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ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO


MINJI HAN ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO +64 21 0231 9596 minji.han@gmail.com


EDUCATION University of Auckland / MArch(Prof) 2017 / BAS 2015 Rangitoto College 2012 EXPERIENCE | ACHIEVEMENTS NZIA Student Design Awards: 2017 / Shortlisted - top 12 in Auckland Unversity for Master of Architecture thesis design Forest Furniture: 2014 - 2017 Responsibilities & Skills / Sales assistant working with customers’ creating made-to-measure furniture design / Knowledge gained in timber materials - Kauri and Rimu - through direct communication with workshop technicians / Meeting weekly sales targets / Training new employer on days with sole charge Europe Study Tour: Spain and Portugal / Autonomous University of Lisbon 2015 Wallace Arts Exhibition finalist: 2012 Languages: English and Korean

SOFTWARES | SKILLS Adobe Suite; \ Photoshop \ Illustrator \ Indesign \ After Effects Autodesk; \ Rhino \ Autocad Strengths in drawing and physical model making, particularly wood and metal workshop tools

REFERENCES Michael O’Sullivan | Bull O’Sullivan Architecture \ Thesis supervisor michael@bosarchitecture.co.nz Ann Wales | Forest Furniture North Shore \ Manager +64 9 442 4125


CONTENTS THESIS

THE ARCHITECT’S PICNIC FURNITURE DESIGN

ADVANCED DESIGN 2

THE DOCTORS’ HOUSES: HERITAGE CONSERVATION

DESIGN 6

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS TOWER

DESIGN 4

ORBIS


MARCH(PROF) THESIS ABSTRACT Taking up space, whether dead or alive, is only pertinent with the existence of those who seek to remember.Without this fundamental principle of rememberingw, it could be argued that there is almost no purpose for taking up any form of space on this earth. If the notion that we only really die when our names are no longer voiced out loud is true, then the ritual of yearly visitations to loved ones at their burial sites would ensure immortality. This is what the traditional Korean ritual of Jesa is. If in fact it is true that paying respect to the dead by speaking aloud their names and memories made together is an assurance of eternal life, this truth would only be for certain until the death of the next generation of humans and so on.

existing Symonds Street Cemetery.

The Architect’s Picnic is about the journey towards the paramount element of the living from a place of dead - the shift from confinement to consumption, and to go from an architecture of enclosure to quite the opposite, the architecture of revelation. A substantial amount of personal perception and judgment was vital to decode a form of architectural interpretation. Therefore, the necessary research components came to be largely personal and intuitive rather than detached and unbiased.This is an investigation of the culture I was exposed to for a short, brief moment in my early childhood and more significantly, my early adulthood. Its core consists of four main elements This architectural interpretation bears from the critical question of being an - the blanket, the mound, the basket of food and the dead. immigrant, understanding by way of custom and ritual what is appropriate to leave and to bring.This examination lies in none other than the desire for the permanence of life, through the fundamental consumption of food, merging with the relinquishment of a stagnant afterlife.The synergy of the two groups, the living and the dead, displays a controversial yet captivating relationship through the act of a ritual. It is an exchange that this thesis aims to investigate. SUPERVISOR: How do we know when a custom has expired? Is there an appropriate and MICHAEL O’SULLIVAN respectable manner in which to dismiss an ingrained tradition, all the while SITE: being introduced to yet another formality? Perhaps one way is through the SYMONDS STREET CEMETERY representation by way of a physical embodiment of a narrative. This thesis PROGRAMME: aims to do just this through the introduction of a foreign presence in the EXTENSION OF CEMETERY existing urban landscape of Auckland City - by means of an extension of the + RESTAURANT


AXONOMETRIC DRAWINGS OF DESIGN CONCEPT MEDIA: PEN, PENCIL AND WATERCOLOUR DIGITAL COLLAGE


MODEL MAKING MATERIALS: 4MM PLYWOOD, SCORCHED/PLAIN ASH, CONCRETE ABOVE GROUND LEVEL


MODEL MAKING MATERIALS: 4MM PLYWOOD, SCORCHED/PLAIN ASH, CONCRETE BELOW GROUND LEVEL


AXONOMETRIC DRAWING STUDIES MEDIA: PENCIL, INDIAN INK AND WATERCOLOUR DRAWING TO MODEL


CONCRETE MODELS MEDIA: MORTAR + PLASTER


AXONOMETRIC DRAWING STUDIES (II) MEDIA: PENCIL, INDIAN INK AND WATERCOLOUR


AXONOMETRIC DRAWING STUDIES (III) MEDIA: PENCIL AND WATERCOLOUR WITH DIGITAL COLLAGE


SECTIONAL DRAWING MOMENTS MEDIA: PENCIL, PEN, WATERCOLOUR, DIGITAL COLLAGE


SECTIONAL DRAWINGS MEDIA: PENCIL, PEN, WATERCOLOUR, DIGITAL COLLAGE


MARCH(PROF) THESIS FURNITURE DESIGN Through the process of designing, making and redesigning, these four stools developed into very symbolic, representative features of my thesis research. For the most comprehensive architectural investigation to take place, it was necessary to hone down to this reductive form of architecture in order to support the critical question, program, brief, land and architecture. The most basic shape of architecture, next to the human body, is the chair, after all “furniture is halfway between architecture and the body� and furthermore, a stool is halfway between the sitting and standing figure of the body. It was only upon succeeding the completion of Stool One, that the chair retired from ornamental form to a personal form. The physical forms of each stool became one with the critics, at the time of the final review, held in a form of restriction by myself and this research.

MATERIALS: PACIFIC KAURI PACIFIC RIMU ASH, SCORCHED AND PLAIN

FURNITURE

drawing to making


STOOLS LEFT TO RIGHT KAURI, KAURI/RIMU, KAURI/RIMU & ASH


FEATURES


ADVANCED DESIGN II BRIEF The ever-present student body on Symonds Street could be the answer to the almalgamation of the two former doctors’ residences. Though, with the addition of the whole new rooftop space on top of 86 Symonds Street that is open to the public as a multi-functional space, it is not limited to just one demographic. The tunnel attempts to bring people in and up into the new student hub.

SITE: 84 AND 86 SYMONDS STREET, AUCKLAND PROGRAMME: UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND STUDENT HUB

CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES


LEFT: SECTIONAL DRAWINGS RIGHT: PLAN DRAWINGS MEDIA: DIGITAL COLLAGE RHINO AND ILLUSTRATOR

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22 student organised cinema space 23 critique/debate room, multi use 24 reading pods, tranquility pods 25 corridor to student tuition rooms 26 w/c unisex

26 multi function rooftop lounge 27 bar 28 storage 29 bar storage


DESIGN SIX MODEL MAKING MATERIALS: MACROCARPA 10MM STRIPS, 5MM STEEL RODS


CONCEPTUAL RENDERS OF ‘ORBIS’

DESIGN FOUR BRIEF Considered the winning project of the Festival of Transitional Architecture (FESTA) 2014, this group project featured hundreds of hanging, hand-knitted sleeves carrying water balloons filled with LED lights. These moving stalactites invited people into their midst, more so when the sun set behind the clouds and the balloons took on their true form of glowing orbs. The notion behind this installation was the seismic waves of the Christchurch earthquake of 2011. Orbis is able to look beyond its horrifying aftermath into a more positive light. It was organic and inviting, setting users up for an abstracted, imaginative experience - detaching and constrasting to the devastating consequences of the event.

SITE: CHRISTCHURCH CENTRAL PROGRAMME: FESTA 2014 INTERACTIVE INSTALLATION


PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN AT VARIOUS MOMENTS OF THE PROGRESSION OF ‘ORBIS’ FROM FUNDRAISING TO CONSTRUCTING ON SITE AND FINAL INSTALLATION


Minji Han Architectural Portfolio  
Minji Han Architectural Portfolio  
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