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ADVANCING EDUCATION INCOME AND HEALTH

SHAPING THE FUTURE 2013 Annual Report

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.

metrounitedway.org


Investing in children yields returns for all of us.


CONTENTS

2

Changing the Odds: Cradle to Career

6

Achieving a Milestone for Success

3

Shaping the Future

8

Building Family Networks

4

Preparing for Kindergarten

10

Providing a Network to Meet Needs

12 13 14

Reporting Financial Outcomes

Ensuring Accountability and Trust

15 16

LIVE UNITED: One Team

Focusing on Education, Income and Health

Thanking our Volunteer Leaders


7 COUNTIES SERVED

BULLITT (KY)

WITH A SHARED COMMITMENT

OLDHAM (KY)

BY METRO UNITED WAY

TO SUPPORT

CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

FROM CRADLE TO CAREER

CLARK

JEFFERSON (KY)

OLDHAM FLOYD

SHELBY (KY)

HARRISON

CLARK (IN)

SHELBY

JEFFERSON

FLOYD (IN)

BULLITT

HARRISON (IN)

CHANGING THE ODDS: 2013-2014 LAST YEAR, IN OUR

COMMUNITY IN 2013, METRO UNITED WAY WORKED TOGETHER WITH

1,800

More than children received quality child care

1,105 organizations and 58,424 donors gave $27.6 million

29,400

youth benefitted from quality outof-school time programs and services

1,200

More than families participated in the Ages & Stages Questionnaires Program

141,000

over people received assistance to meet their basic needs

139,000 volunteers contributed over 473,981 hours

71,764 calls received through 2-1-1 and 97,138 referrals

of community service valued at

made to local community resources

$10,328,029

for assistance


SHAPING THE FUTURE. CHANGING THE ODDS.

To Our Community: Community focused, volunteer run, and driven to shape our future by changing the odds for our kids: for decades, Metro United Way has focused on solving community problems and that will never change. What has changed is how we help solve those problems; today we work more strategically with more partners to bring more people together to focus much more deeply on root causes of social problems. We all win when a child succeeds in school, when a neighborhood turns around, when families have good health and when workers have solid jobs. At Metro United Way, our vision is a community whose people achieve their fullest potential through education, financial stability and healthy lives – the building blocks for a good quality of life. And today’s reality in our community is this:

47% of our children are not ready to learn when they enter kindergarten; 32% of 3rd graders can’t read at grade level

1 in 4 high school students will not graduate on time and almost 1200 in our community will drop out this year

Over 70,000 people request assistance from Metro United Way’s 2-1-1 referral service annually, many for the first time

to significant, lasting change. And we know that when individuals are unable to meet their immediate needs, it is more difficult to focus on long-term goals such as employment, housing or education…and that’s why we’ll continue to help individuals get back on their feet and on the road to self-reliance. We’re proud of all that we’ve been able to achieve in our long history of service, and we are excited about our community’s future. What can you do to help? Demonstrate your support for our kids with your generosity to Metro United Way. Volunteer – maybe by reading, tutoring or mentoring a child. Raise your voice and be heard as an advocate for education initiatives. If we are serious about reducing poverty, achieving greater equity and social stability, and increasing economic growth for our community, investing in our children is imperative. Join us and Live United.

Studies show that quality education leads to better income and a healthier life. The human price, as well as the economic impact, is staggering when children don’t succeed in school. And the entire community pays that price. To have strong and productive communities, to develop a skilled workforce, to compete in the global economy and so on, we have to focus our energies on those areas that will lead

Joe Tolan

President & CEO, Metro United Way

Joseph L. Brown, CPA

Partner, Rodefer Moss & Co., Board of Directors Chair, Metro United Way

3


Zip Code

Not Met Benchmark

Met Benchmark

Total # Zip Code

%Met Benchmark

40023

2

5

7

71%

40205

34

71

105

68%

40222

52

96

148

65%

40059

15

26

41

63%

63% to 77% Ready

40245

104

159

263

60%

Above 77% Ready

40243

33

46

79

58%

40241

112

136

248

55%

40242

35

40

75

53%

40223

65

71

136

52%

40299

175

181

356

51%

40206

63

61

124

49%

40207

72

68

140

49%

40228

103

88

191

46%

40204

41

33

74

45%

40220

151

119

270

44%

40291

187

136

323

42%

40209

5

3

8

38%

40217

58

34

92

37%

40216

342

158

500

32%

40229

198

90

288

31%

40272

318

131

449

29%

40218

293

111

404

27%

40213

137

51

188

27%

40214

405

150

555

27%

40211

286

104

390

27%

40258

229

81

310

26%

40202

34

12

46

26%

40203

259

84

343

24%

40212

196

61

257

24%

40215

268

79

347

23%

40219

389

103

492

21%

40118

102

27

129

21%

40210

205

54

259

21%

40208

105

20

125

16%

40177

1

0

1

0%

Grand Total

5074

2689

7763

35%

Jefferson County Public Schools 2013 Students Meeting Benchmark in Kindergarten Readiness By Zip Code

2014 JCPS Brigance Data Below 43% Ready 43% to 53% Ready 53% to 64% Ready

40059

Chestnut Street YMCA Child Development Center

Neighborhood House

40241

Keystone Learning Academy 40242

40212 40206

40202

St. Benedict Center for Early Childhood Education 40211

40203

40216

40215

40223 40222

40204

40210 40208 40217

District 35%

40207

40245

40243

40205 40220

40209

40218 40023

40213

40299

40214

40258

40219

State 28%

40291 40228

40118 40272

40229

Southwest YMCA Child Development Center

Excellence Academy locations


PREPARING FOR KINDERGARTEN In Kentucky, school readiness means that a child enters school ready to engage in and benefit from early learning experiences that best promote the child’s success. Families, early care and education providers, school staff and community partners must work together to provide environments and developmental experiences that promote growth and learning to ensure that all children in Kentucky enter school eager and excited to learn. This community of connected people – all people – united to make a difference for the benefit of all is at the heart of what Metro United Way represents.

Over 100,000 children ages six years old and younger live in the area served by Metro United Way, and sadly, recent data shows that as few as 35% of incoming kindergarteners are ready to learn.

Research shows that children who start out behind, tend to stay behind. In fact, nearly 2/3 of students who reach 4th grade without proficient reading skills end up on welfare or in prison. This is simply unacceptable, and it drives our belief that we need to work together to get better results given the harsh realities facing many of our kids and families. Today Metro United Way stands at a unique threshold of opportunity for our community; our Mayor has chosen us to be the community-wide convener in transforming Early Care and Education, based on our significant work in early childhood education over the past few years and including our most recent achievements in our Excellence Academy early learning centers. The benefit of kindergarten readiness includes raising lifetime wages and reducing the likelihood that children will drop out of school. That’s why our efforts with our Excellence Academy program are so important; we’re strengthening the skills of preschool teachers, improving classroom environments and teaching kids to love learning.

Substantial evidence shows that early education makes a critical difference for at-risk children. Studies have

found that a dollar invested in early development returns up to $17 as a result of higher education attainment. However we look at it, to invest in a child today is to invest in our common future: the world of tomorrow will inherit the children of today.

According to the Governor’s Office of Early Childhood, the five developmental areas for school readiness are: • Approaches to learning • Health and physical well being • Language and communication development • Social and emotional development • Cognitive and general knowledge

5


Zip Code

Total Provider Sites

Total Children Served

40118

2

425

40202

3

183

40203

8

703

40205

2

401

40206

4

628

40207

4

616

40208

2

306

40210

1

793

40211

7

1577

40212

2

1351

40214

4

1190

40215

1

662

40216

4

996

40217

1

269

40218

6

1073

40219

3

857

40220

3

680

40222

2

453

40228

3

375

40229

2

451

40241

3

758

40242

1

358

40243

2

224

40245

1

832

40258

2

623

40272

2

545

40291

4

725

40299

5

790

40023

0

61

40059

0

296

40204

0

329

40209

0

4

40213

0

414

40223

0

604

2013 School Aged Youth (5-17) Served by OST Programs in Jefferson County by Zip Code*

2-1-1 LOUISVILLE LINKED HELP REFERRAL Usage by Level 60% 50% 40%

55%

Louisville Linked Usage

48

JCPS Enrollment

%

30%

23% 21%

20% 10%

20

%

26% 2%

0%

Elementary

Middle

High

*Includes data from FRYSC Report and Louisville Linked Online Jefferson County Public Schools CES and Data Management. RR.DD.jv.lj. 7.5.1414

Types of Needs Reported 2013-14

38%

Basic Needs Academic Interventions *The numbers for each zip code reflect the number of OST sites located in that zip code and the number of youth who live in the zip code who participated in a MUW funded OST program. Youth in the zip code may have participated in a program outside of that zip code.

32% 24%

Health Fostering Resiliency

7%

4%

Special


ACHIEVING A MILESTONE FOR SUCCESS Education is the foundation for a child’s success in work and life, and high school graduation is a major milestone toward achieving that success. In fact, high school dropouts are four times more likely to be unemployed as those who have completed four or more years of college; sadly, only 3/4 of students nationally graduate on time and the statistics are similar for our region. Metro United Way is committed to ensuring that students all across our community graduate high school in order to succeed, and we are leading the way through our key partnerships to create a premier out-of-school time (OST) system that advances our children’s learning outside of the classroom. The BLOCS OST Coordinating Council is a community partnership – founded by Metro

United Way, JCPS and Louisville Metro Government – that works to bridge in-school and out-of-school time while demonstrating OST is a fundamental support in improving education outcomes. Quality OST programs are universally recognized as a critical tool to help students graduate on time, contributing to key performance indicators including attendance, engagement in learning, test scores and grades.

In fact, youth who attend OST programs are 12% less likely to drop out of school in comparison to their peers who don’t participate. Last

year, the Council’s efforts helped over 32,000 youth access high-quality OST programs that encourage them to stay in school, remain on grade level and graduate. Metro United Way works to help build a system that supports increased quality of and access to OST programs, improve the quality of MUW-funded OST programs and participate in and support the community’s Education Pipeline initiatives. In a new partnership, Metro United Way joins JCPS and Louisville Linked to help

children get what they need outside of school to be successful in the classroom. Students only spend 9% of their lives in school, so it’s important to make every minute count. And when students are struggling with mental health, emotional and behavioral problems, they may not want or be able to process and engage in instruction during school hours. Metro United Way’s 2-1-1 help referral service offers a resource for educators – Louisville Linked – to help JCPS students remove barriers to learning by linking them with partners to help them; over 31,000 students have been “linked” to help meet their needs.

The economic impact of children’s successful high school graduation is staggering: on average, Kentucky high school dropouts earn about $7,800 less each year than someone with a diploma. In fact, if the high school students who dropped out of the class of 2011 nationally had graduated, the nation’s economy would have benefited from the nearly $154 billion in additional income over the course of their lifetimes.

7


AGES & STAGES QUESTIONNAIRES

Third Edition Results (from June 2009 – August 2014) 70% 60%

65%

63%

62%

50% 40% 30% 20%

14

%

10%

21%

14

%

23%

% 17% 19

0%

Community Wide Outreach

Zip Codes 40203, 40210, 40212

Neighborhood Outreach

Typical: The child’s score indicates his/her development is on track at this time. Monitor: The child’s score is 1.0-2.0 standard deviations from the mean and indicates that his/her development should be monitored further over time through periodic screenings. Refer: The child’s score is 2.0+ standard deviations from the mean and the family is provided with information to access further evaluation from a community agency.

Age range of children whose families complete the Ages & Stages Questionnaires 60-66 Months

6

%

48-60 Months

14

%

ASQ Results by County

1-6 Months

15%

6-9 Months

9

%

36-48 Months

24-36 Months

5%

15

%

17%

19%

9-12 Months 12-24 Months

County

Number Requested

Number Returned

Rate of Return

Bullitt County

120

65

54%

Jefferson County

5118

3441

67%

Oldham County

139

73

53%

Shelby County

380

260

68%

Clark County

358

230

64%

Floyd County

267

117

44%

Harrison County

208

116

56%


BUILDING FAMILY NETWORKS At Metro United Way, we know that when families and neighborhoods engage in education, our kids are better prepared for school, have higher academic achievement, better social skills and increased likelihood of high school graduation. Family engagement is a shared responsibility among schools and community organizations and it’s continuous through a child’s life – from birth to adulthood. The most effective family engagement spans across and reinforces learning in the multiple settings where children learn, not just in school.

The earlier in a child’s educational process parent involvement begins, the more powerful the effect. Families are critically important in the early stages of a child’s life, especially in their roles to:

• Understand they are their child’s first teacher, nurturing and stimulating their child’s development • Provide safe and financially stable homes • Build wellness awareness including nutrition and exercise, and • Access information on how to advocate for their child’s learning and development. Today, Metro United Way works in low-income neighborhoods with parents and caregivers to build support networks of participants that share a passion for children and learning. Led by a volunteer “parent advocate” who represents Metro United Way’s focus on the building blocks for a good quality of life – education, financial stability and health – while respecting the families’ needs and interests in these communities, these groups engage families through a variety of activities together designed to provide consistent interaction, learning opportunities, family-centered events and more. This is important, in part, because school activities to develop and maintain partnerships with families decline with each grade level and drop dramatically at the transition to middle grades.

Families whose children are doing well in school often exhibit the following characteristics: • • • • • •

Establish a daily family routine Monitor out-of-school activities Model the value of learning, self- discipline, and hard work Express high but realistic expectations for achievement Encourage children’s development/ progress in school Encourage reading, writing and discussion among family members

Parents and caregivers often initially get involved in their child’s development through Metro United Way’s Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ). By enrolling in this program

and completing the series of questionnaires, parents help their children learn and grow as much as possible during the crucial early years, and also give them a boost that will make a difference from kindergarten to career. This program offers confidential support and resources to help improve outcomes, especially for children who may be behind. It’s quick, easy and free to gain access to these through Metro United Way.

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THE NUMBERS

Metro United Way

75,565 People found

TOP FIVE NEEDS REQUEST

the help they need

Information and Referral Lines

Homeless Shelters

160

2,472

41,578

Calls for information answered

33,987

2-1-1 online searches completed

103,946 Referrals

made to local community resources Food Pantries

4,231

Utility Service Payment Assistance

16,219 Rent Payment Assistance

9,208

2-1-1 CALLER PROFILE Women Men Unknown Age Range Average

All results are from July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2014

76% 19% 5% 11-102 49


PROVIDING A NETWORK TO MEET NEEDS For decades, Metro United Way has focused on solving community problems. With nearly 100 years of service, we have worked to advance the common good in our community by creating opportunities for a better life for all by providing a network of services for people’s most basic needs of food, shelter, health and safety. Basic need services are critical to getting people back on their feet and on the road to self-reliance. Metro United Way sees how interconnected we all are in our community and we know that the ultimate measure of our success is in the ways we impact the quality of life for all of us. Serving core and

basic needs includes our work to support a strong network of services that address the basic needs

seniors; this network touches 1 in 3 in our community every year. In part, our efforts to improve lives includes our work to: • Provide access to information and referral through our 2-1-1 help line, answering nearly 72,000 calls for assistance last year, 7% more than prior year. Our 2-1-1

service is available in nine counties in Kentucky and an additional three counties in Indiana; today this partner network of resources supports growing community needs such as educational initiatives (Louisville Linked, Destination Degrees and JCPS summer programs), increased

COUNTIES SERVED: Clark (IN)

Bullitt (KY)

Oldham (KY)

Floyd (IN)

Carroll (KY)

Shelby (KY)

Harrison (IN)

Henry (KY)

Spencer (KY)

Jefferson (KY)

Nelson (KY)

Trimble (KY)

numbers of senior citizens as well as those of transitioning Veterans, and continued fluctuations in employment rates. • Serve as the volunteer backbone and proud partner for the Mayor’s Give a Day week of volunteer service, coordinating over 144,000 acts of compassion during this period that demonstrates the caring, compassionate nature of our community, how interdependent we all are and how powerful we can be when we come together. We also support other services that help ensure everyone has the opportunity for a better life because we all want to make our community stronger. In the end, we will reach our mutual goals by working together – by working with dozens of service organizations and community leaders, hundreds of companies and thousands of citizens all across our community. We are a trusted partner across sectors, we recruit people to the cause, get commitments for actions and connect expertise and systems with the resources that get things done for longterm, sustainable change.

of young children, families and our

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STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION

STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES Metro United Way

Metro United Way April 30, 2014 and 2013 ASSETS Cash and Cash Equivalents Investments

Pledges Receivable, Net of Allowance for Uncollectible Pledges Other Receivables and Prepaid expenses Land, Building, and Equipment, Net Assets Held for Custodian Funds Investments Held by Others Total Assets

2014

2013

$3,139,615

$3,541,022

6,787,521

6,644,563

12,779,049

13,398,707

538,229

451,352

2,634,298

2,722,090

885,643

1,107,301

1,317,988

1,207,842

$28,082,343

$29,072,877

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Allocations Payable

$8,595,747

$10,084,483

Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

552,613

872,625

Grant Funds Payable

444,058

Pension Liability Amounts Due Custodian Funds Total Liabilities

2,048,710

2,765,411

885,643

1,107,301

12,526,771

14,829,820

NET ASSETS Unrestricted Invested in Land, Building and Equipment

2,634,298

2,722,090

Unappropriated

6,731,183

5,352,753

9,365,481

8,074,843

Temporarily Restricted

4,599,113

4,616,103

Permanently Restricted

1,590,978

1,552,111

15,555,572

14,243,057

$28,082,343

$29,072,877

Total Net Assets Total Liabilities and Net Assets

Years Ended April 30, 2014 and 2013

April 30, 2014

April 30, 2013

2013 (2012) campaign: Total 2013 (2012) campaign results Donor designations Total 2013 (2012) campaign contributions

$26,462,448 (5,583,887) $20,878,561

$27,660,108 (6,723,441) $20,936,667

Revenues, gains, and other support: Total campaigns Legacies and Bequests Grant and Other Incomes Total public support

$21,630,473 500 270,152 21,901,125

$20,897,861 261,395 2,891,258 24,050,514

197,095 39,548 408,808 102,359 268,620 22,917,555

109,839 42,950 431,849 88,695 283,010 25,006,857

17,653,537 (5,583,887) 12,069,650

19,888,266 (6,723,441) 13,164,825

5,664,763 3,036,716 1,800,220 22,571,349

5,620,173 2,976,493 1,706,465 23,467,956

966,309

(559,832)

1,290,638 (16,990) 38,867 1,312,515

(82,288) 792,094 269,263 979,069

14,243,057 $15,555,572

13,263,988 $14,243,057

Investment income Rental income Realized and unrealized gains (losses) on investments Appreciation (depreciation) of investments held by others Other fees and miscellaneous sales Total revenues, gains and other support Allocations and other functional expenses: Gross allocations to agencies and partners Less donor designations Net allocations to agencies and partners Programs/community services Fund raising Management and general Total allocations and other functional expenses Pension related changes other than net periodic pension costs Change in net assets: Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted Total change in net assets Net assets at beginning of period Net assets at end of period

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ACCOUNTABILITY CHECKLIST Transparency All supporters, partners and others have access to Metro United Way documents on our website at metrounitedway.org including:

• Our mission and how we accomplish it • Summary of annual audited financials • IRS tax return (Form 990) • Annual Report • Board of Directors roster • Partner listing

Volunteer-Led Organizational Self-Assessment Every three years, Metro United Way evaluates organizational performance by conducting a volunteer-led self-assessment. The last organizational selfassessment was conducted in fall, 2011. Our complete audited financial statement can be found on Guidestar.

Does Metro United Way have an active Board of Directors comprised of citizen leaders that meets regularly? • Yes No The Board is comprised of 32 local community leaders representing business, government and other sectors. Does the Board of Directors review and approve the annual budget and monthly financial statements? • Yes No The annual budget and monthly financial statements are approved by the Board following thorough review by the Finance Committee. Does Metro United Way have a Finance Committee? • Yes No The Finance Committee is comprised of financial and business experts. Does the Board of Directors review and approve the annual independent audit report as well as the auditor’s management letter comments? • Yes No The annual audit is approved by the Board following thorough review by the Finance Committee and the Executive Committee. Does the Board of Directors review its bylaws and governance documents at least once every three years? • Yes No Does Metro United Way have additional oversight committees? • Yes No Finance Committee, Human Resources Committee, Investment Committee and Community Impact Cabinet.

Does Metro United Way have ethics and conflict of interest policies? • Yes No The Board members and staff are required to sign a Code of Ethics and a Conflict of Interest Statement annually. Does Metro United Way adhere to an investment policy approved by the Board of Directors? • Yes No Does Metro United Way have a diversity and inclusion policy? • Yes No Does Metro United Way have a “whistleblower” policy? • Yes No Is the CEO’s performance and compensation reviewed and approved? • Yes No The Board Chair heads a five person committee that reviews the CEO’s performance and recommends a salary adjustment. The full Board then approves the CEO’s salary adjustment. Is the senior management team’s performance and compensation reviewed and approved? • Yes No The CEO conducts annual performance appraisals of the senior management team. These appraisals, along with compensation levels of the senior management team, are reviewed and ratified by the CEO. The Board of Directors and Executive Committee approve the salary adjustment “pool” that is distributed to staff.

Does Metro United Way post its annual independent audit summary, annual IRS tax return (Form 990) and its current IRS tax exempt determination letter on its website? • Yes No Available for download. Has Metro United Way established written human resources, accounting, use of assets, pledge processing and internal control policies? • Yes No All policies are systematically reviewed and updated. Does Metro United Way have a written Donor Bill of Rights? • Yes No A copy of the policy is available on the website. Does Metro United Way prohibit providing donor information to third parties? • Yes No Does Metro United Way have adequate insurance coverage? • Yes No Does Metro United Way have a Board-approved business expense reimbursement policy? • Yes No Does the Board or their delegates review and approve all funding decisions? • Yes No

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THANKING OUR VOLUNTEER LEADERS With sincere gratitude for their contributions of time, talent and treasure, we recognize our volunteer leadership, including our Board of Directors:

OFFICERS

Mr. Joseph L. Brown, Chair Rodefer Moss & Co. Mr. Joseph P. Tolan, President & Secretary Metro United Way Mr. Barry R. Pennybaker, Treasurer Mountjoy Chilton Medley LLP MEMBERS

Mr. J. Barry Barker Transit Authority of River City Mr. Jeffrey A. Been Legal Aid Society, Inc. Mrs. Marsha Biven Baptist Health LaGrange Mr. Kent Blake LG&E and KU Energy LLC Mr. Christopher L. Bottorff Centra Credit Union Mr. David M. Bowling Citizens Union Bank - Shelby County Campbell Boyer Boyer Consulting Group

Mr. Robert W. Bracy Greater Louisville Central Labor Council

Mr. Alan D. Shepard First Savings Bank Clark County

Mr. Christopher S. Burnside Frost Brown Todd LLC

Mr. Tim Snavely BKD, LLP

Dr. Julie Temes Ellis KentuckyOne Health

Mr. Joel Stone Fifth Third Bank, Kentucky, Inc.

Ms. Christine A. Harbeson Hope Southern Indiana

Dr. William D. Stout University of Louisville

Mr. Chris Hermann LG&E and KU Energy LLC

Mr. Justin M. Suer Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana

Ms. Lynn Howard Louisville Metro Government

Dr. Robert L. Taylor The Oliver Group

Ms. Joni Jenkins Jefferson Community & Technical College

Ms. Pattie Dale Tye Humana Inc.

Mr. Thomas Johnson Norton Healthcare

Mr. Vincent Walker Chase

Ms. Beverly Keepers Spalding University

Ms. Anne S. Wilhelmus Community Volunteer

Ms. Gail Lyttle Fifth Third Bank, Kentucky, Inc.

Ms. Deborah B. Williams PNC

Mrs. Jane C. Morreau Brown-Forman Corporation Dr. Anthony L. Newberry Jefferson Community & Technical College


Thank you to Metro United Way’s dedicated and talented staff who Live United every day.

SENIOR MANAGEMENT TEAM

COMMUNITY BUILDING

Angela Ditsler

FINANCE

COMMUNITY GIVING

Joe Tolan President & CEO

Melissa Cummings

Michelle Elsby

Lisa Breit

Patty Belden

Jeannette Hopkins

John Fasteen

Janet Boyd

Gil Betz Chief Strategy Officer

Cori Gadansky

Cindy Lehnert

Karen Napier

Sam Johnson, Jr.

Nicole Breyette

Phillip Bond VP & CFO

John Nevitt

Judy Schroeder

Alayna Middleton

Marisa Davis

Pam Ottersbach

Debbie Polston

Katie Floyd

Wannah Robinson

Kelly Garvey

Sandra Taylor

Tiffany Harrington

Stephanie Burton

Greg Hudelson

Benjamin Donlon

Theresa Hettinger

Mary Gwynne Dougherty VP, Human Resources

Glen Powell Erica Price

Maggie Elder VP, Community Building

Jan Sherrell

Mary Grissom Engagement Initiatives Director

Roberta Steutermann

Carmen Hickerson Principal Gifts Officer Betsy Paulley VP, Marketing, Communications and Engagement Joe Phelps VP, Labor Services

Emily Sprawls Donna Wooten STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Julie Bowie Kimberly Broecker Mia Cooper Kofi Darku TJ Delahanty

CENTRAL SERVICES & TECHNOLOGY

Lynn Armstrong

Ed Post Dennis Renschler John Sands

HUMAN RESOURCES

Tonya Schweitzer Katherine Smith

MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Ben Smock

Latara Appleby

EXECUTIVE OFFICE

Alex Clark

Alice Barnett

Jill McNatt Melody Murphy

Terry Stinnett ENGAGEMENT INITIATIVES

Nikki Johnson Aleksandra Jozic Mary Sullivan Daryle Unseld, Jr.

15


Success in school is the cornerstone of individual and community success. But with more than 1.2 million children dropping out nationally each year, America faces an education crisis. The cost? More than $312 billion in lost wages, taxes and productivity over their lifetimes. These trends are reversible, but only when communities and public, private and nonprofit sectors work together.

BUILDING BLOCKS FOR SUCCESS Education, financial stability and health are the building blocks for a better life and a stronger community. Remove any one, and the other two topple. Build them all up, and we have a strong foundation for collective success.

The challenge of improving graduation rates goes beyond our schools.

Parents with good jobs are able to provide adequate healthcare for their families, and kids are more likely to succeed in school if they’re healthy and well-fed when they enter the classroom.

Education

e om Increasing individual and family financial security

Hea lt

h

Inc

Preparing children to enter and graduate from school

Increasing access to health care, nutrition and healthy environments

That’s why we focus on these Community Aspirations: • All children enter kindergarten ready to learn • All youth complete high school on time prepared for college, work, and life • Parents and caregivers have the knowledge, skill and abilities to maintain family stability and help their children succeed • We sustain a compassionate network of services that address basic needs.

To reach our goal, we need your help. We invite you to give,

to advocate, or to volunteer – only by working together can we help every child unlock their full potential and empower the workforce of tomorrow. Join us and LIVE UNITED.


If we are serious about reducing poverty, achieving greater equity and social stability and increasing economic growth, investing in children is imperative.


ADVANCING EDUCATION INCOME AND HEALTH

OUR MISSION Improve lives and our community by engaging people to give, advocate and volunteer.

OUR VISION A community whose people achieve their fullest potential through education, financial stability and healthy lives.

LIVE YOUR DAY UNITED

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.

2013 Metro United Way Annual Report  
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