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ALL THE B E S T,

2013


SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS M F A P H O T O G R A P H Y, VIDEO AND R E L AT E D M E D I A

ZHANGBOLONG LIU CLASS OF 2015

So, who is Alice? If you missed the answer in our first issue please call 212.592.2434 or follow this link mfaphoto.sva.edu/alice

CREDITS Charles Traub, chair Randy West, director of operations, faculty Michelle Leftheris, systems administrator (network and video), faculty Seth Lambert, systems support specialist, faculty Adam Bell, academic advisor, faculty Kelly Sullivan, assistant to the chair

mfaphoto.sva.edu VISUAL ARTS PRESS Anthony P. Rhodes, executive vice president Michael J. Walsh, director of design & digital media Brian E. Smith, art director Sheilah Ledwidge, associate editor Cover image: Baoyang Chen, class of 2014


THESIS PROPOSAL S P OTLI GHT

Judith Stenneken Jessica Bandy

The proposal is a game plan as well as a creative endeavor. It is the big idea that leads us to a careful examination of a specific point of view.

Throughout the thesis year, the faculty will help students achieve their thesis goals. Collectively we will worry about getting them through this process. We will witness their excitement and struggle as they wrestle with a demanding exploration. The reward is to experience how each student’s thoughts become transformed, built and actualized.

The steeled determination of our students is paramount to their success and a good reminder that they are drivers of their own ideas and ultimately their works of art.

Randy West, faculty

JUDITH STENNEKEN  CLASS OF 2013


Judith Stenneken  class of 2013 Thesis excerpt Over the past two years I have lived in three different countries and travelled 87,000 miles: approximately 8,000 miles in cars, 6,000 in trains and 73,000 in airplanes. I am in motion. I am in transition, in a permanent state of being between spaces and places. I am a contemporary nomad. The outside world is one of constant change—landscapes, languages, temperature, smells and tempi. The slow movement of the clouds is underneath me as I sit in the fastest of all mass transportation vehicles; the fast movement of a countryside out of the window of a train… green, brown and grey strokes. Everything is moving; everything is ongoing and never finished. Yet, I try to interrupt this stream and pause. I take a moment. I take a picture. I am sitting in the car. The tank is low. It must have been hours since I started driving. I turned off the navigation system, the Google maps and the radio. I hear the car on the road. The landscape is vast—stubbles from harvested grains to all sides. Where starts the unknown? The horizon starts to flicker at the very end of how far I can see. How far is that? Fifty miles? An hour in a car? Two days walking? Is it the Earth’s curvature or the limitation of my eyesight that I see in the far distance? I know this area. I have seen it in movies, pictures and on TV. I have read about it in stories. I have heard about it through someone else’s description. So what is left to discover? I try to disconnect from my knowledge of this place and replace it with my own experiences of the landscapes in front of me, which I will try to see through my eyes only. In the bus, on the airplane, I am surrounded by people. We do not see each other. We do not have to talk. I enjoy this kind of anonymity and the play of distance and closeness. It allows me to be alone in the mass, but not lonely. We share the same limited space, and we are free to feel a sense of disinterest for the other. For a few hours, we are in a magical space and out of reach—no phone calls, no emails. I am at home in hotels that are designed to give me 24-hour comfort, using a set of common tastes like soaps with citrus flavor, M&Ms and a flat-screen TV. Photos on the walls show images of the city I am in but might not get to see. Who slept in this room yesterday? Who will sleep here tomorrow? This room must be full of stories about closeness, exhaustion, happiness, tears, love, anxiety and sleeplessness. It will be cleaned tomorrow at noon, and there will be no trace that I lived here for one night. It’s five miles to the next exit. I guess: McDonald’s, KFC, In-N-Out Burger, Pizza Hut, Starbucks, Taco Bell and Subway; Shell, Chevron, Texaco and BP; Hyatt, Hilton and Hampton Inn. Unlimited food, unlimited gas, and unlimited hotels—the endless options to make unlimited decisions every day. I get lost in the vastness.

JUDITH STENNEKEN    CLASS OF 2013


JUDITH STENNEKEN    CLASS OF 2013


Jessica Bandy  class of 2013 Thesis excerpt

BETHLEHEM STEEL Bethlehem, a quiet town in eastern Pennsylvania, was once the headquarters of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The Bethlehem Rolling Mill and Iron Company was established in 1860, and during the next 135 years it provided the steel used to build structures that included the Empire State Building, Madison Square Garden and the Golden Gate Bridge. Being the second largest producer of steel in America could not keep Bethlehem Steel from going cold in 1995, and it officially went bankrupt in 2003 as a result of outdated technology in the plant as well as management and union issues. In April 2011, SteelStacks, a mixed-use development, opened on the site, which is now home to a welcome center, ArtsQuest branch (a non-profit arts organization), the local PBS39 studio, a Sands casino and hotel complex and the Smithsonian’s Museum of Industrial History. One small section of the old steel plant remains open and functions under the new name, Lehigh Heavy Forge. About 300 workers continue to make products there. The site is a hodgepodge of new and old, and has become a cultural attraction visited by tourists and locals alike. The site of the steel mill developed gradually and over decades, overtaking rows of houses in South Bethlehem as it spread out along the Lehigh River. It was a living, breathing machine: alive with sounds, smells, and the thousands of people who worked there. Now, sitting abandoned for more than a decade, this place is experiencing a rebirth of sorts. What does it mean for a symbol of American industrial might to be transformed into a commercial and cultural center? What does that say about the past, present, and where we go from here? There are also the lives and deaths of the employees to consider. These men and women devoted their lives to the steel, some died on the job, others died from the job, and still others are living out their lives on what they earned from the job. This past summer, I interviewed former employees of the steel company. I met the first, Richie Check, at a blueberry festival two years ago, where he was sitting at the Steelworkers Archives table. Months later, when we met at his home in South Bethlehem, Richie proceeded to tell me his life story, beginning with his parents’ arrival in the United States from Czechoslovakia. Between Richie, his father, eight brothers and one sister, the family devoted 441 years to Bethlehem Steel. Since then, I have met other workers through Richie, the Archives, and through further contacts I made in Bethlehem. I see the story of Bethlehem Steel as a metaphor for what is happening today as technology changes at a rapid pace and old industries in America are unable to keep up. By examining the life of the steel plant through the stories and memories of those who knew it best, I hope to better understand the mark that it has left on history and the ways in which it has shaped the future.

JESSICA BANDY CLASS OF 2013


JESSICA BANDY CLASS OF 2013


CRITIQUE

Are you bored with your own work? Confused about where to go next? Do people nod off during your critiques? Are you comfortable with your process even before you’ve found one? Have you read “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” at least 25 times? If so, you could be failing. And we all could be failing better.

Critique is a place where questions such as these are pivotal. It is a time—a stage—to court failure, take risks and to acknowledge the possibility of success.

YINTZU HUANG CLASS OF 2014


MAGGIE SHANNON CLASS OF 2013

BENZ THANACHART CLASS OF 2013


JOEY SBARRO CLASS OF 2013

YAEL EBAN CLASS OF 2014


SINAN TUNCAY CLASS OF 2013

JEAN BETTINGEN CLASS OF 2014


DAVID BROWN CLASS OF 2013


NOAH McLAURINE CLASS OF 2014

GEMMA LOPEZ CLASS OF 2013

FLORE ADELE GAU CLASS OF 2014

DAVID BROWN CLASS OF 2013


ANNA BEEKE CLASS OF 2013

AARON WAX CLASS OF 2014


DALIA AMARA CLASS OF 2013

ELLEN SILVERMAN CLASS OF 2014


BARRY SALZMAN CLASS OF 2014

CECILIA SALINAS RIOS CLASS OF 2014


ANGELLE MYERS CLASS OF 2014

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS CLASS OF 2013


MELODY MELAMED CLASS OF 2013

KHANH XIU TRAN CLASS OF 2014


HILLARY BASING CLASS OF 2013

YOAV FRIEDLANDER CLASS OF 2014


ALUMNI S P OTLI GHT

BRIAN CASSIDY AND MELANIE SHATZKY ALUMNI 2006 STILL FROM FRANCINE, 2012


STILL FROM THE PATRON SAINTS, 2011 BRIAN CASSIDY AND MELANIE SHATZKY ALUMNI 2006

Their most recent films are The Patron Saints and Francine. The first is a disquieting and hyper-realistic glimpse into life at a nursing home. Bound by

For me they did have something in common. The subjects of both are people who, from the start or gradually, lose their intellectual ability

initially fear, and show things from our subjective and often contradictory point of view.

People can be beautiful, while their suffering is not. All we try and do is bring the viewer closer to that which they may not understand or which they may

in both the shooting and the editing.

close to. But they are often shot as if they are beautiful, aesthetically pleasing; rather than recoil, we often feel quite close to them. This is true

intellectual limitations due to age or sickness or isolation. These are not subjects one would expect to feel comfortable with, gratified by, or

The Patron Saints focuses on people confined to a nursing home. Many of them are old, many have serious physical limitations and many have

never feel entirely apart from our subjects or our characters.

dium that deals largely with surfaces. And the feeling that, ultimately, we are not so very different from one another is what allows us to make our work. We

Melanie Shatzky and Brian Cassidy: It presents an interesting paradox in filmmaking, this attempt to capture something of a person’s internal life in a me-

to function in society. They become very internal. I believe that’s a situation not far from any of us.

The Patron Saints is a collection of carefully composed observations.

Ed Bowes: Francine and The Patron Saints are quite different movies; one’s fiction, the other is non-fiction; Francine has a linear narrative line,

and her fragile first steps in an unfamiliar world.

in a downtrodden lakeside town after her release from several years in prison. Gritty, elliptical and voyeuristic, Francine is a portrait of a near-silent misfit

portrait of fading bodies and minds. In Francine, Academy Award winner Melissa Leo gives a superb performance as a woman struggling to find her place

conventional documentary methods for a heightened cinematic approach to storytelling, the film employs lyrical realism and black humor in its charged

the candid confessions of a recently disabled resident, the film weaves haunting images, scenes and stories from within the institution’s walls. Sidestepping

work was more kinetic, intimate and sociologically oriented. Melanie’s work was more static, removed and psychological.

a love for the moving image, and began collaborating shortly thereafter. As still image-makers, they each had distinct approaches and aesthetics. Brian’s

at the School of Visual Arts. Both began the program making still images; after taking video classes with faculty member Ed Bowes, they both developed

Brian M. Cassidy and Melanie Shatzky came to filmmaking while pursuing their graduate degrees in the Photography, Video & Related Media Department

Melanie Shatzky (2006) and faculty member Ed Bowes

A conversation between alumni Brian M. Cassidy (2006),


MELANIE SHATZKY ALUMNI 2006

has completed his Guggenheim Fellowship project, Small Skeletons, and is editing Grisaille.

Ed Bowes is a videomaker working on the borders of fiction and of narrative. He teaches Critique and Thesis Forms in this department. Most recently he

Planete Doc Review in Warsaw, and RIDM in Montreal. In 2012, they were Gotham Award nominees for Breakthrough Director.

the National Gallery of Art, ICA London and Lincoln Center. Film festival awards include the European Media Art Festival, Chicago, New Orleans, Athens,

Films by Brian M. Cassidy and Melanie Shatzky have screened at the Sundance, Berlin, Toronto and Rotterdam film festivals, the Museum of Modern Art,

but we’ll keep you posted.

We’re currently working on a fiction, a documentary and a photography project. We don’t like to say too much before our projects are close to completion,

Are you currently working a new project?

to lean in and use all of their senses, rather than sit back and have everything explained to them.

snapshots and of the stories lurking in a given moment, in a given place. In this way, our process is very photographic. We prefer a viewer to read our films,

In general, we are more interested in the day-to-day joys and struggles of a given individual, however seemingly undramatic or small. We think in terms of

interest you have?

Both films are about the quotidian rather that the heroic, and one never feels the heavy hand of exposition or explanation. Is that an overall

can access them. So much of our work depends on the trust of our subjects. Without their trust, our work would amount to very little.

possible. We feel that the less a film set feels like a film set, the better. Particularly in documentary, it is key that the subjects feel comfortable so that you

solo endeavor, where the photographer has an intimate exchange with his or her subject. We have tried to preserve that intimate exchange as much as

Having come to the medium of filmmaking via photography, our approach has been quite different from other filmmakers. Photography is primarily a

structure, are a result of so few people having so much control and responsibility.

directed by you, shot by Brian and edited by both of you, with an another editor. I’d suggest that part of its intimacy; its beauty and innovative

I believe, edited primarily by the two of you. More extraordinarily, Francine—a fictional feature—was developed and written by the two of you,

Both of you were photographers before working in video. Photographers often work by themselves. The Patron Saints was shot, directed and,

cinematically, an approach that would allow the viewer to feel something akin to her interior life, so that we may empathize with her as she walks this path.

tation and routine for a kind of improvisational autonomy and survival, which for her is often disorienting. We needed to find a means of expressing that

We wanted to use a discontinuity approach to the editing in order to mirror Francine’s experience outside of prison. She has left behind a life of regimen-

and experience—the experience of the character and the experience of the viewer watching that character.

is not about continuity of time, or even, it seems, about clarifying the focus for the viewer. For me, the editing decisions were based on emotion

I’d like you to talk about the editing in the fictional Francine. Some scenes have few edits, and others have quite a few. The internal scene editing

BRIAN CASSIDY AND


FAC U LT Y STUDENT ALUMNI NEWS

F A C U LT Y Charles Traub produced a body of photography over the last decade called Still Life in America, which is now both a book and an interactive online map of the continental United States. Last year his work was included in the exhibitions “Toward The Social Landscape” at Lianzhou Foto and “Being American” at the Visual Arts Gallery.

Shimon Attie had a solo exhibition in 2012 at the Block Museum at Northwestern University and will open another exhibition at the Wexner Center for the Arts from May to July 2013.

Suzanne Anker recently organized an interdisciplinary conference called Molecular Cuisine: The Politics of Taste, investigating the importance of taste from the perspectives of the culinary arts, sociology, anthropology, as well as the cognitive and biological sciences. Adam Bell had work included in “29x29,” at Bruce Silverstein Gallery in 2012. He lectured at the 2012 Visual Studies Workshop Photo-Bookworks Symposium and continues to write essays and photo book reviews on his blog. Ed Bowes’s film Entanglement (2009) was screened at Counterpath Gallery in 2012. His production and distribution unit Walsung Company exists online as a public archive of his films, scripts and other writings, images and collaborations. Phong Bui is an artist, curator and publisher of the Brooklyn Rail/Black Square Editions. In December 2012 he had a solo exhibition at Show Room called “Phong Bui: Work According to the Rail, Part I.” He recently organized “Readings in Contemporary Poetry #1” at the same gallery.

Elinor Carucci is working on her third monograph MOTHER, which will be published by Prestel Publishing in winter of 2013. It will show nine years of her motherhood/childhood project with her children.

Sarah Charlesworth had a solo exhibition at Susan Inglett Gallery (New York) and was included in three group exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago, the National Gallery of Art and Fort Worth Contemporary Arts in 2012. Ann Collins worked as post-production consultant in the editorial department for the shorts High Heels & Hoodoo (2012) and Saying Goodbye (2011). She has won awards at Sundance Film Festival for Audience Favorite Documentary. Liz Deschenes was part of a two-person exhibition at Melas Papadopoulos Gallery, Athens, in fall 2012. She has an upcoming solo exhibition at Secession, Vienna, in early 2013.

Simin Farkhondeh is currently editing Caught Between Two Worlds: Iranians in the USA. She is a recipient of the Rockefeller Foundation Artists Fellowship for Who Gives Kisses Freely From Her Lips, a video about temporary marriage in Iranian culture.

Marvin Heiferman is editor of Photography Changes Everything, a book that offers a provocative rethinking of photography’s impact on our culture and our daily lives. He is currently working on WHY WE LOOK (2012 – present), a Twitter-based project that follows breaking news stories about photography and visual culture. Seth Lambert’s work was included in “29x29,” at the Bruce Silverstein Gallery in 2012.

Richard Leslie’s recent research and curatorial efforts concentrate on the intersections of art criticism and sociology, on the writing of global histories outside the networks of commercial galleries, and on the effect of technology and science on contemporary art and theory. His recent curatorial project is entitled PULSE (People Using Light, Sound and Energy).

Andrew Moore had three solo exhibitions in 2012, at the National Building Museum (DC), the Grand Rapids Art Museum, and the University Art Gallery (Indiana State University). His book Cuba was released in the Fall of 2012.

Mary Patierno recently edited the documentary Pancaper. Her current project Play Like a Girl: The Rock & Roll Life of June Millington chronicles the life of the trailblazing, rock and roll legend and member of the one of the first women’s rock band, Fanny.

Lyle Rexer co-curated the 2013 show “Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography” at the Museum of Arts and Design. Collier Schorr’s work was included in the 2012 “Myths and Realities” show at SVA, and “Composed: Identity, Politics, and Sex” at the Jewish Museum. Steel Stillman had a feature article in Art in America on Wayne Koestenbaum. His photographs were on view in two recent New York exhibitions: a group show curated by Haim Steinbach at The Artist’s Institute and a three-person exhibition at Show Room.

Amy Taubin published in 2012 a new foreword to the reissue of her book Taxi Driver, a study on the prominent Scorsese film.

Penelope Umbrico is currently working on a permanent public art installation for PS/IS 71 with the New York Department of Cultural Affairs called “Percent For Art” (2013).

Grahame Weinbren is a filmmaker and an editor of the Millennium Film Journal. In 2012 he traveled to Paris to introduce “The Cinema of Pat O’Neill: The Decay of Fiction.” Randy West’s work was included at The George Eastman House, Schneider Museum of Art and Louisiana Museum of Art and Science in 2012. The monograph I Never Promised You Anything was published this past fall.

CURRENT STUDENTS Cylixe (2014) will show her film Una ciudad en una ciudad at the Berlinale Festival Shortfilm Program in February 2013.

Yoav Friedlander (2014) will show his series, Man Made: Long Chapters in Short History of (a) Man, as a solo exhibition as part of the Nidbach series at the Jerusalem Artists’ House, April 2013 in Jerusalem.

ALUMNI Zeljka Blaksic (2010) will show her new collaborative multimedia project, Resistance of the Earth, at the Czech Center in February 2013. Blaksic is the 2012 recipient of the District Kunst- und Kulturförderung studio grant program in Berlin.

Catherine Del Buono (2008) exhibited a video installation at the Chashama Gallery this past spring, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts. The Art Place Wynwood Gallery recently awarded her the First Place in the juried group show in Miami for her short animation, Equal/ Unequal. She will exhibit a solo show at the gallery in 2013. Natan Dvir (2010), the 2012 recipient of the POYi, PDN, and IPA awards, will unveil his series, Coming Soon, as a solo show at Anastasia Photo Gallery in March. His series Eighteen will be included in a three-artist exhibition at the Southeast Museum of Photography, opening February 2013.

Harlan Erskine (2009) is a USA Selected Winner in Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward Emerging Photographers for his series Imaginary Wars. His artist booklet, ten convenient stores, is included in the upcoming anthology, VARIOUS SMALL BOOKS: Referencing Various Small Books by Ed Ruscha, (MIT Press, January 2013). His work will also be included in the group show at Gagosian Gallery, opening March 5. Mariam Ghani (2002) received a 2012 Graham Foundation grant for her two-channel video installation, A Brief History of Collapses, which premiered at dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel and Kabul and has been screened at CPH:DOX and the Stedelijk Museum. dOCUMENTA also published her book, Afghanistan: A Lexicon in the series 100 Notes, 100 Thoughts.

Ryan Koopmans (2012) will co-direct a short film in Hokkaido, Japan, in February 2013 and in March will lead an architectural multimedia project documenting the rise of West Africa’s tallest building development Villagio. Nuartlink Gallery in Westport, CT will present a solo exhibit of his prints in February 2013.

Janelle Lynch (1999) will show work from her monograph, Los Jardines de México, at the Southeast Museum of Photography Jan. 25–Apr. 21, 2013. She will have a two-person show at Wall Space Gallery Mar. 25–May 5, and a solo show at Robert Morat Galerie, Berlin, in June. Her River series will be on view at the Newark Museum through March 2013. Lynch is working on her second monograph, to be published by Radius Books in fall 2013.

Gay & Lesbian Art from Feb. 15–Mar. 15, in affiliation with the Queer Art Caucus of the Colleges of Art Association, with support by the Canada Council for the Arts. She was featured in a panel discussion for the exhibition in February.

David Evan Todd (2009) has been awarded a Visiting Scholar Appointment to the Art department at Cornell University, where he is establishing a reverse technology digital-to-analog photographic workflow.

Keren Moscovitch (2005) has selfpublished her first book, Me Into You, a limited edition monograph contextualized within the photographer’s experiences in an open relationship. The volume, which includes an essay by Allen Frame, is available for purchase at the ICP Book Store.

Rachel Papo’s (2005), Serial No. 3817131, is included in WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, which will travel nationwide in 2013. Serial No. 3817131 will also be exhibited at Perth Centre for Photography in Australia in February. Images from her winning portfolio from PhotoLucida’s 2012 Critical Mass Top 50 competition will be included in a traveling exhibition this spring.

Jenny Riffle (2011), the 2012 recipient of the Juror’s Award, Newspace Center for Photography 8th Annual Juried Exhibition, will show her series, Scavenger: Adventures in Treasure Hunting, as a solo exhibition at Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, Oregon, December 2013.

Steph Rogerson (1999) is currently a PhD candidate in the Joint Graduate Program of Communication & Culture Ryerson/York University. “Rare & Raw,” an exhibit she co-curated, will be exhibited at Leslie Lohman Museum of

Raul Gomez Valverde (2011) edited and designed his first monograph, I can reach very high/llego muy alto, published by Universidad Complutense Press in Winter 2012. Shen Wei (2006), winner of the 2012 Philadelphia Museum of Art Photography Portfolio Competition, and recipient of the 2012 Asian Art and Religion Fellowship from Asian Cultural Council, was recently included in group exhibitions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Southeast Museum of Photography Art and Science Museum at Marina Bay Sands in Singapore. Peter Weiermair’s All Saints Press will publish a limited edition portfolio box of his work, titled Still Life, in 2013. Amani Willett (2012) will publish his first book, Disquiet, through Damiani in the spring of 2013. Book signings and other events are forthcoming.

Edie Winograde (1995) will be included in Reality of Fiction, a group exhibition curated by Mark Sink for Denver’s Month of Photography, at RedLine Denver, Feb. 27–Apr. 28, 2013, with an opening reception on March 8.


LENS AND SCREEN ARTS – THE STILL AND MOVING IMAGE 2012 Summer Residency by Barry Salzman I knew nothing. I’d never made a video of any kind. Not on my phone, not on my digital point-and-shoot camera, not anywhere. No video experience. Nada. While I’d had some experience as a commercial photographer, I was an art neophyte. I had recently decided to go back to school to do a master of fine arts in photography as what they call “a more mature student.” The program chair, Charles Traub, suggested I do the summer residency on the Still and Moving Image as a way to acclimate to student life and to build some video basics, so enroll I did, along with 12 others as diverse in their geographic origins as in their experience and creative pursuits. In a matter of days we ditched the “dummies” guide to handling the 5D and EX1 and blew through the refreshers/ intros to codecs, fps, wb, iso, dof, f-stops, audio and lighting. It was time to shoot. But what? We had just over three weeks to make a short film to be screened in a real theater on a big screen. Oh, the insomnia. But after years of sleep challenges that wasn’t a surprise. What to shoot? Oh, the anxiety. And the insomnia again. Ah, I just got it. My short film was going to be about my insomnia. I set out to video myself sleeping for a few nights as visual proof of my sleep disorder that was about to take on the starring role in my debut as a filmmaker. Enter acclaimed film critic Amy Taubin for the first critique of the residency. “Show her whatever you have,” they told us. “Share your idea; wherever you are is fine.” “Of course, it’s no problem to show raw footage.” So I did. After four minutes of watching me sleep, Amy announced that there was a fundamental disconnect between my insomnia/anxiety narrative and my footage. She told the class, “I feel like I am watching a commercial for the perfect mattress guaranteed to give you nights of peaceful sleep.”

The editing challenge had begun along with a crash course in Final Cut Pro. Our days were a mix of theory and practice, watching film, discussing photography, shooting and editing. Several times a week Charles Traub and Grahame Weinbren, led our theory and practice classes, looking at the similarities and differences between photography and video. We engaged in a crash course in video literacy that spanned the gamut from Vertov’s Man With a Movie Camera to Coppola’s Apocalypse Now and beyond. We stopped by Hollis Frampton, Stan Brakhage, Wong Kar-wai, Bill Viola, Joan Jonas, Bruce Nauman, and many others, along the way. We looked at the great photographers from Cartier-Bresson’s decisive moment to the works of André Kertész, Eugène Atget, Walker Evans, Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand, Sally Mann, and lots more. We compared and contrasted what some describe as the medium of the past with that of the present and considered the differences between telling your entire story within the frame versus sequentially across many frames. And tell my story I did until I felt like the ultimate con artist by the time my film was screened at the SVA Theatre. Because from the first viewing of my own raw video footage of myself sleeping, I had to acknowledge that Amy Taubin was onto something: I’ve not had a bad night’s sleep since. Samples of residents’ work can be viewed at http://vimeo.com/channels/residency For further information regarding the Lens and Screen Arts – The Still and Moving Image residency contact: Keren Moscovitch, Program Coordinator Tel: 212.592.2188  E-mail: kmoscovitch@sva.edu

DANIEL JOHNSON CLASS OF 2013


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