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ory CAST Lisa Bostnar Jack Davidson Kristin Griffith James Knight Katie Lowes Victoria Mack Jack Ryland Stephen Schnetzer Sets: Sarah Lambert Lights: Mark T. Simpson Costumes: Theresa Squire Costume Associate: Naama Greenfield Hair and Wigs: Broadway Wig Co. Props: Judi Guralnick Sound: Jared Coseglia Casting: Sharron Bower Dialects: Amy Stoller Stage Manager: Samone B. Weissman Asst. Stage Manager: Eleanor Boockmeier Production Manager: Helena Webb Press Representative: David Gersten & Associates Flyer: Jude Dvorak Show Logos: Aaron Lenehan Director: Jonathan Bank

The Mint has been rummaging around in the attic of theater history for the last ten years, winning a Special Drama Desk Award and an Obie while bringing to light such worthy but neglected plays as The Voysey Inheritance, Far and Wide and most recently, The Daughter-in-Law -selected by Bruce Weber of The New York Times as one of the top ten season highlights with the praise: “Proof that theater history is worth excavating.” Now, the company is applying its full dramaturgical resources to illuminate the considerable dramatic talent of a single author — Alan Alexander Milne—proclaimed in 1922 by Alexander Woolcott of The New York Times as “The happiest acquisition the English theater has made since it captured Shaw and Barrie.”

“Alan Alexander Milne ... that extraordinarily brilliant theatrical prospect.”

“In its way it is priceless, it is extraordinarily entertaining.” The New York American, 1922

When is the truth better left unsaid?

When A. A. Milne passed away in 1956 at the age of 74, virtually all of his prodigious literary productivity was out-of-print—over two-dozen plays, ten novels, and several volumes of poetry—all forgotten. The only books that remained were four slim volumes about a bear named Winniethe-Pooh.

Heywoud Broun, The Post 1922

“The most brilliant light comedy since Oscar Wilde.” The Nation, 1921

What great events from little causes spring!

The remarkable fact is that before Pooh, Milne was one of England's most promising and successful playwrights. When The Truth about Blayds arrived in New York in 1922, it was Milne’s fourth Broadway opening in just 54 weeks! Blayds followed close on the heels of Mr. Pim Passes By, The Great Broxxup and The Dover Road. Fellow playwright St. John Ervine jealously complained: “He has not yet taken possession of the sixty theaters of New York, but if he continues to occupy them at his present pace, the whole lot will soon be labeled ‘Reserved for Mr. Milne.’”

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Truth About Bladys and Mr. Pim Passes By  

By A.A. Milne