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MY JOURNEY MAPS FACILITATION GUILD & PRINTABLE TOOLS

By Min Wen Yeh A class engagement & self-reflection tool co-designed with the ESLI program at UArts.

Copyright © 2014

INTRODUCTION

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THE PAST MAP

04

THE PRESENT MAP

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THE FUTURE MAP

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A FUTURE REMINDER

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INTRODUCTION How We Get Here?

How Does My Journey Maps Facilitation Guild Work?

During the summer to fall of 2014, I worked with a team of educators to re-imagine ways of externalizing international students’ thoughts in class discussion in the ESLI program at UArts. The co-design process with ESLI writing teachers benefited from their rich experience in education. We adopted design process and moved from the observation to implementation (prototyping) phase in the classes as quickly as possible. As the final result, the prototypes (activities) are a series of timeline mapping tools that work as a complementation and structure-builder during the students’ essay writing process.

A FACILITATION PLAN

PRINTABLE TOOLS

A facilitation plan includes sessions of stats, room setup and tools, essential questions, before starting, and activity to guild facilitators step by step during the activity. Also, each facilitation plan has visual image to represent the usage of printable tools. Stats

What We Aim For? This series of timeline mapping tools aim to help international students develop, organize and share their thoughts around without being constrained by their current language capacity. The activities have been designed to meet international

Essential Questions

How can students learn about themselves by connecting the dots from the past?

Before Starting 1. Metaphor: explain what a metaphor is and how it can be used in writing a journey/autobiography. 2. Provide the context of traveling to a new environment by using the metaphor of a bus.

they need.

The ready-to-print files are provided for regular black & white printers. All the tools can be produced by only Step 1. Introduce the tool

Timeline This is where students will note the years, people, or experiences that have influenced them, giving a details or descriptions on the timeline paper on the table. Bus Each student is the driver of their bus. This is a metaphor for their life. Student should put their name and draw an image of themselves on it. Keys These are used to represent people and experiences that influenced the students from their past. Ask each student to identify people that influenced them in different stages of his/ her life. Once he/she decides who will get on their bus at each important time, they should put the names of these people on the keys. Keep one key on the timeline table and the other stapled/glued to the bus.

Step 2. Model the tool Demonstrate how to map out your past on the timeline. It is useful for the teacher/facilitator to do this as an example of what brought them to their present.

using papers with different colors. However, a few files

Step 3. Create your timeline map Students work individually on their timeline.

will have better results from printing in tabloid size paper

Step 4. Share Students share their own timeline stories by taking their buses to the start of timeline. The other students listen and, if time permits, ask questions to gain clarity about the details of the past story. Step 5. Reflect Students will be prompted questions to reflect on their learning experience from the activity. They also will discuss what they liked most, what was challenging, and how the map will help in writing their autobiography. Also, the buses generated from students’ past timeline will be the takeaways for them and can act as evidence of their own learning experience.

students’ needs on expressing their ideas in the active learning environment.

the preparation time, but also alter the tools as the way

Keep one key on the timeline table and the other stapled/glued to the bus.

Room Setup & Tools 1. A long table covered with paper 2. Color tape or sharpies (for drawing timeline) 3. Printed buses (letter size, for each student) 4. Key I (people : friend, family, teacher, artist…etc.) 5. Key II (the crucial “experience”.)

in this page. The facilitators are able to not only plan on

PRINTABLE FILES

Activity by Steps

Suggested time : 40- 90 Minutes Level of difficulty : Moderate Participants : Students Materials needed : Colored pens/markers, long roll of paper, colored masking tape, glue sticks, printables.

An overview of material preparation has been illustrated

CASE STUDY

with color printers. Please note: 1.This tool works as a complement of ESLI curriculum at UArts. 2.Facilitators are suggested to revise prompts in the tools while using them in other context.

“Case study” gives the examples of how this journey map had been used in classes. “How it was used” session described when and how the adjustments had taken by facilitators during the activity. “The outcome” session recorded the observational interaction and reflection/ feedback from students’ participation in the activities.

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INTRODUCTION The PAST MAP The PRESENT MAP The FUTURE MAP A FUTURE REMINDER

My Journey Maps Overview

Objectives

My Journey Maps include three activities that complement the

The three sessions of mapping activities will help students who

autobiography writing in the ESLI curriculum.

are starting their journey in a new environment to discuss and

• The Past Map : Students will reflect on their past experiences, motivation, and inspiration that contributed to their development as artists, musicians, or designers. They will add keywords to a timeline of their past. • The Present Map : Students will identify places or people on a map of the city that 1.inspire them, 2.help their growth, and 3.

reflect on their learning experience. Students will structure their learning experience and ideas base on the timeline and maps. Students will apply their speaking skills and practice speaking strategies by presenting their maps. Students will practice active listening skills and giving appropriate constructive feedback to their peers.

encourage them. • The Future Map : Students imagine “heaven” and “hell” states for their academic, social, and personal life in their near future (next semester as matriculated students). students will write down keywords as a small group. Later, each student comes up with the academic/social/personal goals for the next semester and write actionable steps they are going to take to fulfill their goals. • Closure Activity - A future reminder : Students at beginning identify what they are thinking, doing, saying and feeling in one of their current challenges. Later, students pick up avatars (LEGO mini-figures) represent both current self and future self. (The characters they wish to become in the future). Ask students work individually first, and as a group later, to think and write down the secret power their future self will give current self. In the end, create a motto for a future reminder from those secret powers they have. Students show and talk about their maps after completing each mapping activity. The process leads students through a visual exercise of synthesizing their experience by reflecting, mapping, discussion and sharing. That prepares their ideas in a structured way for their next autobiography writing exercise.

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MAP: THE PAST A FACILITATION PLAN Stats

Activity by Steps

Suggested time : 40- 90 Minutes Level of difficulty : Moderate Participants : Students Materials needed : Colored pens/markers, long roll of paper, colored masking tape, glue sticks, printables.

Keep one key on the timeline table and the other stapled/glued to the bus.

Room Setup & Tools 1. A long table covered with paper 2. Color tape or sharpies (for drawing timeline) 3. Printed buses (letter size, for each student) 4. Key I (people : friend, family, teacher, artist…etc.) 5. Key II (the crucial “experience”.)

Essential Questions

How can students learn about themselves by connecting the dots from the past?

Before Starting 1. Metaphor: explain what a metaphor is and how it can be used in writing a journey/autobiography. 2. Provide the context of traveling to a new environment by using the metaphor of a bus.

Step 1. Introduce the tool

Timeline This is where students will note the years, people, or experiences that have influenced them, giving a details or descriptions on the timeline paper on the table. Bus Each student is the driver of their bus. This is a metaphor for their life. Student should put their name and draw an image of themselves on it. Keys These are used to represent people and experiences that influenced the students from their past. Ask each student to identify people that influenced them in different stages of his/ her life. Once he/she decides who will get on their bus at each important time, they should put the names of these people on the keys. Keep one key on the timeline table and the other stapled/glued to the bus.

Step 2. Model the tool Demonstrate how to map out your past on the timeline. It is useful for the teacher/facilitator to do this as an example of what brought them to their present. Step 3. Create your timeline map Students work individually on their timeline. Step 4. Share Students share their own timeline stories by taking their buses to the start of timeline. The other students listen and, if time permits, ask questions to gain clarity about the details of the past story. Step 5. Reflect Students will be prompted questions to reflect on their learning experience from the activity. They also will discuss what they liked most, what was challenging, and how the map will help in writing their autobiography. Also, the buses generated from students’ past timeline will be the takeaways for them and can act as evidence of their own learning experience.

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MAP: THE PAST CASE STUDY Tool in Practice Partners : University of the Arts (UArts), English as a Second Language Institute (ESLI), Writing Studio Participants : Nicole Dupree, instructor; High-Intermediate/Advanced ESLI Writing Studio students Timeline : 80 minutes Location : UArts, Philadelphia

How It Was Used

(Feedback from Nicole Dupree)

This tool was used as described in the description above with only a few adjustments. (1) Students additionally added some illustrations to the timeline. (2)We didn’t discuss metaphors before using the tool.

The Outcome

(Feedback from Nicole Dupree)

The stories told really illuminated many things about the struggles some of the students faced in their pasts to get to where they are today. Some of the stories were quite touching and empowering. Students started to draw connections between past experiences and influences with future goals. They enjoyed the activity and left with a lot of materials for their essay.

Photo resource : 2014 summer and fall ESLI writing studio.

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MAP: THE PAST PRINTABLE TOOLS

Bus : letter size paper with different colors. (Fold it after print)

Experience Key : etter size paper with yellow color. (Cut it after print)

People Key : letter size paper in white color. (Cut it after print)

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MAP: THE PRESENT A FACILITATION PLAN Stats

Activity by Steps

Suggested time : 40- 90 Minutes Level of difficulty : Moderate Participants : Students Materials needed : Post-it notes, sharpies, tape, projector, google map of the city, printables (maps)

Step 3. Write short descriptions on notes.

Room Setup & Tools

Step 1. Mark your footprints on the city

1. A screen can be used to project the map of the city. 2. Post-it notes in three colors (corresponding to the color coded prompts) 3. Sharpies

Essential Questions How can students share and explore their present connection to the new environment?

Before Starting Warm-up with discussion questions : 1. Before you came here, what did you expect this new place to be like? 2. What was your first impression on this new city/ environment? 3.How is it different from or similar to the place you are from?

Step 4. Make an individual map

Step 1. Mark your footprints on the city Each student has 8-10 paper marks. Students tape the marks on the projected-map, showing the places that left them with great impressions. (Consider where you are inspired; think about places where you feel you are learning; and places where you feel you are supported and encouraged.) Step 2. Walk the audience through your footprints Students show the places they left their footprints and shortly explain why they selected those places. Step 3. Generate the content on the screen map Students write a short description or adjectives on the Post-it notes, identifying the places have been marked on the map with why they have been inspired, what helped their learning, and how they feel they have been encouraged.

Step 4. Make your own map Students take or copy the descriptions from the projected-map to their own individual maps. Add new descriptions if they feel they are needed. Step 5. Share your own map Students share their own individual maps with the group. Step 6. Reflect Students will be prompted questions to reflect on their learning experience from the activity. They also will discuss what they liked most, what was challenging, and how the map will help in writing their autobiography. Also, the individual maps generated will be the takeaways for them and can act as evidence of their own learning experience.

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MAP: THE PRESENT CASE STUDY Tool in Practice Partners : University of the Arts (UArts), English as a Second Language Institute (ESLI), Writing Studio Participants : Nicole Dupree, instructor; High-Intermediate/Advanced ESLI Writing Studio students Timeline : 80 minutes Location : UArts, Philadelphia

How It Was Used

(Feedback from Nicole Dupree)

As the facilitation plan outlined above.

The Outcome

Photo resource : 2014 fall ESLI writing studio.

(Feedback from Nicole Dupree)

In this particular group, the places they felt most encouraged/supported was at UArts and at the gym. I was pleasantly surprised to see that beyond the academic goals of the curriculum, the social and personal needs of the students are being met by the program. There were a few challenges with the group map. The projected image wasn’t quite right. If we zoomed in, then it didn’t include enough of the city, and if we zoomed out, we couldn’t see streets to place markers accurately. The group map looked chaotic. Additionally, the post-its didn’t want to stick to the surface of the smart board. One student told me later that he posted his maps on the back of the front door in his dorm. He used it later to help with his essay, but also as a reference tool for finding things in the city with his roommates. The tool has a function in his present life beyond the expectations of the activity. This was a wonderful outcome.

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MAP: THE PRESENT PRINTABLE TOOLS

Marks : letter size paper print with three colors. (Cut it after print)

Individual map : One tabloid size or two letter size paper.

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Enlarge to tabloid size while printing.


MAP: THE FUTURE A FACILITATION PLAN Stats Suggested time : 50- 90 Minutes Level of difficulty : Advanced Participants : Students Materials needed : Pen, Paper, Tape, glue stick

Activity Step 2-2. Identify your goals Step 2-3. Make actionable steps. Session one : Group discuss an write down what would happen in both Heaven state/ Hell state on the Post-it notes.

Room Setup & Tools 1. A 3ft x 2ft empty wall 2. Group : Arrange the heaven cloud on the top left side and the hell cloud on the bottom right side of the wall. Place them in the order: academic, personal, and social. 3. Group : Post-it notes in six colors (corresponding to the color coded themes) 4. Individual : Mini-figures with color-coded post-it notes 5. Sharpies

Essential Questions How can students identify their goals and come up with actionable plans for the near future (next semester)?

Before Starting The instructor leads the students to define/describe what are the qualities of a heaven and hell state.

Session one : Group (The clouds) Step 1-1. The heaven state Students discuss and write down what would happen in the heaven state for their academic / personal / social life in the next coming semester on the Post-it notes corresponding with the colors of the clouds. Step 1-2. The hell state Students discuss and write down what would happen in the hell state of their academic / personal / social life in the next coming semester on the Post-it notes corresponding with the colors of clouds. Step 1-3. Persona from the heaven and hell state One student presents a persona built from the heaven state by describing the situation from the Post-it notes. The other student presents a persona built from the hell state.

Session two : Individual plan (The mini-figures) Step 2-1. Model Instructor demonstrates how the mini-figure and actionable steps work by providing a solid example.

Step 2-2. Identify your own academic/personal/social goals Each student takes a mini-figure and writes down the goals they want to achieve in the next semester on the center of body. Step 2-3. Make actionable steps Each student writes down three steps that lead them from their current state to heaven (towards attaining their goal) and three steps that would lead them from their current state (away from attaining their goals) to hell. The steps they come up with need to be actionable tasks that they can try in next coming semester. Step 2-4. Present the future plans Students tape their own mini-figures on the wall with actionable steps placed toward heaven and hell clouds. After placing them, students share their personal goals and the steps they will take to achieve them. Step 2-5. Reflection Students will be prompted questions to reflect on their learning experience from the activity. They also will discuss what they liked most, what was challenging, and how the future map will help in writing their autobiography. Also, the mini-figures created by students are evidence and a reminder of this learning experience.

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MAP: THE FUTURE CASE STUDY

Tool in Practice Partners : University of the Arts (UArts), English as a Second Language Institute (ESLI), Writing Studio Participants : Nicole Dupree, instructor; High-Intermediate/Advanced ESLI Writing Studio students Timeline : 120 minutes Location : UArts, Philadelphia

How It Was Used

(Feedback from Nicole Dupree)

This tool was used to help facilitate goal identification and actionable tasks to help students move toward those goals in the next semester. The tool was used as described with a few minor adjustments. Students completed this activity in one long session. For steps 1 and 2 in “session one”, students took turns being the person who wrote on the post-it notes.

The Outcome

Photo resource : 2014 summer and fall ESLI writing studio.

(Feedback from Nicole Dupree)

Some of the goals identified were quite idealistic or more long-term goals (e.g.,“I want to be famous”), though others were concrete and were later noted in their essays. Students who stated that they didn’t have their own goals previously, came up with clear and concise ideas through this activity. Some of the challenges : The first two steps in session one took more time to complete than expected. Students needed to look up how to spell words in the dictionary. They also had some difficulty coming to consensus about what would constitute ideal or unfavorable outcomes, as well as whether those ideas should be identified as academic, social, or personal goals. This required some mediation from the instructor. Lastly, a few students had difficulty articulating and creating actionable steps towards reaching their goals.

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MAP: THE FUTURE PRINTABLE TOOLS

Mini-figure : Print in letter size paper, each student gets one mini-figure.

Heaven & Hell State Clouds : Print in tabloid size paper.

Post-it notes : corresponding to the colors of clouds.

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Enlarge to tabloid size while printing.


Enlarge to tabloid size while printing.


Enlarge to tabloid size while printing.


Enlarge to tabloid size while printing.


Enlarge to tabloid size while printing.


Enlarge to tabloid size while printing.


CLOSURE ACTIVITY: A Future Reminder A FACILITATION PLAN : Create your Motto as a Future Reminder Stats Suggested time : 60- 90 Minutes Level of difficulty : Advanced Participants : Students Materials needed : Post-it notes, sharpies, print stickers, LEGO mini-figures (with various characteristics)

Room Setup & Tools 1. A desk that displays the LEGO mini-figures in the center. 2. “Current Me” Wheel. 3. Post-it notes in one color. (for brainstorming the secret power as a group) 4. Speaking bubble stickers. (for writing down the mottos) 5. Sharpies

Essential Questions How can students recognize their strengths and motivate themselves to their challenges? How can we help them see themselves with a different mindset?

Before Starting Warm-up with discussion questions: 1. Prompt students to discuss “what are the powers super heroes have?” 2. What does “my secret power” mean? It is the ability/ power you are not aware of having. Imagine that your ten-year older self visits your current self. From this visit, you will realize the power in yourself to overcome current challenges.

Activity Step 1. The wheel of their current situation Ask students to imagine a time that their current self met a challenge. Students write down what their current selves were doing/thinking/saying/feeling on the wheels. Step 2. Choosing avatars from LEGO mini-figures Students take some time to look at a group of LEGO mini-figures with different characteristics. Each student picks up one avatar to represent their current self (current me). Each student puts the avatar they choose for current me in the center of their wheels. Later, pick up another avatar to represent their future self looks (future me)? Step 3. My secret power Students place the future me avatar a distance from the current me. Ask students to think about an example of time traveling: “When your future self visits your current self. “What does your future self have that your current self doesn’t?” Write down the secret power your future self will give your current self. (This part might need facilitator’s modeling.) Step 4. Present and gain group suggestions for secret powers Each student presents their current me wheel, their future me and the secret power. After each student presents, other students take turns to give suggestions on the presenter’s secret powers. They write them down on the post-it notes and explain why. Step 5. Generate your own mottos and share with the group Students take their list of secret powers and pick up one to translate into a sentence or motto. The facilitator explains what

Step 2 : Choosing avatars to represent their current and future me.

Step 1 : Each student write down their current selves’ situation while meeting a challenge.

Step 3 & 4 : (Individual & group) Write down the secret power your future self will give your current self on the yellow Post-it notes.

your motto! Step 5 : Generate your own mottos frome the secret powers.

a motto is and how it works as a reminder in the future. Students are encouraged to seek out help creating and selecting the best language from the facilitator. After a motto is created and written down on the stickers, students share it with the group. Step 6. Reflect Students will be prompted questions to verbalize their experience of using a reminder in their lives. Also, they will reflect on their learning experience from the activity. They will be asked to write down their feedback on the back of the wheels. The motto stickers motto and the list of secret powers created by students will be the takeaways for them. It will work as a reminder for their current selves.

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CLOSURE ACTIVITY: A Future Reminder CASE STUDY

Tool in Practice Partners : University of the Arts (UArts), English as a Second Language Institute (ESLI), Writing Studio Participants : Nicole Dupree, instructor; High-Intermediate/Advanced ESLI Writing Studio students Timeline : 80 minutes Location : UArts, Philadelphia

How It Was Used

(Feedback from Nicole Dupree)

The tools was used as described above with four male international students. When students talked about the super powers they saw in other students, they picked up the LEGO character representing their classmate’s future self and talked directly to it. This brief conversation helped them to articulate the special quality they saw in their friend, or the thing they thought they would benefit most from. Students were very supportive of one another. They concluded with a super power.

The Outcome

Photo resource : 2014 fall ESLI writing studio.

(Feedback from Nicole Dupree)

This tool was used in the last class of the semester just before final presentations. It was a great activity to bring closure to the semester. Here is some of the feedback from the students: 1. This project helped me with my future to think more honest to myself and not to be regretted. 2. Solve some of my problems. Helps me to find solutions. 3. I think that this project makes me more confident and independent to face the challenges in the future. I will keep on trying. 4. It is great and inspirational. Seeing my challenges through other people’s eyes was interesting.

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CLOSURE ACTIVITY: A Future Reminder PRINTABLE TOOLS

The wheel of current situation : letter size paper.

Current me, future me and my secret power sign : letter size paper.

Motto stickers: letter size sticker paper.

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Special thanks to the faculties in ESLI program at UArts : Mara Flamm, April Read and Nicole Dupree. This project can’t be done without their enthusiasm in education. I appreciated ESLI student participants’ thoroughly engagement in those activities.

MY JOURNEY MAPS FACILITATION GUILD & PRINTABLE TOOLS Min Wen Yeh minwenyeh@gmail.com minyeh.com

My Journey Maps: Facilitation Guide and Tools  

Developed by Min Wen Yeh for her 2014 Post-graduate Thesis Fellowship project. My Journey Maps contains timeline mapping tools that aim to h...

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