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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE

Navy Suicide Prevention Several myths exist about suicide and suicide prevention, Here are facts that counter common misconceptions about suicidal ideation and intervention. By knowing the truth, you can empower yourself to ACT! PAGE A5 VOL. 28, NO. 35, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

September 2-September 8, 2021

Hampton Roads Chamber now accepting nominations for Military Citizen of the Year By Navy Region Mid-Atlantic

Public Affairs

An undated portrait of Navy Corpsman Maxton W. Soviak during recruit training released by his family. Soviak was killed during an attack at the Abbey Gate of Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 26, 2021. He was supporting Operation Allies Refuge while assigned to 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, based at Camp Pendleton, California. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Navy Identifies Sailor who paid the ultimate sacrifice in Kabul Attack By U.S. Navy Public Affairs

WASHINGTON — A Sailor assigned to 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, Camp Pendleton, California, was killed during the attack at the Abbey Gate of Hamid Karzai International Airport in

Kabul, Afghanistan, August 26, 2021. Navy Corpsman Maxton W. Soviak was killed while supporting Operation Allies Refuge. Soviak, from Ohio, enlisted in the Navy on Sept. 26, 2017, and graduated from Recruit Training Command, in Great Lakes, Illinois, November 2017.

His other military assignments included Hospital Corpsman School in San Antonio, Texas; Navy Medical Readiness and Training Command in Guam; and Field Medical Training Battalion West, Camp Pendleton. Soviak reported to 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division in September 2020.

NORFOLK, Va. — Are you a Sailor, or do you know a Sailor, who goes above and beyond the call to duty by volunteering in the Hampton Roads community? The Hampton Roads Chamber is now accepting nominations for the 2021 Samuel T. Northern, Military Citizen of the Year (MCOY) award. The Samuel T. Northern award has been given annually to recognize the military citizen who has made the most significant contribution in the area of community service. The award is not for a single act, but rather for sustained community service in the Hampton Roads area for a period of at least one year. Nominees volunteer by coaching Little League teams, youth mentoring, fundraising, emergency medical services, and many more community programs. “Hampton Roads is blessed with such a large presence of Navy in the region. The men and women who wear the Navy uniform, Department of the Navy civilians and all their family members are intertwined into the fabric of our region and contribute so much to it,” said Bryan K. Stephens, President & CEO, Hampton Roads Chamber. “It is our honor every year to recognize those who go above and beyond their call to duty to the Navy and give back to their community.” Previous winners include: Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Zaruba, USN, (2020); Petty Officer 1st Class Cynthia Cordero, Turn to Nominations, Page 7

Hampton Roads bases return to HPCON Charlie By Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Public Affairs NORFOLK, Va. — Naval installations in Hampton Roads were ordered to move to Health Protection Condition (HPCON) Level Charlie today following a sustained increase in coronavirus cases in the local community. The change means that occupancy levels in work spaces onboard installations must be less than 25 percent of their normal capacity and that military exercises may be re-scoped, modified or canceled. Under HPCON Charlie, installations may also consider limiting visitor access and canceling events. Social gatherings for personnel must be limited to 10 people. Military commanders also may restrict unvaccinated personnel from off-installation venues such as bars, restaurants and concert halls. The Hampton Roads area was most recently in HPCON Charlie from Nov. 18, 2020 to May 1, 2021. During that time, military personnel were barred from non-essential activities off base. But since then, the Navy has revised its policies following an extensive vaccination effort. Sailors who are fully vaccinated are not subject to individual restrictions any higher than those corresponding to HPCON Bravo. While in HPCON Charlie, capacity at

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gyms and restaurants on base will likely be limited by installation commanders. Military treatment facilities may also limit elective surgeries in accordance with guidance from the Defense Health Agency and the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs. “This virus has shown us time and again the best way to beat it is for everyone to get vaccinated,” said Rear Adm. Charles Rock, Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. “The vaccine is safe and effective. The sooner everyone gets the shot, the sooner we can return to normal. I want everyone to encourage their friends, family members and neighbors to get vaccinated so we can sink COVID-19 once and for all.” All service members, civilians, contractors and visitors already must wear masks while indoors on all military installations regardless of vaccination status. Military personnel in Hampton Roads also must adhere to state and local guidance regarding off-base activities. Military personnel also are required to follow the guidance of their commanding officers, and any guidance provided by region or installation commanders. If local conditions worsen, HPCON levels can increase. The move to HPCON Charlie was a result of sustained community transmission that included a daily average of 31 to 60 new cases per 100,000 population in the last seven days.

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Drydocking

Automated parts

Housing

USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) departed Aug. 26 for sea trials, marking completion of one of the largest and most complex aircraft carrier availabilities conducted at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. PAGE A6

At Fleet Readiness Center East (FRCE), the challenge or organizing the thousands of parts from an aircraft that comes in for maintenance or repair is being managed using a new software application called WISK, short for Work-in-Process Inventory, Storage and Kitting. PAGE A3

Unaccompanied Housing at Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads-Northwest and Portsmouth Annex were recognized for their efforts. PAGE A2

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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

Military unaccompanied housing pictured above. (COURTESY PHOTO)

NSA Hampton Roads Unaccompanied Housing teams recognized for results from Tenant Satisfaction Survey By Katisha Draughn-Fraguada

Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — Unaccompanied Housing (UH) at Naval Support Activity (NSA) Hampton Roads-Northwest and Portsmouth Annex were recognized for their efforts following the results of the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Tenant Satisfaction Survey. The survey is a tool used to identify issues, implement corrective actions, and measure the level of customer satisfaction of military services and facilities for housing Navywide. The surveys are conducted by CEL & Associates, Inc., worldwide for all Navy UH sites. On the survey, residents are asked to rate

their facility and management team on a variety of facility and customer service measures. The criteria is a customer service score of 85 percent or greater and a response rate of at least 20 percent. Portsmouth Annex UH is the A List Award Winner and Northwest Annex UH is the Platinum A List Award Winner for the survey. “We achieved an outstanding service score of 91 percent from our residents,” said Denise Burke, UH Installation Program Director at Portsmouth Annex. “Our service score was only 1.1 percent away from winning the A-List Platinum Award.” The Northwest Annex UH was also recognized for their score of 93.8 for their service satisfaction with a 58.3 percent response rate.

“Whenever you get recognized for the work you do it’s a good feeling, but when it is the customers who recognize and appreciate the work that is being done, it makes me feel very good and proud of what this staff has accomplished,” said Troy Wagers, UH Housing Manager at Northwest Annex. Navy UH provides suitable, affordable and safe living quarters for single Sailors. The Portsmouth Annex UH manages two buildings, Building 282 and 288, which is currently undergoing renovations. Both buildings have a total of 366 room and 514 beds. Building 282 went through a $16.2 million renovation project that was completed in March 2020 and the facility now has a new beverage and snack machine, two gazebos, and barbecue areas for the residents to use along with lounge chairs.

“This place is a hidden gem for our residents to enjoy the great views and the relaxing environment that the property has to offer,” said Burke. There are nine civilian employees and seven military members who work tirelessly each day to provide service and support to the residents at the Portsmouth Annex. About 45 minutes away at Northwest Annex, the UH includes 80 rooms and 160 beds with a staff of three civilians and three military members. The building has a lounge area with two 60 inch televisions and a pool table. “I am very proud of the teams at both of the Unaccompanied Housing buildings at Portsmouth and Northwest Annex,” said Matt Frauenzimmer, Commanding Officer of NSA Hampton Roads. “Their hard work each day and dedication to our Sailors and the Navy’s mission does not go unnoticed and I am very happy that we are able to recognize their efforts and congratulate them on a job well done.” These awards have become the standard for Navy housing excellence. “Our team works hard every day to ensure that we always maintain our culture of outstanding customer service and we are proud to do so,” said Burke. “This is a team effort and it takes each of us doing our part for it to be a success.”

NAMTS Expands Sailor Self Sufficiency with Acquisition of Diesel Engine Mockup By Team Ship Public Affairs NORFOLK, Va. — For years, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center (MARMC) Diesel Shop had been interested in implementing the Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy (NAMTS) Diesel Engine, Governor and Injector Repair Technician Job Qualification Requirement (JQR). While hands-on work accomplishment is the driving force behind NAMTS JQR completion, it is beneficial to have mockup or simulation opportunities available for the Sailor’s initial observation of the equipment on which they will be working. MARMC Diesel Shop felt that the procurement of a diesel engine mockup would be a force multiplier and greatly enhance the NAMTS Diesel Engine repair learning experience for their Sailors. MARMC is one of three Regional Maintenance Centers at which Sailors can enroll in NAMTS; the command currently offers 16 of 21 available skill areas in which to train. Courses are rigorous and Sailors are able to complete JQRs at their own pace, however, Regional NAMTS Coordinators help ensure Sailors are continuously making progress. Despite challenges presented by COVID-19, NAMTS graduated a record of 1,135 Sailors in 2020; the program continues to strive and is currently on pace to match last year’s success. MARMC’s Diesel Shop reached out through several avenues to acquire a suitable diesel

engine to use as a mockup and identified the Detroit 671 as an ideal engine to be used as a static display trainer, as the engine was known for its compact size, maintainability, and most importantly, its simple design. Although these attributes made the Detroit 671 diesel engine a perfect base level platform to teach Sailors the basics of diesel maintenance fundamentals, the engine is considered obsolete compared to modern engines, making it difficult to come by. Luckily for MARMC, Andrew Porter, MARMC’s regional NAMTS coordinator, received a lead from ENC (SW/EXW) James Elgin, Diesel Shop Leading Chief Petty Officer at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, which led to the discovery of an engine being housed a few miles away at Assault Craft Unit Two, on Joint Expeditionary Base (JEB) Little Creek-Fort Story. Assault Craft Unit Two had a Detroit 12V71 diesel engine that was originally utilized by the Army’s Diesel Training Program at Fort Eustis. The command was no longer in need of the engine and offered to transfer it to MARMC. Porter and EN1(SW) Dallon Horman with Assault Craft Unit Two ensured that the 3,400pound engine was safely delivered to MARMC in late July. MARMC now has the capability to train Sailors on diesel engines through the NAMTS Diesel Engine Governor & Injector Repair Technician JQR, which the command expects to implement within the next few months. With a training engine in place, the

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shop will be capable of training Sailors in a safe, closed environment before being tasked with real-world maintenance and production on the waterfront. “Many of the NAMTS training shops at MARMC use training aides to help build confidence in how certain pieces of equipment work and develop greater competency for real-world maintenance applications. The use of training aides gets our Sailors more sets and reps to develop skills,” said Mr. Daniel Spagone, Director of Intermediate-Level Maintenance, Code 900 at Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center. “Working on an engine is complex and requires in-depth knowledge of its parts and components,” said MARMC Regional NAMTS Coordinator, Andrew Porter. “Being able to physically show a Sailor how to remove a cam shaft and demonstrate how it functions with the cylinder valves is a much better way of teaching diesel engine fundamentals, as opposed to reading about it or watching it on a computer screen. Sailors who roll up their sleeves and dive into maintenance exemplify what it means to be NAMTS qualified.” Navy Afloat Maintenance Training Strategy was established in 1998 by the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) to improve battlegroup organic maintenance capability and material self-sufficiency. Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center trains Sailors through the

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm Charles W.“Chip”Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA): Public Affairs Director | Beth Baker The Flagship® is published by Flagship, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense (DOD) or the United States Navy, under exclusive written contract with Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the paper, including advertisements, are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Government, DOD, or the Department of the Navy (DON). The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the DOD; DON; Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic or Flagship, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase,use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Public Affairs Department of Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Stories may be submitted via email to news@flagshipnews.com. The Flagship® is published every Thursday by Flagship, Inc., whose mailing address is located at PO Box 282501, Norfolk, Va. 23510. © 2021Flagship, Inc. All rights reserved

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NAMTS program by utilizing Intermediate Level, hands-on maintenance production to “forge maintenance warriors,” who are competent and confident in their ability to own, maintain and operate their shipboard equipment. While assigned to a Regional Maintenance Center, Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Naval shipyard, or Trident Refit Facility, NAMTS trains Sailors in 25 different Journeymen Level Repair and Maintenance Technician training programs through hands-on shop production work accomplishment. Upon NAMTS JQR completion and the passing of a written test and oral board, Sailors are awarded NAMTS Navy Enlisted Classifications codes. In addition to NAMTS training available at the Regional Maintenance Centers, Intermediate Maintenance Facilities, and Naval Shipyards, many afloat NAMTS programs have been established aboard ships across several different platforms. Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center is making NAMTS training a priority for our Sailors to help improve self-sufficiency in the fleet.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 3

Automated parts storage system improves efficiency at Fleet Readiness Center East By Kimberly Koonce

Fleet Readiness Center East Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. — At Fleet Readiness Center East (FRCE), the challenge or organizing the thousands of parts from an aircraft that comes in for maintenance or repair is being managed using a new software application called WISK, short for Work-in-Process Inventory, Storage and Kitting. The WISK application provides parts accountability, auditing, inventory control, accumulation of parts as production assembly kits, online queries, and report capabilities. Military airplanes and helicopters are made up of thousands of parts, and when those aircraft come in for maintenance or repair, somebody has to account for each and every one of those parts throughout the entire rework process. At Fleet Readiness Center East (FRCE), that organizing challenge is being managed using a new software application called WISK, short for Work-in-Process Inventory, Storage and Kitting. The WISK application provides parts accountability, auditing, inventory control, accumulation of parts as production assembly kits, online queries, and report capabilities. WISK went live at FRCE June 4, replacing the previous Automated Storage, Kitting and Retrieval System (ASKARS) software that had been used for years at FRCE. Leonard Domitrovits, director of the Components Division within FRCE’s Maintenance Repair and Overhaul Production Department, said the improvements in efficiency created by replacing ASKARS with WISK should result in better service for fleet customers. “The customer wants to bring more work in at a reduced cost, because they can only afford so much,” Domitrovits said. “Every efficiency that we can get gives the customer an opportunity to generate increased readiness. Giving them more for less cost should be our goal.” The various parts of WISK can be found

Cynthia Hargett, FRCE production controller, searches for an aircraft part using the WISK system. The software application is the result of a fiveyear collaboration between the Naval Air Systems Command’s three depot-level Fleet Readiness Centers to create a real-time automated parts management system. (COURTESY PHOTO)

all over the FRCE plant, from the main production hangars to the component shops to a large warehouse built for longterm storage. Production controllers — who manage the flow of parts and labor within the organization to ensure production lines run smoothly and efficiently — call up parts on their computer terminals. Once the system receives these instructions, robotic arms zip along rows of storage bins nearly 40 feet high to find the requested items, returning them to the controllers in less than a minute. The system includes nearly 10,000 bins to house parts of all shapes and sizes. The WISK system gives production controllers a place to track and store parts, but it also allows them to create “full kits” — signaling when all the parts required to reassemble a component or aircraft are available in WISK, whether they have been repaired, purchased or supplied. When a full kit is ready, planners can schedule that component for rework in the production shop, according to Rick Haskett, WISK Production Control supervisor at FRCE. “The computer knows where all the parts are stored, and once all the parts are

accounted for in WISK, then it signals we have a full kit,” Haskett said. “At that point, the planner decides when to pull the parts from the system and schedule the work back into production.” WISK provides the same massive storage capacity as its predecessor ASKARS. When using ASKARS, however, most of the tracking and record keeping was performed manually by production controllers, according to Domitrovits. “I’ve heard it called mandraulics. Things you have to do manually, things you’re always trying to track with lists and spreadsheets and everything,” he said. “Now WISK has the capability to do all those things for you, which makes it much more efficient.” The Naval Air Systems Command’s three depot-level Fleet Readiness Centers have been planning for WISK implementation for about five years. Cynthia Hargett, FRCE production controller, has been involved in the planning for the last three years. She said the communication and teamwork between the three FRCs contributed to the quality of the WISK system. “A lot of people might have thought we

were alone in implementing WISK, but the enterprise really came together,” Hargett said. “We may do things a little differently, but when it comes down to the basics, we’re all in the same system and we’re trying to accomplish the same goals.” Software support is part of the WISK system. Production controller Jordan Lewis said the development team listened to the quality of life suggestions from WISK users, and it’s evident in the resulting product. “They keep updating our software, which makes it easier for us and for the people on the floor who are going to use these reports,” Lewis said. “We’re coming more into the modern day with WISK. We see some improvements for sure in the new version, and life’s good.” FRCE is North Carolina’s largest maintenance, repair, overhaul and technical services provider, with more than 4,000 civilian, military and contract workers. Its annual revenue exceeds $1 billion. The depot provides service to the fleet while functioning as an integral part of the greater U.S. Navy; Naval Air Systems Command; and Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers.

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Navy Suicide Prevention: Together we can make a difference #ACT By U.S. Navy Public Affairs Several myths exist about suicide and suicide prevention…wouldn’t you rather know the truth? Below are facts that counter common misconceptions about suicidal ideation and intervention. By knowing the truth, you can empower yourself to ACT! TRUTH: DISCUSSING THE SUBJECT OF SUICIDE OPENLY PROMOTES HELP-SEEKING BEHAVIOR. One of the many reasons Sailors do not speak up about their feelings of hopelessness is because they fear negative perceptions. By starting a discussion, you are NOT giving a suicidal person morbid ideas or increasing risk. The opposite is true — bringing up the subject of suicide and discussing it openly is one of the most helpful things you can do. TRUTH: OUTREACH FROM A SAILOR’S SUPPORT NETWORK CAN HELP CURTAIL THE IMPULSE TO END HIS/HER LIFE. Even the most severely depressed person has mixed feelings about death, wavering until the very last moment. Getting them to see, through helpful intervention, that their circumstances will not last forever can help them see alternative solutions. Loved ones, trusted peers, friends, and shipmates have an obligation to ACT (Ask Care Treat). Most suicidal people are open to a helpful intervention and sometimes even a forced one can help them see that Life Counts. TRUTH: SAILORS WHO TALK ABOUT SUICIDE AREN’T JUST JOKING AROUND. Most people who attempt or die by suicide have given some warning. No matter how jokingly it’s said, statements like “you’ll be sorry when I’m dead” or “I can’t see any way out” may indicate serious suicidal feelings that shouldn’t be ignored. It’s likely that you’re not the only person in the Sailor’s life who has noticed these comments or changes in behavior. The signs may be different but if you speak up and come forward you may find others have the same concerns. Early intervention works and together you can often facilitate the appropriate course of life-saving action. TRUTH: VERY FEW SUICIDES OCCUR WITHOUT SOME SORT OF WARNING. Most people communicate how they are reacting to or feeling about stressful events in their lives. Problems with a significant other, family member, best friend, supervisor, financial matters, or legal issues can become overwhelming. The resulting warning signs may present themselves as direct statements, physical signs, emotional reactions, or behaviors such as withdrawing from friends. When stressors and warning signs are present, the person may wrongly consider suicide as the option to escape pain, relieve tension, maintain control, or cope with stress. Help them see alternatives.

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TRUTH: A NON-FATAL SUICIDE ATTEMPT SHOULD BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY, NOT DOWNPLAYED AS AN ATTENTION-SEEKING ACT OR THE RESULT OF ALCOHOL. A non-fatal attempt by a Sailor is an opportunity to help him/her live. Offer help and alternatives rather than punishing or reprimanding someone who has acted on suicidal thoughts. Get them to talk to a Chaplain or counselor. Suicidal behaviors must be taken seriously. Addressing them can prevent a future attempt or successful act of suicide. TRUTH: A SAILOR CONSIDERS SUICIDE AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO MAKE THE PAIN STOP, NOT BECAUSE HE/SHE ACTUALLY WANTS TO DIE. Very few people who consider suicide are determined to end their life. Most suicidal people do not want death; they want the pain to stop. Traumatic life events or jolting changes may surpass a Sailor’s ability to cope and cause him/her to suffer feelings of helplessness. While the majority of those who consider suicide at some time in

their life find a way to continue living, offering them help and alternatives can relieve feelings of isolation and hopelessness. TRUTH: SUICIDAL THOUGHTS DO NOT MEAN THAT SOMEONE IS MENTALLY ILL OR “CRAZY.” Most suicidal people are not psychotic or insane. They might be upset, grief-stricken, depressed, or despairing. Extreme distress and emotional pain are not necessarily signs of mental illness. Other disorders related to depression, such as substance abuse, may worsen symptoms related to depression and lead to thoughts of suicide. TRUTH: IN MOST SITUATIONS, SEEKING HELP OR TREATMENT IS AN INDICATOR OF THE GOOD RELIABILITY AND JUDGMENT REQUIRED FOR SECURITY CLEARANCES. Less than 2% of revoked or denied clearances are for psychological problems. Failure to seek help and allowing problems to get worse impacting performance, conduct, and finances are more likely to lead to clearance loss. With changes in April 2008, mari-

tal, family, or grief counseling (not related to violence by the applicant and unless the treatment was court-ordered) and any counseling for post combat deployment concerns are not required to be reported on the security clearance form SF 86. While other counseling or psychological treatment is reported by the applicant on the SF 86 form and leads to an extra step in the clearance process, this very rarely results in denial or revocation of clearance. TRUTH: WHILE LONG TERM CARE SHOULD BE HANDLED BY A PROFESSIONAL, IMMEDIATE RECOGNITION OF SOMEONE WHO NEEDS HELP IS UP TO YOU. By paying attention to what the person is saying, taking their concerns seriously, offering support, and getting them help, you can prevent a potential tragedy. The first step in getting a suicidal person the proper professional treatment during his/her time of despair begins with a peer or loved one recognizing warning signs. Many are lost to suicide because immediate support wasn’t offered. Suicide Prevention is an All Hands Evolution.

NAVSUP FLC Norfolk Wraps Up Response to Lengthy Runway Closure By NAVSUP FLC Norfolk Public Affairs NORFOLK, Va. — The NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Norfolk Regional Navy Mail Center recently wrapped up a remote operation at Joint Base Charleston, S.C. to support continuous mail service to its customers during a lengthy runway closure. Chambers Field at Naval Station Norfolk, one of the busiest runways in the Department of Defense shut down operations March 1 for much needed repairs and updated technology. According to Director of Postal Operations Tom Wilson the closure’s impact was huge, particularly to mail services to NAVSUP FLC Norfolk’s outside the continental United States (OCONUS) and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (GTMO) customers. NAVSUP FLC Norfolk immediately responded with a detailed logistical support plan and sent a team of Chief Logistics Specialist Carlos Bright and Logistics Specialist Second Class Christopher Lowe to Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina to liaison with the 437th Aerial Port Squadron (APS) to establish a remote base operation to support both GTMO and OCONUS Navy sites for both ordinary and Registered Mail. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville augmented this core team with additional Sailors during the shutdown including Aviation Boatswain’s Mate-Fuels Third Class Dalton Voorhees, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate-Fuels Third Class Marcus Wood, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate-Fuels Third Class Marquis Demetre Buckley and Aviation Boatswain’s Mate-Launch/Recovery Second Class Christopher Arnold. Wilson explained mail going to and from personnel stationed at Guantanamo Bay is transported via military air assets. This mail is for Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen, Marines, civilians and contractors and acts as the conduit to normalcy with the United

States. Deployed personnel order items from online retailers, receive care packages from home and take care of their official and personal correspondence all through the mail. “NAVSUP FLC Norfolk Regional Navy Mail Center takes great pride in providing the best possible service to those assigned to GTMO,” Wilson added. The runway closure also had a major impact on the global transportation of mail. Registered mail is transported by Military Air to OCONUS Navy locations in Rota, Spain, Sigonella and Naples, Italy, Souda Bay, Greece, Bahrain and Djibouti. This mail is typically classified, high-dollar, or sensitive in nature, including Navy rating examinations to and from Pensacola. Both Bright and Lowe worked alongside their 437th APS counterparts and the local office of the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) to account for all mail brought to them by the USPS or from the flights originating from Cuba or overseas. “They worked quickly to establish a base operation where the mail was staged and safeguarded awaiting its ultimate destination via aircraft or truck,” said Wilson. “They also worked closely with the 437th APS Special Handling Unit to ensure all accountable Registered Mail was documented and safeguarded between flights to and from both GTMO and OCONUS locations.” He added they immediately began manifesting mail for various flights and moved mail from USPS to tri-walls to accommodate aircraft load outs. “Communication was critical,” said Wilson. “They communicated daily with NAVSUP FLC Norfolk Regional Navy Mail Center to ensure a continuation of operations and with the local USPS representative to ensure mail was uninterrupted and flowing smoothly.” Shifting the postal logistics routing operations back to Norfolk required meticulous

Chief Logistics Specialist Carlos Bright tracks ships and OCONUS customers flight destination schedules and tracks updated mail routing information for this mail. He also uses the laptop to keep up to date on all communications between Norfolk Regional Navy Mail Center. (COURTESY PHOTO)

planning and coordination to avoid disruption in service, including ensuring USPS in both Chicago and New York began shifting routes for FPO addressed mail to Guantanamo Bay Cuba, OCONUS Shore hubs and forward deployed U.S. Navy ships.

“After a nearly six-month operation at Joint Base Charleston, the Chambers Field runway was reopened in July,” said Wilson. “I’m very proud to say the team successfully handled more than 550,000 lbs. of mail during the closure.”


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Sailors discharge a hose during a fire drill aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77). GHWB is at Norfolk Naval Shipyard undergoing its Docking Planned Incremental Availability. (MC2 STEVEN EDGAR)

USS George H.W. Bush Completes Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability at Norfolk Naval Shipyard By NNSY Public Affairs and USS George H.w. Bush Public Affairs PORTSMOUTH, Va. — USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) departed Aug. 26 for sea trials, marking completion of one of the largest and most complex aircraft carrier availabilities conducted at Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY). The Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA), which began in February 2019, marked Bush’s first time out of the water since 2006. The shipyard workforce contributed 762,500 workdays of the 1.3 million workday availability, with the ship’s crew, Alteration Installation Teams and contractors comprising the rest. The DPIA included a number of compli-

cated planned efforts including a complete shaft and propeller overhaul, rudder refurbishment, catwalk and tank preservation, and modernization and upgrades to electronic and combat systems, catapults, and hotel services. “At the beginning of this challenging availability I shared with the project team this would be a marathon event due to the large work package and the length of time it would take to return George H.W. Bush to the Fleet,” said Project Superintendent Jeff Burchett. “At that time, we had no idea what we would face with the COVID 19 pandemic and the additional challenges it brought to the team to overcome such a major obstacle on top of the planned work. The team stepped up and worked through it.” The ship’s commanding officer Capt. Robert

“Aggs” Aguilar was complimentary of the collaboration between NNSY and the crew. “The end of this maintenance period marks the beginning of our team’s ability to execute our primary mission which is to provide combat capability to Fleet and Joint Force commanders whenever and wherever it is needed,” said Aguilar. “We remain grateful for the teamwork with Norfolk Naval Shipyard to get us back to sea. Now the crew of George Herbert Walker Bush will bring the ship to life and return her to full operational capability.” NNSY implemented process improvement and innovations in several areas of the availability, including the U.S. Navy’s first organic cold spray repairs at any of the four public shipyards to repair components on Bush. Laser scanning was used to facilitate installation of

sponsons onboard, supporting first time quality. Additionally, the shipyard’s special emphasis group developed unique weight handling equipment using electric winches for servicing components while in dry dock. “The team has been all-in with either fixing or elevating any issues as they occurred, with non-stop execution in mind to ensure USS George H.W. Bush was returned to the Fleet,” said Shipyard Commander Capt. Dianna Wolfson. “With such an extensive and challenging availability, it took a daily commitment from our team members in delivering technical excellence and skilled craftsmanship on Bush so it could be ready to excel in its mission and demonstrate Freedom at Work.” The ship will now complete sea trials and multiple certifications before beginning a pre-deployment training cycle. “It’s been a unique privilege leading the project team of this availability throughout its entire duration at Norfolk Naval Shipyard,” said Burchett. “When starting the project, we adopted a quote from George H.W. Bush himself: ‘This is my mission and I will complete it.’ It’s taken a lot of teamwork and perseverance, on top of working through unexpected challenges, but today we can say the mission is complete and USS George H.W. Bush—and the Navy—is all the better for it.”


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Nominations from Page 1

USN, (2019); Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth Kirlin, USCG, (2018); Petty Officer 2nd Class Tarrell Jones, USN, (2017); Petty Officer 2nd Class Breanna Coleman, USN, (2016); Staff Sgt. Tracey Evans, USAF, (2015). Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Zaruba, the 2020 MCOY winner, expressed during last year’s luncheon, “I am absolutely honored to receive this award today. Thank you so much. Just because one person wins the award today, doesn’t take away the fact that these four individuals have done amazing work in the community. I am honored to be standing among them.” Zaruba had donated more than 800 hours of volunteer service while serving on the Virginia Beach Little League Board and was founder of a youth travel baseball team. Local commands, as well as local volunteer organizations, can nominate active duty E-6 and below. Nominations must be received by Wednesday, Sept. 22. Nominations received from volunteer organizations must be endorsed by the service member’s parent command in order to qualify for the award. Packages received from volunteer organizations will be forwarded to the appropriate command for verification and endorsement. This year’s winner and finalists will be recognized during a luncheon on the Navy’s 243rd birthday, Wednesday, Oct. 13, at the Sheraton Norfolk Waterside. To access the 2021 MCOY nomination form, go to https://docs.google.com/ document/d/1WLgs9W8qfhPuPwUMbng M 6 HG Kv lp 4 SJ Bk / e d it ? u sp = sharing&ouid=114148707378117417777&rtpof=true&sd=true OR https://drive.google. com/file/d/1foB_Hogp9MAJIHhJfUs6pLzQPuDAtf22/vie w?usp=sharing

More than 200 active-duty personnel and business professionals attended the Hampton Roads Chamber’s 2019 Military Citizen of the Year Luncheon. ( JOEMMEL /HAMPTON ROADS CHAMBER)


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 1

uarterdeck

‘Over-the Horizon’ The U.S. military conducted an unmanned drone strike in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan which killed two ISIS-K individuals. Page B3

Medical staff from Navy Medical Readiness and Training Command Sigonella rehearse COVID-19 screening procedures in support of the Department of Defense mission to facilitate the safe departure and relocation of U.S. citizens, Special Immigration Visa recipients, and vulnerable Afghan populations from Afghanistan, Aug. 20,2021. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Secretary of Defense Mandates COVID-19 Vaccinations for Service Members

By DOD Public Affairs

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III yesterday issued a memorandum directing mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for service members, a Pentagon official said today. John F. Kirby, Pentagon press secretary, said only Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines will be mandatory. The secretary has determined — after careful consultation with medical experts and military leaders and with the support of the president — that mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for service members are necessary to protect the health and readiness of the force, Kirby said. On Aug. 23, the FDA gave full approval to the Comirnaty vaccine — previously known

as the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine — for individuals 16 years of age and older. Before Aug. 23, the vaccine was available for use through an FDA emergency use authorization. Kirby said vaccines other than Comirnaty will not be made mandatory, but that could change if the FDA issues full approval for others. The memo directs the secretaries of the military departments to immediately begin full vaccination of all members of the department on active duty or in the Guard or Reserve, who aren’t yet fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Service members who are actively participating in COVID-19 clinical trials are exempt from mandatory vaccination until the trial is complete to avoid invalidating

clinical trial results, the memo states. The secretaries are also directed to “impose ambitious timelines for implementation and to report regularly on vaccination completion using established systems for other mandatory vaccine reporting,” the memo states. “The secretary has communicated to the military departments to execute this mandatory vaccination program with, obviously, skill and professionalism, which we always do, but also with a measure of compassion,” Kirby said. Service members with preexisting conditions who are advised against being vaccinated by their doctors would be exempt from mandatory vaccinations, Kirby said, adding there may also be possible exemptions on religious grounds.

U.S. Flights Take Afghan Evacuees from Italy to the United States By Naval Air Station Sigonella NAVAL AIR STATION SIGONELLA, Italy — Evacuees from Afghanistan departed Naval Air Station Sigonella Aug. 28th en route to the United States. The U.S.-bound planes took off at full capacity carrying American citizens and vulnerable Afghans to Philadelphia and Dulles Airport as part of Operation Allies Refuge. “The United States has successfully evacuated and facilitated the evacuation of over 100,000 people and their families on U.S. military and coalition flights. The departure of planes bound for the United States is the beginning of a new chapter in the lives of American citizens and Afghans who have undergone much hardship,” said Thomas Smitham, Chargé d’Affaires, U.S. Embassy Rome. “It is a testament to our brave U.S. service members, our civilian and military cooperation, and to the strength of our partnership with the Italian government.” Operation Allies Refuge is the U.S. Department of State’s mission for the evacuation of U.S. citizens, Special Immigration Visa applicants, and other vulnerable populations from Afghanistan as quickly and safely as possible. Working in partnership with allies in the Italian Air Force and Italian government, NAS Sigonella is serving as a transit location for evacuees before their onward travel to the United States and other locations. “I could not be more proud of the Marines, Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen, Guardians, U.S. government officials, and our civilian staff here that have worked tirelessly and continuously to ensure we provide a safe haven for these vulnerable people,” said NAS Sigonella Command Master Chief Anna Wood. “This has been a herculean effort that we have implemented with the Department of State and other U.S. government agencies, working together to assist and facilitate the transit of American

Service members outside those two categories who still object will be offered a chance to sit down with a physician and have that physician communicate to them the risks that they’re taking by being unvaccinated, Kirby said. They’ll also be offered a chance to sit down with those in their chains of command to talk about the risks that their objection will impose on the unit and on the force and on their teammates, he added. “Commanders have a wide range of tools available to them to help their teammates make the right decision for themselves, for their families, and for their units, and the secretary expects that the commanders will use those tools, short of having to use the UCMJ,” he said, referring to the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

NAVCENT Stands Up Task Force Supporting Afghanistan Evacuation By NAVCENT Public Affairs

agency coordination at Sigonella. “We are doing everything we can to help vulnerable Americans and Afghans in desperate need of assistance. Our goal is to receive them, support them and their families, and lead the coordination with interagency colleagues to ensure they can get to their destinations as quickly as possible.” The team at NAS Sigonella has also worked nonstop to prepare for and care for evacuees as part of the ongoing airlift effort throughout the U.S. Central Command and U.S. European Command theaters. NAS Sigonella personnel have designated two barracks buildings and other tempo-

NAVA L S U P P O RT AC T I V I T Y BAHRAIN — A U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) task force established Aug. 19 is temporarily assisting the safe evacuation of personnel from Afghanistan. More than 700 U.S. military personnel stood up Task Force 58 from units operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet region. U.S. Sailors, Marines, Soldiers and Airmen are working alongside their U.S. Embassy and Bahraini counterparts to temporarily facilitate the safe departure of U.S. citizens and evacuees from Afghanistan through Bahrain. “We are extremely grateful for the Kingdom of Bahrain’s critical efforts and assistance in the safe transit of U.S. citizens and evacuees from Afghanistan,” said Vice Adm. Brad Cooper, commander of NAVCENT, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Maritime Forces. “We deeply value our enduring bilateral relationship.” International military staff from the Combined Maritime Forces are also contributing to efforts that include providing travelers meals, short-term lodging and medical services before departing for the United States.

Turn to Evacuees, Page 7

Turn to NAVCENT, Page 7

Evacuees from Afghanistan board a Boeing 777 bound for the United States from Naval Air Station Sigonella, Aug. 28, 2021. NAS Sigonella is currently supporting the Department of State mission to facilitate the safe departure and relocation of U.S. citizens, Special Immigration Visa recipients, and vulnerable populations from Afghanistan. (MC2 KAILA PETERS)

citizens and at-risk Afghans to the United States. This first flight of evacuees leaving Italy for the United States is a testament to everything we’ve done and how much more we have to do. We will accomplish this mission, and we will do it together.” Department of State officers and their local staffs, together with military service members, have worked to provide roundthe-clock assistance since the evacuation mission began August 22. “I am honored and humbled to be able to serve alongside so many dedicated men and women representing multiple government agencies,” said Kim Krhounek, Minister Counselor for Political Affairs at U.S. Embassy Rome and leader of inter-


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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

Heroes at Home

Q: Will I be assigned to housing that is less than what I am authorized? A: Service members will not normally be involuntarily assigned to housing at less than assignment criteria for their pay grade except when military necessity is declared in writing by the Commanding Officer of the installation. You can request a house that is less than what is authorized as long as you sign an acknowledgement that you are voluntarily accepting less than what you are authorized and that you understand you will not be moved to other housing at a later date. Subsequently, if your bedroom requirement increases, you may apply to be placed on the wait list for the appropriate bedroom entitlement.

NAVY HOUSING Norfolk (757) 445-2832 JEBLCFS (757) 462-2792 Oceana/Dam Neck (757) 433-3268 Yorktown (757) 847-7806 (ISTOCK)

Leave no witnesses: The Secret Life of Mom By Lisa Smith Molinari “Did you have a good summer?” clusters of military moms in school parking lots asked each other this week. In response, we simultaneously gave the nurturing, motherly pat answer, “Yeah we had fun, but I only wish I had more time with the kids.” We waved good-bye to our children, then headed home, appearing ready for a full and productive day. But once our minivan doors closed, backto-school reality hit us like a runaway school bus. “I’m free,” I muttered to myself, my eyes wide and unblinking, my caffeine-affected fingers trembling against the steering wheel. “Finally … free.” In the time it took for me to round the circle and exit the school property, I’d thought of a million things I could do with my day now that there were no witnesses. Over two decades of taking our three kids back to school at the end of each summer, I always found the feeling of being completely alone — unfettered by parental responsibilities, social mores, ethical codes and rules of human decency — quite liberating. Seized with a pang of hunger in my minivan, I realized that there was no one to stop me from opening the neglected bag of cheese curls in the center console and pouring them directly into my upturned mouth. I switched

Military Clause: Terminate Your Lease Due to Deployment or PCS By Military Onesource Service members are protected by the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act if they need to end their lease early due to deployment or permanent change of station. Understanding the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act Your protection under the SCRA begins on the date you enter active duty and generally ends between 30 and 90 days after the date of discharge from active duty. This safeguard applies to: Active-duty members of the regular forces National Guard members serving active-duty status under federal orders Reservists called to active duty Coast Guard members serving on active duty in support of the armed forces Terminating a lease Under the SCRA, to end a housing lease early without penalty you must: Prove you signed the lease before you entered active duty and that you will remain on active duty for a minimum of 90 days. Provide your landlord written notice of your intent to end the lease early and a copy of your military orders. Notice should be provided no fewer than 30 days in advance of planned early termination of the lease. Notice must be hand-delivered, or mailed through a private business carrier (such as FedEx, UPS) or using return receipt requested. If you signed a lease or rental agreement after you began active-duty service, you may still be able to terminate the lease early without penalty if you:

the radio from the pop music station my girls insisted on to my favorite - the 80s channel and bellowed “Karma Chameleon” as I negotiated traffic. At one stop light, I flossed my teeth. At the next, I plucked my eyebrows. As I approached the Navy base gate guard, I flipped off the radio and wiped my cheese stained mouth on my sleeve. Leave no witnesses, I thought. At home, I spent a good twenty minutes on the floor snuggling with our dog, Moby, before planning my day. There was no one home to hear me talking to Moby out loud or to see him licking my face. There was no one there to balk, demand my attention, or roll their eyes. There was no one to embarrass, shame or disgust. It was just me. And it was wonderful. Sure, we moms feel pangs of guilt at deceiving our children in this way every year. Here they are, off at school, thinking that Mom is home jotting down new sandwich ideas, organizing their homework spaces, and thinking nothing but nurturing thoughts. When in reality, we are leading a secret double life. With the freedom that the school year affords, we moms can mop our kitchen floors while singing the entire Sound of Music soundtrack, complete with “Lonely Goatherd” yodeling and “Climb Every Mountain” contralto vibrato. We can fold laundry while

binge-watching DVRed episodes of “Bachelor in Paradise.” We can meet our work friends out for long lunches, or stay home and eat logs of cookie dough all alone. We can join base bowling leagues, or teach ourselves the Ukulele from YouTube videos. We can take a yoga classes, or take a nap wearing yoga pants. Whatever we moms decide to do with our time, it’s our little secret. Our kids would be wise to keep up our little charade, by the way. After all, there’s no sense in revealing that the fried chicken on the table was cooked by Colonel Sanders. Our intentions are good, but we may have run out of time to cook dinner between spin class and that sale at the outlet mall. So just say, “This meal is delicious, Mom!” and be thankful that we had time to hit the drive-thru. Also, don’t complain if Mom shows up late for practice pick ups. You have no idea how hard it is to attend a friend’s jewelry party and “like” all the funny cat videos on Facebook in one afternoon. Lastly, don’t comment on new hair styles, funky outfits, or sudden tattoos. Mom may be finding herself, or recovering from a girls’ night out — either way, it’s her business. Moms spend most of their time attending to their families’ and children’s needs. So, once the kids are back in school, they deserve alone time to do whatever they darned well please. Shhhhh … mum’s the word.

Mid-Atlantic Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) programs and services are designed to help you make the most of your military experience, and they’re all available to you at no cost. FUNCTIONS AND/OR SERVICES FFSC PROVIDES:  ClinicalCounseling(Individual, Couples,a nd Child Counseling)  Personal Financial Management  Information & Referral  Family Employment Assistance  Transition Assistance  Family Advocacy Program  Deployment and Mobilization Support  Ombudsman Support  Relocation Assistance  Parenting Programs  Stress and Anger Management  Command Support  Crisis Support  SuicidePrevention  SAPR Support

(COURTESY PHOTO)

Received PCS or deployment orders that will last for more than 90 days. Provide written notice to your landlord and a copy of your orders, preferably with at least a 30-day notice. Notice must be hand-delivered or mailed using return receipt requested or through a private business carrier. If you complied with the requirements of the SCRA, your lease should end 30 days after your next monthly rent payment is due. Terminating an automotive lease Under the SCRA, National Guard and reserve service members can also end automotive leases early when they are called to active duty for a minimum of 180 days. A National Guard or reserve member may be protected if they receive: Orders for a PCS to relocate the member to a different state Military orders for a PCS to move the member outside of the continental United States The service member deploys at least 180 days To terminate an automotive lease early, members need to: Give the dealership written notice of the intent to end the lease early and a copy of your military orders. Notice must be hand-delivered or mailed using return receipt requested or through a private business carrier. Return the vehicle no later than 15 days after delivery of the written notice. If you have complied with the requirements of the SCRA, your lease should end the day you return the vehicle. Knowing if there is a “military clause”

in your residential lease Familiarize yourself with the language in your residential lease. You should review your lease to ensure it does not contain anything you do not fully understand. If it contains confusing provisions, you should seek legal assistance from your nearest military legal office to discuss the lease and associated documents in detail. Look for separate SCRA waiver documents in the paperwork you receive from your prospective landlord. If you legally waive SCRA rights and protections, then you may not be able to end your lease early if you receive PCS or deployment orders without significant penalties. If you had not waived your rights, you would be entitled to end your lease penalty free. It is not recommended to sign any documents that take away your rights under the SCRA. If you did sign a SCRA waiver, you may want to consider having the lease updated or contacting your installation legal assistance/judge advocate office for assistance. Additionally, your lease may include a military clause, which gives you additional protection and allows you to end the lease early under certain circumstances. Such clauses are common in housing leases near military installations. If your lease doesn’t have a military clause, ask your landlord or management company if one can be added. Getting legal assistance If you have questions about ending a lease early, contact your installation legal services/JAG office. You can also find the closest office with this Armed Forces Legal Services locator.


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MISAWA, Japan (Aug. 12, 2021) – Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Austin Bowen, assigned to Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Yokosuka Site Misawa, works to fulfill his role in a training environment where power has been cut off from the building to simulate impact from an earthquake. NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka is the Western Pacific region’s largest U.S. Navy logistics command and has a network of more than 14 detachments. (MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS JAN DAVID DE LUNA MERCADO)

NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Yokosuka Completes Second COOP Exercise, Expands Scope and Participation By Brandon Taylor & Lt.j.g. Russell Pico

NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Yokosuka Public Affairs

YOKOSUKA, Japan — Between Aug. 9 and Aug. 12, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Yokosuka performed its second annual Continuity of Operations Exercise (COOPEX). COOP is a command’s ability to sustain mission-critical tasks with little disruption amid emergencies such as natural catastrophes, terrorist or military attacks, pandemics, infrastructure failures and other general disruptions. The necessity for cohesive and coherent COOP capabilities that enable NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka to continue mission essential functions throughout a broad range of conceivable situations is highlighted by ever-changing natural or artificial threat environments. This year’s COOPEX focused almost exclusively on natural disasters, placing the command of 1,200 personnel—spanning multiple sites across the Indo-Pacific region—in adverse training conditions, simulating multiple severe earthquakes, tsunamis and more, leading to damaged infrastructure, loss of communications and impact to workforce. “We are always mindful of naval competitors in this region, however, natural disasters are another threat here,” said Capt. Edward Pidgeon, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka commanding officer. “Many of our professionals remember the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and have stories to tell of what it was like, both professionally and personally.”

The first training event was a 7.5 magnitude earthquake striking Japan’s island of Kyushu, impacting NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Site Sasebo. This inject resulted in a quarter of its personnel unaccounted for, a damaged natural gas pipeline near Site Sasebo’s main building, and damage to the command’s fuel terminal, Defense Fuel Service Point (DFSP) Akasaki. In the immediate aftermath, it was simulated that afloat mission partners requested emergency stores on-loads and 100,000 gallons of fuel. An evacuation drill was also conducted and Site Sasebo’s personnel simulated immediate actions and relied upon NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s other sites to help sustain operations. Minutes after, Site Chinhae experienced a simulated tsunami, suffering damage to a warehouse and site material handling equipment (MHE). Site Chinhae reached out to ashore mission partners and was able to temporarily use MHE to continue mission essential functions. At the same time, Site Okinawa experienced a simulated tsunami, completely disrupting primary and back-up communications. “If in the event you lose all communications, it is up to you to apply your best judgement to the training scenario,” said Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Peters, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka assistant operations officer, from the logistics operations center (LOC). “Remember to apply the commanding officer’s standing orders.” “Your primary mission is to support the installation commander, supporting afloat and ashore units as a representative of NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Yokosuka,” said Pidgeon

in an all hands announcement. On the next day of the exercise, Site Sasebo’s conditions experienced little improvements and simulated a ship emergency fuel request despite all available forms of communication disrupted. Simultaneously, Site Atsugi was tasked with transporting medical supplies to Commander, Fleet Activities Sasebo and prepared to procure 200 mattresses and 100 cots to accommodate displaced personnel. Throughout the exercise, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s site directors responded to each scenario inject by contacting mission partners, testing and learning alternative ways their mission essential functions could continue under such scenarios. COOPEX’s facilitators designed the scenarios to increase interoperability between NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s sites, which serve an area of responsibility 14 times the geographic size of the United States. NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka locations in Japan’s Kanto region were set to experience a simulated disaster of their own next. Severe aftershocks struck the area leading to moderate damage of buildings and causing power outages at its Navy Overseas Air Cargo Terminal in Yokota and Fleet Mail Center Yokohama. Site Atsugi, earlier tasked with delivering high priority logistics support, had lost its primary form of communication as result of the aftershocks. “It felt like several layers of emergencies stacked on top of one another,” said Lt. Brian Lasley, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Site Atsugi Site Director. “It felt real and our professionals were resourceful and creative in their responses to the scenarios.”

Similar training events progressed throughout the day, eventually leading to a simulated injury of the commanding officer, resulting in his hospitalization with an unknown condition. In the training environment, the LOC informed NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s executive officer, temporarily making him the acting commanding officer for further training purposes. “We will stay true to Capt. Pidgeon’s guiding principles,” said Executive Officer Cmdr. Howard Milligan in his announcement to all hands during COOPEX 21. “Supporting the mission, remaining a world class workforce, enabling a culture of excellence and remembering that downrange is counting on us.” On the final day, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka headquarters experienced an 8.1 magnitude earthquake, severely damaging its main building that contained the logistics operations cell and key leaders. An evacuation drill was performed at headquarters and command leadership relocated and established a secondary LOC onboard DFSP Hakozaki, relying on backup generators and resorting to secondary communications methods. In the exercise debrief, it was evident the scenario identified the requirement to be able to effectively communicate in a variety of ways to respond to real world natural disasters. According to COOPEX 21 facilitators, reporting speed and accuracy had improved compared to last year’s COOPEX and obtaining more forms of communication can help with resiliency. NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka is one of eight FLCs under Commander, NAVSUP. Headquartered in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, NAVSUP employs a diverse, worldwide workforce of more than 22,500 military and civilian personnel. NAVSUP and the Navy Supply Corps conduct and enable supply chain, acquisition, operational logistics and Sailor & family care activities with our mission partners to generate readiness and sustain naval forces worldwide to prevent and decisively win wars. Learn more at www.navsup.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/ navsup and https://twitter.com/navsupsyscom.

‘Over-the Horizon’ Air Strike Kills 2 High-Profile ISIS-K Targets By DOD Public Affairs The U.S. military conducted an unmanned drone strike in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan — to the east of Kabul — which killed two ISIS-K individuals who were known to be responsible for planning and facilitation activities within the organization, the Pentagon’s joint staff deputy director for regional operations said. During a briefing today at the Pentagon, Army Maj. Gen. William D. “Hank” Taylor said that an additional ISIS-K member was also wounded in the strike, and that there were “zero civilian casualties.” “We will continue to have the ability to defend ourselves and to leverage over-the-horizon capability to conduct counter-terrorism operations as needed,” Taylor said. The U.S. military has said since the departure from Afghanistan was announced that it has the ability to conduct “over-the-horizon” operations as part of its ongoing counter-terrorism mission. That means it would continue to be able to conduct an operation such as the drone strike in Nangarhar Province, without having to actually launch it from within Afghanistan. While two ISIS-K members were killed and one was injured, the security situation in Afghanistan is still dangerous, said Pentagon Press Secretary John F. Kirby. “The threat stream is still active, still dynamic. We’re still laser focused on that and force protection, and we aren’t thinking for a minute that what happened yesterday gets us in the clear,”

Pentagon Press Secretary John F. Kirby holds a press briefing with Army Maj. Gen. William D.“Hank”Taylor on Afghanistan at the Pentagon, Washington, D.C., Aug. 28, 2021. (SSGT JACKIE SANDERS)

Kirby said. “Do we think that that will have some impact on their ability going forward? Absolutely. What and to how much we’re just going to have to keep watching the intelligence going forward.” The U.S. military expects to be out of Afghanistan by August 31. Until then, noncombatant evacuation operations, or NEO, continue at Hamid Karzai International Airport to get as many American citizens, Afghan special immigrant visa applicants and other vulnerable Afghans out of the country. At the same time that evacuation is happening, the U.S. military is also conducting retrograde operations to get out military equipment and people not involved in the NEO. Taylor said both of those operations — the NEO and the retrograde — can happen concurrently and both will continue until the last U.S. aircraft and service member leaves the country.

“We have the ability to include evacuees on military airlift out of Afghanistan until the very end,” he said. “This is a massive military, diplomatic, security and humanitarian undertaking for the United States and our allies.” In the last 24 hours, he said, 32 U.S. military aircraft left Hamid Karzai International Airport with about 4,000 personnel. An additional 34 coalition aircraft departed the airport with approximately 2,800 personnel. So far, he said, more than 117,000 have been evacuated from Afghanistan, with approximately 5,400 of those being American citizens. “This is an incredible number of people who are now safer thanks to the heroism of the young men and women who are putting their lives on the line each day to evacuate American and vulnerable Afghans out of Kabul,” Taylor said. Thursday morning outside the gates of

Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, 13 of those American service members were killed as the result of an enemy attack while supporting the NEO there. A number of Afghan civilians were also killed, and both American service members and Afghan civilians were injured. Those service members killed came from the Marine Corps, the Army and the Navy. From the Marine Corps, the deceased include Sgt. Darin T. Hoover, Sgt. Johanny Rosariopichardo, Sgt. Nicole L. Gee, Cpl. Hunter Lopez, Cpl. Daegan W. Page, Cpl. Humberto A. Sanchez, Lance Cpl. David L. Espinoza, Lance Cpl. Jared M. Schmitz, Lance Cpl. Rylee J. McCollum, Lance Cpl. Dylan R. Merola, and Lance Cpl. Kareem M. Nikoui. From the Navy, Seaman Maxton W. Soviak was killed. And from the Army, it was Staff Sgt. Ryan C. Knauss who was killed.


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MISAWA, Japan (Aug. 12, 2021) – Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Austin Bowen, assigned to Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Yokosuka Site Misawa, works to fulfill his role in a training environment where power has been cut off from the building to simulate impact from an earthquake. NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka is the Western Pacific region’s largest U.S. Navy logistics command and has a network of more than 14 detachments. (MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS JAN DAVID DE LUNA MERCADO)

NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Yokosuka Completes Second COOP Exercise, Expands Scope and Participation By Brandon Taylor & Lt.j.g. Russell Pico

NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Yokosuka Public Affairs

YOKOSUKA, Japan — Between Aug. 9 and Aug. 12, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Yokosuka performed its second annual Continuity of Operations Exercise (COOPEX). COOP is a command’s ability to sustain mission-critical tasks with little disruption amid emergencies such as natural catastrophes, terrorist or military attacks, pandemics, infrastructure failures and other general disruptions. The necessity for cohesive and coherent COOP capabilities that enable NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka to continue mission essential functions throughout a broad range of conceivable situations is highlighted by ever-changing natural or artificial threat environments. This year’s COOPEX focused almost exclusively on natural disasters, placing the command of 1,200 personnel—spanning multiple sites across the Indo-Pacific region—in adverse training conditions, simulating multiple severe earthquakes, tsunamis and more, leading to damaged infrastructure, loss of communications and impact to workforce. “We are always mindful of naval competitors in this region, however, natural disasters are another threat here,” said Capt. Edward Pidgeon, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka commanding officer. “Many of our professionals remember the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and have stories to tell of what it was like, both professionally and personally.”

The first training event was a 7.5 magnitude earthquake striking Japan’s island of Kyushu, impacting NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Site Sasebo. This inject resulted in a quarter of its personnel unaccounted for, a damaged natural gas pipeline near Site Sasebo’s main building, and damage to the command’s fuel terminal, Defense Fuel Service Point (DFSP) Akasaki. In the immediate aftermath, it was simulated that afloat mission partners requested emergency stores on-loads and 100,000 gallons of fuel. An evacuation drill was also conducted and Site Sasebo’s personnel simulated immediate actions and relied upon NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s other sites to help sustain operations. Minutes after, Site Chinhae experienced a simulated tsunami, suffering damage to a warehouse and site material handling equipment (MHE). Site Chinhae reached out to ashore mission partners and was able to temporarily use MHE to continue mission essential functions. At the same time, Site Okinawa experienced a simulated tsunami, completely disrupting primary and back-up communications. “If in the event you lose all communications, it is up to you to apply your best judgement to the training scenario,” said Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Peters, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka assistant operations officer, from the logistics operations center (LOC). “Remember to apply the commanding officer’s standing orders.” “Your primary mission is to support the installation commander, supporting afloat and ashore units as a representative of NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Yokosuka,” said Pidgeon

in an all hands announcement. On the next day of the exercise, Site Sasebo’s conditions experienced little improvements and simulated a ship emergency fuel request despite all available forms of communication disrupted. Simultaneously, Site Atsugi was tasked with transporting medical supplies to Commander, Fleet Activities Sasebo and prepared to procure 200 mattresses and 100 cots to accommodate displaced personnel. Throughout the exercise, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s site directors responded to each scenario inject by contacting mission partners, testing and learning alternative ways their mission essential functions could continue under such scenarios. COOPEX’s facilitators designed the scenarios to increase interoperability between NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s sites, which serve an area of responsibility 14 times the geographic size of the United States. NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka locations in Japan’s Kanto region were set to experience a simulated disaster of their own next. Severe aftershocks struck the area leading to moderate damage of buildings and causing power outages at its Navy Overseas Air Cargo Terminal in Yokota and Fleet Mail Center Yokohama. Site Atsugi, earlier tasked with delivering high priority logistics support, had lost its primary form of communication as result of the aftershocks. “It felt like several layers of emergencies stacked on top of one another,” said Lt. Brian Lasley, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka Site Atsugi Site Director. “It felt real and our professionals were resourceful and creative in their responses to the scenarios.”

Similar training events progressed throughout the day, eventually leading to a simulated injury of the commanding officer, resulting in his hospitalization with an unknown condition. In the training environment, the LOC informed NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka’s executive officer, temporarily making him the acting commanding officer for further training purposes. “We will stay true to Capt. Pidgeon’s guiding principles,” said Executive Officer Cmdr. Howard Milligan in his announcement to all hands during COOPEX 21. “Supporting the mission, remaining a world class workforce, enabling a culture of excellence and remembering that downrange is counting on us.” On the final day, NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka headquarters experienced an 8.1 magnitude earthquake, severely damaging its main building that contained the logistics operations cell and key leaders. An evacuation drill was performed at headquarters and command leadership relocated and established a secondary LOC onboard DFSP Hakozaki, relying on backup generators and resorting to secondary communications methods. In the exercise debrief, it was evident the scenario identified the requirement to be able to effectively communicate in a variety of ways to respond to real world natural disasters. According to COOPEX 21 facilitators, reporting speed and accuracy had improved compared to last year’s COOPEX and obtaining more forms of communication can help with resiliency. NAVSUP FLC Yokosuka is one of eight FLCs under Commander, NAVSUP. Headquartered in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, NAVSUP employs a diverse, worldwide workforce of more than 22,500 military and civilian personnel. NAVSUP and the Navy Supply Corps conduct and enable supply chain, acquisition, operational logistics and Sailor & family care activities with our mission partners to generate readiness and sustain naval forces worldwide to prevent and decisively win wars. Learn more at www.navsup.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/ navsup and https://twitter.com/navsupsyscom.

‘Over-the Horizon’ Air Strike Kills 2 High-Profile ISIS-K Targets By DOD Public Affairs The U.S. military conducted an unmanned drone strike in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan — to the east of Kabul — which killed two ISIS-K individuals who were known to be responsible for planning and facilitation activities within the organization, the Pentagon’s joint staff deputy director for regional operations said. During a briefing today at the Pentagon, Army Maj. Gen. William D. “Hank” Taylor said that an additional ISIS-K member was also wounded in the strike, and that there were “zero civilian casualties.” “We will continue to have the ability to defend ourselves and to leverage over-the-horizon capability to conduct counter-terrorism operations as needed,” Taylor said. The U.S. military has said since the departure from Afghanistan was announced that it has the ability to conduct “over-the-horizon” operations as part of its ongoing counter-terrorism mission. That means it would continue to be able to conduct an operation such as the drone strike in Nangarhar Province, without having to actually launch it from within Afghanistan. While two ISIS-K members were killed and one was injured, the security situation in Afghanistan is still dangerous, said Pentagon Press Secretary John F. Kirby. “The threat stream is still active, still dynamic. We’re still laser focused on that and force protection, and we aren’t thinking for a minute that what happened yesterday gets us in the clear,”

Pentagon Press Secretary John F. Kirby holds a press briefing with Army Maj. Gen. William D.“Hank”Taylor on Afghanistan at the Pentagon, Washington, D.C., Aug. 28, 2021. (SSGT JACKIE SANDERS)

Kirby said. “Do we think that that will have some impact on their ability going forward? Absolutely. What and to how much we’re just going to have to keep watching the intelligence going forward.” The U.S. military expects to be out of Afghanistan by August 31. Until then, noncombatant evacuation operations, or NEO, continue at Hamid Karzai International Airport to get as many American citizens, Afghan special immigrant visa applicants and other vulnerable Afghans out of the country. At the same time that evacuation is happening, the U.S. military is also conducting retrograde operations to get out military equipment and people not involved in the NEO. Taylor said both of those operations — the NEO and the retrograde — can happen concurrently and both will continue until the last U.S. aircraft and service member leaves the country.

“We have the ability to include evacuees on military airlift out of Afghanistan until the very end,” he said. “This is a massive military, diplomatic, security and humanitarian undertaking for the United States and our allies.” In the last 24 hours, he said, 32 U.S. military aircraft left Hamid Karzai International Airport with about 4,000 personnel. An additional 34 coalition aircraft departed the airport with approximately 2,800 personnel. So far, he said, more than 117,000 have been evacuated from Afghanistan, with approximately 5,400 of those being American citizens. “This is an incredible number of people who are now safer thanks to the heroism of the young men and women who are putting their lives on the line each day to evacuate American and vulnerable Afghans out of Kabul,” Taylor said. Thursday morning outside the gates of

Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, 13 of those American service members were killed as the result of an enemy attack while supporting the NEO there. A number of Afghan civilians were also killed, and both American service members and Afghan civilians were injured. Those service members killed came from the Marine Corps, the Army and the Navy. From the Marine Corps, the deceased include Sgt. Darin T. Hoover, Sgt. Johanny Rosariopichardo, Sgt. Nicole L. Gee, Cpl. Hunter Lopez, Cpl. Daegan W. Page, Cpl. Humberto A. Sanchez, Lance Cpl. David L. Espinoza, Lance Cpl. Jared M. Schmitz, Lance Cpl. Rylee J. McCollum, Lance Cpl. Dylan R. Merola, and Lance Cpl. Kareem M. Nikoui. From the Navy, Seaman Maxton W. Soviak was killed. And from the Army, it was Staff Sgt. Ryan C. Knauss who was killed.


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Jesse Click, from Sylvan Springs, Ala., assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), signals an MH-60S Seahawk helicopter from the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25. (MC3 JONATHAN BERLIER)

USS America Conducts Cyclic Flight Operations with HMS Queen Elizabeth By Lt. John Stevens

Amphibious Squadron 11 Public Affairs

PHILIPPINE SEA — USS America (LHA 6), the Navy’s only forward-deployed amphibious assault ship, participated in cyclic flight operations with HMS Queen Elizabeth (R 08) in the Philippine Sea, Aug. 22-24. “The two days of continuous flight operations were the culmination of several days

of interoperability and maritime strike training with allied air power on America and Queen Elizabeth,” said Capt. Ken Ward, America’s commanding officer. “This interaction showcased how quickly and seamlessly the U.S. and U.K. can fold together our combined air power, and execute highly intricate and sustained flight operations to devastatingly lethal effect.” America operates with a detachment of

F-35s from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121, which reinforce rotary-wing and tiltrotor aircraft from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 as part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). America also fields a detachment of MH-60S Sea Hawks from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25. Queen Elizabeth deployed with F-35s from U.S. Marine VMFA-211 and Royal Air Force No. 617 Squadron.

“Conducting exercises with ships of the U.S. Expeditionary Strike Group 7 is another milestone for HMS Queen Elizabeth,” said Royal Navy Capt. Angus Essenhigh, Queen Elizabeth’s commanding officer. “We have shown interoperability with our allies and as we get accustomed to operating in the Indo-Pacific again these relationships will be important for all future Royal Navy ships operating in the region.” The America Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) and the Queen Elizabeth Strike Group (CSG-21) have been operating together in the Philippine Sea this month as part of Large Scale Global Exercise (LSGE) 21 and Noble Union. America, flagship of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, along with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility to enhance interoperability with allies and partners, and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 5

The crew of the USS Vermont (SSN 792) man the rails during a commissioning commemoration for the USS Vermont (SSN 792) onboard Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn., Aug. 28. (MCC JOSHUA KARSTEN)

Navy Celebrates Commissioning of USS Vermont (SSN 792) By Submarine Readiness Squadron 32 Public Affairs GROTON, Conn. — The Navy celebrated the commissioning of USS Vermont (SSN 792), the first Block IV Virginia-class submarine to enter service, Saturday, Aug. 28, at Naval Submarine Base New London. “Vermonters have served with valor from the highest mountains to the depths of the ocean,” said Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro, who served as the event’s keynote speaker and was attending his first ship ceremony as secretary. “This vessel has already proven itself in service, not only because it was designed the right way, but because of the exemplary work of the men aboard,” he continued. Vermont was administratively commissioned on April 18, 2020, but due to restrictions on large gatherings because of the COVID-19 pandemic at the time, no traditional commissioning ceremony was held. To ensure the health and safety of the crew and all those in attendance during the ceremony Saturday, attendance was limited and no public or media tours were held. Masks

were required in all indoor spaces and encouraged in outdoor spaces. Since its administrative commissioning, USS Vermont has been an active submarine in the U.S. Navy, including participation in anti-submarine warfare exercises alongside the Brazilian navy in the U.S. 4th Fleet area of operations in December of 2020. In addition to Del Toro, Rear Adm. Douglas Perry, director of undersea warfare on the chief of naval operations’ staff and a Vermont native, was among those who spoke at the Saturday ceremony. Perry spoke of the legacies of previous Navy ships with Vermont ties and military heroes from the state’s past, like Ethan Allen during the Revolutionary War and 19th Century Admiral of the Navy George Dewey. “The Green Mountain State’s legacy of naval service runs deep,” Perry said. “You join a rich history of honorable service.” This is the third U.S. Navy ship to bear the name Vermont, but first in a century. The first was one of nine 74-gun warships authorized by Congress in 1816. The second, Battleship No. 20, was commissioned in 1907 and first deployed in Decem-

ber of that year as part of the “Great White Fleet.” The battleship Vermont was decommissioned June 30, 1920. The submarine Vermont was christened in a traditional ceremony at General Dynamics’ Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Connecticut, on Oct. 20, 2018. “She was built by the best, for the best, and is the best of the best,” said Gloria Valdez, the ship sponsor and a former deputy assistant secretary of the Navy overseeing shipbuilding and modernization. “She is the most technologically advanced submarine in the world.” USS Vermont is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged. She has a crew of more than 130 Navy personnel. “We get to finally say, ‘The ship’s in commission, thank you so much to everyone who supported us,’ ” said Cmdr. Charles Phillips, the commanding officer of USS Vermont. “This represents the people of Vermont. We want to make them proud and let them justify their confidence in us as we

defend our country.” Fast-attack submarines are multi-mission platforms enabling five of the six Navy maritime strategy core capabilities — sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security and deterrence. They are designed to excel in anti-submarine warfare, anti-ship warfare, strike warfare, special operations, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, irregular warfare and mine warfare. Fast-attack submarines project power ashore with special operations forces and Tomahawk cruise missiles in the prevention or preparation of regional crises. Block IV Virginia-class submarines incorporate design changes focused on reduced total ownership cost. By making these smaller-scale design changes to increase the component-level lifecycle of the submarine, the Navy will increase the periodicity between depot maintenance availabilities and increase the number of deployments. Blocks I-III Virginia-class submarines are planned to undergo four depot maintenance availabilities and conduct 14 deployments. Block IV design changes are intended to reduce planned availabilities by one to three, and increase deployments to 15. Also speaking at the ceremony Saturday were members of the Vermont and Connecticut congressional delegations: U.S. Rep. Peter Welch of Vermont, U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney of Connecticut and U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut.

NAVWAR Launches Phase II of Project Overmatch Prize Challenges By Elisha Gamboa

Naval Information Warfare Systems Command Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO — Naval Information Warfare Systems Command (NAVWAR) kicked off Phase II of the Artificial Intelligence and Networks Advanced Naval Technology Exercise (AINetANTX) Prize Challenges, focused on identifying solutions at speed, for a more lethal, better connected fleet of the future in support of Project Overmatch. Project Overmatch is a high priority Department of the Navy initiative aimed at connecting platforms, weapons, and sensors together in a robust Naval Operational Architecture (NOA) that integrates with Joint All-Domain Command and Control for enhanced Distributed Maritime Operations. Critical to Project Overmatch is the development of networks, infrastructure, data architecture, tools and analytics that support the operational and developmental environment that will enable sustained maritime dominance for years to come. To deliver this modernized network, the AINetANTX Prize Challenges are open to all U.S. citizens, including commercial, government and academic individuals or teams, lowering the barrier to entry and increasing the competitive landscape to identify the best solutions possible. NAVWAR selected a total of 14 participants from more than 50 potential applicants. After successfully completing the Phase I white paper review, participants

have moved to Phase II where they will demonstrate their solutions in a simulation-based environment that will employ tactically relevant scenarios in operationally relevant conditions. “Invited participants have been asked to bring their technologies and integrate into our digital warfare platforms and simulators,” said Carly Jackson, NAVWAR Science and Technology Director. “While we did allow participants to integrate into our labs in the 2019 ANTX EAST/WEST, this wasn’t a requirement. We are constantly evolving our methods and tools, and these platforms and environments are now core to the AINetANTX evaluation process.” Focused on delivering the NOA, the Networks Prize Challenge is exploring new networking technologies that will advance the reach, capacity and resiliency of the maritime tactical network of networks. The AI Prize Challenge aims to identify and leverage the latest in AI-enabled technologies to allow warfighters to make decisions in operationally relevant maritime environments and in operational timeframes. During Phase II, selected participants will to demonstrate candidate technologies in the Overmatch Software Armory (OSA), a cloud-enabled digital environment using industry-standard development, security and operation (DevSecOps) principles aimed at bringing the rapid delivery of software capability to the fleet. The OSA will provide participants virtual desktop infrastructure access to a secure, govern-

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ment-owned commercial cloud service provider with training-quality data sets. Each prize challenge is offering $100,000 for the best solution presented, with a combined $200,000 in total cash prizes. First-place entries will win $75,000, while second place entries will be awarded $25,000. Winners will be announced in November 2021. “These cash awards are being leveraged to recognize the importance of the specific technologies that we will be evaluating and in recognition of the increased levels of integration that will be required,” said Jackson. “This will bring speed and effi-

cacy to our methods. We will learn much faster by assessing the tech that these Phase II participating teams bring into our digital platforms, data sets, and operationally relevant fleet architectures.” About NAVWAR NAVWAR identifies, develops, delivers and sustains information warfighting capabilities and services that enable naval, joint, coalition and other national missions operating in warfighting domains from seabed to space and through cyberspace. NAVWAR consists of more than 11,000 civilian, active duty and reserve professionals located around the world.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121) navigates in the Gulf of Mexico during bravo trials. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Future Frank E. Petersen Jr. Completes Builder’s Trials By Team Ships Public Affairs The future USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121), the Navy’s 71st Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, completed Builder’s sea trials, Aug. 26. The trials were conducted by the shipbuilder, Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division.

Builder’s trials consist of a series of in-port and at-sea demonstrations that allow the shipbuilder to assess the ship’s systems and readiness for Acceptance Trials prior to delivery. “Completion of these trials gives us confidence that DDG 121 will be able to conduct successful Acceptance Trials in

mid-September,” said Capt. Seth Miller, DDG 51 program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. “The Navy and industry team continues to work diligently to ensure the ship is ready to operate at its peak performance and can provide capability and capacity to the fleet.” DDG 121, a Flight IIA destroyer, will be

equipped with the Aegis Combat System, which includes Integrated Air and Missile Defense capability and enhanced Ballistic Missile Defense capabilities. This system delivers quick reaction time, high firepower, and increased electronic countermeasures capability against a variety of threats. HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division is currently in production on future destroyers Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123), Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), Ted Stevens (DDG 128) and Jeremiah Denton (DDG 129). As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 7

Evacuees from Afghanistan wait to board a flight bound for the United States from Naval Air Station Sigonella, Aug. 28, 2021. (MC2 KAILA PETERS)

Evacuees from Page 1 Sailors, assigned to NSA Bahrain, prepare equipment in support of evacuation efforts supporting Afghanistan. (COURTESY PHOTO)

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from Page 1

“Every organization is contributing,” said Cooper. “The entire team is stepping up and doing phenomenal work during a challenging time. I could not be prouder.”

The U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations encompasses nearly 2.5 million square miles of water area and includes the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Red Sea and parts of the Indian Ocean. The region is comprised of 20 countries and includes three critical choke points at the Strait of Hormuz, the Suez Canal and the Strait of Bab-al-Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen.

rary lodging on base for evacuees. Each lodging is provided halal dining, religious and recreation areas. In addition, medical care is provided to assess and assist those with injuries or other medical concerns. A local imam has made daily visits to aid the evacuees with religious and spiritual support. Local community members and dependents of the U.S. forces assigned to NAS Sigonella continued to volunteer and donate. The response has been so overwhelming that every one of the hundreds of children who

arrived at NAS Sigonella has received a stuffed toy to welcome them, with clothing and other needs provided to everyone. In addition to the airlift operation conducted by the U.S. Air Force’s Air Mobility Command, the U.S. Navy has provided additional critical evacuee support by utilizing four C-40A Clippers, from Fleet Logistics Support Wing, based at Joint Base Fort Worth. Known as the “Hub of the Med,” NAS Sigonella’s strategic location as the Navy’s only overseas air station enables U.S., allied, and partner nation forces to deploy and respond as required to ensure security and stability in Europe and Africa.


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 1

Fresh Grilled Flavors When bright, sunny days offer opportunities to take it outside for a celebration or casual weeknight dinner, take advantage with the fresh flavors of grilled fare. PAGE C4

IT’S BACK TO ‘HOMESCHOOL PROGRAM DAYS’ AT JAMESTOWN SETTLEMENT

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By Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation WILLIAMSBURG, Va. — Jamestown Settlement and the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown will offer special admission September 4-19 during “Homeschool Program Days,” an annual opportunity for homeschooling families to explore 17th- and 18th-century Virginia history with a variety of in-person educational programs. Homeschool students can discover the story of America’s beginnings with an educational, engaging and exciting museum experience at these two living-history museums administered by the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, an educational agency of the Commonwealth of Virginia accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The museums’ safety protocols allow visitors to enjoy extensive indoor gallery exhibits and outdoor living-history areas, connecting with the stories of our shared history. Admission to “Homeschool Program Days” is $13 per family member and offers unlimited admission to both museums during a two-week period on September 4-19. Children under age 4 are free. Tickets can be purchased online at the eStore or in person at either museum. Tickets include: • Admission to Jamestown Settlement, including refreshed exhibition galleries, short films in immersive settings and outdoor living-history that feature re-cre-

ations of a Paspahegh town, one of the three ships that sailed to Virginia in 1607 and an English fort. • Admission to the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown, including expansive exhibition galleries, short films in immersive settings and outdoor re-creations of a Continental Army encampment and Revolution-era farm. • In-person access to guided tours and education stations that offer opportunities to engage with museum educators from a safe social distance. Homeschool Guided Museum Tours Also included in this year’s ticket, homeschool families will have access to 90-minute guided tours led by an educator at both museums. Tours are limited in size and require pre-registration. Jamestown Settlement tours will be available on September 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17 and 18 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. At the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown, tours will be available on September 7, 9, 12, 14, 16 and 19 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Homeschool Education Stations Education stations at each museum will allow families to interact with educators from a safe distance as they explore a variety of historical topics as well as critical thinking, primary source analysis and how historians use clues from the past to put together a historical narrative. At Jamestown Settlement, stations will

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examine games played by Virginia Indians, the ways English colonists tried to make money for the Virginia Company of London, importance of fire as a technology among the Virginia Indian, English and West Central African cultures, and the lives of women in early Virginia. Stations will be available September 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17 and 18 at 10 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m. At the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown, stations will examine the roles of Native Americans in the American Revolu-

tion, lives of men who fought in the Revolution, medicine of the 18th century, and how fibers grown on the farm were processed into a usable product. Stations will be available September 7, 9, 12, 14, 16 and 19 at 10 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m. Homeschool Admission Tickets For more information about Homeschool Program Days, contact Group Reservations at (757) 253-4939 or toll-free (888) 868-7593. Tickets can be purchased online at the eStore or in person at either museum.

Fashion and Theater Inspire New Exhibit at Barry Art Museum By Amber Kennedy Beginning Sept. 9, the Barry Art Museum will celebrate the intersection of fashion and theater in its new exhibition, “Karen LaMonte: Théâtre de la Mode.” LaMonte is known for her finely detailed sculptures inspired by fashion, often depicting sumptuously draped fabrics without human figures. The acclaimed American sculptor, living and working in Prague, is known for pioneering complex casting methods to create largescale sculptures in glass, iron and bronze. LaMonte’s sculptures have been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., Kampa Museum in Prague, Toyama Glass Art Museum in Japan and Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, among others. The Barry Art Museum will set the stage for LaMonte’s work with a new exhibition inspired by “Théâtre de la Mode(Theatre of Fashion),” the 1940s exhibit of miniature wire mannequins wearing French fashion that toured the world on traveling theater sets. The touring mannequins were intended to raise funds for war survivors and herald the revival of the French fashion industry. LaMonte was deeply influenced by the French mannequins, saying, “The small scale of (‘Théâtre de la Mode’) with its large intention and effect ... was a declaration of the importance of beauty and culture particularly during difficult and confus-

ing times.” The works that emerged from LaMonte’s fascination are the “Études,” which are the small-scale companions to her full-size “Nocturnes” sculptures. Examples from both series will be presented on sets created by the Theater Department at ODU. A selection of the original French mannequins, on loan from Maryhill Museum in Goldendale, Washington, will be on view to offer a richer historical context. The Barry Art Museum offers free museum admission and free public programs, including a monthly lecture series and exhibition opening receptions. Programming will include: The monthly lecture series occurs on the first Thursday of each month. At 6 p.m. on Sept. 2, Steven L. Grafe, Curator of Art at Maryhill Museum of Art will introduce the history and artwork of Théâtre de la Mode. Register for this free Zoom event here. Museum members are invited to virtually preview the exhibition at 6 p.m. Sept. 9 via Zoom, with LaMonte, the curators and set designers for a first look at the exhibition and a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the exhibition development process. Museum members will receive an evite to RSVP. From 5 to 8 p.m. Sept. 10, the public is invited to the exhibition opening reception with designs and costuming from Canvas by Phil Odango, and a performance by Core Theatre Ensemble. RSVPs are encouraged, but not required.

A piece of Karen LaMonte’s artwork. (COURTESY PHOTO)

INSIDE: Check out Flagship Values, your source for automobiles, employment, real estate and more! Pages C6-7


2

The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

Community Submit YOUR events, news and photos

The Flagship welcomes submissions from our readers online. Please submit events here: www.militarynews.com/users/admin/calendar/event/ Please submit news and photos here: www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/submit_news/

Gear Up 4 School at Nauticus

(COURTESY PHOTO)

By Nauticus Norfolk, Va.— Get a head start on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) in a super FUN way by joining Nauticus on Saturday, August 28 for Gear Up 4 School! Nauticus is celebrating the new school year with $7.57 general admission & STEM to STERN-based activities focusing on simple machines to get students “Geared Up to Go Back to School”. “We’re excited to offer local students and visitors an interactive event day to spark an interest in learning as they prepare to head back to school” said Nauticus Education Manager, Rachel Harrington. Special programming on August 28 includes: • Chain Fall - Discuss the Simple Machines on the Battleship Wisconsin. • Sinking Sharks - Learn all about how sharks move in the water. • Pollution Solution - Our Youth Action Council will share information about our recent Community Clean-up and guests will create their own Pollution Solution. • Hands-Free Haul - Norfolk has one of

the largest ports in the Nation. Test your engineering skills and build a contraption that will move Legos into a container. (pic attached) • [11:51 AM] Wells, Diane • Replenishment At Sea (RAS) - Learn how the Battleship Wisconsin resupplied at sea! (pic attached) • & MORE! Nauticus will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and paid admission includes access to the Nauticus museum, STEM to STERN programming, and the Battleship Wisconsin. As always, Nauticus members are free. Tickets and additional details are available online at https://nauticus.org/event/gearup-for-school/. About Nauticus Gear Up 4 School discovery day and additional programs are supported by the Nauticus Foundation. The Nauticus Foundation is the nonprofit, 501©3 that supports the mission and activities of Nauticus. Nauticus’ mission is to benefit the community through education, impactful experiences, and sharing access to maritime resources. For more information, visit https://nauticus.org/

(COURTESY PHOTO)

Slover Library to participate in 9/11 memorial and museum’s education exhibition

By Slover Library

NORFOLK, Va — Slover Library will participate in September 11, 2001: The Day That Changed the World, an educational exhibition that presents the history of 9/11, its origins and its ongoing implications through the personal stories of those who witnessed and survived the attacks. The exhibition will be on display September 1 — 15. Told across 14 posters, this exhibition includes archival photographs and images of artifacts from the 9/11 Memorial & Museum’s permanent collection and several local items. It explores the consequences of terrorism on individual lives and communities at the local, national, and international levels, and encourages critical thinking about the legacies of 9/11. This 9/11 Memorial & Museum curated exhibition reflects the core pillars of commemoration, education, and inspiration as we prepare to observe the 20th anni-

versary of the 9/11 attacks. “During this 20th anniversary year, it is our privilege to share these lessons with a new generation, teach them about the ongoing repercussions of the 9/11 attacks and inspire them with the idea that, even in the darkest of times, we can come together, support one another and find the strength to renew and rebuild,” said Alice M. Greenwald, 9/11 Memorial & Museum President and CEO. The poster exhibition was developed by the 9/11 Memorial & Museum and has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy Demands Wisdom. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for Humanities. For questions or more information on this exhibition, please visit the 9/11 Memorial & Museum website or contact them at: press@911memorial.org.

(COURTESY GRAPHIC)


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 3


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

Food

Grilled Lamb Burgers (COURTESY PHOTO)

Get Outside with Fresh Grilled Flavors By Family Features

When bright, sunny days offer opportunities to take it outside for a celebration or casual weeknight dinner, take advantage with the fresh flavors of grilled fare. Good food and good company can combine for a meal to remember with loved ones while enjoying the outdoors. Try taking your grilling game to the next level with Atkins Ranch grass fed ground lamb — available at Whole Foods Market — for lean, delicate flavor perfect for burgers, skewers, meatballs and sausages. Grass fed lamb is a versatile option that’s easy to cook, even on the grill — simply treat it the way you would beef. If you’re new to cooking lamb, consider these Grilled Lamb Burgers that showcase 100% grass-fed lamb topped with a light herb salad, sliced tomato and yogurt sauce on a brioche bun. Or you can combine a robust herb dipping sauce with Lamb Meatball and Veggie Skewers for a customizable meal hot off the grates. Visit Take-It-Outside.AtkinsRanch.com for more grilling inspiration. Lamb Meatball and Veggie Skewers with Herb Sauce Total time: 1 hour, 30 minutes Yield: 6 skewers 6 wooden skewers 1 pound Atkins Ranch ground lamb 2 large eggs ⅔ cup Italian breadcrumbs 1 teaspoon olive oil

½ cup finely minced yellow onion 1 clove minced garlic ¼ teaspoon coriander seeds, crushed ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes ½ teaspoon kosher salt freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1 medium red onion, cut into 1-inch stacks 1 medium green bell pepper, cut into 1-inch stacks 1 medium red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch stacks Herb Sauce: 1 cup flat leaf parsley 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary leaves, minced 2 tablespoons capers 1 lemon, juice only 2 cloves garlic ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil grilled Italian bread, for serving Soak skewers in water 10 minutes. In large bowl, break apart ground lamb; add whisked eggs and breadcrumbs. In small saute pan, add olive oil then saute yellow onion, garlic clove, coriander seeds, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper, to taste, about 5 minutes, until onion is translucent and spices are fragrant. Add to bowl with lamb. Mix until combined and form into roughly 1 ½-ounce balls. Add meatballs to skewers, alternating with onions and peppers. Cover and refrigerate 1 hour to ensure meatballs hold together during grilling. To make herb sauce: In immersion blender,

blend parsley, rosemary, capers, lemon juice, garlic and olive oil until smooth. Refrigerate until serving. Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Grill skewers about 3 minutes on each side, or until meatballs reach 150 F internal temperature. Rest 5 minutes. Serve with dipping sauce and grilled Italian bread. Grilled Lamb Burgers Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes Servings: 4 1 ½ pounds Atkins Ranch ground lamb ¼ teaspoon kosher salt Spread: ⅔ cup full-fat Greek yogurt 1 clove raw garlic, grated ⅓ cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard Salad: 1 small English cucumber, thinly sliced 2 green onions, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped flat leaf parsley 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill ¼ cup microgreens 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon lemon zest 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 brioche buns 1 medium tomato, sliced into rounds Gently divide lamb into four parts, 6 ounces each, and shape into rounds slightly larger than buns. Place covered in refrigerator, 1 hour.

Lamb Meatball and Veggie Skewers with Herb Sauce (COURTESY PHOTO)

To make yogurt sauce: In small bowl, mix yogurt, garlic, mayonnaise and Dijon mustard; refrigerate until ready to assemble burgers. To make salad: In medium bowl, mix cucumber, onions, parsley, mint leaves, dill, microgreens, lemon juice, lemon zest and olive oil; refrigerate until ready to assemble burgers. Preheat grill to medium-high heat with direct and indirect zones. Salt patties then add to grill, cooking about 6 minutes on each side until internal temperature reaches 150 F. As patties near this temperature, or start to brown, move to indirect zone to regulate doneness. Transfer to plate and let rest about 5 minutes. To build burgers, add dollop of yogurt spread to bottom buns. Top each with tomato slice, lamb burger, herb salad and top bun.

Sweet Ideas for Easy Backto-School Breakfasts By Family Features A healthy breakfast can give your student a boost that lasts all day long. Mornings tend to be rushed, but it’s still possible to prepare easy breakfasts that power little learners throughout the school day. Fresh fruit is a breakfast staple, and a nutritious option like watermelon is a sweet way to satisfy hunger (and thirst). As a refreshing ingredient or standalone treat, watermelon includes just 80 calories and no fat. It’s an excellent source of vitamin C (25%) and because it’s made of 92% water, it’s a flavorful way to encourage kids to start a busy day well hydrated. A bowl of watermelon cut into cubes, balls or fun shapes is a winning idea, but you can also think outside the rind with these ways to give watermelon a place at your breakfast table: • Top a grain-based cereal like corn flakes or oatmeal with bite-size bits. • Make Watermelon Donuts for a graband-go delight, perfect on hectic mornings. • Freeze cubes overnight and use them in place of ice with your favorite smoothie ingredients. • Put a twist on a breakfast favorite with these Watermelon Oat Flour Waffles. • Add a layer of oat crumble to a bowl of watermelon balls for a savory, satisfying treat. Get in a school morning groove with more easy breakfast ideas at watermelon.org. Kid-Friendly Cuts It’s no secret that kids gravitate toward fun foods. Watermelon is a versatile fruit that offers plenty of serving options that let kids get hands-on and creative. Slices A classic watermelon slice may be basic, but it does have a few tricks up its sleeve. With the rind on, it’s an instant finger food with a built-in

“handle.” Add a wooden stick for watermelon you can eat like a sucker or pop it in the freezer for a cool way to start the day. Cubes Simple and versatile cubes are a solution for banishing breakfast boredom. You can cube a melon and use them differently every day of the week by eating them on their own, mixing in a fruit salad, layering with other ingredients, blending in a smoothie and more. Sticks There’s nothing like a dipper to get kids’ attention. A watermelon stick offers a bit of rind to hold onto and a juicy strip of sweet melon that’s perfect for dunking in a cup of yogurt or fruit dip. Cutouts Cut watermelon into thin slices and use cookie cutters to create a treat that shows off creativity. Watermelon Oat Flour Waffles Yield: 8 waffles Waffles: 1 cup old-fashioned or regular oats ¾ cup all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup watermelon juice ½ cup vegetable oil 4 egg whites nonstick cooking spray Garnish: 2 cups plain Greek yogurt 3 cups watermelon, diced ½ inch fresh mint leaves powdered sugar (optional) honey (optional) Preheat Belgian or regular waffle iron. In blender, process oat flakes into flour. In bowl, mix oat flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder and salt. Mix in watermelon

Watermelon Oat Flour Waffles (COURTESY PHOTO)

juice and oil. Whip egg whites into stiff peaks and fold into batter. Spray hot waffle iron with nonstick cooking spray. Pour batter into waffle iron and bake 3-4 minutes, or according to waffle iron instructions. Repeat with remaining batter. Garnish waffles with yogurt; watermelon cubes; mint sprigs; powdered sugar, if desired; and honey, if desired. Watermelon Donuts Servings: 1

2 slices seedless watermelon, 1 ½ inches thick 2 tablespoons nonfat plain Greek yogurt 1 pinch sugar vanilla, to taste 9 slivered almonds Cut out donut shapes from watermelon slices. Sweeten Greek yogurt with sugar and vanilla, to taste, to create frosting. Frost half of watermelon donuts with half of frosting. Add layer of remaining watermelon donuts and top with remaining frosting. Sprinkle toasted almonds over top and serve.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 5

Health

Spc. Tyler Boyer, a Hayden, Colorado native and medical specialist assigned to the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, administers the COVID-19 vaccine at Fort Carson, Colorado Aug 3, 2021. The 4th Inf. Div. remains committed to keeping the Fort Carson community safe and healthy by offering mobile vaccinations centers. ( SGT ANDREW GREENWOOD)

Secretary of Defense Mandates COVID-19 Vaccinations for Service Members By David Vergun Dod News

The Secretary has determined - after careful consultation with medical experts and military leaders and with the support of the president - that mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for service members are necessary to protect the health and readiness of the force, Kirby said. On Aug. 23, the FDA gave full approval to the Comirnaty vaccine - previously known as the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine - for individuals 16 years of age and older. Before Aug. 23, the vaccine was available for use through and FDA emergency use authorization. Kirby said vaccines other than Cominaty will not be made mandatory, but that could change if the FDA issues full approval for others. The memo directed the secretaries of the military departments to immediately begin full vaccination of all members of the department on active duty or in the Guard or Reserve, who aren’t yet fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Service members who are actively partic-

Army Spec. Dorien Lewis, a combat medic with Division Sustainment Troops Battalion MEDOPS, 3rd Division Sustainment Brigade, administers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to an Army soldier at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, Aug. 17, 2021. Medics across Camp Arifjan held a COVID-19 vaccine drive for personnel that are not fully vaccinated . (Army Sgt Marquis Hopkins).

ipating in COVID-19 clinical trials are exempt from mandatory vaccination until the trial is complete to avoid invalidating clinical trial results, the memo states. The secretaries are also directed to “impose ambitious timelines for implementation and to report regularly on vaccination completion using establishment systems for other mandatory vaccine reporting,” the memo states. “The secretary has communicated to the military department to execute this mandatory vaccination program with, obviously, skill and professionalism, which we also do, but also with a measure of compassion,” Kirby said. Service members with preexisting conditions who are advised against being vaccinated by their doctors would be exempt from mandatory vaccinations, Kirby said, adding their may also be possible exemptions on religious grounds. Service members outside those two categories who still object will be offered a chance to sit down with a physician and have that physician communicate to them the risks that they’re taking by being unvaccinated, Kirby said. They’ll also be offered a chance to sit down with those in their chains of command to talk about the risks that their objection will impose on the unit and on the fore on their teammates, he added. “Commanders have a wide range of tools available to them to help their teammates make the right decision for themselves, for the families, for their units, and the secreatroy expects that they commanders will use those tools, short of having to use the UCMJ,” he said, referring to the Uniform COVID of Military Justice.

TRICARE has Resources for Those Struggling with Events in Afghanistan By TRICARE.mil Staff The news out of Afghanistan has affected many in our community. We know this may cause stress to some service members, military retirees, and their families. If you think you or a family member could benefit from mental health services, you’re covered with TRICARE. “Departure of U.S. forces from Afghanistan stirred emotions from many people, particularly those who served in Afghanistan, their families, and their coworkers,” said Army Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Ronald J. Place, director of the Defense Health Agency. “Helplessness, anger, and frustration are all normal feelings, but know that you are not alone. Lean on each other, friends, family, chaplains, and others to talk it through. And know that the Military Health System is here for you if you need assistance.” It’s important to note that there are resources that the Military Health System offers that you and your family can turn to. If you want to speak with a TRICARE-authorized provider, you can reach out to your primary care manager or primary care provider. They can provide an initial assess-

A soldier with the Army’s 10th Mountain Division looks out over a valley in the Kunar Province of Afghanistan while on patrol. (SGT MATTHEW MOELLER)

ment and possibly treatment. And they can refer you to an appropriate mental health care provider, if necessary. You can also visit a mental health care provider. If you need help finding a network provider that’s right for you, call your TRICARE contractor. Keep in mind, some providers may offer telehealth options, which will allow you to use your phone, tablet, or computer to talk to a health care provider. Remember, how you get non-emergency mental health care depends on the level of care you need, your health plan, and your

sponsor status. If you or a loved one needs immediate help, you are not alone. You can call the Military Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and choose option 1, text 838255, or chat online. The crisis line is available to you 24/7. The Psychological Health Resource Center is another 24/7 resource if you want help getting information or resources in your area. Call 1-866-966-1020. If you prefer to chat online with someone who can help you, you can also start a live chat. The Military Health System has additional

mental health resources that you can use. Find one that works for you. If you think you have a medical health emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number right away. You can also go to the nearest emergency room. You don’t need a referral or pre-authorization for emergency care. Learn more about covered mental health services. You can also download the TRICARE Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Services Fact Sheet for more on your options for getting help.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, September 2, 2021

AntiquesSales & Collectibles Estate

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, September 2, 2021 7 Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

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Boats & Watercraft

Trucks and SUVs Room For Rent

MINI 2014 COOPER S

Countryman Package, 4 dr., AWD, leather, full sunroof, low miles, new inspection, runs & looks new. $16,900. 757-620-7570. Va. Dlr.

AUTOS ACCEPTED-ANY YEAR Make or Model. Top Dollar, Fast, Free Towing. 757-737-2465, 252-232-9192

BMW 2018 X5

Prestine,fully loaded heated seats/ steering 28kmiles 4wd head up display, panoramaglass roof,full warranty til sep-2022,premium pkg/dealer maint garaged $42K 7572735844

CADILLAC 2018 XTS

Trucks and SUVs

FORD 2019 ESCAPE

GLEN L10 SAILBOAT 1985 Wooden. Sailed for 1yr - stored inside garage since $200obo 757-419-0177 SAILBOAT 14’ Crawford Melonseed Garage kept, Shaw & Tenney Oars, New Sail, old sail,New boat cover, Dynamic Dolly.$6700. rob.kunzig@yahoo.com

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157k mi., cold AC, alot of new parts. $3,000 OBO. Call: 757-647-0328

LEXUS 2019 RX 350L

Signature. 65K orig. mis., gar. kept, new Michelin tires, fully loaded, Limited Pkg., new insp. Showroom new. $12,500. 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

26K orig. mis., factory warranty, 3rd row seat, fully loaded, 1 owner, all serviced/inspected, showroom new. $49,900. 757-620-7570. Va dlr

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Fun & Games

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Sudoku

CryptoQuip

Last week’s CryptoQuip answer

I really have no idea what to do with this very hard mineral. It’s a corundum conundrum.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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