Issuu on Google+


UNIVERSIDAD DE PUERTO RICO PONCE

UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO IN PONCE OFFICE SYSTEMS PROGRAM BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

QUALITY ASSURANCE REPORT

Prepared for The Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs February 2012


TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................................................1 Overview ........................................................................................................................................................................2 Standard 1 – Leadership ...............................................................................................................................................4 Standard 3 – Student and Stakeholder Focus Results....................................................................................................5 Standard 4 – Measurement and Analysis of Student Learning and Performance .......................................................12 Standard 5 – Faculty and Staff Focus Results .............................................................................................................18 Standard 6 – Educational and Business Process Management ....................................................................................28 Appendixes Appendix A- Note Standard #4, Measurement and Analysis of Student Learning and Performance..................40 Appendix B - Note Standard #5, Faculty and Staff Focus ....................................................................................41 Appendix C- Condition on Standard #6, Educational and Business Process Monitoring ....................................41


1

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Bachelor’s Degree in Office Systems of the University of Puerto Rico in Ponce (UPR-Ponce), established in 1982 as a Bachelor in Secretarial Sciences, is a business related program. Its curriculum was revised in 1994 and approved by the Board of Trustees of the University of Puerto Rico through Certification 107-1994-95, as amended. The current curriculum focuses in the development of highly qualified administrative assistants, skilled in technology and procedures for the office administration, as required by the business community. The name of the Program was changed to Bachelor’s Degree in Office Systems. The Program responds to the UPR-Ponce mission and goals; its primary purpose is to satisfy the needs of stakeholders such as employers and students of the southern region of Puerto Rico. The Program is continuously updated in response to the changing business environment and job market. The Program was revised and will be implemented in August 2012. The Office Systems Program (OSP) Faculty is a highly qualified one based on its valuable teaching and business professional experience. The OSP Faculty is constituted by eight professors who hold a master’s or doctorate degree. They recognize the importance of continuous participation in professional development activities, which renew their knowledge and skills to enrich the teaching and learning processes. This enables the integration of new education delivery technologies and teaching strategies. Their commitment is also evidenced through their leadership in the design of a curriculum that satisfies its constituents’ needs and expectations. The Faculty has also demonstrated its leadership by holding different administrative positions in the UPR-Ponce and in the institution’s governing bodies. In the process of teaching over 235 students enrolled in the Program, the OSP faculty is engaged with the achievement of the learning outcome expectations. The Program fosters the knowledge acquisition as well as attitudes and skills development necessary to perform effectively as office professionals. This is attained through the curriculum integration of business content areas as information systems, office procedures, office administration, accounting, marketing, business law, global dimensions, policies, statistics, and interpersonal relations. The curriculum also integrates general education areas as communication; ethics, civic values; teamwork; critical thinking; decision making and problem solving skills. The OSP promotes students’ social responsibility through their participation in community service projects. The curriculum provides the senior students an internship course as the comprehensive experience in a real work environment. The quality of the OSP has been evidenced through its accreditation by ACBSP in May 2010.


2 Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) Quality Assurance (QA) Report for Baccalaureate/Graduate Degree Programs Current as of February 2011 Overview (O)1. Complete all information requested. Submit your report as an attachment to reports@acbsp.org on or before February 27th or September 30th. This report should be limited to maximum of 50 pages. The average length of most good reports is 30 pages. To help reduce the page numbers you can remove the ACBSP examples used in this report template to help you complete the report.

O2. Institution Name: University of Puerto Rico in Ponce Address: PO Box 7186; Ponce, PR 00732 O3. Year Accredited/Reaffirmed: 2010

/

Date

This Report Covers Years:

February 2012

2010-2012

O4. List All Accredited Programs (as they appear in your catalog): Office Systems Bachelor Program Business Administration Bachelor Program. Majors: Accounting, Management, Marketing, and Finance

O5. List all programs that are in your business unit that are not accredited by ACBSP and how you distinguish accurately to the public between programs that have achieved accredited status and those that have not. The business and business-related programs are accredited.

O6. List all campuses that a student can earn a business degree from your institution: Students can earn a business and business-related degree from UPR-Ponce campus.

O7. Person completing report Name: Dr. Doris S. Torres Phone: (787) 844-8181, Extension 2441 E-mail address: doris.torres3@upr.edu ACBSP Champion name: Dr. Doris S. Torres ACBSP Co-Champion name: Prof. Carmen Bracero


3 O8. Conditions/Notes/Opportunity for Improvement (OFI) to be Addressed Please explain and provide the necessary documentation/evidence for addressing each condition/note/OFI since your last report. Remove Note: Note on Standard 4 – UPRP has an outcomes assessment program with trend data dating back to 2004. The MFT was given in the fall of 2009 to 14 students; this assessment will need to be tracked. See Appendix A. Remove Note: Note on Standard 5 – UPRP has policies and plans to ensure an excellent faculty but will need to provide evidence of student learning outcomes and student and stakeholder satisfaction to support rationale for not adhering to historical criteria and/or show results of plan to increase doctorally qualified faculty. See Appendix B. Remove Condition: Condition on Standard 6 – UPRP needs to demonstrate improvement in the following areas: 1) assessment of the new curriculum for

OSP after full implementation, 2) deployment of quantitative data to analyze the effectiveness of program improvement measures and assessment, and 3) analysis of retention rate with plan to continually monitor for improvement. See Appendix C. O9. The business unit must routinely provide reliable information to the public on their performance, including student achievement. As shown in Table O-1, using various mechanisms, the OSP provides reliable information and makes data accessible to the stakeholders as students, alumni, administrators, faculty, and non-faculty personnel. Table O-1: Mechanisms to Make OSP Information and Data Accessible to Stakeholders Mechanisms

Purpose

  Newsletters (Faculty, students, non-faculty, and  administrators)  Assessment reports (Faculty, students, non faculty, and administrators) OSD annual reports (Faculty, students, non faculty, and administrators)  Faculty meetings   Assessment dialogues  Dialogues between students and faculty

OSP Web Page

Request students’ recommendations about program, services, courses, and faculty performance Share actions taken regarding students’ recommendations Share data about the assessment process and results Share data about accreditation process Share data about the assessment process and its results Provide a summary of assessment activities and changes resulting from this process Discuss the assessment procedures to be followed Explore strategies for the student learning improvement Refine the program and its curriculum Share information about the program assessment with faculty, deans, and department heads

 Present the OSP vision, mission, goals, values, student profile, curricular sequence, faculty profile, and office hours  Share information about the Office Systems Association  Provide information about the accreditation process and the OSP Advisory Board


4 Standard #1 Leadership Organization a.

List any organizational or administrative personnel changes within the business unit since your last report. The Office Systems Department has experienced the following changes in terms of faculty and non-faculty members since the report submitted in January 2010. Table 1.1: Changes in Faculty and Non-Faculty Personnel

Faculty Member

Tenure Tenure

Dr. Lourdes Torres

Tenure

Dr. Rosa Del Valle Prof. Sonia Negrón

Service Contract Service Contract

Non-Faculty Member Mrs. Cecill Cuevas b.

Type of Contract

Prof. Ruth Calzada Prof. Angelita Guzmán

Type of Contract Service Contract

Change Retired – December 2009 Retired – June 2010 Transfer from UPR-Ponce Education Department – August 2010 Part-time professor at OSP during the self-study period No service contract for 2011-2012 academic year No service contract for 2011-2012 academic year

Change No service contract for 2010-2011 academic year

List all new sites where students can earn an accredited business degree (international campus, off-campus or on campus, on-line) that have been added since your last report? There is no new site where students can earn an accredited business degree that has been added since the report submitted in January 2010.

Standard #2 Strategic Planning (this standard not typically addressed in the QA report) This is used as a place holder to allow all the other standards to be addressed in the QA report and keep the numbering system consistent with self-studies and QA reports.


5 Standard #3 Student and Stakeholder Focus Results Student- and stakeholder-focused results examine how well your organization satisfies students and stakeholders key needs and expectations. Key indicators may include: satisfaction and dissatisfaction of current and past students and key stakeholders, perceived value, loyalty, persistence, or other aspects of relationship building, end of course surveys, alumni surveys, Internship feedback, etc.

Student- and Stakeholder-Focused Results

Each academic unit must demonstrate linkages to business practitioners and organizations, which are current and significant, including an advisory board. Periodic surveys should be made of graduates, transfer institutions, and/or employers of graduates to obtain data on the success of business programs in preparing students to compete successfully for entry-level positions.

Std. 3 Students and Stakeholders Focus Performance Measure (Competency) Eighty-five percent (85%) of Internship students of the Office Systems Program will assess as excellent or good the attainment of the OSP learning goals

Description of Measurement Instrument Graduating Students Survey, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 (first semester)

Analysis of Results Areas of Success (results) Internship students assess as excellent or good the attainment of the OSP learning goals as follows  2009-2010 – 97% or more  2010-2011 – 93% or more  2011-2012 – 92% or more

Analysis and Action Taken (Improvement) The OSP will sustain promoting academic excellence through continuous improvement.

Results of Action Taken The Internship students continue assessing as excellent or good the attainment of learning goals.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years) Table 3.1: OSP Learning Goals Attainment According to Active Students 2009-2010

2010-2011

Competency Communication Teamwork Decision making and problem solving Interpersonal relationships Technology Knowledge in office procedures Civic, ethical, and aesthetical values Logical and critical thinking Knowledge of basic business principles

2011-2012 (First semester)

Excellent

Good

Excellent

Good

Excellent

Good

83.0% 93.2%

15.3% 6.8%

75.9% 69.0%

20.9% 24.1%

80.8% 92.3%

17.3% 7.7%

93.0%

6.8%

82.8%

13.8%

92.3%

7.7%

90.9%

6.8%

86.2%

10.3%

92.3%

7.7%

81.8%

14.8%

86.3%

10.4%

92.3%

7.7%

93.2%

6.8%

86.2%

10.3%

84.6%

15.4%

90.9%

6.8%

82.8%

10.3%

84.6%

15.4%

68.2%

29.5%

72.4%

24.1%

92.3%

7.7%

84.1%

15.9%

82.8%

13.8%

84.6%

7.7%


6 Std. 3 Students and Stakeholders Focus Performance Measure (Competency) Eighty percent (80%) of Internship’s supervisors will assess as excellent or good interns’ attainment of the OSP learning goals

Description of Measurement Instrument Internship Supervisors Survey 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 (first semester)

Analysis of Results Areas of Success (results) During 2009-2010 academic year, Internship’s supervisors totally agreed or agreed that interns possess the nine learning goals as follows:  communication; teamwork; interpersonal relationships; technology; office procedures; civic, ethical, and aesthetical values; and logical and critical thinking 86% or more  decision-making and problem solving skills 79%  knowledge of basic business principles in a global environment 64% During 2010-2011 academic year, Internship’s supervisors totally agreed or agreed that interns’ possess the nine learning goals as follows:

Analysis and Action Taken (Improvement) The OSP curricular sequence was revised. The reviewed curriculum includes four onecredit hour courses in the following areas: marketing, economics, statistics, and finance. The purpose of adding these courses is to strengthen students’ knowledge in business. The credit hours for accounting course were increased from 45 hours to 60. The curricular revision proposal was submitted to the Vice Presidency of Academic Affairs (VPAA) at the systemic level in August 2010. In February 2011, the OS Department Head received the VPAA feedback

Results of Action Taken The OS Department goal is to implement the reviewed curriculum in August 2012.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years) Table 3.2: OSP Learning Goals Attainment According to Internship Supervisors 2009-2010 Competency Communication Teamwork Decision making and problem solving Interpersonal relationships Technology Performance in office procedures Civic, ethical, and aesthetical values Logical and critical thinking Knowledge of basic business principles

Totally Agree

Agree

82.2% 100.0%

10.7%

50.0%

28.6%

100.0%

2010-2011 Totally Agree

Agree

66.7% 100.0%

33.3%

61.1%

33.3%

100.0%

2011-2012 (First Semester) Totally Agree Agree 91.7% 91.7%

8.3%

41.7%

50.0%

83.3%

16.7%

92.9%

7.1%

94.4%

5.6%

83.3%

8.3%

85.7%

14.3%

83.3%

16.7%

75%

16.7%

81.0%

9.5%

98.0%

88.9%

8.3%

64.3%

21.4%

61.1%

27.8%

66.7%

33.3%

35.7%

28.6%

27.8%

38.9%

41.7%

33.3%


7 Std. 3 Students and Stakeholders Focus Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Success (results)  communication; teamwork; interpersonal relationships; technology; office procedures; civic, ethical, and aesthetical values; decision-making and problem solving skills; and logical and critical thinking 89% or more  the knowledge of basic business principles in a global environment67% During the first semester of 20112012, Internship’s supervisors totally agreed or agreed that interns’ possess the nine learning goals as follows:  communication; teamwork; interpersonal relationships; technology; office procedures; civic, ethical, and aesthetical values; decision-making and problem solving skills; and

Analysis and Action Taken (Improvement) recognizing it as a curricular revision with minor changes. The Dean of Academic Affairs submitted it to the UPR-Ponce Academic Senate for its recommendations before implementation. In November 2011, the UPRPonce Academic Senate issued the Certification 2011-2012-28 to allow its implementation. The OSP Accreditation Committee in collaboration with the Curriculum Committee began the new curriculum disclosure among students as well as other implementation processes. The OSP Advisory Board’s recommendations to strengthen

Results of Action Taken

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)


8 Std. 3 Students and Stakeholders Focus Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Success (results) logical and critical thinking 92% or more  knowledge of basic business principles in a global environment, 75%

Analysis and Action Taken (Improvement) students’ relationship with business community were taken into consideration. Students continue involved in learning activities in which they collaborate with business community. For example, students enrolled in SOFI 4505, Training Techniques for In-service Personnel, visited the Banco Popular Development and Training Center for an orientation about the institution’s procedures for in service personnel training.

Results of Action Taken

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)


9 Std. 3 Students and Stakeholders Focus Performance Measure (Competency) Eighty percent (80%) of Internship’s supervisors will assess as excellent or good interns’ performance

Eighty percent (80%) of internship students will assess as excellent or good the academic preparation received through OSP

Description of Measurement Instrument Internship Supervisors Survey 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 (first semester)

Graduating Students Survey, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 (first semester)

Analysis of Results Areas of Success (results) During 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 first semester, 92% of Internship’s supervisors assessed as excellent or good the academic preparation received by OSP interns regarding their job. Also, 92% of supervisors assessed as excellent or good interns performance during the internship.

Internship students assessed their academic preparation as excellent or good as follows: 2009-2010 - 96% 2010-2011 - 100% 2011-2012 - 100%

Analysis and Action Taken (Improvement) The OSP will sustain promoting the academic excellence through continuous improvement.

The OSP will sustain promoting the academic preparation excellence through continuous improvement.

Results of Action Taken The Internship supervisors continue assessing as excellent or good interns’ performance.

The internship students continue assessing as excellent or good the academic preparation received.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Table 3.3: Internship Students’ Performance According to Internship Supervisors 2009-2010

Assessment Area

2011-2012 (First Semester)

2010-2011

Excellent

Good

Excellent

Good

Excellent

Good

78.5%

14.3%

100%

-

91.7%

0.0%

86.7%

7.1%

100%

-

83.3%

8.3%

OSP internship students’ academic preparation received regarding their work at the internship OSP internship students’ performance regarding their work at the internship

Figure 3.1: Internship Students' Perception of Academic Preparation Received at OSP 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

75%

21%

86%

77%

14%

23%

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012

Excellent Good


10 Std. 3 Students and Stakeholders Focus Performance Measure (Competency) Eighty percent (80%) of internship students will be very satisfied or satisfied with the OSP

Description of Measurement Instrument Graduating Students Survey, 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 (first semester)

Analysis of Results Areas of Success (results) Internship students assess their level of satisfaction with the OSP as very satisfied or satisfied as follows: 2009-2010 - 96% 2010-2011 - 93% 2011-2012 - 100%

Analysis and Action Taken (Improvement) The OSP will sustain promoting the academic excellence through continuous improvement.

Results of Action Taken The internship students continue being very satisfied or satisfied with the OSP.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Figure 3.2: Internship Students' Level of Satisfaction with OSP 100%

82%

86%

Very Satisfied

76%

80%

Satisfied

60% 40% 20%

14%

24% 6%

0%

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012


11 Std. 3 Students and Stakeholders Focus Performance Measure (Competency) Eighty percent (80%) of internship students will be satisfied with the OSP

Description of Measurement Instrument Graduating Students Survey, 2009-2010, 2010-2011 and first semester of 2011-2012

Analysis of Results Areas of Success (results) During 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and the first semester of 2011-2012, 93% or more of internship students considered that the OSP has satisfied their needs and educational expectations.

Analysis and Action Taken (Improvement) The OSP will sustain promoting the academic excellence through continuous improvement.

Results of Action Taken The internship students continue being very satisfied or satisfied with the OSP.

Ninety percent (90%) or more of internships students considers that the OSP is updated according to new trends in the office systems area.

Eighty five percent (85%) of alumni will assess as excellent or good the attainment of the OSP learning goals Eighty percent (80%) of employers will assess as excellent or good alumni attainment of the OSP learning goals

Alumni Survey

Employers Survey, 2011-2012

Ninety-three percent (93%) or more of internship students considers that they possess the competencies necessary to perform effectively in office systems area and would recommend the Program. Survey will be conducted during 2012-2013 academic year. Survey results will be available in May 2012.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years) Table 3.4: Active Student Satisfaction with OSP Area Assessed Do you consider that the OSP has satisfied the needs and educational expectations that you had when enrolled in the Program? Do you consider that the OSP is updated according to new trends in the office systems area? As a graduate, do you consider that you possess the competencies necessary to perform effectively in office systems area? Would you recommend the Bachelor’s Degree in Office Systems to another person?

20092010

100%

Answered Yes 201020112011 2012

93%

Answered No 2009- 2010- 20112010 2011 2012

20092010

-

-

-

7%

-

100%

No Answer 2010- 20112011 2012

-

96%

90%

100%

2%

3%

-

2%

7%

-

100%

93%

100%

-

-

-

-

7%

-

93%

93%

100%

-

-

-

7%

7%

-


12 Standard #4 Measurement and Analysis of Student Learning and Performance a.

Program Outcomes

List outcomes, by accredited program. Many of the program outcomes should be used as part of a student learning assessment plan and be measurable. The Office Systems Program’s graduate will demonstrate effectively the following competencies: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

b,

Communication skills Teamwork skills Problem solving and decision making skills Interpersonal relationships skills Technological skills Knowledge and skills in office procedures Civic, ethical, and aesthetical values Logical and critical thinking skills Knowledge of basic business principles in a global environment (marketing, finance, management, economics, statistics, accounting, and legal environment of business)

Performance Results

Student Learning Results (Required for each accredited program, doctorate, masters, and baccalaureate) Performance Indicator 1. Student Learning Results (Required for each accredited program)

Definition A student learning outcome is one that measures a specific competency attainment. Examples of a direct assessment (evidence) of student learning attainment that might be used include: capstone performance, third-party examination, faculty-designed examination, professional performance, licensure examination). Add these to the description of the measurement instrument in column two: Direct - Assessing student performance by examining samples of student work. Indirect - Assessing indicators other than student work such as getting feedback from the student or other persons who may provide relevant information. Formative – An assessment conducted during the student’s education. Summative – An assessment conducted at the end of the student’s education. Internal – An assessment instrument that was developed within the business unit. External – An assessment instrument that was developed outside the business unit. Comparative – Compare results between classes, between online and on ground classes, between professors, between programs, between campuses, or compare to external results such as results from the U.S. Department of Education Research and Statistics, or results from a vendor providing comparable data.


13

Std. 4 - Student Learning Results Performance Measure (Competency) Seventy percent (70%) of students will obtain 70% or more in oral communication skills assessment

Eighty five percent (85%) of students will obtain 90% or more in communication skills assessment

Description of Measurement Instrument Direct, formative, internal, assessment rubric used in SOFI 3355

Indirect, summative, internal, capstone course SOFI 4985, (Internship Performance Evaluation Instrument).

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken

During 20092010 academic year, 100% of students obtained 70% or more.

 Continue oral communication skills reinforcement in SOFI 3017 and SOFI 3355 courses through a workshop about effective oral presentations.  For the second semester of 2012-2013 academic year, increase success indicator to 75% of students will obtain 70% or more for the competency assessment.  Revise the Internship Evaluation Instrument to assess individually the oral and writing competency to determine which of the two areas students need to reinforce.

During 20092010 academic year, 71% of students obtained 90% or more.

Results of Action Taken During 2010-2011 academic year, 100% of students obtained 70% or more.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Figure 4.1: Oral Communication Skills Assessment 100%

100%

100% 80% 60% 40%

20% 0% 2009-2010

During 2011-201 academic year 2, 82% of students obtained 90% or more.

2010-2011


14 Std. 4 - Student Learning Results Performance Measure (Competency)

Seventy five percent (75%) of students will obtain 75% or more in technological skills assessment

Description of Measurement Instrument

Direct, formative, internal, course embedded tests used in SOFI 4005

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

During 20092010 academic year, 85% of students obtained 75% or more.

Analysis and Action Taken  Coordinate, through the UPR-Ponce Academic Learning and Support Center for Students and Faculty, writing workshops for students enrolled in SOFI 3215 and SOFI 3327 courses.  Continue reinforcing the writing skills in SOFI 3215 and SOFI 3327 through reviewing language and grammatical rules usage and writing exercises.  After analyzing the assessment results, it was found that the major difficulty in SOFI 4005, was the preparation of the Excel exercises in which students need to perform

Results of Action Taken

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Figure 4.2: Oral Communication Skills Assessment 81%

85%

82%

80% 75%

71%

70% 65%

2009-2010

During 2011-2012 academic year, 75% of students obtained 75% or more. Faculty continues reinforcing

2010-2011

2011-2012


15 Std. 4 - Student Learning Results Performance Measure (Competency)

Eighty five percent (85%) of students will obtain 90% or more in technological skills assessment

Description of Measurement Instrument

Indirect, summative, internal, capstone course SOFI 4985 (Internship Performance Evaluation Instrument).

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

During 20092010 academic year, 96% of students obtained 90% or more.

Analysis and Action Taken mathematical operations. The Faculty in charge of the course has determined that it is necessary to increase the hours assigned in the course to the development of this skill.  Continue reinforcing the technological skills in SOFI 3005, SOFI 3105, SOFI 3125, SOFI 3218, SOFI 3305 and SOFI 4005 through work on practical exercises.  Continue reinforcing the technological skills in SOFI 3005, SOFI 3105, SOFI 3125, SOFI 3218, SOFI 3305 and SOFI 4005 through work on practical

Results of Action Taken the technological skills in the OSP courses.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Figure 4.3: Technological Skills Assessment 89% 90% 85% 80% 75% 70% 65%

85% 75%

2009-2010

During 2011-2012 academic year, 93% of students obtained 90% or more.

2010-2011

2011-2012


16 Std. 4 - Student Learning Results Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken

Results of Action Taken

exercises.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Figure 4.4: Technological Skills Assessment 100% 100%

96% 93%

95% 90% 85% 2009-2010 Eighty five percent (85%) of students will obtain 90% or more in civic values assessment

Indirect, summative, internal, capstone course SOFI 4985, rubric for civic values assessment through a community service project.

During 20092010 academic year, 83% of students obtained 90% or more.

 Continue reinforcing the civic values in SOFI 3017, SOFI 3355, and SOFI 4985 through community service projects.

During 2011-2012 academic year, 100% of students obtained 90% or more.

2010-2011

2011-2012

Figure 4.5: Civic Values Assessment 97% 100%

100%

83%

80% 60% 40% 20%

0% 2009-2010

Eighty five percent (85%) of students

Indirect, summative,

During 20092010 academic

 Continue reinforcing the

During 2011-2012

2010-2011

2011-2012


17 Std. 4 - Student Learning Results Performance Measure (Competency) will obtain 90% or more in ethical values assessment

Description of Measurement Instrument Internal, capstone course SOFI 4985 (Internship Performance Evaluation Instrument).

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken

year, 96% of students obtained 90% or more.

ethical values in SOFI 3015, SOFI 3017, SOFI 3210, SOFI 3355, SOFI 4038 and SOFI 4985 through community service projects and case studies.

Results of Action Taken academic year, 100% of students obtained 90% or more.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years) Figure 4.6: Ethical Values Assessment 100% 100%

96%

95%

90% 85%

2009-2010

Sixty five percent (65%) of students will obtain 70% or more in the assessment of basic business principles knowledge in global environment

Direct, formative internal, course embedded comprehensive test used in SOFI 4038

During 20092010 academic year, 91% of students obtained 70% or more.

 Continue reinforcing the knowledge acquisition of basic business principles in global environment in SOFI 3357 and SOFI 4038 through quizzes, critical analysis, research projects, and case studies.

100%

During 2011-2012 academic year, 89% of students obtained 70% or more.

2010-2011

2011-2012

Figure 4.7: Basic Business Principles Knowledge in Global Environment Assessment 95%

91% 89%

90%

85%

85% 80% 2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012


18 Standard #5 Faculty and Staff Focus Complete the following table. Use a maximum of three or four examples, reporting what you consider to be the most important data. It is not necessary to provide results for every process. Standard 5 - Faculty- and Staff-Focused Results 4.

Faculty and Staff Focused Results

Faculty and staff-focused results examine how well the organization create and maintains a positive, productive, learning-centered work environment for business faculty and staff. Key indicators may include: professional development, scholarly activities, community service, administrative duties, business and industry interaction, number of advisees, number of committees, number of theses supervised, satisfaction or dissatisfaction of faculty and staff, positive, productive, and learning-centered environment, safety, absenteeism, turnover, or complaints.

Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument Assess Faculty job 2008-2009 and satisfaction in 2010-2011 various aspects OSD  Opportunities Leadership for Faculty Survey professional development offered by the Office Systems Department

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken

Results of Action Taken

During 20082009 and 2010-2011 academic years, 100% of OSP Faculty was very satisfied or satisfied with the opportunities for professional development offered by the Office Systems Department.

When comparing 2008-2009 and 2010-2011 OSP Faculty level of satisfaction regarding the professional development opportunities offered by the Department, an increase of 24% was observed in the very satisfied option.

One hundred percent (100%) of OSP Faculty was very satisfied or satisfied with the following professional activities coordinated by the OSP Professional Development Committee:  Workshop: Using the Grade Center in Blackboard

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Figure 5.1: OSP Faculty Professional Development 100%

80% 60%

70% 46%

2008

54% 30%

40% 20%

0%

Very Satisfied

Satisfied

2010


19 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument

 Ethical values disclosure and procedures to address ethical issues in OS Department

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

The OSP Faculty was very satisfied or satisfied with the disclosure of the ethical values of the OSP and with the procedures to address ethical issues as follows:

Analysis and Action Taken

Results of Action Taken

The OSP Professional Development Committee has continued the coordination of professional activities according to the needs assessment completed by the OSP Faculty.

 Workshop: Information Skills  Workshop: Teaching Strategies for Office Systems Courses  Workshop: Meaningful Learning for New Generations  Workshop: Faculty Role in Students Retention

When comparing 2008-2009 and 2010-2011 OSP Faculty level of satisfaction regarding the disclosure of the ethical values of the OSP and procedures to address ethical issues, an increase of 8% was observed in

The OSP ethical values statement is included in the syllabi and disclosed through different means.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Figure 5.2: OSP Ethical Values Disclosure 100%

82%

90%

80%

2008

60%

2010

40%

9% 10%

20% 0% Very Satisfied

Satisfied


20 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken

2008-2009 91%

the very satisfied option.

Results of Action Taken

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

2010-2011 100% The OSP Department Head has continued with the disclosure of the ethical values and procedures to address ethical issues in OS Department.  Faculty participation in the planning process that is conducted in the OS Department

The OSP Faculty expressed to be very satisfied or satisfied with their participation in the planning process conducted in the OSD as follows:

When comparing 2008-2009 and 2010-2011, OSP Faculty level of satisfaction regarding their participation in the planning process conducted in the OSD, an increase of 34% was observed.in the very satisfied alternative.

The OSP Faculty has participated actively in the development of the following plans: OSD Operational Plans and OSD Assessment Plans for the academic years 2010-2011 and 2011-2012. The OSD committees for Faculty Professional Development, Orientation and

Figure 5.3: OSP Faculty Participation in the Planning Process 80%

100% 80% 60%

46%

2008

36%

2010 20%

40% 20% 0% Very Satisfied

Satisfied


21 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken

Results of Action Taken

2008-2009 82%

The OSP Department Head has continued promoting Faculty participation in the planning process.

Promotion, and Students Retention are revising their working plans for August 2012. OSP Faculty has participated in decisionmaking processes as:  Approving syllabi for twelve OSP new courses during 20102011 and 2011-2012 academic years  Recommendations for the OSP students quota and general entrance index for admission  Recommendations for academic matters discussed in the UPRPonce

2010-2011 100%  Faculty participation in the OS Department decisionmaking process

The OSP Faculty was very satisfied or satisfied with their participation in the decision making process that is conducted in the OSD, as follows: 2008-2009 100% 2010-2011 100%

When comparing 2008-2009 and 2010-2011, OSP Faculty level of satisfaction regarding their participation in the decision making process conducted in the OSD, an increase of 24% was observed in the very satisfied option. The OSP Department Head has continued promoting Faculty participation in the decisionmaking process.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Figure 5.4: OSP Faculty Participation in the Decision Making Process

100% 80%

2008

70% 46%

54%

2010

60% 30%

40% 20% 0% Very Satisfied

Satisfied


22 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken

Results of Action Taken

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Academic Senate as policy for general education components  Availability of technology for Faculty work

The OSP Faculty was satisfied or very satisfied with the availability of technology for their work in the OSD, as follows: 2008-2009 91% 2010-2011 90%

When comparing 2008-2009 and 2010-2011, OSP Faculty level of satisfaction regarding the availability of technology for their work in the OSD, the results were similar, although there is a significant difference in the percentages distribution. The OSP Department Head has continued working on the availability of OSD equipment, software, and

The OSD acquired the MedOne and IMClaim software licenses for billing and medical records courses. Microsoft Office 2010 and Windows 7 were installed in five computer laboratories. The memory (RAM) was upgraded in a computer lab. The OSD requested the acquisition of 26 computers for a lab for August 2012.

Figure 5.5: Availability of Technology at OSP

100% 80% 60%

73%

2008 50%

40% 18%

40% 20%

0% Very Satisfied

Satisfied

2010


23 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken

Results of Action Taken

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Internet connection.  Availability of financial resources for Faculty work

The OSP Faculty was very satisfied with the availability of financial resources for their work in the OSD as follows 2008-2009 64% 2010-2011 40%

When comparing 2008-2009 and 2010-2011, OSP Faculty level of satisfaction regarding the availability of financial resources, a decrease of 24% was observed in the level of satisfaction. The UPRP has experienced a decrease in the budget. This resulted in a decrease in the department budget for materials acquisition, travel arrangements, and professional development. The OS

The OSD has been updating the equipment and software necessary to comply with the attainment of the OSP competencies.

Figure 5.6: Availability of Financial Resources 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

64%

2008 40%

0%

0%

Very Satisfied

Satisfied

2010


24 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument

Assess Faculty participation in the academic advising process

Log of students advised

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

The number of students per advisor is at manageable levels.

Analysis and Action Taken Department Head has made necessary adjustments in the use of operational budget to assure academic excellence and quality service. The OSP Faculty is involved in the students’ academic advising each semester. From First Semester to Second Semester of academic year 2010-2011, there was an increase of 36% of students advised by Faculty. From Second Semester 2010 -2011 to First Semester 2011-2012, there was an additional increase of 4%.

Results of Action Taken

All full-time professors continue participating as academic advisors.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Table 5.1: OSP Students Advised by Faculty Professor Bracero, Carmen

I Semester 2010-2011 Acting Chancellor 11 2 6 7 8 82 116 255 45%

II Semester 2010-2011

I Semester 2011-2012

-

13

Del Valle, Rosa 11 Fournier, Ada I. 12 Mercado, Rosa 18 Negrón, Sonia 20 Rodríguez, Aida 14 Rodríguez, Yannira * Román, Marilyn 17 Torres, Doris*** 90 Torres, Lourdes Total 182 Total Enrollment 225 % Students Advised 81% *Maternity leave. **No service contract for 2011-2012 academic year. ***Dr. Doris Torres is the OSD Department Head.

** 6 18 ** 6 9 5 118 24 199 235 85%


25 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

Analysis and Action Taken The OSP Department Head has continued promoting OSP Faculty participation in students’ academic*Dr. Rosa del Valle and Prof. Sonia Negrón were not contracted for 2011-2012 academic year. *Dr. Rosa del Valle and Prof. Sonia Negrón were not contracted for 2011-2012 academic year.

advising.

Results of Action Taken

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)


26 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument Faculty Number of involvement with community the community organizations to which Faculty offered services

Analysis of Results Areas of Success The OSP Faculty is actively involved with the business and nonbusiness community organizations.

Analysis and Action Taken The OSP Faculty participates in business and non-business community service activities as: helping less advantage people in nonprofit organizations; coordinating workshops, professional development activities, and trainings for inservice personnel at public and private business organizations; holding leadership positions in boards of nonprofit organizations; and participating as evaluators in ACBSP accreditation

Results of Action Taken

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Continue promoting OSP Faculty participation in business and non-business community services projects.

Table 5.2: OSP Faculty Participation in the Business Community and Community Service Organizations Professor

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012 (First Semester) 4 * ** 0 * 0 ** 1 2 0 4 3 14

Bracero, Carmen 5 7 Calzada, Ruth 2 * Del Valle, Rosa*** 0 5 Fournier, Ada I. 0 1 Guzmán, Angelita 2 * Mercado, Rosa*** 0 2 Negrón, Sonia 0 2 Rodríguez, Aida 1 1 Rodríguez, Yannira 0 1 Román, Marilyn 0 1 Torres, Doris 6 17 Torres, Lourdes 8 6 Total 24 43 *Retired. **No service contract for 2011-2012 academic year. ***Dr. Rosa Del Valle and Prof. Rosa Mercado were actively involved in the collection of food and personal hygiene articles to be donated to community organizations, mainly to help children and elderly people.


27 Std. 5 - Faculty and Staff Focused Results Performance Description of Measure Measurement (Competency) Instrument

Faculty participation in OSD committees

Number of committees in which OSP Faculty serves on

Analysis of Results Areas of Success

The OSP Faculty is dynamically involved in various departmental committees.

Analysis and Action Taken process mock visits. When comparing 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, there is an increase of 44% in Faculty participation in community services projects. When comparing the the last two academic years, it is observed that Faculty has been actively involved in more OSD committees.

Results of Action Taken

The OSD Faculty participation in committees has been essential in the attainment of the OSD objectives as stated in the Annual Operational Plans.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Table 5.3: OSP Faculty Participation in Departmental Committees

Professor

Bracero, Carmen Del Valle, Rosa* Fournier, Ada I. Mercado, Rosa Negrón, Sonia* Rodríguez, Aida Rodríguez, Yannira Román, Marilyn Torres, Doris Torres, Lourdes

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012 (First Semester)

2 1 5 3 1 5 4 2 3 2

4 4 4 3 4 2 5 4 5 6

4 N/A 5 4 N/A 3 6 4 5 7

*No service contract for 2011-2012 academic year.


28 Standard 6 -Budgetary, Financial, and Market Results a.

Describe how you routinely provide reliable information to the public on your performance, including student achievement. See Overview O9, Page 3.

b.

Curriculum 1.

List any existing accredited degree programs/curricula that have been substantially revised since your last report and attach a Table - Standard 6, Criterion 6.1.3 – Undergraduate CPC Coverage for each program. The OSP was revised in 2009. In February 2011, the Vice Presidency of Academic Affairs (VPAA) at the systemic level recognized it as a curricular revision with minor changes. The Undergraduate CPC Compliance through the Office Systems new curricular sequence was revised. It is included as Table – Standard 6, Criterion 6.9 at Page 37.

2.

List any new degree programs that have been developed and attach a Table - Standard 6, Criterion 6.1.3 – Undergraduate CPC Coverage for each new program since your last report. Any new degree programs have been developed.

3.

List any accredited programs that have been terminated since your last report. None accredited programs have been terminated.


29 Budgetary, Financial, and Market Performance Results

Budgetary, financial, and market performance results examine (1) management and use of financial resources and (2) market challenges and opportunities. Adequate financial resources are vital to ensuring an outstanding faculty and teaching environment. The resources budgeted for and allocated to business units should be adequate to fund the necessary technology and training to allow students to develop the requisite competencies for business environments. Key indicators may include: expenditures per business student, business program expenditures as a percentage of budget, annual business unit budget increases or decreases, enrollment increase or decrease of business students, transfer in or out of business students, student credit hour production, or comparative data. Analysis of Results

Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Availability of financial resources to meet OSP needs

Approved OSP budget for 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 academic years

Areas of Success The budget assigned to OSP for 2010-2011 increased in 12%, when comparing to 2009-20l0 budget. The percentage of UPR-Ponce budget assigned to OSP has increased by 0.19% from 2009-2010 to 2011-2012 academic years.

Analysis and Action Taken The OSP Department Head used allocated funds to acquire the necessary resources to comply with the Program’s goals. The OSP Faculty has available the necessary equipment and updated software to deliver courses. The OSP Department Head has requested additional funds to meet other needs.

Results of Action Taken (occurs in the following year) The OSP requested budget increase for 2012-2013 academic year according to enrollment and Program’s needs as computers, educational materials, and office supplies, traveling, and Faculty and staff professional development.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years) Figure 6.1: OSP Budget

$751,294

$767,235

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 $853,064

Table 6.1: Expenditures per OSP Student Academic Year Expenditures 2009-2010 $2,889.59 2010-2011 $3,345.35 2011-2012 $3,264.83 Table 6.2: OSP Expenditures as a Percentage of UPR-Ponce Budget Academic Year Percentage 2009-2010 3.15% 2010-2011 3.21% 2011-2012 3.34%


30 Analysis of Results Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Areas of Success

Admission quota established by the UPR-Ponce Administrative Board

Institutional Annual Data Profile prepared by UPR-Ponce Office of Planning and Institutional Research (OPIR)

During 20102011 and 20112012 academic years, the admission quota for freshman students was exceeded by 5% and 6% respectively. The total enrollment in OSP decreased by 2% during 20102011, when comparing to 2009-2010 academic year. The total enrollment in OSP decreased by 8% during 20112012 when comparing to 2010-2011 academic year.

Analysis and Action Taken The OSP Department Head has appointed the Orientation and Promotion Committee who has developed activities to promote the Program as open houses, occupational fairs, and high school visits. The members of the Committee coordinate the preparation of the OSP academic offerings brochures and promotional recruiting materials with the collaboration of the non-faculty personnel and students enrolled in SOFI 4030 Desktop Publishing course.

Results of Action Taken (occurs in the following year) The Orientation and Promotion Committee continues developing activities to promote the Program to increase enrollment. During 20092010 academic year, the Committee visited three high schools and participated in the UPRPonce Open House. During 20102011 academic year, the Committee visited six high schools offering orientation to 199 students. Also, the committee participated in the UPR-Ponce Open House. The

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Table 6.3:Freshman OSP Admission Quota and Students Enrolled Freshman Academic Year Quota Students Enrolled 2009-2010 75 73 2010-2011 75 79 2011-2012 75 80

Figure 6.2: Total OSP Enrollment

235

2009-2010

255

2010-2011 260

2011-2012


31 Analysis of Results Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Compliance with StudentCredit Hour Production of an average of 15 credits per semester

Institutional Annual Data Profile

Areas of Success

The student-credit hour production was almost the same for the past three years:  2009-2010 – 15 credits  2010-2011 – 15 credits  2011-2012 – 15 credits

Analysis and Action Taken

When comparing the average per year, it remained almost the same. The Faculty advised students to enroll in the courses following the curricular sequence.

Results of Action Taken (occurs in the following year) Committee’s members coordinated a departmental Open House. These activities impacted high schools students, and based on the enrolled freshman students, the Committee is complying with its purpose. The Faculty encourages students to follow the curricular sequence as an approach to complete the OSP requirements in a six-year period or less and to increase the graduation rate.

Insert Graphs or Tables of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years)

Table 6.4: Student-Credit Hour Production Academic Year 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 Average per Semester

First Semester 15.47 15.48 15.40 15.45

Second Semester 14.57 14.52 14.50 14.53

Average per Year 15.02 15.00 14.95 14.99


32 Standard 6 - Organizational Performance Results Organizational effectiveness results examine attainment of organizational goals. Each business unit must have a 5. Organizational Effectiveness Results systematic reporting mechanism for each business program that charts enrollment patterns, student rete ntion, student academic success, and other characteristics reflecting students' performance. Key indicators may include: graduation rates, enrollment, improvement in safety, hiring equity, increased use of webbased technologies, use of facilities by community organizations, contributions to the community, or partnerships, retention rates by program, and what you report to governing boards and administrative units. Analysis of Results Areas of Analysis and Success Action Taken

Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Increase the OSP graduation rate at least 38% over the next five years

Data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS)

During 20092010 academic year (2003 Cohort), the OSP graduation rate was 32%.

Institutional Annual Data Profile

During the last three years, the average time to degree has been five years.

During 2010-2011 academic year (Cohort 2004), the OSP graduation rate was 42% exceeding the projection of 38% over the next five years. The OSP’s graduation rate for 2010-2011 (Cohort 2004) had increased a 10%, when comparing to 2009-2010 (Cohort 2003). The degrees granted in 20102011 (Cohort 2004) increased by 20% when comparing to 2009-2010 (Cohort 2003).

Results of Action Taken (occurs in the following year) The OSP continues developing strategies to increase the graduation rate as the academic counseling by appointment. This allows students to comply with the curricular sequence in a six-year period or less and with the credit-hour production.

Insert Graphs or Tales of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years))

Table 6.5: OSP and UPR-Ponce Graduation Rates Academic Year

OSP Graduation Rate

UPR-Ponce Graduation Rate

32%

42%

42%

45%

34%

*

37%

44%

2009-2010 (Cohort 2003) 2010-2011 (Cohort 2004) 2011-2012 (Cohort 2005) Average

*Data not available. Table 6.6: Time to Degree Academic Year 2009-2010 (Cohort 2003) 2010-2011 (Cohort 2004) 2011-2012 (Cohort 2005)

Total Degrees Granted

Four Years

Five Years

Six Years

22

2

12

8

28

7

20

1

20

6

11

3


33 Performance Measure (Competency)

Improve OSP freshman to sophomore retention rate by at least 5% over the next five years

Description of Measurement Instrument

Institutional Annual Data Profile

Analysis of Results Areas of Analysis and Success Action Taken

The OSP retention rate for the past three years was 2009-2010 - 81% 2010-2011 - 65% 2011-2012 - 58%

The current OSP requires 132 semester credit hours. To complete a bachelor’s degree on a traditional four year academic schedule, a student must complete from 14 to 19 credits per semester for eight semesters (four years). The OSP’s retention rate for 2010-2011 (Cohort 20092010) had decreased a 16%, when comparing to 2009-2010 (Cohort 20082009). The OSP’s retention rate for 2011-2011 (Cohort 20102011) had decreased a 7%, when comparing to 2010-2011

Results of Action Taken (occurs in the following year)

The OSP continues developing proactive strategies to increase the retention rate as:  promote students’ development of strong ties with the University  promote students’ participation in OSP

Insert Graphs or Tales of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years))

Table 6.7: Freshman to Sophomore Retention Rate Academic Year 2009-2010 (Cohort 2008-2009) 2010-2011 (Cohort 2009-2010) 2011-2012 (Cohort 2010-2011) Average

OSP Retention Rate

UPR-Ponce Retention Rate

81%

83%

65% 58% 73%

74% 77% 79%


34 Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Analysis and Success Action Taken

(Cohort 20092010). The OSP Retention Committee was appointed to strengthen the students’ retention. The Committee approaches are focused on freshman and sophomore students through the collaboration of alumni, Counseling and Guidance Department, senior students, Office Systems Students’ Association, and OSP Faculty.

Results of Action Taken (occurs in the following year) extracurricular activities  identify on time students who need support and intervene with them  improve students’ experience in the university  ensure academic advising’s quality  monitor students’ progress  encourage students’ participation in tutoring and mentoring services. With the implementation of the new curricular sequence, the professors encourage

Insert Graphs or Tales of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years))


35 Performance Measure (Competency)

Students’ participation in community service projects

Description of Measurement Instrument

Number of community organizations that students impact with their projects Rubric to assess level of satisfaction of the impacted community organizations

Analysis of Results Areas of Analysis and Success Action Taken

OSP students participate in community service projects mainly with marginalized communities. One hundred percent (100%) of community organizations impacted with students’ projects is very satisfied with the contribution of the students.

The OSP students are involved in diverse projects as:  train community groups through workshops  support community and university projects, especially those aimed at the rescue of marginalized and vulnerable communities. The OSP curriculum provides opportunities for students’ participation in community service projects in courses as SOFI

Results of Action Taken (occurs in the following year) students, through the academic advising process, to continue in the Program. The OSP fosters students’ social responsibility through their participation in community service projects as in-service training; collection of food, clothes and personal hygiene articles for children and elderly; and activities that aimed to at caring for the environment, among others. The OSP students continue participating in community service projects to reinforce the social responsibility

Insert Graphs or Tales of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years))

Table 6.8: Community Organizations Impacted by Students Academic Year 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 (First semester)

Course SOFI SOFI 4985 3017 4 0 5 1 3

0

SOFI 4505 2 2

ASOFI

1

2

2 2


36 Performance Measure (Competency)

Description of Measurement Instrument

Analysis of Results Areas of Analysis and Success Action Taken

3017, SOFI 4505, and SOFI 4985.

Course availability through several formats for instructional delivery

Courses available through independent study format and BlackBoard educational platform

The OSP has identified four (4) courses that students can enroll as independent study format. The use of the BlackBoard educational platform has been incorporated in 60% of OSP courses.

The Office Systems Association (ASOFI, for its Spanish acronym) also develops these activities. The OSD Committee for Courses Design in BlackBoard and Elluminate was appointed to promote faculty participation and training in designing courses through these educational platforms. According to a survey administered in May 2010, 96% of students is very satisfied or satisfied with the use of BlackBoard in OSP courses.

Results of Action Taken (occurs in the following year) skills. The community service project is integrated as an enriching activity in other OSP courses.

The OSP continues with instructional delivery through several formats to meet the needs and preferences of the OSP students. The OSD plans to survey the students’ preference for the offering of hybrid and online courses.

Insert Graphs or Tales of Resulting Trends for 3-5 Years (please graph all available data up to five years))


37 Standard 6, Criterion 6.1.3 Table 6.9 presents the Common Professional Components for the OSP as the new curricular sequence. Table 6.9: Common Professional Components Compliance through the OSP New Curricular Sequence Hour Class Sessions by Common Professional Component Core Courses SOFI XXXX – Document Production Basic Level SOFI XXXX – Document Production Intermediate Level SOFI 3327 – Spanish Transcription SOFI XXXX –Document Production Advanced Level SOFI 3305-3306 – Information Processing Information Processing Lab SOFI 3017 – Interpersonal Relations in the Office SOFI 3015 – Office Systems Concepts and Technologies SOFI 4005 –Programs Integration for Electronic Processing of Information SOFI XXXX – Administrative Procedures for Office Professionals SOFI 3210 – Records Management SOFI XXXX –Accounting Procedures for Office Professionals SOFI 4038 – Office Administration SOFI 4030 – Desktop Publishing SOFI 4985 – Internship and Seminar

a1 MKT

a2 FIN

a3 ACC

a4 MGT

b1 LAW

b2 ECO

2 7

7

6

6

6

6

7

60

60

63

2

30

34

2

55

1

90

8

60

10

84

6

10

2 45

6

1

6

22

45

60

10

84

4

44

3

6

3

20

6

64

4

13 3

5

96

3

64

45 4

2

2

15

Total

3

3

5

d POL/ COMP

63

6

2

c2 STAT/ QUANT

60

8

24

c1 IS

3

6

4 3

b4 GLO

3

6

3

b3 ETH

6

8

84

45 200

321


38 Table 6.9: Common Professional Components Compliance through the OSP New Curricular Sequence Hour Class Sessions by Common Professional Component Core Courses

a1 MKT

SOFI 4040 – Planning and Implementation of Office Systems SOFI 4505 – Training Techniques for In-service Personnel MATE 3041 – Introductory Mathematics MERC XXXX –Basic Principles of Marketing for Office Professionals ECON XXXX –Basic Principles of Economics for Office Professionals ESTA XXXX –Basic Principles of Statistics for Office Professionals FINA XXXX –Basic Principles of Finance for Office Professionals

Totals

a2 FIN

2

a3 ACC

a4 MGT

b1 LAW

b2 ECO

b3 ETH

b4 GLO

c1 IS

4

10

2

3

3

1

45

2

4

2

2

3

18

4

c2 STAT/ QUANT

2

3

2

45

2

30

20 15

Office Systems

15

80

117

30

31

70

Business (Office System)

General Education

33 credit hours

15

15

36

64

45

35

590

89

Table 6.10: Bachelor’s Degree Credits for the OSP New Curricular Sequence

Major

26

20

31

Total 68

20

2

d POL/ COMP

Core Requirements

Requirements Beyond Core

Business Courses

61 credit hours

20 credit hours

4 credit hours

General Electives

Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation

12 credit hours

130

234

1,343


39 APPENDIX A: NOTE STANDARD #4, MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF STUDENT LEARNING AND PERFORMANCE, CRITERION 4.2 The ACBSP evaluation team that evaluated the Office System Bachelor Program included a note in the Evaluation Report indicating that the Major Field Test was given during the fall of 2009 to 14 students and recommending that the assessment be tracked. The OSP Accreditation Committee continued administering the MFT to graduating students enrolled in the capstone course SOFI 4985 – Internship and Seminar. Table A-1 shows the results obtained from 2009-2010 academic year to 2011-2012. Table A-1: Associate Degree Business Major Field Test Results of UPR-Ponce OS Program Semester Academic Year August – Dec 2009 January-May 2010 Average August – Dec 2010 January – May 2011 Average August – Dec 2011

Number of Students 13 15 14 13 18 16 14

Accounting

Marketing

Management

Economics

27% 26% 27% 30% 32% 31% 25%

28% 25% 27% 31% 33% 32% 27%

32% 29% 31% 34% 27% 31% 32%

36% 36% 36% 35% 35% 35% 33%

Semester Average 31% 29% 30% 33% 32% 33% 29%

Annual Average 30%

33% 29%

The OSP current curriculum includes two courses in the area of administration and one course in accounting. In the revised OSP, the credit hours for the accounting course were increased from 45 to 60 hours. It also includes a one-credit hour course for each of the following areas: marketing, economics, finance, and statistics. Based on the 2009-2010 Business MFT results, the OSP Accreditation Committee has been coordinating coaching workshops in the areas of accounting, marketing, and economics since 2010-2011 academic year. Students assessed the workshops regarding its usefulness while answering the Business MFT. Results revealed that 73% of students was very satisfied or satisfied with the workshops. Other results showed that 65% of students stated that the workshops were helpful when answering the MFT, and 84% of students recommended continuing offering the workshops. The 2010-2011 Business MFT results revealed an increase in the average percentage for accounting and marketing, when compared to 2009-2010 percentages. When comparing first semester of 2011-2012 to each semester of 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 academic years, the results were similar to one of the semesters, but lower than the other three semesters. The OSP Curriculum and Accreditation Committees are in the process of implementing the new curricular sequence in August 2012. The one-credit courses in the areas of economics, marketing and finance will allow students to strengthen their knowledge in those areas. The OSP Faculty continues reinforcing management concepts in OSP courses. The OSP has been complying with the administration of the Business MFT and maintaining a tracking of the results. Therefore, we request the removal of the Note for Standard #4, Measurement and Analysis of Student Learning and Performance, Criterion 4.2.


40 APPENDIX B: NOTE STANDARD #5, FACULTY AND STAFF FOCUS, CRITERIONS 5.3 AND 5.4 The ACBSP Office System Bachelor Program evaluation team included a note in the Evaluation Report indicating that UPRP will need to provide evidence of student learning outcomes and student and stakeholder satisfaction to support rationale for not adhering to historical criteria and/or show results of plan to increase doctorally qualified faculty. Information included in Standards 3 and 4 provides sufficient evidence of stakeholder’s and students’ satisfaction with OSP and student learning outcomes that support the rationale for not adhering to historical criteria. Program’s Faculty reflects an adequate mix of professionally and doctorally qualified faculty and their qualifications are appropriate for meeting program’s mission and goals. Faculty credentials respond to the OSP’s mission which is to deliver a curriculum at the undergraduate level, theoretically sound and directly pertinent, that facilitates and promotes the students’ integral development. Since 2006-2007 academic year, Article 42 (as amended) of the UPR General By-Laws established that for a faculty position the candidate should have obtained a doctorate degree or an equivalent terminal title in the discipline to be taught, from an accredited institution of higher education. According to this institutional law, and to comply with ACBSP requirements, the OSP Human Resource Plan states that the candidate for a faculty position should have obtained a doctorate degree. Currently a full-time professor is in the process of completing the doctoral degree. Therefore, we request the removal of the Note for Standard #5, Faculty and Staff Focus, Criterions 5.3 and 5.4. APPENDIX C: CONDITION ON STANDARD #6, EDUCATIONAL AND BUSINESS PROCESS MONITORING The ACBSP Office System Bachelor Program evaluation team included a condition in the Evaluation Report indicating that UPR-Ponce needs to demonstrate improvement in the following areas: 1) assessment of the new curriculum for OSP after full implementation, 2) deployment of quantitative data to analyze the effectiveness of program improvement measures and assessment, and 3) analysis of retention rate with plan to continually monitor for improvement. Assessment of the new curriculum for OSP after full implementation The OSP curricular sequence was revised. It was submitted in August 2010 to the UPR Vice Presidency of Academic Affairs (VPAA) at the systemic level. In February 2011, the OSP Department Head received the VPAA feedback recognizing it as a curricular revision with minor changes. The UPRPonce Dean of Academic Affairs submitted it to the UPR-Ponce Academic Senate for its recommendations before implementation. The UPR-Ponce Academic Senate reviewed the curricular sequence and in November 2011issued Certification 2011-2012-28 to allow its implementation. The OSP Accreditation Committee in collaboration with the Curriculum Committee coordinated the new curricular sequence disclosure among students and of other implementation processes. On February 8, 2012, the OSP Department Head called to a student’s assembly to inform about the new curricular sequence. The students have had a reflection period to decide to stay in the current curriculum or change. The Committees developed an adjusted curricular sequence for sophomore and junior students that decided to change from the current curriculum to the new one. During the academic counseling process for the first semester of 2012-2013 academic year, the students will sign an agreement to establish their selection of the two options: to stay in the current curriculum or change to the new curricular sequence.


41 The new curricular sequence will begin in August 2012. After five years, the OSD will assess the effectiveness of the curriculum implemented, as stated in Certification No. 43 (2006-2007) of the UPR Board of Trustees. Deployment of quantitative data to analyze the effectiveness of program improvement measures and assessment The OSP Faculty is committed to comply with the assessment activities until closing the loop. At the end of each academic year, the OSP Faculty meets to evaluate and review the assessment results and identify actions to be taken when the success indicator is not accomplished, when the data reflects a decrease in the percentage of students who attains the performance measure or when Faculty’s target is to increase the percentage of students who accomplish the performance measure. Those actions are evaluated to determine their effectiveness. If the actions are not effective, the Faculty develops other strategies for students learning improvement. Table XX presents some examples of competencies assessment activities, results, actions taken, and analysis of those actions.

Table C-1: Competencies Assessment Activities, Results, Actions Taken, and Analysis of Actions Taken Competency Technological Skills Course: SOFI 4005

Result The performance measure was attained, as stated in the assessment plan.

Action Taken The technological skills were reinforced in SOFI 3305 through more practical exercises.

The performance measure was attained, as stated in the assessment plan.

The course content of basic business principles in global environment was reinforced through the use of strategies as quizzes, oral presentations, research papers, case studies, teamwork, and providing students written material.

Performance measure: Seventy five percent (75%) of students will obtain 75% or more in technological skills assessment

Basic Business Principles Knowledge in Global Environment Course: SOFI 4038 Performance measure:

Analysis of Action Taken Although the success indicator was attained in 2011-2012 academic year, the percentage of students who attained the success indicator decreased. After analyzing the assessment results, it was found that the major difficulty in SOFI 4005 was the preparation of the Excel exercises in which students need to perform mathematical operations. The Faculty in charge of the course has determined that it is necessary to increase the hours assigned in the course to the development of this skill. Although the performance measure was attained, the percentage of students who attained the success indicator showed a slight decrease during 2010-2011 academic year. The strategies integrated to the learning and teaching process


42 Table C-1: Competencies Assessment Activities, Results, Actions Taken, and Analysis of Actions Taken Competency Sixty five percent (65%) of students will obtain 70% or more in the assessment of basic business principles knowledge in global environment Civic Values Course: SOFI 4985 (Capstone Course)

Result

The performance measure was attained, as stated in the assessment plan.

Performance measure: Eighty five percent (85%) of students will obtain 90% or more in civic values assessment

Action Taken

The civic values were reinforced in SOFI 4985 through the use of strategies as the presentation of community service projects completed by students enrolled in the course during the previous semester, and the orientation of persons with experience in community service projects.

Analysis of Action Taken demonstrated to be effective. During 2011-2012 academic year, the percentage of students who attained the performance measure increased by 4% in comparison to 2010-2011 academic year. The strategies integrated to the learning and teaching process demonstrated to be effective. During 2011-2012 academic year, the percentage of students who attained the performance measure increased by 17% in comparison to 2009-2010 academic year.

Comparative information and data analysis are continuously reviewed by OSP Faculty to improve its deployment and the effectiveness in promoting program mission, goals, and objectives attainment. Periodically, the Program conducts surveys to identify program strengths and weaknesses and to determine performance improvements needed to achieve program’s targets. The OSP receives feedback from graduating students, alumni, employers, external reviewers, and interns’ supervisors. The comparative information and data are obtained from measurement instruments as:      

Business Major Field Test developed by ETS (BMFT) Internship performance assessment Employers’ evaluation of OSP alumni competencies Alumni evaluation of OSP competencies attainment Retention rates Graduation rates

The OSP Faculty meets periodically to evaluate and review comparative information and data used by the Program to improve its effectiveness. A result sustained from the analysis of comparative data serves as a framework for revising program targets and benchmarks and for developing strategies and improvements required to achieve the goals. The OSP Assessment Plan was implemented during 2009-2010 academic year. Assessment activities have been completed as stated in the Plan. This provides the opportunity to accumulate comparable historical data assessment results for a three-year period. The OSP Faculty has decided to revise the


43 plan and the instruments designed after a cycle of three years. The OSP Faculty has submitted recommendations for the revision of some instruments: comprehensive tests, rubrics, and case studies, among others. After an analysis of the process of gathering data, the OSP Faculty identified the need of developing a system to securely maintain the assessment information. A template was designed in Excel to compile assessment data. At the end of each academic semester, the OSP Faculty completes the template according to the competency assessed and provides the data with the evidence to the OSP Assessment Committee. Analysis of retention rate with plan to continually monitor for improvement The OSD Faculty is aware of continually to monitor its retention rate for improvement and has developed a plan. Figure C-1 presents the stages included in the plan. Figure C-1: Retention Rate Plan to Continually Monitor for Improvement

Request retention data from UPR-Ponce Office of Planning and Institutional Research (OPIR)

Identify students on probation through the Counseling and Guidance Department

Organize the data in comparative tables in Excel

Meet with UPR-Ponce professional counselor assigned to advice the students on probation

Discuss retention data with OSP Faculty at departmental meetings

Provide recommendations to OSP Students Retention Committee

Develop a students retention plan

Implement retention strategies

Assess retention plan's effectiveness


44 The OSP Faculty annually gathers retention rate data from the Office of Planning and Institutional Research (OPIR) and analyzes it. Based on the data, the Retention Committee determines specific actions with the purpose of improving the rates. Some of the strategies developed to impact freshmen to increase the retention rates are:        

conduct workshops for adjusting to university life provide mentoring and tutoring programs on basic skills have dialogues to know their experiences within the Institution and the Program and to identify areas that need to be improved or need to be taken into consideration for student retention organize motivational orientations provided by alumni promote students’ participation in OSP extracurricular activities identify on time students who need support and intervene with them ensure academic advising’s quality encourage students’ participation in tutoring/mentoring services

Other strategies that the OSP Retention Committee is considering are:   

promote students’ development of strong ties with the UPR-Ponce improve students’ experience in the university monitor students’ progress

During the academic advising process, the OSP Faculty encourages students to maintain in the Program, asks about their experience in the Program, and shares with them information about the support services available in the institution. Also, students that need help are referred to the Counseling and Guidance Department where professional counselors and psychologists are available to advise them. The OSP Faculty is committed to explore the reasons for the decrease of the OSP retention rates for the past two years. The Retention Committee is conducting a study to determine the reasons for leaving and will use the results to develop strategies to address the reasons presented by students. The Committee is currently revising the OSP Retention Plan developed in 2009-2010 academic year. The OSP has been very proactive in analyzing its retention rates and has a formal plan for its monitoring and improvement. After explaining and providing the necessary documentation for addressing the condition placed for Standard 6-Educational and Business Process Management, we request the removal of the condition.


QA REPORT for ACBSP