? Pick up some fried chicken, made to order sandwiches, fresh deli salads, & sliced meats and cheeses. Or mix and match items from our hot case. Need some dessert with that? Our bakery makes cookies, cakes, and brownies that are ready when you are. $-$$

Iron Horse Brew Pub 501 N. Higgins • 728-8866 www.ironhorsebrewpub.com We're the perfect place for lunch, appetizers, or dinner. Enjoy nightly specials, our fantastic beverage selection and friendly, attentive service. Chilly weather is here. Stop in, warm up, & stay awhile! No matter what you are looking for, we'll give you something to smile about. $$-$$$

Paul’s Pancake Parlor 2305 Brooks • 728-9071 (Tremper’s Shopping Center) Check out our home cooked lunch and dinner specials or try one of 17 varieties of pancakes. Our famous breakfast is served all day! Monday is all you can eat spaghetti for $8.50. Wednesday is turkey night with all of the trimmings for $7.75. Eat in or take-out. M-F 6am-7pm, Sat/Sun 7am-4pm. $–$$.

Photo by Cathrine L. Walters

HAPPIESTHOUR The Missoula Club Atmosphere: Arguably one of Missoula’s goto watering holes for University of Montana football fans, the Mo Club boasts wall upon wall of Griz memorabilia. No surprise really that the bar has inherited so much material; the Mo Club’s been around since 1890. If you want a spirited game day experience, or the chance to rub shoulders with past and present Griz players, this is the place to be. Who’s serving: Jace Palmer is a familiar face in these parts. Besides his Mo Club career, he played defensive end for the Griz from 2005 to 2009. He racked up 5.5 sacks and an interception in his final season, making him the perfect bartender for the regular lunch crowd of shop-talking football fans. What you’re drinking: “We’re pretty meat and potatoes around here,” Palmer says, noting that the bar doesn’t have any happy hour special. Nor, he adds, do they have much in the way of a specialty mixer. True to the football den feel, most folks drink bottled domestics from the old-school wood-and-glass cooler. The Mo Club was, however, among the first local bars to offer microbrews on tap back in the 1990s. If it’s a real cold one you’re looking for, it also has milkshakes for $4 and malts for $4.25. What you’re eating: The fabled Mo Club burger is a Missoula staple, with Independent

Photo by Alex Sakariassen

readers consistently voting it the best in Missoula. This place cooks the onion right into the patty for extra flavor. And that special horseradish cheese? Don’t get us started. Claim to fame: Never mind the state big wigs like Gov. Brian Schweitzer and Sen. Jon Tester that occasionally stop in here. Back in summer 2008—when his wife Hillary was running for president—Bill Clinton made an unannounced appearance at the Mo Club. He tried the burger, but went with a beverage choice that must have puzzled regulars: a Diet Pepsi. Where to find it: 139 W. Main St., about half a block off Higgins. —Alex Sakariassen Happiest Hour celebrates western Montana watering holes. To recommend a bar, bartender or beverage for Happiest Hour, e-mail editor@missoulanews.com.

d o w n t o w n

Sushi Bar & Japanese Bistro

When we say Not just Sushi! we mean it. 403 North Higgins Ave • 406.549.7979 www.sushihanamissoula.com Missoula Independent

Page 20 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Pearl Café & Bakery 231 E. Front St. • 541-0231 Country French specialties, bison, elk, trout, fresh fish daily, delicious salads and appetizers. Breads and desserts baked in house. Three course bistro menu with wine $30, Tues. Wed. Thurs. nights, November through March. Extensive wine list, 18 wines by the glass, local beers on draft. Reservations recommended for the warm and inviting dining areas. Go to our website Pearlcafe.us to check out nightly specials and bistro menus, make reservations or buy gift certificates. Open Mon-Sat at 5:00. $$-$$$ Red Robin 2901 Brooks Street • 830-3170 www.redrobin.com Half the price, twice the fun! Halfy Hour at the Southgate Mall Red Robin®! Half price bar drinks Monday – Friday, 4-6 p.m. and Monday – Saturday, 9-10 p.m. Enjoy a drink with one of our insanely delicious Gourmet Burgers, Bottomless Steak Fries. Or, snack on one of our shareable starters with friends! $-$$ SA WAD DEE 221 W. Broadway • 543-9966 Sa-Wa-Dee offers traditional Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Choose from a selection of five Thai curries, Pad Thai, delicious Thai soups, and an assortment of tantalizing entrees. Featuring fresh ingredients and authentic Thai flavors-no MSG! See for yourself why Thai food is a deliciously different change from other Asian cuisines. Now serving Beer and Wine! $-$$ Scotty’s Table 131 S. Higgins Ave. • 549-2790 Share a meal within the warm elegance of our location at the historic Wilma Building. Enjoy our seasonal menu of classic Mediterranean and European fare with a contemporary American twist, featuring the freshest local ingredients. Serving lunch Tues-Sat 11:00-2:30, and dinner Tues-Sun 5:00-Close. Beer and Wine available. $$-$$$ Sean Kelly’s 130 West Pine • 542–1471 Located in the heart of downtown. Open for Lunch and Dinner, featuring a Sat.-Sun. Brunch 11-2pm. Great Fresh food With Huge Portions. Featuring international & Irish pub fare as well as locally produced specials. FULL BAR, BEER, WINE, MARTINIS. $-$$ NOT JUST SUSHI Sushi Hana Downtown offering a new idea for your dining experience. Meat, poultry, vegetables and grain are a large part of Japanese cuisine. We also love our fried comfort food too. Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner. Corner of Pine & Higgins. 549-7979. $$–$$$ Ten Spoon Vineyard + Winery 4175 Rattlesnake Drive • 549-8703 www.tenspoon.com Made in Montana, award-winning organic

wines, no added sulfites. Tasting hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 5 to 9 pm. Soak in the harvest sunshine with a view of the vineyard, or cozy up with a glass of wine inside the winery. Wine sold by the flight or glass. Bottles sold to take home or to ship to friends and relatives. $$ Uptown Diner 120 N. Higgins • 542-2449 Step into the past at this 50's style downtown diner. Breakfast is served all day. Daily Lunch Specials. All Soups, including our famous Tomato Soup, are made from scratch. Voted best milkshakes in Missoula for 14 straight years. Great Food, Great Service, Great Fun!! Sun Wed 8-3pm, Thurs - Sat 8-8pm $-$$ Westside Lanes 1615 Wyoming • 721-5263 Visit us for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner served 8 AM to 9 PM. Try our homemade soups, pizzas, and specials. We serve 100% Angus beef and use fryer oil with zero trans fats, so visit us any time for great food and good fun. $-$$

BITTERROOT Burger Shack 205 Main St., Stevensville 777-2370 Come take a bite out of our 1/2 pound big & beefy burgers. The only burger joint in Missoula and the Bitterroot serving 100% Certified Angus Beef, hand pattied, charbroiled and made to order. We have over a dozen mouth watering specialty burgers to choose from, like the Inside Out, stuffed with creamy gorgonzola cheese and fresh chopped bacon. Or the Philly Cheesesteak made with 100% Certified Angus top sirloin - touted to be the best outside of Philly! It's not just a burger, it's a destination. The Burger Shack is open Monday - Saturday, 11:00am to 8:00pm. Also serving beer & wine. Orders to go 7772370. $-$$ Spice of Life 163 S. 2nd St., Hamilton • 363-4433 Spice of Life welcomes you to the Bitterroot’s best locavore dining experience. Serving up fresh and fun food in a conscientious manner. For lunch try one of our hand made burgers from Lolo Locker or one of our fabulous fresh salads. Dinner selections include natural beef which contains no growth hormones or antibiotics ever, sustainable seafood selections and pasta dishes made from Montana wheat from Pasta Montana. Quench your thirst with beer from right here in Hamilton or try one of our reasonably priced yet fantastic wine selections. Children’s menu available. No reservations. So come as you are to Spice of Life! 163 S 2nd St. Hamilton, MT. Lunch: Mon - Fri 11:00 to 2:00 Dinner: Wed - Sat 5:00 to 9:00. 363-4433.

Januar y

MISSOULA'S BEST

COFFEE SPECIAL

COFFEE

Butterfly House Blend $9.95/lb Missoula’s Best Coffee

BUTTERFLY HERBS Coffee, Teas & the Unusual

232 N. HIGGINS AVE • DOWNTOWN

IN OUR COFFEE BAR

BUTTERFLY 232 NORTH HIGGINS AVENUE DOWNTOWN

Open 7 Days a Week 11:30 am - 9:00 pm 3075 N. Reserve Street Missoula • 327-0731

Mondays & Thursdays - $1 SUSHI (all day) (Not available for To-Go orders)

Daily TEMPURA Special - $1.25 for 2 pieces - 11:30am-2:30pm Tuesdays - LADIES’ NIGHT, $5 Sake Bombs & Special Menu

Missoula Independent

Page 21 January 20 – January 27, 2011


8

days a week

Arts & Entertainment listings January 20 – January 27, 2011

THURSDAY January

20

If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK. End your afternoon with a fine glass of fermented grape juice when the Missoula Winery hosts its tasting room from 4–7 PM at the winery, 5646 W. Harrier. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 830-3296 and visit missoulawinery.com. UM’s Dance Program presents an informal showing of Susan Marshall & Company’s Cloudless Suites, plus a new work in progress by company member Luke Miller, from 2–4 PM in Room 005 of UM’s PARTV Center. Free. Call 243-2832.

nightlife Sip on some well fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 549-8703. Raise your glass in honor of the Missoula Art Museum’s 39th Benefit Auction Exhibition during Artini: Art & Soul, which runs from 5:30–9 PM at the museum, 335 N. Pattee St., and features 102 works of art on display, a panel discussion on contemporary art at 6 PM from Karen Shimoda, Matt Hamon and Gretel Stoudt, plus music by Pterodactyl Plains and Churchmouse, and an art project with Josh Quick. Free. Call 728-0447 and visit missoulaartmuseum.org. John Floridis halts the impending war on flouride and Florida when the singer/ songwriter plays at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT.

photo by Chad Harder

The Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave., on Fri., Jan. 21, at 7:30 PM. $15/$7.50 students. A gala performance occurs Jan. 22 at 6:30 PM, and nightly performances continue Jan. 26–29 and Feb. 2–5 at 7:30 PM. Visit mtactors.com.

Butter up your folk biscuits when locals Butter plays indie folk during the Top Hat’s “Artists-InResidence” family-friendly concert series every Thu. this month from 6–8 PM. Free. Families First presents the talk “Big Brains, Bad Grades: Understanding Underachievement,” which meets at 6:30 PM at Chief Charlo Elementary School, 5600 Longview Drive. Free. Call 721-7690 and visit familiesfirstmontana.org. Take some time out to care for yourself when The Women’s Club, 2105 Bow St., hosts a free self-care workshop, starting at 6:30 PM. Free. Call 728-4410. Get your literary fix during the Missoula Public Library’s Third Thursday Book

Group, which meets to discuss The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon, starting at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Leisure suit plus beer goggles not required: Trivial Beersuit, Missoula’s newest trivia night for the layperson, begins with sign ups at 7:30 PM and trivia shortly thereafter at the Brooks and Browns Lounge, at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. Free. Includes prizes like a $50 bar tab, and trivia categories that change weekly. E-mail Katie at kcgt27@gmail.com. Bowling and karaoke go together like nihilists and crude coated candy bars during Solid Sound Karaoke at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING.

Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip hop, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week when Dead Hipster DJ Night gets booties bumpin’ at 9 PM. $3. Women give a thumbs up to spirits during Ladies’ Night at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S., which features half-off drinks for women and occurs this and end your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 21, to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367.

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Cinemas, Live Music & Theater The King's Speech (R) Sat(1/22) Matinees at 1 & 3:10 Evening at 7 ONLY Sun(1/23) Matinee at 1 ONLY Evening at 7 ONLY Black Swan Nightly at 7 & 9 Sat(1/22) Matinees at 1 & 3 Evening at 9:10 ONLY Sun(1/23) Matinee at 3:10 ONLY Evening at 9:10 ONLY

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Missoula Independent

Page 22 January 20 – January 27, 2011

FULL BAR AVAILABLE 131 S. Higgins Ave. Downtown Missoula 406-728-2521

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every Thu. starting at 9 PM at the bar. Free. Call 251-5402. Work your mind and your tentacles on the dance floor during Synergy in the Zoo!, a DJ night presented by the folks that brought you the Synergy Music Gathering featuring an array of electronic styles from Mirror Minds, Rustallion, 35th Octave & Uttara Praana, Dagga and Logistalone, starting at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Also includes visuals by Kameon/Flowfiles. Save a spot in your sleeping bag for the afterparty when the UF Okies play the Sunrise Saloon & Casino, 1100 block of Strand Ave., at 9 PM. Free. Call 728-1559. Women celebrate their womanhood with cheap libations and a bit of karaoke during ladies’ night and live karaoke with Party Trained at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, this and every Thu. at 9:30 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3277. Put your jazz hands up for Haiti during a Haiti Benefit Concert with music by Jazz Exposure, which begins at the Top Hat at 10 PM. Cost TBA. Cross your karaoke sword with others during Combat DJ and Karaoke nights, this and every Thu. at the Press Box, 835 E. Broadway St., at 10 PM. Free. Nate Hegyi, lead singer/songwriter of Wartime Blues, keeps the folk and Americana flowing free when he plays with a rotating cast of friends this and every other Thu. at the Old Post, 103 W. Spruce St., at 10 PM. Free.

FRIDAY January

21

Families can get help narrowing their search for quality child care, and find out if they qualify for assistance, with Child Care Assistance, which is offered by Child Care Resources from 8 AM–5 PM Mon.-Fri. at its office, on the lower level of 105 E. Pine St. Free. Call 728-6446 and visit childcareresources.org. Head down to Break Espresso, 432 N. Higgins Ave., every Fri. to catch a “Clarity Book Meeting with Great Freedom/Balanced View: Clarity in Everyday Life,” which begins at 10 AM. Free. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info.

The Missoula Public Library hosts a preschool storytime geared toward children 3–6 years old every Fri. at 10:30 AM. This week, The Mane Squeeze by Shelly Laurenston. Just kidding. (Did I need to tell you that?) Free. Call 721-BOOK. Families First presents the program “Pizza for Parents,” a lunchtime chat for parents with free pizza that this week features the topic “What is Self-Esteem?” and begins at 11:30 AM at Lewis & Clark Elementary School, 2901 Park St. Free. Call 721-7690 to register. Do your part to help run an important cultural festival by becoming a volunteer for the 2011 Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, which occurs Feb. 11–20 at the Wilma Theatre. Visit bigskyfilmfest.org/bsdff/festival/volunteers for a list of volunteer positions, and more info. E-mail volunteer@bigskyfilmfest.org with questions. Southgate Mall, 2901 Brooks St., hosts “Give Kids a Smile Day,” an event where local volunteer dentists from the Montana Dental Society offer free dental screenings and dental work to low-income children, from 4:30–6 PM. Screenings will occur in the mall’s community room, located in the corridor near PetStop. Call 549-2778.

nightlife Say howdy to your aesthetically inclined neighbors when The Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main St. in Polson, presents an opening reception for Welcome Neighbors!, an exhibit featuring work by members of the Hot Springs Artist Society, with the opening from 5–7 PM. Free. Visit sandpiperartgallery.com. Slip something stringy into your night when Nate Biehl and Caroline Keys of Broken Valley Roadshow play acoustic and electric instruments, perhaps with a drum machine, during the Top Hat’s “Family Friendly Friday” concert series, from 6–8 PM. Free, all ages. Just say yes to the grape juice mafia when Richie Reinholdt performs at the Ten Spoon Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive, at 6 PM. Free. Call 549-8703. Party down when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents The Blue Dragon Gala, an opening night party for the Rep’s performance of Willian Inge’s Bus Stop that begins at 6:30 PM in the lobby of UM’s PARTV Center with appetizers and cocktails, followed by the

performance at 7:30 in the Montana Theatre. Then, you’ll head back to the lobby for music by Full Grown Men and a performance by aerialist Holly Rollins. $30 for the entire night. Call 243-6809 to RSVP, or visit montanarep.org to purchase tickets online. (See Spotlight in this issue.) You’re a cheap date, not a cheapskate: The Missoula Public Library hosts another installment of its cheap date movie night, which screens Salt at 7 PM at the library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Enter from the parking lot side of the building. Call 721-BOOK and visit missoulapubliclibrary.org. Witness the talents of a piano tickling master when pianist Bill Charlap performs as The Bill Charlap Trio, starting at 7 PM at DalyJazz, 240 Daly Ave. $45. Reservations required by e-mailing dalyjazz@gmail.com. Visit dalyjazz.com. Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt, after a car crash kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. Witness the life of infamous Nigerian artist and activist Fela Anikulapo Kuti with a mix of dance, theater and music when Morris Productions presents an encore screening of the National Theatre Live’s performance of Fela!, starting at 7:30 PM at the Roxy Theater, 718 S. Higgins Ave. $16/$14 seniors/$11 students. Get tickets at Rockin Rudy’s and online at morrisproductions.org. Jazz it up for UM’s Jazz Program when it hosts its “Quick Draw” Fundraiser, which features art that will be created on site by several artists, plus music by the UM Combo I and UM Jazz Band I, with the music starting at 7:30 PM, followed by a live auction for the art at 9, all at St. Anthony Parish, 217 Tremont St. $10/$5 students and seniors. A silent auction for other artworks occurs throughout the night. Call 243-5071. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Soothe your aching paws with the smooth

Missoula Independent

plucking of Trapline, which plays folk and bluegrass at 8 PM at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but pass-thehat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. When Copper Was King doesn’t want you to stop believing in that coppery feeling when it plays reggae with funk and soul elements, starting at 8 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $7. DJ Kris Moon also plays. Drain the ooze out of your sneakers when Party Trained rocks your toes with a variety of tunes at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Be thankful the freedom to speak includes the freedom to sing when you sidle up to the mic at karaoke night at the VFW, kicking off at 9 PM. Free. Shake it like a salt shaker when DJ Sanchez cranks out the jams at The Office Bar, 109 W. Main St. in Hamilton, every Fri. at 9 PM. Free. Call 363-6969. It’s time for an all-request video dance party to celebrate the week’s end: Feelgood Friday featuring hip hop video remixes with The Tallest DJ in America at 9 PM at The Broadway Sports Bar and Grill, 1609 W. Broadway. Free. Call 543-5678. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sweet at Karaoke by Figmo at Jokers Wild Bar and Restaurant, 4829 N. Reserve St., which features “Brain Strain” trivia and “Scaryoke Karaoke” and begins at 9 PM. Free. Spit the grit out of your mouth and feel the bass vibes in your thighs when San Jose’s NiT GRiT plays dubstep at 9 PM at the Badlander. $5/$10 for those under age 21. Portland’s Enzymes and locals Lui and Ebola Syndrome open. (See Noise in this issue.) House of Quist snaps your gingersnaps with a hearty helping of rock when it plays with openers Victory Smokes and Treehouse, at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. Enjoy a shred-a-riffic snowboard movie and a band that blends up hip-hop, jazz and neo-soul when the Top Hat hosts a set by Boulder, Colo.’s Salem, along with a premiere screening of the film Tailgate Alaska, starting at 9:30 PM. $7. I’ll show you my vulcan grip if you show me your version of the sip and dip when Zeppo MT plays the Union Club at 9:30 PM. Free. Scratch your way to the top of the social ladder when The Tom Cats play classic rock hits at 9:30 PM at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H. $2.

Page 23 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Gyrate that pelvis like you mean it when Zoo City plays smokin’ hot rock at 9:30 PM at the High Spirits Club & Casino in Florence, 5341 Hwy. 93 N. Free. Call 273-9992. Stick that flea collar on the man just ‘cause you can when Blue Collar plays at 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Salon & Casino, 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Don’t be a born-again shame monger when No Shame plays rock at 9:30 PM at The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. Free. Call 728-1559. He lives to spin: DJ Dubwise just can’t stop the dance tracks once they start at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799.

SATURDAY

22

January

Those suffering from illness or loss can find solace during one of Living Art Montana’s Creativity for Life workshops at the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., at 10:30 AM. This week features the program “Paper Silhouettes” with Beth Jaffe. Free, but donations are appreciated but not expected. Register by calling 5495329 or visit livingartofmontana.org. Habitat for Humanity of Missoula announces that its dedicating its 42nd home in Missoula from 10:30 AM–noon at 4206 Deveraux Place, in the Windsor Park subdivision. Free. Call 549-8210. Your bedtime tales of college-age debauchery fall a little short of the mark. Family Storytime offers engaging experiences like stories, fingerplays, flannel-board pictograms and more at 11 AM at the Missoula Public Library. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Travelers’ Rest State Park, one half-mile west of Lolo on Hwy. 12,

presents a talk with Salish and Kootenai tribal member Tim Ryan on geological events that are referenced in Salish mythology starting at 11 AM at the Holt Museum and Visitor Center at the park. $3 per adult/free for children under age 18 and all current Travelers’ Rest Preservation and Heritage Association members. Visit travelersrest.org or call 273-4253. Tile it up when the Missoula Urban Demonstration Project (MUD), 629 Phillips St., presents its “Basic Bathroom Tiling” workshop, which meets from noon–3 PM. $20/$10 members. Call 721-7513 to RSVP and visit mudproject.org. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets.

nightlife Sip on some well fermented spirits when Ten Spoon Vineyard and Winery hosts its wine tasting room, which runs from 5–9 PM, with last call at 8:30 PM, at the winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Drive. Free to attend, but the wine costs you. Call 549-8703. Put your horns down and your smiley face on when singer/songwriter John Floridis plays the Blacksmith Brewery, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0608. Quit dancing with scissors and rock out to a rock band with a psychedelic influence when Voodoo Horseshoes plays a CD release party at 6 PM at the Bitter Root Brewery, 101 Marcus St. in Hamilton. Free. Call 363-PINT. (See Noise in this issue.) Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt, after a car crash kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’

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Missoula Independent

Page 24 January 20 – January 27, 2011

Class of the week: 1000 Hands Buddha Qigong for Health Care Providers with Libby McIntyre 9:30-Noon, Friday, January 28 and Friday, February 4. This is a seated Liu Dong healing qigong form that uses flowing and powerful hand movements to open the heart energy and quiet the mind. It allows the student to find calmness and balance helping to heal body, mind and spirit.

Course cost: $85.00 Sliding scale avalable for all classes sponsored by Red Willow Learning Center. For a complete listing of our classes and to learn more about our project, please visit www.redwillowlearning.org or contact Kathy Mangan at 406-721-0033. 825 W. Kent St.

Theatre presents a gala performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, starting at 6:30 PM with appetizers and drinks, and the performance at 7:30, all at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $15/$7.50 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. Enjoy a game of b-ball and support a local no-kill animal adoption center when UM presents a 50/50 raffle for AniMeals during the UM vs. Montana State men’s basketball game, which begins at 7 PM at the Adams Center. Visit griztix.com for ticket info. Be one with other dudes when the Wilma Theatre hosts “The Dude Abides–A Lebowski Fest,” a celebration of the Coen Brothers film The Big Lebowski with a 35mm print screening of the film, a live band, contests including a “Maude vaginally inspired live painting,” drink specials and other shenanigans, starting at 7:30 PM. $5. Drain the ooze out of your sneakers when Party Trained rocks your toes with a variety of tunes at 8 PM at the Eagles Lodge, 2420 South Ave. W. Free. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Break out of the cellar and hang with some boyz when The Basement Boyz play jazz at 8 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $5. Call 830-3296. Keep your belt on and your head high when the Belton Blues Band plays at 8 PM at the Symes Hotel, 209 Wall St. in Hot Springs. No cover, but pass-the-hat donations welcome. Call 741-2361. Keep it slicker than an oil slick when the Missoula Senior Center, 705 S. Higgins Ave., presents a Saturday Night Dance with The City Slickers, from 8–11 PM. $5. Call 543-7154. Solid Sound Karaoke proves that music can also be a liquid or a gas, but never plasma, at Westside Lanes at 8:30 PM. Free. Call 541-SING. DJs Kris Moon and Monty Carlo are guaranteed to keep you dancing to an assortment of hip hop, electronic and other bass-heavy beats ‘til the bar closes during Absolutely at the Badlander at 9 PM. Free. Bust out a cover tune and dance the night away when Combat Karaoke overtakes Deano’s Casino near Airway Blvd., 5318 W. Harrier, with a combo of karaoke tunes and dance music this and every Sat. at 9 PM. Free. Belt out a few bars of somethin’ sweet at Karaoke by Figmo at Jokers Wild Bar and Restaurant, 4829 N. Reserve St., which features “Brain Strain” trivia and “Scaryoke


Karaoke” and begins at 9 PM. Free. Dance out that indigo fire in your pants with a night of blues featuring sets by MudSlide Charley, Black Mountain Moan, Darah Fogarty and Andrew Mason, starting at 9 PM at the Palace. $5. The Wild Coyotes gracefully save you from that mercy killing when it plays country and classic rock at 9 PM at the Lumberjack Saloon, off Hwy. 12 and one mile up Graves Creek Road near Lolo. Free. Get your shred face on in support of some local snow shredders when Demonlily Entertainment presents The Backwoods Project After Party, featuring sets by local metal bands Universal Choke Sign, Blessiddoom and 6 Days Under, starting at 9 PM at Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H. $5 suggested donation. Proceeds benefit The Backwoods Project, a nonprofit that aims to provide modern freestyle terrain to the public. Stick that flea collar on the man just ‘cause you can when Blue Collar plays at 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Salon & Casino, 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Don’t be a born-again shame monger when No Shame plays rock at 9:30 PM at The Dark Horse, 1805 Regent St. Free. Call 728-1559. Inject a little life into your decomposing toes when Cash for Junkers plays Americana with a swing at the Union Club, at 9:30 PM. Free.

DJ Dubwise supplies dance tracks all night long so you can take advantage of Sexy Saturday and rub up against the gender of your choice at 10 PM at Feruqi’s. Free. Call 728-8799. Dance on eggshells when Reverend Slanky slips funk and soul into your soul when it plays at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $5. Dress for luau success when The Imperial Sovereign Court of the State of Montana and Mr. Miss & Ms. Gay Youth 1 present the “Lu-OUT II” drag show, which notes that you should “Come dressed to get Leid!” and begins with a line-up at 8:30 PM, followed by the show at 10, all at Fuse at Deano’s Casino and Lounge, 5318 W. Harrier. $5, with a dance party after the show.

SUNDAY

23

January

Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 2 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $16. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Break on through to the grassy side when locals Broken Valley

Roadshow play bluegrass at 3 PM at Seeley-Swan High School, 456 Airport Road in Seeley Lake. $14/$12 seniors/free for children with an adult. Call 677-0717.

nightlife Get moving with a moving picture when the Zootown Arts Community Center, 235 N. First St. W., presents its Winter Cinema Film Series, which runs from 6–9 PM. Free, but donations accepted. Call 549-7555 and visit zootownarts.org. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 6:30 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $18/$15 children. Call 728PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Tap into clarity when you head to a “Clarity Book Meeting with Great Freedom/Balanced View,” which runs every Sun. at 7 PM in the meeting room of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, 519 S. Higgins Ave. Free. Enter from the back entrance. Visit greatfreedom.org for more info. Kick off the latter hours of your day of rest when the Badlander’s Jazz Martini Night welcomes saints and sinners alike with $4 martinis, plus jazz DJs and jazz bands starting at 7:30 PM. Free. This week: jazz from Josh Farmer, the Front Street Jazz Group and DJ Mermaid.

Dip into a culturally rich dance performance when the Whitefish Theatre Co. presents a performance by Dancing Earth, an indigenous dance ensemble that features an array of inter-tribal contemporary dance artists, and begins at 7:30 PM at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 600 E. Second St. $20/$18 seniors/$10 students. Visit whitefishtheatreco.org for tickets or call 862-5371. The revolution will not be crushed by bad vibes when Santa Barbara, Calif.’s Rebelution plays reggae with special guests Iration at 8 PM at the Wilma Theatre. $18/$16 advance at Rockin Rudy’s and online at ticketfly.com. Men always get to belt out a slick tune or two during Man Night featuring Karaoke, which occurs this and every Sun. starting at 9 PM at the Silver Slipper Sports Bar and Grill, 4063 Hwy. 93 S. Free. Call 251-5402. Enjoy a brew and a moving picture when the Palace hosts a movie night, featuring “the finest of badass cinema” starting at 9 PM. Free.

MONDAY

24

January

Keep an eye on diversity when UM hosts the Diversity ContinuUM, a

project that celebrates and promotes diversity, tolerance and inclusion within the UM campus community, and occurs from 11 AM–2 PM each day through Jan. 28 at the University Center Atrium. Free. Call 243-2019.

nightlife Leave the deerskin outfit at home when Cash for Junkers plays Americana with a swing influence from 7–10 PM at the Red Bird Wine Bar, 111 N. Higgins Ave. Ste. 100. Free. UM presents a lecture on PTSD by expert Bessel van der Kolk, starting at 7 PM at the Urey Lecture Hall. Free. Call 243-6249. Have a drink and take a load off in the company of your fellow laborers during the Badlander’s Service Industry Night, which runs this and every Mon. and includes drink specials for service industry workers starting at 9 PM. Free. Also, if you have an iPod, bring it in and they’ll play it. See if you can become a star under the spotlight at Sean Kelly’s open mic night, hosted by Mike Avery every Mon. at 9 PM. Free. Call 542-1471 after 10 AM on Monday to sign-up. Kick off your week with a drink, some free pool and an array of electronic DJs and styles for das booty during Milkcrate Monday with the Milkcrate Mechanic at 9 PM every week, at the Palace. Free. This week features the program “Get Saved By the Bass” featuring DJs Buckaroo Blaster, Feldman and Shea Daze.

KettleHouse Brewing Company would like to thank Missoula & our patrons for participating in KettleHouse's “Community Unite” program in 2010. Together, we helped the following community organizations earn

$6,792.00. Adventure Cycling, American Humanics Association, AniMeals, Bike Walk Alliance, Biomimicry Institute, Clark Fork Coalition, Clark Fork School, CMC Foundation, Ecology Project International, Five Valley Audubon Society, FootLoose Montana, Great Bear Foundation, Habitat for Humanity, Hellgate Rollergirls, homeWORD, Human Rights Network, Humane Society, Inner Roads Wilderness Project, Jeannette Rankin Peace Center, KBGA, Missoula Children's Theatre, Missoula Food Co-op, Missoula International School, Missoula Mavericks, Missoula Medical Aid, Missoula Smokejumpers, Montana Brewers Association, Montana Conservation Corps, Montana Public Radio, Montana Shares, Montana Wilderness Association, MUD, North Missoula Community Development Corp., Northwest Connections, Owl Research, Poverello Center, Raptor View Research Institute, Run Wild, Selway Bitterroot Foundation, Sentinel German Club, Sustainable Business Council, Tamarack Grief Resource Center, UM Ultimate Frisbee, United Way, Watershed Education Network, and Zootown Arts Community Center.

"In the New Year, may your right hand always be stretched out in friendship, never in want." ~ Irish Toast

Missoula Independent

Page 25 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Jam the indigo out of your system when Harry Davids, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H, presents Blues Jam Night with Kevin Van Dort, where you can come play or listen to blues music every Mon. starting around 9 PM. Free. Contact Kevin at 396-5731 to play.

TUESDAY

25

January

You can fight for peace in many different ways, but how about knitting for it? Find out when the group Knitting for Peace meets every Tue. from 1–3 PM at Joseph’s Coat, 116 S. Third St. W. Free. Call 549-1419. UM presents a “University Council Meeting,” a discussion on campuswide issues and university initiatives, starting at 2 PM in Room 333 of the University Center. Free. Call 243-2311.

nightlife Missoula’s YWCA, 1130 W. Broadway, hosts weekly support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, including groups for American Indian women and teens, every Tue. starting with dinner at 5:30 PM, followed by meetings at 6:30 PM. Free. Those with children are asked to arrive at 6:15. Call 543-6691 for more info. Follow your dreams of becoming the next Willie Nelson during an open mic/jam night hosted by Louie Bond and Teri Llovet every Tue. at the Brooks and Browns Lounge at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St., from 7–10 PM, with sign-up at 6 PM. Free. E-mail terillovet@hotmail.com. Get lost in someone else’s true story, or perhaps tell one of your own, during MissoulaMoth, an open mic storytelling forum in the spirit of New York City’s The Moth, which runs

from 6–9 PM at the Badlander. Free. If you’re interested in sharing a story, you can sign-up the day of the event or e-mail missoulamoth@gmail.com. Jam out with some suds and buds when the Blacksmith Brewery, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, presents an “Open Jam & Mic,” at 6 PM. Free. Call 777-0608. The Missoula International School, 1100 Harrison St., presents an informational meeting on its bilingual education program starting at 6:30 PM. Free. Visit mismt.org. Organist Nancy Cooper makes her instrument emanate wondrous sounds when she plays a faculty and guest artist recital, at 7:30 PM at the UM Music Recital Hall, in the Music Building. $10/$5 students and seniors. Call 243-6880. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Sean Kelly’s invites you to another week of free Pub Trivia, which takes place every Tue. at 8 PM. And, to highlight the joy of discovery that you might experience while attending, here’s a sample of the type of question you could be presented with. Ready? What’s the boiling point of water, using the kelvin scale of temperature measurement? (Find the answer in the calendar under tomorrow’s nightlife section.) The Broadway’s Tuesday Night Comedy takes place every Tue. at 9 PM and is followed by dancing with tunes from the Tallest DJ in America. $5/$3 students. Call 543-5678. All royalty gets irie during Royal

Reggae Night, which features free pool plus reggae, dancehall and hip hop remixes spun by an array of DJs starting at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Just remember to wear your cardboard underpants when The Box Cutters mulch your mind with rock when it plays the Badlander’s “Live and Local” night at 9 PM. Free. Peoples opens. Keep it on the cool side when you listen to some hip hop and enjoy a drink special or two during Hip-Hop Tuesday with Wapikiya Records, which features DJs spinning beats along with guest MCs starting at 9:30 PM at Harry David’s Bar, 2700 Paxson St. Ste. H. Free. Call 830-3276.

WEDNESDAY

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January

First United Methodist Church, 300 E. Main St., hosts Project Homeless Connect, an event for those who are homeless or those worried about becoming homeless that features medical, dental and eye care, a warm meal, clothing, hair cuts, mental health counseling, legal advice, housing assistance, employment counseling and other services, from 10 AM–3 PM. Free. Call 258-4980. It’s all about a literary lunchtime when Fact & Fiction presents an author luncheon with Stanley Gordon West, author of Blind Your Ponies, starting at 11:30 AM at the Holiday Inn–Downtown at the Park, 200 S. Pattee St. $15. Visit Fact & Fiction, 220 N. Higgins Ave., for tickets or call 721-2881. Slack off from your duties with a moving picture when the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St., hosts its “Afternoon Matinee” program with a screening of On the Waterfront, at 2 PM. Free. Call 721-BOOK. Sorry dude, no munchies provided. The Missoula County Commissioners currently seek an applicant to serve on the Marijuana Initiative Oversight Committee. Grab an application at the Missoula County Courthouse annex, 200 W. Broadway St. Applications are due by 5 PM on Wed., Jan. 26. Call 258-4877. Sop up the sights of a true DIY Missoula institution during an open tour of the Zootown Arts Community Center, which runs from 4–5 PM at the ZACC, 235 N. First St. W. Free. RSVP by e-mailing Hanna at info@zootownarts.com.

nightlife Enjoy a local brew and support a local organization during the Kettlehouse Northside Tap Room’s Community U-NITE Pint Nights, which occur this and every Wed. from 5–8 PM at the tap room, 313 N. First St. W. Free to attend. A portion of the proceeds from each

Missoula Independent

Page 26 January 20 – January 27, 2011


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I wouldn’t call the late playwright William Inge a high-spirited kind of guy. In a recent article in Broadway Magazine, a former student of Inge’s recalls a time, in 1966 to be exact, when the dramatist didn’t show up for the first six weeks of a college class he was supposed to teach. Inge was apparently very depressed, due to the fact that theater critics weren’t digging his new work. Sadly, Inge’s depression worsened and he took his own life in 1973. But despite his seemingly perpetual morose mind state, critics note that the Kansas-born writer had a comedic side that came out best in works like his Tony Awards-nominated 1955 play Bus Stop, which opens in Missoula this week as the kickoff to the Montana Repertory Theatre’s 2011 National Tour.

WHERE: Montana Theatre in UM’s PARTV Center HOW MUCH: $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children/$30 for the gala MORE INFO: montanarep.org

pint sold goes to a different organization each week. This week’s beneficiary is the Montana Snowbowl Ski Patrol. Visit kettlehouse.com. Juggle some grapes with suds in your mouth when Blue Melon plays the Blacksmith Brewery, 114 Main St. in Stevensville, at 5:30 PM. Free. Call 777-0608. Pianist Jodi Marshall tickles your senses with her deft piano skills while you munch Chinese food when she performs every Wed. from 6–9 PM at Hong Kong Chef, 2009 Brooks St. Free to attend, with free potstickers. Call 549-6688. Hear about Haiti’s level of progress towards improving conditions, among other things, when the World Affairs Council of Montana hosts Carolyn Miles, executive vice president of the organization Save the Children, for the talk “Women and Children at Risk: Haiti and the Developing World,” which begins at 7 PM in the University Center Ballroom. $5/free for students and

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Set in rural Kansas in the dead of winter, the Bus Stop features, from left, Erin Mae Johnson, Matt story follows five bus passengers stranded at a Warner, Hannah Boreal Kanengieter and Jackson Palmer. diner during a crappy snowstorm. In the matter of just a few hours, romance, and the pursuit of romance ensue. Among these heart struck characters includes a rowdy Montana cowboy named Bo (Jackson Palmer), who tries his hardest to court a WHAT: Performance of William Inge’s Bus former nightclub singer named Cherie (Hannah Stop Boreal Kanengieter), regardless of the fact that she’s just not that into him and doesn’t want to tie WHO: Montana Repertory Theatre the knot. Over the course of the night, love sizzles WHEN: Gala: Fri., Jan. 21, at 6:30 PM. and hilarity arises within a narrative that director Jere Hodgin calls “a wonderful, warm, and delightAll other shows: Tue., Jan. 25–Sat., Jan. 29 ful comedy that has some serious overtones to it and Tue., Feb. 1–Thu., Feb. 3 and Sat, about what it’s like to live in small town America.” Feb. 5 at 7: 30 PM nightly. Sat. , Jan. 29 includes a 2 PM matinee.

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The Montana Rep’s run of Inge’s masterpiece starts Friday with a special opening night party called “The Blue Dragon Gala.” It’s a nightclubthemed benefit for the Rep that features appetizers and drinks before the play, plus tunes after the show by Full Grown Men and a performance by aerialist Holly Rollins. —Ira Sather-Olson

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www.missoula-labor.info Missoula Independent

Page 27 January 20 – January 27, 2011


World Affairs Council members. Call 728-3328. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Smooth tunes make the sake and pad thai go down easy when IZA Asian Restaurant, 529 S. Higgins Ave., presents live Chinese Koto music with Aaron at 7 PM. Free to attend. Call 830-3237. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Get swooned by “Portland’s French Troubadour” when Alliance Française de Missoula (AF) presents a performance by Eric John Kaiser titled “Paris Rendez-Vous,” a concert featuring traditional French favorites as well as selections from his new CD, starting at 7:30 PM at the Missoula Winery, 5646 W. Harrier. $10/$8 for students and AF members. (See Noise in this issue.) UM celebrates the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with “Conner, King, Kennedy: Birmingham Icons Tell the Civil Rights Story,” a talk with author Glenn Eskew that begins at 7:30 PM in Room 123 of UM’s Gallagher Business Building. Free. Call 243-2088. Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt, after a car crash kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $18/$15 children. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. You can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but neither will help you emit that high lonesome sound every Wed., when the Old Post Pub hosts a Pickin’ Circle at 9 PM. Free. The boiling point of water—using the

Missoula Independent

photo courtesy Stephen Dummit

They know you ate that burrito, so just admit it. Santa Barbara, Calif., reggae band Rebelution plays the Wilma Theatre Sun., Jan. 23, at 8 PM with Iration. $18/$16 advance at Rockin Rudy’s and online at ticketfly.com

kelvin scale of temperature measurement—is 373.15 K. Go Science! The tenets of women’s lib broadens to include cheap drinks and DJs spinning dance tracks when Feruqi’s hosts Ladies’ Night every Wed. at 9 PM. Free. Rev your internal dance machine when BassFace presents HOUSE PARTY!, an evening of house and electro music with sets by A Nipple Named Sexy (an Ebola Syndrome side project), Fatty Acid and Cadence, at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Dodge a sweaty bullet when the Dodgy Mountain Men play a set of its self-described “Stompgrass” music at 10 PM at the Top Hat. $3. Josh Clinger opens.

THURSDAY January

27

If you can’t read this, perhaps you’re simply pre-literate, in which case the Missoula Public Library wants you for Tiny Tales, a movement, music and singing program for babes up to 36 months at 10:30 AM every Thu., Fri. and Tue. Free. Call 721-BOOK.

Page 28 January 20 – January 27, 2011

nightlife Butter up your folk biscuits when locals Butter plays indie folk during the Top Hat’s “Artists-InResidence” family-friendly concert series every Thu. this month from 6–8 PM. Free. Blast off into the world of permaculture when Paul Wheaton hosts a lecture on “Rocket Mass Heaters” starting at 6:30 PM in the large conference room of the Missoula Public Library, 301 E. Main St. Free. Visit permies.com/permaculture/missoula for more info. Ladies can dance to the beat of booty busting tunes during Dance Dance Party Party, a dance party for women that runs from 7–8 PM at YWCA Missoula, 1130 W. Broadway St. Free, all ages. No booze, boys or judgement allowed, but leg warmers are optional. E-mail Roe at rohanna.erin@gmail.com. A bus stop at a rural diner in Kansas turns into a hotpot of romance when the Montana Repertory Theatre presents a performance of William Inge’s play Bus Stop, at 7:30 PM at the Montana Theatre, in UM’s PARTV Center. $20/$16 seniors and students/$10 children age 12 and under. Visit montanarep.org for tickets or call 243-4581. (See Spotlight in this issue.) Soak up a poignant play about a girl who goes to Berlin to live with her aunt, after a car crash

kills her parents, when the Montana Actors’ Theatre presents a performance of Larke Schuldberg’s play Sound of Planes, at 7:30 PM at the Crystal Theatre, 515 S. Higgins Ave. $12/$6 for students at the box office only. Visit mtactors.com for tickets. Laugh it up with a play that combines British wit with a story about a town in Japan and the affairs of its citizens when the MCT Community Theatre presents a performance of The Mikado, at 8 PM at the MCT Center for the Performing Arts, 200 N. Adams St. $20. Call 728-PLAY or visit mctinc.org for tickets. Join several hundred people and revel in the glory of debauchery when cheap well drinks and laptop-fueled hip hop, electronic, pop and mashed-up tunes hit the Badlander every week where Dead Hipster DJ Night gets booties bumpin’ at 9 PM. $3. Jah insists that you take a puff from a musical pipe when Chele Bandulu, Supa J and DJ Green play reggae at 9 PM at the Palace. Free. Avoid shrinkage of your dancing parts and bust a move to the UF Okies when it plays at 9:30 PM at the Sunrise Saloon & Casino, 1100 block of Strand Ave. Free. Call 728-1559. Purr it up with some bass heavy electronic music when BassFace presents its Pussy Cat Party for AniMeals, which features sets of various electronic styles by locals Ebola Syndrome, Kris Moon, Ir8Prim8 and AP, at 9 PM at the Top Hat. Free, but AniMeals will be accepting donations. The show also includes a raffle, silent auction, visuals by Amber Bushnell, and breakdancing by “Soled Out.” Wow, three high quality theatrical productions opening in the same week? That seems like a first. Maybe it’s not, but that’s pretty darn cool I’d say. So get out there, reader, and support some thespians by injecting a little drama into your life. Until then, keep me in the know of your own stage shows in a timely manner by sending your event info by 5 PM on Fri., Jan. 21 to calendar@missoulanews.com. Alternately, snail mail the stuff to Calendar Overlord c/o the Independent, 317 S. Orange St., Missoula, MT 59801 or fax your way to 543-4367. You can also submit stuff to me online. Just head to the arts section of our website and scroll down a few inches and you’ll see a link that says “submit an event.”


MOUNTAIN HIGH ust a few years ago, Victor resident and outdoor adventurer Skip Horner almost met his fate. He was guiding on a mountain in Nepal and got caught in an avalanche. The mass of snow swept him 1,000 feet down the mountain, but somehow he miraculously survived. Another time, Horner was guiding a crew that was attempting to ascend the highest peak in Greenland when a cyclonic storm hit. In a recent e-mail to the Indy, Horner describes that particular situation as “hellish.” With 30 plus years of adventuring under his boots, Horner has certainly had his brushes with danger, but he also says the majority of his trips have been successful. One such jaunt includes guiding the “7 Summits,” also known as the highest peaks in

J

each continent. Horner says he was the first person to do this. You’ll be able to hear more about his accomplishments and close calls with gaia this week when he hosts a talk about his outdoor pursuits, and presents photos and a video from several of his trips. Besides a wild night of storytelling, Horner’s talk also benefits the West Central Montana Avalanche Foundation, a local nonprofit that provides avalanche safety education and awareness through snow reports and clinics. Skip Horner presents “Hot Water and Cold Hell: Speed Bumps on the Road to Adventure” on Wed., Jan. 26, at 7 PM at the Trail Head, 221 E. Front St. $5. Call 543-6966.

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THURSDAY JANUARY 20 Figure out where you are or where you want to be when trekking it in the woods when REI MIssoula presents its “GPS Basics” class, which features info on GPS setup, capturing and navigating waypoints, and working with coordinates, starting at 6:30 PM at REI, 3275 N. Reserve St. Ste. K-2. Free. RSVP quickly by visiting rei.com/stores/72.

FRIDAY JANUARY 21 Shoot to thrill during the Seeley Lake Challenge Biathlon, the highlight of the three-day Seeley Lake Area Winterfest. The race offers contests for greenhorns and seasoned racers alike (including a 10K ski race with 10 targets). Load up on info at seeleylakechamber.com or call 677-2880.

SATURDAY JANUARY 22 Slap on your snowshoes and get ready for a chill adventure during the Montana Natural History Center’s (MNHC) “Saturday Discovery Day: Winter Ecology of the Clearwater Canoe Trail,” a snowshoeing trip just north of Seeley Lake with naturalist Hobie Hare that offers the chance to learn how birds and mammals “make a living” during the winter, among other topics, starting with a meet-up at 8 AM at the MNHC, 120 Hickory St. $45/$35 MNHC members. Call 327-0405 to RSVP. Hit up the slopes with your skis like the mountaineer you truly are during the Whitefish Mountain Resort’s Whitefish Whiteout Ski Mountaineering Race, which features two courses for racers to choose from and begins at 9 AM, with day-of registration starting at 7:45 AM, all at the resort, 3896 Big Mountain Road. $45 to participate in the race course, and $25 to participate in the recreation course. Call 862-2990 and visit skiwhitefish.com. Earn the nickname “Camel Spinner” when the Missoula Figure Skating Club presents its “LLearn to Skate Basic Skills” class, which meets for eight weeks starting at 10 AM today at the Glacier Ice Rink, 1101 South Ave. W. $110 for the eight-week session. Visit missoulafsc.org for more info and to download a registration form.

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Hit some awesome terrain on your skis or snowboard when The Backwoods Project presents “Ride Montana,” a public terrain park for skiers and snowboarders at Marshall Mountain, 5250 Marshall Canyon Road, that opens at 10 AM today and tomorrow, and is followed by contests each day at 1 PM including a best trick contest slated for Saturday and a Rail Jam on Sunday. $10 to ride each day, plus an additional $5 to ride in the contests. Visit thebackwoodsproject.org for details. Kids ages 5 and up figure out how animals survive our brutally long and cold Montana winters when the Montana Natural History Center (MNHC) presents its “Saturday Kids’ Activity: Hibernation Celebration,” which begins at 2 PM at the MNHC, 120 Hickory St. $3/$1 MNHC members. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Call 327-0405 and visit montananaturalist.org.

SUNDAY JANUARY 23 Run and walk your way to victory at Run Wild Missoula’s Jeff Galloway Run/Walk Missoula Marathon Training Class, a class that offers Galloway’s comprehensive training program for those planning to participate in the Missoula Marathon, which meets every Sun. at 8 AM and every Wed. at 6 PM up until the marathon in July, all at Runner’s Edge, 325 N. Higgins Ave. $125/$100 Run Wild Missoula Members. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 26 Sprint with a cold one and perhaps a JJ’s Chicken Fried Steak on your mind during Run Wild Missoula’s Beer Run, a group run of five miles that begins at 6 PM at The Oxford Saloon, 337 N. Higgins Ave., and ends with a beer at the establishment. Free. Visit runwildmissoula.org.

THURSDAY JANUARY 27 Learn how to alert others when in danger of being swallowed up by snow during an Avalanche Transceiver Clinic, which runs from 4:30–8:30 PM at UM’s Outdoor Program in the Fitness and Recreation Building. $15. RSVP by Jan. 25 by calling 243-5172. calendar@missoulanews.com

Missoula Independent

Page 29 January 20 – January 27, 2011


scope

Wild by nature Outdoors writer Steven Rinella takes aim at new television series by Skylar Browning

Certain people were born to be on television. Steven Rinella admits he isn’t one of those people. Rinella’s always been more Boone and Crocket than Regis and Kelly, a better fit for spending weeks alone in the wilderness—and then taking his time writing about the experience—than shooting multiple takes in front of an entire film crew. In fact, the award-winning author and graduate of the University of Montana’s creative writing program remembers when the publicist of his first book— a woman who is now Rinella’s wife—wouldn’t even consider booking him for television interviews. She felt the same qualities that made Rinella’s adventure writing so audacious would be his undoing on camera. “One of the first times I met her she says—ask her; she still tells the story—she says she can’t book me for any TV interviews because I was too coarse, too rough around the edges,” Rinella says. “She thought I’d be terrible. So, she thought that. I thought that. And I never expected anyone to think any different.” All of which makes it that much more surprising that Rinella has assumed the role of host of his own adventure series on The Travel Channel. “The Wild Within” debuted January 9 in a prime Sunday evening time slot, and is scheduled for an eight-episode season. In each hour-long show, the lifelong outdoorsman and survivalist embarks

on an elaborate demonstration of how to hunt for your own food—whether it’s spear-fishing for Hawaiian octopuses (and then biting behind their eyeballs to kill them) or gathering snails from Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. In short, the author of The Scavenger’s Guide to Haute Cuisine and American Buffalo: In Search of a Lost Icon basically does the same sorts of things he’s been writing about for years—but now for a television audience. “Let me just say, sneaking up on an animal by yourself is a whole lot different than sneaking up on an animal with four or five other guys, and two of the guys are carrying cameras,” says Rinella during a recent phone interview. “It’s a whole new set of challenges for me.” Rinella only started to welcome the challenges once he was lined up with Zero Point Zero Productions, Inc. The same company behind cantankerous chef and best-selling author Anthony Bourdain’s Emmy-winning series “No Reservations,” ZPZ is used to working with a “coarse” host who’s new to television. The show took two years to plan before shooting started, and Rinella’s still adjusting to his new role. “When you’re doing journalism or writing the stuff I’m writing, you go on a trip for a week or a couple years—my buffalo book took two years to research—and you come home and you think about it. You sleep on it and you go

Steven Rinella, an award-winning author and UM grad, recently started hosting The Travel Channel show “The Wild Within.“ Each episode sees the lifelong outdoorsman and survivalist embark on an elaborate hunting expedition. “Let me just say, sneaking up on an animal by yourself is a whole lot different than sneaking up on an animal with four or five other guys, and two of the guys are carrying cameras,” says Rinella.

Missoula Independent

Page 30 January 20 – January 27, 2011

hang out with your buddies at the bar and you talk about it, and you slowly formulate everything that you’re going to write,” he says. “In TV, it’s all on the fly. You don’t have time to think about what you’re going to write for your first sentence that’s genius. You have to think quicker so you don’t end up sounding like a moron. It’s not always easy.” Rinella never aspired to work in television. When he arrived at UM, he’d left a career as a professional fur-trapper in hopes of becoming a professional trapping writer. Immediately, he says his interests and background separated him from his peers. “You have kids come in from all these famous schools to the MFA program in Missoula and they all have these dreams of being the next avant-garde, right? They want to do all these experimental things and write about how much they drink and how hard they’ve had it,” he says. “I think that must just be exhausting, you know? I came to school and I just wanted to write outdoors stuff. No one goes to grad school and says I want to write about hunting. I think what I wanted was so attainable, so realistic, that people helped me.” Rinella still recalls sitting in professor Deirdre McNamer’s office, and explaining that all he ever wanted was for a magazine to pay him to write about anything having to do with the outdoors. Sure enough, he sold his first article to Trapper and Predator Caller during his first year of grad school. “I was dating a girl at the time who lived at the Wilma—it used to be a whole lot different than it is now,” he says. “And I remember picking up a letter from my P.O. box at the old Hellgate station, riding up the Wilma’s old manual elevator—a guy named “Scootin’” Newton used to run it—and opening it at her apartment. I got $250 and couldn’t have been happier.” Rinella, who also reviewed art exhibits for the Indy while living in Missoula, moved quickly up the outdoor writing food chain. Before earning his master’s from UM in 2000, he sold an article to Outside, and is now a regular contributor to the magazine. His first book, The Scavenger’s Guide to Haute Cuisine, was published in 2006. Despite his foray into television, Rinella still considers himself a writer first and foremost. He’s working on a third book, and says his greatest satisfaction comes from finishing his writing projects. But “The Wild Within” has provided him with some unforgettable experiences, including paddling a boat made from a buffalo hide down the Missouri River in eastern Montana and bow-fishing in “treacherous death rapids” for a herbivorous piranha with a native tribe in Guyana. The latter—he carved the arrowheads from scratch—counts as one of his two biggest highlights working on the show. “When you’re bow fishing, you have to deal with refraction, and you also had to account for the speed of the rapids,” he says. “I missed probably 25 times. Twenty-five misses, but I finally hit one. It took three days.” And the other highlight? “I can’t tell you,” he says. “I’m not allowed. All I can say is that it happens in Hawaii and it involves a knife.” An expert tease delivered like a true TV host. “The Wild Within” airs Sundays on The Travel Channel at 7 and 10 p.m. sbrowning@missoulanews.com


Scope

Noise

Books

Eric John Kaiser Portland Rendez-Vous self-released

You might not get the chance to be serenaded underneath the Eiffel Tower by a Parisian street performer, but Eric John Kaiser provides a pretty solid approximation. The self-described “French troubadour” now lives in Portland. But from the sound of the EP Portland Rendez-Vous, his birthplace is still first in his heart. That sense even defines the stylistic qualities of the album. Kaiser’s music basically boils down to fairly straightforward pop with serious French-folk influences. This guy can tease the hell out of a melody. Electric guitar provides solid springboard into more exotic horns or accordion. As an individual who gets improbably excited about a good accordion solo, I was embarrassing

Voodoo Horseshoes Flight of the Platypus Higher Mountain Boy

The Voodoo Horseshoes are redneck hippie stoner country freaks. I’m not being rude, that’s just how the local band describes itself on its new album. Sure enough, the tunes mix a sort of libertarian sentiment (“I can go mine, you can go your own way”) with psychedelic riffs, 4:20 references, Appalachian picking and a song about a platypus. Apparently, guitarist Anthony Gordon is the lead vocalist and banjo player Tobias Roberts backs him up, but oftentimes it sounds like there are numerous voic-

NiT GrIT NiT GrIT Self-released

NiT GrIT’s blistering brand of dubstep seems fitting for the post-post-apocalypse, when robots battle against extraterrestrials and humans are just a charred memory. From the start, this San Jose-based producer rattles speakers by mixing industrial-tinged breakbeats with growling bass lines that sound like cyborgs arguing over who gets to nuke the nearest three-headed alien. It’s relentlessly heavy and raw dance music, but what hooks me is that the aggression is complemented by mournful and uplifting melodies, which buoy each track and add a human touch. Opener “Prituri Se Planinata,” a remix of a tune by world music group Stellamara, is a prime example of

Ghostface Killah Apollo Kids Def Jam

True story: Once, in a dark Virginia Beach parking garage, Method Man told me in an intimidating vioce, “Beware of the Wu.” But it was Ghostface Killah who seemed the legit menace, passing by with a smile and gesticulating like he was slitting my craw with a katana. So it’s when Ghostface Killah drops a new album that you best listen up. “Purified Thoughts,” sums up the good and the less-than-good on Apollo Kids. Potent musical tension

Film

Movie Shorts

myself with spastic headbobbing before the first track concluded. Lyrically, I have no idea—it’s all in French, and I’m your garden-variety monolingual American. But it sure sounds nice. I caught the word “baguette” at one point and subsequently craved a good loaf of French bread, so I suppose the album’s songwriting affected me in some respect. My own reaction probably provides the strongest endorsement. After listening to the EP, I immediately acquired the rest of Kaiser’s material. That doesn’t happen very often. (Cameron Rasmusson) Eric John Kaiser plays The Missoula Winery Wednesday, Jan. 26, at 7:30 PM. $10/$8 Alliance Française members. es here, singing—sometimes chanting—into outer space. Flight of the Platypus sometimes gives off a whiff of The Doors, which I could do without. But mostly it’s a pretty cool album with enough creeping guitar and dynamic instrumentation to keep the jam breakdowns from ever turning to cheese. I love “Miniature Circular Orbits” because it sounds like what would happen if you tried to have a rock and roll séance. And the rendition of the traditional tune “Cluck Ol’ Hen” has a delicious molasses pace to it, punched up by what sounds like an auto-tuned banjo. The best songs come last with “The Ride,” a ballad with a no-care attitude and “Platypus,” which offers catchy hooks and a fakeout ending. That’s good stuff. (Erika Fredrickson) Voodoo Horseshoes plays a CD release party at the Bitterroot Brewery Saturday, Jan. 22, at 6 PM. Free. this delicate balance. A chopped up, melancholic female vocal sample coalesces with a toothy, sinuous bass line and a simple but poignant synth melody—the result is both menacing and beautiful. “Invisible Monsters” ups the aggro factor with barking bass tones that sound downright evil, while a horror movie-esque melody jumps about. Despite a few forgettable filler tracks, NiT GrIT’s fusion of darkness with beauty sustains my interest. The combo is much more satisfying than most bellicose dubstep dominating the scene. (Ira Sather-Olson) NiT GrIT plays the Badlander Friday, Jan. 21, at 9 PM with Enzymes, Lui and Ebola Syndrome. $5. abounds when Ghostface’s free-associative rhymes are juxtaposed against the placid beat and soulful vocals. This track also features the less-than-good Killah Priest who doesn’t possess the lucid insanity of Ghostface. In fact, seven of 10 tracks feature a bevy of rappers with only two standout supporters. On “Drama,” Game delivers killer cultural connections from Raekwon to Rachael Ray; Black Thought drops stark old-school Philly knowledge on “In Tha Park.” No auto-tune. No Fergie. The vintage vibe makes this an ideal record for Wu-Tang newbies. Just dope loops and one of the greats telling street stories and letting the people know, “New Rappers need to skip town / This is East Coast music / Grandpa Ghost is around.” But Apollo Kids could use more grandpa and less grandkids. (Jason McMackin)

Missoula Independent

Page 31 January 20 – January 27, 2011


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Missoula Independent

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Page 32 January 20 – January 27, 2011

Noise

Books

Film

Movie Shorts

House of pain Proulx’s digs a money pit in Bird Cloud by Azita Osanloo

At first glance, Annie Proulx’s new memoir, Bird Cloud, comes across as unflinchingly honest. Early on she tells the reader: “Well do I know my own character negatives—bossy, impatient, reclusively shy, short-tempered, single-minded.” Fifty-odd pages later, that seeming candidness persists: While describing the complicated factors associated with building her dream house, the 75-year-old writer remarks that her urgency to build the house is time related. “I was not,” she writes, “getting any younger. I wanted to be in the house and on the property watching falcons and eagles.” And, when describing a bathroom mirror adorned with highwattage bulbs, Proulx admits that “[f]or an aging woman it was frightening rather than useful.” The problem with such honesty, even for (perhaps especially for) a Pulitzer Prizewinning author, is that it doesn’t always translate into the kind of wisdom we tend to associate with purposefully intimate narratives. Though it combines aspects of autobiography, history, ornithology, and even archeology, the narrative crux of Bird Cloud rests quite fully on the Bird Cloud author’s quest to buy a 640-acre Annie Proulx plot of land in rural Wyoming Hardcover, Scribner on the North Platte River and to 256 pages $26.00 build her late-in-life dream house upon it (the title for both the book and the property comes from a cloud formation Proulx witnessed one day while in negotiations to buy the land). Though the candor in Proulx’s voice is most certainly designed to invite readers in, more often than not it feels as though she’s taking the opportunity to unload on us, not unlike an insufferable aunt who vents her frustrations in the guise of revealing some piece of hallowed wisdom for which we ought to be grateful. The book, Proulx’s first work of nonfiction in more than 20 years, chronicles the author’s uphill battle to build her ideal home according to her own exacting specifications. After months of searching for the right land, Proulx eventually purchases property from The Nature Conservancy near the town of Saratoga and begins the self-imposed journey. The end result is a sort-of-but-not-quite home of her dreams—one with impassable roads in winter (a pertinent fact discovered rather late in the building process). Proulx generously gives most of the credit for the house’s many successes to her trio of builders, whom she affectionately dubs the “James Gang” (named for the last name of two brothers from the trio) and, at least to some extent, she manages to convey their heroic deeds with the artistic sensitivity for which she is generally known. As should be the case, though, Proulx is her own main character in this work of autobiographical nonfiction. While those who have built their own homes might find solace in her narrative, it becomes

hard to sympathize with the author as she goes on and on about the travails of ordering the right kind of wood from Alaska, installing a Japanese soaking tub, buying a Mexican talavera sink, and contemplating the specifications of a meditation room furnished with tatami mats. Upon the completion of her newly stained concrete floors, Proulx writes: “I drove over early on a Friday morning eager to see the beautiful new floor. My God! My God! What a terrible sight. The floor was the color of raw liver and shone greasily as though coated with Vaseline.” The floor is redone, unsatisfactorily. Eventually Proulx special orders floor tiles from Brazil (“I knew at once that these would suit Bird Cloud and make the horrible floor beautiful.”) Though she never tells us the final building cost, Proulx does share that the project goes $200,000 over budget. In addition to this portion of the book, Proulx includes three other essay-like sections that contemplate genealogy, the history of the land upon which Bird Cloud sits, and, at the book’s end, a year-long study of the eagles and other birds that live on her land. Reflecting on her family’s history, Proulx comments on how her father’s constant search for a job that would allow him to “escape his French Canadian heritage” (a heritage deemed unworthy by her mother’s staunchly born-toNew-England-out-of-old-England family) forced the family to move often, sometimes every year. “I have lived in many houses,” she writes, “most inadequate and chopped into awkward spaces, none with enough book space.” One assumes these sections are meant to add much needed depth to the book, purportedly creating a narrative that—had it reached its highest potential— might have constituted a book-length meditation on a sense of place and one author’s conflicted history with the notion of home. The problem is that these separate sections don’t successfully come together to create such an ideal narrative. Proulx’s characteristically spare prose (which relays a haunting intensity in her fiction) comes off as hollow and disengaged in the seemingly contemplative sections of the book. By contrast, her voice in the all-important chronicle of a home being built comes off as irritated (and irritating). At one point in Bird Cloud, Proulx calls to mind an essay she wrote in the late 1990s that described her ideal house. She admits that “when I reread [the essay] myself I saw it more as a complaint than as a constructive ideal.” Sadly, this book-length re-imaging of the same subject echoes that complaint more than it rebuilds it. arts@missoulanews.com


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The King’s Speech makes every word count by Dave Loos

Someday, when I write my multi-part investigative series about the ins and outs of The Wilma for this paper, I plan on devoting at least 3,000 words looking into how the distribution of independent films works in Missoula. (Because I know you’re interested, Part One will investigate why western Montana’s most beautiful theater also has its worst sound system, and Part Two will attempt to answer why management charges the same price to see a film in the small theater, where

Let’s play the “quiet game.”

one can sit in folding chairs and stare at a screen only slightly larger than the biggest televisions available at Best Buy.) But Part Three will delve into the mysterious time lag that tends to result in many films opening at The Wilma a month or two after going wide across the rest of the country. Maybe there’s a reasonable explanation—the guess here is money—but at this point it is no longer the exception but the rule. Take The King’s Speech, which opened in limited release the last week of November. I realize Missoula will never compete with New York and Boston and Los Angeles for first dibs on opening a movie, but what’s from stopping The King’s Speech from arriving in Missoula when the film goes into wide release, as it did in mid-December? I understand this may sound like a petty complaint, but think about it: By the time The King’s Speech finally opened at The Wilma last Friday, you already knew it was going to be good. That makes my job a lot harder. It’s great, actually. As I write this, Colin Firth has just picked up a Golden Globe award for best actor for his wonderful portrayal of the stuttering and stammering King George VI—an accolade that is almost surely to repeat itself at next month’s Academy Awards. And he will deserve it. It’s cliché to laud the actor who has taken on the role of disabled character (Tropic Thunder made that premise a running joke the entire movie), and to successfully pull it off requires not only a great script but the discipline not to overreach. There can be

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a fine line in films like these—and The King’s Speech is no exception—between manipulative melodrama and brilliance. This one falls well on the side of the latter. The movie’s climatic scene where, well, the king gives his speech, is evidence to this fact. It’s one thing to root for a character you’ve grown to like and admire over the course of two hours. It’s another altogether to feel nervous for that person, to want them to succeed so badly that you mentally urge them along. I watched that scene with the same emotion as if it was my brother or sister giving the most important speech of their lifetime. I did not want him to fail. A film must earn those sentiments, which it does by integrating a fascinating but forgotten historical tale of pre-World War II England with a cast that manages to stay on par with Firth. That’s no easy task considering Firth had me believing his painful-to-watch speech impediment within the movie’s first five minutes. But Geoffrey Rush as speech therapist Lionel Logue and Helena Bonham Carter as the king’s stubborn-but-loving wife are nearly perfect in their supporting roles. The King’s Speech is the product of a strong original screenplay by David Seidler, but the film has the feel of an adapted play as it follows the strange tale of the British monarchy over the course of about 15 years. The future King George VI sought help for his horrendous stutter long before taking the throne, and only ended up as king after his brother became the first and only British royal to abdicate his position after falling in love with a twicedivorced American socialite. The film plays up the reluctance of the younger brother to assume the symbolically important position, but makes it clear he’s far more qualified and attuned to the world’s events to take on that role at a perilous time. If only he could speak in public. With fine direction by Tom Hooper—who most recently helmed The Damned United, another British historical drama and one of my favorites of last year—The King’s Speech gives us a wonderfully satisfying working friendship between Lionel and the King. Each has their doubts about the other, and Logue’s methods are admittedly quirky and unconventional. But they work, however slowly, to get to the root of the problem. Logue is as much a shrink as he is a speech therapist and Rush captures that dedication to his patient with irreverent charisma. That The King’s Speech will make you empathize and sympathize with British royalty—perhaps the most spoiled and coddled class of humans on the planet—is an achievement in its own right. That the film will make you love these people takes it to an entirely different level.

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Missoula Independent

Page 33 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Scope OPENING THIS WEEK BALLET IN CINEMA: GISELLE Moscow, Russia’s Bolshoi Ballet offers up its modern take on this classic ballet, which follows a young village girl who’s courted by a nobleman, but soon dies of a weak heart. Carmike 10: 9 AM only on Sun. and 7:30 on Wed. MOUNT ST. ELIAS This feature documentary follows three diehard mountaineers/skiers—Axel Naglich, Jon Johnston and the late Peter Ressman—as they embark on a totally epic quest to reach the summit of Alaska’s Mount St. Elias, so they can ski down 18,000 vertical feet. Carmike 10: Thu. only at 7 and 9:55. NO STRINGS ATTACHED Yes, this movie is about gettin’ it on. Ashton Kutcher and Natalie Portman are old friends who

Noise

Books

Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:30 and 4:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:10, 4:05, 6:50 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. COUNTRY STRONG Gwyneth Paltrow is a faltering country singer struggling with the bottle and trying to get her musical act back on track by touring with up-and-coming cowboy crooner Garrett Hedlund. Country musician Tim McGraw stars as Paltrow’s hubby. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. THE DILEMMA Vince Vaughn witnesses the wife of his coworker/best friend smooching another guy, and has to figure out the most dude-friendly way to break the bad news to his buddy. Jennifer Connelly, Winona Ryder and Queen Latifah co-star. Carmike 10:

Film

Movie Shorts

Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:55 and 4:50. Pharaohplex in Hamilton in 2-D: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 12:55, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sun. show at noon, and an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9 and 9:35. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Entertainer Cinema in Ronan: 4, 7 and 9:20. GULLIVER’S TRAVELS Funnyman Jack Black is Lemuel Gulliver in this modern 3-D adaptation of the classic 18th century novel. The story follows Black as he sets sail to the Bermuda Triangle to write a fluffy travel article. Along the way, Black gets shipwrecked, taken captive by small people, and is enlisted to help fend off a rival horde of tiny folks using things like his

than-thou father-in-law Robert De Niro. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:30 and 9:55, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:10, 2:25, 4:45, 7:10 and 9:35, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:30, 7:10 and 9:35. SEASON OF THE WITCH Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman are 14th century crusaders given the not-so-fun task of transporting a witch—who allegedly caused the Black Plague— to a monastery, in the hopes her powers of pestilence will be destroyed. Along the way, some evil things start to happen. Carmike 10: 4:15, 7 and 9:30, with no shows Wed.–Thu., and Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:20. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:25, 2:45, 5, 7:30 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 4, 7:30 and 9:45. TANGLED The Rapunzel fairy tale gets a 3-D makeover in this “action-packed” animated version starring the voice of Mandy Moore as the girl with really long hair. Carmike 10 in 2-D: 4:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:15. Village 6 in 2-D: 7 and 9:20, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:15 and 4:15. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:25 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:25, 4:10, 6:55 and 9:40. TRON: LEGACY This 3-D sequel to the 1982 classic ought to make your inner sci-fi freak scream with delight. It follows Garrett Hedlund as he plugs into a digital world—filled with flashy costumes and awesome looking spaceships—so he can find Jeff Bridges and return him back to reality. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:50, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:35, 3:40, 6:40 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:10, 4:05, 6:45 and 9:30.

It’s probably best to float the idea of a threesome after dinner. No Stings Attached opens Friday at the Village 6.

start knocking boots, and then Kutcher realizes he’s got a heart-on for Portman. Village 6: 7 and 9:45, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1:35 and 4:15. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 7 and 9, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1, 3:55, 7:05 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight.

NOW PLAYING BLACK SWAN Darren Aronofsky (Pi, Requiem for a Dream) delivers yet another psychological head trip with a story that pits two ballet dancers, Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis, against each other as they fight for stage prominence during a production of Swan Lake. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9, with 9:10 only shows Sat.–Sun., Sat. matinees at 1 and 3, and a Sun. matinee at 3:10. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:25, 4:15, 6:45 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER The third film based on C.S. Lewis’ fantasy trilogy gets a little 3-D love in a story that centers around Edmund Pevensie and company venturing to the end of the world in a ship, and features lots of eye candy like eerily glowing swords and shapeshifting humans. Village 6 in 2-D: 7:30 and 9:55, with

Missoula Independent

4:15, 7 and 9:40, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:50, 3:35, 6:35 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:10, 6:55 and 9:40. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4, 7 and 9:15, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:30. THE FIGHTER Mark Wahlberg is the knockout star of this Rockyesque, biographical sports drama about the life of East Coast boxer “Irish” Micky Ward, who punched his way to the top thanks to expert training from his ex-convict half-brother, played by Christian Bale. Carmike 10: 4, 7 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:50, 3:35, 6:35 and 9:40, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:20, 4:10, 6:55 and 9:40. THE GREEN HORNET Seth Rogen is a financially well-off son of a newspaper publisher who decides to put bad guys in their place by becoming a masked ass-kicking crime fighter in this 3-D adaptation of the classic 1930s radio program. Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind) directs. Carmike 10: 4:30, 7:10 and 9:45, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:35. Village 6 in 2-D: 7:25 and 10, with

Page 34 January 20 – January 27, 2011

giant belly. Village 6 in 2-D: 7 and 9:30, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 9:25 and Mon.–Thu. at 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 The first part of the seventh (and, thankfully, last) installment of this ever popular book/film empire follows Harry and his pals Ron and Hermione as they try to bring down the dark lord known as Voldemort. Village 6: 7:40, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 1 and 4:30. THE KING’S SPEECH After English aristocrat Colin Firth gets crowned King George VI of England, he tries to rid himself of a nasty stammer so he can give good speeches to his fellow Brits, who are on the brink of World War II. Critics are already predicting that this flick is bound for an Oscar. Wilma Theatre: nightly at 7 and 9:10, with 7 only shows Sat.–Sun., and Sat. matinees at 1 and 3:10 and a Sun. matinee at 1. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:45, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:30, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight, and Mon.–Thu. at 1, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:30. LITTLE FOCKERS Your favorite Focker Ben Stiller returns in this third, and last, installment of the comedy series that began with Meet the Parents and Meet the Fockers. This time around, Stiller has to contend with parenthood, a midlife crisis, and his nosier-

TRUE GRIT The Coen brothers offer up their stylish adaptation of the 1968 novel, and 1969 movie, of the same name. Jeff Bridges is a booze-loving U.S. Marshal, enlisted by a 14-year-old girl to track down shady drifter Josh Brolin, after Brolin kills the girl’s dad. Matt Damon co-stars. Carmike 10: 4:15, 6:30, 7, 9 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1, 1:30 and 3:45. Pharaohplex in Hamilton: 6:50 and 9:10, with Sat.–Sun. matinees at 3 and no 9:10 show on Sun. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: 1:05, 3:45, 7:15 and 9:45, with an additional Fri.–Sat. show at midnight. Mountain Cinema in Whitefish: 4:15, 7:15 and 9:30, with Fri.–Sun. matinees at 1:45. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4, 7 and 9:15. YOGI BEAR This 3-D flick features Dan Aykroyd getting his bear on as the voice of Yogi Bear, who, with his pal Boo Boo, voiced by Justin Timberlake, must save Jellystone Park from getting bought and cut down by loggers. Carmike 10: 7:15 and 9:30. Stadium 14 in Kalispell: Fri.–Sun. at 12:05, 2:30, 4:50 and 7:10, and Mon.–Thu. at 1:30, 4:05 and 7:10. Showboat Cinema in Polson: 4:15, 7:15 and 9. Capsule reviews by Skylar Browning and Ira Sather-Olson. Moviegoers be warned! Show times are good as of Fri., Jan. 21. Show times and locations are subject to change or errors, despite our best efforts. Please spare yourself any grief and/or parking lot profanities by calling ahead to confirm. Theater phone numbers: Carmike 10/Village 6–541-7469; Wilma–728-2521; Pharaohplex in Hamilton–961-FILM; Stadium 14 in Kalispell–752-7804. Showboat in Polson, Entertainer in Ronan and Mountain in Whitefish–862-3130.


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Missoula Independent

Page 35 January 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; January 27, 2011


M I S S O U L A

Independent

www.missoulanews.com

January 20 - January 27, 2011

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Red Willow Learning Center now available to rent. 1000’ space for classes or meetings. Video conferencing, AV, beverage service. 825 West Kent. Call Kathy 880-2639. Support groups for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault each Tuesday at YWCA Missoula. Orientation Group, Living in Peace, and Domestic Violence Native Women’s Talking Circle. Groups also available for children/teens. Dinner at 5:30, groups start at 6:30. Please arrive by 6:15 if you have children. 1130 W. Broadway. 543-6691 for more information. THE BOAT SHOW! “Boat Buying Event of the Year” at Lewis & Clark Fairgrounds, in

Helena, Jan. 28th, 29th & 30th. 443-6400 or 266-5700. www.mtboatshow.com The Western Montana Combined Federal Campaign is accepting applications from federations, charitable organizations or combinations thereof to serve as the administrator for the 2011 federal employee fundraising drive. Interested agencies must submit an application by January 24, 2011. Please call (406) 549-6104 for more information. Submissions should be sent to the Local Federal Coordinating Committee, PO Box 7395, Missoula, MT 59807.

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PET OF THE WEEK NANNERS. 2 year-old Nanners is one of the stunning and adored black cats at the Humane Society. Black cats are always chic and dressed for any occasion whether it be a black tie event, Halloween or even just a lazy Saturday afternoon, they’re always wearing the perfect outfit. Nanners insists that she is always stylish and that a black suit and emerald eyes will never be ‘so last season.’ Besides being fashionable, Nanners is sweet, smart and a cuddly companion.


ADVICE GODDESS

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By Amy Alkon

HOME IS WHERE THE FART IS

When somebody asks, “So, what first attracted you to your wife?” I’m guessing you don’t answer, “I’d have to say it’s pretty much a toss up between the toxic farts and oozing open sores.” It’s no accident that toilets are installed in little locking closets in the corners of homes and not in a big glass box in the middle of the living room. (“Poop du Soleil” is not a spectacle people are looking to see.) There are those couples that brag, “Nothing comes between us, not even the bathroom door!” That may work for them, but you’ve made it clear to your wife that watching her pick her acne scabs while straining on the pot isn’t your idea of foreplay. Your wife probably buys into the notion that love involves embracing absolutely everything about a person, including everything that comes out of their intestines. (Well, love might be blind, but lust sure isn’t, nor has it had its nostrils cemented shut.) Your wife, like her burping, farting girlfriends, seems to see the marriage license as a voucher entitling her to retire from making an effort. Of course, it doesn’t help that academic feminism elevated refusing to please a man into a sociopolitical virtue: “Dismantle patriarchy!” “Rewrite herstory!” “March around in nasty old sweatpants and see how long you can go without washing your hair!” With so much support for your wife’s behavior from her friends and society, your best bet for getting her to change is com-

LOVE HAS COME TO STY My girlfriend’s wonderful, but her house is one big clutterfest, with books, papers, old bills and Post-its everywhere. I find myself unable to relax there, so we spend all our time at my place. She knows she’s messy and jokes about it, so there’s no awkwardness there, but can it work in the long run between two people with such varying standards of neatness? —Type A-Minus There are people who march out into the world looking completely put-together, and then you open their front door and see that the only clutter-busting tip you could possibly give them is “Strike a match and run.” If you don’t look down on Sloppy Susan or maintain illusions that she’ll change, this could work—providing Good Housekeeping rules remain in effect: You keep your house and she keeps hers and visits yours. One major consideration is whether you’ll eventually want kids. In sharing a home, you can do your best to bridge the tidiness gap—hire a housekeeper and give your love a room of her own that she’s free to decorate feng-shovelstyle. Ultimately, you may need to be prepared for that day when you can’t be sure whether your children have been kidnapped or are just lost in the debris pile in the den.

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MUSIC GUITAR WANTED! Local musician will pay up to $12,500 for pre1975 Gibson, Fender, Martin, Rickenbaker and Gretsch guitars. Fender amplifiers also. Call tollfree! 1-(800)995-1217 MORGENROTH MUSIC Stop in for Year End Clearance in all Departments! MORGENROTH MUSIC CENTERS. Corner of Sussex and Regent, 1 block north of the Fairgrounds entrance. 1105 W Sussex, Missoula, MT 59801 549-0013. www.montanamusic.com Outlaw Music Specializing in stringed instruments. Open Monday 12pm-5pm, TuesdayFriday 10am-6pm, Saturday 11am-6pm. 724 Burlington Ave, 541-7533

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My wife of eight years is a really good person but always needs reassurance that she’s attractive. I’m finding that difficult because, on a typical night, she takes a dump in our master bathroom with the door open, saunters over to our bed with a few open sores on her face from picking her zits, rips a fart, and comes at me for a kiss. I give her a peck and dive under the covers so she won’t think I’m interested in sex. She then feels rejected and unloved. When I point out specific things that turn me off, she’s offended. She apparently expects me to be supernaturally attracted to her despite her actions (always wearing nasty sweatpants, hair in shambles, etc.). I don’t expect her to dress up, just to try to look a little cute. If only she’d see herself as a beautiful, seductive, confident woman, and act like it—instead of acting like her girlfriends, who brag that they’ve “trained” their husbands to accept their burping, farting, etc. Am I completely ignorant about true love? —Troubled But Committed

ing at this from the love angle: You’ve failed to master the secret language of farts (one long burst and two short ones mean “I love you, your happiness means everything to me”?), and frankly, your feelings are hurt. You don’t care how these other women treat their husbands. You want to be treated like you’re special, like it means something to her to meet your needs. To minimize her defensiveness, separate the woman from the behavior: I love you and think you are a beautiful, sexy, sensual woman, but I find these behaviors off-putting. They block the beautiful view—kind of like a billboard in front of Yosemite. (Actually, it’s more like a New York City garbage truck, but that’s not helpful.) The bottom line is, you love her so, so much, and you’re just asking that she join you in a few small steps to keep the heat in your marriage—and no, lighting her farts isn’t one of them.

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EMPLOYMENT GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT PT. Retail store needs data entry and general office work (office machines, computer work, answering telephones and providing excellent customer service. Monday thru Friday and pay is $7.50-$8.00/hr, DOE. #2978910 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 ! BARTENDING ! $300-Day potential, no experience necessary, training provided. 1800-965-6520 ext. 278 CHILDCARE. WE ARE A FACILITY THAT RUNS 24/7. WE ARE COMMITTED TO OUR CHILDREN AND EACH OTHER. YOU WILL NEED TO HAVE TRANSPORTATION, A WORKING PHONE NUMBER, CPR/FIRST AID, AND YOU WILL NEED TO GET 8 HOURS OF

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C2 January 20 – January 27, 2011

TRAINING. WE NEED SOMEONE IMMEDIATELY. THE HOURS WILL VARY AND THE DAY YOU WORK WILL CHANGE. WAGE WILL BE SPOKEN ABOUT DURING THE INTERVIEW. #9950138 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 FARM/RANCH WORK AVAILABLE. Calving experience and basic riding skills required. Alcohol, drug, tobacco-free workplace. Resume, references to: Blind Box 406, Box 900, Lewistown, MT 59457 FRAC SAND HAULERS - Tons of runs in Texas! Come to where the weather is warm, pay is great and the land is flat. 817-769-7621, 817-769-7713 FRONT DESK CLERK PT. Hours will vary between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., 3 to 4 days per week up to 32 hours per week. Pay is DOE. #2978904 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

Garden City Harvest Garden City Harvest seeks Youth Harvest Project Coordinator to work in a therapeutic, service-oriented, work program with youth in Missoula, Montana. We’re a nonprofit building community through agriculture with and for low-income Missoulians. Position closes 2/4. www.gardencityharvest.org LARGE NORTHEAST MONTANA NEW HOLLAND FARM EQUIPMENT DEALERSHIP has an immediate full-time opening for a parts person. Pay depends on experience. Company participates in health insurance, uniforms, sick leave, vacation and 401(K). Parts and computer experience required. Call Galen Zerbe 1-800-228-5393 PROPERTY MANAGER. Seeking friendly and upbeat person with excellent customer service skills. Must be hardworking, responsible,

and honest. Must have reliable transportation, good computer skills and be familiar with Microsoft office. #9950137 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 SAWMILLS-Band/Chainsaw-Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. In Stock ready to ship. From $ 4 0 9 0 . 0 0 . www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7747 VETERAN’S SERVICE OFFICER. Responsible for providing information and assistance for veterans and their eligible family members to obtain benefits through Department of Veterans Affairs; prepare and submit claims to the VA, perform case management and advocate for veterans throughout the process. Other duties include administrative tasks in Missoula office. #9810191 Missoula Job Service 728-7060


Capital Campaign Consultant The Missoula Urban Demonstration Project (MUD) is seeking a fundraiser to launch and implement a capital campaign to relocate and expand MUD’s Tool Library and Truck Share programs. For more information, contact info@mudproject.org or visit www.mudproject.org. CASE MANAGERS. Work with adults with severe and disabling mental illness. Must have 1 year of full time cumulative experience working for clients with mental illness. Bachelors degree only preferred. #9950144 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 Garden City Harvest ED Garden City Harvest seeks Executive Director to lead our efforts in fundraising, strategic planning and operations in Missoula, Montana. We’re a nonprofit building community through agriculture with and for Missoulians with low-income. We are accepting applications until the position has filled. Submit application including cover letter, resume and 3 references to: gch.director@gmail.com For more information go to www.gardencityharvest.org Position closes 1/31. www.gardencityharvest.org. METEOROLOGIST. KPAX-TV is looking for part-time, weekend meteorologist. Forecast on Saturdays and Sundays, with occasional fill-in work possible on weekdays. Applicants should be able to exhibit experience in forecasting and on-air roles although we will consider qualified and talented people looking to get their start. Degree and certification is a plus. This forecast area involves complicated mountain weather, especially in the winter, so we’re looking for someone who can learn local details quickly. We expect our meteorologists to contribute to news content so shooting, writing and editing skills are valued. Qualified applicants must have a valid driver’s license with adequate automobile insurance. Wage is DOE. #2978907 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

HEALTH CAREERS LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE (LPN) for rotating evening, graveyard and weekend shifts, 32 - 40 hours per week. Duties include: Overseeing the health care of clients with developmental disabilities in a group home setting, monitoring client health conditions and needs, and acting as unit clinical and managerial resource. Employer will conduct background checks. Benefits are available after 6-month probation. Starting wage is $13.72/hour. #2978895 MIssoula Job Service 728-7060 PATIENT CARE COORDINATOR. RN who coordinates implementation of clinical objectives and

ensures high-quality, cost-efficient patient care. Coordinates nursing services, daily workloads, scheduling and client triage. Makes client visits as necessary to cover for absences, new admissions and other unscheduled needs. Facilitates communication with field staff to ensure efficient service delivery. Serves as a role model for professional practice. Must know and be able to perform all aspects of the RN/Case Manager position. Requires current Montana RN license (BSN preferred); 3 years of RN experience, with 2 years in home care preferred; plus valid Montana driver’s license, auto insurance & reliable transportation. #9950129 Missoula Job Service 728-7060

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OPPORTUNITIES ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part-time to $7,500/month. Fulltime. Training provided. www. KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888-3042847 Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN for excavation projects. Requires 2 years experience and solid supervisory skills with ability to work effective with owner and workers. Will work within a 150 mile radius of Missoula. Hours are 6:00 am to 6:00 pm, Monday through Saturday. Will work 40 to 60 hours per week. Wage is $13.00-20.00 per hour. #2978905 Missoula Job Service 728-7060 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING. Complete programs and refresher courses, rent equipment for CDL. Job Placement Assistance. Financial assistance for qualified students. SAGE Technical Services, Billings/Missoula, 1-800-5454546

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SKILLED LABOR AGRICULTURAL FIELD TECHNICIAN and Farm Mechanic (2 positions) MSU-AESCARC Moccasin, MT. Details at www.montana.edu/ jobs, Lewistown Job Service, or call 406-423-5421. Screening Date: 1/27/11. MSU-Bozeman is an ADA/EEO/AA/Vet Pref Employer

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montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C3 January 20 – January 27, 2011


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT BODY MIND SPIRIT

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The age-old question comes up for review once again: Which should predominate, independence or interdependence? The answer is always different, of course, depending on the tenor of the time and the phase of your evolution. But in the coming weeks, at least, my view is that you should put more emphasis on interdependence. I think you’ll reap huge benefits from wholeheartedly blending your energies with allies whose power and intelligence match yours.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I find many of you Tauruses to be excessively self-effacing. It’s a trait that can be both endearing and maddening. Even as my heart melts in the presence of Bulls who are underestimating their own beauty, I may also feel like grabbing them by the shoulders and shaking some confidence into them, barraging them with frustrated exhortations like, “Believe in yourself as much as I believe in you, for God’s sake!” But I’m guessing I won’t be tempted to do that anytime soon. You appear to be due for a big influx of self-esteem.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It will be good week to let your mind go utterly blank while slouching in front of a TV and sipping warm milk, or to spend hours curled up in a ball under the covers on your bed as you berate yourself with guilty insults for the mistakes you’ve made in your life. NOT! I’m kidding! Please don’t you dare do anything like that. It would be a terrible waste of the rowdy astrological omens that are coming to bear on you. Here are some better ideas: Go seek the fire on the mountain! Create a secret in the sanctuary! Learn a trick in the dark! Find a new emotion in the wilderness! Study the wisest, wildest people you know so that you, too, can be wildly wise!

Classes at Meadowsweet Herbs: Staying Healthy Through the Winter Join Herbalist Jessica Maisel as she shows us how to use medicinal herbs in our food, home and daily routine to keep us healthy throughout the cold and flu season. Thursday January 27, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Childhood Vaccinations: A Naturopathic Perspective Every parent is concerned with making the right decisions when it comes to their child’s health. Vaccines are a controversial and complicated subject. It is important to be able to make an informed decision. Dr. Teresita Martinez of The Golgi Clinic will share the latest naturopathic perspectives on childhood vaccines and how to optimize your child’s health. Tuesday February 1, 7-9 pm, Cost: Free. Herbs and Kids Herbalist and Mom Jessica Maisel discusses creative ways to get your kids using and loving medicinal herbs to achieve and maintain optimum health. Wednesday, February 9, 79 pm, Cost: $20. Local Medicinal Herbs Herbalist and wildcrafter Jessica Maisel takes us on an indepth exploration of 10 useful and abundant medicinal herbs local to the Missoula area including arnica, balsam root, red root, hawthorn, horsetail, yarrow, St. John’s Wort, poplar, monarda and oregon grape. Thursday, February 17, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Spring Cleansing for the Body Series Spring is the perfect time to do a cleanse. Join Herbalist Jessica Maisel and learn how to effectively cleanse and purify your body in a safe and nourishing way from the inside out. This three part series will cover the reasons we need to actively cleanse our



CANCER (June 21-July 22): This would be an excellent week to grieve madly and deeply about the old love affairs that shattered your heart. I’ve rarely seen a better astrological configuration than there is now for purging the residual anguish from those old romantic collapses. So I suggest you conduct a formal ritual that will provide total exorcism and bring you maximum catharsis. Maybe you could build a shrine containing the photos and objects that keep a part of you stuck in the past, and maybe you could find the bold words and innovative gestures that will bid goodbye to them forever. Do you have any intuitions about how to create a rousing healing ceremony?



LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The History cable TV channel has a reality show called “Ice Road Truckers.” It documents the exploits of drivers who haul heavy loads in their 18-wheelers for long distances across frozen rivers and lakes and swamps in Alaska and northwest Canada. They bring supplies to remote outposts where humans work exotic jobs like mining diamonds and drilling for natural gas. If you have any truck-driving skills, Leo, you’d be a good candidate to apply for a gig on the show. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, your levels of courage and adventurousness will be at an all-time high in 2011. May I suggest, though, that you try to make your romps in the frontier more purely pleasurable than what the ice road truckers have to endure?



VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Pop chanteuse Katy Perry is renowned not only for her singing ability but also for her physical appearance. Her preternatural ability to sell her musical products can be attributed in part to her sparkling good looks and charisma. That’s why it was amusing when her husband, the trickster Russell Brand, tweeted a raw photo of her that he took as she lifted her head off the pillow, awakening from a night of sleep. (See it at tinyurl.com/RealKaty.) Without her make-up, Katy’s visage was spectacularly ordinary. Not ugly, just plain. In accordance with the astrological omens, Virgo, I urge you to do what Russell Brand did: Expose the reality that lies beneath and behind the glamorous illusion, either in yourself or anywhere else you find a need.



LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): While I was growing up, I was taught to regard my analytical mind as a supreme tool for understanding reality. I’ve never stopped believing that. However, I eventually realized I had to add the following corollaries if I wanted to thrive: (1) My imagination and intuition are as essential to my success as my analytical mind; (2) I need to regularly express my playful, creative urges, and that requires me to sometimes transcend my analytical mind; and (3) to maintain my emotional well-being, I have to work with my dreams, which occur in a realm where the analytical mind is not lord and king. Does any of this ring true for you, Libra? Now is an excellent time to cultivate other modes of intelligence besides your analytical mind.



SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): If you’re planning on spending any time hibernating during the next few months, this would be an excellent time to do it. Your reaction time is slowing down, which is a very healthy thing. Meanwhile, your allergy to civilization is acting up, your head is too full of thoughts you don’t need, and your heart craves a break from the subtle sorrows and trivial tussles of daily life. So go find some sweet silence to hide inside, Scorpio. Treat yourself to a slow-motion glide through the eternal point of view.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Dear Rob: All my life I’ve been passionate about the big picture—learning how the universe works, meditating on why things are the way they are, and probing the invisible forces working behind the scenes. Too often, though, I’m so enamored with these expansive concepts that I neglect to pay enough humble attention to myself. It’s embarrassing. Loving the infinite, I scrimp on taking care of the finite. Any advice? —Larger Than Life Sagittarian.” Dear Larger: You’re in luck! Members of the Sagittarian tribe have entered a phase when they can make up for their previous neglect of life-nourishing details. In the coming weeks, I bet you’ll find it as fun and interesting to attend to your own little needs as you normally do to understanding the mysteries of the cosmos.



CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): All the most credible studies say that the crime rate is steadily decreasing, and yet three out of every four people believe it’s rising. What conclusions can we draw from this curious discrepancy? Here’s one: The majority of the population is predisposed towards pessimism. In my astrological opinion, Capricorn, you can’t afford to be victimized by this mass psychosis. If you are, it will interfere with and probably even stunt the good fortune headed your way. I’m not asking you to be absurdly optimistic. Just try to root out any tendencies you might have to be absurdly gloomy.

bodies, which herbs and supplements to use and how to use them properly for maximum benefit. We will prepare and share some Spring Tonic Soup at the last class! Tuesdays, February 22, March 1 and 8, 7-9 pm, Cost: $60. Healthy Skin from the Inside Out Join Meadowsweet’s Kimberly DeVries to learn about healing the skin from the inside out. Learn how you can help your liver and other eliminatory organs do their jobs better so the skin doesn’t have to take on a heavier load. Thursday March 24 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Makng your Own Natural Body Care: Healthy Skin from the Outside In Join Meadowsweet’s own Kimberly DeVries to learn how to make your own natural body care. Kim will show us how to make a face lotion, face toner and a face scrub using herbs, essential oils, clays, fixed oils & other natural products. Thursday March 31, 7-9 pm, Cost: $20. Take home each product you make for an additional $10. Meadowsweet Herbs, 180 S. 3rd St. W., Missoula, MT 59801 728-0543 www.meadowsweet-herbs.com DR Naturopathic Take the Natural Path to Health with DR. NATUROPATHIC. Specializing in:

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Primary care & midwifery, Pain management, naturopathic manipulation, metabolic disorders, Wilson’s temperature syndrome, herbal medicine, and HCG diet. Call DR. Nesbit at 541-7672. 2016 Strand Avenue in Missoula. www.DrNesbit.com Escape with Massage$50. Swedish & Deep Tissue. Gift Certificates Available. Janit Bishop, CMT. 207-7358 127 N. Higgins Loving what is; the work of Byron Katie (Visit www.thework.org) inquiry facilitated by Susie Clarion 406-552-7919

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the early 20th century, many women at the beach covered most of their bodies with swimsuits made of wool. If they went in the water, they’d emerge about 20 pounds heavier. Swimming was a challenge. Your current psychic state has resemblances to what you’d feel like if you were wearing drenched woolen underwear and a drenched woolen clown suit and a drenched woolen robe. My advice? Take it off; take it all off. The astrological omens are clear: Whatever your reasons were for being in this get-up in the first place are no longer valid.



PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In comedian Sarah Silverman’s memoir, The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee, she confesses that she was still wetting her bed at age 19. Depression was a constant companion throughout adolescence, and she took a lot of Xanax. Yet somehow she grew into such a formidable adult that she was able to corral God himself to write the afterword for her book. How did she manage that? “This is so trite,” she told Publishers Weekly, “but…sex.” I predict that a comparable reversal of fortune is ahead for you, Pisces. Some part of your past will be redeemed, quite possibly with the sexy help of a divine ally. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C4 January 20 – January 27, 2011

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Nico Helsing, Professional

Dominatrix For the Curious to the Connoisseur http://sites.google.com/site /missouladungeon/ 406-531-1405


PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF MISSOULA CONSULTANT SERVICES SOQ/RFP ADVERTISEMENT The City of Missoula has received approval from the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) to develop a federal-aid Community Transportation Enhancement Program (CTEP) project titled “University of Montana Crosswalk Improvements.” The City of Missoula is requesting proposals and statements of qualifications for engineering services to assist the Engineering Division in the design and oversight of construction of crosswalk improvements on public streets adjacent to the University of Montana in compliance with all applicable requirements under the MDT CTEP. Copies of the detailed request for statements of qualifications (SOQ) and Request for Proposals (RFP), including a description of the services to be provided by respondents, the minimum content of responses, and the factors to be used to evaluate the responses, can be obtained by visiting www.ci.missoula.mt.us/cityclerk/ bid.htm, or by contacting Doug Harby, Engineering Division, 435 Ryman, Missoula, Montana 59801,(406)-5526091, or at dharby@ci.missoula.mt.us All responses to the detailed request for SOQs and RFPs must be submitted to City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 435 Ryman Missoula, Montana 59802 on or before 3:00 p.m., February 11, 2011 CITY OF MISSOULA SECTION 00100 INVITATION TO BID Notice is hereby given that sealed bids for the construction of: MRA URD III – Residential Curb & Sidewalk Project – Phase 3 will be received by the City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, Montana, 59802-4297 until 11 a.m., local time, on Thursday February 10, 2011. The bids will then be publicly opened and read aloud at the: Missoula Redevelopment Agency Conference Room, MRA office, 140 West Pine Street, Missoula, Montana. Bidders shall submit sealed bids as prescribed in the Project Manual addressed to: City Clerk, 435 Ryman Street, Missoula, MT, 59802, enclosed in a sealed envelope plainly marked on the outside “Proposal for MRA URD III – Residential Curb & Sidewalk Project – Phase 3.” The envelope shall also be marked with the bidder’s name, address and Montana contractor’s registration number. This project consists of installing approximately 49,000 square feet of city sidewalk, 5,525 lineal feet of city curb, drainage facilities, ADA facilities, street repairs and associated work. A complete set of the project manual, drawings and specifications may be furnished or reviewed at Territorial Landworks, Inc. 620 Addison Missoula, Montana (406-721-0142), upon a nonrefundable payment of $50.00 (plus shipping) by company check, cashier’s check, or bank money order (cash cannot be accepted). In addition, the project manual, drawings and specifications may also be examined at the Missoula Plans Exchange, (406) 549-5002 and iSqFt® website: http://www.isqft.com. There will be a non-mandatory pre-bid conference at the Missoula Redevelopment Agency Conference Room, 140 West Pine St, Missoula, Montana (406-552-6160), Friday January 28, 2011. Interested contractors are encouraged to attend. Questions regarding the project manual, drawings and specifications shall be directed to the Engineer Territorial-Landworks, Inc.; 620 Addison, PO Box 3851; Missoula, MT 59806. (406) 721-0142 Proposals must be accompanied by cash, cashier’s check, certified check, or bank money order drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the State of Montana, or by any banking corporation incorporated in the State of Montana, or by a bid bond or bonds executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the State of Montana in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract. The bid security shall identify the same firm as is noted on the bid proposal form. Performance and Payment Bonds will be required of the successful bidder in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the aggregate of the proposal for the faithful performance of the contract, and protection of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency against liability. Contractor and any of the contractor’s subcontractors doing

work on this project will be required to obtain registration with the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) except as listed in MCA 39-9211. Information on registration can be obtained from the Department of Labor and Industry by calling 1-406-4447734. Contractor is required to have registered with the DLI prior to bidding on this project. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractor or subcontractors in performance of this construction work shall be paid wages at rates as may be required by law. The contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of their actual or perceived race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, creed, sex, age, marital or familial status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or because of their association with a person or group of people so identified. Successful contractors and vendors are required to comply with City of Missoula business licensing requirements. All laborers and mechanics employed by contractors or subcontractors in performance of the construction work shall be paid wages at rates as set out in the bid proposal. Any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement is subject to all appropriate federal laws, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The Missoula Redevelopment Agency hereby notifies all bidders it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this invitation, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation. The Disadvantaged Business Enterprises’ contract goals are 0%. In accordance with Section 49-3207, MCA, and Chapter 9.64, MMC contractors agree that for this contract all hiring will be made on the basis of merit and qualifications and that there will be no discrimination on the basis of actual or perceived race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, creed, sex, age, marital or familial status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or because of their association with a person or group of people so identified, by the persons performing the contract. The Missoula Redevelopment Agency reserves the right to waive informalities, to reject any and all bids received , and, if all bids are rejected, to re-advertise under the same or new specifications, or to make such an award as in the judgment of its officials best meets the Agency’s requirements. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of bids, which is specified above. The City of Missoula provides accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person’s ability to participate in any service, program, or activity of the City. To request accommodation, please contact Doug Harby at the City of Missoula Public Works Office at 406-552-6345. City of Missoula is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Bid announcements and bid results are posted on the city’s website at www.ci.missoula.mt.us/bids. Any objections to published specifications must be filed in written form with the City Clerk prior to bid opening at Thursday February 10, 2011 at 11 a.m. MISSOULA COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed with the County Commissioners requesting to abandon that certain county road specifically described as: GLO on Plat, located in NW _ of Section 1, Township 13N, Range 20W, Missoula Development Park From Trumpeter Court To Airway Blvd And further described in the Road Book of the Missoula County Department of Public Works Surveying Division and shown on the attached Exhibit as: On Lot 1-A Missoula Development Park, PH 2, Block 10, Lots 1A & 2A (For more information, please see the petition on file in the Clerk & Recording Office at 200 West Broadway, 2nd floor, Missoula MT.) The abandonment of this county road is necessary and advantageous for the following reasons: 1. No need of road or access in platted subdivision 2. Now required when platting new subdivisions 3. Stopping sale of property A PUBLIC HEARING on the above requested abandonment will be held before the Board of County Commissioners at

their regular meeting on February 2, 2011 at 1:30 P.M., Room 201, Missoula County Courthouse. Interested parties are requested to be present at that time to be heard for or against the granting of this petition. Written protest will be accepted by the Commissioners’ Office, Room 204, Missoula County Courthouse, Missoula, MT prior to the hearing date. /s/ Vickie M. Zeier Clerk & Recorder /Treasurer By Kim Cox Assistant Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder 200 W. Broadway St. Missoula, MT 59802 (406) 258-3241 Date: January 6, 2011 MISSOULA COUNTY SHERIFF’S SALE V-TEC INC, Randy L. Mineer, Claimants Against KYLE F. DAVIS, DANNY SUNDAHL, Owners GOLDENWEST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Lien Holder. To Be Sold at Sheriff’s Sale: TERMS: CASH, or its equivalent; NO personal checks On the 27th day of January A.D., 2011, at Ten (10:00) o’clock A.M., at 2420 Benton Avenue, in the City of Missoula, County of Missoula, State of Montana, that certain personal property situate in said Missoula County, and particularly described as follows, to-wit: 2002 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4D, VIN 1J4GW48S82C275847 Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining. No warranty is made as to the condition or title of the vehicle. Dated this 20th day of January A.D., 2011. CARL C. IBSEN Sheriff of Missoula County, Montana By /s/ Patrick A. Turner, Deputy MISSOULA COUNTY CALL FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Missoula County Department of Public Works until 10:00 A.M., Tuesday, Monday February 7th, at which time bids will be opened and read for the purpose of purchasing one (1) Injection Patching Machine. Specifications and bid procedures can be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 6089 Training Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 Telephone Number (406) 258-4816. Proposals must be accompanied by security in the amount of five percent (5%) of the amount of the bid as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into the required contract and in the form specified in MCA 18-1-203, for example: Cash, cashier’s check, certified check, bank money order, or bank draft, any of which must be drawn and issued by a national banking association located in the state of Montana or a banking association incorporated under the Laws of Montana; or a bid bond or bond executed by a surety corporation authorized to do business in the state of Montana. THE CONTRACT WILL BE AWARDED TO THE LOWEST RESPONSIBLE QUALIFIED BIDDER WHOSE BID PROPOSAL COMPLIES WITH ALL THE REQUIREMENTS. Proposals shall be sealed and marked “Proposals for Injection Patching Machine” and addressed to: Missoula County Departmentof Public Works 6089 Training Drive Missoula, Montana, 59808 Montana Department of Livestock, is causing to be published pursuant to MCA 81-3-106 NOTICE 2011 is a year for rerecording MARKS AND BRANDS And that no mark or brand continues of record unless rerecorded Brand owners have until December 31, 2011 to rerecord registered brands and the fee is $100.00 IN THE JUSTICE COURT OF MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, vs- Laramie Loewen Defendant. )))))))Cause No. CV2010 - 31131-LT SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT LARAMIE LOEWEN: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, which is filed in the office of the Clerk of this Court, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to file your Answer and serve a copy thereof upon the Plaintiff’s attorney within ten (10) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; and in case of your failure to appear or Answer, Judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action relates to an eviction and subsequent possession upon the following described real property in the County of Missoula, State of Montana: THE WEST 10 FEET OF LOT 11, ALL OF LOTS 12, 13, 14 AND THE EAST

25 FEET OF LOT 15 IN BLOCK 66 OF CAR LINE ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 199 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 2284 WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court, this 29th day of December, 2010. (SEAL OF THE COURT) /s/ Karen A. Orzech Justice Court Judge Dated this 23rd day of December, 2010. MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM Attorneys for Plaintiff 38 Second Ave E Dickinson, ND 58601 Tel: (701) 227-1841 MT BAR ID#2429 By: /s/ Charles J. Peterson Charles J. Peterson, Attorney Attorney for the Plaintiff Please be advised that Mackoff Kellogg Law Firm may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information you provide will be used for that purpose. NOTICE Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that unless you dispute the validity of the foregoing debt or any portion thereof within thirty days after receipt of this letter, we will assume the debt to be valid. On the other hand, if the debt or any portion thereof is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt and will mail you a copy of such verification. You are also advised that upon your request within the thirty day period, we will provide you with the name and address of your original creditor, if different from the creditor referred to in this Notice. We are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No 1 Cause No. DP 11 3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT C. McGIFFERT, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above—named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to BRIAN S. McGIFFERT, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 10th day of January, 2011. /s/ Brian S. McGiffert, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP 11 12 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KARRIE LEE FIMBRES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Co— Personal Representatives of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to BONNIE ACEVES and MANUEL FIMBRES, the Co-Personal Representatives, return receipt requested, c/o Reely Law Firm, P.C., 3819 Stephens Avenue, Suite 201, Missoula, Montana 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 14th day of January, 2011. /s/ Bonnie Aceves, Co-Personal Representative /s/ Manuel Fimbres, Co-Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 2 Cause No. DP-10-203 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JESSE EUGENE GEDDES, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the abovenamed Estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to the Personal Representative, Nicholas A. Geddes, return receipt requested, at The Modine Law Office, 215 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 5th day of January, 2011. /s/ Nicholas A. Geddes, Personal Representative, 10412 Tookie Trek, Missoula, MT 59801 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Department No. 3 Cause Probate No. DP-10202 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARY E. PENGELLY, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice of said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Laure Pengelly Drake, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, Montana 59807-9197, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. Dated this 30th day of December, 2010. /s/ Laure Pengelly Drake, Personal Representative, c/o Maclay Law Firm, PO Box 9197, Missoula, MT 59807-9197 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DP-10-200 NOTICE

TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of FREDALINE M. YONCE, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Barbara A. Palmer, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at 2937 Grassland Dive, Missoula, Montana 59808 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 28th day of December, 2010. /s/ Barbara A. Palmer, Petitioner, 2937 Grassland Drive, Missoula, MT 59808 MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 2 Cause No. DV-11-25 Notice of Hearing on Name Change In the Matter of the Name Change of Adam Russell Luce, Petitioner. This is notice that Petitioner has asked the District Court for a change of name from Adam Russell Luce to Adam Russell Freeman. The hearing will be on February 22, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. The hearing will be at the Courthouse in Missoula County. Dated January 6, 2011. /s/ Shirley E. Faust, Clerk of District Court By Cori Ollin, Deputy Clerk of Court MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Case No. DP-10-201 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN RE THE ESTATE OF RICHARD HOWARD WILLIAMS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Darinda Williams, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, at Tipp & Buley, P.C., PO Box 3778, Missoula, MT 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 5th day of January, 2011. /s/ Darinda Williams, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Cause No. DP-10-198 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MAURICE J. AHERN, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will b forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to PATRICIA L. AHERN, the Personal Representative, return receipt requested, c/o Marsillo & Schuyler, PLLC, 103 South 5th Street East, Missoula, MT 59801, or filed with the Clerk of the above Court. DATED this 20th day of December, 2010. /s/ Patricia L. Ahern, Personal Representative MONTANA FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, MISSOULA COUNTY Dept. No. 4 Probate No. DP-10-199 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF C. CALVIN NESS, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said estate are required to present their claim within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be mailed to Julie K. Gosselin, return receipt requested, c/o Worden Thane P.C., PO Box 4747, Missoula, Montana 59806 or filed with the Clerk of the above-entitled Court. DATED this 20th day of December, 2010. /s/ Julie K. Gosselin, Personal Representative NOTICE OF SALE UNDER MONTANA DEED OF TRUST Deed of Trust: Dated: December 20, 2005 Names of Original Parties: Grantor: Todd D. Runkle 24696 Wallace Creek Road Clinton, Montana 59825 Todd D. Runkle 5054 Lower JC Road Darby, Montana 59829 Todd D. Runkle P.O. Box 235 Conner, Montana 59827 Trustee: First American Title P.O. Box 549 Missoula, Montana 59806 Beneficiary: Dan Russell Family, L.P. c/o Daniel G. Russell 9905 Inspiration Drive Missoula, Montana 59808 Successor Trustee: Christopher B. Swartley Attorney at Law Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807 -8957 Date and Place of Recordation: December 21, 2005 in Book 766, Page 473, Micro Records of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana The undersigned hereby gives notice that on the 19th day of April, 2011 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, West Broadway side, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana, Christopher B. Swartley, as Successor Trustee under the above-described instrument, in order to satisfy the obligation set forth below, has elected to and will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, lawful money of the United States of America, payable at the time of sale to the Successor Trustee, the interest of the above-named Trustee, Successor Trustee, and Grantor, and all of its successors and assigns, without warranty or covenant, express or implied, as to title or possession, in the following described real property: : Queen Mary

Survey No. 9702 Embracing a portion of Sections 17 and 18 in Township 12 North of Range 16 West of the Montana Meridian, in the Wallace, unorganized, Mining District, Missoula County, Montana, and bounded, described and platted as follows: Beginning at Corner No. 1, a fir post 4 feet long, 5 inches square, marked 1-9702, with mound of earth and stone, from which the East Quarter corner of Section 18 in Township 12 North of Range 16 West of the Montana Meridian, bears N6˚26’W., 374.7 feet distant; then, first course N66˚59’W., 242.05 feet to a point from which discovery shaft bears S9˚55’W., 85 feet distant; 462.36 feet to corner No. 2, a pine post 4 feet long, 5 inches square, marked 2-9702, with mound of earth and stone; thence second course, S17˚49’W., 532.3 feet to corner No. 3, a granite stone 24x8x6 inches marked 3-9702, with mound of earth and stone; thence third course, S77˚16’E., 190.5 feet to corner No. 4, a granite stone 24x8x6 inches marked 4-9702, with mound of earth and stone; thence fourth course, S21˚56’W., 964.93 feet to corner No. 5, a pine post 4 feet long, 5 inches square, marked 5-9702 and P.I. 4139 – 7609, with mound of earth and stone; situate at the point of intersection of line 1 – 2 of Survey No. 4139, with Aladdin lode claim with line 3 – 4 of Survey No. 7609 the Cape Nome lode claim; thence, fifth course, S66˚59’E., 330 feet intersect line 1 – 2 of Survey No. 7607, the Bullion lode claim, at S37˚9’W., 39.6 feet from corner No. 2; 616 feet to corner No. 6, a spruce post 4 feet long, 5 inches square, marked 6-9702, with mound of earth and stone; thence sixth course, N9˚55’E., 53.87 feet intersect line 2 – 3 of said Survey No. 7607, at S70˚2’E., 264.48 feet from corner No. 2; 186.2 feet to corner No. 7, a pine post 4 feet long, 5 inches square, marked 7-9702, with mound of earth and stone; thence seventh course, N7˚5’E., 1,330.65 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning; - expressly excepting and excluding from these presents all that portion of the ground hereinbefore described; embraced in said mining claim or Survey No. 7607. Recording Reference: Book 673 of Micro Records at Page 351. Subject to easements and encumbrances of record. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are the failure of the above-named Grantor, and all of his successors and assigns, to pay when due the monthly payments provided for in the Deed of Trust in the amount of Seven Hundred Forty-seven and 01/100ths Dollars ($747 .01) for the months of June 2010 through the present; together with late charges in the amount of Five Hundred Dollars ($500 .00); and the failure to pay real and personal property taxes and assessments for the years 2009 and 2010 (first one-half). The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is Sixty-one Thousand Two Hundred Eleven and 42/100ths Dollars ($61 ,211 .42), plus interest thereon at the rate of eight and one -half percent (8 .5%) from and after the 20th day of May, 2010, to November 20, 2010, in the amount of Two Thousand Six Hundred One and 49/100ths Dollars ($2 ,601. 49), plus per diem interest thereafter at the rate of Fourteen and 27/100ths Dollars ($14.2 7), plus all costs, expenses, attorney’s and trustee’s fees as provided by law. DATED this 22nd day of November, 2010. /s/ Christopher B. Swartley Christopher B. Swartley, Successor Trustee Christopher B. Swartley, PLLC P.O. Box 8957 Missoula, Montana 59807 -8957 STATE OF MONTANA :ss. County of Missoula This instrument was acknowledged before me on the 22nd day of November, 2010, by Christopher B. Swartley, Trustee. /s/ Roxie Hausauer Notary Public for the State of Montana. Residing at: Lolo, Montana My commission expires: January 6, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 03/02/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200705409, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Darwin L. Kinyon and Jill M. Kinyon, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Challenge Financial Investors, Corp. was Beneficiary and Title Services of Missoula Inc. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Title Services of Missoula Inc. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 12, Forty-four Ranch Estates, according to the official plat thereof, as filed in the Clerk and Recorder’s office Missoula County, Montana. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 11/01/09 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 19, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $208,032.57. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $190,016.00, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings.

Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 4, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.72357) 1002.178688-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 01/26/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200702634, Book 791, Page 655, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Mark W. Knight and Laura A. Knight, husband and wife was Grantor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Home123 Corporation was Beneficiary and First American Title Insurance Company was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title Insurance Company as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 55-B of Snider Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. By written instrument recorded as Instrument No. 200807848, Bk. 816, Pg. 1024, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 01/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of November 24, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $805,190.60. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $599,322.54, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 6, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7777.26264) 1002.97599-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 11/30/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200631097, Bk. 788, Pg. 366, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Matthew M. Miller and Rebecca L. Miller was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title and Escrow

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C5 January 20 – January 27, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title and Escrow as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 1 of Kalberg Estates, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 04/01/08 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 3, 2010, the amount

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Missoula Consolidated Planning Board will conduct a public hearing on the following items on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., in the Missoula City Council Chambers located at 140 W. Pine Street in Missoula, Montana. 1. Missoula Development Park, Block 4, Lot 1 The Missoula County Airport Industrial District and Missoula County Special Projects request to rezone the subject property from the “Neighborhood Commercial” Sub-district to the “Light Industrial” sub-district of the Missoula Development Park Special Zoning District. The property is located at the inter-

necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $475,664.21. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $365,584.06, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 14, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.17612) 1002.99556-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/29/06, recorded as Instrument No. 200615934, Bk. 777, Pg. 1307, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Robert Che Garrard, Tonia D. Garrard was Grantor, Community Bank-Missoula, Inc. was Beneficiary and First American Title was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded First American Title

as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lots 12-17 Inclusive in Block 7 of Frenchtown Townsites according to the official plat thereof and recorded in the office of the County Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana excepting a portion thereof conveyed to the State of Montana on May 5, 1955 by deed recorded in Book 189 at Page 266 deed records of Missoula County, Montana as retraced by Certificate of Survey No. 5442. By written instrument, beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust was assigned to Chase Home Finance, LLC. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 08/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 3, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $260,747.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $251,769.20, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 11, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including fore-

COMMENTS ON CITY’S ANNUAL ACTION PLAN REQUESTED

section of Expressway and Butler Creek Road (see Map O). 2. Article 9 Public and Private Improvements, Missoula City Subdivision Regulations The Office of Planning and Grants, in cooperation with the City Engineering Division, is initiating a revision to the Missoula City Subdivision Regulations, Article 9 Public and Private Improvements. The intent of this item is to update and revise the regulations to better reflect current practices. The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on item #1 at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, February 16, 2011, in Room 201 of the County Courthouse at 200 West Broadway in Missoula. The City Council will conduct a public hearing on item #2 at a time to be determined. Your attendance and comments are welcomed and encouraged. The project files are available for public inspection at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants, City Hall, 4 3 5 Ry m a n , M i s s o u l a , Montana. Telephone 258-4657. If anyone attending this meeting needs special assistance, please provide 48 hours advance notice by calling 258-4657. The City of Missoula or will provide auxiliary aids and services.

The City of Missoula has developed an Annual Action Plan describing activities that it will undertake as a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Entitlement City and as a Home Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) Participating Jurisdiction for the program year beginning April 1, 2011. The City’s Program Year 2011 Annual Action Plan is now available for public review and comment. A public hearing on the Plan has been requested before City Council at its regular meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, January 24, 2011, in the City Council Chambers at 140 West Pine Street in Missoula. Public comments on the City’s proposed activities submitted by February 9 will be included in the final version of the Annual Action Plan submitted to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Comments may be made in writing or in person at the Missoula Office of Planning and Grants (OPG), 435 Ryman, Missoula, MT, 59802; by phone at 258-4934, or via email to nharte@co.missoula.mt.us. The City of Missoula and OPG welcome comments on its HOME and CDBG activities, Consolidated Plan and annual Action Plans on a year-round basis. Copies of the Action Plan are available for review at OPG in Missoula City Hall, 435 Ryman; at the Missoula City-County Library, 301 East Main; or on OPG’s website at www.co.missoula.mt.us\opgweb. Persons wishing to receive a copy of the Action Plan or to review it in an alternative format should contact Nancy Harte at OPG, 258-4934.

closure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7037.72582) 1002.179340-FEI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Reference is hereby made to that certain trust indenture/deed of trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated 06/04/07, recorded as Instrument No. 200714367, Bk 798, Pg 1453, mortgage records of Missoula County, Montana in which Marcus M. Stenslie, a married person was Grantor, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. was Beneficiary and Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. was Trustee. First American Title Insurance Company has succeeded Alliance Title & Escrow Corp. as Successor Trustee. The Deed of Trust encumbers real property (“Property”) located in Missoula County, Montana, more particularly described as follows: Lot 5 in Block 2 of Meadow Hill Addition, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Beneficiary has declared the Grantor in default of the terms of the Deed of Trust and the promissory note (“Note”) secured by the Deed of Trust because of Grantor’s failure timely to pay all monthly installments of principal, interest and, if applicable, escrow reserves for taxes and/or insurance as required by the Note and Deed of Trust. According to the Beneficiary, the obligation evidenced by the Note (“Loan”) is now due for the 05/01/10 installment payment and all monthly installment payments due thereafter. As of December 1, 2010, the amount necessary to fully satisfy the Loan was $244,050.80. This amount includes the outstanding principal balance of $233,379.84, plus accrued interest, accrued late charges, accrued escrow installments for insurance and/or taxes (if any) and advances for the protection of beneficiary’s security interest (if any). Because of the defaults stated above, Beneficiary has elected to sell the Property to satisfy the Loan and has instructed Successor Trustee to commence sale proceedings. Successor Trustee will sell the Property at public auction On the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, City of Missoula on April 12, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Mountain Time. The sale is a public sale and any person, including Beneficiary and excepting only Successor Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding at the sale location in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by trustee’s deed without any representation or warranty, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, whereis basis. Grantor, successor in interest to Grantor or any other person having an interest in the Property may, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, pay to Beneficiary the entire amount then due on the Loan (including foreclosure costs and expenses actually incurred and trustee’s and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred. Tender of these sums shall effect a cure of the defaults

EAGLE SELF STORAGE will auction to the highest bidder abandoned storage units owing delinquent storage rent for the following units: 2, 35, 251, 301, 380, 407, 477, and 670. Units contain furniture, cloths, chairs, toys, kitchen supplies, tools, sports equipment, books, beds & other misc household goods. These units may be viewed starting Monday, January 24, 2011 by appt only by calling 251-8600. Written sealed bids may be submitted to storage offices at 4101 Hwy 93 S., Missoula, MT 59803 prior to Thursday, January 27, 2011, 4:00 P.M. Buyers bid will be for entire contents of each unit offered in the sale. Only cash or money orders will be accepted for payment. Units are reserved subject to redemption by owner prior to sale. All sales are final.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C6 January 20 – January 27, 2011

stated above (if all non-monetary defaults are also cured) and shall result in Trustee’s termination of the foreclosure and cancellation of the foreclosure sale. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by the reference. You may also access sale status at www.Northwesttrustee.com or USAForeclosure.com. (TS# 7023.90439) 1002.179551-FEI Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 18, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which THOMAS E RANDALL, as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 09/20/2006 and recorded 09/22/2006, in document No. 200624228 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 783 at Page Number 880 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 24 AND 25 IN BLOCK 78 OF DALY’S ADDITION NO. 2, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF RECORD IN BOOK 2 OF PLATS AT PAGE 31. Property Address: 2250 10TH SOUTH ST WEST, Missoula, MT 598013255. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LPThere is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 09/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $112,637.14 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 09/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: December 02, 2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082. T.S. NO 10-0156693 FEI NO 1006.121260 Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on February 9, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which TROY A MAGRUDER, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated

6/13/2005 and recorded 06/14/2005, in document No. 200514382 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 754 at Page Number 687 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: PARCEL I: TRACT 5-B-1D OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2595 LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 11 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. PARCEL II: TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR ACCESS AS SHOWN ON CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 2595. Property Address: 14010 SAPPHIRE DR, Lolo, MT 59847-9637. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 06/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $128,422.50 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.75% per annum from 05/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: September 24, 2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082. T.S. NO 10-0110367 FEI NO 1006.110534 Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 05/09/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee, at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which SCOTT DEAN JOHNSON, AND MARY ELIZABETH JOHNSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 06/23/2006 and recorded 06/30/2006, in document No. 200616003 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 778 at Page Number 63 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 5 OF BITTERROOT HOMES ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 809 DIXON AVE, MISSOULA, MT 59801-8619 The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LPThere is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 05/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obliga-

tion secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $184,614.96 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 7.125% per annum from 05/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 12/22/2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee 2380 Performance Dr., TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 T.S. NO 10-0164695 FEI NO 1006.123570 Notice of Trustee’s Sale THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 4/4/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT,59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which LARRY STOLLE and DAWN STOLLE, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS as Grantors, conveyed said real property to CHARLES J PETERSON, ATTORNEY AT LAW as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 07/01/2009 and recorded 07/13/2009, in document No. 200917156 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 843 at Page Number 798 In the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: IN THE COUNTY OF MISSOULA, STATE OF MONTANA, THE E 1/2 SE 1/4 SE 1/4 NW 1/4 OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 11 NORTH, RANGE 2O WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Property Address: 4287 E CARLTON CREEK RD, Florence, MT 59833-6161. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 08/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $169,289.54 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 5.50% per annum from 08/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation Dated: 11/19/2010 ReconTrust Company, N.A. Successor Trustee, 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407, Richardson, TX 75082. T.S. NO. 10-0151973 FEI NO. 1006.119979 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 25, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND


PUBLIC NOTICES IN CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 417, PAGE 2148, ID#5301078, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 5, BLOCK 9, HILLVIEW HEIGHTS NO. 4. BY FEE SIMPLE DEED FROM JAMES TIMOTHY GREENE AS SET FORTH IN DEED BOOK 417, PAGE 2148 DATED 06/27/1994 AND RECORDED 6/27/1994, MISSOULA COUNTY STATE OF MONTANA. James Greene and Janet Greene, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Tucker Harris, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to CitiFinancial Mortgage Company, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 31, 2001 and Recorded on August 09, 2001 under Document # 200119439, in Bk-666, Pg-386. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. Successor in interest to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,545.02, beginning September 15, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 29, 2010 is $113,732.45 principal, interest at the rate of 6.02% now totaling $37,994.78, late charges in the amount of $459.94, escrow advances of $31,697.66, other fees and expenses advanced of $2520.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.76 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 18, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 18, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V. Greene 41499.823 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 28, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTH 65 FEET OF LOT 11 AND THE SOUTH 65 FEET OF THE WEST 20 FEET OF LOT 12 IN BLOCK 132 OF WOODY ADDITION, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 276 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 1300 Gwen K Harlan, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Title Services of Missoula, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated October 15, 2003 and recorded October 20, 2003 in Book 720, Page 638, under Document No. 200340174. The beneficial interest is current-

ly held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,058.88, beginning June 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 4, 2010 is $125,726.37 principal, interest at the rate of 6.250% now totaling $11,196.53, late charges in the amount of $795.34, escrow advances of $2,450.54, and other fees and expenses advanced of $1,911.33, plus accruing interest at the rate of $21.53 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 19, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 19, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Citimortgage V Harlan 41533.889 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on February 28, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT C45 OF WINDSOR PARK PHASE IV, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. A.P.N.: TO BE ASSIGNED Frank E. Gehring and Jennifer L. Gehring, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title of Missoula County, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated January 28, 2008 and Recorded on February 01, 2008 under Document # 200802341, in Bk-812, Pg-1000. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,321.99, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 1, 2010 is $165,641.47 principal, interest at the rate of 6.25% now totaling $4,313.60, late charges in the amount of $168.08, escrow advances of $-66.76, and other fees and expenses advanced of $199.30, plus accruing interest at the rate of $28.36 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become

JONESIN’ C r o s s w o r due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 19, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 19, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Citimortgage V. Gehring 42011.151 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 15, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 5 AND THE NORTH 15 FEET OF LOT 6, IN BLOCK 59 OF SOUTH MISSOULA, IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF RECORD IN BOOK 1 OF PLATS AT PAGE 19. RECORDING REFERENCE: BOOK 548 OF MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 132. Steve Peters and Jacqueline C. Peters, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Western Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 18, 2006 and Recorded on July 19, 2006 under Document # 200617668, in Bk-779, Pg-159. The beneficial interest is currently held by CU Members Mortgage, a division of Colonial Savings, F.A.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $898.58, beginning August 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 2, 2010 is $90,537.20 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $2,224.45, late charges in the amount of $64.80, and other fees and expenses advanced of $63.80, plus accruing interest at the rate of $17.98 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is

being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 5, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 5, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 Colonial Savings V. Peters 41870.070 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 18, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 40 OF SUNNY MEADOWS NO. 2. A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULACOUNTY, MONTANA. ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF Keith A Walt and Michelle L Walt, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Community Bank-Missoula, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 16, 2005 and Recorded on December 21, 2005 under Document # 200533821, in Bk-766, Pg-469. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc. as successor in interest to ABN Amro Mortgage Group Inc., f/k/a ABN Amro Mortgage Group, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana.The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,406.22, beginning December 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October, 30 2010 is $185,616.75 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $11,787.15, late charges in the amount of $1,474.92, and other fees and expenses advanced of $2627.96, plus accruing interest at the rate of $32.42 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default.The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 8, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson

Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 8, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V. Walt 41926.723 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 21, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND, BEING A CONDOMINIUM DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: UNIT 209, AS SHOWN AND DEFINED IN THE CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS FOR THE LYNNWOOD, A RESIDENTIAL CONDOMINIUM, TOGETHER WITH ITS EXHIBITS AS RECORDED IN BOOK 170 MICRO RECORDS AT PAGE 581, OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED .0261508918 INTEREST IN AND TO TRACT 1, BLOCK 2, HAMMOND ADDITION NO. 1, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION OF THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF (REFERENCE: CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 255), TOGETHER WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON. TOGETHER WITH AN EXCLUSIVE USE AREA OR LIMITED COMMON AREAAS THOSE TERMS ARE DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION AND AS DESCRIBED IN THE PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS ATTACHED THERETO AS BEING A STORAGE SPACE S-26, TOGETHER WITH THEIR APPURTENANCES. APN 5849375 WITH THE APPURTENANCES THERETO. APN: 5849375 Dale L Garberding and Roberta C Garberding, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated July 27, 2007 and recorded August 7, 2007 in Book 803, Page 266, under Document No. 200720401. The beneficial interest is currently held by CitiMortgage, Inc.. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $690.57, beginning May 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 07, 2010 is $105,813.95 principal, interest at the rate of 6.5000% now totaling $4,125.18, late charges in the amount of $207.12, and other fees and expenses advanced of $274.50, plus accruing interest at the rate of $18.84 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an asis, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 11, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson

d s

"Mix Masters"–they'll get the party going.

by Matt Jones

AC ROSS 1 Magic spirit 7 Mrs., in Munich 11 Electrical unit 14 Some belly buttons 15 He clashed with O'Brien 16 Hip-hop's ___-A-Fella Records 17 Currency in the Horn of Africa 20 Seahawks safety ___ Scott 21 Salary limit 22 Sleep aid once advertised to "help you get your Z's" 23 ___-OZN (1980s group with the hit "AEIOU, Sometimes Y") 24 "Reach for the ___!" 25 Seminole leader 27 Carve in marble 29 Hard to hold 31 Flee the premises 32 Took a break 34 Prefix meaning "times one trillion" 36 Speck in la mer 37 Star of "Amistad" and "The Tempest" 41 "Sprechen ___ Englisch?" 42 Second word of many fairy tales 43 Kissing in front of everyone, e.g. 44 Table scrap 45 Steven Tyler's show, to fans 47 "That's hilarious," in Internet-speak 50 Settled 53 Hairy beast 55 Lutelike instrument 57 Snaggable fabric 58 Crocodile's dinner, often 59 Paper towel roll leftover 60 Pioneering "hot" jazz guitarist 64 Colin Hanks, to Tom Hanks

Last week’s solution

65 Settled 66 Yom follower 67 Award bestowed by The Queen, for short 68 Go fast 69 Squeezable African drum

DOWN 1 Ram maker 2 Fruity concession stand bit 3 Contradicting phrase 4 Pen ends 5 New beginning? 6 Self-defeating words 7 Go nuts 8 "The Crying Game" star 9 Curry of "Today" 10 Home of the Tar Heels, as sometimes abbreviated 11 Handel work 12 State capital that means "sheltered bay" 13 "Die Hard" main character John 18 Actor Diggs 19 Deli bread 24 SeaWorld star attraction 25 Bread spread 26 Coffeehouse additive 28 CBS show that sometimes features weird fetishes 30 Prefix before musicologist 33 Subject of debate 35 Late "Giant" wrestler 37 Someone's gotta do it, it's said 38 One way to leave, in song 39 Lymphatic mass 40 ___ Paulo, Brazil 41 Enemy to remain nameless 46 Clinton nominee Guinier 48 Time for afternoon tea 49 Heartbeat noise 51 One billion years 52 One of the deadly sins 54 Ashton Kutcher show 56 Raison ___ 58 It may be spliced 59 Cassette 61 Fertility clinic stock 62 DVR button 63 K leadup

©2011 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C7 January 20 – January 27, 2011


PUBLIC NOTICES Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA)) ss. County of Stark) On November 11, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Citimortgage V Garberding 42011.040 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 21, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 1 OF SCOTT MEADOWS, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Carl R. Crisp and Susan S. Crisp, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Guaranty Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated on August 1, 2006 and recorded on August 7, 2006 in Book 780, Page 720 under Document No. 200619828. The beneficial interest is currently held by One West Bank, FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $2,059.63, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 26, 2010 is $325,477.17 principal, interest at the rate of 6.375% now totaling $10,066.68, late charges in the amount of $1,123.98, escrow advances of $824.60, and other fees and expenses advanced of $283.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $56.85 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTA DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: November 10, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On November 10, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Onewest V. Crisp 41969.547 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 4, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: PARCEL 12 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 351 LOCATED IN THE NORTH ONE-HALF OF SECTION 13,

TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MONTANA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Vern L. Rollins and Lois M Rollins, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Charles J. Peterson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of trust dated June 3, 2009 and recorded June 8, 2009 in Book 840, Page 1378 and under Document No. 200913539. The beneficial interest is currently held by PHH Mortgage Corporation. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,801.57, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of September 1, 2010 is $293,551.07 principal, interest at the rate of 0.06125% now totaling $6,059.01, late charges in the amount of $540.36 and other fees and expenses advanced of $42.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $49.26 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTA DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 25, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 25, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Phh V. Rollins/vern & Lois 41392.693. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 4, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 3 OF SCENIC VIEW ESTATES ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISON IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. David R. Krause and Jodie L. Hooker, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Insured Titles, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated August 31, 2006 and Recorded on September 06, 2006 under Document # 200622780 Book 782 Micro Records Pg. 820. The beneficial interest is currently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,490.17, beginning November 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and

other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 11, 2010 is $173,019.40 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $13,898.59, late charges in the amount of $1,119.80, escrow advances of $3,383.18, suspense balance of $-1,024.77 and other fees and expenses advanced of $363.34, plus accruing interest at the rate of $34.37 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTA DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 25, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 25, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Onewest V. Krause & Hooker 41969.538 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOTS 19 AND 20 IN BLOCK M OF CAR LINE ADDITION NO. 3, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. Doreen M Bermingham, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to Stewart Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated March 30, 2006 and Recorded on March 31, 2006 in Book 771, Page 353 under Document # 200607104. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company Americas as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2006-2. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $852.14, beginning September 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 19, 2010 is $98,968.87 principal, interest at the rate of 7.25% now totaling $9,342.61, late charges in the amount of $105.15, escrow advances of $1,932.07 other fees and expenses advanced of $2,423.54, plus accruing interest at the rate of $19.66 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of

this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTA DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 26, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 American Home Mortgage V. Bermingham 41537.432 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: TRACT 1 OF CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 5171, LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 20 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. Caylee Kittelson-Hehn and Brian Hehn, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Company of Montana Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated April 06, 2009 and Recorded on April 10, 2009 under Document # 200908088, in Bk-837, Pg-124. The beneficial interest is currently held by GMAC Mortgage, LLC. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,475.60, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 5, 2010 is $217,488.26 principal, interest at the rate of 5.0% now totaling $5,437.20, late charges in the amount of $397.18, escrow advances of $12.06, and other fees and expenses advanced of $71.25, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.80 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C8 January 20 – January 27, 2011

grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTA DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 26, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Joan Meier Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 02/23/2013 GMAC V. Kittelson-Hehn 41965.397 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in MISSOULA County, Montana: LOT 16A OF CAR LINE ADDITION BLOCK 18, LOTS 15A AND 16A, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. KORY KNIE, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED ON APRIL 27, 2007 AND RECORDED ON JUNE 3, 2007 IN BOOK 796, PAGE 805 UNDER DOCUMENT NO. 200710763. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Trust 2007-FLX4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-FLX4 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated May 1, 2007. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of MISSOULA County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $732.01, beginning June 1, 2010, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 12, 2010 is $164,024.30 principal, interest at the rate of 6.625% now totaling $4,855.24, late charges in the amount of $420.30, escrow advances of $.70, and other fees and expenses advanced of $69.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $29.77 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTA DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT

PURPOSE. Dated: October 26, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Onewest Bank V Knie 41969.530 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 7, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PREMISES IN MISSOULA COUNTY, STATE OF MONTANA: LOT 157 OF PLEASANT VIEW HOMES NO. 2, PHASE III, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO GARY L. HANNINEN AND CAROL R. HANNINEN, AS JOINT TENANTS AND TO THE SURVIVOR OF SAID NAMES JOINT TENANTS BY DEED FROM PLEASANT VIEW HOMES, INC. RECORDED 09/30/2003 IN DEED BOOK PAGE 200337678, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER OF MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA. TAX ID# 3790302 GARY L. HANNINEN AND CAROL R. HANNINEN, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to WILLIAM T. STEVENS, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, by DEED OF TRUST DATED ON FEBRUARY 22, 2006 AND RECORDED ON APRIL 4, 2006 IN BOOK 771, PAGE 651 UNDER DOCUMENT NO. 200607402. The beneficial interest is currently held by HSBC Mortgage Services, Inc. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,526.62, beginning July 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of October 6, 2010 is $185,369.28 principal, interest at the rate of 8.99% now totaling $26,291.46, late charges in the amount of $107.58, escrow advances of $2845.28, and other fees and expenses advanced of $125.00, plus accruing interest at the rate of $45.67 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTA DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 26, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 26, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to

be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Hsbc V Hanninen 41472.525 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE on March 8, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Main Door of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway in Missoula, MT 59802, the following described real property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 26 of Meriwether, a platted Subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the Official Recorded Plat thereof Richard J Bateman, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real property to First American Title Insurance Comp., as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as Beneficiary, by Deed of Trust dated December 14, 2006 and recorded December 18, 2006 in Book 789, Page 42 under Document No. 200632161. The beneficial interest is currently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley, MSAC 2007HE5. Charles J. Peterson, is the Successor Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana. The beneficiary has declared a default in the terms of said Deed of Trust by failing to make the monthly payments due in the amount of $1,431.51, beginning April 1, 2009, and each month subsequent, which monthly installments would have been applied on the principal and interest due on said obligation and other charges against the property or loan. The total amount due on this obligation as of November 15, 2010 is $216,798.03 principal, interest at the rate of 8.000% now totaling $25,350.65, late charges in the amount of $57.27, escrow advances of $3,418.05, suspense balance of $-2,499.40 and other fees and expenses advanced of $4,954.52, plus accruing interest at the rate of $47.51 per diem, late charges, and other costs and fees that may be advanced. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary, the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds of this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. The sale is a public sale and any person, including the beneficiary, excepting only the Trustee, may bid at the sale. The bid price must be paid immediately upon the close of bidding in cash or cash equivalents (valid money orders, certified checks or cashier’s checks). The conveyance will be made by Trustee’s Deed without any representation or warranty, including warranty of Title, express or implied, as the sale is made strictly on an as-is, where-is basis, without limitation, the sale is being made subject to all existing conditions, if any, of lead paint, mold or other environmental or health hazards. The sale purchaser shall be entitled to possession of the property on the 10th day following the sale. The grantor, successor in interest to the grantor or any other person having an interest in the property, at any time prior to the trustee’s sale, may pay to the beneficiary or the successor in interest to the beneficiary the entire amount then due under the deed of trust and the obligation secured thereby (including costs and expenses actually incurred and attorney’s fees) other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred and thereby cure the default. The scheduled Trustee’s Sale may be postponed by public proclamation up to 15 days for any reason, and in the event of a bankruptcy filing, the sale may be postponed by the trustee for up to 120 days by public proclamation at least every 30 days. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECTA DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: October 29, 2010 /s/ Charles J. Peterson Successor Trustee MACKOFF KELLOGG LAW FIRM P.O. Box 1097 Dickinson, ND 58602-1097 STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA )) ss. County of Stark) On October 29, 2010, before me, a notary public in and for said County and State, personally appeared Charles J. Peterson, Successor Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. /s/ Stephanie L. Crimmins Notary Public Stark County, North Dakota Commission expires: 12/24/2014 Saxon V Bateman 41744.252 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE To be sold for cash at Trustee’s sale on May 17, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., on the front (south) steps of the Missoula County Courthouse located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, all of Trustee’s right, title and interest to the following-described property situated in Missoula County, Montana: Lot 38 of Hawthorn Springs, a platted subdivision in Missoula County, Montana, according to the official recorded plat thereof. Russ L. Allaway and Kathy Allaway, as Grantors, conveyed the real property to Stewart Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to Bitterroot Valley Bank, d/b/a Clark Fork Valley Bank, as original Beneficiary, by Trust Indenture dated June 5,


PUBLIC NOTICES 2008, and recorded as Document No. 200812624, Book 820, Page 202, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder, which Montana Trust Indenture was modified on June 5, 2009, and a Modification of Deed of Trust was recorded June 9, 2009 as Document No. 200913839, Book 841, Page 279, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder, and was further modified on February 18, 2010, and which Modification of Deed of Trust was recorded February 19, 2010, as Document No. 201003394, Book 855, Page 877, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The Beneficiary’s Interest in the Montana Trust Indenture was assigned to Gravely Mountain Investments, LLC on or about December 30, 2010, by Assignment recorded January 4, 2011, in Book 872, Page 242, records of the Missoula County Clerk and Recorder. The default of the obligation, the performance of which is secured by the aforementioned Trust Indenture, and for which default of this foreclosure is made, is for failure to pay the monthly payments as and when due. Pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture, the Beneficiary has exercised, and hereby exercises, its option to declare the full amount secured by such Trust Indenture immediately due and payable. There presently is due on said obligation the principal sum of $202,996.47, plus interest at a rate of 5.5% totaling $4,129.45, for a total amount due of $207,125.92, as of December 20, 2010, plus the costs of foreclosure, attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, escrow closing fees, and other accruing costs. The Beneficiary has elected, and does hereby elect, to sell the abovedescribed property to satisfy the obligation referenced above. The Beneficiary declares that the Grantor is in default as described above and demands that the Trustee sell the

Notice of Trustee’s Sale: THE FOLLOWING LEGALLY DESCRIBED TRUST PROPERTY TO BE SOLD FOR CASH AT TRUSTEE’S SALE. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on 03/01/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the following described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor, his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee at the following place: on the front steps of the Missoula County Courthouse, 200 West Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59802. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Trust Indenture in which MAUREEN ANNE GRAHAM, AND VERNON E CLINCH, as Grantor(s), conveyed said real

property to CHARLES J PETERSON as Trustee, to secure an obligation owed to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary by Trust Indenture Dated 11/15/2005 and recorded 11/23/2005, in document No. 200531329 in Book/Reel/Volume Number 764 at Page Number 1313 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder Missoula County, Montana; being more particularly described as follows: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 2 OF MILLER CREEK VIEW ADDITION PHASE I, A PLATTED SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MISSOULA, MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. Property Address: 7014 ALISHA DR, Missoula, MT 59803-3502. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP. There is a default by the Grantor or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay the monthly installment which became due on 07/01/2010, and all subsequent installments together with late charges as set forth in said Note and Deed of Trust, advances, assessments and attorney fees, if any. TOGETHER WITH ANY DEFAULT IN THE PAYMENT OF RECURRING OBLIGATIONS AS THEY BECOME DUE. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable said sums

being the following: The unpaid principal balance of $186,658.08 together with interest thereon at the current rate of 6.375% per annum from 07/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges, escrow advances, attorney fees and costs, and any other sums incurred or advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said Trust Indenture. The Beneficiary anticipates and may disburse such amounts as may be required to preserve and protect the property and for real property taxes that may become due or delinquent, unless such amounts of taxes are paid by the Grantors. If such amounts are paid by the Beneficiary the amounts or taxes will be added to the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust. Other expenses to be charged against the proceeds to this sale include the Trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees, costs and expenses of the sale and late charges, if any. Beneficiary has elected, and has directed the Trustee to sell the above described property to satisfy the obligation. Dated: 10/15/2010; ReconTrust Company, N.A., Successor Trustee; 2380 Performance Dr. TX2-984-0407; Richardson, TX 75082; T.S. NO. 100136217 FEI NO. 1006.115992

107 E. Kent 2bd/1ba House near U. w/ new carpet & garage. Grizzly Property Management 542-2060

microwave, washer/dryer & microwave. Carport & storage. NO PETS. GATEWEST 7287333

HOUSES

118 West Alder- Historic Park Place Hotel at the heart of downtown –Secured entry, Studio units now offering newly remodeled loft style living with great views, coin-ops and flat rate for gas heat. Rent $525-$595. Contact PPM for rent specials. 721-8990

329 E. Front #B5 - $510/$510 deposit. W/S/G paid. Coinop laundry, off street parking & close to the U. NO PETS. GATEWEST 728-7333

property described above in accordance with the terms and provisions of this Notice. DATED 7th day of January, 2011. /s/ Kevin S. Jones, Trustee STATE OF MONTANA)) ss. County of Missoula) On this 7th day of January, 2011, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Kevin S. Jones, Trustee, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written (SEAL) /s/ Christy Shipp, Notary Public for the State of Montana Residing at Missoula, Montana My Commission Expires: 5/7/2013

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, the 1st day of March, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at the front door of the Missoula County Courthouse, located at 200 West Broadway, Missoula, Montana 59802, Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, Successor Trustee, in order to satisfy the obligations set out below, has been directed to sell and has elected to sell at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, payable at the time of sale, and without warranty or covenant, express or implied as to title, possession,

encumbrances, condition, or otherwise, the interest of the Successor Trustee, Martin S. King, and of the Grantor PRINGLE LANDHOLDING, LLC. in and to the following described real property, situated in Missoula, Montana, to wit: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 22 WEST, P.M.M., MISSOULA COUNTY, MONTANA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS CERTIFICATE OF SURVEY NO. 917. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 28030 Highway 10 West, Huson, MT 59846. Said sale will be made in accordance with the statutes of the State of Montana, and the terms and provisions of: that certain Deed of Trust dated October 31, 2007, and recorded November 2, 2007 in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, State of Montana, in Book 808 at page 517 as Document No. 200728880, wherein PRINGLE LANDHOLDING, LLC is Grantor, FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF MONTANA, INC. is the named Beneficiary, and FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY is named Trustee; that certain Appointment of Successor Trustee dated October 27, 2008, and recorded October 28, 2008, in the records of the office of the Clerk and Recorder of Missoula County, Montana in Book 828 at page 860 as Document No. 200824474, wherein the Beneficiary substituted Trustee First American Title Company with Martin S. King, attorney at law, as Successor Trustee; and that certain Loan Modification Agreement dated April 8, 2009, This foreclosure is made because the Grantor PRINGLE LANDHOLDING LLC, and its successors in interest, have defaulted in the terms of said Deed of Trust and the corre-

sponding Promissory Note in that it has failed to pay the monthly payments and otherwise defaulted on said Deed of Trust and that certain Loan Modification Agreement dated April 8, 2009, and pursuant to the terms of the Deed of Trust, the Beneficiary has exercised its option to declare the full amount secured by such Deed of Trust immediately due and payable. That the principal sum now owing on the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust is the sum of Four Hundred Sixty-four Thousand Six Hundred Nineteen and 04/100 Dollars ($464,619.04), together with interest at the default rate of 18% per annum, until the date of sale. That on the date of sale, presuming no other payments are made and that the sale is not postponed, there will be due and owing the sum of Four Hundred Sixty-four Thousand Six Hundred Nineteen and 04/100 Dollars ($464,619.04) in principal; One Hundred Fifty-seven Thousand Eight Hundred Ninety-five and 69/100 Dollars ($157,895.69) in interest; and One Thousand Eight Hundred Fifty and No/100 Dollars ($1,850.00) in late fees, Eight Thousand Seven Hundred Sixty and No/100 ($8,760.00) for force-place insurance costs, totaling the sum of Six Hundred Thirty-three Thousand One Hundred Twenty-four and 73/100 Dollars ($633,124.73) together with costs and expenses of foreclosure and related trustee fees, costs and attorney fees allowable by law. DATED this 20th day of October, 2010. /s/ Martin S. King, Successor Trustee STATE OF MONTANA):ss). County of Missoula). On this 20th day of October, 2010, before me, the undersigned a Notary Public for the State of Montana, personally appeared Martin S. King, Attorney at Law, known to me to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within Notice of

Trustee’s Sale as Successor Trustee, and acknowledged to me that he executed the same as such Successor Trustee. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my official seal the day and year in this certificate first above written. (SEAL) /s/ Rhonda M. Kolar, Notary Public for the State of Montana, Residing at Missoula My commission expires: January 24, 2012

washer & dryer, 2 car garage and large fenced back yard. Convenient 7th St. location. $1200/mo. Contact Lily 3960997.

MLS # 10006316. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

ROOMMATES

Request for qualifications Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for Montana manufacturers online database update and enhancement: The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD, Inc) is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit a proposal to update and enhance a database which provides information about Montana’s manufacturers. Up to $9,500 is available for this project. Proposals due February 4, 2011. Access the RFQ at http://www.bredd.org. Contact Melissa Fisher at mfisher@bredd.org or 406-258-3423 with questions. Request for qualifications The BitterRoot Economic Development District (BREDD, Inc) is offering interested individuals or organizations an opportunity to submit a proposal to develop an Economic Gardening Strategic Plan for Mineral, Missoula and Ravalli Counties. Proposals are due February 11, 2011. Up to a total of $50,000 is available for this project. The entire Request for Qualifications can be accessed at http://www.bredd.org. Contact Melissa Fisher at mfisher@bredd.org with questions.

RENTALS APARTMENTS APARTMENTS FOR RENT 1 & 2 Bedroom FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished apartments. UTILITIES PAID. Close to U & downtown. 549-7711. Check our website! www.alpharealestate.com 1+bedroom apt close to UofM 1 bedroom upstairs apt. with bonus study room. Less than mile from UofM. 800+sq. feet of space. fantastic view and light. Utilities paid, $750/mo. $800 security deposit, pets considered, available 1/15

Jane's Place Montana... A Vacation Rental Hot Springs, MT $45 & up Big Fork / Flathead Lake 406-546-0404 www.airbnb.com/rooms/24722

218 Barclay St. – B 1bd/1ba Lolo rental….$525 Everything included! Grizzly Property Management 542-2060 2201 W. Railroad #106 $900/$900 deposit. Move in Special-2 weeks free rent. 2 Bed/1.5 bath, G/S paid, D/W,

4104 Hillview Way - 1/2 month rent free-see PPM for details. Located on the corner of 39th and Russell. 2bd/2ba, gas fireplace, single car garage, DW, w/d hookups, covered patio/deck, gas hot water heat. Apply this week and receive your application fee free! Contact PPM for more details. 721-8990

Professional Property Management

Find your new home with PPM

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal and State Fair Housing Acts, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, marital status, age, and/or creed or intention to make any such preferences, limitations, or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, and pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To report discrimination in housing call HUD at toll-free at 1-800-8777353 or Montana Fair Housing toll-free at 1-800-929-2611

ppm@montana.com professionalproperty.com

406-721-8990

House for Rent: 3bd/3ba with bonus room built in 2003. D/W,

Price Reduced! Large 4 bed/3 bath w/ great views on nearly 6 acres set up for horses. Attached sunroom w/ deck & hot tub pad. Kitchen opens to living and dining room. $255,000 •

FIDELITY Management Services, Inc. 7000 Uncle Robert Ln #7

251- 4707

COMMERCIAL Downtown Studio office storage warehouse space available, various sizes & prices. Contact 239-2206.

ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listing with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse. Visit: http://www.roommates.com

1&2

Bedroom Apts FURNISHED, partially furnished or unfurnished

UTILITIES PAID Close to U & downtown

549-7711 Check our website! MHA Management An affiliation of the Missoula Housing Authority 226 S. Catlin 1 BR $480 w/d incl. wsg paid $500 deposit 149 W. Broadway 1 BR $500/ heat paid Downtown location $515 deposit

2 BD APT Uncle Robert Ln. $605-$620/mo.

2 BD APT 1309 Cooper $600/mo. Visit our website at

1515 Liberty Ln. 1 BR $495 wsg paid $500 deposit

www.fidelityproperty.com

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GardenCity

Property Management

422 Madison • 549-6106 For available rentals: www.gcpm-mt.com

Russell Square 1 BR $525-$550 Heat paid/ Southside $550-575 deposit

Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

226 S. Catlin 2 BR $574 w/d incl. wsg paid $600 deposit

"Let us tend your den" Since 1995, where tenants and landlords call home.

2426 Ernest - $1050/$1050 deposit. NEW 3 bed/1.5 bath with D/W, Washer/dryer, Microwave & garage. NO PETS GATEWEST 728-7333

Finalist

Finalist

1601 South Ave • 542-2060• grizzlypm.com

Some restrictions apply. For more information contact MHA Management at

549-4113

No Initial Application Fee Residential Rentals • Professional Office & Retail Leasing

30 years in Missoula

Call for Current Listings & Services Email: gatewest@montana.com

montanaheadwall.comMissoula Independent Classifieds Page C9 January 20 – January 27, 2011


SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTORS Natural Housebuilders, Inc. • Passivhaus Designs • Smaller Homes • Additions/Remodels • 369-0940 OR 642-6863 • www.naturalhousebuilder.net

CHILDCARE Little Monkey Day Care Openings for ages 1-6. 1st Aid/CPR certified, RMA. Conveniently located on HWY 200 in Bonner. Contact Amanda for rates or questions at 406207-3900

HANDYMAN

MISCELLANEOUS

Squires for Hire. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, Plumbing, General Handyman. I actually show up on time! Bret 544-4671

Are You Afraid of the Dark? Don’t be! Winter Darkroom Workshops at Photographers’ Formulary in Condon Montana Feb 11-13 & 18-20 www.workshopsinmt.com

Drive a little, save a lot!

HOME IMPROVEMENT Remodeling? Look to Hoyt Homes, Inc, Qualified, Experienced, Green Building Professional, Certified Lead Renovator, testimonials available. Hoythomes.com or 728-5642

Blue Mountain Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x20 $65 Bitterroot Mini Storage 5x10 $35 • 10x10 $45 • 10x15 $55 10x20 $65 • 10x30 $85 • 542-2060 Grizzly Property Management, Inc.

"Let us tend your den"

RECYCLING

John

The Plumber, Inc. "When Quality Matters" New Construction •Service Remodels • Boiler Radiant Heating John Ricker, Owner 40 Years Exp.

I.E. Recycling CURBSIDE RECYCLING U District, Rose Park, and Riverfront areas 4 pickups per month ONLY 2.50! GLASS bottles and jars, plastics, aluminum, tin cans, junk mail, magazines/newspaper, phone books. Call for more info! (406)396-5317

4007 US Hwy 200 E • Missoula

251-3744 or 880-2976

880-6211

Commercial or Residential ImprovingYourOutlook.com

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE 2 bdrm 2 bath manufactured home. Addition for possible den or office. Shop & extra space in dbl garage. Zoned for multifamily or commercial. $124,900. MLS#906610. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 240-6503. 3 bed, 1 bath with large living room, a new bathroom & new flooring throughout bathroom & kitchen, new siding, and windows as well as a new roof. Convenient location. 2402 McDonald $148,000 MLS # 10006235 Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage. Master bed w/ closet/office area, Large storage shed, new deck & underground sprinklers $220,000 • MLS # 10007009. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

$399,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy2 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED NORTHSIDE BUNGALOW. 2 Bdr/1 Bath, hardwood floors, new windows, new kitchen w/stainless appliances & tiled countertops, updated bath, great deck & private back yard, close to downtown. $182,500. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy0 to 74362 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Classic University Home, Great floor plan, fireplace, hardwood floors, Nice sized rooms, Lots of Bonus Rooms downstairs w/kitchenette, well maintained, oversized 2 car garage, 116 E. Sussex. 3278787 porticorealestate.com

Condo Along the River -Close to the U, one-of-a-kind 2br Edgewater Condo, highly desirable, hardwood floors, lots of character, fantastic location. 521 Hartman #2, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Deck Overlooks Clarkfork River - for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr condo, attached 2 car garage, like new, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #22 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Fantastic Opportunity for income qualified first time homeowners, great 2bdr. condo along the river, attached single car garage, bonus room, pets allowed, 1401 Cedar St #12 & #5 327-8787 porticorealestate.com Farm Houses w/land in Missoula, these funky farm

5 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 living rooms (one upstairs, one downstairs). Nice house in nice Missoula area. Large lot. Lots of updates. Must see! $275,000. 406-534-0553, 541-786-0742 Affordable Condo, Didn’t think you could afford to buy your own place? This sweet, new, green-built development may be cheaper than rent. 1400 Burns, 327-8787 porticorealestate.com BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED UNIVERSITY DISTRICT HOME. Gorgeous 3 Bdr/2 Bath home in a prime University District location. Gorgeous hardwood floors, built-ins, french doors, bright, sunny kitchen, great yard, and much more.

GORGEOUS CRAFTSMAN STYLE TARGET RANGE HOME ON 0.94 ACRES. 5 Bdr/3.5 Bath, double garage, hardwood & tile floors, gourmet kitchen, breakfast nook, main floor master, 2 family rooms. Close to schools, shopping, and the Bitterroot River. $469,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy12 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com GORGEOUS HANDCRAFTED HOME IN 3.3 ACRES ON PETTY CREEK. 3 Bdr/2.5 Baths, Main floor master suite, great room, gorgeous kitchen, hardwood floors, heated double garage, with guest quarters,

and great views. $595,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy8 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Handsome, Spacious Home on Prime Upper Miller Creek Acreage, 5+ bedrooms, with out of town living on quiet cul-desac, and acres. Rodeo Rd. 3278787 porticorealestate.com IMMACULATE HOME ON A 20,000 SQ FT LOT. Beautifully updated and maintained 4 Bdr/3 Bath Lolo area home. Great yard and deck, spacious living room and family room, great kitchen with breakfast bar & dining area, master bedroom and more. $269,900. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy16 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

912 Defoe • $169,900 3 bedroom two full bath home with GIGANTIC shop/garage. Brand new carpet just installed. Come take a look! Across from the Northside Trail System. MLS #20110354

4 bed, 2 bath, 1 car garage. Centrally located home, large living room & family room in daylight basement • $174,900 MLS # 10004809. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com 5 bed, 3 bath home in South Hills. House has central air, vaulted ceilings, big family room with gas fireplace. Yard w/ underground sprinklers and privacy fence. 2 car garage. Great home for entertaining! MLS # 10007275. $240,000. Jeremy & Betsy Milyard 880-4749 www.hotmontanahomes.com

houses boast lots of land to spread out and do your thing, Development potential. 3278787 porticorealestate.com

RICE TEAM

435 Mount • $199,000

riceteam@bigsky.net Robin Rice Janet Rice missoularealestate4sale.com 240-6503 240-3932

Right across from lovely Rose Park. This home has had many upgrades including remodeled kitchen featuring Hickory Cabinets, Brazilian Hickory laminate flooring throughout, all new stainless steel appliances. New blinds in the living room and solid core doors in all the main level rooms. The new roof was put on in May. The yard features a nice array of perennials. There is parking in the rear under the carport and a shed for extra storage. Call Mary Marry for a showing today. MLS # 20110323.

2 creeks down each side of property • 4 Bed, 1.5 Bath, 3 Car Garage • Guest or rental set up • 2 seperate Kitchens • Lots of room to stretch! • $299,000 • MLS#10005332 Price Reduced • Bonner area 5 Bed / 2 Bath on 2 acres • Large kitchen w/ island • Chain link fence in front yard • Private deck in back, mature trees • $209,900 • MLS#906641

919 Coloma Way, Potomac • 3 bdrm/2 bath/10 Acres • Covered deck / fenced acreage • 28 x32 garage / 40x49 Quonset shop • RV hookups behind garage • $259,900 • MLS#10002960 NEW LISTING • 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage • 32435 Bible Lane, Alberton • Deck in private backyard • Close to river & outdoor recreation • $174,900 • MLS#10004303

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C10 January 20 – January 27, 2011

Mary Mar ry

R E A LT O R ® , B r ok er

mmarry@bigsky.net

www.marysellsmissoula.com

406-544-2125 Missoula Properties

NEWER HIDDEN TRAIL HOME JUST MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN MISSOULA. 3 Bdr/2 Baths, Great open floor plan, lots of natural light, laundry room, Dbl garage, easy access to trails. $199,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy4 to 74362 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com PRICE REDUCED! 55+ COMMUNITY 2 Bed, 2 Bath, large family room. Homeowners fee is $370/mo. includes clubhouse,

sewer, garbage, land lease, snow removal & lawn care. $129,900 • MLS#10006023. Janet 240-3932 or Robin 2406503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Rattlesnake Home on Large Lot, nice 3br home sits on very rare lot, mature landscaping, tennis court, home has lots of upgrades, 506 Redwood 3278787 porticorealestate.com

204 C Heritage St, Stevensville

$115,000

Move-in ready 2 bedroom townhouse, walking distance to downtown Stevensville. Great quiet locale with views! Tiled kitchen and entries, large walk-in master closet, fresh interior paint, & garage. Fenced private backyard w/ access to common area. Should go FHA, RD. MLS#10003149

Grant Creek Log home 26+ private acres

BEST DEAL IN POTOMAC ON 20 ACRES

$419,000

$215,000

Located just 15 minutes from downtown Missoula! The main house is a 3 bd, 2 bath, 3 story log home, with completely renovated bathrooms, newer 3 car open garage with tons of storage built above it and a small guest cabin! MLS#10001348 www.11815benchroad.com

2002 Atlantic home w upgraded energy package. Over 1700 sq. ft. of living space. Very nice floor plan. Large detached 28 x 40 heated shop with water, easy access. All on 20 treed acres with views! MLS#10005731.

For location and more info, view these and other properties at:

www.rochelleglasgow.com

Rochelle

Missoula Properties Glasgow Cell:(406) 544-7507 • glasgow@montana.com


REAL ESTATE

SINGLE LEVEL LIVING CLOSE TO THE BITTERROOT RIVER. 4 Bdr/3 Bath single-level Stevensville home. Great, open floor plan, incredible mountain views, next to public park, walk to Downtown Stevi or Bitterroot River. $219,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 2396696, Text Mindy10 to 74362 or visit... www.mindypalmer.com SOUTH HILLS HOME LESS THAN 1 BLOCK FROM CHIEF

CHARLO SCHOOL . 4 Bdr/2 Bath, deck, double car garage, family room, laundry/utility room, great views, and much more. $175,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @ 239-6696, Text Mindy6 to 74362, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Unique Lower Rattlesnake home near Bugbee Nature Area, 3Brm, 4Ba, Tree-top views, Lots of upgrades like granite countertops and lots of gorgeous wood through-

out, 327-8787 alestate.com

porticore-

View or list properties for sale By Owner at www.byownermissoula.com OR call 550-3077.

LAND FOR SALE 3.5 ACRES BARE LAND ON PETTY CREEK. Gorgeous bare land parcel straddling Petty

Creek. Septic, well, and utilities in place. Gorgeous building spot with mountain, creek, and valley views. Custom builder available. $149,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com Almost 1/2 acre building site with great views. Close to Ranch Club Golf course and fishing access. City sewer stubbed to the property line. $84,900. MLS# 10007449. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. ARIZONA BIG BEAUTIFUL LOTS, $99/month, $0 down, $0 interest. Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l Airport. Guaranteed Financing. NO CREDIT CHECK! (800) 6318164 Code 4054 www.sunsiteslandrush.com Bargain Lots at Georgetown Beautiful

building sites at Georgetown Lake, 2.87 ac for $55,000 and adjacent 2.25 ac for $70,000 or both for $120,000. Easy year round access, county maintained road, well & septic approved, power & phone to lot line. Open meadow, aspen patch, nice views and great area on Elk Meadows Road just 1/2 mile to lake and 6 miles to Discovery Ski Area. Realtors Welcome! www.fsbomt.info or 406-258-6632 Beautiful 20 acres fenced pasture land. Seasonal stream and pond. Great get away or build your dream home. No power to area. $170 per year road maintenance fee. $149,900 MLS# 905366. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Beautiful wooded 3.69 acres with 550 feet of Twin Creeks frontage. Easy access from Hwy 200 on well maintained county

road. Modulars or manufactured homes on a permanent foundation are allowed. Seller will carry contract with $50,000 down at 7 % interest. $219,900. MLS#10005586. Janet 2403932 or Robin 240-6503. riceteam@bigsky.net. Montana Preferred Properties. Secluded 20 Acres 15 Minutes to Missoula, property boasts nice choices for building site, a healthy and beautiful forest setting, and easy commute. 3278787 porticorealestate.com

COMMERCIAL DARBY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ON MAIN ST. Two main floor retail/professional spaces featuring 10 ft ceilings, storage/back room spaces, and lots of windows plus two second floor residential rentals. Great income potential and priced to sell!

$135,000. Prudential Montana. For more info call Mindy Palmer @239-6696, or visit... www.mindypalmer.com

MORTGAGE & FINANCIAL QUICK CASH PAID FOR YOUR REAL ESTATE NOTE! Local Investor buys private mortgages, trust indentures & Land Installment Contracts. Call Today for a FREE Bid on buying a portion or all of your note. We also lend on Real Estate, must have at least 40% equity. (800)999-4809 www.Creative-Finance.com TIRED OF LOW CD AND ANNUITY RATES? Invest with a fellow Montanan in Phoenix. Great return, constant and guaranteed. w w w. r e i t a l t e r n a t i v e s . c o m 406-949-3078.

Missoula Independent Classifieds Page C11 January 20 – January 27, 2011


Painted Hills All Natural Tri Tip Steak

$4.99

Columbia River Sweet Onions

69¢ lb.

Kashi Organic Promise Autumn Wheat Cereal

New Belgium or Bayern Brewing

$6.49

$3.19

lb.

6 pack

17.5 oz.

Painted Hills All Natural Extra Lean Ground Beef

California Cauliflower

99¢

Rolling Rock, Rainier or Pabst

Mr. Dee's Sweet Potato Fries

lb.

$14.99

24 pack

$1.25

$3.29

16 oz.

lb.

Gold'n Plump Chicken Leg Quarters 80 oz.

20 lb. Bag Montana Red Potatoes

2

$4.99

for

$9

each

Stash Black Tea Sampler Variety Pack

$1.79

Mirassou California Wines

$6.99 .75 liter

HOT BUY!

18 count

Family Pack Assorted Pork Chops

$1.89

lb.

Washington Grannys, Golden Delicious or Cameos

$1.29

Traditional Medicinal Assorted Tea Bags

Krab Salad

$4.99 lb.

$3.99

lb.

16 count

Boneless Beef Sirloin Tip Roast

California Organic Bunched Beets

$2.79

$1.99

lb.

each

Marco Polo Marinated Pickles & Tomatoes

Scrubbing Bubbles Brush Starter

$1.89

$3.99

34 oz.

each

701 ORANGE STREET | OPEN 7 AM - 11 PM MONDAY - SATURDAY | 9 AM - 10 PM SUNDAY | 543-3188 | orangestreetfoodfarm.com


Info and and tickets: tickets: Info 728-0447 or or 728-0447 missoulaartmuseum.org missoulaartmuseum.org

Live auction auction Live

7PM

Dinner seating seating and and Dinner welcome remarks remarks welcome

6:15PM

Live Music, Music, cocktails, cocktails, Live silent art auction silent art auction bidding and and live live art art bidding auction preview auction preview

5PM

Holiday Inn Inn Downtown Downtown Holiday at the the Park Park at

Saturday, February 5, 2011

39th Benefit Art Auction

Missoula Art Art Museum's Museum's Missoula


Missoula Independent