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people

live

a valuable story. design is about people.

MEI HSIEH summer 2011


passionate about

asking questions

problem solving

helping people

Four years ago during a service trip to Antigua, Guatemala I was energized to meet people and discover problems concerning the most basic necessities (water, shelter, sanitation). Today, I have learned that creative thinking and empathy can be used in approaching the most complex of problems. I am an enthusiastic thinker that uses curiousity to uncover valuable insights from a person’s story.


MEI HSIEH EXPERIENCE

513.288.6493 mhsieh08@gmail.com 10558 Stablehand Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45242

ELEVEN, LLC 03.11 to 06.11 - Boston, MA off-site researching, interviewing users and developing future strategy work for Proctor and Gamble; concept development for Reebok and Europro ENTHOVEN ASSOCIATES DESIGN CONSULTANTS 09.10 to 12.10 - Antwerp, Belgium primary research for Belgian tram company; primary and secondary research for assistive mobility tools, followed by setting up and participating in brainstorm; concept development for houseware furniture system; ideation for transportation interior

SCHOOL

SYCAMORE HIGH SCHOOL Class of 2007 GPA: 4.10 AWARDS

PRIORITY DESIGNS 03.10 to 06. 10 - Columbus, Ohio kick off research, ideation, developing finalized concepts for Mead, GE, Lowe’s FISHER PRICE Baby gear team: 03.09 to 06.09 responsible for developing concepts for new lights’n sounds baby monitor, developed CAD model, and resulted in a product Pre-school team: 09.09 to 12.09 responsible for helping geotrax line for 2011, model-making, sketching concepts for role-play; personal presentation on play and social change SPONSORED STUDIOS

FUJI & SRAM SPONSORED STUDIO 06.10 TO 09.10 Cincinnati Innovates Finalist- LPK Branding Award primary and secondary research, conceptualizing electric bike market needs, ideation, 3D modeling, complete model making process LIVEWELL COLLABORATIVE STUDIO 01.10 TO 03.10 researching needs and values of assistive mobility users, conceptualizing with college of nursing, resulting in final presentation to medical professionals around the area

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI College of Design Art Architecture and Planning Industrial Design B.S. - Class of 2012 GPA: 3.75

ACTIVITIES

SKILLS

INTERESTS

Ohio Three Arts Women’s Scholarship 2011 University of Cincinnati Dean’s List Cincinnatus Scholarship Scholastics Ohio Arts Award Winner 2007 National Honors Society Graduated High School top 10% of class Interlochen Emerson Scholar Winner 2006 Interlochen Concerto Competition Finalist 2006 IDSA : UC Chapter: Junior Secretary 2008 to 2009 Racial Awareness Pilot Program XXIII 2007 to 2008 Serve Beyond Cincinnati 2007 to present Guatemala- spring 2008 El Salvador- winter 2009 New Orleans trip leader- spring 2010 Currently volunteering locally in Cincinnati on a regular basis. RAPPORT - 2008 to present Cincinnati Conservatory of Music Concert Orchestra 2008 Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, InDesign; Cinema 4D; Alias Studio 2010; Solidworks 2010; Microsoft Office; photography; PC or Mac volunteer service, traveling, eating, cooking, jazz violin


THE ON CYCLE “AMERICANS NEED E-BIKES. THEY CAN DO MORE.” Well first of all, what is an e-bike? Our group had never heard of an electric bike, and soon found out that most Americans hadn’t either. We needed to create an electric bike that had a unique identity.

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click for the complete process book


2000 URBAN POPULATION WORLDWIDE UNITED STATES POPULATION DENSITY AVERAGE PRICE OF CRUDE OIL (PER BARREL)

ABDOMINAL OBESITY RATE

46.7% 79.7 people/mile2 $28.23 39%

... AND SO SRAM AND FUJI INTRODUCED US TO THE ELECTRIC BIKE.

2010 51.3% 87.4 people/mile

An inexpensive alternative mode of transportation that is booming in asia and europe. It’s an ecological solution that provides light exercise, while the electric motor provides assistance when needed (especially up hills).

2

$64.97 44%

BUT WHY ARE AMERICANS UNINTERESTED?

CITIES NEED BIKES TO CHANGE THEIR TRANSPORTATION HABITS With the increase of population density, urban infrastructure can no longer accomodate so many cars. Despite more traffic jams and less parking space, only 1% of americans bike to work. Distance, hills, and riding with cars are all factors that prevent people from using a bike.

sram and fuji provided an electric bike for us to test ride on

05


WE DISCOVERED THAT E-BIKES HAVE AN UNKNOWN IDENTITY. it wasn’t just us. the electric bike is virtually unheard of and rarely used in america. once people got on one and rode, they were surprised they had never heard of how great they were before. bike retailers won’t sell them because they think there is no interest. people are still riding bikes recreationally. so when people are first looking at electric bikes what is holding people back at the stores? USER TESTING (x18): to see what their first reaction is

RETAILERS (x8): who’s buying, who’s selling?

RIDE THE ROAD CLASS: what’s important when sharing the road

“i can ride up hills with this?!!”

“not many people buy those ebikes... so we don’t sell them”

“people don’t ride the road because they are scared of cars”

“i’ve never heard of this before!”

NEW USERS

ARTICLES, DOCUMENTS, SURVEYS (x23): learning from experts about american bike culture and safety biking in america is mostly recreational, and is slowly growing

CITY BIKE ADVOCATES: people that are paving the way for bike road infrastructure reform ebikes might be a novelty at first, and then would become transportation

BIKE ADVOCATES

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HIGH PERCEIVED VALUE

THE GREEN ZONE: perceived value is greater than the cost

DESIRED VALUE LINE: perceived value is equal to the cost

DO E-BIKES GIVE USERS A GOOD FIRST IMPRESSION? price was the most basic criteria to judge whether e-bikes looked valuable. our graph compared how much we perceived the e-bikes to cost, to their actual cost.

PRICE <$75

PRICE $3000+

THE RED ZONE: LOW PERCEIVED VALUE

perceived value is less than the cost

07


HIGH PERCEIVED VALUE

THE GREEN ZONE: perceived value is greater than the cost

DESIRED VALUE LINE: perceived value is equal to the cost

THE GROUP COMPARED E-BIKE AND BIKE FLASH CARDS over 60 cards of bike and electric bikes were printed, and the price was written on the back. without discretion, people yelled out their first impressions of how much he/she thought it would cost.

PRICE <$75

PRICE $3000+

$600!

$2500?

THE RED ZONE: LOW PERCEIVED VALUE

0

$550

$1500!

$1500

$100

0

perceived value is less than the cost

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HIGH PERCEIVED VALUE

MOST E-BIKES FALL BELOW THE DESIRED VALUE LINE. whether the real price was $3,000 or $500 ebikes, many of them did not look worth the cost! the blue region represents all the dots of e-bikes that did not look worth the ticketed price.

BIKES PRICE $3000+

PRICE <$75

ELECTRIC BIKES

LOW PERCEIVED VALUE

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WHO AND WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM? HIGH PERCEIVED VALUE high perception o f va lu e

HIGH PERCEIVED VALUE • effortless user interaction • cohesive visual aesthetic • harmony and simplicity

st r o n g v i s ua l identity

+

BRAND LIFESTYLE people want something that has an identity they can relate to, yet make their own

we found the most successful products have not only a strong visual identity, but are tamed by harmony and simplicity. lots of products have a strong visual identity but are not carefully designed. the products on the left balance these qualities.

IDENTITY brands that convey a lifestyle are successful and identifiable. although people don’t like to be categorized, they believe their purchases can convey their interests and beliefs

harmony & simplicity

010


OUR DESIGN REQUIREMENTS: INCREASE THE PERCEIVED VALUE

• create a product that defines the “electric-bike” identity

DISTANCE OURSELVES FROM THE BIKE MARKET • revise terminology to prevent confusion

EFFORTLESS USER INTERACTION

• simplify features to create intuitive experience

PREVENT RIDER INTIMIDATION

• integrate traffic safety features to achieve comfort,and stability for the consumer

11


EXPLORING A NEW IDENTITY these ideas wanted to explore the possibilities of an electric bike becoming a transportation vehicle, as well as still the idea of a light, recreational frame. more value to the battery

unique sillhouette

more road presence!

12


THE CONTENDERS

SURVEY RESULTS

IDEALS

THE “DAY EXPLORER” • recreational, agile, fun and portable • easy to lock anywhere (integrated u lock)

THE “TRANSPORTER” • increase road presence • increase transportation identity • focus on storage

“FOR RECREATION”

THE “HYBRID” • integrated features • ability to transport • travels easil y,

FOR RECREATION (53)

FUN (63)

FUN (60)

“FUN”

AGILITY (61)

AGILITY (40)

“ELECTRIC”

AGILITY (59)

ELECTRIC (60)

ELECTRIC (65)

PORTABILITY (52)

PORTABILITY (33)

“LOOKS EASY TO USE””

PORTABILITY (52)

ELECTRIC (56)

CONVENIENCE (48)

“LOOKS EASY TO USE” EASY TO USE (71)

ROAD PRESENCE (59)

a survey given asked users to evaluate our 3 concepts based on first impressions. results showed that people perceived the e-bike concepts to match the same ideals of the three categories. the the most well rounded, and well liked was concept c.

FOR RECREATION (65)

FOR RECREATION (66)

FUN (59)

the three concepts were developed after discussing the extreme purposes of having an electric bike. should it embrace the recreational, the transportation, or the hybrid identity?

FOR TRANSPORTATION (63)

EASY TO USE (68)

CONVENIENCE (63)

“ROAD PRESENCE”

CONVENIENCE (57)

“CONVENIENT”

EASY TO USE (66)

ROAD PRESENCE (60) ROAD PRESENCE (67)

FOR TRANSPORTATION (69)

FOR TRANSPORTATION (68)

“TRANSPORTATION” 13


O N C YC L E AN ELECTRIC BIKE WITH AN IDENTITY.

Finalists in Cincinnati Innovates Competition

14


O N C YC L E THE MEANING: BREAK AWAY from conventional frame geometry by embracing alternative production means and nonstandard componentry. INTEGRATE standard aftermarket components into the frame including lights, D-lock, rack and the bell. CALL OUT the electric power. The glowing bottom bracket showcases the bottom bracket motor and increases road presence.

15


05

01

06

02

03

04

07

HOW IT WORKS: 01. LOCKED IN WHEEL key activated lock secures tires 02. U-LOCK/BIKE RACK bike rack fits into frame, but also becomes lock 03. BREAK LIGHTS to increase road presence and safety 04. LIGHTED PEDAL emphasize the e-bikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electric nature 05. USER INTERFACE simple UI shows battery life and charge 06. THUMB THROTTLE thumb throttle increases battery power 07. MAGNETIC FITTED PANNIER pack on the side allows easy storage 08. FRONT LIGHTS integrated front headlights

08

(^PHYSICAL MODEL) 16


ONCYCLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BRAND LIFESTYLE: SAVVY effortless and logical were two words that came to mind that characterized the bike, as well as user interaction . savvy is the lifestyle that is a combination of the two. It conveys a lifestyle that is cool under pressure and always street smart.

characteristics of user interaction

effortless

savvy

logical

in the ads on the left, the savvy lifestyle is something users want to become, but they can also make their own.

characteristics of the bike

mock advertising meant to exude userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal version of savvy

17


SIMPLE MEAL HOW CAN WE GET PEOPLE COOKING AGAIN? Overwhelming statistics correlate the positive effects of a home cooked dinner to a healthy lifestyle and a healthy home. Can cooking a meal have a parallel convenient experience that people desire from frozen foods or takeout?


microwave

television internet cookbook cultural

stove

vegetables fats/sugars carbs protein

oven

cutting board

knives

dairy fruits spices

pots/pans

money

education

tools

THE QUESTION.

ingredients

cooking

socio-economic factors

TO COOK OR 03 01 02 04 NOT TO COOK?

price BREAKFAST

09 AM

10

11

LUNCH 12 PM

food landscape

access

05

diet

06

DINNER 07 PM

08

Several factors impact the choice between cooking and making convenience foods. The original approach saw the problem with a dividing line that separated factors that influenced those who cooked and those who didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. In order to fully grasp how frozen food developed as real a meal option, I decided to look to Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past.

time

restaurant convenience foods take out cafeteria money

tools oven stove microwave toaster

19


G WORKIN N IO T POPULA

140

OODS

F NIENCE CONVE 120

HEALTH

nown ds are k o fo e c ien re (conven essed with mo c o r n p a m d to be ts, sodiu fa d e t a r oking) satu fresh co n a h t r suga

LABOR FORCE (MILLIONS)

MPTION 100

CONSU

CORN SWEETENER CONSUMPTION

80

60

THE NEED FOR CONVENIENCE IN FOOD HAS BEEN HURTING OUR HEALTH Since the use of processed foods for soldiers in WWII, Americans have continued the demand for convenience foods. Yet our consumption increase in unhealthy foods have cost us our health.

TOTAL ADDED FATS CONSUMPTION

With the world moving faster and faster, there will always be a demand for convenience.

SOFT DRINK CONSUMPTION

How can “convenience” be redefined to include cooking?

40

20 OBESITY RATE DIABETES RATE

1950

1960

1970

Source: U.S. Dep’t of Labor, Health and Economic Research

1980

1990

2000

20


PEOPLE NEED HELPFUL COOKING TOOLS, RIGHT? timed dinner cooker

Inital thumbnail concepts explored cooking tools that would help people cook in the kitchen, or help people make healthier choices at the cafeteria. Although they were helpful tools, the ideas didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t address the issues of getting new users to start cooking.

unit spice dispenser school serving system

tbsp. cartridges

cooking phone app.

21


TOR

INS BRA

KIT

OL M TO

I REALIZED PEOPLE DON’T WANT ANY GADGETS!

“what are the challenges with cooking?”

overwhelming! complicated fear of failure

What started as a brainstorm, made me realize that many people participating were a part of the confused and cooking inexperienced. Unexcited by the idea of more gadgets, they exclaimed they wanted the cooking process to become simpler.

“I don’t want more gadgets in the kitchen, I want help.” -JAMES

22


SO PEOPLE ACTUALLY SEE THE BIG PICTURE AS A SPECTRUM NO COOKING

COOKING

access

fear

complexity

time

“tools”

education

$

simplicity

time

collective sharing

individual accomplishment

The brainstorm evolved into finding out why cooking is avoided, why it is celebrated, and what factors are the thresholds in between. This was a great way to understand what to focus on.

$

23


IT’S ABOUT ACCESS

NO COOKING

COOKING

access

fear

complexity

time

“tools”

education

$

simplicity

time

collective sharing

individual accomplishment

Addressing people’s limit of access meant understanding their personal and social barriers: time, money and complexity. Given the context, it meant rethinking the correct environment.

This meant getting out of the kitchen, and into the store.

$

24


SHOPPING WITH SUSAN Joining Susan on a grocery trip gave some insight to why she preferred buying frozen foods. She shops with a cooking list and checks the ads for certain deals. With two of her three kids constantly out of the house, she doesn’t find all the time cooking a meal worth it if they can’t all enjoy it. She prefers the convenience.

MEET SUSAN

“I’ve been cooking less for my family because everyone’s busy and it’s more convenient.”

25


FROZEN MEAL

VS.

SO WHAT DOES ACCESS LOOK LIKE?

COOKING

It was easy to realize that the grocery store constantly has an overload of information. Frozen food dinners have succeeded in simplifying the process.

olive oil

dinner

basil

eggs

What if there was a way to also minimize complexity, reduce price and time to prepare dinner by offering a new kind of cooking experience?

pasta

marinara sauce

bread crumbs chicken

26


y

space” from g ad ro “ ce y u r b co -c

COMPANY SPONSOR

$ increase

(business plan)

GROCER

t pre

A tool that enables people to want to start cooking meant thinking about a service that could be offered to a shopper.

transport hom e

Considering the key contributers in the shopping experience made it apparent that the foundation of the service must connect a company’s business plan and a consumer’s product experience.

pare POP

COOK

(product experience)

l y cooking sk ills app

shopp ing

on i ti utr reate meal w/n

is

A SYSTEM WILL ENABLE PEOPLE TO COOK!

en

j

oy

m

ea

l wi th famil y!

27


01. EASY LEARNING:

HOW TO CUT AN ONION

company sponsors

cook time, healthiness, serving size

technical videos

02. A VISUAL RECIPE numbers attach magnetically to the shelves to convey how few ingredients are needed

THE GROCERY STORY: A VISUAL RECIPE IN ONE SPOT The grocery store is an environment that can be utilized to educate and entice people to cook. After the grocery and food company collaborate, an â&#x20AC;&#x153;ad spaceâ&#x20AC;? will sell the meal at a sale price and entice shoppers to cook. Simple Meal will demonstrate that cooking a healthy meal can be convenient.

03. SIMPLE WORKSTATION store workers can adjust height of shelving, as well as collapse them to improve portability

prepare foods

store items

GROCER

move cart

set up shelves

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THE COMPANY STORY: WHO WILL INVEST

Farmers and food companies advertise a meal that highlights their product. These companies will become sponsors of the meal, and they will grow and expand their user base.

paceâ&#x20AC;? from ad s gr yâ&#x20AC;&#x153; oc bu e ry

03. DISPLAY MEAL

04. PROFIT

sponsored meal is on sale and is displayed for a few days

target market is expanded, company gains more money

COMPANY SPONSOR

$ increase

sponsor & grocer nutrition collaborate

(business plan)

transport hom e

t tri io

n

is

t pre

pare POP

l y cooking sk ills app

shopp ing

02. COLLABORATION

nu -cre ate meal w/

sponsor pays for ad space, ingredient is discounted, similar to coupon ads

co

01. PAY FOR AD

en

j

oy

m

ea

l wi th famil y!

29


take-home recipe cards from the grocery explain each step!

Y N CURR AI CHICKE recipe:TH utes| four people in m 20 | $15

boil

chop TABLES 01. VEGE and green dice the red ions peppers, on

E ARE RIC 02. PREPs of white rice mix 2 cup s of water. Boil with 4 cupnutes mi for 20

step number instruction

season ONING 03. SEAS t with 3 tbsp. chicken coa, 2 pinches of olive oil 3 clicks of salt, and ick’s Thai of McCorm Rub well. seasoning.

THE COOK’S STORY: SIMPLE STEPS TO FOLLOW AT HOME

01

chop

The ability to find all the “tools” for a home-cooked meal is now possible. After purchasing the discounted Simple Meal cooks now have the ability to make a healthy quick meal for less.

02. READ RECIPE CARD

03. FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS

04. ENJOY!

COOK

(product experience)

l y cooking sk ills app

01. UNLOAD GROCERIES

shopp ing

transport hom e

en

j

oy

m

ea

l wi th famil y!

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STETHOSCOPE I NEED TO DIAGNOSE 83 HEARTS TODAY. Cardiovascular disease account for an estimated total of 30% of all global deaths. Doctors in clinics need to see a lot of patients in one day, and assess these heart problems. In these extreme situations, they need a tool that will help assist their diagnosis.


THE STETHOSCOPE WILL ASSESS MOST CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

12.2% OF TOTAL GLOBAL DEATHS ARE CAUSED BY

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

9.7% CEREBROVASCULAR and...

DISEASE

7.1%

RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

AREAS OF THE HEAR T

low income countries account for 82% of cardiovascular disease deaths. while industrialized countries use an echocardiogram to look at the heart, most heart problems occurring in these clinical settings are different structural problems assessed by the stethoscope.

AORTIC AREA PULMONARY AREA

HIGH INCOME COUNTRIES

82%

of these deaths are found in low income countries

TRISCUPID VALVE AREA

MITRAL AREA

tool of choice in these areas! 32


VISUAL

an echo cardiogram is a sonogram also known as a cardiac ultrasound to show images of the heart. doctors use this tool in many hospital settings, but is not affordable for other situations.

BULKY: portable models are still not practical for extreme conditions

...AND A STETHOSCOPE HEARS

EXPENSIVE: procedure can be up to thousands of dollars, and is too expensive for clinics

EDUCATION: procedure can be up to thousands of dollars, and is unaffordable for clinics

HARD TO HEAR: in extreme conditions it is hard to hear the heartbeat

AUSCULTATION

AN ECHOCARDIOGRAM SEES THE HEART...

AUDITORY

an acoustic tool to listen to the heart, the lungs, intestines and blood flow in arteries and veins. it is an iconic symbol representing the doctor but no recent innovation has been applied.

OUTDATED: nearly 200 years old, no recent innovation and is used as a rough gauge

SLOW: in clinical settings, doctors need to diagnose hundreds of patients faster

VISUAL AND AUDIO

SANITATION: one in three stethoscopes are found contaminated with MRSA bacteria

33


VISUALIZING SOUND WAVES AND SOUND initial concepts that try to tackle problems such as portability,making the screen left to right, and sanitation.

WHAT ABOUT THE EAR BUDS?

-make auditory experience more sanitary -improve portability and durability

LETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MAKE IT EASY TO READ

-minimize user interference with screen -help doctors read left to right -keep form compact

34


54 M

BP

01. CLINICAL SETTING

02. PATIENT INTERACTION

03. TURN ON AND RELEASE SCREEN

04. VISUALIZE HEARTBEAT

SEE THE HEARTBEAT, DIAGNOSE ACCURATELY. visual sound waves as well as sound from earbuds helps clearly identify patient’s cardiovascular problems.

35


REDEFINING AUSCULTATION WHAT ABOUT THE EARBUDS? styling concepts were explored, but it was necessary to keep the stethoscope a familiar and professional medical device, and avoid following strictly trends

• visualize heartbeats while listening to a patients heart • a cost effective alternative to expensive echocardiograms. • saves patients reports, can freeze and zoom in on sound waveform for closer studies • UV disinfectant light sanitizes usually contaminated diaphragm

UV disinfectant light personalized name, date and time

Patient Pulse

digital LCD screen

volume control

bell/diaphragm mode sound waves

36


THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME! | 513.288.6493 | mhsieh08@gmail.com | 10558 Stablehand Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45242

Mei Hsieh Portfolio  

Junior Year Portfolio 2011

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