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CONTENTS

VOLUME NINE

ISSUE THREE

On location in New Orleans for 2 Guns.

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Andrew Vogel

PHOTO BY PATTI PERRET/ UNIVERSAL PICTURES

andrew@louisianafilmandvideo.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Katie Sauro contact@louisianafilmandvideo.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS W. H. Bourne, Michael Dardant, Shanna Forrestall, Natalie Hultman, Jonathan Kieren, Zac M. Manuel, Carol Ann Scruggs, Andrew Zinnes SALES MANAGER Katie Higgins SALES Shay Azadi, Eric Iles PRODUCTION MANAGER John Rusnak DESIGNERS Dawn Carlson, Beth Harrison,

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Christina Poisal WEBMASTER Eric Pederson OFFICE MANAGER Audra Higgins

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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2 GUNS SHOOTS WAHLBERG AND WASHINGTON BACK TO NEW ORLEANS

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LFEA HOSTS EVENT TO CELEBRATE THE LOUISIANA ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

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INVESTIGATION DISCOVERY EXPLORES DESPICABLE DEEDS IN DIXIE WITH SOUTHERN FRIED HOMICIDE

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HOLUB FILM PROFILE

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JAMES BEARB CASTING PROFILE

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LOUISIANA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

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COSTUMER SUPPLIES LLC PROFILE

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LIFF SNAPSHOTS MORGAN NEVILLE’S TWENTY FEET FROM STARDOM OPENS FESTIVAL

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LAKE CHARLES/SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA FILM & TV UPDATE

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Lois Sanborn

Louisiana Film & Video Publications A DIVISION OF MEDIA INDEX PUBLISHING GROUP

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LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION!

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FILMING ON THE CAJUN COAST

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LIFF SNAPSHOTS WOMEN IN FILM PANEL DISCUSSES CHALLENGES, OPPORTUNITIES

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LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE HOSTS NETWORKING SOCIAL

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HOLLYWOOD NORTH MOVES SOUTH

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LOUISIANA’S GOT TALENT!

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WHAT’S YOUR STORY, NEW ORLEANS?

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SYNC UP CINEMA AT NOVAC

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS FILM FESTIVAL RECAP

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LIFF SNAPSHOTS KNOW SMALL PARTS: A CONVERSATION WITH LAURA CAYOUETTE

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THE FRENCH ARE COMING!

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BRINGING UP BABY

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VELOCITY AGENCY PROFILE

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EVENT DESIGN BUILD PROFILE

ISSUE THREE

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ON THE COVER: Denzel Washington and director Baltasar Kormákur on set of 2 Guns. PHOTO BY PATTI PERRET/UNIVERSAL PICTURES

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR B efore I dive into what has been a rambunctious era in our film industry, I want to sincerely thank everyone who came out to our networking social on April 5 (see page 22). We really appreciate all the support from the local community, and I hope everyone had as much fun as I did. Of course, I also need to thank all our sponsors, who greatly contributed to the success of the event. Your generosity was more than we could have asked for. The last few months have been eventful, to say the least. Many upand-coming filmmakers and actors gathered at the 7th annual UNO Film Festival (see page 64). NOVAC continues to relentlessly work towards a secure film industry, hosting multiple trainings and recently co-hosting the three-day conference, Sync Up Cinema, along with the New Orleans Film Society and the Jazz and Heritage Foundation (see page 62). Through the efforts of Chesley Heymsfield and her team, the Louisiana International Film Festival was a great success (see pages 14-21), and I was honored

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with the opportunity to interview some of the filmmakers involved. And in the midst of this flood of events, the industry has joined forces to battle against legislature that could potentially destroy everything that so many have worked towards. Petitions are being signed, calls are being made, and strikes are taking place. The LFEA hosted a grandiose event at Celtic Studios in Baton Rouge, where hundreds if not thousands gathered to show their support for our community (see page 12). It was refreshing to see the many politicians who attended, some with their families, and actually hear them say in person that they are on our side. Although in large part very different in demeanor and dress than the film folk, they seemed to share the same passion for the Louisiana film industry. For now, it seems the dedication and persistence of so many has paid off, and our industry is not in immediate danger. That being said, things change, and in the words of LFEA president, Will French: “Anything can happen between now and the end of the session. So we need to be vigilant, we need to work hard, we need to stay at the capitol so that if anything else comes, we can be there to provide that backup, provide that support, provide that education.� Sincerely, Andrew Vogel Executive Editor


2 GUNS SHOOTS WAHLBERG AND WASHINGTON BACK TO NEW ORLEANS

Actor Mark Wahlberg and Producer Randall Emmett working together again on 2 Guns.

STORY BY W. H. BOURNE

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PHOTOS BY PATTI PERRET/UNIVERSAL PICTURES

was financing and producing Broken City with my best friend Mark Wahlberg, and he brought 2 Guns up to me as a project he loved,” says producer Randall Emmett, who just recently returned from Cannes. “So I got the script from my agents at William Morris and read it and loved it. I committed to it and then went to Universal with it, and they agreed to take me on as their partner. We worked out a budget with producer Marc Platt and then Denzel Washington became involved, and the rest is history.” 8

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The friendship between Emmett and Wahlberg began approximately 18 years ago when Emmett worked as Wahlberg’s assistant during the tail end of his singing career (as Marky Mark) and while filming Boogie Nights. Emmett spends a lot of time in Louisiana. In the last few years, he has shot numerous films in the Bayou State. Wahlberg and Washington have also performed in Louisiana in the past, although 2 Guns is their first project together. Even Iceland native Baltasar Kormákur, director of 2 Guns, is no stranger


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to New Orleans, having directed Contraband with Wahlberg there in 2011. “While the budget was bigger than all my prior films, it still was small in comparison to what we were trying to achieve,” says Kormákur, as he discusses his greatest challenge on 2 Guns. From Emmett’s point of view, however, the project’s greatest challenge was “prepping locations for the New Mexico portion of the production, while still shooting in Louisiana, and then having to move a tremendous amount of equipment and all the crew.” While the story of 2 Guns takes place in Texas, 90 percent of the movie was shot in New Orleans, making use of a lot of practical locations. “The majority of the film shot in Louisiana and we did all our pre-production in Louisiana,” says Emmett, as he discusses how they utilized the tax credits on the film. “New Mexico’s credits are only below the line and very specific, so we were able to take advantage of those when we were shooting there, but chose to do most of our work in Louisiana.” “The credits in New Mexico were way lower than Louisiana,” explains Kormákur, “but we had to shoot a little bit in New Mexico in order to make Louisiana work.” Adds Kormákur, “I like working down there. I like the attitude and atmosphere. I like the people of Louisiana.” When Emmett’s company signed on to the project, Kormákur was already attached to direct. “Mark (Wahlberg) approached me about working on this film while we were working on Contraband,” says Kormákur. “Randall Emmett’s company financed the film and they were great. They pretty much let me do what I wanted to do and stayed out of my way. They were very supportive.” One of Kormákur’s key choices was cinematographer Oliver Wood, whose 46-year career includes such work as the Bourne franchise and the recent box office hit, Safe House. “I really like Oliver’s work,” says Kormákur. “I’ve been a fan of his for quite some time. We Director Baltasar Kormákur consults with cinematographer Oliver Wood.

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Director Baltasar Kormákur on the set of 2 Guns.

were going for a very different style than what he did on Bourne. We were going for something much more composed. And when I suggested that, he was very happy... He was a pleasure to work with.” Notes Emmett, “Oliver Wood is a brilliant cinematographer, and we were lucky to get him on the movie. Baltasar had a very specific look he wanted for the movie, and he decided early on that he wanted Oliver to help him realize that vision. Baltasar and producer Marc Platt worked very hard to get Oliver on board.” Another coup for the 2 Guns production team was landing actor Denzel Washington. “Denzel is one of my favorite actors of all time and one of the greats in the business,” says Emmett. “Mark had said that Denzel was their first choice and then we actually got him on the film, and I was ecstatic on every level. Being on set, it was like a childhood dream watching Denzel

and Mark just go at it and have so much fun making the film. The timing, the comedy, and the action—it’s just an awesome ride on every level.” “I think the reason Denzel chose to do this project was because it was something different,” says Kormákur. “I don’t want to talk for Denzel, but I’m sure there is this danger when going in a different direction… like jumping off a cliff, particularly when you have a huge fanbase. But he was very open to it. It’s always interesting to take a journey with an actor to do something that (he) hasn’t done before.” Adds Kormákur, “The tone was real tricky with this movie. I wanted it to be comedic and light, but I also had all this action… Creating the right environment so the chemistry between the two leads could work and finding a little bit of a different tone with Denzel than people are used to are what I’m happiest about with the movie. A lot of these types of movies take themselves too seriously. We wanted to do something different.” “It’s just a fun ride and the chemistry between Denzel and Mark is incredible. I think audiences are going to love it,” says Emmett. LFV Wahlberg and Washington shoot their way into theaters nationwide with 2 Guns on August 2, 2013.


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LFEA HOSTS EVENT TO CELEBRATE THE LOUISIANA ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY #KEEPUSROLLIN CAMPAIGN LAUNCHES AT “LAISSEZ LOUISIANA FILM ROULER” Photo by Aaron Hogan Eyewander Photography.

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he Louisiana Film & Entertainment Association (LFEA) received extraordinary support from leading elected officials, celebrities, and entertainment industry supporters from across the state on Tuesday, May 14, at the “Laissez Louisiana Film Rouler” legislative event. Actors TJ Mille and Faith Ford. Photo by Ruben Juarbe.

Hair Stylists Linda Traxler and Alison Shepherd. Photo by Aaron Hogan Eyewander Photography.

Held at Celtic Studios in Baton Rouge, the event provided LFEA a platform to launch their new campaign, “Keep Us Rollin.” The focus of the campaign is to encourage both the community and legislators to support the current tax incentives by highlighting the positive economic impact the entertainment industry has on Louisiana. 12

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The evening included exquisite hors d’oeuvres, hot dishes, desserts and complimentary drinks, as well as live entertainment, including musical guests, a stunt performance that featured a crowd fight and a man on fire, and sexy “roller girls” on skates. As a final highlight, LFEA debuted their newly produced PSA and infographic demonstrating the powerful economic impact of the entertainment industry and calling the community to action; sign up, stay informed, and share the message with #KeepUsRollin. The PSA and infographic are available at www.lfea.org. A selection of Louisiana cast and crew were involved with creating the PSA and campaign pieces, doing their part in providing important facts about the positive impact of the indus-

Gerri London and Rep. Dalton Honore. Photo by Ruben Juarbe.

Adam Pally. Photo by Ruben Juarbe.

try on the state, and encouraging the community to “Keep Us Rollin.” “The Louisiana entertainment community is very proud of the industry we have built here and this event is a testament to our commitment to growing it,” said Scott Niemeyer, LFEA’s Chairman of Communications, principal of Gold Circle Entertainment, and founder of Deep South Studios. “This evening is an opportunity for our state legislators to meet the people whose livelihood and welfare will be greatly affected by any material modifications to the incentives that have built this industry.” LFV

IATSE Local 478’s Mike McHugh with the 'Keep Us Rollin' Girls. Photo by Aaron Hogan Eyewander.


LOUISIANA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL FIRST ANNUAL FILM FESTIVAL FOR LOUISIANA IS A MAJOR HIT

PHOTOS BY CLINTON WALLACE

The Louisiana International Film Festival & Mentorship Program aims to act as a conduit for education and outreach where the residents of Louisiana may obtain skills and relationships that enable them to play a central role in the State’s burgeoning film industry. Created as a nexus for local talent, LIFF provides access to opportunity through carefully developed mentorship programs, workshops, guest lectures, and competitive screenings.

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he first Louisiana International Film Festival (LIFF) opened on Thursday, April 18, with a gala screening of the music documentary, Twenty Feet from Stardom, at the Joy Theater in New Orleans. The film’s director, Morgan Neville, and one of its stars, Merry Clayton, attended the screening. Entertainment was highlighted by Henry Gray.

films being presented at the festival, including the documentaries By and By: New Orleans at the Crossroads, Tarzan: Lord of the Louisiana Jungle, and T-Galop: A Louisiana Horse Story. “The community came out for us,” said the festival’s executive director Chesley Heymsfield. “The idea of having an international film festival for the state of Louisiana was reinforced over the last four days. We were very

Merry Clayton with Alan Abrahams.

The festival then picked up in Baton Rouge on Friday, April 19, continuing with screenings at a variety of locations. The festival utilized Cinemark Perkins Rowe, Celtic Media Centre, the Manship Theatre, the Old State Capitol and the LSU Union Theater to showcase more than 50 films throughout the weekend. The festival offered several premieres, including the U.S. premiere of Boxing Day, a British production starring Danny Huston. LIFF also featured the Louisiana premieres of the Shreveport-filmed thriller The East, starring Brit Marling, Alexander Skarsgård and Ellen Page, and The Iceman, a Shreveport-shot film starring Michael Shannon, Winona Ryder and Ray Liotta. There was also a selection of Louisiana 14

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Shanna Forrestall and Mayor Kip Holden.

Filmmakers for By and By: New Orleans at the Crossroads.

Richard Zeringue and Billy Slaughter from The East.


Several vendors exhibited at the Industry Expo, hosted by Celtic Media Centre.

pleased with the feedback and number of participants we received during the festival’s very first screenings and workshops.” The festival included an Industry Expo hosted by Celtic Media Centre, as well as a variety of workshops, panels and other learning opportunities throughout the weekend catering to those new to the industry, as well as seasoned veterans. The festival closed on Sunday, April 21, with the first Golden Boot Awards honoring several of the outstanding performances and films of the weekend.

LIFF SAYS THANKS

Lonely Boy celebrates its win.

Key event sponsors included Lamar Advertising; CBBR, Inc. Foundation (Credit Bureau of Baton Rouge); Noesisdata; Lt. Governor’s Office Dept. of Culture, Recreation and Tourism; Pennington Family Foundation; and Louisiana Technology Park. LIFF was made possible by founding patrons Winifred and Kevin Reilly, Jr. (Executive Producer tier) and John Turner and Jerry Fischer (Screenwriter). The Bob Adelman “1963” photography exhibit was made possible by the sponsorship of Ann Connelly Art Gallery & BancorpSouth– Wright and Percy Insurance Agency. LFV

Leslie Zemeckis (right) won for Bound by Flesh.

Golden Boot winners included: • Best Documentary: Leslie Zemeckis for Bound By Flesh • Best First Feature: Lonely Boy. The screening was attended by writer/producer Alev Aydin and producer Troy Daniel Smith. • Best Acting: Dennis Quaid in At Any Price • Audience’s Choice: a tie between Twenty Feet From Stardom and Disconnect

Bob Adelman

On behalf of both Ian Birnie and myself, we wanted to express how thrilled we were with the reception to the first Louisiana International Film Festival and Mentorship Program. Personally, I’ve never seen such a dedicated filmgoing audience on a first year event throw themselves body and soul into an event with such enthusiasm and passion—imagine, 60 films in four days. Now that’s a commitment even the most serious film lover might think twice about before they commit, but commit Baton Rouge/Louisiana patrons did, and they were rewarded with a smorgasbord of the finest films now in circulation, and amazing guests that accompanied their films. It was nice to know that our guests were equally impressed with the turnout of the BR/Louisiana community, their dedication to film, and the intelligent, respectful questions that were asked at our Q and A’s. The professionalism and coordination it takes to put on such an event is a yearround activity. The planning of our festival alone takes many months to coordinate all the particulars, including guests, tributes, special monthly events, and everything that is LIFF. Being that this is our inaugural year, I can only hope we move forward from here into the filmmaking community so that we can inspire the many young talents in Louisiana just waiting to emerge into their filmmaking careers, and continue to inspire the filmgoing community with the presentation of world class cinema that was on display this year. —Dan Ireland, Co-Artistic Director —Ian Birnie, Program Director

THE LIFF TEAM

Chesley Heymsfield, Executive Director

Jeff Dowd, Co-Artistic Director

Dan Ireland, Co-Artistic Director

Shanna Forrestall, Louisiana Liaison

Clinton H. Wallace, Strategic Relationship Coordinator ISSUE THREE

Alan Abrahams, Director of Music Programming LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE

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LIFF SNAPSHOTS MORGAN NEVILLE’S TWENTY FEET FROM STARDOM OPENS FESTIVAL

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lthough there were many standout films at the 2013 Louisiana International Film Festival, Twenty Feet from Stardom was as memorable as they come. Morgan Neville directs an eye-opening and inspiring piece that warranted the explosive ovation that it received at the Joy Theatre in New Orleans on opening night of the festival. The film dives deep into the lives of several back-up singers—all of whom harmonized with some of the biggest bands in history—including the infamous ‘diva,’ Merry Clayton. As if the opening red-carpet gala, the amazing film, and the after party weren’t enough to ignite the weekend festivities, viewers were honored with a live performance from Clayton following the film that was worthy of an arena audience. Although Clayton left New Orleans in 1959, New Orleans is her home. Like so many background singers, Clayton began singing in the church choir at an early age. At just 14 years old, Clayton began professionally singing background with a group called The Blossoms, which consisted of Darlene Love, who is also in the movie, and Fanita James. Within two months, she was signed with Capitol Records and a lifelong career in music began. Clayton vividly recalls the early stages of her career: “I got a call from a great friend of mine called Billy Preston. Preston Merry Clayton. Photo by Clinton Wallace. was one of the greatest pianists to ever live and was considered the fifth Beatle. I got Merry Clayton to know him through church. We would cross paths at church and all throughout our career we loved and supported each other. He called me one day, and I was just folding some towels, and he said, ‘I need you to drop everything and come sing for Ray.’ He was speaking about Ray Charles. I was 18 at this point. So I went to sing for Ray, and I left with a contract to take to my parents. Ray wanted me to go on tour with him. My mother talked to Ray and said, ‘She can go, but she better leave and come back just the way she left. If she don’t, you gonna have to answer to me. You don’t want to answer to me, Mr. —MERRY CLAYTON Charles, about my baby.’” stay and let him go. So we went in for a meetLuckily for Clayton, and Mr. Charles, going ing with Mr. Charles. Ray told Curtis, ‘She’s too on tour was a very positive experience. Clayyoung and it won’t work.’ Well, we were married ton describes Ray Charles as her greatest musifor 32 years. So yes, it worked—it worked very cal mentor, along with Darlene Love of The Blossoms. During the tour, Clayton met her well. We ended up signing with Lou Adler with A&M Records, who became a great mentor and husband, Curtis Amy, the great jazz musician. a great friend. To this day, he is one of my closClayton explains, “Curtis and I decided we est friends in the entire world. Everything I do wanted to leave. He wasn’t going to stay with has to go through Uncle Lou.” the band and let me go. And I wasn’t going to

“IT WAS AN ABSOLUTE JOY WORKING ON THIS FILM WITH MY SISTERS. I WAS THRILLED TO BE A PART OF IT”

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Throughout the course of her career, Clayton recorded two albums of her own and worked closely with people like James Taylor, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Joe Cocker and Aretha Franklin, whom Clayton affectionately calls “Queen.” Of the many fond memories in her full life, Clayton recalls one in particular that resulted from a telephone call from Jack Niche, asking that she sing with “these guys from England called the Rolling... somebody.” “It was 11:30 at night and I was pregnant. My husband took the phone and said, ‘You know, she’s pregnant.’ They ended up convincing my husband that this could be one of the greatest things I’ve ever done,” says Clayton. “So I put on a pair of silk pajamas and a Chanel scarf, and I had rollers in my head. And off I went to the session. Lo and behold, it was the Rolling Stones.” Clayton’s involvement in Twenty Feet from Stardom began with a call from a good friend of Uncle Lou named Gil Friesen. “Gil explained the situation and said he would like me to come back home,” says Clayton. “I showed up on the lot at A&M Records and was interviewed on the lot about what I did with A&M Records and who I did it with. And before I knew it, I got a call from Morgan Neville saying he would like to do more interviews and make me one of the stars in his movie. I told him I’d be more than happy to.” She continues, “We lost Gil on the 13th of December. Gil had Leukemia and passed away. It absolutely floored all of us. The last time I spoke to him, I had called him to encourage him and tell him I was praying for him and ‘no matter what, you are going to be okay.’ He said, ‘You know I love you, Merry, and you’ve done such a great job, and I’m so absolutely proud of you. I’ll speak to you soon.’ I said, ‘I love you, Uncle Gil.’ That was the last time I talked to him.” Clayton finishes her story with an inspiring reflection on her own life and the lives of others she has been involved with. “We are a sisterhood. I’ve been working with these girls for over 40 years. It was an absolute joy working on this film with my sisters. I was thrilled to be a part of it,” Clayton says with heartwarming affection. “We were very happy with the way Morgan shot the film and the people involved with the film. It’s something we are very proud of and Gil would be very proud of.” LFV


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LIFF SNAPSHOTS

KNOW SMALL PARTS: A CONVERSATION WITH LAURA CAYOUETTE STORY BY CAROL ANN SCRUGGS GUEST COLUMNIST

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s an actor here in New Orleans, I made the decision to attend the inaugural Louisiana International Film Festival in Baton Rouge held in April. I was very impressed with its organization, films and the workshops offered. It was so well orchestrated, I would have never guessed it was the first one. Kudos and a job well done to its organizers! I already look forward to attending again next year. The majority of the workshops were a mere $10, with seasoned, expert, professional presenters. Needless to say, all the workshops were well attended with packed rooms. I took advantage of the workshops offered, which included “Know Small Parts: A Conversation with Laura Cayouette.” I wasn’t familiar with her by name, but her subject matter definitely had my interest. The Louisiana film industry market largely comprises the under 5 and under 10 market for actors, and I definitely wanted to know anything that might give me an edge or insight to make my career more successful. So, who is she? And what’s her book, Know Small Parts: An Actor’s Guide to Turning Minutes into Moments and Moments into a Career, about exactly? Cayouette was born in Laurel, Maryland, evolving from a dress boutique manager and an English composition instructor into an actress. She studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York and started doing plays and commercials. She started acting at the “ripe old age of 28,” as she calls it, which is a little late for most female actors. In 1992, Cayouette moved to Los Angeles, feeling she was “educated, talented and ready to get to work!” While living in L.A., she worked at Universal City Walk Hollywood Cinemas. At the LIFF workshop and in her book, Cayouette shares her pearls of wisdom learned from her experience with one of the great actresses of our time, Shirley MacLaine. “In 1995 I got my first L.A. theatrical agent and began being seen for film and television roles. I booked my first part in a big Hollywood movie, the sequel to the beloved Terms 18

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of Endearment. Both Shirley MacLaine and Jack Nicholson would be returning for The Evening Star…” She continued, “While filming a scene where Juliette (Lewis) and I were co-stars on a TV sitcom about Catholic school girls, Shirley MacLaine entered to watch her granddaughter from the bleachers. I could hardly believe I was working with this national treasure and that she was essentially a background player in one of my big scenes. MacLaine came alive as the overbearing “Aurora” and totally stole the scene right out from under us without ever saying a line… It was a crushing blow when I saw the movie and realized that was the only scene that survived their hour of cuts from the original. I was totally floored when I saw that the scene began at the very end, when we all said one line each, and then zoomed into Shirley clapping and creating a whole story of a person in just a few seconds—and with no lines. Though I was devastated at my dashed dreams, I finally really got what was meant by ‘There are no small parts, only small actors.’ You can turn any minute into a moment.” Personally, I will never think less of a part with little or no dialogue ever again! In 2009, Cayouette moved to New Orleans (her family is from Louisiana) and started blogging to keep her friends updated and to compare the two cities of Los Angeles and New Orleans. She called it “L.A. to N.O.L.A.” A whole new set of questions opened up for her: “How do you get started in a secondary market? How is it different? How do you network in a smaller market?” Now with 20 years of experience under her belt, she wanted to write a book that answered

these questions. She states in her book, “This is the book I wanted to find when I started out and the book I needed while building my career… my years in the industry have taken me around the world, introduced me to people I grew up watching and given me the opportunity to be a part of America’s #1 export; entertainment. I figured out how to do it at the age most women are retiring, with no family in the industry and without having theatrical representation for most of my career. I wrote this book to explain to you how to turn minutes into moments and moments into a career.” Another one of my favorite bits of wisdom in her book comes from the advice of a seasoned veteran of the business, Richard Dreyfuss. “When I was starting out, Richard Dreyfuss gave me some impossible-sounding advice. He said to ‘Make it so they can’t sleep. Make them stay up at night thinking of how to put you into their movie’… If you want to be a movie star, you’re going to have to be more than just an actor, you’re going to have to be unforgettable.” Now that’s a very powerful thought. There are just too many other tidbits of wisdom to even touch in one article. The book covers small parts, auditioning, breaking a scene down, being a pro, when to go SAG, when to get an agent, and anything else you can think of as an actor. Cayouette’s list of notable credits include Django Unchained, Kill Bill, Enemy of the State, Friends, JAG, Treme, over 50 commercials, and numerous other film and TV credits. She also became a producer/director and writer with the encouragement from her friend Quentin Tarantino. He’s one of my personal faves. She wrote and directed Intermission, an award-winning short film with Joanna Cassidy, and also produced with Tarantino Hell Ride, with Dennis Hopper, David Caradine, Michael Madsen and Eric Balfour. She said she has been so privileged to be mentored and influenced by so many Academy Award and Golden Globe winners. Cayouette has given us this great gift of sharing her wisdom, experiences, expertise and practicalities of being a working actor in a small parts market. Her guidance will give you a realistic perspective on the industry to help you formulate your career with a successful winning strategy. Hopefully, this will be one that we can all use to have a long and successful career. Thank you, Laura! LFV Know Small Parts: An Actor’s Guide to Turning Minutes into Moments and Moments into a Career is available at Amazon.com and on Kindle.


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LIFF SNAPSHOTS

WOMEN IN FILM PANEL DISCUSSES CHALLENGES, OPPORTUNITIES

STORY BY NATALIE HULTMAN GUEST COLUMNIST

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o you want to be part of the growing Louisiana film industry, but aren’t sure where to begin? The Louisiana International Film Festival & Mentorship Program (LIFF) has you covered! One of the main goals of LIFF is to provide those passionate about filmmaking with education and networking opportunities through carefully developed mentorship programs, workshops, guest lectures, and competitive screenings.

(l to r) Donna Duplantier, Nikki Brown, Megan Coates, Shanna Forrestall, Lindanne Lewis and Laura Cayouette.

As part of their inaugural film festival in Baton Rouge this year, LIFF offered a Women in Film Panel, where six women came together to discuss the unique challenges they face both in front of and behind the camera. Lindanne Lewis is a scenic artist, photographer and author with over 22 years of experience working in television and film. She is also the only deaf film worker in Louisiana. “Who knows what a five-gallon bucket setup is?” Lewis asks the roomful of women. She then goes on to explain the process with great enthusiasm. “Oh, I used to hate the hardware store but now I go in there—like a candy store to a child, a hardware store is to me!” One thing Lewis loves about set construction is that age, gender or even disability won’t prevent you from having a career, as long as you are willing to learn and work hard. “Do your homework, do your research, and you can go wherever you want.” Lewis has four children, all of whom she has successfully trained to work in the film industry. Next, Lewis will lend her skills to Jurassic Park IV, filming in Baton 20

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Rouge. She is also the author of the soon-tobe-released book, Hear My World: The Lindanne Lewis Story. For makeup artist Nikki Brown, it was important to be skilled at several different vocations. “It helped me to know that there was always something else that I could go and do,” says the former pastry chef. “I held myself to a higher standard, as it related to how I treated people and how I sought out jobs. I always believed that what was meant for me was meant for me.” After finding success fairly quickly, Brown recently began struggling to find work for the first time. “I felt like I hit a wall. Like there was this ceiling all of a sudden and I was like, ‘what is this?’” After some soul-searching, she concluded that she was not yet ready to walk away. “There are a lot of highs and lows in this business and if it’s meant for you, you have to stick with it.” Brown has worked on over 30 feature films and television projects, including The Expendables, Looper, Treme and Django Unchained. Actress and former dancer Donna

Duplantier has many successes and credits to her name. She finds that sometimes the biggest challenges can come from within. “I still struggle with self-doubt,” she admits. “I’m my biggest critic. The industry has a lot of rejection and it’s easy to get discouraged and consider quitting, no matter how long you’ve been in it. Everyone has a tolerance level and mine fluctuates.” When having a hard time, Duplantier suggests taking a break to get inspired again. “Go to L.A. and take some workshops. Go to New York, even just to meet people. Every time I go to New York I get that jolt because there are so many people in theater working on material, working on plays, going to readings, going to plays. It’s about keeping your eyes and ears open and always learning.” You can catch Duplantier in the upcoming film Dallas Buyers Club, opposite Matthew McConaughey and Jennifer Garner, and in The Butler as David Oyelowo’s wife. Laura Cayouette is an actor, producer, director and author of Know Small Parts: An Actor’s Guide to Turning Minutes into Moments and Moments into a Career. She discussed one of the obstacles she faced when she decided to switch from modeling to acting in her late twenties. “I started really late for a woman,” she says. Cayouette studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York and worked in theater before moving to L.A. and studying there for another two years. “That means that by the time I entered the workforce, I was over 30. I had heard that 28 is when you finish and that every year after that there were fewer and fewer parts for women.” Cayouette believes that entering the entertainment industry a little later helped her avoid some of the possible career pitfalls like drug use and unreasonable expectations. “It was an advantage coming to this ridiculous profession as an adult,” she laughs. “I can’t believe that one of the best parts I’ve had in my career I had at 47 years old,” she says of her role as Lara Lee Candie-Fitzwilly in Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained. “So as many things as I lost, missing the first 10 to 15 years of my career time, I feel like being an older person entering the industry benefited me in just as many ways. Anything can happen as long as you’re still in the game. You just have to not quit.” Costume designer and shopper Megan Coates found she had the opposite problem: “One of my biggest challenges was that I came to this industry at a young age and felt that I didn’t necessarily have a place there or deserve to be there quite yet.” After graduating from Emerson College in Boston, she moved to Shreveport and


began working on numerous film and TV projects in Louisiana. Despite just starting out, Coates quickly found herself working with a personal hero, costume designer Sharen Davis. “I was in a small room with she and Quentin Tarantino talking about what “Django” was going to look like in two years, and at 26, I’m like, ‘how did I get here?’” she laughs. “I had to realize that I wasn’t there by accident and the things that I had done and the work effort that I had put forth made it such that I was there.” Now moving closer to her ultimate goal of becoming a costume designer on a major motion picture, Coates currently works as costume shopper on the new film, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.

Full-time actress and producer Shanna Forrestall discussed the challenges of building a career in an area that doesn’t have the history and infrastructure of New York and Los Angeles. “The industry in Louisiana is fairly new. When I jumped in in 2004, it was very hard to find mentors and to find support systems. A big part of why I’m here today with LIFF is that they’re planning to build a mentorship program.” Forrestall is quick to mention that new opportunities are opening up for women every day. “Just because you’re a woman doesn’t mean you have to be in hair and makeup or costuming. There are directing programs going on, grip and electric programs going on. Just the

other week, NOVAC was offering screenwriting classes for free. The opportunities are here. You just have to take advantage.” Forrestall currently has several full-length feature projects in development, including Our Lady of the Pink Pussycat and Indian Sunset, a feature film that will be shot in New Orleans and India. Perseverance was definitely the running theme of the panel, as well as the importance of mentorship and building a strong support system. Though the entertainment industry can be tough, I think it’s safe to say these women are here to stay. Stay tuned and expect to hear much more from each of them—and LIFF—in the future! LFV

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LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE HOSTS NETWORKING SOCIAL

n Friday night, April 5, 2013, Louisiana Film & Video Magazine hosted “A Night in the French Quarter”—an industry networking event for key film and TV contacts. The event was held at the New Orleans Motion Picture Studios on the Westbank of New Orleans in Algiers. Special guests enjoyed a private red carpet walk, where they were interviewed by Tammy Bradley of The Tammy Bradley Show, while all guests were allowed to take their own saunter down the red carpet with photographers flashing away! Guests enjoyed free beer and root beer from Abita, fresh king cakes baked by Haydel’s Bakery, PJ’s coffee, and much more! They also experienced performances by the Toon Squad Dance Troupe, up close and personal magic and fire juggling by “Magic Mike” (Michael Dardant), live music by Jeff Chaz, face painting by Bethani Dardant, and caricature drawings by Kat Walker. “It was an honor to host the event with Shanna Forrestall and our Louisiana Film & Video Magazine team,” said Andrew Vogel, the magazine’s executive editor. “Everything came together as well as I could have hoped. Everyone involved, especially our sponsors, were incredibly generous and helpful and I think our guests had a great time as a result. I personally had a blast reconnecting with old friends and meeting a lot of new faces. It’s always nice to get everyone in one place. A special thank you to Tom Conrad for allowing us to use his studio, and thank you to everyone who came out to support the magazine, and more importantly, our Louisiana film industry.” “The party couldn’t have been better,” said J. Lejeun of Cazadora Entertainment. “Great music, great ambiance, great food, great people. It was great to let loose and make key industry contacts at the same time.” Louisiana Film & Video Magazine wishes to extend a special thank you to the event sponsors: Louisiana Film Resources, Bill Laderer Catering, New Orleans Motion Picture Studios, Strike it Green, Abita, Haydel’s Bakery, and PJ’s Coffee.

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Top left: Helen Krieger and John Joseph Delgadillo. Photo by Kiarra Barthelemy. Top: Group shot on the red carpet. Photo by John Dilosa, ASP. Left: Nicole Lovince and Lance Nichols. Photo by John Dilosa, ASP. Below left: Ellis Pailet and Tim Antwine. Photo by K. Barthelemy. Top right: Magic Mike. Photo by Chris Nausley. Middle right: Sean Braud and Sam Medina. Photo by John Dilosa, ASP. Below right: Cast and crew of Blackbird during red carpet interview. Photo by K. Barthelemy.


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48 HOUR FILM FEST: ADVICE FROM NAB AND THE PROS AT SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE

The Saturday Night Live film unit: (l to r) Stacey Foster, Rhys Thomas, Adam Epstein, and Alex Buono. STORY BY W. H. BOURNE • PHOTOS BY ODIN LINDBLOM

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f you’re looking to make a film in 48 hours, you need to be extremely prepared and have a lot of coffee,” said Adam Epstein, editor of the Saturday Night Live film unit. “You need to be working with people who are thick-skinned enough that when you’re yelling at them and they’re yelling at you, they don’t take it too personally.” Epstein and the rest of the Saturday Night Live film team were in Las Vegas for the annual NAB Show this past April 6 through 11, where more than 90,000 attendees viewed the latest technological advancements for digital media and entertainment. The SNL team was presenting a case study on producing the “Lincoln skit” with Louis C.K. just days after Hurricane Sandy, when much of the city was on lock-down and still without power. While the task at hand provided unique obstacles as far as locations and power, the SNL team was up to the challenge, due largely in part to the production model and workflow that had been established by the team over the past two decades. Rhys Thomas, director/producer of the SNL film unit, explained, “We receive the script on Thursday when pre-production begins. We find our locations and get all the appropriate sets, costumes, gear and designs going. Essentially, we do all the things that are needed to go into a regular production. We also begin our graphics. Everyone needs to be ready to be on camera at Friday morning at 8am and start shooting no later than 9am. Of course, we’re 24

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doing all this around the live show that’s going to air on Saturday, and around the cast and guest that’s rehearsing for Saturday. We shoot for eight or nine hours and then post begins. And that’s the ideal scenario.”

have less than 24 hours to produce the piece.” Needless to say, the SNL film team members are experts in 48-hour film production, creating pre-recorded commercials, parodies, and short skits to be aired on the live show. “Normally the big challenge with the show is the time factor,” said Alex Buono, SNL film unit director of photography. “The editorial deadlines are still rather firm,” added Epstein. “As long as the colorist has it by 5 or 6pm (on Saturday) so it’s finished by 8pm, we’re doing okay. We have rehearsal at 8pm and then we may have to make changes after that.”

DJI introduced several new unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) at NAB focused on aerial cinematography.

Most of the panelists laughed as Thomas added, “Sometimes the schedule goes up late. More and more frequently, we’re trying to do more with less. Sometimes we haven’t shot until 9pm on Friday night, and we shoot until 4am and go immediately into post. In this case, we

“The full rehearsal is in front of a live audience,” explained Thomas. “That’s when you get to see that the joke you’ve been enjoying all day today doesn’t work with the audience, so you’ve got a very short amount of time to adjust it or change it (before it airs that night).”


Noted Stacey Foster, SNL coordinating producer, “There’s literally times when Rhys’ piece is supposed to be playing in the second half of the show, and we’re having to EDS, where you’re literally ingesting the piece while it’s playing in the edit suite with a 10-second delay.” “We’ve never missed a spot, but a lot of times we can’t color correct,” said Thomas. “Even after we broadcast, we continue to implement fixes for the taped delayed show for the West Coast, as well as online.” The Saturday Night Live team spent a good amount of time on the NAB show floor, where 1,600 exhibitors showcased the latest

people to adopt the latest technology, but that’s definitely not true,” noted Thomas. “Case in point is the new G-Tech (drive) with Thunderbolt technology. It literally transfers 12 times faster, so that means if we save 20 minutes ingesting footage, that’s 20 minutes more Adam has to effect (the footage) or color correct.” Buono concurred: “I’m absolutely convinced that new technology is helping us make better spots because they give us more time. For example, if I can light it faster, then Rhys can work longer with the actors and maybe get another joke in.” “The last few years have been an explosion

A look at Canon lenses on the NAB Show Floor.

innovations in gear and equipment from companies like RED, Canon, Arri, Autodesk, The Foundry, Sony and Hitachi. “The difference technology makes is that it allows us to save time and make decisions that we don’t normally have time to make,” noted Foster. “We switched to (Adobe) Premiere before it had been approved for broadcast,” said Epstein. “I try to be system agnostic about a job but, for us, kicking out a project to try something, and then bringing it back in, and kicking it out and bringing it back in, kind of necessitated the change. It’s the same thing with the cameras. We don’t use something new because it’s new; we do it because this will get more done in the timeline and make it smoother because no matter what we’re using, we’re always going to be working until the very last second.” “We were the first to shoot (and broadcast) with the 5D, the 7D, the Alexa, the Epic Monochrome, the C300 and 500,” said Buono. “We try to keep up to date with the latest technology out there to see what it can do for us.” “We used the Epic Monochrome the week that we were trying to parody the very beautiful black-and-white Brad Pitt Chanel commercials,” remarked Thomas. “We were using the C300 and 500 when we needed to shoot something guerrilla-style without permits,” added Buono. “We wanted something that was small and could move quickly, but we wanted the best possible image quality.” “Some people think that we would be the last 26

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of opportunity with the new cameras…” said Epstein. “You can talk to the dude making the camera so you can get technical support immediately.” “Know your workflow inside and out,” advised Buono. “The workflow from the camera to post process is where you will stumble and fall in a 48-hour turn-around situation if you’re not totally clear on the process and the fastest way to get your data from the camera to the editor to the colorist. That’s where we’ve stumbled and fallen.” “I get three hours of footage to edit down to one-and-a-half to three minutes, and a lot of it is having the organization down from the get-go,” said Epstein. “There’s no real time for an assistant editor. You need to see all the footage as quickly as possible, so it’s really just getting in… and starting your assembly… You don’t have time to do a visual pass and then a sound pass and then an effects pass. I’m having to do it all at the same time.” Epstein explained that as he is making his assembly, he’ll switch over to Adobe Audition and add in a sound cue or switch to After Effects and pull a key on a green screen shot, if needed. Epstein will do this throughout his edit so when he reaches the end, the rough edit is fairly close to its final form. “You’re literally interacting with the piece as fast as you’re thinking about it,” noted Epstein. “So if anyone comes in at any moment, they can say, ‘I see where you’re going with this’ or ‘I hear where you’re going

with this’… Anything from a lack of a visual or a sound cue (in the assembly) is going to distract you from the comedy, and it’s the only way to know if the joke is working in the take.” “We work with the codecs beforehand— trying to figure out how to eliminate steps,” said Buono. “We do factor in what each camera does—how it affects the skin, lighting, sharpness…” He added, “It’s just about figuring out your team... That’s the only way it’s work. We have our key grip that’s been here since the mid-’90s who’s on every single shoot. Our gaffer now has been on every single shoot this season… When you get someone new (on the crew) it gets sort of tricky… Everything has to move so fast. As the cinematographer, I try to make it look the best that I can, but I have to constantly remind myself that you have to get this whole script done and not to shoot a single shot that won’t be in the full spot.” “Ultimately our job is that we have to be very cognizant of the show schedule,” remarked Thomas. “We have to work around that. Yes, we’d love to spend four hours with a tech crane to get that one shot perfect, but we can’t do that so we have to walk the fine line to make sure that we’ve got something that looks good and feels appropriate and protect that as best as we can, while keeping to the schedule.” Thomas advised not to use a lack of time as an excuse. “You have to push yourself to get as much scale and scope as you can, but you have to be very practically minded at the same time,” he said. “Don’t bite off more than you can chew. Really have a clear sense of what you want and then build up scale from there.” He continued, “If the writer has written in 12 locations in a piece, we know there’s no way we can shoot that in 6 hours, so we try to look at how we can re-create some of those locations.” “The key (for us) is to get a good grasp on what the piece is that we’re doing,” added Buono. “So if it’s a promo, this is going to be very sound design heavy, very graphics heavy... And a lot of it is watching a lot of promos and understanding what makes them work.” “We always have a library of music that has specific music and specific tones (ready and available),” said Thomas. The SNL team couldn’t stress preparation, teamwork, and fast, effective gear enough, but it was their final piece of advice specifically for 48-hour filmmaking that was most interesting. “Keep the writing process open,” said Buono. “You should never consider it a finished script. You’re writing beforehand; you’re writing it on the set; you’re writing it in the edit. That’s the only way we can do it, so you can keep reacting and keep it moving to where the thing wants to go.” “Lorne Michaels has a great quote,” added Buono. “He says that ‘the show doesn’t go on because it’s ready; it goes on because it’s 11:30.’ That definitely carries over to what we do.” LFV


BIG OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE SMALL SCREEN IFTA panelists (l to r) Adam Besserman, John Penney, and Meghan White.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY W. H. BOURNE

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ith hundreds of TV channels available to audiences and with the increasing relevance of new digital platforms, the small screen appears to offer unparalleled opportunities for producers. The challenge is this: How will the independents enter this new world and monetize their endeavors? Studio execs and producers shared their wisdom at the recent IFTA (Independent Film and Television Alliance) Production Conference on April 19 in Beverly Hills, California.

According to Jeff Sagansky, former executive at NBC, CBS and Sony and chair at Hemisphere Film Capital, there are currently 65 network (TV and cable) buyers. While networks used to produce their own content in-house, dwindling advertising dollars has challenged executives to create content as inexpensively as possible. Independents that can capitalize on tax credits and film incentives like those in Louisiana are in a better position to be more competitive in producing content for the small screen. Jeff Bader, president of Program Planning, Strategy and Research at NBC Entertainment, noted that the average price for a scripted episode on their network is $1.8 million. Because of this, networks like NBC are looking at pitches with low license fees for buy-in. John Penney, executive vice president of Strategy and Business Development at Starz, explained that a show needed to be viewed as a layer cake of various licenses. Foreign territories have become interested in network content because of the quality associated with 28

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these productions. Penney says the key is designing the right show at the right price. His best recommendation for independent producers is to partner with companies that have established ties to these channels, such as Lionsgate TV, Entertainment One, or Gaumont. Meghan White, vice president of Program Acquisitions at Lifetime Networks, talked Kirk D’Amico of Myriad Pictures.

about the increasing need for TV movies. She reiterated Penney’s comments about partnering with a company or producer with a proven track record. While several speakers talked about the increase in revenues in VOD (Video On Demand), the most interesting insights were from Adam Besserman, director of West Coast Development for Yahoo!. Besserman likened Internet video channels to the early days of cable (when there were only local access channels). He predicts that Internet video channels will become the next cable, with premium channels like Hulu Plus, Netflix, Amazon Prime, and YouTube’s new subscription channels vying to be more like HBO, Showtime, and Starz. Internet video consumption has grown by 140 percent over the past year and advertisement dollars are just starting to follow. Besserman believes that quality video production for the Web will be in demand and will see increasing revenues. Katie O’Connell, CEO of Gaumont International Television, talked about licensing for the various windows—theatrical, VOD, TV/cable, DVD, and downloads. Because people want to watch content on the platform they want to watch it on, sales of a specific window don’t necessarily detract from other windows. The windows become more nimble because they’re not paying as much in licensing fees. Kirk D’Amico, president and CEO of Myriad Pictures, explained it best: “There’s a lot more smaller deals over a larger landscape.” LFV


LIGHTS, CAMERA…ANGLES! MOVIE MAGIC (FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF A MAGICIAN)

STORY BY MICHAEL DARDANT GUEST COLUMNIST

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fter 23 years of practicing sleight of hand, I’ve had opportunities to share my knowledge with some of the productions that have filmed in New Orleans. Each experience has been unforgettable and I never know what to expect. Recently I was hired to be a hand double for an actor on Common Law to perform a flourish with a Zippo lighter. After teaching the actor the trick so he could try it from a wide shot, it was determined that my skin tone would have to be changed to match that of the actor. Just as the makeup artist finished making one of my arms look like I was unsure of my heritage, the conclusion was reached that if the actor could complete the move slowly, it could always be sped up in post. Not only did I not have any face time on Common Law, but due to “movie magic” I had no hand time either! Oh, well. I still got paid, so who’s complaining? “Movie magic” has been coined by the general public—or as magicians like to call 30

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them, “laymen”—to describe any would-be impossible situation made to look incredibly real, brought to you by the many sciences behind film production. Whether it’s a huge tornado fan blowing debris or a CGI baby in the arms of a vampire, the effect is simply pawned off as magic. Magic is the force that invisibly gels the patchwork of shots together so that the audience is deceived by its own eyes! Almost every description of a magician could be applied to creators of cinema. A skilled conjuror tries to pull you into a different reality, one in which your rules and your beliefs no longer apply. What you see before you is accepted as true, and more importantly, you abandon the mindset of trying to figure it out. To quote Jon

Racherbaumer, one of my mentors and the author of over 60 books on magic: “A magician hopes to disrupt the serenity of your vain assumptions about the world and to make you aware that things are seldom what they seem.” A good film achieves a very similar effect for the spectator. After all, it’s why they are watching—to escape reality. If you are completely absorbed into this new world on the screen, then you aren’t trying to figure out how the movie was made. Knowing “how it’s done,” or any acknowledgement that what you are experiencing isn’t real, ruins the magic. We’ve all been on a pirate ship, in a space suit, or about to be attacked by zombies when an annoying ringtone reminds us that we are actually sitting in a theater. Even worse is when the disruption happens within the world we are so eager to accept. Picture a boom mic suddenly next to Brad Pitt’s head when he’s supposedly alone at the top of a mountain. The word “flashing” is commonly used in set photography or on Bourbon Street


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balconies. In the magic world, however, to flash describes something seen when it shouldn’t be— but instead of a boom mic, it would refer to something like, say, a palmed card, an off cue bunny, or one of three parts of a woman who’s supposed to be offstage. It’s amazing how even a simple sound issue can pull you completely out of a scene. Magicians use the term “talking.” Once the spectator is convinced that the coin is resting in the right hand, then hearing an accidental clink against a finger ring on the left hand means the coin “talked” and the effect is blown. The human eye is fooled into “real-life” motion at 24 frames per second, yet even one frame with a sound displacement, continuity issue, or bad acting feels completely jarring—hence, the magic is ruined. Another element that makes filmmaking similar to a magic show is the importance of understanding angles! “Bad Angle” would be a great name of a comic book magician’s arch nemesis. Each movement of any manipulation act is choreographed to distract or lead the eye, while at the same time be justified as a natural motion. Practicing with three mirrors to get the point of view of every seat in the house. Storyboarding and creating a shot list basically determine what angle and what lighting will “sell the illusion” for each segment of the story. Angles determine how the story is revealed and can also emphasize how important something is. Proper lighting can make or break the consistency of a shot and can

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be a huge factor for many magic effects, especially stage illusions. At my first theater show in front of my entire high school, a strobe light (remember those?) was accidentally left on and revealed my hidden assistant to everyone sitting stage left! So, while one side of the audience gasped, the other half silently tried to process the appearance of a disembodied shadow. Always remember what the Professor Dai Vernon once said: “Confusion is not magic!” The most clever conjuring, the most wondrous wizardry, the most magical of all the skills is film editing! My favorite class at Hogwarts was Final Cut Pro. The hand doesn’t have to be faster than the eye if we switch from camera 1 to camera 2. Changing the point of reference can be used to capture interest or can be a perfect means of distraction. Each new image we see stimulates multiple assumptions made by the brain that are often based on insufficient evidence. On stage, you don’t have the luxury of cutting to a closeup, but the same principles can be applied. In a basic example, if I were to call the crowd’s attention to a specific audience member, everyone’s heads would turn, meaning that when they attempt to refocus toward center stage, an entirely new set-up needs to be processed. Often in these moments it’s even difficult for the viewer to account for things like the actual amount of time that passed or whether or not they were wearing a watch. In a sense, a solid act is built on moments where spectators lose track of reality.

Now we are at the dawn of an era where reality has become so contorted that no one knows what’s true anymore. While live shows are scripted and actors are camera aware, we can’t tell if a satellite image has been photoshopped or if Morgan Freeman is really a hologram. Exciting times! People have asked, “With advancements in technology, making so much of the impossible realized, will people lose interest in the art of magic?” Not if it’s a solid act! The same applies to movie magic. Magic is often defined as simply a science that we do not understand. Magicians are a unique brand that constantly look for ways to not only create illusions but also challenge reality. That’s why they make great assets on film sets! Filmmakers are faced with the same task of creating awe in a society where we’ve seen it all, and if there’s something we missed, we just have to look down at our smartphones. But as long as they keep creating ways to make us forget reality, we will live in their world for at least 22 minutes, if not 2 hours. We will be absorbed into the story and we will continue to believe in the magic. LFV Michael “Magic Mike” Dardant, of New Orleans is the perfect comedian or emcee on any stage. As a magician, his internationally award-winning act presents completely original routines involving stunning sleight of hand, pickpocketing and a stuffed tiger! As a comedian he brings a genuine Southern flair with a Cajun accent that catches you completely off guard. www.michaeldardant.com.


THE FRENCH ARE COMING! STORY BY SHANNA FORRESTALL

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o one can deny that Francois Pierre Vincentelli is sexy. And when he stepped foot on Louisiana soil to work on his first American film project, Heat, it seemed a perfect fit.

I was lucky to be paired with this amiable Frenchman for an engaging scene in the remake of the classic film that shot in New Orleans in April, and convinced him to answer a few questions about his career, working on American films, and experiencing Louisiana for the first time.

SF: So, this is your first film in English? FV: Yes, it’s my first movie in another language, and it’s hard work for me because it’s different to act in English than to speak in English. Because I speak English with a different accent than I do when I act (to be more understandable), and I have a weak vocabulary in English, when I play a part there are some words I don’t know. It’s challenging, but it’s great. For a French actor, acting in English is a bit like a dream because we grow up watching American movies, and I think English is the best language for film. Well, Italian and English. I love it because, you know, when we would pretend to act as children, sometimes we would act in English because it sounds more like a song or something… so it’s fun now to act speaking English for real.

Shanna Forrestall: So, maybe you can start by telling me a little bit about how you got into acting. Francois Vincentelli: Oh, when I was young, 14, my best friend now who is a producer in Belgium—because I was born in Belgium— asked me if I wanted to act in school. I did my first play at 14 and then after that… I don’t remember, but I think I did some more plays… and after school, I went to theater school in Belgium. I eventually moved to France to act professionally, and I’ve been lucky to work a lot. SF: And now you’re a lead on a French TV show? FV: Yes, the show is called Hard, and it’s a comedy about the porn industry and I play Roy Lapoutre (Roy the Beam). It’s really funny. It’s a love story between a Catholic widow and a porn star. And I’m the porn star, of course. SF: Tell me how you got connected to Simon West, who’s directing Heat. FV: My girlfriend worked in L.A. for two years in Cirque du Soleil and I knew I would be trav-

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but my manager thought that it was “charming and funny.” She began introducing me to some casting directors in L.A., and I met Steven, one of the producers of Heat, at a party, and he told me about the project and asked if I was interested. I eventually sent an audition tape to Simon West, and he liked it, so he called me and booked me on the film.

eling a lot to L.A., so I decided to make some contacts there. I was able to get a manager. I told her, “I’m 40 and ‘I speak French like a Spanish cow’—do you think I can do something here?” (laughs) I thought my accent would be a problem,

SF: This is your first time to New Orleans and Louisiana. Any thoughts on working here? FV: Oh yes, I have fallen in love with the city. You know, when I was a child I loved Tom Sawyer, I wanted to be him, so being this close to the Mississippi River is great. And New Orleans is fantastic. It’s like a little part of France in the U.S. and I really love it and I hope to come back. LFV


BRINGING UP BABY LOCAL FILM PRODUCTION COMPANY SEEKS DISTRIBUTION FOR ITS FIRST NARRATIVE FEATURE STORY BY ZAC M. MANUEL THE GREENHOUSE COLLECTIVE

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un, twisted, hectic, and at times unsettling. These are just a couple choice words that come to mind when I think back to the production of our micro-budget, found-footage, psycho-thriller baby, Thelema: The Equinox Diaries. Thelema, which would be my company’s first narrative feature, is something of a twisted, coming-of-age story about two brothers on a murderous rampage in post-Katrina New Orleans. Ex-Marine, and Black Water operative, Marshal Seth, fueled by a lust for power and the occult teachings of Aleister Crowley, instructs his little brother, Simon, in all the various sadistic ways in which to dispatch hapless pedestrians, with Simon’s camera rolling the whole time. Thelema is a simple and honest, albeit intense, depiction of murder, not dependent on excessive gore but instead grounded in realism and the idea that anyone you are, anywhere you sleep, a killer (or two) could be lurking just around the corner. There were

times when I couldn’t tell we were making a movie, driving around New Orleans at odd hours of the morning searching for the perfect home to break into, ravage, and sneak away undetected, while other times were pure (demented) comedy. Filmmaking is always a challenge, which can differ depending on the project. In our case, it didn’t take long to finish a cut, and being a multimedia company, we were able to record most of the music present in the film, which saved us the headache of acquiring copyrights. However, working at the micro-budget level does have its disadvantages. At our budget range, we weren’t eligible to apply for any state tax credits, so financing for us turned out to be similar to a rollercoaster, where we often found ourselves at the bottom of the hill, and on the other side of excitement. Of course, we charged headfirst into the festival circuit, but without a guide to direct us through the myriad festivals, we found ourselves guessing

and spending to varied success. The overarching goal has been achieving distribution, which we’ve come to discover may (or may not) be dependent on discerning and playing to the market. Anyone who’s seen the film has been affected by it, whether they enjoyed it or not, which to me is imperative to any film viewing experience. I’m positive that what we have is a unique and marketable product, the only found-footage horror film I know of, stateside at least, to put viewers in the backseat with the deadly threat. We’ve had offers, but the challenge for us as filmmakers is to find the right fit for our bruised and bloodied boot. We love our killer baby and, charged with a responsibility to our investors, we must see that it makes it into the right hands. Making the film is the “easy part”—seeing that the film makes it is the challenge. If there’s anything to be learned from this film, it’s to keep your eyes and ears open, forget about sleep, and always have a killer plan of action. LFV For more information, visit www.thegreenhousecollective.com.

OUT IN FRONT

From concept to completion...

Contact Attorneys: Tom Clark Baton Rouge 225.378.3246 tom.clark@arlaw.com Meg Alsfeld Kaul New Orleans 504.585.0426 meg.kaul@arlaw.com

The Adams and Reese Entertainment and New Media team covers the legal arena within the entertainment, film, music, and book industries including intellectual property, technology, and new media. From concept to completion, we are advocates for our clients in contract preparation and negotiations as well as in purchasing, selling, licensing, protecting, and enforcing intellectual properties.

www.adamsandreese.com

800.725.1990 | 504.581.3234 | 225.336.5200 ALABAMA | FLORIDA | LOUISIANA | MISSISSIPPI | SOUTH CAROLINA TENNESSEE | TEXAS | WASHINGTON, DC

Attorney Advertising. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of the legal services performed by other lawyers. Advertisement contains stock photography. Contacts: Charles P. Adams, Jr. and Ralph H. Wall, 504.581.3234 36

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elocity Agency is the only full service marketing and production company in the region with clients throughout the United States. Our approach is to provide a holistic marketing experience and with our team of experts we bring fresh concepts and fuse them with strategic approaches to guarantee success for your business. We can handle everything from planning to production and placement. We have a super-charged team ready to create your campaign and marketing initiatives across multiple platforms. Whether it’s corporate identity, mailing campaigns or heavy digital marketing campaigns, we produce and implement it all. Velocity strategically implements proprietary tools and techniques that optimize premium conversions for your business. Initiatives begin with client research and discovery that focus on the identification of end goals. Next, projects are launched securing the most effective platforms and channels. Finally, continual monitoring and real-time adjustments ensure exceptional ROI. For more information, visit our website at www.velocity-agency.com or call 504-838-8811. Velocity Agency, Importance In Direction

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vent Design Build is a full service live event and production company focused on producing experiential events for some of the largest companies in the United States. Our uncommon range of expertise and services allows us to create permanent exhibits, live events, HD Video production, 3D animation and everything in between. From concept sketches to complex technical development and installation, we’ve done it all. When we say that we can do it, it will get done. With over 40 years combined experience in event design, staging and construction, we will give you the attention and personal service you’ll come to expect and enjoy. Event Design Build has created and produced phenomenal events for clients spanning the country, such as Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, TNT/TBS Essence Experience and Mercedes-Benz. Contact us with your specific inquiry and we will prepare your estimate for free. Call us at 504-834-8811 or visit our website at www.eventdesignbuild.com. What ever it takes!

The Only Motion Picture Automatic Wavemaking Tank of Its Kind in the World

Louisiana Wave Studio Located on approximately 18 acres of open land at the Sealy-Slack Industrial Park Just 6 miles from downtown Shreveport, Louisiana Phone: (323) 932-1685 email: inquiry@thelouisianawavestudio.com ISSUE THREE

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INVESTIGATION DISCOVERY EXPLORES DESPICABLE DEEDS IN DIXIE WITH SOUTHERN FRIED HOMICIDE

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gainst a backdrop of Southern hospitality, etiquette, and traditional values, evil creeps in like vines on a timehonored plantation. Investigation Discovery’s new summer television series, Southern Fried Homicide, proves that ugliness lurks behind Southern beauty when cracks in moral society give way to cold-blooded

Investigation Discovery. “We were looking for an authentic Southern narrator and location. Shanna was a stand out, and her home state of Louisiana offered the perfect setting, so rich in character,” said Chris Nusbaum, executive producer for Sirens Media. “It has been such a pleasure to work with Shanna, along with the rest of the

SOUTHERN FRIED HOMICIDE PROBES THE JUICIEST STORIES FROM DOWN IN THE BIBLE BELT. murder. Actress Shanna Forrestall, a native of Louisiana, serves as the gatekeeper to these salacious stories that give another meaning to things that “go south.” The 10-part series kicked off Wednesday, June 5, at 10pm on

talented New Orleans crew.” Southern Fried Homicide probes the juiciest stories from down in the Bible Belt, from the Carolinas to Louisiana and Tennessee. The premiere episode on June 5 profiled an old

adage in the South: families are a bit like fudge—mostly sweet, but with a few nuts. After pedigreed Southern belle Susie Newsom’s marriage fails, sweet Susie spirals and starts to have an affair…with her disturbed first cousin. When the rest of the family isn’t exactly thrilled with the kissing cousins, their scandalous relationship ends with nine family members dead, spanning from Kentucky to North Carolina. Southern Fried Homicide is produced by Sirens Media with Valerie Haselton as executive producer, and Diana Sperrazza as executive producer with Investigation Discovery. Sara Kozak is senior vice president of production, Kevin Bennett is general manager, and Henry Schleiff is president and general manager of Investigation Discovery. LFV For more, visit investigation.discovery.com/tv-shows/southernfried-homicide.

“Offering Solid Communications Solutions for New Orleans and the Gulf South since 1985”

504-943-1888 504-304-8377 fax

www.solidcomnola.com 710 Poland Ave. • New Orleans, LA 70117 Sally G. Cobb & Phillip M. Cobb, Owners

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RENTAL • SALES • SERVICE MOTOROLA • HYT RADIOS – SURVEILLANCE MICS HEADSETS – SPEAKER MICS FILM – VIDEO – COMMERCIALS CONVENTIONS - SPECIAL EVENTS


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YRS

CREATING STUNNING MOTION IMAGERY

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ince 2004, Edward Holub, 49, has owned and managed Cassidy’s Girl LLC, a Louisiana Film Production company. Edward has been engaged in Media Production since his 1985 graduation from Rochester Institute of Technology, BFA in Film and Photography. Edward worked as an advertising still photographer in New York City, working for major agencies like Grey, Saattchi, and DDB Needham, and publishers like Random House for national clients like Citibank, Jim Beam, RJ Reynolds, Lexmark, etc. He shifted into motion pictures by self-producing the award-winning nationally distributed video and DVDs, Night Runs Red and Unknown Man. He continues to produce festival favorites. As a camera operator, Holub has run virtually every type of digital video camera made for a large variety of projects from commercials, events, music, and feature films. His unique business savvy and knowledge of the industry poise him for a quantum leap on his current trajectory launching his company as a local powerhouse for digital media content creation. For more information, visit www.holubfilm.com, ed@holubfilm.com, or 504-338-4567.

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ames Bearb Casting (JBC) is a full-service casting facility strategically located in the historic Garden District of New Orleans. JBC casts union and non-union talent for film, television, commercial and reality projects, as well as offers a 3,000-square-foot production facility rental space through its partnership with Hollywood South Casting (HSC). After managing HSC for the past seven years, James Bearb decided to branch out and create a new casting company focused primarily on principal and union talent available in the region. JBC is currently in development on several network series, independent features, and is always taking submissions for reality programming. “We recently cast the network pilot Dark Water and it was exciting to see the level of non-union talent available in the region,” said Bearb. “Dark Water is a new non-union scripted platform sure to change the way we all watch TV.” A native of Louisiana, Bearb moved to Los Angeles at the age of 19. He worked in the entertainment industry there, both in front of and behind the camera, and his employment background includes Central Casting, Extras Management and the Directors Guild of America. While in L.A., Bearb learned from Hollywood’s A-list and brought certain industry standards back to Louisiana, which has not only helped local acting talent, but has also helped Hollywood South as a whole. “The emerging Louisiana entertainment industry continues to provide opportunities for both talent and crew,” said Bearb. “The tax incentive package available in Louisiana has been the most successful of any state and brought billions to Louisiana’s infrastructure. Producers know when they make their project in Louisiana they are getting the best crew and talent available in the Gulf South region and in many cases nationally.” For more information, visit www.jamesbearbcasting.com, e-mail info@jamesbearbcasting.com, or call 504-264-1089.


L&R SECURITY SERVICES, INC. 3930 OLD GENTILLY ROAD NEW ORLEANS, LA 70126

PHONE: (504) 943-3191 F AX: (504) 944-1142 TOLL FREE: (800) 324-4672

CERTIFICATIONS SDVOSB HUB ZONE GSA CONTRACT GSA-07F-5683R

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s costumers in theatre and film for more than twenty years, we have seen the entertainment industry in Louisiana grow by leaps and bounds. In addition, we have heard producers say more and more - can’t you get these things locally? Well, the time has come to meet that need. Instead of ordering supplies from Los Angeles or New York when working in Louisiana, we can be found just outside of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We have reached out to suppliers all over the country and we now stock many items that Costumers use regularly including hangers, tags, shoe bags, top stick, Dirt Worx Schmere, RIT Dyes, Shoe Supplies, nude cover and many other items. If there are supplies that you need for your production but do not see on our site, please contact us. If we don’t have it in stock we will do our best to get it for you and begin stocking it on a regular basis. We look forward to serving you and growing along with the entertainment industry of Louisiana! For more information, www.CostumerSupplies.com, 225-369-2179, please leave a message, or info@CostumerSupplies.com.

I.A.T.S.E. LOCAL 4 78

Motion Picture Studio Mechanics of Louisiana & Southern Mississippi Louisiana motion picture tax incentives aren’t news. They’re a success story. IATSE Local 478 now has 1,100 members and we’re still growing. These dedicated men and women work in various crafts in the art department, construction, crafts services, electric, first aid, greens, grip, locations, paint, props, set dressing, sound, special effects, video assist and wardrobe. We have one of the strongest and longest lasting incentives systems around which means these professionals have worked on hundreds of movies over more than ten years. They bring experience to your production. They raise the bar and lower your bottom line. If you’re looking for your next crew, look no more.

432 N. ANTHONY STREET SUITE 305 • NEW ORLEANS, LA 70119 OFFICE (504) 486-2192 • FAX (504) 483-9961 • iatse478.org

Set Security Ushers Roving Supervisors Body Guards ATM Escort

Preview Screenings Uniformed Guards Site Managers Ticket Takers Armed & Unarmed Event Logistics Consulting Services

CLIENTS & PARTNERS NOBLE INC SECURITY HUNGRY RABBIT JUMPS LLC GERARD SELLERS FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION VETERANS AFFAIRS SCORE TRANSPORTATION SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

L&R IS LICENSED IN THE FOLLOWING STATES LOUISIANA CALIFORNIA COLORADO MISSISSIPPI ARIZONA ALABAMA MISSOURI TEXAS NEW MEXICO ARKANSAS TENNESSEE FLORIDA VIRGINIA MARYLAND WASHINGTON, D.C. WE CAN OBTAIN LICENSING IN ALL 50 STATES. TO LEARN MORE CALL (504) 943-3191.

WWW.LRSECURITY.COM L&R SECURITY SERVICES, INC.

3930 Old Gentilly Rd | New Orleans, LA 70126 phone: (504) 943-3191 | fax: (504) 942-1142 | email: info@lrsecurity.com

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LAKE CHARLES/SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA FILM & TV UPDATE

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wo years ago, Sternwood & MacGuffin shot a short horror film, East Stackton, in Southwest Louisiana. The film, written by Sean Farina and Lake Charles native John Veron, is now available for digital download at www.eaststackton.com/buy. This past January, Authentic Entertainment was in town for a week working with local realtor, Nikki Pruitt, on TLC’s My First Home, which aired June 1. Pruitt took clients Brandon Varnado and Artie Brown, both Louisiana natives, around town to over 40 houses searching for the perfect fit for the couple. Producers also shot scenes around town at Petro Bowl, which the Southwest Louisiana Film Commission arranged, and Nina P’s Cafe. In a serendipitous

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Lake Charles realtor Nikki Pruitt, with Keller Williams, appeared on TLC’s My First Home on June 1.

moment on set, Varnado proposed to Brown! Then in April, Sirens Media was in town for a week filming an episode of an Investigation

Discovery Channel series. The episode featuring Lake Charles covers the investigation of Robyn Davis and Carol Saltzman, who were charged with the murder of Brian Davis in 2009. The Southwest Louisiana Film Commission assisted with locations around town, the crime scene, video poker machines, the courthouse where the case was tried, and interview locations. The Calcasieu Parish Police Jury and Sheriff ’s Department also assisted with locations. The episode is set to air later this summer. Also this summer, Sedona Studios will roll out DVOX movie kiosks, similar to Redbox, throughout Southwest Louisiana. Look for local, independent films alongside feature films in this new distribution channel. Michael McGowan, president of Sedona Studios, is a Lake Charles native and writer/director of How to Love a Geek. He is committed to producing more films in Southwest Louisiana. LVF For more information about Lake Charles and Southwest Louisiana, go to www.visitlakecharles.org.


LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! ST. TAMMANY PARISH/LOUISIANA NORTHSHORE HAS IT ALL

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ust across Lake Pontchartrain, about 40 minutes from New Orleans, St. Tammany Parish offers a great variety of location possibilities for your next film project—and full-service assistance aimed at making your job easier. Not only will you find classic Louisiana scenery—moss-laden cypress swamps, dreamscape bayous and a panoply of Southern architecture—but corners of the beautiful parish can pass for the rolling horse country of Kentucky or African savannah (complete with exotic wildlife). St. Tammany has 19th-century homes, quaint downtowns, an historic lighthouse, and a track record of working with film companies—Beautiful Creatures, The Campaign, Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters, Skeleton Key, Kingfish, Dead Man Walking, and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button were all in part filmed here. The Louisiana Northshore Film Office can help with everything from location scouting and workforce to accommodations and catering. St. Tammany has talented locals, experienced in the film industry, who offer post-production services, a crew base, and movie catering. Find great restaurants, willing extras and, of course, those great state tax incentives in St. Tammany Parish, the Louisiana Northshore. LFV For location photos or more information, contact Loren Legendre at 800-634-9443 or visit www.louisiananorthshore.com/film.

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FILMING ON THE CAJUN COAST

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he Cajun Coast has been in the film production business since 1917— when a group of adventurous filmmakers journeyed to South Louisiana to film the first Tarzan of the Apes movie, starring Elmo Lincoln. It was the first movie filmed on location, the first movie to gross over $1 million, and is considered one of the top silent movie films ever made. Since then, the Cajun Coast has hosted a number of film productions and leading men and women, including Thunder Bay, starring Jimmy Stewart; The Drowning Pool with Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward; the iconic Easy Rider, starring Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda; All the King’s Men, starring Jude Law,

Sean Penn and Kate Winslet; Déjà Vu, starring Denzel Washington and Jim Caviezel; The Fire Next Time with Craig T. Nelson and Bonnie Bedelia; The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett; and The Yellow Handkerchief, starring William Hurt, Maria Bello and Kristen Stewart.

FILMING IS ALWAYS EASY ON THE RELAXED AND FRIENDLY CAJUN COAST, ONLY 90 MINUTES FROM NEW ORLEANS.

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The Cajun Coast is a sampler of everything Louisiana offers. Head into the wild and exotic beauty of primal swamp in the Atchafalaya Basin. Scout the Antebellum and Victorian homes. Other offerings include: Picturesque small towns. A 19th-century boulevard of cast iron street lamps and mosscovered oaks in a community with over 400 historic buildings. Plenty of inland waterways, bayous and the Gulf of Mexico. Even an authentic decommissioned offshore drilling rig and other locations in the heart of the petroleum industry. Filming is always easy on the relaxed and friendly Cajun Coast, only 90 minutes from New Orleans. The hospitality of the people speaks for itself and they’re eager to help pinpoint all the locations and resources you’ll need to film on the Cajun Coast. Explore the Cajun Coast, the heart of what National Geographic called “this hauntingly beautiful land,” when you’re scouting locations for your next production. Call 800-256-2931 or visit www.cajuncoast.com. LFV


A JOURNEY WITHOUT EXPECTATIONS GERARD SELLERS TALKS LOCATION SCOUTING/MANAGING IN LOUISIANA

STORY BY ANDREW VOGEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

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ne of the more overlooked jobs in film production is that of a location scout and manager. As outsiders looking in, we tend to forget the amount of effort that goes into matching locations to the director’s vision, and then actually securing those locations for use. One such location scout/manager, Gerard Sellers, is a seasoned veteran with over 27 years in the industry. To give a taste of Sellers’ extensive resume, he has scouted and managed major titles, including Twelve Years A Slave, Texas Killing Fields, The Skeleton Key,

true-to-life documentaries on alligator hunting and the Cajun lifestyle. One such documentary, Alligator Hunters: A Louisiana Legacy, aired on PBS and became a precursor to the hit reality show, Swamp People. Through his documentary research all over

A Little Bit of Heaven, Monster’s Ball, and many others. “When you’ve been doing this long enough, you learn to tell a story with your photography. I often use my photography to convince producers and directors to come to Louisiana,” says Sellers, describing the artistic aspect of the field. Without neglecting the business side of the industry, Sellers also expresses the necessity of knowing the right people. “I know the city, the sheriff ’s department and the police department in several parishes,” he explains. “It’s all about having the connections. Because of my connections and my crew, I end up saving production companies a ton of money in the long run. And that’s what it’s about.” Born and raised in Abbeville, Louisiana, Sellers got his start as a true Cajun making

Louisiana, Sellers quickly gained clout as a determined worker, which evolved into a start in the film industry. “I was at Antlers bar in Lafayette drinking cold beer and eating crawfish with Randy Labry and Glen Pitre,” recalls Sellers. “They told me about a project with Robert Duvall, Armand Assante and a bunch of others called Belizaire Waltz, which later became Belizaire the Cajun. So I quit my day job and went to work as a P.A. I was all over the place at first. I didn’t really know what the hell I was doing. This was my first job as a location scout. But I was a passionate artist and a hard worker, so people started hiring me for other jobs. And that’s how I got my start.” From that point on, Sellers describes his life as a journey without expectations. Fortunately, doors quickly began to open.

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“I got to be friends with Bobby Duvall on the set of Belizaire and he told me he wanted to see my documentaries,” says Sellers. “So of course I showed him, and afterwards he said, ‘I got this little project I’m trying to get together called The Apostle. When I get it together, would you mind if I called?’ I said, ‘Hell no, I don’t mind.’” He continues, “Two years later, I was at my house not doing much of anything, and I got a call from Duvall’s assistant, Brad Wilson, and he left a message saying, ‘Bobby’s got tickets to France for New Year’s, but wants to spend New Year’s Eve at Mulates (restaurant) in Breaux Bridge (Louisiana) instead so he can scout locations for The Apostle. He’s got a million dollars to put into it now.’ But Brad didn’t leave me a number. And I had been sending Bobby my work for two years and never heard anything, so I thought this was some kind of a joke. I finally found the number and called Bob and left him a message on his answering machine. Five minutes later, Brad Wilson calls me back and says they decided not to go to France and they want to come to Louisiana and find some authentic locations. So they came down, and I spent some time with them in Lafayette and Abbeville helping find locations for The Apostle. We spent New Year’s together on Pecan Island. And I eventually came to find out he was also researching the part of ‘Gus’ for Lonesome Dove.” By the time Sellers received a call from Duvall to be his official locations manager, Sellers had just signed a deal memo for Hallmark’s movie of the week, The Old Man, 30 minutes prior. Fortunately, he was well on his way to a successful career as a location scout/manager at this point, and he continues to allow doors to open for him. “You never know how things will play out. Thirty minutes ago I didn’t know I’d be talking to you,” says a free-spirited Sellers. Sellers’ open-minded and altruistic way of life keeps him motivated and content with the work he does. He says, “To be able to influence any other human being in a positive way— more than just the person, but the things that he does—what else do we have in this life?” Sellers also gives advice for those beginning a career in the film industry: “Make sure you don’t think you know everything. Don’t come in with any preconceived ideas of what you are doing. If you show people that you are willing to work and expect long hours, they will remember and call when they have a new project.” LFV


Louisiana LOCATION SCOUTS/MANAGERS A L SS LO OCA IST CA TIO AN TIO N T N MA AS N SI AG ST ER AN / T RE CE NT PR OJ EC TS

LO CA TIO N

LO CA TIO N

SC OU T

Company City, State Phone Web site

MA NA GE R

SERVICES PROVIDED

ACE Locations - Louisiana David Margulis New Orleans, LA 504-723-4006 www.louisianalocations.com

The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, Young Adult, Jeff, Who Lives at Home

Craig Aspen New Orleans, LA 504-909-2500 www.wildmagnoliafilms.com

Chrysler Imported from Detroit (commercial), Clarks Fall Catalogue (photo shoot)

Denise Ann Beale New Orleans, LA 504-343-9760

Treme

Katie Calhoon Baton Rouge, LA 225-454-3221

The Power of Few, Mighty Fine, Meeting Evil

Lisa Calhoun Baton Rouge, LA 225-206-0494 www.lisalocations.com

Dark Circles, Shaman’s Mark, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2

Batou Chandler New Orleans, LA 504-581-5053

2 Guns, Bullet to the Head, Killing Them Softly

Carl Chauvin Golden Meadow, LA 985-696-5690

N/A

Monique Davis New Orleans, LA 504-383-5893 www.moniquemdavis.com

Going In Circles, A Glimpse Into Glamour (photo shoot)

Aaron Dunsay New Orleans, LA 504-345-8203 adunsay.smugmug.com

Audi Love (commercial), Maxwell House (commercial), Makers Mark Cocktail Party (commercial)

Johnny Eastlund New Orleans, LA 816-223-4261

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Elsa & Fred, The Campaign

Adam Gambrel New Orleans, LA 606-344-6613 www.adamgambrel.com

Homecoming

Dana Hanby Covington, LA 985-893-0948

Now You See Me, Looper, Deja Vu

Megan Hebert New Orleans, LA 504-799-8678

Lizard Lick Towing

Meagan Higdon Ginter New Orleans, LA 703-626-8841

Terra Diablo (music video)

Elston Howard New Orleans, LA 504-723-2974

G.I. Joe: Retaliation, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, The Lucky One

Kendrick Hudson Shreveport, LA 318-393-5798

Olympus Has Fallen, Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, Snitch

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Louisiana LOCATION SCOUTS/MANAGERS A L SS LO OCA IST CA TIO AN TIO N T N MA AS N SI AG ST ER AN / T RE CE NT PR OJ EC TS

MA NA GE R LO CA TIO N

LO CA TIO N

Company City, State Phone Web site

SC OU T

SERVICES PROVIDED

Islands of the Marsh Productions Gerard Sellers New Orleans, LA 504-453-2451 www.louisianafilmlocations.com

Twelve Years a Slave, Lay the Favorite, Texas Killing Fields

John Jabaley New Orleans, LA 504-865-0723 www.johnjabaley.com

Empire State, Broken City, Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter

John A. Johnston New Orleans, LA 323-646-7226

The Loft, Green Lantern

Mickey Lambert New Orleans, LA 504-324-6649

The Butler, True Blood, Treme

Lisa Latter New Orleans, LA 504-483-8200

The Tomb, Contraband, The Campaign

Andre Le Lafayette, LA 337-257-6167

Common Law, Final Witness, Jordan/HSI (commercial)

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Louisiana LOCATION SCOUTS/MANAGERS A L SS LO OCA IST CA TIO AN TIO N T N MA AS N SI AG ST ER AN / T RE CE NT PR OJ EC TS

LO CA TIO N

LO CA TIO N

SC OU T

Company City, State Phone Web site

MA NA GE R

SERVICES PROVIDED

Stephen LeBlanc New Orleans, LA 504-231-0938

Now You See Me, G.I. Joe: Retaliation, Looper

Rikki Longanecker Prairieville, LA 225-933-7304

The Haunting in Connecticut 2, Backwater, Dungeons & Dragons: The Book of Vile Darkness

Louisiana Locations David Ross McCarty New Orleans, LA 504-450-1938 www.davidrossmccarty.com

The Host, Stolen, The Paperboy

Paul Lucero New Orleans, LA 718-775-6228

Young Adult, Found Footage, Our Idiot Brother

Bonnie Marquette Wakefield, LA 225-721-1571

Oblivion, The Host, The Haunting in Connecticut 2

Tara Martin New Orleans, LA 504-388-1155

So Undercover, ESPN/Nissan (commercial), Gulf Coast Tourism (commercial)

Matt McLellan New Orleans, LA 504-669-6533

Django Unchained, G.I. Joe 2, Oldboy

John A. Mmahat Jr. New Orleans, LA 323-252-9091

Hell Baby, The Campaign, Parker

Shedrick Nellon Baton Rouge, LA 225-454-5832

Wicked Blood, The Courier, Hijacked

Neutral Ground Films Jason A. Waggenspack Sean Donnelly New Orleans, LA 225-266-9560 www.neutralgroundfilms.com

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Ender’s Game, The Host

New Orleans Locations Dennis Curren New Orleans, LA 985-845-0636 www.neworleanslocations.com

VH1 Tough Love, Bing (commercial), Swamp People

Norris Ortolano Gonzales, LA 504-909-7983

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters, The Host

Thomas Parris Metairie, LA 910-471-8668

The Conjuring, Safe Haven, Revenge

F. Stanley Pearse, Jr. New Orleans, LA 318-426-2885

The Pardon, Olympus Has Fallen, The Iceman

Marc Preuss New Orleans, LA 504-228-7134

N/A

Christopher J. Quackenbush LaPlace, LA 985-768-1707

This Is the End, Bullet to the Head, Killing Them Softly

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Louisiana LOCATION SCOUTS/MANAGERS A L SS LO OCA IST CA TIO AN TIO N T N MA AS N SI AG ST ER AN / T RE CE NT PR OJ EC TS

MA NA GE R LO CA TIO N

LO CA TIO N

Company City, State Phone Web site

SC OU T

SERVICES PROVIDED

Albert Quaid New Orleans, LA 985-327-5116

Common Law, Old Boy, Bud Light (Super Bowl commercial)

Reinvention Media Darren Sumner New Orleans, LA 504-252-0765 www.reinvention-media.com

Net Effect

Hamilton Ridenour Baton Rouge, LA 225-588-3507

Battleship, Ticking Clock, Transit

Win Riley New Orleans, LA 504-452-2675 www.winriley.com

Broken City, 21 Jump Street, X-Men: First Class

Dominique Rotolo New Orleans, LA 504-388-0595

Baytown Disco, Memphis Beat Season 1 & 2, Gatorade (commercial)

Valerie Ryan Metairie, LA 504-339-1820

Olympus Has Fallen, Common Law, On the Road

Brandon Sanford New Orleans, LA 318-267-9632

Duck Dynasty, The Dark Tales of El Diablo, Naked Fame

Phil Seifert Springfield, LA 985-507-3067

The Third Act, Vanity Fair/Annie Leibowitz (photo shoot), Killer Joe

Mary Shelton New Orleans, LA 504-261-5289

The Mortician, Flakes, The Dead Will Tell

Michael E. Smith Shreveport, LA & Los Angeles, CA 818-269-8206 www.michaelsmithproductions.com

Angriest Man in Brooklyn, Electric Slide, Snake and Mongoose

Lauren Sullivan Baton Rouge, LA 513-739-8299

The Loft, No One Lives, Battleship

Nadiyah-Skyy Taylor New Orleans, LA 504-521-6709

Ghost Shark

David Thornsberry Metairie, LA 818-535-4183

The Maze Runner, The Kennedy Detail, Broken City

Kai Thorup Atlanta, GA 954-873-4878 www.kaithoruplocations.com

Broken City, The Goats, RED

Ron Uribe New Orleans, LA 985-707-4883

Twelve Years a Slave, Paradise, Empire State

Dawson Warner Baton Rouge, LA 702-677-1789

Oblivion, Pitch Perfect, Pawn Shop Chronicles

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LOCATION VOCATION LOUISIANA FILM & VIDEO MAGAZINE CATCHES UP WITH A FEW OF THE STATE’S LOCATION SCOUTS AND MANAGERS.

DAVID ROSS McCARTY LOUISIANA LOCATIONS 504-450-1938 What are some recent production projects you’ve worked on? The Host, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Why did you get into this field? I love and have an understanding of architecture and people. This job is a people job and I have an honest work ethic. What sets you and/or your company apart from others in your industry? I have been a Yankee in the South with a little extra energy since 1978. There are not many locations that I have not scouted or at least visited in the state. I am invited back to every location that I have shot in 35 years. What are some of your most exciting discoveries as a location scout/manager? I was asked to find a waterfall for a Kentwood Springs commercial in 1980. I loved the property so much I bought it. I still have the land today and will bring up my twin daughters on that river. What is your most memorable experience on the job?

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I was eating lunch on a movie entitled Monster’s Ball. I happened to be sitting across from the actor Peter Boyle, and the young producers were bragging about their work experiences at the next table. One said, “I worked for 10 years with Roman Polanski.” The other replied, “I was the assistant to Kubrick on two movies!” Peter Boyle looked up from his sandwich and said, “I did a Little Rascals movie in 1923.” Not a word was spoken for the rest of the lunch...

GERARD SELLERS ISLANDS OF THE MARSH PRODUCTIONS 504-453-2451 What are some recent production projects you’ve worked on? Promos for Bonnie and Clyde, Twelve Years A Slave, Untitled Diablo Cody Project, The Marriage Counselor (New Orleans). Why did you get into this field? I got into the field because it’s what I did best. Telling a story with photos, working with people, searching new locations can be very exciting. What sets you and/or your company apart from others in your industry? 25-plus years of experience working throughout

Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, and Texas. The knowledge of the land, the towns and cities, the people, the government of each location and how to present those locations to producers and directors in order to get them to film in Louisiana. What are some of your most exciting discoveries as a location scout/manager? I’m still discovering new places after all of these years. Louisiana is truly amazing. No matter where you’ve been, there is always a new place, an area in a park, house, barn, etc. Every town or city has a different look at night than it does in daylight. It’s almost like a negative in film processing. Your eyes adjust to different scenes and you see things differently. This past weekend I discovered a new plantation, sugar mill and fields that I’d heard about but never saw before. Every new script presents a different challenge. What is your most memorable experience on the job? The most memorable experience that I continue to have is to influence producers and directors to film in Louisiana. Location scouts are among the first people to hear about new shows and the locations that they hope to find. I find that I continue to learn and grow with each new project.


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HOLLYWOOD NORTH MOVES SOUTH

D

avidson & Sons Customs Brokers, a Vancouver-based logistics provider to the film industry, sees a move to Louisiana as their next step. Says Tippy Kelly, the Director of Film & Entertainment at Davidson & Sons, “It is a natural move for us. We have been servicing the film business in Vancouver for years, and recognize that providing the film industry’s logistics needs is a specialized and time-sensitive service. We see that Louisiana supports this industry and as we grew with the business in Vancouver, we want to be here and help grow and service the industry here.” Kelly has 12 years’ experience moving productions into and out of Vancouver and around the world. With expertise in both customs and freight forwarding, most of the larger productions that have come, and continue to come, to Western Canada have been assisted by Kelly. Bill Davidson, CEO and great grandson of the founder of D&S, thinks that the experience of his company will help the industry

in Louisiana. “We were there when Vancouver started to see a huge increase in the number of productions moving north,” he says. “Through the early years we saw and experienced the trials and tribulations of moving all kinds of production equipment, props, etc., north from L.A., and we also had a border to contend with. With that experience, and the fact that this type of work is a 7/24 commitment that is

“AS WE GREW WITH THE BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER, WE WANT TO BE HERE AND HELP GROW AND SERVICE THE INDUSTRY [IN LOUISIANA].”

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built on the trust that your provider will get what the production needs when they need it, we feel we can contribute to the success of the film business in the state.” Tara Mews, who is a production coordinator in Vancouver and more recently a production liaison to the industry for Davidson & Sons, points out that “historically in Vancouver, the industry has been loyal to a small number of service providers simply because it is not regular freight forwarding or brokerage that we need. We need people who understand our industry and are willing to go that extra mile to ensure they maintain a very high service level. Delays are very expensive in our business, and to have a partner we can rely on means everything.” Davidson & Sons was founded in 1917 and has clients all across North America. This year Davidson has worked on seven productions in Vancouver, with four more scheduled to start shortly. They have also worked on two films in Louisiana in the past few months, and now feel the time is right to open an office in Louisiana and bring some of their expertise and experience from Hollywood North to Hollywood South. LFV


COURTNEY N. EVANS Courtney N. Evans, a New Orleans native, has always had a passion for the performing arts. Since 2005, she’s directed all of her energy toward pursuing acting in the booming Louisiana film industry. In 2012, she made her television debut as “Sally” on Army Wives. Courtney continues to cultivate her craft, studying with Lance Nichols, Tasha Smith, and Deena Levy, amongst others. In 2009, she discovered Coach Jerry Katz, teaching the Ivana Chubbuck technique, who greatly influenced her approach to acting. Courtney has grown as a performer and has established herself as an up-and-coming star whose professionalism and impressive resume has earned her the admiration and respect of fellow actors and film-industry professionals. Her unique heritage (African American, French and Native American) allows her to embody a variety of roles, and gives her tremendous range. Courtney is emerging as a force, as she continues to hone her skills and make major strides in acting. www.courtneynevans.com LANDRUM ARTS LA 318-742-6554 LA www.LandrumArts.com

SHANNA FORRESTALL Shanna was born and raised in South Louisiana in a small town called Gonzales (located on a bayou between Baton Rouge and New Orleans). Shanna is a serious and trained SAG film and television actor. She is a dual citizen - legally able to live and work in the United States and Canada. Shanna has appeared in a series of successful films including The Last Exorcism, Olympus Has Fallen and just wrapped on the remake of Heat, scheduled to be released in theaters in 2014. She is also the host of a brand new show that launched June 5, 2013, on Investigation Discovery called Southern Fried Homicide. Shanna is a strong Southern woman whose versatility allows her to play roles that range from MILF to mom, and law enforcement to a lesbian enforcer for a prostitution ring. www.shannafromlouisiana.com Twitter: shannafromla

ANDREW VOGEL Andrew’s interest in performance developed at a very young age through rehearsed routines for his family as well as local and school plays. His passion continued into high school theatre where Andrew performed in a number of productions, most notably playing the role of Danny Zuko in Grease. Initially pursuing a career as a psychologist at LSU, Andrew felt his dreams of becoming an actor were unrealistic and instead found creative solace in forming a comedic rap group called The Zoo Keepers. Andrew’s plans for grad school quickly fell short in comparison to the feeling of passion that was reignited by a local acting class. Within two years of his decision to join a growing Louisiana film community, Andrew became the editor of Louisiana Film & Video Magazine, a monthly columnist for NOLAwoman.com, and a working actor. Andrew has acted in a number of local and national productions including Synarchy, My Life Is God’s Sitcom and God’s Not Dead starring Dean Cain. Andrew most recently landed a recurring role in CBS’s Under the Dome which premieres this June. http://resumes.actorsaccess.com/andrewvogel Open Range Management 225-216-2424 openrange@bellsouth.net 56

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ESCALANTE LUNDY Escalante Lundy was born and raised in New Orleans. In 2005 he was introduced to theater and film producing because of project management experience while working for the California Department of Transportation in Sacramento. Because of a no-show of another actor, Escalante was thrust into the performance world. While in collaboration with Falkon Kwest Productions, he was involved in several stage productions in Los Angeles and Las Vegas before moving back to New Orleans after Katrina to assist family. He decided to stay awhile and try the local acting scene. In 2007 Escalante began studying at the Anthony Bean Community Theater and made his New Orleans stage acting debut as the “Papaya Man”. After several other theater productions, the film world was next. He began studying with Valeka Grey, Lance Nichols and others before becoming a fixture at Jerry Katz Acting Joint. Over the past 5 years Escalante has been involved in over 20 film/theatre projects, most notably the HBO television show Treme, national commercial for Pampers with Drew Brees, the lead in feature film The Sickle, and one of his most recent bookings as “Big Fred” in Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained. Escalante is currently slated for a couple of upcoming film projects: he will play “Hubbard” in Burn; a jazz musician in the remake of classic Body Heat; and he will also play “Lenny Lyle” in Mouthpiece, a biographical film that documents the seedy underworld of prostitution in 1970s Atlanta’s dangerous sub-culture. Escalante feels that acting has not only been exciting as a profession, but has been key to human emotional development. He looks forward to continue working making acting a full time career. www.escalantelundy.com 504-493-7927 elundy17@yahoo.com

SEAN P. BRAUD Sean Paul Braud (BRO) was born into a family of mainly non-athletic people who were more than mildly confused with the perpetual ball of motion in their midst. He excelled at every sport he attempted but it was diving that combined his kinesthetic awareness with his need to jump off of high surfaces. He was a high school state champion and heavily recruited before he was chosen by the University of Pittsburgh where he was a 4 time All Big East Accolade recipient and a 3 time Big East Team Champion. In ‘01 he decided that high diving was not challenging enough and took 12th place in the Red Bull Cliff Diving Championships in Athens, Greece. This earned him a world ranking of 16th. In ’08, he placed 4th in the world, competing off the famous cliffs of Acapulco. Lest it be thought he was only a mindless jock, in ‘03 he graduated Cum Laude with a MA in Public Relations. Sean is currently living his childhood dream of being a professional stuntman and has been quoted as saying that every day on set as a stuntman is living in a dream that has come true. In his free time he studies Krav Maga which allows him to enjoy his second love, martial arts. spbraud23@gmail.com

MEGAN FEW Megan Few grew up in rural Montgomery, Texas. During her high school career and early into her college career, Megan was actively involved in the theater community. Shortly after graduating high school, Megan began to take film acting classes with Elesee Lester and Mari Ferguson. Megan also frequently traveled to Los Angeles to study under acting coach Cliff Osmond. Cliff Osmond had an especially strong influence on Megan and after a particular conversation with Osmond, Megan decided it was time to move on to bigger waters. After two years in the Texas industry, Megan made the transition to New Orleans to continue to pursue her career in film. During her time she has been in New Orleans she has been in various independent films including The Alternates, Rejects and the recently premiered Home, written and directed by Lula Fotis. Megan currently is training under Jerry Katz and Lance Nichols. Del Corral & Associates 504-324-3782 delcorralandassoc@msn.com

CAROL ANN SCRUGGS Carol Ann was born in Vicksburg, Mississippi, with most of her years spent in the Jackson area. After raising a family and caring for her ill mother she made the decision to pursue her acting aspirations. She commuted to New Orleans for over 2 years and re-located to New Orleans in October 2012 to focus on her acting career. Her background includes being a Registered Nurse with a Master’s degree in Healthcare Administration. Carol Ann is a serious trained film and television actress who has ongoing studies with an Ivana Chubbuck certified instructor at Jerry Katz Acting Joint in New Orleans. Additionally she has studied with Lance Nichols, Paul Webber, Tom Todoroff and many others. She has worked on many feature films, shorts and commercials. These include Moon Pie, Lavanda, Net Effect, Can’t Let Go, Blue Cross and many more. Del Corral & Associates 504-324-3782 / 601-842-7899 carolannscruggs@gmail.com 58

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WHAT’S YOUR STORY, NEW ORLEANS? THE DOCUMENTARY SUMMIT COMES TO THE BIG EASY STORY BY ANDREW ZINNES GUEST COLUMNIST

A

bout eight years ago, my phone rang. On the other end was a woman named Cyndi Capen—a woman with an idea for a documentary film set in New Orleans. But as many of these calls tend to go, she had no idea how to get it done. She had a subject—one of the very few African American Roman Catholic priests in the United States. And after a lot of research, filming, and long distance consultation phone calls with yours truly, she eventually had a story— how he was trying to save his church from closing in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. She toiled on the project relentlessly and I’m pleased to say that the film, entitled Father Tony, just played during Jazz Fest, nearly eight years to the day that Cyndi called me for the first time. I recount this tale for a few reasons. First, to congratulate Cyndi for her triumph—it’s not easy to take on one of these projects that span

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many years and take up a lot of time, money and psychological resources. But secondly, it’s to tip my hat to the community of New Orleans for opening up to Cyndi, who hails from the suburbs of Los Angeles. Never once did they make her feel like an outsider. Never once did they refuse to help her tell her story. And never once did they say, “It can’t be done.” It’s no wonder she actually moved to New Orleans for a couple of years during production and still goes back every so often. But perhaps the biggest reason I’m going on a bit comes from something else. As Cyndi would tell me about the people she would meet in her travels, from community leaders to street performers to politicians, one thing became abundantly clear: the New Orleans area is a veritable treasure trove of potential documentary subjects. And when you add in the fact that Louisiana in general has become such a

hotbed for filmmaking, you get a very fertile atmosphere for creativity and storytelling. And that is exactly why we are brought The Documentary Summit to NOLA for the first time on June 8 and 9. The whole purpose of The Documentary Summit, when we at Filmmaker Junction/The Guerilla Film Makers Handbook created it, was to connect talented people together and give them access to professionals at the top of their game. When you do that, anything is possible. And in a community like New Orleans, it becomes even more amplified. My phone recently rang and it was Cyndi now telling me how awesome her screening in New Orleans went. There was such a sense of satisfaction in her tone. Our greatest hope is that The Documentary Summit will be the catalyst to similar calls. LFV For more information, visit www.documentarysummit.com.


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SYNC UP CINEMA AT NOVAC T he New Orleans Video Access Center (NOVAC), the Jazz & Heritage Foundation, and the New Orleans Film Society (NOFS) recently partnered to produce Sync Up Cinema, a free film industry conference focused on Louisiana film production and the emerging opportunities in the film industry. For three days (April 29 through May 1), in between the weekends of Jazz Fest, Sync Up Cinema offered local film industry types screenings of local and international documentaries, NOVAC conversations and panels with internationally-renowned filmmakers and industry pros, and the Technical and Film Industry Outreach Expo featuring technical demonstrations and production resources from national film industry vendors. All of the events took place at the beautiful New Orleans Museum of Art in City Park and were free to the public. Major sponsors for Sync Up Cinema included: Cineworks Louisiana, Entertainment Partners Financial Solutions, Creative America, and National Endowment of the Arts. Cineworks also sponsored the presentation, “Editorial License: Conversation with Michael Philips and Christopher Holmes.”

“The entire NOVAC team had a great time and were thrilled to have an opportunity to bring renowned filmmakers and industry experts to showcase their work and discuss with the community topics that really spoke to filmmakers developing their own projects. It was also great to have the support of industry leaders like Cineworks and Entertainment Partners and organizations like Creative America, who are also committed to cultivating a sustainable film community and supporting both the independent and studio projects in the state.” –Ashley Charbonnet, Director of Programs, NOVAC

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Top: New Orleans Film Society program director Clint Bowie interviews marketing strategist for indie filmmakers Sheri Candler. Above left: Entertainment attorney James Napper, New York-based manager from Caliber Media Company Will Rowbotham, and New York-based entertainment attorney and industry blogger Robert Seigel at the “Got Rep?” conversation. Above right: Hollywood South blogger Stanley B. Gill and NOVAC director of programs Ashley Charbonnet. Left: NOVAC board member and manager at Entertainment Partners Financial Solutions Melissa Wiseman introduces the “Got Rep?” panel sponsored by Entertainment Partners. Below left: NOVAC member Andrew Larimer during a Q&A session. Below right: Sync Up Cinema attendees Victoria Greene, Shanna Forrestall, Dawn Streek and Carol Ann Scruggs.


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UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS FILM FESTIVAL RECAP STORY BY JONATHAN KIEREN • PHOTOS BY BETH BURRIS

F

ilmmakers, families, and curious moviegoers from all over the city gathered at the University of New Orleans Robert E. Nims Theatre to enjoy a slate of over 50 short films presented at the 7th Annual University of New Orleans Film Festival (UNOFF) from May 10 through 12. Although the main attraction was the student work completed during the school year by the UNO film program’s 350-plus undergraduate and graduate students, UNOFF also welcomed submissions from independent filmmakers from around the country. Films were scheduled in short programs, a showcase for thesis and advanced projects, and a raucous “UNOFF After Dark” program, capturing the racier, raunchier side of the fest. In addition, the fest welcomed a number of special guest speakers, including entertainment lawyer Rob Wollfarth, of Baker Donelson law firm, who gave a talk entitled “Lights, Camera,

(Legal) Action.” Louisiana native filmmaker Zack Godshall, director of Lord Byron (Sundance 2011, New York Times Critics Pick), opened the fest on Thursday night with a special screening of his feature Low and Behold, shot entirely on location in New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. UNOFF’s volunteer jury—19 filmmaking professionals, festival programmers, and ardent moviegoers—awarded prizes in 16 areas, including technical categories like cinematography and sound design, best actor and actress, and an overall “Best of Fest” category. Three prizes were reserved for audience choice awards, chosen by a general ballot in the theater each night. Big winners included James Madison Roe’s paranoid thriller A.M. 800, a UNO MFA thesis film, and Cockroach, a gritty second-year graduate project by Eric Gremillion. Audience awards skewed toward lighter fare, with dating comedy 5 Stages of Dan and supernatural adventure Guinevere getting nods from the crowd. All of the weekend’s films were exhibited using UNO’s Barco 4K DLP projector, the only one of its kind at a Louisiana university. For the first time this year, a significant number of the films being shown were shot using 4K technology, as well. Preparation for the event was undertaken by an 11-member committee made up of student volunteers, who met at least once a week from the beginning of the year to keep the planning process running smoothly. The committee is already looking forward to next year’s fest, which will feature the first group of films shot using UNO’s recently acquired RED Epic digital cinema camera.

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BRIEFS ENTERTAINMENT PARTNERS EXPANDS TO NEW LOCATION IN NEW ORLEANS Entertainment Partners (EP), a leader in payroll, residuals, and production services, is moving to a larger building to accommodate Louisiana’s growing film industry. EP, which has been operating in Louisiana since 2008, also provides production incentive services through EP Financial Solutions. These offerings include film financing, production incentive administration, tax credit placement, and point-of-sale services through EPPS Purchasing, Inc. “We are excited to be expanding here in Louisiana not only with our EP payroll services, but also with our offerings through EP Financial Solutions,” shared Melissa Wiseman, manager of EP Financial Solutions in the LA office. “Since our office opened in 2008, we have been able to serve our local clients in the state. We look forward to growing even further and helping keep the

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entertainment industry in Louisiana thriving. The production incentive offered here has been a game changer for the state and our business. It has been great to be able to offer all of our services locally.” EP’s new office is located at 935 Gravier Street, Suite 1110, in New Orleans, in the same building as FotoKem, LEAP Productions, and various production offices. For more information, visit www.entertainmentpartners.com.

5TH ANNUAL NORTH LOUISIANA GAY & LESBIAN FILM FESTIVAL PACE (People Acting for Change and Equality) has announced its 5th annual North Louisiana Gay & Lesbian Film Festival (NLGLFF). The event is to be held September 6-12, 2013, at the Robinson Film Center in downtown Shreveport. The film selection committee is currently in the process of reviewing options, and the titles will be announced at a later date. For

additional information as it becomes available, visit www.nlglff.org. For more information about PACE, North Louisiana’s leading advocacy organization for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community, go to www.pacelouisiana.org.

BEBEE LIGHTS ADDS NOLA LOCATION Since 1978, Los Angeles-based company Night Lights by Bebee has been on the sets of some of the greatest productions of all time. And now, the company has added equipment locally in New Orleans to serve the burgeoning Hollywood South production industry. Bebee’s 2013 lineup of equipment, pricing and photo metrics are online and available for your viewing anytime. Be sure to check out the new Bebee Mini, which was invented for tight spots like the French Quarter. You can watch a video of it in action on the “Equipment & Pricing” page at www.nightlightsbybebee.com.


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