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Blue Valley Unified School District Overland Park, Kansas

Center for Advanced Professional Studies Facility Design Guidelines April 2008


table of contents

CAPS project overview purpose of facility design guidelines location blue valley school district introduction education and financial feasibility report project overview process project goals and ideas steering commitee workshop participants

1 2 4 5 8 34 35 41 44 45

project context sustainable strategies sustainable case studies local climate site analysis

47 51 60 64

planning concepts planning concepts technology concepts safety and security concepts flexibility and agility concepts

65 66 69 71

facility program overview of program format facility program building diagram site diagram 1 student learning strands 2 administration and staff spaces 3 community and stakeholder spaces 4 facility management and support spaces

74 75 81 82 83 121 139 146

appendix glossary planning planning planning planning planning

meeting meeting meeting meeting meeting

one presentations two presentations two - visual listening two - culture, experience, brand three presentation

i A1 A17 A26 A31 A40

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purpose of facility design guidelines The Facility Design Guidelines document is a guide for architects, educators, administrators, parents, and community members that identifies instructional, technological, and space requirements for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies. After the collaborative workshops, this document is produced to represent the process of long term facility analysis, design and construction. There will be opportunities for the information presented in these pages to be further refined with user input during the next steps of the process. The document is designed to: 1. Present an understanding of the basic philosophy and design parameters for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies in Overland Park, Kansas. 2. Indicate spatial adjacencies and general performance requirements. 3. Identify programmatic needs and establish a base line for the scope of the project. 4. Present a snapshot in the development of the project process. 5. Serve as a working document that is compiled in a binder for ease in adding or replacing information as additional needs and changes occur. The document is not intended to: 1.

Limit design opportunities within the facility.

2.

Standardize the building via implementation of component parts.

Over the course of the design phases, deviations may be necessary that do not meet the requirements of this document and need to be discussed with the project leadership for waiver. As a guideline, an acceptable range of deviation from the areas indicated in the space program is 2-3% for spaces smaller than 2000 sf and 1-2% for larger spaces. Classrooms should not be smaller than areas indicated.

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location

About Overland Park, Kansas Overland Park is located about 12 miles southwest of Kansas City. It’s current population of approximately 177,000, represents about 1/3 of Johsnson County’s population. It is the second largest city in Kansas, comprised of 75.33 square miles. (information from: http://www.opkansas.org)

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blue valley school district Blue Valley Mission Statement The Blue Valley School District’s mission is unprecedented academic success and unparalleled personal growth for every student.

Overview of Blue Valley School District The Blue Valley School District (USD 229) is committed to giving students an Education Beyond Expectations - an education filled with opportunities. This K-12 district encompasses 91 square miles in southeastern Johnson County, Kansas. More than 20,000 students attend Blue Valley’s 33 schools, and the district is committed to providing a personalized learning experience to every one of them. The district has five high schools (grades 9-12), eight middle schools (grades 6-8) and 20 elementary schools (grades K-5). Special programs include: Advanced Placement (AP) and other college credit courses K-12 enrichments programs Intervention programs for reading and math The Blue Valley Academy, a non-traditional program for high school students Mentoring programs, and ACCESS, a program teaching independent living skills for students with moderate to severe disabilities. The district’s Wilderness Science Center offers students of all ages hands-on environmental education in a 30-acre nature preserve adjoining an elementary school on the Blue River. The Blue Valley School District provides not only a high quality education based on the mission and strategic plan goals of unprecedented academic success and unparalleled personal growth for every student, but it also allows opportunities for students to grow outside the classroom as well through a variety of extra- and co-curricular activities. Blue Valley staff members are committed to helping students find their path to success. Together, we will enable each child to become more than he or she ever hoped to be.

(the above information is from http://www.bluevalleyk12.org/)

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introduction Project Introduction Blue Valley School District is preparing students to become citizens of a twenty-first century diverse and global society. The school district is planning a unique new facility with a 250 student capacity, 11th and12th grade Center for Advanced Professional Studies of approximately 66,000 gross square feet. In February through April of 2008, Perkins+Will, with NSP Architecture, facilitated a project programming phase. Collaborative workshops were held with a group comprised of administrators, teachers, board members and community members. Throughout the interactive meetings, the architects presented to the group and facilitated large and small group discussions. Concepts were developed by the participants during these planning meetings to create a program that will support the unique curriculum being developed. Perkins+Will and NSP Architecture are pleased to be working with Blue Valley School District in the programming of their new Center for Advanced Professional Studies. To provide a conceptual foundation for the architectural design phases, the following document incorporates concepts explored in the collaborative workshops and provides a guideline for flexible facility models to support and enhance the forward thinking educational ideas developed by Blue Valley School District and the community of Overland Park, Kansas.

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why CAPS? The Blue Valley School District was unified in 1965. Since that time, the district has grown between 3 and 20 percent each year. The Blue Valley School District’s mission is unprecedented academic success and unparalleled personal growth for every student. • The Blue Valley School District encompasses 91 square miles in southeastern Johnson County. • The district is located in south Overland Park, KS, which was rated as the #1 suburb in the greater metropolitan Kansas City area by the Kansas City Star in November 2005. Facilities • In Newsweek’s Top U.S. Schools list for 2007, Blue Valley accounted for 4 of 6 Kansas high schools making the list • In the 2007 – 2008 school year our students earned the highest ACT score in district history (34) and the top score in the KC metro area (24.4). • For the sixth year in a row all Blue Valley Schools and the District made Academic Yearly Progress (AYP) as mandated by the No Child Left Behind legislation. To substantially improve the skills and ignite the interest level of high school graduates selecting life sciences research as a career path so they can be highly successful in contributing to this changing scientific field. Fewer graduating seniors are selecting the field of science as a career than were 20 years ago. While the field of science and research is increasing in the greater KC area, the graduates are not meeting the demand. In the recent issue of Business Facilities magazine, the nation’s premier site relocation resource, Kansas ranked in the Top 10 states in the nation in several key categories: •

4th in bioscience investments

5th in bioscience research funding

10th in education climate

13th in educated work force

And the highest concentration of employment in research, testing and medical laboratories

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what is CAPS? Innovation is what will grow our economy and ensure that every family prospers in an increasingly competitive global market. Our students must acquire 21st century skills to be successful in the "Innovation Generation." Blue Valley's Center for Advanced Professional Studies (CAPS) will inspire students to succeed in the critical areas of Bioscience, Business, Engineering and Human Services.

CAPS is an example of how industry and our educational system can work together to produce personalized learning experiences that prepare the next generation of professionals for 21st century opportunities. Junior and senior level students from all Blue Valley high schools will join together in a unique learning opportunity to deeply explore their interests in a profession-based learning approach. Learning is student driven; teachers facilitate the learning process through problem-based projects comprised of authentic and relevant work assignments.

Students learn the professional skills necessary to succeed in today's fast-paced world, all before entering college or other post-secondary educational opportunities. CAPS is all about students solving real problems, with real tools (used by real professionals), being mentored by real employers, leading to real contribution.

(the above information is from http://www.bluevalleyk12.org/)

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education and financial feasibility report Center Based Program Education and Financial Feasibility Report

CENTER BASED PROGRAM EDUCATION AND FINANCIAL FEASIBILITY REPORT

1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND ADMINISTRATIVE RECOMMENDATION During the summer of 2006, the Blue Valley Board of Education charged the superintendent to study the feasibility, both educationally and financially, of a program that would be targeted to provide unique student learning opportunities that currently do not exist in the school district. This charge was born out of the Strategic Plan’s commitment to investigate innovative programs that would aid in student achievement. From that original charge and the numerous focus groups, discussions, and committee meetings that followed, the idea of a Center Based Program (CBP) emerged and is presented in this report. The purpose of this report is to address the questions raised by the BOE in its charge to the superintendent, and to surface other issues that will need discussion and resolution prior to full implementation of the CBP. The report describes the process followed for identifying areas of study, as well as perceived needs and concerns of offering a CBP. Details of identified program strands, rationale for selection of those strands and feedback from staff, students and parents will be addressed later in the document. Two task forces led the research effort into a CBP. Dennis King led an educational task force (ETF) formed to review the curricular and interest area aspects of a CBP, as well as to develop a timeline for implementation. The ETF was comprised of district teachers from all curricular areas, as well as administrators and district coordinating teachers. A total of 37 people served on the committee. Once that committee finished its work regarding the curricular interest areas, Mike Slagle led an educational-business task force (BTF) to investigate the feasibility aspects of the CBP. The BTF was comprised of administration from the areas of human resources, business and finance, and planning and facilities. It is believed, based on the analysis of the ETF, that a CBP would provide the following benefits to Blue Valley students: x x x x x x x

increase opportunities to explore different interest paths prepare for lifelong learning increase options for non-college bound students provide authentic educational opportunities within the community allow for relevant and rigorous course of study within an interest area experience hands-on learning for all students integrate 21st century skills into the curricula

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Based on the analysis and discussion in this report, moving forward with a CBP is recommended. The CBP is recommended to be located in a free-standing building on the District Office Campus. It is recommended that the CBP consist of upper level (grades 11-12) courses in four interest areas – business, bio-science, human services and engineering. The CBP is recommended to be coordinated with entry level classes at the building level. Potential opportunities with the CBP include collaboration with professionals in the field, corporate collaboration, and career interest shadowing. A timeline for the opening of a CBP in the fall of 2010 is recommended, though with the opening of Blue Valley Southwest also scheduled for the fall of 2010, it is recommended that this issue be discussed further. Financial analysis suggests that the CBP can be operated by the district with little general operating fund impact on the system for the first two years. After that two year period, actual financial impact on the district will depend on program enrollment and level of corporate partnership/sponsorship.

2.0 CHARGE FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION AND WORK TO DATE As part of the Strategic Plan commitment to investigate innovative programs that would aid in student achievement, the Board of Education (BOE) charged the superintendent to develop a study around the concept of a Center Based Program (CBP). Specifically, the charge the BOE gave to the superintendent was: “By the end of January 2007, a preliminary report will be provided to the Board of Education regarding the interest on the part of students and parents in a school such as the Center Based Program. A final report, including administrative recommendations, will be provided to the Board of Education by April 1, 2007. The final report will include potential funding sources, potential corporate partners, cost, potential site, program initiatives/educational consideration and timeline for implementation.” In November 2006, the Strategic Plan Oversight Committee 1 recommended to the Board of Education that the district move forward with the exploration of a CBP. In December 2006, district administration presented the BOE with a preliminary report regarding the interest of students and parents in a school such as the Center Based Program. Twenty-five parent focus groups were facilitated by an outside consulting firm. Approximately half of the group included parents with no exposure to the district’s current, similar programs (such as BVTV and Health Careers). Parents with little or no exposure to these programs were cautiously apprehensive about the idea of a CBP, while parents who were familiar with the current programs were very supportive. The BOE gave its approval at the December workshop to continue with the exploration of a CBP. In December 2006, under the leadership of Dennis King, a second committee was formed to review the curricular and interest area aspects of a CBP, as well as to develop a timeline for implementation. This committee was comprised of district teachers from all 1 This committee has the role of reviewing many of the initiatives of the Strategic Plan prior to review at the BOE level. This committee includes two BOE members, the superintendent’s cabinet, and representatives from the BVNEA and Communications Department.

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curricular areas, as well as administrators and district coordinating teachers. A total of 37 people served on the committee. Once that committee finished its work regarding the curricular interest areas, Mike Slagle led an effort to investigate the feasibility aspects of the CBP.

3.0 FORMAT OF THIS REPORT This report presents the work of various committees and workgroups throughout the past year. Section 4.1-7 presents the feasibility study of the CBP, organized around the central questions to which the BOE is seeking answers, as evidenced by its charge to the superintendent. Throughout committee discussions this past year on the CBP, several other issues were raised that at some point will need further dialogue and resolution. Those issues are presented in section 4.8.

4.0 FEASIBILITY STUDY The BOE has asked, by virtue of its charge, for information regarding the CBP. The information requested includes potential funding sources, potential corporate partners, cost, potential site, program initiatives and timeline for implementation. The purpose of this section is to provide information related to each of those topics.

4.1 Program Initiatives/Educational Considerations 4.1a Introduction The process followed for identifying areas of study as well as perceived needs and concerns offering a CBP is presented in section 4.1. A brief review of literature as well as brief descriptions of what high schools across the country are providing in this area for their learners is discussed. Details of identified program strands, rationale for selection of those strands and feedback from staff, students and parents is also presented.

4.1b Overview High school reform has long been a topic of study for educational researchers. Many are looking to find how schools can better prepare students for post-secondary education and entrance into the workforce. Much research has gone into identifying skills necessary to be successful in the 21st century. These “21st Century Skills” include digital age literacy, inventive thinking, effective communication and high productivity. North Central Regional Educational Laboratories suggests that schools embrace new designs for learning based on these 21st century skills in the context of rigorous academic content (Lemke 2003). These new designs come in many forms, but there are components that each have in common. First, authentic experiences for students are

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necessary. Breaking Ranks II suggests connecting “real-life applications of knowledge and skills to help students link their education to their future” (2004). A second critical component for enhancing student learning is removing the artificial dividing line between curricular areas. Interdisciplinary learning allows students to infuse information from a wide variety of sources into their learning, evaluate the information, and synthesize it into a solution to a complex problem. Howard Gardner, renown for his multiple intelligences theory, gave the following reply when asked what the context of the substance of education should be: “…something which is a bit more eccentric: The necessity of being able to at least participate in interdisciplinary activity; That is, activity, which calls on you to bring together different sources of knowledge, to be able to synthesize them, judge them and so on” (Larsen 2002). Lastly, the idea of personalizing the learning experience for the student is important. Another suggestion from “Breaking Ranks II” requires the school to actively involve the student in his or her own learning (Lemke 2003). The challenge for schools is to effectively implement these general principles in the most effective method possible. It has been suggested that using workplace connections to structure learning experiences that contribute to the intellectual, social, academic, and career development of students will develop positive attitudes, knowledge, skills, insights, and habits (Lynch & Harnish, 1998). The advantages for the student reach beyond purely academic gains. Research indicates “that a career-focused secondary education experience facilitates adolescent identity achievement” enabling teenagers to develop a sense of purpose and identity that is beneficial (Allen, 1999). Breaking Ranks II also suggests taking advantage of learning opportunities which extend beyond the walls of the high school. Howard Gardner summed it up well when he stated the following: “Students will have had opportunities to develop more targeted skills-those literacy, numeracy, and scientific skills that will allow them to probe more deeply into the disciplines. Rather than learning these in a rote manner, however, they will have had the opportunity to engage in a number of apprenticeships, where they beheld the most developed versions of these skills being usefully deployed. They will have participated in projects in which they could themselves draw on and cultivate these skills” (Gardner 1991). It is that type of authentic, interest-based learning that the CBP is attempting to afford students in Blue Valley. 4.1c Goals and Objectives of the Center Based Programs (CBP) The broad goals of the CBP are to increase student achievement and personalize student learning. The following objectives have been developed for the CBP to achieve those goals:

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1. Increase the rigor, relevance and relationships of each student in the CBP. 2. Provide authentic “hands-on” learning experiences for all students. 3. Integrate 21st Century learning skills into the curricula. 4. Challenge each student in a way which requires him to evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of disciplines to solve a problem. 5. Provide authentic, educational internships and mentoring within the community. 6. Promote enthusiasm for lifelong learning through student interests. The CBP will serve as an exemplar for high school reform nationwide, as well as within Blue Valley. 4.1d Process for Developing Program Strands In January, a task force comprised of educational professionals within the district was convened to assess the district and community’s needs and resources in order to make recommendations for areas of study that would be effective within a CBP. National programs were investigated to develop the types of programs that were available nationally as well as effective methods for implementing these programs. Although there are many different examples of interest-based programs, they generally fall into one of the following categories: magnet schools, magnet programs, academies or centers. The programs researched include the following: x

x

x

x

A magnet program in the Pinellas County School District was discussed. They have schools within the district that address the following interest areas: health science, advanced technology, criminal justice, performing arts, and 21st century learning. These magnet schools were built with specialized facilities to meet the unique needs of their programs. Glen Oaks High School in Canton, Ohio is an example of career academies which have been effectively integrated into their school. They have the following academies available for students to choose from: arts and communication, business and marketing, human services, engineering and industrial, health science, and environmental science. All students are in a career academy with individual academies functioning as small schools within the school. Milliard School District outside of Omaha, Nebraska is in the process of developing a center where students can receive their core education around an interest theme as well as specialized classes in their chosen area. The three broad themes in Milliard’s center are business and finance, health and hospitality service. The Olathe School District is a neighboring district which has used the concept of magnet programs to engage students in specialized learning. They have programs at their various high schools in aerospace

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x

engineering, biotechnology, e-communication, geosciences and sports medicine. Montgomery County Schools in Rockville, Maryland, incorporates both academies as well as magnet programs within their district.

The task force outlined the benefits and concerns of all of these programs in relation to the characteristics of Blue Valley. In addition to the national models, local data was analyzed by the task force. They examined student career interest data from Johnson County Community College (JCCC) and American College Testing (ACT), as well as focus group data from Blue Valley parents and students. ACT data showed student interests in health sciences, business, social sciences, arts, engineering and science. Although responses were wideranging in district focus groups, the areas students listed most frequently were health care, business, education and journalism. The most comprehensive data set was from JCCC, which surveyed every Blue Valley senior. The following interest pathways were identified most often: human services, business, engineering, bioscience and arts. A more complete summary of data from these sources is in Appendix B. From the data available, the taskforce was able to develop several options for themes of study for the CBP. Those options were narrowed down in subsequent meetings after input was solicited from the educational staff of the high schools. A summary of the strengths and concerns produced by the educational staffs of the four high schools is listed in Appendix C. Community resources were then evaluated and different possibilities and philosophies for the CBP were discussed. Consensus was developed for the following themes by the taskforce: biosciences, business, engineering and human services. Minutes of individual meetings of the taskforce are included in Appendix A.

4.1e Local Basis for the Center Based Programs In Blue Valley, we share many of the same concerns as the nation for the education of our children. We have concerns about college readiness and the ability of our students to sustain their education once they are admitted into college. As the world changes, so do the skills that promote success, both educationally and professionally. Our desire is to stay ahead of the curve by preparing our students and implementing innovative programs which are founded in current research. The BOE established the charge, but feedback from parents, students and our community has solidified the vision. Feedback from various focus groups indicates that students want more relevance in their education as well as authentic and challenging work. They believe they are being adequately prepared for college, but maybe not for life. Some feel disengaged from their studies. Parents want positive connections for their students and the best preparation possible to enhance their students’ opportunities to be successful. Our community values education. Area businesses, as well as the Kauffman Foundation, have made

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commitments to support efforts to improve the skills of tomorrow’s workforce. They believe there is a need, yet see the potential for a bright future in the Kansas City area. It is believed that a CBP would provide the following benefits to Blue Valley students: x x x x x x x

increase opportunities to explore different interest paths prepare for lifelong learning increase options for non-college bound students provide authentic educational opportunities within the community allow for relevant and rigorous course of study within an interest area experience hands-on learning for all students integrate 21st century skills into the curricula

4.1f Strand Details and Program Philosophy At this juncture in the process, details have not been fully developed, but many exciting possibilities have been discussed. The opportunity for interdisciplinary work is nearly limitless. It has been conceptualized that a wide variety of foundational skills, including the ability to present, collaborate, problem-solve, and appropriately use technology, will be woven through the fabric of each of the themed programs. A graphic depicting this “tapestry” of skills integrated into the strands is in Appendix C. The opportunities are available to personalize a student’s learning in ways never before possible. While the skills and knowledge developed in a particular theme may be similar for two students, their experience while acquiring their learning can be tailored to suit the needs of each individual student. Student experiences, which may be different for each student, may include working in teams with students across themes. Although students may work on research in the biosciences, design projects in engineering and marketing in business, they may work together, interdependently, on a common project. Students would begin these unique experiences during their 11th or 12th grade years, after establishing a foundation in their home high school. This foundation, as well as continued learning at their home high school, would ensure a well-rounded education and a successful future. Examples of the articulation between the home high school courses and the CBP are provided in Appendix D. It is also possible that the CBP serves as a place where a student can take a single specialized class which may not be feasible to offer at the comprehensive high schools. Within each of the broad themes at the CBP, there are many opportunities for students to customize their learning. A student with an interest in biosciences may choose a healthrelated path, while another chooses biotechnology or genetic and molecular biology or bioscience research. Strands within the human services theme may include education, law, public safety, social services, or hospitality and culinary arts. Engineering strands could include computer engineering, mechanical & industrial engineering, chemical engineering or engineering design. Business opens the door to specializing in international business, marketing and advertising, business technology or

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entrepreneurship. The idea is that the door is open to personalize the students’ learning in a way that increases their achievement.

4.1g Recommendations In an effort to increase student achievement and to personalize learning for our students, we believe that it is necessary to further investigate CBP in order to develop an exemplar for high school reform. Once developed, it is our belief that the CBP will allow for unprecedented success for its students.

4.2 Potential Costs Several potential costs were identified in the research phase of this project. Specifically, the following items as they relate to the CBP were discussed: certified staffing costs; classified staffing costs; building construction costs; on-going building costs; and administrative costs. Each of those items will be addressed individually.

4.2a Certified Staffing Costs The CBP is expected to serve approximately 250 students in the morning session and 250 students in the afternoon session. This results in a full-time equivalency (FTE) enrollment of 250 students. Because of the unique enrollment nature of special courses 2 , we anticipate low student-to-staff ratios in these CBP classrooms. We have made the assumption to base a certified staffing cost on 15 students per classroom, which equates to 17 FTE teaching positions at the CBP. Thus, projected certified staffing costs 3 for the CBP with a student enrollment of 250 FTE would be $1,105,000. The 17 FTE teaching positions would allow for 85 teaching sections 4 at the CBP.

4.2b Support Staffing Costs It is estimated that a CBP will need a nurse, custodial staff, at least a ½ time bookkeeper, and two office support personnel. The total annual estimated cost 5 for this staff is approximately $200,000. 2

Experience with our career technical education classes suggest that an assumption of 12 to 18 students per class is appropriate for cost estimates. We have used the midpoint of 15 students per class for the feasibility study. 3 This is estimated to be 250 FTE students divided by 15 students per class for a total need of 17 FTE teachers. Multiply 17 FTE teachers by a projected average teacher salary for 2010 of $65,000. 4 This is calculated by taking the 17 FTE teaching positions and multiplying that by 5, which is the number of teaching sections each teacher is involved in each day. 5 This is calculated by assuming an annual salary of $25,000 for custodial and office support persons, $65,000 for a nurse, and $35,000 for a bookkeeper. 8

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4.2c Building construction The actual footprint and design of a building for the CBP will be determined at a later date. For now, cost estimates were arrived at by assuming construction costs on a 75,000 square foot, 25-classroom building on five acres with no cafeteria, auditorium or gym space. According to the Facilities and Operations Department, such a facility could be expected to cost between $16,000,000 and $18,000,000, depending on variables such as the number of highly specialized areas, the amount of equipment and technology, and the year the project is bid.

4.2d Building On-going Costs On-going costs include utilities and insurance. According to cost estimates from the Business and Finance Department on similarly sized facilities, on-going costs are estimated to be about $100,000 annually.

4.2e Administrative Costs The individual who would be charged with administering the CBP also may have significant other duties related to the CBP including, but not limited to fundraising, corporate contact and program development. Based on discussions with Human Resources about the administrative costs associated with a CBP, it is estimated that an annual cost of $100,000 would be appropriate for a qualified person capable of handling the above mentioned duties. 4.2f Discretionary Costs Every school is allotted a budget for discretionary costs for items such as staff development, supplies, materials and postage. Using the Blue Valley Academy as a guide, a cost of $45,000 per year is assumed for the CBP.

4.3 Potential Funding Sources

4.3a General Operating Funds The primary method of funding schools in Kansas is through the general operating fund. For every student, the state allocates a certain amount of money for education. For FY 2007, that amount is $4,316. This is a funding source that would be available to the CBP. However, using general operating funds for the CBP would require the district to make cuts or reductions in other areas to move money from those programs to the CBP. Making cuts in other areas for the CBP may be something the district may want to avoid as long as there are other funding sources available.

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4.3b New Facilities Weighting Money 6 Per current state finance law, school districts are eligible for state funding beyond the base amount, for students enrolled in a new facility. Such funding is calculated to be 25 percent of the FTE of the students enrolled at the new facility. In a simple illustration, if the base aid per pupil is $4,000 for every one FTE student enrolled at the CBP, an additional $1,000 per student would be generated from new facilities revenue. There is no direct tax impact to the residents of Blue Valley with this funding stream for years 1 and 2, as all monies under new facilities weighting come from the state7 . 4.3c Board of Tax Appeals (BOTA) Funding8 Per current state finance law, school districts which qualify 9 may appeal for the costs of operating a new facility that are above what the new facilities money would provide. For example, if the cost of operating a new program in a new facility was calculated to be $1,000,000, and the new facilities weighting money was able to provide $250,000, a school district could appeal for the additional $750,000 of costs. Such an appeal is heard by the BOTA review panel in Topeka. The district has done this in the past with all of the new facilities it has opened. There is a direct tax impact on the taxpayers of the district, as all funds raised in support of the BOTA revenue stream are raised via local property taxation.

4.3d Capital Outlay Per current state finance law, the district has the ability to raise local funds for capital construction projects. This fund cannot be used for operating expenditures. For example, capital outlay funds can be raised for the construction of a new facility, but not for the operation of the new facility. The current capital outlay authority that districts can work with is capped at eight mills of assessed value. There is a direct tax impact of the capital outlay funding source, as all monies are raised through property taxes. However, because school districts are capped at 8 mills, and the Blue Valley School District is 6

This weighting is allowed for costs associated with opening new school facilities. The weighting is determined by multiplying the enrollment in the new facility by a specified numerical factor (currently 0.25). In order to qualify for this weighting, the district must have utilized the full amount of its local option budget (LOB) authority authorized for the school year. The weighting is only available for the year in which facility operations are commenced and the following year. This weighting is capped to be 75% of year 2 cost in year 3, 50% of year 2 cost in year 4 and 25% of year 2 cost in year 5 of the facility. 7 After years 1 and 2, all new facilities revenue is generated from local property tax. 8 This weighting is allowed for additional costs incurred in staffing and operations in new facilities by rapidly growing districts that cannot be recovered from any other source. It is entirely raised locally and is obtained by an appeal to the State Board of Tax Appeals. 9 Qualification for BOTA funding includes school districts who meet the extraordinary growth criteria, which Blue Valley current does. This criterion includes school districts who have an enrollment increase of greater than 1,200 FTE students over the past three years, or that have an average three year increase of at least 6 percent in FTE enrollment. Blue Valley meets the first criteria. 10

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currently levying the full 8 mills, the CBP would be funded from existing authority which may limit the revenue for other capital projects during the same period.

4.3e Staff savings Because enrollment at the CBP will reduce the FTE enrollment at the sending high schools, there is an opportunity to offset some of the costs of operating the CBP by reducing staffing levels at the high schools. This is similar to what is currently being done at BV Academy. It is estimated that about 55 percent of the cost of staffing the CBP could be provided by the opportunity for staff savings at the sending high schools 10 .

4.3f Corporate Partnerships/Grants Because of the uniqueness of the CBP, it may be possible to gain monetary support from corporate organizations. Additionally, the district will want to pursue potential grant opportunities for support of the CBP. Work in this area will intensify if the BOE gives direction for staff to move forward with the development of a CBP.

10 This is calculated by taking the 250 student FTE from each the five high schools (5 x 50) at a rate of 18 FTE students per teacher (250/18 = 13.8 = rounded to 13). Assuming that a 1-to-1 staff reduction will likely not be possible, the assumption is made that a 10 FTE staff savings is actually realized. Given the need in the previous section for 17 FTE teachers at the CBP, a staff reduction of 10 FTE at the building level allows for a 58% (10/17) economic opportunity gain.

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4.4 Operational Feasibility Analysis Based on the costs and revenue streams described above, a feasibility plan for the operation of the CBP in the first four years of operation is presented. Year 1 $1,105,000 $200,000 $100,000 $100,000 $45,000 $1,550,000

Year 2 $1,279,200 $208,000 $104,000 $104,000 $46,800 $1,742,000

Year 3 $1,460,368 $216,320 $108,160 $108,160 $48,672 $1,941,680

Year 4 $1,648,782 $224,972 $112,486 $112,486 $50,618 $2,149,344

Primary Revenue Streams

BOTA NFW FTE Saving

BOTA NFW FTE Saving

Financial Impact on General Operating Revenues of District

Low

Low

75% BOTA 75% NFW FTE Saving GO Corp/Grant Moderate

50% BOTA 50% NFW FTE Saving GO Corp/Grant Moderate/High

Certified Staffing Cost Support Staffing Cost Building Ongoing Cost Administrative Cost Discretionary Cost Total Costs 11

4.5 Potential Site After discussions with planning staff, and after considering the situational relationships of other potential sites, it is recommended that if a CBP is pursued by the district, that the site for such a program be located on the current District Office Campus. Transportation links to the site are outstanding 12 , the site is centrally located in the district, and the district already owns the land, thereby saving on land purchase costs. Planning staff has indicated that a site plan, complete with parking and area for future CBP expansion, could be developed to incorporate a CBP into the environs of the current campus. 4.6 Potential Corporate Partners Because the curriculum and other details of offering instruction at the CBP has yet to be more fully determined, the identification of specific corporate partners can not be discussed in detail at this time. However, based on informal conversations with business and philanthropic organizations, there is great interest in the possibility of a CBP 11 An inflationary factor of 4% is added to each of the cost items beginning in year 2. Additionally, expansion of the CBP is anticipated in year 2, with 2 FTE staff members being added each year through year 4. This is done for illustrative purposes only, and does not necessarily presuppose that level of growth at the CBP in years 2, 3, and 4. 12 151st Street, Metcalf Avenue and Highway 69 would serve as major arterials for transportation to and from the site.

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in Blue Valley. Work in this area will intensify if the BOE gives direction for staff to move forward with the development of a CBP. 4.7 Timeline for Implementation A timeline for implementation has been prepared to allow the BOE to view what work has been completed and what work is left to develop a CBP. Items checked have been completed. Items with an open o have yet to be addressed. 9 9 9 9 9

July 2006 November 2006 December 2006 January 2007 April 2007

o Summer 2007 o Fall 2007 o Spring 2008 o Fall 2008 o o o o o

December 2008 Spring 2009 Summer 2009 Fall 2009 Fall 2010

Initial charge from BOE to explore possibility of CBP Strategic Plan Oversight Committee recommendation Develop advisory study teams Research career pathway programs Recommend 2-4 programs to BOE for fall 2008 Complete research on budget, sponsorship, site location, and timeline Curriculum development/training on initial pathways CBP facility design started CBP facility design completed/construction process begins Research additional pathways; report to BOE Implementation of initial career pathways at the high schools Study additional career pathways Recommend additional career pathways to BOE CBP construction continues Develop curriculum and training Implement additional pathways at the high schools Open CBP

4.8 Other Issues to Consider 4.8a Transportation In all likelihood, because students going to the CBP would be juniors and seniors, transportation to and from the CBP would be via student vehicle. Experience with similar programs suggests that upper level students do not avail themselves of school provided transportation when private transportation is possible.

4.8b Certification Issues The CBP will likely offer special classes that will require special expertise from a variety of areas. The district’s Human Resources Department is cognizant of the need for highly qualified individuals in the classroom, and that the development of coursework in a CBP will be coordinated with efforts to locate professionals with the proper certifications.

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4.8c What does this look like in the classroom? Relative to the above point is what will the CBP model look like in a classroom? As an answer, it may be possible for a teacher to have primary teaching responsibilities in a classroom, but for other professionals in certain fields, such as medicine or business, to teach certain sections of a class for brief period of time. This is a detail that has yet to be worked out as the CBP comes in to clearer focus, but the opportunities for such symbiotic relationships are exciting, and may provide our students with unique learning opportunities.

4.8d Tax Impact of BOTA The BOE will need to be cognizant of the tax impacts that may be necessary for support of the CBP. If one of the funding strategies is to support the CBP through BOTA appeal, a minor tax impact could be expected. This impact, coupled with the impact of a BOTA appeal for BV Southwest, may be an issue the BOE will want to consider. As of now, it is far too early for a projection of what those tax impacts may be. However, as a historical reference, when BV West opened, there was an approximate tax impact of 2 mills 13 .

4.8e State Finance Law A couple of significant areas discussed in this study are predicated on the belief that state finance law will be similar between now and 2010, when the CBP is scheduled to open. Any changes in school finance laws could change the feasibility of opening a CBP.

4.8f Impact on Elective Areas A common concern voiced by teachers during the research phase of this study is the impact the CBP may have on elective courses at the high schools. There is a possibility that implementing a new program in the district with additional elective offerings, such as the CBP, could affect enrollment in other elective areas. The Education Services Department is aware of this concern.

4.8g Timing With The Opening of BV Southwest It was noted throughout many of the discussions that opening the CBP the same year as opening BVSW may cause stress on the system. Activities such as the ability to handle construction coordination, supply and equipment ordering and the general 13

On a $250,000 home, the tax impact of 2 mills is $52.90 per year. 14

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activities that go into opening a new facility are stretched whenever a facility the size of a new high school opens. Opening an additional facility the same year as a new high school may serve to stress the system. Additional discussion is recommended to determine if 2010 is the most optimal time for the CBP to open.

4.8h Consistency among the High School Schedules Currently, all four high schools operate with a slightly different schedule. A CBP may require all schools operate from a common schedule, though this detail has not been completely explored and will require more discussion.

5.0 SUMMARY It is believed that a CBP would provide the following benefits to Blue Valley: x x x x x x x

increase opportunities to explore different interest paths prepare for lifelong learning increase options for non-college bound students provide authentic educational opportunities within the community allow for relevant and rigorous course of study within an interest area experience hands-on learning for all students integrate 21st century skills into the curricula

Based on the analysis and discussion in this report, moving forward with a CBP is recommended. The CBP is recommended to be located in a free-standing building on the District Office Campus. The CBP will house upper level (grades 11-12) courses in four interest areas – business, bio-science, human services and engineering. The CBP will be coordinated with entry level classes at the building level. Potential opportunities with the CBP include collaboration with professionals in the field, corporate collaboration and career interest shadowing. A timeline for the opening of a CBP in the fall of 2010 is recommended, though with the opening of Blue Valley Southwest also scheduled for the fall of 2010, it is recommended that this issue be discussed further. Financial analysis suggests that the CBP can be operated by the district with little impact on the system for the first two years. After that two year period, actual financial impact on the district will depend on program enrollment and level of corporate partnership.

6.0 ACKNOLWEDGEMENTS This report would not have been possible without the hard work and commitment of many individuals. The Blue Valley School District has outstanding people who are dedicated to improving student achievement. Their contributions and expertise to this report is gratefully acknowledged.

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Reference Page

Allen, A. (1999, May 18). Graduates of high school career magnets succeed at high rates [On line]. Available: http://vocserve.berkeley.edu/CW83/ExeSummary.html Breaking Ranks II: strategies for leading high school reform (2004). Reston, VA: National Association of secondary school principals. Gardner, H. (1991). The Unschooled Mind:How Children Think and How Sch. New York, NY: Basic Books. Larsen, S. (June 5, 2002). HG_Larsen. Retrieved March 26, 2007 from Project Zero. http://www.pz.harvard.edu/PIs/HG_Larsen.pdf. Lemke, C. (2003). enGauge 21st Century Skills. Retrieved March 26, 2007 from The Metiri Group/McREL. http://www.metiri.com/21/21%20Century%20Skills%20Final.doc. Lynch, R.L., & Harnish, D. (1998). Preparing pre-service teacher education students to use work-based strategies to improve instruction. In Contextual teaching and learning: Preparing teachers to enhance student success in the workplace and beyond (pp. 127158). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, Center on Education and Training for Employment and Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education

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APPENDIX A Process An initial committee charged with exploring the concept of Center Based Programs first met in July 2006. At that time, five primary tasks were identified including: gauging parent/student interest; determining the concept; investigating possible funding and costs; determining the location; and determining curriculum and college connections. The first task was gauging student and parent interest in a CBP. If there was no interest in a CBP on the part of the parent and student community, then the BOE needed to know that. To that end, twenty-five parent focus groups were facilitated by an outside consulting firm. Approximately half of the group included parents with no exposure to our current, similar programs (BVTV and Health Careers). Parents with little or no exposure to these programs were cautiously apprehensive about the idea of a CBP, while parents who were familiar with our current programs were very supportive. Students surveyed said they were very interested in the possibility of a CBP, as long as scheduling issues could be worked out. Students who were familiar with current similar offerings (BVTV and Heath Careers) commented that expanding course offerings in this manner would be good for students. In November 2006, the Strategic Plan Oversight Committee recommended to the Board of Education that we move forward with the exploration of a CBP. In December 2006, under the leadership of assistant superintendent Dennis King, a second committee was formed to review the curricular aspects of this type of program, as well as to develop a timeline. This committee was comprised of district teachers from all curricular areas, as well as administrators and district coordinating teachers. A total of 37 people served on the committee. At its initial meeting on January 11, the committee was presented with examples of other Center Based Programs from around the nation and was asked to comment on their interests and concerns. Examples of Center Based Programs in Rockville, MD., Millard, NE., Pinellas County, Florida, and Canton, Ohio were reviewed. Among other things, the committee was impressed with the variety of career choices made available to students, as well as the hands-on opportunities, the interdisciplinary coursework being taught and facilities provided by some of the districts. Some of the concerns raised at the meeting included: scheduling; early identification; staffing; cost; admission process; accessibility for all students; and process for students to change pathways. Other questions raised during this meeting included: x x x x x

Do larger numbers of students make it easier to execute the program? How can the program be managed to appeal to all levels of students? What do Blue Valley parents want in terms of structure? What would be the implementation process? How do you get the community involved?

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x x x x x

What are the long-term benefits? What grade levels would be allowed to participate? In order to fund this program, would other programs have to suffer? Once the core pathways have been established, can they be change? How will teachers adjust to “teaching out of the box?”

At the next meeting, held on January 31, the committee was charged with identifying six to eight programs to explore more in-depth. Information regarding student interest surveys, workforce needs, current programs and community resources was shared with the group. The committee was also provided with regional, state and national occupational outlook; career choice responses from the ACT for 2006 graduates; and a 2004 JCCC student interest survey. The committee narrowed the scope of the potential programs to the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Health Care Computer Technology/IT Networking Business/International Studies Engineering & Architecture Human Services (law, education and hospitality) Arts (graphic, communications, performing, visual, etc.)

A third meeting, held on February 20, presented the group with various pathway models to consider including an integrated model, specialization model, human services model, research and internship model and hybrid model. The group was charged with narrowing the selection to four pathways. After much discussion regarding strands and areas of interest, the following four pathways were selected: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Engineering Human Services Bio Science Business

Following the February 20 meeting and prior to the meeting on March 6, a group of committee members led by Dennis King visited each of the high schools during lunch to visit with classroom teachers and to gather their thoughts and concerns about the possibility of a Center Based Program. Some of the common themes that surfaced from these discussions include the following strengths and concerns: Strengths x Could offer courses not available at the regular high schools x Would facilitate positive interaction between schools and community businesses x Would encourage individualized learning x Would help keep students engaged x Would expose students to different career options x Could help provide specialized equipment that might not be accessible otherwise. 18

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Concerns x Staffing x Funding x Transportation x Possible decrease in enrollment in high school elective courses x Might force kids to choose to specialize to early In addition to the four basic career pathways that have been identified (human services, engineering, bioscience and business), the following “strands,� which are interwoven through each of the pathways, have also been identified: communication and presentation skills; international perspectives; creativity and artistic skills; authentic projects; problem solving and research skills; digital literacy and technology integration; teamwork and collaboration; internships and job shadowing; curiosity and inventive thinking; ethics and environment; and analytical and evaluative thinking. These strands were woven into each of the pathways to effectively integrate the 21st century skills required to maximize academic achievement in the areas of digital-age literacy, inventive thinking, effective communication and high productivity. According to Partnership for 21st Century Skills, The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, identifies the core subjects as English; reading or language arts; mathematics; science; foreign language; civics; government; economics; arts; history; and geography. Framework for 21st century learning suggests that several significant, emerging content areas are critical to success in communities and the workplaces. These content areas are typically not emphasized in schools today and include: global awareness; financial, economic business and entrepreneurial literacy; civic literacy; and health and wellness awareness. Additionally, in order for 21st century assessment to be effective, it must measure core subjects; content; learning and thinking skills; ICT literacy; and life skills. Assessment should not be left to standardized tests alone. During the March 6 meeting, the committee identified the following sub-fields for each of the four, designated career pathways. Bio-Science Health Science Biotechnology Research and Development Biomedical Engineering Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Pharmaceuticals Animal Science Business Marketing, Sales and Services Business Management and Administration Hospitality and Tourism

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Business con’t Culinary Arts Finance International Business Information Technology Entrepreneurship Foreign Language and Culture

:

Human Services Law Public Safety and Security Govt. and Public Administration Education and Training Consumer Services Foreign Language and Culture Engineering Architecture and Design Engineering Technology Communication Systems Research and Development Mechanical Engineering Chemical Engineering Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering Environmental Engineering Bio-engineering Aerospace Engineering Civil Engineering

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APPENDIX B Student Interest Data Johnson County Community College Survey Summary 800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0 Human Services

Business

Engineering

BioSciences

Arts AV Tech

Military

Information Technology

Transportation

2006 ACT Data Summary Blue Valley Students Career Choice Response from ACT for 2006 Graduates Source: 2006 ACT Report

Undecided Visual & Performing Arts Trade & Industrial Social Sciences Sciences (Biological & Physical) Philosophy, Religion & Theology Mathematics Letters Human, Family & Consumer Sciences Health Sciences & Allied Health Fields Foreign Languages Engineering-Related Technologies Engineering Teacher Education Education Cross-Disciplinary Studies Computer & Information Sciences Community & Personal Services Communications & Comm. Technologies Marketing & Distribution Business & Office Business & Management Architecture & Environmental Design Agriculture Sciences & Technologies

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

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Student Focus Group Data Report There were 16 student focus groups. The total participants of the student focus group were approximately 330. Students were asked to note on an index card, what career, job or profession they were interested in, or what college major they were considering. The following is a list in chronological order of their choices. ˆ Health Care (most just wrote “health care”, but some were specific: physician, psychologist, nutritionist, nurse, physical therapist, dentist, pharmacist) ˆ Business (include accounting, marketing, advertising) ˆ Education ˆ Journalism/Writing ˆ Architecture ˆ Law ˆ Music/Production ˆ Broadcast/Film ˆ Arts ˆ Biosciences ˆ Interior/Fashion Design ˆ Veterinary ˆ Graphic Design ˆ Social sciences ˆ Engineering ˆ Culinary ˆ Sports Management ˆ Construction Science ˆ Cosmetology ˆ Pilot ˆ Auto mechanics ˆ Law Enforcement ˆ Wedding Planning

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APPENDIX C Summary of Strengths and Concerns from Teacher Meetings

Common Concerns Staffing- Certification Funding Specializing and selection too early Elective decrease Elective / Enrollment in current classes Transportation issues Impact on activities and sports

Strengths Offer courses not available at individual schools. Interaction w/ community and business Individualizing learning Keep students engaged during HS (keep seniors in school) Exposure to career options Provide specialized equipment and facilities – available at individual schools.

Tracking Transportation / logistics

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APPENDIX D Tapestry of Integrated Skills

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APPENDIX E Examples of High School Course Articulation to the Center

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project overview Project Overview In April of 2008, Blue Valley School District completed the programming process for it’s new Center for Advanced Professional Studies, with a capacity of 250 students. at approximately 56,000 square feet. Over 35 administrators, teachers, community members and stakeholders participated in the collaborative planning meetings. Through these interactive meetings, the group developed the framework for a unique learning environment that will support engaged learning and multiple learning styles. Collaboration and innovation were major themes during the programming process. A major idea behind CAPS is to collaborate in a hands-on environment with professionals, peers and teachers in order to facilitate learning. This unique collaboration at a high school level, will lead to innovation. Therefore, it was important that an innovative facilitye support these ideas. Flexibility of all spaces was also major theme during the programming process, to allow for different uses for different needs and at different times of the day. Also, it was important to take into account flexibility of the entire facility to account for future unknown professions that the building might need to accomodate. By creatively thinking about scheduling and planning for flexibility of spaces, the workshop participants were able to successfully program the school to support the curriculum, students and learning facilitators of Blue Valley School District. Transparency is another important feature of the program. Linking the strands together is a centralized commons area, open to all the strands via an atrium space. Surrounding the atrium are informal student areas, as well as project areaas for small group work. These innovation project areas are visible from the atrium, so all strands are connected visually. Finally, the lab spaces themselves have a transparent connection to the project areas. Incorporating natural daylight via a transparent connection to the outside from all spaces is makes for a desirable learning environment. In the building diagram that was derived from the workshops, all strands face either north or south, the best and most easily controlled daylight. The centralized commons area maximizes daylight and views to the outdoors as well.

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process The Programming Committees The first and initial committee that was formed was the Steering Committee. The Steering Committee was charged with project oversight and was directly involved with the Perkins+Will and NSP Architecture team in developing a calendar of programming workshop sessions, providing an understanding of critical project issues, project history, establishing the project goals and bringing together a workshop committee. The second committee that was formed was the Planning Committee. This was the group that participated in a series of planning meetings/charrettes designed to develop a facility program solution for the Center for Advanced Professional Studies and build consensus behind the solution. The Plannning Committee consisted of the administrators, board members, teachers, community members and stakeholders. Planning Committee operated by consensus, and served as project ambassadors who brought the meeting decisions to the larger school and community population.

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process Programming Planning Meetings The programming planning participants were led through a series of meetings designed to develop a facility program solution and build community consensus. During the workshops, the participants explored planning models for CAPS that carefully evaluated educational goals, space requirements and relationships. Each meeting focused on articulating, through small and large group discussions, the facility goals as they relate to its educational mission. Initial presentations were made by Perkins+Will and NSP Architecture on various related topics followed by small group work sessions that allowed specific topics to be explored in greater detail (All presentations can be found in the appendix of this document). The smaller groups were then asked to present their findings back to the whole group for discussion and consensus.

February 29, 2008 • CAPS Report

April 4, 2008

April 18, 2008

TBD

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Final Draft Program Presentation and Edits

• User Group Meetings to discuss detailed room requirements

• CAPS Planning • Program g Review & Diagrams

• Large and Small Group Discussions • Draft Conceptual Program • Program Review & Diagrams

Feb 22

• Site Analysis and Options p

• Site Diagrams

• Large and Small Group Discussions

• Large and Small Group Discussions

Meeting 3

Meeting 2

Meeting 1

• Review Building Diagram Options

March 29

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April 14

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process Planning Meeting One - Looking to the Future The intention for this planning meeting was threefold. First, it gave all participants an opportunity to meet each other, understand the magnitude of this effort and its schedule, and appreciate that numerous voices need to be heard and accommodated to reach consensus. Secondly, this meeting was geared toward establishing a common vision, mission, and set of goals for the project. Thirdly, this meeting established the types of programmatic spaces that were desired, to allow Perkins+Will to generate a draft program for Planning Meeting Two. During the first workshop session, Superintendent, Dr. Tom Trigg, PhD. and Deputy Superintendent, Dr. Sue Dole, PhD., spoke to the group to summarize the history of events that lead to the process that the group was about to undertake and share the overall vision Blue Valley School District. Local industry professionals then presented trends in their careers, and how those trends might manifest themselves into a career pathway/strand system. Expanding on that topic, Perkins+Will illustrated current societal, workforce, economic trends and highlighted some of the challenges facing the U.S. today and how they might impact the design of career based educational facilities. Along with this, images of other sample projects and ideas were presented of other career based schools as well as professional environments. This enabled the participants to evaluate what other facilities around the country and internationally are doing as well as the direction of 21st century facility design. A large group discussion followed the presentations, to provide an opportunity for the group to react to issues and ideas presented. The participants were then asked to have small group discussions about what is currently happening in community businesses, what facilities, resources and organizations exist and what community business groups need to get engaged in the process. Then, the groups were asked to provide initial thoughts on the types of spaces that might be needed for the major strand areas and building amenities and support spaces. All workshops ended with a recap of the results of that meeting and a “look ahead� at the next steps and meeting dates. This process established the vision for the project, generated excitement, and provided the necessary launching pad for the subsequent work of the programming committee.

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process Planning Meeting Two – Facility Space Programming The second planning meeting commenced with a brief review of the goals articulated during Planning Meeting One and a presentation of the agenda for Workshop Two. To determine the big ideas behind the CAPS facility, Eileen Jones of Perkins+Will introduced a “Visual Listening” exercise to determine the the groups response to images that portrayed various potential ideas for the CAPS model. The group placed dots on images they thought were relevant, and then explained why they chose that image. The purpose of the exercise was to discover qualities about the built environment, both visually and verbally, that might not easily be described in other ways. In other words, painting a picture of the future. (Details of this exercise can be found in the appendix of this document.)

At the meeting prior, the programming committee was asked to complete a homework assigment for this workshop. The homework focused on “Culture, Experience and Brand”. The pupose of the exercise was to discover the values that the space must portray or encourage, and begin to understand how the built environment can support these values. Each participant brought in an image or an object that answered questions about what they wanted the culture, experience and brand of CAPS to be. (Details of this exercise can be found in the appendix of this document.)

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process As a follow up to the visual exercises, Steve Turckes and Aimee Eckmann presented examples of innovative work environments to the group. The committee was then asked to react to the presentation and the morning activities to summarize the vision of the CAPS facility. Next, Aimee Eckmann presented ‘Bubble Diagramming 101’ and Workshop Participants were lead through a series of exercises to enable them to articulate space needs visually through diagrams and begin to indicate desired relationships between major building components and the individual spaces contained in those components. To begin to move the vision of the facility to a reality, Steve Turckes gave an introduction to the draft space program. This included describing the types of spaces to support the reseach/project based strands as well as all other support spaces in the facility. Small groups representing each strand reviewed the draft space program to determine if the right spaces were included, and their relationship to other spaces. Discussion included opportunities for sharing spaces, strategies for increasing usage and flexibility, verification of the types and quantity of spaces allocated, etc. It was during this time that the participants explored important issues that impacted the desired types of spaces and configuration, and bubble diagrams of the spatial relationships were produced. At the end of the day, the meeting participants reconvened into the large group, and presented back their ideas from their small group discussions. As a group, they articulated the common goals, desires and space needs for the project for the design team to gain a general understanding of the key programmatic components and relationships for the project. The Perkins+Will and NSP team left with enough information to prepare a more detailed draft program of spaces including how programmatic areas needed to relate to each other.

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process Workshop Three – Facility Space Program Refinement During the third planning meeting, Steve Turckes of Perkins+Will did a recap of planning meeting two and presented the final draft space program. The next presentation covered site analysis and site diagrams showing possible site layouts, overall building diagrams, and detailed diagrams of each strand and support spaces. After the presentation, the large group discussed initial thoughts on the diagrams. Then, the small groups met to discuss the detailed planning diagrams. They were charged with validating and challenging relationships between the spaces, possible improvements, opportunities for sharing space and the location of the spaces. Each of these groups, reported a summary of their discussion back to the large group. To conclude, the large group finalized their diagram preferences and the space program while reflecting on the importance of the programming committee’s effort and the unique facility that would come from it.

Building Diagram – Linear 2 Story Scheme

Building Diagram – Finger 2 Story Scheme

project/student area

toilets

bioscience 1st floor business 2nd floor

toilet

staff

stair

commons 1st floor human services 2nd floor

outdoor workspace pottential add dition

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

receiving/ mech

admin 1st floor dist lobby mp room 2nd floor admin outdoor td workspace k

project/student area

admin 1st floor human services 2nd floor

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

potential addition

lobby

toilets

outdoor td workspace k

Building Diagram – Atrium 2 Story Scheme

dist admin

coommons 1st flooor mp room 2nd flooor m

outdoor space

stair

stair

stair

bioscience 1st floor business 2nd floor

receiving/mech

Building Diagram – Atrium 3 Story Scheme

outdoor workspace

outdoor workspace stair

receiving/mech

dist admin outdoor space

stair

dist admin

bioscience 1st floor business 2nd floor

project/student area 2 story commons/ resource area project/student area

toilets

admin 1st floor mp room 2nd floor

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

receiving/mech

potential t ti l addition

toilets stair

outdoor space

stair

lobby

project/ student area 3 story commons/ resource area

dist admin proj area 2ndd floor

potential addition

stair

stair

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

human services 2nd floor

mp room 1st floor human services 2nd floor

admin 1st floor business 2nd floor

lobby

business 2nd floor

outdoor workspace

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project goals and ideas During the programming phase of the project, recurring goals and ideas helped to shape the development of the Facility Design Guidelines. These ideas are intended to carry forward, guiding the decision-making process during the design of the new high school:

– Presentation space – Reception area – Outdoor learning space – Organic, sensory experience – Transparency T – outside t id

inside i id

– Electronic media display – Height/openness g p – Cyber café/technology – Collaboration

– Symbol of strand – Meeting space/resource area – Flexibility – Transparency – Non-traditional N t diti l – Inspirational – Warm,, intimate – Collaboration – Fun! – Team-building – Unique

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project goals and ideas – Open ceiling - expose building systems, teaching tool, flexibility – Transparency – Comfort helps with creativity – Multi-level, unexpected – Color, light, bright – Different types of furniture – Lighting defines spaces – Place to relax – A place where creativity happen – Openness – Outdoor seating, outdoor space

– CAPS will have its own culture of 5 schools coming together, strands coming together – Clients are the kids, capture different kinds of learners, attainable tt i bl b by everyone – Students can personalize their learning – One of the most innovative schools, creative, out-of the-bo – Relevant learningg through g professional experiences – Multiple-uses, flexibility

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project goals and ideas – Spirit of innovation and discovery – Interdisciplinary – Collaborative, personalized – The experience and how it is d li delivered d will ill make k it unique i – Prepare students for a global society – Professional – Symbol for the future – Community/professional involvement

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steering committee Blue Valley School District Dr. Tom Trigg, Superintendent Dr. Sue Dole, Deputy Superintendent – Education Services Verneda Edwards Executive Director – Curriculum & Instruction Donna Deeds, Executive Director - CAPS Dave Hill, Executive Director – Facilities & Operations Jeff Christian, Design and Construction Manager 15020 Metcalf Ave Overland Park, KS 66223 913.239.4000 phone 913.239.4150 fax www.bluevalleyk12schools.org Perkins+Will - Chicago Steven Turckes, Principal, AIA, LEED AP, REFP Jerry Johnson, Principal, AIA, LEED AP Eileen Jones, Principal, NCIDQ, LEED AP Aimee Eckmann, Associate, AIA, LEED AP 330 N. Wabash, Suite 3600 Chicago, IL 60611 312.755.0770 phone 312.755.0775 fax www.perkinswill.com NSP Architecture - Overland Park Gary Nevius, Principal, AIA Craig Serig, Principal, AIA 11011 Cody Street, Suite 175 Overland Park, KS 66210 913.317.6772 phone 913.469.0630 fax www.nsp-a.com

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programming committee Over 35 people participated in the collaborative programming workshops. The following pages list these participants: Affholder, Linda

DCT – Career & Technical Education

Bacon, Scott

Principal

Burns, Carter

Principal

Christian, Jeff

Design & Construction Manager

Deeds, Donna

Executive Director - CAPS

Dehart, Donna

Family & Consumer Science Teacher

Dole, Sue

Deputy Superintendent – Education Services

Eckmann, Aimee

Architect, Perkins+Will

Edwards, Verneda

Executive Director – Curriculum & Instruction

Feuerborn, Damon

Industrial Technology Teacher

French, Dan

Board of Education Member

Gold, Marilyn

Health Careers Teacher

Hanna, Al

Deputy Superintendent – Administrative Services

Hansen, Stacy

Administrative Assistant – Deputy Superintendent, Education Services

Hill, Dave

Executive Director – Facilities & Operations

Jones, Eileen

Branded Enviroments Principal, Perkins+Will

Kessler, Eric

Science Teacher

King, Dennis

Assistant Superintendent – School Improvement

Kokoruda, Russ

Executive Director – School Administration

Kreps, Angela

CEO & PresidentKansasBio

Lake, Tony

Principal

LaTerza, Perri

Career Pathways Coordinator

Matson, Sue

Board of Education Member

McBride, Diana

Business Teacher

McNerlin, Kristi

Communications Manager

Moore, Bob

Executive Director - Technology

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programming committee Mosier, Mark

Art Teacher

Murphy, Amy

Principal

Nelson, Mike

Industrial Technology Teacher

Nevius, Gary

Architect, NSP Architecture

Robinson, Pam

Board of Education Member

Sutcliffe, Trevor

Computer Science Teacher

Trigg, Tom

Superintendent of Schools

Turckes, Steven

Architect, Perkins+Will

Willson, Brad

Administrative Intern

Woods, Julia

Director of Patient Care Services St. Lukes South

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sustainable strategies Demands for improved student performance, concerns about student health and a continuing need for costeffective facilities have focused attention on the integrated design approach known as green building. Integrating green building techniques into school design can result in a demonstrated improvement in student performance, increased teacher satisfaction, reduced operating costs and a healthier indoor environment. For the planet, green building offers the promise of dramatically lowered air pollution, improved surface water quality, and the preservation of habitat and natural resources for future generations. Green buildings do not necessarily cost more to design or build than conventional buildings. Sustainable design involves a range of choices that can be evaluated against the project criteria. Some strategies, like the use of recycled materials or native plant landscaping, cost the same or less than conventional choices, and can easily be incorporated. Other strategies, such as improved mechanical system efficiency, may involve higher capital costs, but will have significant long-term strategic or operational paybacks, and can be evaluated on that basis. This evaluation is known as life-cycle cost analysis. Taking sustainable design one-step further, facilities can double as a teaching tools. Students learn through their school about native plant life, the power of sunlight, and the efficiency of building systems. Sustainable design strategies such as—siting buildings with classrooms facing north and south to maximize energy efficiency and daylighting, using bioretension gardens (landscaping that minimizes stormwater runoff and provides natural filtration) and riparian buffers for storm water management, using natural ventilation, specifying recycled materials—are sensible design strategies. The following pages include strategies for sustainable design, benefits of sustainable design, and examples of projects that incorporate sustainable ideas.

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sustainable strategies Relevance of Sustainability “Sustainable design provides for the demands of today whilst protecting the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.� [Brundtland Report] A sustainable school not only embraces the concept of sustainability but is, in itself, a teaching tool for sustainability. Its design addresses the Triple Bottom Line, namely environmental impacts, social concerns and economic performance. Globally, buildings consume large amounts of resources and emit different types of pollution. It is very crucial that buildings are made sustainable so as to reduce the damage caused to the environment. The utilization of resources by buildings and the impact they generate is illustrated in the diagram below. Resource flow through typical buildings

INPUTS

OUTPUTS

Materials 50% of all global resources 70% of global timber

Social impacts

Energy 50% global energy [45% to operate 5% to construct]

Construction

Emissions to air, water and soil.

Use

Water 40% of water used globally

Land 60% of prime agricultural land lost to farming is used for building purposes

Investment & cash

Maintenance

Noise

Renovation Demolition

Waste

Financial returns

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sustainable strategies Buildings over their lifetime impact two main issues, environmental and socio-economic. Within a sustainable building these impacts will be reduced substantially. Environmental impact: Buildings impact the environment during construction, use and demolition. The major impacts are listed below:

Ozone depletion

Ecological loss

Fuel depletion

Land depletion

Climate Change

Waste

Water Depletion

Acid Rain

Socio-economic impact: There are many social and economic issues that are a by-product of the design of the built environment. Sustainable buildings will attempt to address these issues during the design stage. Socio-economic impacts include the following: 1.

Indoor air quality

2.

Student performance

3.

Visual and thermal comfort

4.

Ease of operation/maintenance

5.

Ecological literacy/building as a teaching tool

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sustainable strategies Additional socio-economic benefits of sustainable learning center design Higher Test Scores A recent study of some schools in California, Washington, and Colorado indicates a strong correlation between increased daylighting and improved student performance. For example, students in classrooms with the most daylighting progressed 20% faster on math tests and 26% faster on reading tests in one year than those in classrooms with the least amount of daylight. (See Daylighting Report on Office of Energy Website: www.energy.state.or.us/ school/highperform.htm) Increased Average Daily Attendance Improving indoor air quality by controlling sources of contaminants, providing adequate ventilation, and preventing moisture accumulation can reduce the number of sick days for students and teachers, especially those suffering from asthma or other respiratory problems. Reduced Operating Costs By using less energy and water than standard schools, overall operating costs can be reduced. School districts can save 20–40% on annual utility costs for new schools and 20–30% for renovated schools by applying high performance design concepts. Savings can be used to supplement other budgets, such as maintenance, computers, books etc. Increased Teacher Satisfaction and Retention High visual & thermal comfort, good acoustics, and fresh indoor air become positive factors in recruiting and retaining teachers and in increasing their overall satisfaction with work. A sustainable learning center design will follow an integrated design approach. This is summarized in the diagram below:

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies

Woodward Academy Middle School Campus. Sustainable strategies provide outdoor environmental learning opportunities. Perkins + Will created a new middle school campus for 550 students at Woodward Academy in College Park, Georgia with a classroom building, dining hall and arts building enclosing a middle school quadrangle. The facility is LEED Certified-Silver for sustainable design. It is heated and cooled by a geothermal field of piping extending under the courtyard in front of the building. The building is oriented for north-south exposure maximizing energy efficiency. Many recyclable finish materials (i.e., linoleum and wood) were used. Storm water management strategies include bioretention gardens in the landscape design which clean the water and serve as detention facilities as well as the use of a green roof on the art building. The dining hall opens onto the quad with a tree covered patio to accommodate outdoor dining. All of the arts classrooms face north and have full glass walls to flood the space with natural light. Daylighting strategies such as building orientation and sunscreens reduce heat gain and glare while allowing natural light and reducing energy costs. The bioretention gardens lessen storm water to the municipal drainage system and also provide outdoor learning spaces for students.

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies

Woodward Academy Middle School Campus College Park, GA Storm Water Management

To clean the rain water coming off building roofs and parking lots, Perkins+Will has designed bioretention gardens which collect the rain water from roof drains and pavement areas. These gardens are designed to hold water for a 24 hour period and allow it to slowly percolate through the soils where it is cleaned before returning to the natural stream system. The gardens are designed with plants which tolerate standing water well.

Sun Angles and Daylighting

When siting the building, Perkins+Will oriented classrooms with a north/south exposure for energy efficiency, minimizing heat gain from the hot west afternoon sun. On the south side of the building, sun screens and patterned glass are used to shade the direct overhead sun. Also taken into account wherever possible are the use of deciduous trees. These trees offer shade in the summer when the southern sun is high in the sky. In the winter when the trees loose their leaves, they allow the low winter sun to provide warmth in the building. All classrooms have natural daylight reducing the need for artificial lights in the building. Art rooms are located on the northern side of the facility where they get north light which is most consistent and glare free.

Conserving Natural Resources

To help reduce the draw down of finite resources and construction waste, recycled wood from the trees on site were used for the stairs in the middle school. lobby. Similarly brick and stone pavers from the existing middle school complex were reset in this middle school courtyard. Existing trees were also relocated and transplanted on site. April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Round Rock ISD High Schools

Woodward Academy Middle School Campus College Park, GA Geothermal Heating And Cooling

Geothermal heating and cooling has been used at all our projects at Woodward Academy. Water source heat pumps are supplied with water circulated through pipes in the ground. Since the earth remains at a fairly constant temperature, less energy is needed to warm or cool the water which is used to condition the space, hence saving considerable energy. A geothermal system also reduces the need for mechanical equipment and mechanical space in the building, thus saving square footage.

Green Roofs

Green roofs provide a means for storm water management and provide insulation for buildings. Roof plantings collect rain water reducing the need for on site detention. They also can provide learning environments for students.

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies

Hector Garcia Middle School. Building planning responds naturally to the surrounding environment and climate. Hector Garcia Middle School, one of three new middle schools in Dallas Independent School District’s 2002 Bond Program, provides a broad selection of learning opportunities and services planned to meet the developmental needs of the whole child. The building’s layout nurtures social and academic development in a safe and secure environment. Supporting the neighborhood and community beyond school hours, the building is zoned to allow public access to the gymnasium, library, and performing arts areas. The site location provided the opportunity to create a neighborhood and community asset. The North Oak Cliff neighborhood is a vital area within the city and offers many opportunities for synergy relationships with the new middle school. Downtown amenities, city parks, and the Dallas Zoo with a dart rail stop are located near the school site. The school’s planning responds naturally to the site’s climate. North facing classrooms offer stunning views to the skyline, take advantage of indirect north light for optimal daylighting, and minimize cooling demand by facing classrooms away from Texas’ harsh sun exposure. Grouping general sciences and classrooms along one exposure also allows a similar temperature demand for similar academic spaces. The building’s exposure to the east and west sun are minimized to further assist with cooling demand. The south façade is planned to buffer to the southern sun. Program spaces organized to the south require minimal natural light and are situated with the ability to control the southern exposure. Large volume and shared instructional spaces are located toward the south, allowing a direct connection to the school’s outdoor play areas. As specified in the school’s program, art rooms are located with exterior access, allowing the opportunity for creating outdoor art projects and display.

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies

Central Middle School. The school's landscape design acts as a demonstration of sustainability principles making it a symbol of the school's relationship with the wider surrounding environment. The new Central Middle School is a replacement facility for a 100-year old school located on the same site in Columbus, Indiana's architecturally significant downtown district. Designed to serve 900 students in grades 6 through 8, the school demonstrates Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation’s commitment to a middle school educational model. Perkins+Will incorporated several sustainable features into the school's design. The classroom areas are designed to incorporate the optimal amount of daylighting opportunities. Immeasurable positive qualities are gained in the learning spaces through the effective daylight manipulation. Daylight harvesting became a major form generator for the building. Extensive studies were conducted to ensure that the natural light would be reflected and bounce further into the spaces, greatly reducing the amount of artificial lighting required. The school is oriented in order to take advantage of the prevailing winds. The wind forces are harvested to naturally ventilate and cool the interior spaces. Wind towers on the roof were coordinated to exhaust air from the inside of the building while louvers allow natural air to circulate and replace the exhausted air. The landscape design consists of outdoor classrooms, a typical recreational landscape, and an outdoor ecology laboratory. These components were designed with recycled and low embodied energy materials creating a "learning landscape" for the students.

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies

Blue Valley Southwest High School. The District's fifth high school strives to become LEED® Certified - Silver for sustainable design. Located in Overland Park, Kansas, a southern suburb of Kansas City, Blue Valley Unified School District 229 serves over 20,000 students in grades Pre-K to 12. In the fall of 2006, Perkins+Will with HTK Architects and NSP Architects facilitated a series of participatory workshops resulting in a facility program statement for the District’s fifth High School to be ready for the 2010/2011 academic year. The purpose of the programming and planning process, and the resulting space program, was to translate the educational goals and objectives of Blue Valley Schools into a flexible teaching and learning environment. The exciting new 300,000 square-foot, 9th through 12th grade comprehensive high school will provide spaces and functional relationships that reflect and support the curricular, instructional, and developmental needs of the district’s students both now and well into the future. Some sustainable strategies that will be incorporated to gain LEED Silver Certification include a courtyard to provide a safe outdoor learning space, maximizing natural daylight throughout the building, a displacement ventilation mechanical system, bioswales, and using limestone found on the site as a building material.

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies

Alpharetta High School Alpharetta, Georgia

Stretching across a ridge in the foothills of the north Georgia Mountains, Alpharetta High School is a jewel of academic design excellence. In addressing a concern for the impersonal culture of large schools, Alpharetta High School is designed to support a “school within a school” concept. The 1,850 student school population is divided between three classroom wings (or “houses”), where each wing is served by a core group of teachers. This smaller community, sharing the resources and benefits of a larger high school, allows faculty to personally know and guide the same group of students for their entire high school career. Students leave their houses for athletics, art, music and career technology classes, and may switch houses for some language and science courses. However, the classroom wings were designed with the flexibility to support a variety of other organizational models as well. The classroom wings open to a linear spine connecting the building’s shared facilities: the media center, cafeteria, career tech components, arts and athletic facilities. In response to the client’s desire for a campus atmosphere, the arts and athletic facilities are located in separate buildings near the front door to facilitate public access during and after school hours. Sustainable design is an essential part of Perkins+Will’s design philosophy, thus every effort was made to be environmentally responsible at Alpharetta High School. Nearly all instructional areas receive natural daylight, building materials include recycled content and trees removed from the site were harvested through timber companies. In an effort to limit impact on the Big Creek basin and surrounding neighbors, site storm water is controlled through a series of shallow rain gardens intended to help clean storm water run-off from the building and parking lots and rehydrate the water table prior to leaving the site.

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies

Blythewood High School

Richland School District Two Columbia, South Carolina

Blythewood High School. New high school emphasizes a flexible, learner-centered facility designed to serve both the student population and the community-atlarge. Facility Guidelines were created for Blythewood High School through a collaborative, participatory process with the school district community. The guidelines put emphasis on the school being a flexible, learner-centered facility designed to serve both the student population and the community. The building is broadly organized into academic and arts/wellness areas, connected by a cluster of central community spaces. The academic areas contain classroom space for both core and specialty curriculum, including science and vocational technology labs. The core classrooms are clustered into four student academic houses, each supported by its own grouping of satellite administration, resource, and breakout areas. The house concept reinforces smaller groups of students and encourages stronger student/staff interaction. The central community spaces include the media center, commons/cafeteria, and cyber cafe; all located at the heart of the school near the main lobby making them easily accessible for daily student use as well as after-school, evening, or weekend events. The central administration and student activities center are also located here enabling school administrators to efficiently supervise student activity and ensure safety. Beyond the central community spaces are arts and wellness areas that include a 500-seat auditorium, music/art/drama classrooms, a 2,000-seat basketball gymnasium, auxiliary gym and locker rooms. The school’s 140-acre site is geographically rich, with natural amenities such as a 10-acre lake, wetlands, and densely wooded areas. Facilities on the site include a 6,000-seat football stadium and play fields for baseball, football, softball, tennis, and track & field. Every element of the facility was carefully sited to preserve as much of the existing forest and wetlands as possible, while taking advantage of the views across the lake, the topography, the prevailing wind and solar orientations, and natural interactive opportunities afforded by the unique location.

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sustainable case studies

examples to be considered for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies

Mint Hill Middle School Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

Mint Hill, North Carolina

Mint Hill Middle School. Learning communities for each grade and natural lighting for classrooms. Phase I of this 64-acre suburban site accommodates a new middle school fronting Idlewild Road in the town of Mint Hill. An elementary school will share the site in the next phase. The program total square footage for the 1200-student middle school is 152,143 square feet. The site was master planned to accommodate the future elementary school, parking, service, and playfield requirements. Drawing on the suburban nature of the site, a spacious oval lawn connects the two schools. Bus and automobile parking surfaces will be shared between them, preserving green spaces for school activities. The school's “finger-plan” design is organized around three daylighted grade houses for grades 6-8. A major daylighted circulation corridor, or “street,” connects the grade houses to the shared spaces of the program. The design takes full advantage of natural daylighting techniques via clerestory windows and lightshelves at the window wall. This strategy provides superior lighting for the individual classrooms as well as the shared common areas in each grade house. April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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local climate To design a sustainable school building it is crucial to understand the local environment, the climate and analyze the temperatures, humidity levels, available daylight etc. Data for the Overland Park area is provided below.

Degrees (F)

Temperature 100 Max. °F 90 Ave. °F 80 73 Min. °F 70 64 60 54.5 50 42.6 40 31.3 30 25.7 20 10 (0information from: http://www.worldclimate.com/) Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

78.4

76.1 67.5 56.5 43 30.6

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Heating and cooling degree days • Heating degree day: The cumulative number of degrees in a month by which the mean temperature falls below 65°F. • Cooling degree day: The cumulative number of degrees in a month by which the mean temperature is above 65°F. 1200 0

Degrees (F)

1000

1073

1217

800

945 657

600 689

0

0 Jan

Feb

0 Mar

9 Apr

349

252

324

200

279

418

400 106 135

0

5 May

5

Jun

Jul

130 56 Aug

18 Sep

0 Oct

0 Nov

Dec ,

(information from: http://www.worldclimate.com) April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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local climate Wind Rose Diagrams The wind in the Overland Park area is predominately from the south in the summer and predominately from the north and south in the winter months.

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local climate

seasonal conditions and response Spring

In the Overland Park area, the spring season is a mild time of year with more precipitation than any of the other seasons. Average springtime temperatures range from the low 40°s to the low 80°s Farenheit. Wind is predominantly from the south. Response to climate: • Heating is not typically required; internal heat gain from electric lights and people can increase the internal temperature bringing internal temperature within the comfort range on cooler days • Controlled natural ventilation can be provided during early to mid spring to provide a comfortable internal environment • Mechanical cooling may be required for some of spring • Building may utilize shading from the high south and low east & west sun to avoid overheating • Horizontal sun shading devices placed externally are recommended Summer The summer season is a hot and humid time of year. Average summertime temperatures range from average highs in the mid to upper 80’s to average lows in the 60’s (degrees Fahrenheit). Wind is predominantly from the south. Response to climate: • Mechanical cooling will be required for most of the summer • Building may utilize shading from the high south and low east & west sun to avoid overheating • Horizontal sun shading devices placed externally are recommended Autumn From the late September into early November, the average temperature ranges from mid 40°s to high 70°s Farenheit. Wind direction is predominantly from the north and south. Autumn has almost as much precipitation as spring. Response to climate: • Controlled natural ventilation can be provided during most of autumn to achieve daytime comfort cooling • Internal heat gain from electric lights and people can increase the internal temperature bringing internal temperature within the comfort range on cooler days

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local climate

seasonal conditions and response Winter

During the winter, daily average temperatures range from mid 20°s to 30°s Farenheit. Wind is predominantly from the northwest direction. Response to climate: • Active heating is required • Building enclosure system should be well insulated. • Maximize passive solar heat gains from the low sun along the south facade. • Building may maximize protection from the cold southern/northern winds through its orientation and through utilization of coniferous vegetation.

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site analysis

West 149th Terrace

Predominant Winter Winds

High Point 1010

Summer Sun Martyy Street

In Line Detention Setback

Winter Sun

Low Point 995

Predominant Summer Winds

Low Point 985

West 151st Street

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planning concepts Key areas that are experiencing dramatic changes in educational facilities are technology, safety and security, and flexibility in the performance of spaces. The space concepts included within this document are planned to accommodate spatial relationships necessary to support a contemporary educational facility. To further strengthen these relationships, planning concepts have been provided to offer guidance in the planning, design and decision making process for Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies.

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technology concepts Technology is a key element in the creation of a contemporary high school. Just as technology is reshaping other institutions, it offers the high school exciting new ways not only to meet student and community needs but also to manage facility operations. Technology’s impact on the instructional environment should be reflected in the design of the facilities by accommodating technology infrastructure systems that account for advancements in both wired and wireless technologies. New technology and interactive tools supporting collaborative activities over the internet are impacting facility power and data requirements. As educators, teachers, and students are developing new internet resources, facilities must be prepared to accommodate instant access to the internet. To accommodate this growing use of technology, each and every space–not just classrooms–in the new facility should be considered a potential learning environment. Access to areas of technology concentration for after hours use by students and community should also be a consideration in planning the campus. New technology implies the need for comprehensive staff development programs, student access to technology applications, home-to-school access, technical support personnel, and a “positive” security system that encourages use and protects the learning center’s investment in technological tools. Other opportunities include provisions within the building for students to serve as informal “teachers” of technology. These spaces foster better student/teacher relationships while taking advantage of the student’s knowledge of technology. Informal spaces–even exterior spaces–should also be equipped with the potential for network connections and support impromptu learning opportunities. As the facility is designed, it will be important for the design team to coordinate with Blue Valley’s Executive Director, working closely to identify facility design opportunities that support the use of instructional technologies. Examples of areas to discuss with the Executive Director are: access to power and data, controllable light levels, spaces equipped for independent and/or self directed instruction, and mechanical systems that will accommodate a potential heat gain from increased number of sources (computers, monitors, etc.). To further the idea that the entire facility is a learning environment, the design of the building should also allow the possibility for digital expression, both audio & digital. While it is customary for classrooms to have a large format monitor, TV (not recommended), interactive white board or LCD projector, other opportunities include monitors or projection capabilities in conference rooms, informal student spaces, the cafeteria/multi-purpose room/gymnasium, and public lobbies. The challenge with integrating instructional technologies into the design of an educational facility is directly linked to the magnitude of technological changes likely to occur over the next 25 years. Blue Valley Schools will successfully meet this challenge by acknowledging the many possibilities of technology and providing an agile infrastructure to accommodate them.

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technology concepts Blue Valley School District is considering forward-looking technology strategies for implementation in the initial stages of the programming process. As the process moves into detailed design, additional detail and verification needs to occur with the administrators, educators, community stakeholders and the Executive Director to assure technology is up-to-date at the time of implementation. While meetings with the Executive Director are needed to further define the district’s direction for technology, the below assumptions were made for the programming phase. Over the course of the design phases, deviations that do not meet the requirements defined below should be discussed with the Executive Director and other project leadership. The Center for Advanced Professional Studies is planning a wired and wireless network to support a variety of connectivity needs. The network will contain a local data network, an intranet for use by students and faculty, and accessibility to the internet from any space on campus. The system should also provide the flexibility to transmit television or cable information via the digital network. Wired connections are envisioned for uses that need fast access to large amounts of data, for example multi-media and video functions. Wireless connections are envisioned to allow general connections to large amounts of users, for example a general classroom receiving instruction. Wireless technology also provides flexibility for mobile users and provides greater opportunities for formal and informal teaching and learning in spaces outside of the classroom, including the library, cafeteria/multi-purpose room, gymnasium, and other indoor and outdoor spaces. Presentation should be a critical component to the technology plan at the The Center for Advanced Professional Studies. Spaces should be planned for digital projectors to allow images to be large enough for meaningful presentation of videos and images. Sound systems in learning spaces should also be planned for multi-media functions. Network connections for cameras will allow classrooms and other spaces to broadcast, receive, and participate in educational activities around the district’s campuses, the region, and the world. To provide flexibility in room assignments, all classrooms are planned to have similar technology features. Wired network connections as well as wireless connections are planned for each classroom. The individual labs are planned to accommodate ceiling mounted projectors and a phone for inter-campus communication, with additional provision for their respective functions. In planning the technology systems at The Center for Advanced Professional Studies, constant attention should be given towards flexibility to accommodate a variety of interactive activities as well as the agility to accommodate rapidly changing equipment and performance requirements.

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technology concepts Technology mixed with other activities Technology is only one aspect of projects and research for interdisciplinary curriculums. At the International School of Beijing, technology is integrated with other activities such as conference space, books, copy machines allowing the opportunity for self directed learning and working with project teams. Arrangements like this photo also allow students to multi-task: research, read, discuss, work, and meet with others. At Blythewood High School in South Carolina, seen in the photo to the right, students spend time in a “cyber-cafe� that is located adjacent to the library. It is a common area in which the students can access the internet, read, eat, drink, or just hang out, much like what is offered at many contemporary bookstores.

Technology is getting smaller Students can use palm devices, smart phones or laptop computers that provide access to information in remote locations, or perhaps more importantly, in locations where they are working on instructional projects. Although technology is getting smaller and access is becoming remote, power is still an issue as devices need to be charged or plugged into the electric system.

Access to a variety of technology At this public school in Aurora, Illinois students work in project teams. The students at the table in the foreground are working together on a presentation and viewing their collective efforts on the wall via a projection device. Other students in the room are working individually with the teacher serving as a guide. Interactive electronic whiteboards, as seen in this classroom, can engage students through energized presentations and active learning. The touch-senstive display is connected to a computer and a digital projector. Teachers or students can use interactive programs and write digital notes on the electronic whiteboard which can be saved, printed or e-mailed. April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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safety and security concepts The successful creation of a safe and secure learning environment depends on the integration of “active” and “passive” design strategies. The active approach uses hardware security systems such as cameras or motion detectors. Passive security is based on program and facility design, building and site configuration, and community participation. Passive measures for program and building configuration can be the primary means to foster safety and security while active security measures are applied where and when they are deemed necessary as a secondary precaution. Further, The Center for Advanced Professional Studies can take advantage of building technology, signage and landscaping to further enhance campus security. Passive Security Concepts Classroom organization that minimizes student travel time  Well defined entry sequence with a visitor check-in desk similar to entrances at libraries, museums, or other public facilities. Planning that avoids blind spots, unnecessary corners, and corridor recesses greater than one foot.  Locating administrative and teacher preparation areas or offices with good visual contact of major circulation areas [i.e., corridors, cafeteria, parent and bus drop-off, parking].  Locating actively programmed elements around the periphery of the school building so that there is “natural surveillance” from within the school to outdoor areas such as parking lots and playgrounds.  Minimizing windowless, blank walls at the periphery of the building, particularly when these uses face residential, play areas, courtyards and parking lots.  Planning spatial relationships in such a manner that there are natural transitions from one location to another.  Locating restrooms in close proximity to classrooms to minimize students wandering the halls.  Locating areas likely to have significant community [before/after school] uses close to parking and appropriately zoned so these areas can be closed off from the rest of the building.  Providing for natural integration of students and staff during class changes.  Providing a high degree of ‘transparency’ within the building. Active Security Concepts  A security consultant can help with system design and device location and should be consulted during schematic design.  When planning a security system, it is recommended to include a provision for accessing cameras and recorded data remotely in the event the building should become inaccessible.  Auto-connecting systems to police and fire authorities when an alarm is tripped should be considered.

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planning concepts

CAPS

safety and security concepts Uses of Technology for Security  Providing phones in every instructional and support area.  Building-wide public address system designed to be heard throughout the school and on the play fields when needed.  Motion or infra-red detectors which can also be configured to conserve lighting costs.  Video cameras that are used for instructional purposes could also be used for security and risk management purposes during non-school hours. Site Planning, Vehicular and Pedestrian Traffic  The bus drop-off area may be at the curb or in a public right-of-way and should be ‘connected’ to the building entries by wide, well illuminated open walkways.  The building envelope should be sensitive to how it responds to the proximity of pedestrian walkways. (Consider window size and location, climbing access to the roof, etc.)  Exterior play areas and open space should minimize ‘blind’ spots.  Clear signage to indicate public entries with easily controllable entry lobbies.  A bus drop-off area separated from other vehicular traffic.  Separate faculty/staff and community parking areas.  Separate student [pedestrian] site circulation flow from roadways. Landscaping and Lighting  The use of high branching trees and low bushes to deter hiding.  The use of an aesthetically pleasing–yet secure–perimeter fence around the site.  Building placement along the site perimeter to protect on site open space.  General, non-intrusive site lighting of all parking, pedestrian and entry areas. General exterior building lighting and illuminate public areas, window areas and potentially dark corners or surfaces.  Security lighting at selected building and parking lots with photocell timer with on/off capacity.  Separate athletic fields from informal gathering areas.  Locate athletic facilities used for after school events away from building and consider perimeter fencing.

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flexibility and agility concepts Understanding that change is a constant for school and community facilities, these learning environments should be comprised of flexible, agile spaces equipped with the necessary tools and furniture to support the many varieties of teaching–including collaboration and self-directed learning, exploration and discovery–that are the trademark of superior and healthy educational environments. To accommodate an ever changing world of educational practice, these environments should be equipped to change not just year-to-year but dayto-day, even performing differently at different times during the day. During meetings with workshop participants, concepts were explored that will create a flexible building to support changing program needs. In addition to supporting the demands of the unique program, the facility needs to accommodate learning in labs as well as hallways, the atrium, and other community spaces and shared areas. Dynamic and agile learning environments that accept and respond to change, necessitate facilities to be designed to support multiple uses. In planning multi-functional spaces, recognition needs to be made that–while more cost effective to build fewer spaces–as the performance expectations of individual spaces increase, budgets need to be allocated to accommodate the needs of all of the multiple uses. Strategies that support flexible and agile environments at The Center for Advanced Professional Studies include:  Creating spaces that can adapt to a variety of teaching and learning styles (lecture, team work, self directed, individual, etc.)  Providing movable and mobile storage and technology for building users to accommodate needed room changes.  Accommodating re-configurations of interior space by providing partitions that are demountable, movable, or at least non-load bearing.

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planning concepts

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flexibility and agility concepts

Spaces that behave differently at different times One strategy to creating a flexible school facility is to provide spaces that are able to change their use during different times of the day. This cafe at a train station in Setagawa-Ku in Tokyo is a good example of a space that has the ability to change uses over the course of a day. In the first diagram, a serving area is open to a cafe, providing a traditional service arrangement for a cafe. Visitors select their order and proceed to the dining area. In the second diagram, the dining area is separated from the serving area. The dining area is available for meeting functions, while the serving area still operates for snacks. In the final diagram, the serving area is closed completely and the dining area is opened to the adjacent spaces allowing a larger public space and opportunities for informal conversation.

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planning concepts

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flexibility and agility concepts

Learning environments equipped for flexible layouts Classrooms that are ready to meet the educational demands for the coming years will respond quickly and easily to a variety of teaching methods. Various strategies allow furniture to be grouped for lectures, seminars, small groups and project teams. In each configuration, teams need access to technology and presentation equipment. Teachers’ furniture can be mobile to allow the desk to also be a conference table and storage to move from room to room. Science rooms and technology labs also need to be planned for changing configurations. Like general classrooms, science and research rooms need to accommodate lectures, small groups, seminars, experimental labs, and research activities.

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facility program

CAPS

overview of program format The programming section of the Facility Design Guidelines is organized into four interrelated sections. Individual sections identify spaces that are programmatically similar and strongly related to each other. Each space within the facility is identified in one of the following sections: 1

Student Learning Strands

2

Administration and Staff Spaces

3

Community and Stakeholder Spaces

4

Facility Management and Support Spaces

The beginning of each section provides a space program that indicates the name of each space, the quantity of the spaces and the size of the space. Following the space program are relationship diagrams that show how spaces within each section relate to each other. The program describes the net area which is the space required for specific activities; the grossing factor, which provides an allowance for circulation, restrooms, mechanical spaces, etc; and the total gross area which represents the required buildable area. After the relationship diagrams are informational data sheets provided for each major space within the section. The data sheets are comprised of three types of information: a text section providing room data specific to the space; a room diagram showing a representative diagram that provides programmatic direction and adjacencies; and a relationship diagram that shows the interconnection of the space to related spaces. Listed furniture and equipment is as requested by users and will need to be coordinated with final space constraints and budget. To begin the programming section, a program summary provides an overview of the space program and a diagrammatic overview of how the pieces of the Center for Advanced Professional Studies combine to form a complete environment.

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facility program

CAPS

program summary

04/24/2008 DRAFT

250 planned students, grades 11-12 0

A. 1. 2.

Area Summary Total area Target area Difference

B. 1. 2. 3.

Capacity Summary Teaching Stations Utilization Factor Effective Student Capacity

1. 2.

Area Analysis Square feet per student: Planned Square feet per student: Actual

D. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Student Learning Strands Administration Community Facility support

NET SQUARE FEET GROSSING total factor

38,890 nsf 38,483 nsf 407 nsf

15 85%

GROSS SQUARE FEET total

1.45

56,391 gsf * 55,800 gsf * 591 gsf

305 students 259 students

250 students 259 students

223 gsf 218 gsf

Area Comparison

Total GSF E.

CAPACITY students

0

78% 7% 12% 3% 100%

30,300 nsf 2,650 nsf 4,800 nsf 1,140 nsf 38,890 nsf

43,935 gsf 3,843 gsf 6,960 gsf 1,653 gsf 56,391 gsf

Area Chart

Student Learning Strands 78% Administration 7%

Community 12%

Facility support 3%

* - does not include area for shelled space

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facility program

CAPS

1

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

1

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12

student learning strands NOTES

teaching

SPACES total

each

STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

1

1

20

20

3,000

3,000

12' clear ceiling, overhead door to CAD Lab

STUDENT LEARNING STRANDS

A.

Engineering

1.

CNC Lab ("Dirty" Lab)

2.

Welding/Spray Area

-

-

-

-

-

area with curtain, part of CNC lab

3.

Project Storage - CNC

1

-

-

600

600

adjacent to CNC lab and exterior

4.

CAD Lab ("Clean" Lab)

1

20

20

1,200

1,200

5.

Print Room

-

1

-

-

150

150

6.

Digital Electronics Lab ("Clean" Lab)

1

1

20

20

1,200

1,200

closest to Bioscience, overhead doors, outdoor access

1

connect to CAD/Digital Elec labs

7.

Project Storage - Clean Labs

1

-

-

150

150

connect to CAD/digital electronics

8.

Project Area

1

-

-

1,200

1,200

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

-

-

-

-

1 large storage room for CNC lab

-

-

150

150

1 small group room goes to storage hooks/shelves in hallway for coats/backpacks

9.

Project Area Storage

10.

Small Group/Resource Room

1

11.

Student Storage

1

50

50

12 12.

Informal student area

1

400

400

13.

Toilets Sub-Total:

-

-

see community spaces

10

2

20

40

1,500

3,000

1

20

20

1,500

1,500

senior lab

2

-

-

300

600

share with project area storage and project area auxiliary building

B.

Bioscience

1.

Bioscience/Animal Science Learning Lab

2

2.

Bioscience/Animal Science Learning Lab

1

3.

Prep/Storage

60

-

3

8,100 include outdoor lab

4.

Greenhouse

1

-

-

5.

Outdoor Learning Lab

1

-

-

junior labs - moveable walls? Storage along moveable wall?

6.

Project Area

1

-

-

1,200

1,200

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

7.

Project Area Storage

1

-

-

-

-

share with prep/storage

8.

Small Group/Resource Room

2

-

-

150

300

moveable walls?

9.

Student Storage

1

100

100

hooks/shelves in hallway for coats/backpacks

10.

Informal student area

1

500

500

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

11.

Toilets

-

-

-

see community spaces

Sub-Total:

3

13

60

7,200

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facility program

CAPS

1

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12

student learning strands NOTES

teaching

SPACES total

each

STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

C.

Business

1.

Interactive Media Lab

1

1

20

20

1,200

1,200

Combined 2100sf space, glass moveable wall between

1.

Interactive Media Lab

1

1

20

20

900

900

Combined 2100sf space, glass moveable wall between

2.

Video Production Lab

-

-

-

-

-

-

next to human services, 2nd floor

3.

Business Lab

1

1

25

25

1,200

1,200

door into 1200sf Interactive Media Lab

4.

IT Lab

1

1

20

20

1,200

1,200

glass moveable wall next to 900sf Interactive Media Lab

5.

Project Area

1

-

-

1,200

1,200

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

6.

Project Area Storage

1

-

-

100

100

7.

Small Group/Resource Room

2

-

-

150

300

moveable walls?

8.

Student Storage

1

100

100

hooks/shelves in hallway for coats/backpacks

9.

Informal student area

1

400

400

combine between business and human services

10.

Toilets

-

-

-

see community spaces

Sub-Total:

4

10

85

6,600

D D.

Human Services

1.

Human Services (Law) Lab

1

1

25

25

900

900

moveable wall with pre-teacher ed lab

2.

Pre-Teacher Education Lab

1

1

25

25

900

900

moveable wall with human services lab

3.

Pre-School/Daycare

-

-

-

-

-

-

practicum (outside of school)

4.

Health Professions Lab

1

1

10

10

1,200

1,200

CNA/CMA/EMT

5.

Health Professions Room

1

1

25

25

900

900

6.

Health Professions Storage

-

1

-

-

150

150

7.

Sports Medicine Lab

1

1

15

15

1,200

1,200

athletic training room function

8.

Sports Medicine Storage

-

1

-

-

150

150

between Sports Med Lab and Health Professions Room

between CNA Lab and Health Professions Room

9.

Project Area

1

-

-

1,200

1,200

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

10.

Project Area Storage

1

-

-

-

-

share stor. for health prof./sports medicine - door to proj. area?

-

-

150

150

11.

Small Group/Resource Room

1

12.

Student Storage

1

50

50

13.

Informal student area

1

400

400

14.

Toilets Sub-Total:

Total student learning spaces:

-

-

-

5

12

100

7,200

15

23

305

30,300

hooks/shelves in hallway for coats/backpacks

see community spaces

continued on next page April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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facility program

CAPS

2

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12 teaching

2

administration and staff spaces

SPACES total

NOTES STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

1

-

150

150

each

ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF SPACES

A.

Offices

1.

Waiting Area

adjacent to commons, close to the strands

2.

Exec. Director's Office

1

-

150

150

3.

Security Office

1

-

150

150

4.

IT Office

1

-

100

100

5.

Career Counselor Office

1

-

150

150

6.

Conference room

1

-

200

200

7.

Copy Room

1

-

100

100

8.

Storage

1

-

100

100

9.

Toilet

1

-

50

50

Sub-Total:

9

-

B.

Distributed Professional Areas

1.

Learning Facilitator/Visitors Workspace

2

2.

Shared Private Phone Call Space

3.

closet

4.

Faculty toilet Sub-Total:

1,150 locate between strands

-

-

500

1,000

2

-

30

60

2

-

20

40

2

-

50

100

8

-

-

-

-

1,200

C.

Clinic

1.

Clinic Office/Reception

1

-

150

2.

Office

1

-

-

-

3.

Cot area

1

-

100

100

4.

Toilet

1

-

50

50

Sub-Total:

4

-

300

13

-

2,650

Total admin. and staff spaces:

near commons/entry

"flight lounge", hoteling spaces (4 teachers, 2 visitors)

near strands? Close to visitors/faculty office

150

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facility program

CAPS

3

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12 teaching

3

community and stakeholder spaces

SPACES total

NOTES each

STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

900

900

COMMUNITY AND STAKEHOLDER SPACES

A.

Lobby

1.

Lobby/Reception/Welcome Desk

1

-

Sub-Total:

1

-

B.

Commons/Café

1.

Commons/Café (Retail)

1

2.

Career Research Center/Resource Area

1

3.

Vending

4.

Catering area

5.

Storage Sub-Total:

receptions/presentation/display

900

-

1,800

1,800

include vending, retail compontent

-

600

600

lower ceiling with projection?

-

-

-

-

alcove in commons area

1

-

150

150

1

-

150

4

-

-

150

area from multi-purpose room storage

2,700

C C.

Community Spaces

1.

Community/Visiting Personnel Office

-

-

-

-

2.

Multi-Purpose Room

-

-

-

-

3.

Multi-Purpose Room Storage

-

-

-

-

4.

Toilets

4

-

300

1,200

Sub-Total:

4

-

1,200

Total community spaces:

8

-

4,800

moved into learning facilitator office

moved adjacent to commons

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facility program

CAPS

4 facility management and support spaces

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12 teaching

4

SPACES total

NOTES each

STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

300

FACILITY MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORT SPACES

A.

Property Control

1.

Central receiving / office

1

300

2.

Storage

1

150

150

3.

Recycling Storage/Collection Area

1

100

100

4.

Toilet / locker

1

50

50

Sub-Total: B.

Facility Support

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Custodial Closets Distributed Mechanical Rooms Chiller Room Main Electrical Electrical Closets Water Heater/Boiler Room Fire Pump Fire Riser MDF/Demark IDF Elevator & machine room Freight elevator & machine room

600 displacement ventilation/underfloor air - size req?/LEED Gold Certification 4 1 1

60 150 150

Sub-Total: C.

Exterior Facilities

1.

Outdoor learning lab

2.

Staff Parking

3.

Vistor Parking

4.

Parent Queing Length

5.

Buses

in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor near main stairs for disabled students near loading? For large equipment. One shared elevator?

540

see Bioscience Strand

Sub-Total:

-

-

1,140

Total facility management and support spaces: TOTAL NSF

240 150 150

15

305

38,890

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facility program

CAPS

building diagram

building diagram The building diagram that was derived throughout the workshops and subsequent discussions is an atrium scheme. It provides exterior spaces accessed easily from the strands and the commons. The atrium connects all three floors and has project areas surrounding it, directly outside of each strand. The diagram is zoned with the shared atrium easily accessible to students and the public with a secure entry point at the main administration area. The easily accessible outdoorsspaces can be used for outdoor projects. This diagram maximizes daylighting potential, especially north/south daylight, which is the most easily controlled natural light. This building diagram will be used to explain adjacencies in the following facility program sections.

outdoor workspace

engineering

stair

project/student area toilets/ support

stair

potential addition add to

3 story commons/ resource area

dist admin stair

lobby receiving/ mech

admin

first floor diagram

bioscience

project/student area toilets/ support

stair

3 story commons// resource area

potential addition add to

stair

dist admin project/student area

stair

human services

second floor diagram

business

project/student area toilets/ support

stair

3 story commons// resource area

potential addition add to

stair

dist admin project/student area

stair

shelled space

third floor diagram April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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facility program

CAPS site diagram

site diagram West 149th Terrace

The site includes an area for possible future expansion of the facility to the east. Additional parking can be added to the south in the future, if needed.

Marty Stre eet

Throughout the workshops, the site plan was discussed and refined. There is one main access point onto the site. The main entry is from West 151st, which will provide a view of the building upon entering the site. Visitor and teacher traffic can enter or exit from Marty Street or West 149th Terrace. The two access points help alleviate traffic congestion and allow for safe traffic flow throughout the campus. Drop-off and parking are located directly south of the building, with easy access to the main building entry. West 151st Street

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facility program

CAPS

1

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

1

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12

student learning strands NOTES

teaching

SPACES total

each

STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

1

1

20

20

3,000

3,000

12' clear ceiling, overhead door to CAD Lab

STUDENT LEARNING STRANDS

A.

Engineering

1.

CNC Lab ("Dirty" Lab)

2.

Welding/Spray Area

-

-

-

-

-

area with curtain, part of CNC lab

3.

Project Storage - CNC

1

-

-

600

600

adjacent to CNC lab and exterior

4.

CAD Lab ("Clean" Lab)

1

20

20

1,200

1,200

5.

Print Room

-

1

-

-

150

150

6.

Digital Electronics Lab ("Clean" Lab)

1

1

20

20

1,200

1,200

closest to Bioscience, overhead doors, outdoor access

1

connect to CAD/Digital Elec labs

7.

Project Storage - Clean Labs

1

-

-

150

150

connect to CAD/digital electronics

8.

Project Area

1

-

-

1,200

1,200

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

-

-

-

-

1 large storage room for CNC lab

-

-

150

150

1 small group room goes to storage hooks/shelves in hallway for coats/backpacks

9.

Project Area Storage

10.

Small Group/Resource Room

1

11.

Student Storage

1

50

50

12 12.

Informal student area

1

400

400

13.

Toilets Sub-Total:

-

-

see community spaces

10

2

20

40

1,500

3,000

1

20

20

1,500

1,500

senior lab

2

-

-

300

600

share with project area storage and project area auxiliary building

B.

Bioscience

1.

Bioscience/Animal Science Learning Lab

2

2.

Bioscience/Animal Science Learning Lab

1

3.

Prep/Storage

60

-

3

8,100 include outdoor lab

4.

Greenhouse

1

-

-

5.

Outdoor Learning Lab

1

-

-

junior labs - moveable walls? Storage along moveable wall?

6.

Project Area

1

-

-

1,200

1,200

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

7.

Project Area Storage

1

-

-

-

-

share with prep/storage

8.

Small Group/Resource Room

2

-

-

150

300

moveable walls?

9.

Student Storage

1

100

100

hooks/shelves in hallway for coats/backpacks

10.

Informal student area

1

500

500

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

11.

Toilets

-

-

-

see community spaces

Sub-Total:

3

13

60

7,200

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facility program

CAPS

1

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12

student learning strands NOTES

teaching

SPACES total

each

STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

C.

Business

1.

Interactive Media Lab

1

1

20

20

1,200

1,200

Combined 2100sf space, glass moveable wall between

1.

Interactive Media Lab

1

1

20

20

900

900

Combined 2100sf space, glass moveable wall between

2.

Video Production Lab

-

-

-

-

-

-

next to human services, 2nd floor

3.

Business Lab

1

1

25

25

1,200

1,200

door into 1200sf Interactive Media Lab

4.

IT Lab

1

1

20

20

1,200

1,200

glass moveable wall next to 900sf Interactive Media Lab

5.

Project Area

1

-

-

1,200

1,200

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

6.

Project Area Storage

1

-

-

100

100

7.

Small Group/Resource Room

2

-

-

150

300

moveable walls?

8.

Student Storage

1

100

100

hooks/shelves in hallway for coats/backpacks

9.

Informal student area

1

400

400

combine between business and human services

10.

Toilets

-

-

-

see community spaces

Sub-Total:

4

10

85

6,600

D D.

Human Services

1.

Human Services (Law) Lab

1

1

25

25

900

900

moveable wall with pre-teacher ed lab

2.

Pre-Teacher Education Lab

1

1

25

25

900

900

moveable wall with human services lab

3.

Pre-School/Daycare

-

-

-

-

-

-

practicum (outside of school)

4.

Health Professions Lab

1

1

10

10

1,200

1,200

CNA/CMA/EMT

5.

Health Professions Room

1

1

25

25

900

900

6.

Health Professions Storage

-

1

-

-

150

150

7.

Sports Medicine Lab

1

1

15

15

1,200

1,200

athletic training room function

8.

Sports Medicine Storage

-

1

-

-

150

150

between Sports Med Lab and Health Professions Room

between CNA Lab and Health Professions Room

9.

Project Area

1

-

-

1,200

1,200

incl. project display/presentation/digital capabilities

10.

Project Area Storage

1

-

-

-

-

share stor. for health prof./sports medicine - door to proj. area?

-

-

150

150

11.

Small Group/Resource Room

1

12.

Student Storage

1

50

50

13.

Informal student area

1

400

400

14.

Toilets Sub-Total:

Total student learning spaces:

-

-

-

5

12

100

7,200

15

23

305

30,300

hooks/shelves in hallway for coats/backpacks

see community spaces

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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84


strands

facility program

CAPS

1

student learning strands

Student Learning Strands The student learning strand spaces are planned to provide flexible and agile, learning areas for 250 students in grades 11 and 12. The student learning strands are broken down into the following groups: 1. Engineering 2. Bioscience 3. Business 4. Human Services To provide flexibility and agility in the strand areas, raised access floors will be used wherever possible.

Participant drawn building diagram from planning meeting two.

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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85


strands

facility program

CAPS

1

student learning strands outdoor workspace

engineering

stair

project/student area toilets/ support

stair

potential addition add to

3 story commons/ resource area

dist admin stair

lobby receiving/ mech

admin

first floor diagram

bioscience

project/student area toilets/ support

stair

3 story commons// resource area

potential addition add to

stair

dist admin project/student area

stair

human services

second floor diagram

business

project/student area toilets/ support

stair

3 story commons// resource area

potential addition add to

stair

dist admin project/student area

stair

shelled space

third floor diagram April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

86

86


engineering CNC lab (“dirty” lab) 3,000 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program Flexible, utility-instensive lab space for fabrication using CNC (computer numerical control) machines. Provide a clean area for CNC and “dirty” area for fabrication with power tools. special considerations • specially ventilated areas where required requested furniture and equipment • floor drains • workstation tables • locked storage • compressed air • sinks • welding area • power tools • CNC machines • tack board • marker board • AED and first aid kit

student learning strands outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

storage

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

i i i administration

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample outlets for power tools and CNC equipment • overhead, retractable outlets • clock • telephone/intercom system • interactive white board room finishes • exposed painted structure • high output fluorescent lighting • painted CMU walls • polished concrete floor

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

87

87


engineering project storage - CNC 600 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program Secure project storage space to support CNC lab.

outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

special considerations • provide direct access to lab space requested furniture and equipment • floor to ceiling heavy duty shelving • lockable base cabinets requested technology/power/communications • ample wall outlets

student learning strands

storage

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

i i i administration

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • painted CMU walls • high output fluorescent lighting • polished concrete floor

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

88

88


engineering CAD lab (“clean” lab) 1,200 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program A flexible learning environment for CAD instruction designed to support a variety of teaching disciplines and styles (i.e. lectures, group projects and individual instruction). special considerations • capability for digital display requested furniture and equipment • moveable computer drafting tables • chairs • marker boards • tack boards • mobile demo station

student learning strands outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

storage

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

administration i i i

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • clock • ample wall outlets • interactive white board • telephone/intercom system room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • rubber floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

89

89


engineering print room 150 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program Secure print room and storage area for CAD lab. requested furniture and equipment • plotters • large work table • heavy duty shelving • storage for different sizes of paper, including rolls, and ink • flat file storage

outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

storage

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • rubber floor tile

student learning strands

administration

administration i i i

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

90

90


engineering digital electronics lab (“clean” lab) 1,200 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program A flexible learning environment for digital electronics instruction designed to support a variety of teaching disciplines and styles (i.e. lectures, group projects and individual instruction). special considerations • capability for digital display requested furniture and equipment • moveable tables • chairs • marker boards • tack boards • mobile demo station • plotter • upper and lower cabinet s with worksurface and area for digital equipment

student learning strands outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

storage

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

i i i administration

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • clock • ample wall outlets • interactive white board • telephone/intercom system room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • rubber floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

91

91


engineering project storage - clean labs 150 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program Secure project storage area for clean labs.

student learning strands outdoor workspace

welding

requested furniture and equipment • heavy duty shelving

cnc lab 2 story space

storage

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • rubber floor tile

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

i i i administration

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

92

92


engineering project area 1,200 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program Space immediately accessible from each strand that can be used as a break-out area for small group work or informal interaction.

student learning strands outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

storage

special considerations • include display area for project work requested furniture and equipment • lower cabinets with lockable, solid doors • tables • chairs • marker board

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

i i i administration

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

93

93


engineering small group/resource room 1 @ 150 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program Small group rooms to provide an unscheduled break-out space for small groups of students and informal meetings. special considerations • locate near learning facilitators and commons • provide glass into small group rooms for natural supervision requested furniture and equipment • table • chairs • marker board

student learning strands outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

storage

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

i i i administration

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

94

94


engineering student storage 50 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program Storage area in each strand for student coats and backpacks.

outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

requested furniture and equipment • hooks • shelving room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • carpet tile

student learning strands

storage

cad lab

digital elec lab

print room

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

i i i administration

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

95

95


engineering informal student area 400 sf

facility program

CAPS

1

program Area for informal student gathering. Moveable tables, chairs and lounge seating should be provided for comfortable and informal interaction.

student learning strands outdoor workspace

welding cnc lab 2 story space

storage

digital elec lab

print room

special considerations • open and accessible near strands requested furniture and equipment • tables and chairs • soft seating

cad lab

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area

sm grp

project area/ display

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

stair

administration

i i i administration

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

96

96


bioscience bioscience/animal science learning lab 2 @ 1500 sf - junior labs 1 @ 1500 sf - senior lab

facility program

special considerations • consider moveable walls between rooms if possible with casework needs • capability for digital display requested furniture and equipment • professional lab style tables with sinks • flexible height chairs • large demo table with sink • bio safety cabinets • fume hoods • areas for moveable equipment • upper and lower cabinets with lockable, solid doors • chemical resistant countertops • marker board • tack boards

bioscience lab

prep/sstorage

bi i bioscience llab b

casework teaching wall

moveable wall

teaching g wall

bi i bioscience llab b

student learning strands

casework

casework prep/sstorage

program Highly flexible labs modeled after professional lab spaces focusing on bioscience and animal science.

1

moveable e wall

CAPS

teaching wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below human services

human services

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • interactive white board • telephone/intercom system • water/gas/electric • compressed air at demo station • overhead power • interactive white board room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • rubber floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

97

97


bioscience prep/storage 2 @ 300 sf

facility program

special considerations • provide ventilation for chemical storage requested furniture and equipment • upper and lower cabinets with lockable, solid doors • chemical resistant countertops • sink • refrigerator • ice maker • freezer • dishwasher (fits under countertop) • mobile wardrobe cabinet • chemical storage cabinet • autoclave

bioscience lab

prep/sstorage

bi i bioscience llab b

casework teaching wall

moveable wall

teaching g wall

bi i bioscience llab b

student learning strands

casework

casework prep/sstorage

program Prep room connected to two labs to share storage, equipment and preparation of in class experiments.

1

moveable e wall

CAPS

teaching wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below human services

human services

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock • telephone/intercom system • gas/compressed air connection room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • rubber floor

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

98

98


bioscience project area 1,200 sf

facility program

special considerations • include display area for project work requested furniture and equipment • lower cabinets with lockable, solid doors • tables • chairs • marker board

bioscience lab

prep/sstorage

bi i bioscience llab b

casework teaching wall

moveable wall

teaching g wall

bi i bioscience llab b

student learning strands

casework

casework prep/sstorage

program Space immediately accessible from each strand that can be used as a break-out area for small group work or informal interaction.

1

moveable e wall

CAPS

teaching wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below human services

human services

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

99

99


bioscience small group/resource room 2 @ 150 sf

facility program

special considerations • locate near learning facilitators and commons • provide glass into small group rooms for natural supervision

bioscience lab

prep/sstorage

bi i bioscience llab b

casework teaching wall

moveable wall

teaching g wall

bi i bioscience llab b

student learning strands

casework

casework prep/sstorage

program Small group rooms to provide an unscheduled break-out space for small groups of students and informal meetings.

1

moveable e wall

CAPS

teaching wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

student storage project storage

stair

requested furniture and equipment • table • chairs • marker board

commons/resource area below human services

human services

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

100

100


bioscience student storage 100 sf

facility program

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • carpet tile

bioscience lab

prep/sstorage

bi i bioscience llab b

casework teaching wall

bi i bioscience llab b

moveable wall

teaching g wall

requested furniture and equipment • hooks • shelving

student learning strands

casework

casework prep/sstorage

program Storage area in each strand for student coats and backpacks.

1

moveable e wall

CAPS

teaching wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below human services

human services

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

101

101


bioscience informal student area 500 sf

facility program

bioscience lab

prep/sstorage

bi i bioscience llab b

casework teaching wall

moveable wall

teaching g wall

bi i bioscience llab b

student learning strands

casework

casework prep/sstorage

program Area for informal student gathering. Moveable tables, chairs and lounge seating should be provided for comfortable and informal interaction.

1

moveable e wall

CAPS

teaching wall

special considerations • open and accessible near strands requested furniture and equipment • tables and chairs • soft seating

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below human services

human services

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

102

102


business interactive media lab 1 @ 1200 sf 1 @ 900 sf

facility program

CAPS program Flexible learning environment to support interactive media. Lab will support lectures, group projects and individual instruction. special considerations • consider a moveable wall between the labs requested furniture and equipment • computers • computer desks and chairs • modular tables and seating • marker boards • tack boards • mobile storage carts • mobile demo tables

1

student learning strands

Business

exterior

interactive media lab

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

iinteractive t ti media di lab

IT lab l b

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

b i business l b lab

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • interactive white boards • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

103

103


business business lab 1,200 sf

facility program

CAPS program Flexible learning environment to support business curriculum. Lab will support lectures, group projects and individual instruction. special considerations • include display area for project work requested furniture and equipment • computers • computer desks and chairs • modular tables and seating • marker boards • tack boards • mobile storage carts • mobile demo tables • copier

1

student learning strands

Business

exterior

interactive media lab

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

iinteractive t ti media di lab

IT lab l b

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

b i business l b lab

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • interactive white board/LCD’s • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

104

104


business IT lab 1,200 sf

facility program

CAPS program Flexible learning environment to support IT instruction. Lab will support lectures, group projects and individual instruction. special considerations • consider a moveable wall between the labs • include display area for project work

1

student learning strands

Business

exterior

interactive media lab

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

iinteractive t ti media di lab

IT lab l b

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

b i business l b lab

student storage project storage

stair

requested furniture and equipment • computers • computer desks and chairs • modular tables and seating • individual soft seating with laptop arm • marker boards • tack boards • mobile storage carts • mobile demo tables

commons/resource area below

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • interactive white board/LCD’s • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • rubber floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

105

105


business project area 1,200 sf

facility program

CAPS program Space immediately accessible from each strand that can be used as a break-out area for small group work or informal interaction.

1 Business

exterior

interactive media lab

iinteractive t ti media di lab

special considerations • include display area for project work learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

requested furniture and equipment • lower cabinets with lockable, solid doors • tables • chairs • marker board

student learning strands

IT lab l b

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

b i business l b lab

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

106

106


business project area storage 100 sf

facility program

CAPS program Secure storage for media technology equipment such as cameras and portable equipment. requested furniture and equipment • extra wide doors • shelving requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets

1

student learning strands

Business

exterior

interactive media lab

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

iinteractive t ti media di lab

IT lab l b

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

b i business l b lab

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

107

107


business small group/resource room 2 @ 150 sf

facility program

CAPS program Small group rooms to provide an unscheduled break-out space for small groups of students and informal meetings. special considerations • locate near learning facilitators and commons • provide glass into small group rooms for natural supervision

1

student learning strands

Business

exterior

interactive media lab

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

iinteractive t ti media di lab

IT lab l b

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

b i business l b lab

student storage project storage

stair

requested furniture and equipment • table • chairs • marker board

commons/resource area below

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

108

108


business student storage 100 sf

facility program

CAPS program Storage area in each strand for student coats and backpacks. requested furniture and equipment • hooks • shelving room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • carpet tile

1

student learning strands

Business

exterior

interactive media lab

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

iinteractive t ti media di lab

IT lab l b

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

b i business l b lab

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

109

109


business informal student area 400 sf

facility program

CAPS program Area for informal student gathering. Moveable tables, chairs and lounge seating should be provided for comfortable and informal interaction. special considerations • open and accessible near strands requested furniture and equipment • tables and chairs • soft seating

1

student learning strands

Business

exterior

interactive media lab

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

iinteractive t ti media di lab

IT lab l b

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

b i business l b lab

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area below

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

110

110


human services human services (law) lab 900 sf

facility program

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • modular tables and seating • marker boards • tack boards • mobile storage carts • mobile workstations

bioscience commons/resource area below

stair

health professions room

sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

health professions lab

sm grp

student area sm grp

additional human n services rooms

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sttorage

special considerations • consider a moveable wall between the human services and pre-teacher ed lab

student learning strands

bioscience

sttorage

program Flexible learning environment to support human services/law curriculum. Lab will support lectures, group projects and individual instruction.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • interactive white board • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

111

111


human services pre-teacher education lab 900 sf

facility program

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • modular tables and seating • marker boards • tack boards • mobile storage carts • mobile workstations

bioscience commons/resource area below

stair

health professions room

sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

health professions lab

sm grp

student area sm grp

additional human n services rooms

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sttorage

special considerations • consider a moveable wall between the human services and pre-teacher ed lab

student learning strands

bioscience

sttorage

program Flexible learning environment to support pre-teacher education. Lab will support lectures, group projects and individual instruction.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • interactive white board • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

112

112


human services health professions lab 1,200 sf health professions room 900 sf

facility program

CAPS

bioscience commons/resource area below

stair

health professions room

sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

health professions lab

sm grp

student area sm grp

additional human n services rooms

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sttorage

special considerations • provide a door in between labs • direct access to storage room from health professions lab

student learning strands

bioscience

sttorage

program Flexible learning environment to support health professions curriculum such as CNA, CMA and EMT. Labs will support lectures, group projects and individual instruction.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior

requested furniture and equipment • modular tables and seating • marker boards • tack boards • mobile storage carts • mobile workstations • sink in health professions lab

exterior

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • interactive white board • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

113

113


human services health professions storage 150 sf

facility program

CAPS stair

health professions lab

sm grp

health professions room

student area sm grp

sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

additional human n services rooms

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • carpet tile

bioscience commons/resource area below

sttorage

requested furniture and equipment • heavy duty shelving

student learning strands

bioscience

sttorage

program Secure storage area for the health professions lab.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

114

114


human services sports medicine lab 1,200 sf

facility program

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • ice machine • refrigerator • freezer • sink • water cooler • extremity whirpool • taping tables • cardio equipment, resistance equipment and weights • slat wall • moveable marker board • full height wall mirror on one wall

bioscience commons/resource area below

stair

health professions room

sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

health professions lab

sm grp

student area sm grp

additional human n services rooms

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sttorage

special considerations • provide direct access to storage room • locate near a toilet room with a shower

student learning strands

bioscience

sttorage

program Flexible learning environment to support sports medicine curriculum such as physical therapy treatment and exercise. Lab will support hands on sports medicine instruction.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • rubber floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

115

115


human services sports medicine storage 150 sf

facility program

CAPS stair

health professions lab

sm grp

health professions room

student area sm grp

sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

additional human n services rooms

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • rubber floor tile

bioscience commons/resource area below

sttorage

requested furniture and equipment • heavy duty shelving

student learning strands

bioscience

sttorage

program Secure storage area for the sports medicine lab.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

116

116


human services project area 1,200 sf

facility program

CAPS program Space immediately accessible from each strand that can be used as a break-out area for small group work or informal interaction.

1

student learning strands bioscience

bioscience commons/resource area below stair

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp

student area sm grp

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

sports medicine lab

moveable wall m

health professions room

additional human n services rooms

health professions lab

sttorage

requested furniture and equipment • lower cabinets with lockable, solid doors • tables • chairs • marker board

sttorage

special considerations • include display area for project work human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • zoned indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

117

117


human services small group/resource room 150 sf

facility program

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • table • chairs • marker board

bioscience commons/resource area below

stair

health professions room

sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

health professions lab

sm grp

student area sm grp

additional human n services rooms

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sttorage

special considerations • locate near learning facilitators and commons • provide glass into small group rooms for natural supervision

student learning strands

bioscience

sttorage

program Small group rooms to provide an unscheduled break-out space for small groups of students and informal meetings.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample wall outlets • clock room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

118

118


human services student storage 50 sf

facility program

CAPS stair

health professions lab

sm grp

health professions room

student area sm grp

sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

additional human n services rooms

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • carpet tile

bioscience commons/resource area below

sttorage

requested furniture and equipment • hooks • shelving

student learning strands

bioscience

sttorage

program Storage area in each strand for student coats and backpacks.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

119

119


human services informal student area 400 sf

facility program

CAPS

student learning strands bioscience

bioscience commons/resource area below stair

sm grp

student area sm grp

health professions room

sttorage

requested furniture and equipment • tables and chairs • soft seating

health professions lab

sttorage

special considerations • open and accessible near strands sports medicine lab

project storage

project area/ display

student storage g

moveable wall m

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

additional human n services rooms

program Area for informal student gathering. Moveable tables, chairs and lounge seating should be provided for comfortable and informal interaction.

1

human services lab

pre-teacher ed lab

exterior exterior

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

120

120


programming

CAPS

2

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12 teaching

2

administration and staff spaces

SPACES total

NOTES STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

1

-

150

150

each

ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF SPACES

A.

Offices

1.

Waiting Area

adjacent to commons, close to the strands

2.

Exec. Director's Office

1

-

150

150

3.

Security Office

1

-

150

150

4.

IT Office

1

-

100

100

5.

Career Counselor Office

1

-

150

150

6.

Conference room

1

-

200

200

7.

Copy Room

1

-

100

100

8.

Storage

1

-

100

100

9.

Toilet

1

-

50

50

Sub-Total:

9

-

B.

Distributed Professional Areas

1.

Learning Facilitator/Visitors Workspace

2

2.

Shared Private Phone Call Space

3.

closet

4.

Faculty toilet Sub-Total:

1,150 locate between strands

-

-

500

1,000

2

-

30

60

2

-

20

40

2

-

50

100

8

-

-

-

-

1,200

C.

Clinic

1.

Clinic Office/Reception

1

-

150

2.

Office

1

-

-

-

3.

Cot area

1

-

100

100

4.

Toilet

1

-

50

50

Sub-Total:

4

-

300

13

-

2,650

Total admin. and staff spaces:

near commons/entry

"flight lounge", hoteling spaces (4 teachers, 2 visitors)

near strands? Close to visitors/faculty office

150

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

121

121


administration and staff spaces

programming

CAPS administration spaces

2

administration and staff spaces

g

Located at the main public entry to the building, the suite provides an administration and check-in area and provides a security checkpoint for the building. The main office is the first point of contact for visitors to the school. The area should be inviting and have a clear line of sight into the building.

Building diagram illustrating administration spaces, resulting from discussions during planning meeting two.

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

122

122


offices waiting area 150 sf

programming

CAPS

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • secure vestibule entry into this area for visitor check-in

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program The waiting area is the first point of contact for visitors to the building. The area should also be inviting and allow a clear line of site to the main building.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested furniture and equipment • soft seating • coffee tables or side tables • reception desk and chair • file cabinets • bookcases and display cases • tack board requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets • provide infrastructure for flat panel technology room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

123

123


offices executive director’s office 150 sf

programming

CAPS

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • provide flexibility in office arrangement • provide acoustical treatment to maximize privacy

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program Private office also used to hold formal meetings, small group discussions and informal gatherings.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested furniture and equipment • flexible, moveable furniture • desk with chair • small table with 4 chairs • file cabinet • bookcases • tall, lockable wardrobe cabinet • tack board requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

124

124


offices security office 150 sf

programming

CAPS

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • provide acoustical treatment to maximize privacy • locate within main office area, with a view to the building entry/commons • provide control area for building security systems • provide view to hallway or commons

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program Private office also used to hold formal meetings, small group discussions and informal gatherings.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested furniture and equipment • flexible, moveable furniture • desk with chair • small table with 4 chairs • file cabinet • bookcases • tall, lockable wardrobe cabinet • tack board requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board or CMU walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

125

125


offices IT office 100 sf

programming

CAPS

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • provide flexibility in office arrangement • provide acoustical treatment to maximize privacy • locate near MDF room

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program Private office also used to hold formal meetings, small group discussions and informal gatherings.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested furniture and equipment • flexible, moveable furniture • desk with chair • small table with 4 chairs • file cabinet • bookcases • tall, lockable wardrobe cabinet • tack board requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • multiple wired computer connections • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

126

126


offices career counselor office 150 sf

programming

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • flexible, moveable furniture • desk with chair • small table with 4 chairs • file cabinet • bookcases • tall, lockable wardrobe cabinet • tack board

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • provide acoustical treatment to maximize privacy

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program Private office used also for small team and individual meetings with students and parents.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

127

127


offices conference room 200 sf

programming

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • marker board • tack board • conference table • chairs • credenza with closed storage

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • provide acoustical treatment to maximize privacy

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program A location for formal meetings and presentations.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ceiling mounted projection system with screen (provide conduit) • telephone/intercom system • clock • ample wall outlets • provide infrastructure for flat panel technology room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

128

128


offices copy room 100 sf

programming

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • marker board • tack board • copier • fax machine • mail slots

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • located within administrative office area

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program Centralized mail and photocopy room for staff.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • telephone • clock • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

129

129


offices storage 100 sf

programming

CAPS

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

requested furniture and equipment • storage shelves • locked file cabinets

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program General storage located within the administrative area for storage of office supplies.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • fluorescent lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • sealed concrete

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

130

130


offices toilet 50 sf

programming

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • floor drain • automatic flush toilet • lavatory (with hot/cold water) • soap dispenser • mirror above lavatory • paper towel dispenser

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • extend walls to the bottom of the deck

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program Faculty restrooms located within the the main administrative area.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

room finishes • lighting with occupancy sensors • full height glazed tile on all walls • ceramic tile floor • painted plaster ceiling

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

131

131


distributed professional areas learning facilitator/visitors workspace 500 sf

programming

CAPS

2

administration and staff spaces

program Centralized location for learning facilitator and visitor collaboration and production. special considerations • adjacent to toilet and private area for phone calls requested furniture and equipment • marker board • tack board • moveable tables/chairs for collaboration and as a worksurface • printer

visiting p personnel

exterior

learning facilitator workspace private fac phone toilet corridor

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • telephone • clock • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

132

132


distributed professional areas shared private phone call space 2 @ 30 sf

programming

CAPS

2

administration and staff spaces

program Room within learning facilitator/visitor workspace for private phone calls requested furniture and equipment • small table and chair requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • telephone • clock • ample wall outlets

visiting p personnel

exterior

learning facilitator workspace private fac phone toilet corridor

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

133

133


distributed professional areas closet 2 @ 20 sf

programming

CAPS

2

administration and staff spaces

program Closet to support the learning facilitator’s and visitors special considerations • to be located within the learning facilitator/ visitor workspace requested furniture and equipment • storage shelves • hanging storage area

visiting p personnel

exterior

learning facilitator workspace private fac phone toilet corridor

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

134

134


distributed professional areas toilet 2 @ 50 sf

programming

CAPS

2

administration and staff spaces

program Centrally located staff toilet within the learning facilitator/visitor workspace. special considerations • provide adequate ventilation requested furniture and equipment • floor drain • automatic flush toilet • lavatory (with hot/cold water) • soap dispenser • mirror above lavatory • paper towel dispenser

visiting p personnel

exterior

learning facilitator workspace private fac phone toilet corridor

room finishes • fluorescent lighting (with occupancy sensors) • full height glazed tile on all walls • ceramic tile floor • painted plaster ceiling

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

135

135


clinic clinic office/reception 150 sf

programming

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • brochure display • upper and lower cabinets with undercounter refrigerator and sink • soft seating • nurses desk and chair • file cabinet • bookcases • tack board • tall, lockable wardrobe cabinet

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • provide a comfortable environment

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program Clinic waiting area for students waiting to see the nurse for medical treatment or distribution of prescription medicine. Also serves as an office area for the nurse.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • rubber floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

136

136


clinic cot area 100 sf

programming

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • ceiling hung curtains • cots

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

cop py

cot room

toilet

corridor

sto or

special considerations • provide acoustical treatment to maximize privacy

administration and staff spaces

toilet

program Cot area for students visiting the clinic that need prolonged supervision.

2

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • indirect lighting (with occupancy sensors) • painted gypsum board walls • rubber floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

137

137


clinic toilet 50 sf

programming

CAPS

2

administration and staff spaces

program Toilet to support clinic area.

requested furniture and equipment • floor drain • automatic flush toilet • lavatory (with hot/cold water) • soap dispenser • mirror above lavatory • paper towel dispenser • grab bars

couns office

conf room

cop py

sto or

IT office

clinic office

toilet

cot room

toilet

special considerations • provide adequate ventilation

corridor

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

room finishes • fluorescent lighting (with occupancy sensors) • full height glazed tile on all walls • ceramic tile floor • painted plaster ceiling

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

138

138


programming

CAPS

3

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12 teaching

3

community and stakeholder spaces

SPACES total

NOTES each

STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

900

900

COMMUNITY AND STAKEHOLDER SPACES

A.

Lobby

1.

Lobby/Reception/Welcome Desk

1

-

Sub-Total:

1

-

B.

Commons/Café

1.

Commons/Café (Retail)

1

2.

Career Research Center/Resource Area

1

3.

Vending

4.

Catering area

5.

Storage Sub-Total:

receptions/presentation/display

900

-

1,800

1,800

include vending, retail compontent

-

600

600

lower ceiling with projection?

-

-

-

-

alcove in commons area

1

-

150

150

1

-

150

4

-

-

150

area from multi-purpose room storage

2,700

C C.

Community Spaces

1.

Community/Visiting Personnel Office

-

-

-

-

2.

Multi-Purpose Room

-

-

-

-

3.

Multi-Purpose Room Storage

-

-

-

-

4.

Toilets

4

-

300

1,200

Sub-Total:

4

-

1,200

Total community spaces:

8

-

4,800

moved into learning facilitator office

moved adjacent to commons

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

139


community areas

programming

CAPS community areas

3

community and stakeholder spaces

g

T he s e sp a ce s a c tiv a te the building, providing places for students, parents, faculty, staff and community members to eat, meet and learn. In addition, these spaces provide a place to exhibit and celebrate the success of students.

Building diagram illustrating community spaces, resulting from discussions during planning meeting two.

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

140


lobby lobby/reception/welcome desk 900 sf

programming community and stakeholder spaces

IT office

clinic office

couns office

conf room

special considerations • locate lobby adjacent to commons

sto or

cot room

cop py

corridor

toilet

program The lobby serves as an entry into the school and an area to display student work and achievement to the community. The lobby should be linked to the major shared spaces.

3

toilet

CAPS

security

director’s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

exterior main entry

requested furniture and equipment • display cases requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connections • clock • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • painted gypsum board walls • carpet tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

141


commons/cafe commons cafe 1,800 sf career research center/resource area 600 sf

programming

CAPS

special considerations • atrium space, central to strands

community and stakeholder spaces strand

sm grp

stair

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

project area/ display

sm grp

student storage t project storage caterin ng kitchen

sm grp student area moveablee wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office exterrior outdoor sspace

program An informal area to gather, connect with technology and purchase food/drink items throughout the day. The space can be utilized throughout the day and evening to accommodate a variety activities.

3

commons/resource area

project area/ display

student t d t area sm grp

project storage t student storage

strand

requested furniture and equipment • soft seating • modular tables and seating requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets room finishes • acoustically absorbent wall surface • access floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

142


commons/cafe catering area 150 sf

programming

CAPS

requested furniture and equipment • grab and go kitchen area • secure food/drink storage • sink(s) • work surface • checkout counter • vending area

sm grp sm grp

student area

stair

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

project area/ display

sm grp

student storage t project storage caterin ng kitchen

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

moveablee wall

special considerations • adjacent to the commons

community and stakeholder spaces strand

exterrior outdoor sspace

program An area to purchase food/drink items throughout the day, with an after hours vending area

3

commons/resource area

project area/ display

student t d t area sm grp

project storage t student storage

strand

requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • clock • telephone/intercom system • ample wall outlets/ outlets for special equipment room finishes • acoustically absorbent wall surface • access floor tile

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

143


commons/cafe storage 150 sf

programming

CAPS

3

program Storage area for commons seating and related items.

requested furniture and equipment • storage trolleys for tables/chairs

strand

sm grp

stair

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

project area/ display

sm grp

student storage t project storage caterin ng kitchen

sm grp student area moveablee wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office exterrior outdoor sspace

special considerations • storage to have direct connection to commons

community and stakeholder spaces

commons/resource area

project area/ display

student t d t area sm grp

project storage t student storage

strand

room finishes • acoustical ceiling tile • fluorescent lighting (with occupancy sensors) • sealed concrete

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

144


community spaces toilets 4 @ 300 sf

programming

CAPS

3

program Multiple fixture toilet rooms for use by students and community

requested furniture and equipment • floor drains • automatic flush toilets • lavatories (with hot/cold water) • soap dispensers • mirrors above lavatory • paper towel dispensers

strand

sm grp

stair

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

project area/ display

sm grp

student storage t project storage caterin ng kitchen

sm grp student area moveablee wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office exterrior outdoor sspace

special considerations • provide adequate ventilation

community and stakeholder spaces

commons/resource area

project area/ display

student t d t area sm grp

project storage t student storage

strand

room finishes • painted plaster ceiling • full height glazed tile on all walls • ceramic tile floor

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

145


programming

CAPS

4

04/24/2008 DRAFT SPACE DESCRIPTION 250

Programmed Area

planned students, grades 11-12 teaching

4

SPACES total

facility management spaces NOTES

each

STUDENTS total

each

NET SQUARE FEET total

300

FACILITY MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORT SPACES

A.

Property Control

1.

Central receiving / office

1

300

2.

Storage

1

150

150

3.

Recycling Storage/Collection Area

1

100

100

4.

Toilet / locker

1

50

50

Sub-Total: B.

Facility Support

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Custodial Closets Distributed Mechanical Rooms Chiller Room Main Electrical Electrical Closets Water Heater/Boiler Room Fire Pump Fire Riser MDF/Demark IDF Elevator & machine room Freight elevator & machine room

600 displacement ventilation/underfloor air - size req?/LEED Gold Certification 4 1 1

60 150 150

Sub-Total: C.

Exterior Facilities

1.

Outdoor learning lab

2.

Staff Parking

3.

Vistor Parking

4.

Parent Queing Length

5.

Buses

in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor in grossing factor near main stairs for disabled students near loading? For large equipment. One shared elevator?

540

see Bioscience Strand

Sub-Total:

-

-

1,140

Total facility management and support spaces: TOTAL NSF

240 150 150

15

305

38,890

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

146

146


programming

CAPS

4

facility management spaces Dedicated building services areas which house mechanical and electrical systems, provide areas for building maintenance and cleaning, and storage for supplies and equipment.

facility management spaces

outdoor workspace

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

receiving/mech

toilets stair

outdoor space

stair

project/ student area 3 story commons/ resource area

dist admin proj area 2ndd floor

potential addition

stair

mp room 1st floor human services 2nd floor

admin 1st floor business 2nd floor

lobby

business 2nd floor

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

147

147


mechanical & custodial central receiving/office 300 sf toilet/locker

programming

CAPS program Space for efficient shipping, receiving, storage, and distribution of goods throughout the facility. Work space and break room for facility management staff. special considerations • locate trash dumpsters adjacent to shipping/receiving • provide double doors • proper adequate ventilation

50 sf

4

facility management spaces

l di loading

storage ship/ receiving toilet

corridor special considerations • locate with direct access to storage and toilet requested furniture and equipment • mop sink • floor drain • washer and dryer • workbench • industrial shelving • desk and chair • marker board • tack board • file cabinet • lockers requested technology/power/communications • wireless capability • wired computer connection • ample electrical outlets • clock • telephone/intercom system room finishes • exposed, painted ceiling • painted CMU walls • slip-resistant, sealed concrete floor April 2008 © Perkins+Will

148

148


mechanical & custodial storage 150 sf

programming

CAPS program Secure storage area for items being shipped or received. Supply storage for building maintenance. special considerations • locate with direct access to shipping and receiving area • programmed spaces for maintenance are not to be utilized for electrical panels, data rooms, etc. requested furniture and equipment • industrial shelving

4

facility management spaces

l di loading

storage ship/ receiving toilet

corridor

requested technology/power/communications • ample wall outlets room finishes • exposed, painted ceiling • painted CMU walls • slip-resistant, sealed concrete floor

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

149

149


mechanical & custodial recycling storage/collection area 100 sf

programming

CAPS program Designated are for recycling to be collected and stored until picked up. special considerations • locate with direct access to shipping and receiving area • programmed spaces for maintenance are not to be utilized for electrical panels, data rooms, etc. requested furniture and equipment • bins for recyclables

4

facility management spaces

l di loading

storage ship/ receiving toilet

corridor

room finishes • exposed, painted ceiling • painted CMU walls • slip-resistant, sealed concrete floor

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

150

150


mechanical & custodial custodial closets 4 @ 60 sf each

programming

CAPS

4

program Custodial closets for cleaning and supplies distributed throughout the building

outdoor workspace

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

receiving/mech

special considerations • provide adequate ventilation • programmed spaces for maintenance are not to be utilized for electrical panels, data rooms, etc. • floor drains requested furniture and equipment • floor mounted mop sink with pivoting faucet arm • floor drain • first aid kit • exhaust fan • kick plate on door • mop rack • tool storage

facility management spaces

toilets stair

outdoor space

stair

project/ student area 3 story commons/ resource area

dist admin proj area 2ndd floor

potential addition

stair

1st

mp room floor human services 2nd floor

admin 1st floor business 2nd floor

lobby

business 2nd floor

typical custodial closet location on each floor

room finishes • glazed tile on CMU walls • slip-resistant, sealed concrete floor

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

151

151


mechanical & custodial elevator/freight elevator & machine room 2 @ 150

programming

CAPS program Elevators and machines room for ease of equipment and people moving throughout the building special considerations • consider sharing one large elevator

4

facility management spaces outdoor workspace

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

receiving/mech

toilets stair

outdoor space

stair

project/ student area 3 story commons/ resource area

dist admin proj area 2ndd floor

potential addition

stair

1st

mp room floor human services 2nd floor

admin 1st floor business 2nd floor

lobby

business 2nd floor

typical elevator locations

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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152


appendix

CAPS

glossary Building Program A comprehensive document which presents building project requirements for use in subsequent building design phases. Information presented usually includes: project description, project goals or mission statement, site analysis, concept diagrams, facility space program, program relationship diagrams, and room data sheets. When Programming is combined with Master Planning, Master Plan Diagrams are also often included. Capacity (Effective Capacity) The number of students which can be comfortably accommodated by a facility at any given moment. To determine the capacity of a school, the number of teaching stations is multiplied times the number of students per teaching station which is then multiplied by the requested utilization factor. The effective capacity accommodates the desired degree of flexibility within a school facility. Efficiency A measure of scheduled teaching stations: more teaching stations occupied by a section of students for more periods per day results in a higher efficiency. The higher the utilization factor, the higher the facility’s efficiency. Gross Building Area Total building area, including areas of a building which are not assignable to programmatic functions. Gross area includes space for circulation corridors and stairs, wall construction, public toilets, mechanical rooms, closets, vestibules, lockers, etc. Grossing Factor A number, greater than one, which is multiplied by an established net building area to estimate the total size of a proposed building. The grossing factor is estimated based on actual net-to-gross calculations of completed projects of similar function, size, geographic region, budget, etc. Once the building is designed, the gross building area can be directly measured from the drawings. Master Plan Presents the idea and/or direction of the functional organization of the components of a campus on a site. Net Program Area The areas of a building which are usable and assignable to programmatic functions. Net area does not include space for circulation (corridors and stairs), public toilets, mechanical rooms, closets, lobbies, vestibules, etc. Program Relationship Diagram A graphic representation of optimal adjacencies of program components.

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

i

i


appendix

CAPS

glossary Room Data A detailed description of program requirements of a room or space, often presented with a graphic representation or diagram. Information may include occupancy, furniture, equipment, technology requirements, and any special finishes, technology, millwork/builtins. School Schedule Organization of time - number and duration of periods in a school day or week. Site Analysis An objective, graphic examination of a project site which aids in the development of appropriate site utilization. Typically the analysis identifies existing conditions, main access roads, sun angles, topographic features, desirable and undesirable views, prevailing winds, noise, etc. The site analysis may indicate areas more suitable for building, distinguished from less suitable buildable areas. (Note: For the purpose of this process, the site diagrams and analysis provided are placed on a fictional site due to the unknown nature of the project sites.) Space Program A list of rooms and spaces required by a school to facilitate its defined educational objectives. This list usually evolves to indicate specifics about each room or space such as the net area required, number of occupants, and miscellaneous comments. Teaching Station Any space or place in which a group of students is gathered to learn. In middle schools and high schools that utilize a school schedule, teaching stations include not only classrooms, but also music rooms, science labs, art rooms, fitness rooms, gymnasiums, media center classrooms, theaters, etc. With the idea that each student can occupy only one place at a time, such “co-curricular” spaces relieve the quantity of general classrooms of a requirement to accommodate the entire student body at one time. In elementary schools, classrooms are counted as teaching stations, while music rooms, art rooms, and other pull-out programs are not counted, as students are not scheduled in classrooms when a class, or students, participate in special programs. Utilization Factor An estimated percentage of time less than 100% in traditionally scheduled schools that a teaching station is planned to be in use by a section of students during the cycle of the school schedule. The utilization factor is closely related to the desired schedule model and accommodates the desired degree of scheduling flexibility. Utilization factors vary according to the specific scheduling and practices of an individual school.

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting one

Ideas + buildings that honor the broader goals of society

¿ Blue Valley Schools

Gary Nevius AIA, LEED™ AP

Steve Turckes AIA, REFP, LEED™ AP

Principal

Principal, Perkins+Will

Craig Serig AIA, LEED™ AP

Aimee Eckmann AIA, LEED™ AP

Principal

Associate, Perkins + Will

Blue Valley Schools Center for Advanced Professional Studies – Workshop #1 February 29, 2008 02.15.07

Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1 8:00

Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

10:00

Break

10:00

Break

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

12:00

Lunch

12:00

Lunch

Small Group Reports

12:45

Small Group Discussion

1:30

2:15

Small Group Reports

2:15

Small Group Reports

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

12:45 1:30

Discussion

Small Group Reports Discussion

Small Group Discussion

Planning Process - Synopsis

Creating a Roadmap

February 29, 2008

April 4, 2008

April 18, 2006

TBD

• CAPS Report

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Final Draft Program Presentation and Edits

• User Group Meetings to discuss detailed room requirements

• CAPS Planning • Program Review & Diagrams

• Large and Small Group Discussions • Draft Conceptual Program • Program Review & Diagrams

Feb 22

• Site Diagrams

• Large g and Small Group Discussions

• Large and Small G Group Discussions Di i

Meeting 3

Meeting 2

Meeting 1

• Review Building Diagram Options

• Site Analysis and Options

March 29

7

April 14

21

28

4

11

18

From building planning diagram arrived at in Programming Phase

To actual building floor plan arrived at in Schematic Phase

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

A1

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appendix

CAPS Considerations for Today

Considerations for Today (and future meetings) 1. 2. 3.

You will not agree with everything we say. Open your imaginations, be willing to “try on” ideas. Challenge your assumptions - your ideas about the “way things are” - and look toward the future. 4. Think about the impact of what is presented and discussed today. 5. Remember that understandingg future trends, while respecting the past leads to innovation. 6. There are no preconceived solutions. 7. Think about the students and what it will take to make them successful. 8. Be “on the court”. 9. Cell phones off or on Vibrate, please. 10. Have fun!

planning meeting one Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1 8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

10:00

Break

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

12:00

Lunch

12:45 1:30

Small Group Reports Small Group Discussion

Discussion

2:15

Small Group Reports

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1 8:00

Ideas + buildings that honor the broader goals of society

¿ Blue Valley Schools

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

10:00

Break

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

12:00

Lunch

12:45 1:30

Small Group Reports Discussion

Small Group Discussion

2:15

Small Group Reports

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Strands and Pathways 02.15.07

Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1 8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

10:00

Break

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

12:00

Lunch

12:45

Small Group Reports

1:30

Discussion

Ideas + buildings that honor the broader goals of society

¿ Blue Valley Schools

Small Group Discussion

2:15

Small Group Reports

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Trends and Planning Drivers/Image Survey of Projects and Ideas 02.15.07

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

A2

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting one

Change – what’s different? 20th Century – 1900 – Life expectancy 47 yrs. – 1945 U.N. – 51 countries – Early 20th – Agrarian Economy

“We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.”

What’s next for school facilities?

1900: 40% households farming

–

Mid 20th – Industrial Economy Employment – low or semi skilled Prepare students for agricultural and then industrial jobs – Work was local, isolated – Disconnected – Low-tech – Onslaught of Baby Boom – United States as preeminent industrial power

– – –

–

– – –

Albert Einstein

21st Century – Today - Life expectancy 77 yrs. – 2006 U.N. – 192 countries – Information Economy 2000: <2% households farming

Conceptual Age Economy Employment – highly skilled Prepare students to innovate and create – Work is global, collaborative – Connected – High-tech – Boomers retiring 8000/day – Emergence of China and India – NCLB

What’s next for school facilities?

Change

Change

Schools, are they changing?

Change

The World Employment Report

library/media center

Skills needed, how they are acquired, and the organization of work are all affected by digital globalization.

1.

Globalization

2.

Technological Change

Periods of rapid technological change give rise to innovation and creativity, the outcomes cannot be known in advance.

3.

Management Practices

Work is becoming independent of location and this will change management practices.

4.

Performance Driven

Evidence shows that major gains in enterprise performance only occur where use of the new technology has been combined with changes in work organization.

5.

Project-Based Teams

Transformation of enterprise, resulting in changes in the organizations toward project-based teams.

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting one

The World Employment Report 6.

7.

21st Century Skills

Wealth creation in the wealthiest countries relies less on physical inputs than on knowledge.

Knowledge Workers

Creativity / Innovation

In rapidly evolving technologies, creativity and innovation will matter more than the physical plant, physical raw materials and investment capital.

“The Creative Class now compromises more than thirty percent of the entire workforce. kf The Th choices h i these people make already have a huge economic impact, and in the future they will determine how the workplace is organized, what companies will prosper or go bankrupt, and even which cities will

Frans Johansson

“Disciplinary science is dead . . . most major advancements involve multiple disciplines” Alan Leshner, CEO American Association for the Advancement of Science

“World Flatteners” (Thomas Friedman’s)

Today’s students are likely to change careers 14-15 times during their lifetimes

– analyze critical information – planning skills

“When you step into an intersection of fields, disciplines, or cultures, you can combine existing concepts in to a large number of extraordinary new ones”

thrive or wither”

#1 11/9/89 #2 8/9/95 #3 Work Flow Software #4 Open-Sourcing #5 Outsourcing

Variety of skills required for the changing market – self directed learning – at school and then work

– utilize technical skills related to i f information ti and d communication i ti – problem solving – interpersonal skills- effectively communicate – global awareness and literacy – creativity and innovation

Directions in Education #6 #7 #8 #9 #10

Off-Shoring Supply Chaining Insourcing In-forming The Steroids

“ . . . America, as a whole, will do fine in a flat world with free trade – provided it continues to churn outt knowledge k l d workers k who h are able bl to t produce d idea-based goods that can be sold globally and who are able to fill the knowledge jobs that will be created as we not only expand the global economy but connect all the knowledge pools in the world.

Æ Æ Æ Æ Æ Æ Æ Æ Æ Æ Æ

Student-Centered, Personalized Flexible and Differentiated Learning Environments – for ALL learners Focus on Relationships, Rigor, and Relevancy Multi-use, Shared Spaces Professional Learning Communities Ubiquitous Technology – integration and implementation Informal Learning – places for students to “hang out” Safety & Security Shared Community and School Use Sustainability – high performance design Improved Student Performance

There may be a limit to the number of good factory jobs in the world, but there is no limit to the number of idea-generated jobs in the world”.

Improving Student Performance 1.

DAYLIGHTING:

better performance on standardized tests – as much as 20% in math and 26% in reading.1

2.

ACOUSTICS:

students in quieter schools score 20% higher on word recognition tests.2

3.

INDOOR AIR QUALITY:

poor IAQ reduces the ability to perform mental tasks requiring concentration, calculation or memory.3

4.

COLOR:

functional color schemes significantly reduce incidents of destructive behavior, aggressiveness.4

5.

ERGONOMICS:

furniture designed for active and dynamic movement improves short term memory and learning.5

6.

Small Learning Communities

small learning community high schools experienced 59% fewer drop-outs and 60% fewer missed days as compared to traditional high schools.6

¹ Pacific Gas and Electric report, www.h-m-g.com 2 John Lyons citing a Cornell University study, www.coe.uga.edu 3 United States Environmental Protection Agency 4 Harry Wohlfarth study of four elementary schools 5 Dr. Deiter Breithecker, ergonomic specialist 6 Bank Street College of Education, McKinsey analysis

Technology Technology Infusion – – – – –

Anywhere anytime learning Smaller/portable Unencumbered Faster, Cheaper More Applications My Treo 750

Two classrooms full of inquisitive sixth- and seventh-graders were able to meet for the first time recently with the help of NASA -- an unlikely meeting as the two classes are more than 3,840 miles (approximately 7,100 kilometers) apart.

To obtain 25% – penetration Ph Phone in U.S. homes–it took: Contacts – – – – –

– – 35 Email Telephone years –– 26 Windows Television years – Messaging PC’s – 16 years Calendar Internet – – 7 years Internet PDA’s – 3–years – Camera – Video – Calculator – And more

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting one

Sustainability

Sustainability Why be interested? Lots of good reasons but consider these three. . . – Improved student performance – Operational savings means dollars to the bottom line – It It’ss simply the right thing to do We have not inherited the earth from our ancestors, we have only borrowed it from our children. -Kenyan Proverb

“…every day the “The US spends more on worldwide economy trash bags than ninety burns an amount of on other countries spend energy the planet EVERYTHING” Polly required LaBarre “How10,000 to Lead a days Rich Life,” Company (March (27 Fast years) to create.“ 2003) Paul Hawken

Sustainable Design Strategies immediate payback

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

orientation building massing window position efficient site usage

no cost

International School of Beijing long-term payback

ƒ glazing area and performance ƒ daylight controls light shelves ƒ solar shading ƒ nighttime ventilation ƒ mixed mode ventilation ƒ reflective roofs

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

low cost

medium cost

heat recovery desiccant cooling evaporative cooling wind towers / scoops green roofs

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

photovoltaics wind turbines geothermal double-skin facades

higher cost

Blythewood High School – Small Learning Communities

Blythewood High School – Curricular Flexibility lab lab

career-tech

building section diagram LEVEL 2 LEVEL 1

prep science

career tech

academic wing diagram

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting one

Blythewood High School – Program Integration

Blythewood High School

lab lab

career-tech

building section diagram

Cyber Cafe

Blythewood High School: Blythewood, SC

Curricular Flexibility and Small Learning Communities

Central Admin Science

Spec. Flex. Career Labs S Ed.

Cyber Café Media Center

Books/ Media

Wireless Access Casual Seating Daylight Views

Food

Culinary Arts Lab (or dining)

Cluster Commons

Sm. Cluster S Gp. Commons

Classrooms

Cluster Admin.

Environmental Sciences Cluster Diagram

Curricular Flexibility and Small Learning Communities Science 1500 sf Prep 250 sf Science 1500 sf

850 sf

Flex. Career Labs 1150 sf

Spec. Ed.

Classrooms

Academy @ 998 - Academic Teams Planned Programs Communications Global Issues – Engineering – Professional Science – –

1

2

3

4

Cluster Sm. Gp. Commons

Cluster Admin.

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting one

Academic Teams

group

A

Academic Teams

1

2

1

2

3

4

3

4

group

B group

group group

C group

Academic Teams

Academic Teams

1

2

1

2

3

4

3

4

2

1

2

4

3

Presentation Forum

Integral Administration

1

3

REALITY CENTER

REALITY CENTER

4 WELCOME CENTER

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

A7

A7


appendix

CAPS

planning meeting one

Formal and Informal Interaction

1

3

Artifacts and Evidence of Learning

WORK

REALITY CENTER

EAT

2

4 WELCOME CENTER

Building Plan

academy @ 998 . buffalo ny

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

A8

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appendix

CAPS Concept Sketch

planning meeting one

Academy @ 998

Waubonsee Academic Building Multi-Purpose Room

Concordia International School – Shanghai

Concordia International School – Shanghai

– dining

– dining

– assemblies

– assemblies

– performances

– performances

– fundraisers

– fundraisers

– banquets

– banquets

– pre-function space

– pre-function space

– conferences

– conferences

– large groups

– large groups

– break-out area

– break-out area

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

A9

A9


appendix

CAPS

planning meeting one

Concordia International School – Shanghai

Concordia International School – Shanghai

– dining

– dining

– assemblies

– assemblies

– performances

– performances

– fundraisers

– fundraisers

– banquets

– banquets

– pre-function space

– pre-function space

– conferences

– conferences

– large groups

– large groups

– break-out area

– break-out area

Concordia International School – Shanghai

Flexible Infrastructure

– dining – assemblies – performances – fundraisers – banquets – pre-function space – conferences – large groups – break-out area

Round Rock High School #5 Electronics Lab

Round Rock High School #5 CAD Lab

display

display

moveable furniture overhead utilities 1400 sf

1400 sf

200 sf

140 sf

utilties along the wall, no floor boxes

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting one

Round Rock High School #5 Engineering Classrooms/Workroom

Northwestern University Ford Motor Company Engineering Design Center by Davis Brody Bond LLP

375 sf

850 sf

850 sf

glass walls

Round Rock High School #5 Health Sciences Lab

Michael Berry Career Center

by Fanning/Howey Associates, Inc.

Dearborn Heights, Michigan

850 sf

Dental Assisting

Open Research Area

Medical Assisting

Allied Health

1200 sf

moveable wall

Round Rock High School #5 Flexible Science Classrooms with Project Room

Flexible Science Labs

i.e. - 9th Grade Science, Earth Science

moveable tables

overhead utilities

perimeter sinks

adjustable height tables

140 sf

utilities at perimeter p and/or overhead

1000 sf 1000 sf

moveable furniture

400 sf

window to corridor

moveable walls

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting one

Round Rock High School #5 Flexible Science Classrooms with Student Research Room

Powell Focht Bioengineering Building University of California, San Diego

i.e. - Physics, Biotechnology, Nanotechnology, Forensics display

moveable furniture

1400 sf

overhead utilities

350 sf

1400 sf

140 sf

perimeter sinks

shared small group room with utilities and glass into classrooms

Flexible Classroom

CART: Center for Advanced Research and Technology

Carl Wunsche Sr High School

by SHW Group

Carl Wunsche Sr High School

by SHW Group

Professional Tower

Technology Tower

Medical Tower First floor – career classes

Second floor – academic classes

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting one

Academy of Irving

by Powell/PSP Architects

Tribune Interactive Chicago, Illinois

Courtroom

American Red Cross

Digitas

Broadcasting

Bank of America

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting one

Temple Hoyne Buell Hall

Temple Hoyne Buell Hall

University of Illniois, Champaign

University of Illniois, Champaign

Perkins+Will Office

American Hospital Association

Chicago, Illinois

Chicago, Illinois

DiamondCluster International Chicago, Illinois

Glen Oak High School Canton, Ohio

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS Commons/Gallery Oakton Community College

planning meeting one

Teacher Center – Flight Lounge Model One square = One meter approx.

lounge seating

lounge seating

lounge seating

internet carrels

internet carrels

internet carrels

Infill existing window system with drywall partition to height of door head. Allow wood benches to remain. Same for all four bays. Provide display hanging system or forbo on walls for student artwork.

Teacher Center – Flight Lounge Model

kitchenette

café tables refrigerator sink microwave

café tables

island

café tables

copier

infill wall system (gray tiles)

work / dining counter

Drywall partition screen to the height of door heads (does not extend to ceiling).

Existing plaster ceiling and lighting system to remain.

University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, Texas

Digital Theater

Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1 8:00

Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

10:00

Break

10:00

Break

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

12:00

Lunch

12:00

Lunch

12:45

Small Group Reports

12:45

Small Group Discussion

1:30

2:15

Small Group Reports

2:15

Small Group Reports

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

1:30

Discussion

Small Group Reports Discussion

Small Group Discussion

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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A15


appendix

CAPS Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1 8:00

planning meeting one Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:15

Presentation

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

8:45

Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

10:00

Break

10:00

Break

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

12:00

Lunch

12:00

Lunch

Small Group Reports

12:45

Small Group Discussion

1:30

2:15

Small Group Reports

2:15

Small Group Reports

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

12:45 1:30

Discussion

Agenda – Planning Meeting 1, Day 1 8:00 8:15

Informal Interaction Presentation Presentation

Overview of Programming Process

9:00

Presentation

Trends/Direction/Future of Career Stands/Pathways

10:00

Break

10:15 Presentation

Trends and Planning Drivers, Image Survey of Proj. and Ideas

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion

12:00

Lunch

1:30

Small Group Reports Discussion

Small Group Discussion

2:15

Small Group Reports

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Small Group Discussion

Planning Process - Synopsis February 29, 2008

April 4, 2008

April 18, 2006

TBD

• CAPS Report

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Final Draft Program Presentation and Edits

• User Group Meetings to discuss detailed room requirements

Greetings, Project Rationale and Educational Mission

8:45

12:45

Small Group Reports Discussion

• CAPS Planning • Program Review & Diagrams

• Large and Small Group Discussions • Draft Conceptual Program • Program Review & Diagrams

Feb 22

• Site Diagrams

• Large g and Small Group Discussions

• Large and Small G Group Discussions Di i

Meeting 3

Meeting 2

Meeting 1

• Review Building Diagram Options

• Site Analysis and Options

March 29

7

April 14

21

28

4

11

18

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting two Agenda – Planning Meeting 2 8:00

Ideas + buildings that honor the broader goals of society

¿ Blue Valley Schools

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

10:30

Break

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:45

Lunch

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

1:00

Small Group Discussion

Discussion

2:00 3:00

Small Group Reports Discussion

3:30

Large Group Discussion Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Blue Valley Schools Center for Advanced Professional Studies – Workshop #2 April 4, 2008 02.15.07

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2 8:00 8:15

Informal Interaction Presentation Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

10:30

Break

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:45

Lunch

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

1:00

Small Group Discussion

2:00

Small Group Reports

3:00

Large Group Discussion

Discussion

3:30

– – – – – – – – – – –

April 4, 2008

April 18, 2006

TBD

• CAPS Report

• Visual Listening

• CAPS Planning

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Final Draft Program Presentation and Edits

• User Group Meetings to discuss detailed room requirements

• Large and Small Group Discussions

• Program Review & Diagramming

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Large and Small Group p Discussions

• Program Review & Diagrams

• Site Analysis/Diagrams •L Large and dS Smallll Group Discussions

Meeting 3

Meeting 2

Meeting 1 Feb 22

• Review Building Diagram Options

March 29

7

April 14

21

28

4

11

18

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Small Group Discussions – Common Threads –

February 29, 2008

Tom Trigg

8:30

Discussion

Planning Process - Synopsis

A “do” environment, project areas, “imagination labs” Flexibility to accommodate future changes Agility, mobile, transformational environment Large, multi-use, flexible presentation space Transparency Outdoor learning spaces Professional look look, welcome center Different sized spaces Inviting, engaging Community use Ubiquitous technology 24/7/365

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2 8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

10:30

Break

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:45

Lunch

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

1:00

Small Group Discussion

Discussion

2:00 3:00 3:30

Small Group Reports Discussion

Large Group Discussion Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting two

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2 8:00

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

10:30

Break

10:30

Break

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:45

Lunch

11:45

Lunch

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

1:00

Small Group Discussion

1:00

Small Group Discussion

Small Group Reports

2:00

Large Group Discussion

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

3:30

Discussion

2:00 3:00

Discussion

3:30

Discussion

Small Group Reports Discussion

Large Group Discussion Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Planning Process - Synopsis

Innovative Professional Environments

February 29, 2008

April 4, 2008

April 18, 2006

TBD

• CAPS Report

• Visual Listening

• CAPS Planning

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Final Draft Program Presentation and Edits

• User Group Meetings to discuss detailed room requirements

• Large and Small Group Discussions

• Program Review & Diagramming

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Large and Small Group p Discussions

• Program Review & Diagrams

Feb 22

• Site Analysis/Diagrams •L Large and dS Smallll Group Discussions

Meeting 3

Meeting 2

Meeting 1

• Review Building Diagram Options

March 29

7

April 14

21

28

4

11

Innovative Professional Environments - IDEO

18

Innovative Professional Environments - IDEO

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting two

Innovative Professional Environments - IDEO

Innovative Professional Environments – Bank of America

Communications

Innovative Professional Environments – Bank of America

Associates Hub

Innovative Professional Environments – Bank of America

Associates Hub Daylight and Views

Innovative Professional Environments – Bank of America

Innovative Professional Environments – Haworth

Plaza garden

Sky garden

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CAPS

planning meeting two

Innovative Professional Environments – Haworth

Innovative Professional Environments – Haworth

Work | Restore

Integrated Technology + Messaging

Innovative Professional Environments – Haworth

Innovative Professional Environments – Haworth

Studio | Teaming | Touch Down

Teaming | Break-Out | Casual Meeting | Display

Innovative Professional Environments – Haworth

Innovative Professional Environments – Haworth

Refresh

Work Styles

Lounge | Studio | Refresh

Break-Out Space

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CAPS

planning meeting two

Innovative Professional Environments – Cardinal Health

Innovative Professional Environments – Bloomberg

Flexible technology

Innovative Professional Environments – Bloomberg

Innovative Professional Environments – Bloomberg

Flexible teaming

Open “snack bar”

Innovative Professional Environments – REDBULL

Cultural place names

Real-time communications

Innovative Professional Environments – Mindlab

Transparency

Write-able surfaces

Group

Privacy act

Play

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CAPS

planning meeting two

Innovative Professional Environments – Mindlab

Innovative Professional Environments

Objects as space and place Mobile work place

Project room

Innovative Professional Environments

Innovative Professional Environments

Teaming

Unconventional meeting space

Innovative Professional Environments

Computer Lab

Unconventional meeting space

Innovative Professional Environments – Hyatt Corporate HQ

Integrated technology

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS Innovative Professional Environments – P+W New York

Hoteling | Pin-Up

planning meeting two

Innovative Professional Environments – Resultech

Studio Concept

Innovative Professional Environments – Resultech

Innovative Professional Environments – Stanford Center for Innovations in Learning

Architecture as communication tool

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2 8:00

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

10:30

Break

10:30

Break

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:45

Lunch

11:45

Lunch

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

1:00

Small Group Discussion

1:00

Small Group Discussion

Small Group Reports

2:00

Large Group Discussion

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

3:30

Discussion

2:00 3:00

Discussion

3:30

Discussion

Small Group Reports Discussion

Large Group Discussion Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting two

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2 8:00

Diagramming 101

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

bubble diagrams

10:30

Break

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:45

Lunch

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

1:00

Small Group Discussion

Discussion

2:00 3:00

planning diagrams

Small Group Reports Discussion

3:30

from: concept (idea)

floor plans and sections

Large Group Discussion Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

to details

Diagramming 101

From building planning diagram arrived at in Workshop Phase

Diagramming 101 – Examples

Diagramming 101 – How to Read/Draw a Bubble Diagram

To actual building floor plan arrived at in Schematic Phase (after site selection)

Diagramming 101 – Process BUILDING DIAGRAM

ACADEMIC

CLASSROOMS

SCIENCE AND VOCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting two

Diagramming 101 – Plan View

Diagramming 101 – Building Section

Axon (axonometric)

Plan

Diagramming 101 – Building Section

Section

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2 8:00

lab

career-tech

building section diagram

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

lab

10:30

Break

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:45

Lunch

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

1:00

Small Group Discussion

Discussion

2:00 3:00

Small Group Reports Discussion

3:30

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2 8:00

Large Group Discussion Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Agenda – Planning Meeting 2

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:15

Presentation

Tom Trigg

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

8:30

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 1

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

9:00

Presentation

Visual Listening

10:30

Break

10:30

Break

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

10:45 Presentation

Innovative Work Environments

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion

11:45

Lunch

11:45

Lunch

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

12:30 Presentation

Draft Conceptual Program / Diagramming 101

1:00

Small Group Discussion

1:00

Small Group Discussion

Small Group Reports

2:00

Large Group Discussion

3:00

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

3:30

Discussion

2:00 3:00

Discussion

3:30

Discussion

Small Group Reports Discussion

Large Group Discussion Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

workshop 2 - visual listening

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

workshop 2 - visual listening

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

workshop 2 - visual listening

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting two - visual listening

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting two - visual listening

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand The photographs and notes on the following pages are the result of the following homework assignment, given before Workshop 2: Please bring to the session an image or object that best describes the concepts listed below and be prepared to explain why you selected each item. 1. Culture What is the culture we are trying to create within the new CAPS school? How does this differ from other school cultures? What will make this culture unique? 2. Experience Who are your “clients”? What experience do you want them to have in this environment? How do we craft an experience along the entire range of contact points? 3. Brand What are the Blue Valley CAPS brand attributes? What is the voice and tone of the brand? What will differentiate this brand from any other?

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CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand Photo Compilation Culture - Kids from all 5 schools coming together, different culture at CAPS because they will all be together Experience - Clients are the kids

Culture - Sweet grass basket from South Carolina African American traditional art form, unique to the US All of strands are coming together in different ways to make something solid, useful and beautiful Experience - 2nd Grade Class Photo These are the kids that we will be serving at CAPS Brand - Rock Blue Valley is solid and will continue to be a solid district

Culture/Brand/Experience - Critical Thinking Wheel Areas of comprehension, analysis performance and synthesis Moving learning on to higher levels of critical thinking Training kids for jobs that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist Preparing for the world of work

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CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand Culture/Experience - Picture of Verneda’s Son For learners who we won’t always capture in a traditional high school Kids are the most precious commodity Brand - What is best for kids

Culture/Brand/Experience - Business Card Represents professionals Joe Brown photo Ready when he was 16 to take on the CAPS challenge

Culture - Nike Decided to be different, decided to personalize - student can personalize their own learning More investment in education = more meaningful education Experience - Magnets Clients are the students - Some may work individually, virtually, internationally, collaboratively Brand - “50 Best Companies” Goal is to be one of the 50 most innovative schools April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand Culture – Albert Einstein Didn’t fit in a traditional school Most creative person is the scientist Experimentation and depth of learning Experience – Clients Elizabeth - Kindergartner who loves school no matter what it looks like, will fit into High School and will fit into CAPS, loves the social part of school Zach – Uncanny, peculiar insatiable curiosity, loves learning, likes the experience, he needs something different Brand – Innovation in Education Relevant learning through professional experience

Culture - Gift from BVW industrial technology (pyramid paperweight) Links to the high schools, image is different Creative, out of the box – multiple uses, all kinds of reflections, refractions Experience - Bend-able Happy Face Smiling, happy, successful, moldable, changeable, will respond to stimulus Brand - Nike School has to be for everybody (attainable by everyone) Kids are proud of it, but maintain school spirit from their high school

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CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand Culture – Globe Professional workplace, cross generational as well as global, everybody in the center is a learner (including the instructors) High energy, highly competitive Experience – Academic Beacon Students, business, faculty, community, state etc., empowering opportunities to achieve high expectations Spirit of innovation and discovery, crafted with business partners Branding – Pinnacle Award, Scales Pinnacle of secondary education, transparency

Culture - Flywheel Personalized student learning, to deliver an education beyond expectations Always turning, always changing, flexible Experience – Blue Valley Logo How we deliver education beyond expectations Brand - Global Corporate, personalized, visionary academics, inspirational teaching

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CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand Culture - Treo Technology, innovation, future Can personalize, can download Experience - Magic wand Open possibilities will seem more like play than work

Culture and Experience – 3-Way Switch Turn the “light bulb” on from a couple different locations, interdisciplinary Takes wires to connect – acknowledge different types of learners kids get a great experience out of it

Culture – iPod nano A culture changing device Experience How we use an iPod vs. how kids use it i.e. - two kids both listening to same ipod – it’s a collaborative, personalized experience Branding Provides a different experience It’s the design that makes it different The experience and how it is delivered will make it unique April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand Leonardo DaVinci’s Vitruvian Man Culture - Measuring out knowledge, renaissance of learning for students, eye opening, new ways of learning Experience – Leonardo was a scientist and an artist – encourage interdisciplinary studies Brand – Students should be able to answer the question “What is this facility?” as they would a well know work of art Culture – Starbucks Provides an experience, creates focus, personalized, connects to every person Experience – Compass Charting a course, creating a path Brand – Globe Beyond Blue Valley, beyond Kansas prepare students for a global society Culture - Portfolio Professional environment Clients – The Kids Brand – Kirby Husker Has one finger up in the air - think of kids as one at a time, personalize education

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CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand Culture/Experience/Brand - Piece of a Mountain Sense of pride, mountain as something to climb/accomplish, challenging, Design a space for a location Teamwork â&#x20AC;&#x201C; important for process but also to get it up and running and for students, part of learning

Eiffel Tower Culture/Experience - becomes a goal to see, image stays with you, enduring symbol, sits in a dynamic place accommodates lots of people, culture that has expanded to include many cultures, symbol for the future Brand - Self-descriptive of what it is, where it is

Open Hand Culture - Open, instructional, collaborative Experience - Clients could be anybody, reaching to anyone Brand - Peaceful, safe, invitational

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CAPS

planning meeting two - culture/experience/brand Culture/Experience/Brand - Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award Excellence in the program, quality, leadership, stewardship, mentorship Make everybody better – lift everything up External validation Symbol of quality, quest for excellence – continually striving to be better Not pictured: Eric Kessler Culture - Hand/Images of caves in Lascaux France Innovative, artistic, experiential, learn about the world, global – 1st generation to be competing globally Experience - Balance between professional/playful, youth/ adulthood Dan French Common thread: Partnerships of high school students coming together in common environment Partnerships of companies Brand education with the most touches into the community (noneducational institutions) Pam Robinson Telescope, focused instruction through a particular lens that sees the world beyond Tony Lake Culture/Experience/Brand Think to the future, be relevant to individual needs, attainable for all types of students, the best, cutting edge

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting three Planning Process - Synopsis February 29, 2008

April 4, 2008

April 18, 2006

TBD

• CAPS Report

• Visual Listening

• CAPS Planning

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Final Draft Program Presentation and Edits

• User Group Meetings to discuss detailed room requirements

• Large and Small Group Discussions

Ideas + buildings that honor the broader goals of society

• Program Review & Diagramming

• Draft Conceptual Program

• Large and Small Group p Discussions

• Program Review & Diagrams

¿ Blue Valley Schools

Feb 22

• Site Analysis/Diagrams •L Large and dS Smallll Group Discussions

Meeting 3

Meeting 2

Meeting 1

• Review Building Diagram Options

March 29

7

April 14

21

28

4

11

18

Blue Valley Schools Center for Advanced Professional Studies – Workshop #3 April 18, 2008 02.15.07

Agenda – Planning Meeting 3 8:00 8:15

Workshop 2 Recap – Visual Listening

Informal Interaction Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

10:00

Break

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

12:00

Lunch

12:45 1:45

Small Group Reports Discussion

Large Group Discussion – Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections

2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Workshop 2 Recap – Visual Listening

Workshop 2 Recap – Visual Listening

– Presentation space

– Symbol of strand

– Reception area

– Meeting space/resource area

– Outdoor learning space

– Flexibility

– Organic, sensory experience

– Transparency

– Transparency – outside

– Non-traditional

inside

– Electronic media display

– Inspirational

– Height/openness

– Warm, intimate

– Cyber café/technology

– Collaboration

– Collaboration

– Fun! – Team-building – Unique

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CAPS

planning meeting three

Workshop 2 Recap – Visual Listening

Workshop 2 Recap – Culture/Experience/Brand – CAPS will have its own culture of 5 schools coming together, strands coming together

– Open ceiling - expose building systems, teaching tool, flexibility – Transparency – Comfort helps with creativity

– Clients are the kids, capture different kinds of learners, attainable by everyone

– Multi-level, unexpected – Color, light, bright

– Students can personalize their learning

– Different types of furniture – Lighting defines spaces

– One of the most innovative schools, creative, out-of the-box

– Place to relax

– Relevant learning through professional experiences

– A place where creativity happens – Openness

– Multiple-uses, flexibility

– Outdoor seating, outdoor space

Workshop 2 Recap – Culture/Experience/Brand – Spirit of innovation and discovery

Workshop 2 Recap – Bubble Diagrams Engineering and Bioscience

– Interdisciplinary – Collaborative, personalized – The experience and how it is delivered will make it unique – Prepare students for a global society – Professional – Symbol for the future – Community/professional involvement

Workshop 2 Recap – Bubble Diagrams Human Services and Business

Workshop 2 Recap – Bubble Diagrams Whole Building

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CAPS

planning meeting three

Agenda – Planning Meeting 3 8:00

Agenda – Planning Meeting 3

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

10:00

Break

10:00

Break

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

12:00

Lunch

12:00

Lunch

Small Group Reports

12:45

Large Group Discussion –

1:45

12:45 1:45

Discussion

Small Group Reports Discussion

Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections 2:45

Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections 2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Site Analysis

Large Group Discussion –

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Site Analysis West 149th Terrace

Predominant Winter Winds

High Point 1010

Summer Sun Marty Street

In Line Detention Setback

Winter Sun

Low Point 995

Predominant Summer Winds

Low Point 985

West

Site Analysis – Building Placement

151st Street

Site Study With Streamway Relocation

West 149th Terrace

Parking

Martty

Street

Parking

West 151st Street

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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CAPS

planning meeting three Building Diagram – Linear 2 Story Scheme

Site Study Without Streamway Relocation

receiving/ mech

commons 1st floor human services 2nd floor

bioscience 1st floor business 2nd floor

toilet

staff

potential addition

outdoor space

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

admin 1st floor dist lobby mp room 2nd floor admin outdoor workspace

Building Diagram – Finger 2 Story Scheme

stair

bioscience 1st floor business 2nd floor

project/student area

stair

Marty Street

outdoor workspace

project/student area

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

West 151st Street

Site Diagram – Finger 2 Story Scheme

stair

receiving/mech

toilets

dist admin

commonss 1st floor mp room 2nd floor

West 149th Terrace

admin 1st floor human services 2nd floor

potential addition

lobby

toilets

stair

Site Diagram – Linear 2 Story Scheme

outdoor workspace

Building Diagram – Atrium 2 Story Scheme outdoor workspace

West 149th Terrace

stair

dist admin

Marty Street

outdoor space

stair

dist admin

bioscience 1st floor business 2nd floor

project/student area 2 story commons/ resource area project/student area

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

West 151st Street

toilets

admin 1st floor mp room 2nd floor

potential addition

lobby

stair

receiving/mech

human services 2nd floor

outdoor workspace

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting three

Site Diagram – Atrium 2 Story Scheme

Building Diagram – Atrium 3 Story Scheme

West 149th Terrace

outdoor workspace

engineering 1st floor human services 2nd floor

receiving/mech

toilets stair

Marty Street

outdoor space

dist admin

project/ student area

stair

proj area 2nd floor

3 story commons/ resource area

p potential addition

stair

business 2nd floor

lobby

admin 1st floor business 2nd floor

mp room 1st floor human services 2nd floor

West 151st Street

Building Diagram – Atrium 3 Story Scheme – 3rd Floor

Site Diagram – Atrium 3 Story Scheme West 149th Terrace

bioscience 3rd floor

toilets stair

dist admin 2nd

floor proj area below

3 story commons/ resource area

potential addition Marty Street

project/ student area

2nd floor proj area below

stair

stair

potential greenhouse location

green roof/ outdoor workspace

West 151st Street

Bioscience

Business

outdoor workspace

bioscience lab

prep/storage

bioscience lab

teaching wall

moveable wall

prep/storage

teaching wall

bioscience lab

exterior

casework moveable wall

casework

casework

mass communications lab

video production

IT lab

business learning lab

teaching wall

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

student storage project storage

stair

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

sm grp sm grp

student area

project area/ display

student storage project storage

stair

commons/resource area engineering

commons/resource area below engineering

human services

human services

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting three

Engineering

Human Services bioscience

bioscience

business

business commons/resource area below

stair

stair

commons/resource area

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

student area

sm grp

project storage project area/ display

sm grp

student storage

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

student area sm grp

sm grp

project area/ display

project storage student storage

storage

cnc lab 2 story space

digital elec lab

cad lab

health professions lab

cnc lab below

sports medicine lab

welding

outdoor workspace

pre-teacher ed lab

additional human services rooms

print room

exterior

Human Services - Continued

Administration

business corridor

project area/ display

p

student storage

IT office

couns office

toilet

conf room

copy

clinic office

stor

sm grp

cot room

project storage

toilet

mmons/resource area below

security

directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office

waiting area

lobby

vestibule

pre-teacher ed lab

health professions room

storage

sports medicine lab

moveable wall

s

additional human services rooms

exterior

human services lab

main entry

health professions room

exterior

Distributed Administration

Multi-Purpose Room

learning facilitator workspace

multi-purpose room

private fac phone toilet

moveable wall

exterior

storage

corridor

visiting personnel

corridor exterior

April 2008 Š Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS

planning meeting three

Commons

Facility Management strand

student area

stair

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

project area/ display

sm grp

student storage project storage

commons/resource area

project area/ display

student area sm grp

loading

storage ship/ receiving toilet

catering kitchen

sm grp sm grp

moveable wall

exterior outdoor space o

learning facilitator/visiting personnel office

project storage student storage

corridor

strand

Improving Student Performance

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Rain Garden Alpahretta High School

1.

DAYLIGHTING:

better performance on standardized tests – as much as 20% in math and 26% in reading.1

2.

ACOUSTICS:

students in quieter schools score 20% higher on word recognition tests.2

3.

INDOOR AIR QUALITY:

poor IAQ reduces the ability to perform mental tasks requiring concentration, calculation or memory.3

4.

COLOR:

functional color schemes significantly reduce incidents of destructive behavior, aggressiveness.4

5.

ERGONOMICS:

furniture designed for active and dynamic movement improves short term memory and learning.5

6.

Small Learning Communities

small learning community high schools experienced 59% fewer drop-outs and 60% fewer missed days as compared to traditional high schools.6

¹ Pacific Gas and Electric report, www.h-m-g.com 2 John Lyons citing a Cornell University study, www.coe.uga.edu 3 United States Environmental Protection Agency 4 Harry Wohlfarth study of four elementary schools 5 Dr. Deiter Breithecker, ergonomic specialist 6 Bank Street College of Education, McKinsey analysis

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Green Roof

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Green Roof

Woodward Middle School

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Wind Turbines Near North Apartments, Chicago, IL (Murphy/Jahn)

planning meeting three Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Natural Ventilation – Gale School Community Center, Chicago, IL

ƒ A petite, modular design that can accommodate city rooftops of many sizes ƒ Continuous energy production in variable city winds ƒ Does not rotate in excess of 400 revolutions per minute (rpm) ƒ The first battery-free wind turbine Excerpts from GreenSource Magazine, October 2007

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Permeable Paving Morton Arboretum – Lisle, IL

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Bioswales Morton Arboretum – Lisle, IL

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Living Machine Darrow School – New Lebanon, NY

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Daylighting/Flexibility/Reduce Future Remodel

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Flexibility/Reduce Future Remodel

planning meeting three Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool Stormwater/Greywater – Lehman College Science Facility

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool

Sustainability/Building as a Teaching Tool

Stormwater/Greywater – Lehman College Science Facility

Stormwater/Greywater – Lehman College Science Facility

Agenda – Planning Meeting 3 8:00

Agenda – Planning Meeting 3

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

10:00

Break

10:00

Break

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

12:00

Lunch

12:00

Lunch

12:45

Small Group Reports

12:45

Large Group Discussion –

1:45

1:45

Discussion

Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections 2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Small Group Reports Discussion

Large Group Discussion – Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections

2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

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appendix

CAPS Agenda – Planning Meeting 3 8:00

planning meeting three Agenda – Planning Meeting 3

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

10:00

Break

10:00

Break

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

12:00

Lunch

12:00

Lunch

Small Group Reports

12:45

Large Group Discussion –

1:45

12:45 1:45

Discussion

Small Group Reports Discussion

Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections 2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Agenda – Planning Meeting 3 8:00

Large Group Discussion – Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections

2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Agenda – Planning Meeting 3

Informal Interaction

8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

10:00

Break

10:00

Break

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

12:00

Lunch

12:00

Lunch

Small Group Reports

12:45

Large Group Discussion –

1:45

12:45 1:45

Discussion

Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections 2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Small Group Reports Discussion

Large Group Discussion – Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections

2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

Agenda – Planning Meeting 3 8:00

Informal Interaction

8:15

Presentation

Recap of Workshop 2, Revised Space Program

8:45

Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Verify Space Program

9:15

Presentation

Planning Area, Building and Site Diagrams

10:00

Break

10:15 Discussion

Large Group Discussion - Thoughts on Diagrams

11:00 Discussion

Small Group Discussion – Reaction to Diagrams

12:00

Lunch

12:45 1:45

Small Group Reports Discussion

Large Group Discussion – Finalize diagrams and program, thoughts and reflections

2:45

Final Comments, Next Steps, Adjourn

April 2008 © Perkins+Will

A49


BVCAPS Educational Specifications  

This was the educational specification written for BVCAPS when it was planned.

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