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LOTS

S122 - S202

Saturday August17, 2013


LOTS S122 - S202 TO BE OFFERED

SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 2013

BROADCAST LIVE ON

Information in this catalog has been provided by the seller(s)/consignor(s) and has been deemed accurate but is not guaranteed. All vehicles sold “as is, where is” with all faults and defects. California License# 81410 Printed on 7/15/13


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LOT

S122

1937 INGALLS SPECIAL ROAD RACE CAR FLATHEAD 289 CI V-8, WELL DOCUMENTED RACE CAR BUILT BY ED INGALLS

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hen sports car racing grew popular in the early post-war years, it attracted scores of hot rodders who competed against the influx of European sports cars with home built specials using American components and speed equipment. One such machine was the Ingalls Special, a one-of-a-kind hybrid of the classic American hot rod and sports car cultures. Its builder, Ed Ingalls of Lafayette, California, originally planned to take on the salt flats of Bonneville, but he was bitten by the road racing bug and, in 1948, decided to employ his rodding experience to

build a machine that would compete with the European cars. The Ingalls Special may be the first and oldest existing true hot rod built exclusively for road racing. It uses a 1931 Ford roadster body channeled on a DeSoto Airflow frame with 1932 Ford cross members. Early Model A front suspension is used with a 1939 Ford rear setup; the brakes are 1930-40 Ford with Buick drums. A 289 CI Ford flathead mated to a 1939 Ford 3-speed transmission heads the drive train. A home-made windshield fronts a dash panel lifted from a 1933 Auburn Type 12 Speedster. The front bodywork

fenders made from Ford spare-tire covers and a 1938 LaSalle radiator cover. The rear fenders – added to the car in 1953 – were fashioned in aluminum by renowned body-man Gordon Vann from Ed’s original design for the car. The Ingalls Special was a consistent top-five finisher at such famous Northern California tracks as Pebble Beach, Stockton and Madera Field. After its restoration in 2003, the car competed once again that same year at the Monterey Historic Automobile Races at Laguna Seca, and was displayed in the American Specials Class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

CHASSIS NO. 135170361 ESTIMATE: $135,000 - $165,000

This historically significant American Special is offered with full documentation including many period photos, letters from previous owners and newspaper and magazine articles; such as Hot Rod and the April 1953 issue of Hop Up, which features an expansive article on the Ingalls Special. Eligible for an expansive array of events ranging from road rally to vintage racing, the Ingalls Special will be a welcome participant at many of the key North American collector automobile gatherings including the Monterey Historic Reunion and the California Mille. S AT U R DAY

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LOT

S123

1999 MERCEDES-BENZ CLK60 GT RENNTECH WIDEBODY SUPERCHARGED 5.5L V-8 PUSHING 600 HP, THE ONLY ROAD CAR BUILT BY HARMUT FEYHL OF RENNTECH

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artmut Feyhl knows a thing or two about creating fast, luxurious transportation. After serving as the North American Technical Director for Mercedes-Benz and being the driving force behind 1986 AMG Hammer, then the fastest sedan on the planet, he set out on his own in 1989 forming RENNtech with the mission of delivering “performance without compromise.” The Florida-based company has since produced many of the fastest and most desirable tuned versions of Mercedes-Benz sedans, coupes, roadsters and supercars. If RENNtech’s standard Mercedes-

Benz CLK60 offering was electric, then this special one-of-one 1999 CLK60 Supercharged 600 HP GT RENNtech Widebody should be considered nuclear. Its 200-plus MPH top speed and 10.9-second quarter mile sprints reflect the company's task to engineer it as a road-legal version of the factory-built AMG CLK racer for the DTM German touring car series. This example boasts a number of serious running gear and chassis upgrades, including: a 5.5-liter engine with twin high-boost Lysholm superchargers mated to an upgraded RENNtech transmission; reprogrammed ECU

and TCU; custom tubular headers connected to RENNtech free-flowing dual exhaust; Gleason 3.06 limited slip differential; Heim link suspension and subframe; adjustable shocks/ struts; Eibach springs; larger sway bars; adjustable camber; 14-inch front and 12-inch rear brakes with cross drilled two piece lightweight front rotors; 18inch Mono-Lite wheels; front and rear flares; front spoiler; side skirts; rear apron with carbon fiber insert; vented front hood; and rear splitter. Visually, the beautiful supercar is finished with a Brilliant Silver exterior, black leather seats and carbon fiber and Alcantara

SERIAL NO. WDBLJ70G5XF096679 ESTIMATE: $90,000 - $125,000

interior trim. This truly unique piece of automotive excellence produced by an icon of Mercedes-Benz performance tuning is in superlative condition, with approximately 60,000 miles on the chassis and 15,000 miles on its engine, so it is ready to exhilarate its occupants and annihilate any competition.

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LOT

S124

1985 MARCH/BUICK 85G GTP RACE CAR

MCLAREN-BUICK TURBOCHARGED SIX CYLINDER ENGINE, CHASSIS 85G-1, POLE POSITION AT 1985 DAYTONA 24 HOURS

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fter years of building a successful electrical manufacturing business, Brooklyn-California transplant Phil Conte entered the IMSA GTP racing series in 1983 following a brief introduction to international prototype racing. Three years of lackluster results ensued, but a fresh start came when Conte was approached by Buick Division, who offered to supply its turbocharged V-6 engines through McLaren. Sponsored by RC Cola, Conte Racing was officially crowned Buick’s factory racing team. With plenty of horsepower on tap and John Paul Jr. and Bill Adam sharing the

driving duties, this 1985 March-Buick, chassis no. 85G-1, was on the pole for the 1985 season-opening Daytona 24 Hour race. The best finish for 85G-1 was a fifth during the 1985 season, but the car repeatedly showed well in qualifying. Subsequent type 85G March chassis went on to additional accomplishments into the 1987 season when the GTP series, like the Can-Am before it, fell to Porsche domination. An event-ready car from one of America’s golden eras of road racing, 85G-1 was restored to full racing preparation by Ray Langstrom of Miami, Florida, who also upgraded the

SOLD ON BILL OF SALE ESTIMATE: $250,000 - $350,000

instrumentation and fire protection systems to meet present standards. The V-6 Buick engine was completely overhauled, with only break-in time and running in the 2012 Monterey Motorsports Reunion, after which the car received a comprehensive inspection and service by Robin Automotive of the body, suspension, cockpit, engine, 5-speed gearbox, brakes and wheels. Chassis no. 85G-1 is welcome at many historic racing venues and events on the annual calendar, with the additional benefit of being one of the few GTP cars that can boast its mechanical prowess, history or versatility. S AT U R DAY

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LOT

S125

1971 DODGE CHALLENGER R/T

SERIAL NO. JS23V1B296014

V-CODE 440 SIX PACK, 727 TORQUEFLITE TRANSMISSION, UNDERWENT A 22 MONTH PROFESSIONAL RESTORATION

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his 1971 Dodge Challenger shows the new split front grille and redesigned taillights that distinguish it from the 1970 model, but of more interest to E-Body enthusiasts and collectors are the body side tape stripes, quick-release fuel filler cap and simulated rear brake scoops that signify it as a potent R/T version. In this case the car is endowed with the V-code 440/385 HP Six Pack engine that delivered 490 ft/lbs of torque at just 2,300 RPM thanks to its aggressive performance cam and triple 2-barrel Holley carbs. Completing the car’s performance drivetrain

are a heavy-duty A727 3-speed automatic with Slap-Shift console shifter and a 3.55 rear end with Sure Grip differential. This is a genuine V-code Six Pack car that was professionally restored over a 22-month period and finished in 2007. The car is presented as it was originally delivered in bright High Impact Citron Yella with Black R/T side stripes and a Black interior. The R/T look is furthered with optional twin front spoilers and rear deck spoiler, rear window louvers, the rare Shaker hood scoop and hood pins, dual color-keyed racing mirrors and

ESTIMATE: $80,000 - $90,000 OFFERED AT NO RESERVE

chromed Rallye road wheels wearing BF Goodrich Radial T/As. Additionally notable are optional power steering and power front disc brakes, high back bucket seats, factory lighting package, woodgrain dash, console and door trim, fuel, alternator, temperature and oil pressure gauges, Tic-Toc-Tach, and solid state push-button radio.

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LOT S126

1932 PACKARD TWIN SIX DUAL COWL PHAETON TWIN SIX CHASSIS AND ENGINE WITH UPGRADED COACHWORK IN THE STYLE OF DIETRICH


LOT S126

1932 PACKARD TWIN SIX DUAL COWL PHAETON

TWIN SIX CHASSIS AND ENGINE WITH UPGRADED COACHWORK IN THE STYLE OF DIETRICH CHASSIS NO. 9067 ESTIMATE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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ackard entered the 1930s at the top of the super luxury car pecking order and with enviable cash reserves, putting it in a strong position to weather the coming Depression; but President and General Manager James Alvan Macauley, who also served as President of the National Automobile Manufacturers Association, took steps to further improve the company’s fortunes. Production was consolidated, extraneous facilities closed and parts were shared between different models whenever possible to reduce costs. One thing that did not change was Packard’s relationship with the brilliant designer Raymond Dietrich, whose work had been a major contribution to Packard’s continuing success. Dietrich’s Sports Phaeton design for the new-for-1932 Twin Six model was the inspiration for this award-winning Packard Twin Six 906 Dual Cowl Phaeton. Built on a 7-passenger long wheelbase chassis, it features a handcrafted body modified with new wood and aluminum door panels in the dual cowl, dual windshield style, and is fitted with dual side mount spare tires, a rear mounted trunk rack, built-in rear trunk and Pilot Ray driving lights. The top, top bows, rear window, seats and other components are original Dietrich pieces. After being reconditioned and refined to enhance its spectacular 12

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appearance with new paint and pinstriping, wheels and mechanicals, in 1987 the car reached a pinnacle for classics when it was displayed at the Pebble beach Concours d’Elegance. In 2006 it was freshened by Martin Hveem Automobile Restoration in Red Bluff, California. It was last shown at the 2006 Hillsborough Concours d’Elegance and presented with the Strother McMinn Design Award for its inspirational design elements.

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LOT

S127

1967 JAGUAR XKE ROADSTER

SERIAL NO. 1E14533

MATCHING NUMBERS 4.2 LITER SIX CYLINDER ENGINE WITH TRIPLE STROMBERG CARBURETORS, 39,439 MILES

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he Jaguar XKE created a sensation in the motoring community upon its introduction in 1961. Inspired by the racing D-Type, the XKE’s basic shape was the product of aerodynamicist Malcolm Sayer, but its grace, proportions and animal magnetism were the trademark of company founder William Lyons, whose instinctive grasp of aerodynamics was part of his towering reputation. The XKE followed the three-time Le Mans-winning D-Type in its basic structure, combining a fully stressed steel monocoque body with front and rear subframes, fully independent 14

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front and rear suspension and 4-wheel disc brakes, but its direct forerunner was a lightweight aluminum-bodied car raced at Le Mans by the factory in 1960. Known as the E2A, that lightweight prototype was equipped with fuel injection, dry sump oiling and coil spring suspension. The Series 1 XKE displayed refined road manners resulting directly from Jaguar’s extensive race experience, as did the silky smooth overhead cam inline-6 engine that purred beneath its forwardopening hood. In 1964 the originalspec 3.8L/250 HP unit was replaced by the triple Stromberg-equipped

4.2L/265 HP version that powers this lovely 1967 XKE convertible. A true matching numbers Series 1 car driven just 39,439 original miles, it has been completely restored and finished in splendid Signal Red with a Black leather interior with recent cosmetic and mechanical work completed by renowned Jaguar specials D&D Classic Cars in Covington, Ohio. Fans of the breed will love this car for such iconic details as its chromed Jaguar knock-off wire wheels, racing-inspired dash with bayonet switches and Smiths gauges and old-world wood-rimmed steering wheel.

ESTIMATE: $95,000 - $120,000


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LOT

S128

1962 PORSCHE 356 NOTCHBACK COUPE

UNIQUE FACTORY KARMANN COACHWORK, MODEL PRODUCED FOR ONLY TWO YEARS

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orsche continued to make running improvements to the 356 throughout the 1950s. These were usually of an incremental nature involving mechanical or functional rather than stylistic improvements, but that changed abruptly in 1959 when Porsche showed a brand new face to the world. Erwin Kommenda, Porsche’s old friend and still a major design force within the company, had conceived a new front end with more 16

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prominent, almost straight-edged fenders, more vertical headlights and a larger front bumper that was raised for more crash protection. A chrome grab handle appeared on the front bonnet between new parking lamps located at the ends of the front air inlets. In 1962 the 356B model received changes known collectively as the T6 modifications, involving the addition of twin engine cover grilles, an external gas filler lid on the right

front fender and larger windows. A unique new model briefly appeared, variously referred to as the Karmann Hardtop or the Notchback Coupe. The 1961 production run was basically a cabriolet body with the optional steel cabriolet hardtop welded in place. The 1962 line, which incorporated the T6 features, was a properly dedicated design. The body did not begin life as a cabriolet as before, but was its own design incorporating the cabriolet

SERIAL NO. 201874 ESTIMATE: $100,000 - $125,000

rear end, the T6 coupe windshield frame and a unique hardtop. This Silver 1962 Notchback coupe exemplifies that rare model. Fitted with a sharp Blue-trimmed interior with typical full gauges and snug bucket seats, it is powered by the matching numbers 1,600 CC flat-4 engine linked to a 4-speed transmission.


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LOT

S129

1982 JAGUAR XJR-5 GTP RACE CAR

SOLD ON BILL OF SALE

SERIAL #1, FIRST IN CLASS AT ROAD AMERICA IN 1982, PURCHASED BY CURRENT OWNER DIRECTLY FROM GROUP 44

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fter 20 years of building and racing English cars to 13 SCCA national titles and three Trans Am Championships, in 1980 Bob Tullius’ Group 44 Inc. racing team was facing a grim future. The team’s TR8 racer was no longer useful to its corporate sponsor Triumph, which was ceasing production, and no other patron was on the horizon. That is when Jaguar Managing Director John Egan summoned Tullius and Jaguar North America’s VP of Sales and Marketing Mike Dale to Coventry to discuss his strategy to revitalize Jaguar’s performance image. Beginning with 18

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a North American racing program, the plan was centered on building a prototype to meet both IMSA GTP and FIA World Endurance Manufacturer’s Championship rule books. The result was this car, the 1982 XJR5 Serial Number 001. Designer Lee Dykstra designed the XJR-5’s chassis and aerodynamics, creating a smoothly contoured and aggressive shape and taking full advantage of the long and narrow Jaguar V-12 engine to accommodate large ground effects tunnels for downforce. The XJR-5 was otherwise quite conventional; an aluminum

tub, Kevlar composite body panels, coilover A-arm suspension with Lockheed disc brakes and the V-12 powerplant topped not with sophisticated fuel injection, turbos or engine controls (those would come later) but a half-dozen good old-fashioned dual-throat Weber 48 carburetors. Sleek, powerful and easy to drive, the XJR-5 co-driven by Tullius and Bill Adams showed its potential immediately with a 3rd place overall and 1st in GTP at Road America in August 1982 and then a 2nd at Laguna Seca in 1983. Successive XJR-5 racers were built, competing in both the IMSA

ESTIMATE: $550,000 - $650,000

and FIA series including the 24 Hours of Le Mans. XJR-5 001 remained in Tullius’ ownership and the two were reunited on the track at the 2000 Goodwood Festival of Speed. The car was purchased by the current owner direct from Group 44, effectively making it a one-owner vehicle. Period race driver and innovative engineer Jim Busby, having recently restored Jaguar XJR-5 010, was contracted to restore 001 to full event readiness for the current owner. The work was done without regard for expense, and the results are evident in the smallest detail. Every system


was subjected to a thorough overhaul, and the engine was rebuilt by marque specialist Ed Pink to a dyno-tested 625 HP. The car was successfully track tested at Willow Springs by veteran driver Rick Knoop, who pronounced it “incredibly easy to drive.” It presents in spectacular fashion thanks to Busby’s characteristically thorough preparation. Jaguar XJR-5 001 represents Jaguar’s re-entry into international motorsports after a two-decade absence, and with a GTP win by endurance racing legends Tullius and Bill Adams to its credit, is a historically significant piece of Jaguar’s prototype competition history, a status that is sure to make it a popular attraction at vintage events the world over.

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LOT

S130

1987 PORSCHE 911 TURBO SLANTNOSE

1 OF 144 SLANTNOSE 505 OPTION TURBO COUPES PRODUCED IN 1987, 28,560 DOCUMENTED MILES

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his 1987 Porsche 911 (930) Turbo was built by the factory with the special-order “Flachbau� Slantnose body (option code 505), which mimicked the 935 race cars and added a 60% premium to the cost of the already top-line Turbo. Just 144 Slantnose Turbo coupes were built for 1987, and a mere 349 produced in total (1987-1989), according to Porsche factory records. This car has been driven just 28,558 documented miles and presents in unmolested, near-new condition throughout. It carries all of its original body panels, original paint, original Fuchs light alloy wheels (with the cen-

SERIAL NO. WP0JB0934HS051237 ESTIMATE: $90,000 - $120,000

ters painted red at the dealer), and has not been modified mechanically. Included with purchase are the Porsche Certificate of Authenticity, complete maintenance records back to new, the complete set of original handbooks in their original vinyl folio, the factory tool roll, Porsche tire compressor, the original Blaupunkt cassette player, CarFax history report, and a copy of the Porsche memorandum that lists factory Slantnose production numbers The original body tag listing the factory option codes is still affixed under the front bonnet. S AT U R DAY

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LOT

S131

1962 MERCEDES-BENZ 190SL ROADSTER

FULL RESTORATION WITH ORIGINAL TWIN SOLEX CARBURETORS IN A DESIRABLE COLOR COMBINATION

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ntroduced in prototype form at the 1954 New York Auto Show, the Mercedes-Benz 190SL was directly attributable to two factors: the competition 300SL’s racing successes that included the Mille Miglia, Le Mans and the Carrera Panamericana; and Max Hoffman, the Austrian-born transplant to New York City whose ability to discern the automotive tastes of his wealthy clientele gave him an entrée into all the European manufacturers aspiring to establish their products in the American market. The 190SL was positioned to bask in the sporting glory of its big22

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ger 300SL sibling, and while it did not use the 300SL’s purpose-built tubular space frame – the 190SL was built on a monocoque platform adapted from the W121 sedan – it did incorporate its styling, engineering, detailing, wheelbase and fully independent suspension, employing upper and lower A-arms at the front and swing axles at the rear. The 190SL’s 4-cylinder engine was also directly based on the 300SL unit, but with a slightly reduced stroke in service to greater longevity. Available with either a detachable hard top or a folding soft top, the 190SL was produced from

1955 through 1963, eventually totalling 25,881 cars worldwide. Finished in the traditional Mercedes-Benz combination of Silver with a Red interior, this lovely 1962 190SL convertible has undergone a complete restoration with impeccable results. The Black soft top folds down under a Red boot to reveal its immaculate Leather-trimmed interior. The engine compartment is a study in attention to detail, the engine having been freshly restored in Europe with original parts that include the twin Solex carburetors.

SERIAL NO. 12104010020952 ESTIMATE: $150,000 - $175,000


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LOT S132

1954 FERRARI 750 MONZA SPIDER BY SCAGLIETTI S/N 0462MD, SIGNIFICANT RACING HISTORY AND COMPLETE KNOWN OWNERSHIP SINCE NEW


LOT S132

1954 FERRARI 750 MONZA SPIDER BY SCAGLIETTI SIGNIFICANT RACING HISTORY AND COMPLETE KNOWN OWNERSHIP SINCE NEW CHASSIS NO. 0462MD ESTIMATE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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uring the early 1950s Ferrari ranked among the world’s most competitive manufactures in international formula and sports car racing. Alberto Ascari had clinched the Formula One World Championship title two years running, and did so the second year using Ferrari’s new Lampredi-designed four cylinder twin overhead cam power plant. This confirmed the superior low-speed torque characteristics offered an advantage, particularly on twisty circuits, and the decision was made for the 1953 season to equip Ferrari’s sports racing cars, the Mondial and Monza, with the now-proven Lampredi inline four cylinder platforms. In addition to the new power plant, Ferrari’s design innovation and mechanical sophistication extended to the drive train. In Monza form, a 5-speed transaxle was fitted in conjunction with a de Dion independent rear axel assembly. This both improved weight distribution over the standard mounted transmissions used by other manufacturers, as well as improved traction over road imperfections which defined many of the difficult road circuits of the era. Their innovation was so impressive in fact, that this particular chassis, s/n 0462MD, was acquired in period by Jaguar Cars, who commenced a complete disassembly and analysis to determine why Ferrari 26

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Original owner Joe Kelly driving at the 1954 Tourist Trophy at Dundrod (9/11/54)

was able to continually out-pace the English entries! Among the first Monzas built; this example was sold new to Irish racer Joe Kelly of Dublin in September of 1954. Immediately, Kelly campaigned the car at the Dundrod and Leinster Trophy races. For Goodwood of the same year, future Formula 1 World Champion Mike Hawthorn would be

entered as the driver, unfortunately retiring with rear axle troubles. After being acquired by Jaguar Works for performance evaluation against their venerable D-Type,w the car was sold onward to Jaguar team driver and 1951 Le Mans winner Peter Whitehead. Sir Jack Brabham imported the car to Australia in 1955, where it was actively campaigned by Stan Cof-

fey, Arnold Glass, Jack Neal and Oliver Steel through the 1959 season. After passing through a documented series of known and respected collectors, s/n 0462MD began its Historic Competition career with the 1987 Mille Miglia retrospective, entered by owner at the time, Pietro Brigato of Vicenza, Italy. Other European owners included Engelbert Stieger of Switzerland, who


ultimately sold the car via a respected Southern California dealer to Pat Smiekel, of Montecito, California, in 1996. With the assistance of noted Ferrari collector Brandon Wang, ownership passed to Roberto Crippa, who proved to be an avid participant in various historic racing venues throughout mainland Europe before selling the car to fellow Italian Andrea Burani. Andrea Burani, and his Father Walter were perhaps the most active historic owners of s/n 0462MD, competing in a myriad of events between 2000 and 2009 including the Mille Miglia no less than seven times, as well as Le Mans Classic (2004), and Spa, Goodwood Revival, Mugello, Monza, among other races. GTO Engineering fielded s/n 0462MD during Andrea’s S AT U R DAY

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custodianship, passing to Walter in 2005, who contracted Ferrari Clienti to service and support this wonderful Monza until 2009. Restored at di Diena in Modena in 1998 under Roberto Crippa’s ownership, and maintained by GTO Engineering and Ferrari Clienti while vigorously campaigned by the Burani Family, this 750 Monza is best described as an exceptionally strong running example mechanically, with a wonderful and uniform patina cosmetically. The body, paint, and interior all display good racing cosmetics which serves as a testament to its extensive racing career. The engine bay and underside show the normal signs of charismatic use, and regular upkeep. This 750 Monza starts easily and revs freely making excellent horsepower and ample torque. The transaxle shifts well, and the brakes are effective. The steering is light and nimble, as would be expected of a car fitted with a comparatively light-weight inline four cylinder engine. Perhaps the most appealing characteristic of all is s/n 0462MD’s exceptionally clean and clear history. The ownership chain is known from new and currently carries an Illinois title and all U.S. duties have been paid. This example has avoided the substitute installation of an American V8 power plant, major racing incidents requiring the repairs of replacement of chassis members, and so far as we are aware, any significant body section replacement. Included with the sale of this wonderful 750 Monza is the numbers S AT U R DAY 28

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Future Formula 1 World Champion Mike Hawthorn behind the wheel of 0462MD at the Goodwood International Meeting (9/25/54)


matching engine (number 0462MD), and a rebuilt spare gearbox (number MD 44). Currently fitted is a racing prepared 3.0 litre engine by Hall and Hall, which has seen years of conscientious maintenance by GTO Engineering in the United Kingdom. Ferrari’s excursion into sports car competition with inline four and six cylinder engines occurred at the height of his experimental period. Sports cars of this era, Ferraris in particular, are commonly viewed by experts and collectors alike as the most beautiful cars ever designed. Today, they are highly eligible and welcome entrants for virtually every prestigious historic motorsports venue around the globe. Approximately thirty 750 Monzas were built in total, several of which boast this beautiful Scaglietti coachwork designed by Ferrari’s son Dino. Previously part of the Steiger, Wang, Burani, and Crippa collections, s/n 0462MD has been the subject of admiration by several of the world’s most astute Ferrari custodians.

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LOT

S133

1933 FORD AUBURN SPECIAL ROAD RACE CAR BELIEVED TO BE THE ONLY CAR TO COMPLETE ALL PEBBLE BEACH RACES FROM 1950-1956

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rom 1950 through 1956, the twisting, rudimentary roads of Pebble Beach on California’s Monterey Peninsula were home to the annual Pebble Beach Road Race. Held on a tightly configured circuit between the Cypress Point Golf Club to the north and the Pebble Beach Golf Links to the south, the race was contested by most of the stars of California’s post war racing era, including such names as Phil Hill, John von Neumann, Ernie McAfee and Carroll Shelby. Known as the Ford Auburn Special, this home-built racer is thought to be the only car that competed in 30

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all seven Pebble Beach Road Races. Hand fabricated with outstanding artistic innovation and technical expertise by racer David Addison, the Ford Auburn Special uses a 1934 Ford Roadster body, the fenders and running boards from a 1934 Auburn and the grille shell from a 1929 Cord L29. A 4.1 liter Ford flathead V-8 with twin Stromberg 97 carburetors, aluminum intake manifold and aluminum heads powers the car through a 3-speed manual transmission. Before the Pebble Beach period the car was a participant in the Bonneville Salt Flats speed trials in 1947 and 1948,

and subsequently went on to amass an extensive race history in SCCA sports car events and West Coast hill climbs. After its expert restoration by Le Mans winner, racing engineer and restorer Jim Busby, the Ford Auburn Special appeared at the 2006 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it received a 3rd place trophy in the Pebble Beach Road Races class; the trophy will be included with the car at auction along with a privately commissioned painting of the car on the Pebble Beach road course by Carmel artist Jim Miller.

SERIAL NO. DRF56948 ESTIMATE: $250,000 - $300,000


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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

LOT S134

1955 PORSCHE 550/1500 RS SPYDER

WELL DOCUMENTED EUROPEAN RACING HISTORY, FEATURED BY PORSCHE AT THE 1956 BRUSSELS SALON AUTO SHOW


LOT S134

1955 PORSCHE 550/1500 RS SPYDER

WELL DOCUMENTED EUROPEAN RACING HISTORY, FEATURED BY PORSCHE AT THE 1956 BRUSSELS SALON AUTO SHOW CHASSIS NO. 550-0077 | ENGINE NO. 90089 ESTIMATE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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ntroduced to the public at the 1953 Paris Motor Show, the 550 was Porsche’s first dedicated sports racer, an open-cockpit design inspired by the earlier sports cars built and campaigned by German Volkswagen dealer Walter Glockler in 1949-50 using Porsche mechanicals in lightweight tubular frames. It was Glockler’s success that encouraged Ferry Porsche to authorize the 550 project in 1952. The need for such a car had become quite evident by then. Porsche was beginning to face stiff competition from a new breed of sports cars specifically geared for racing on the larger European circuits. The dualpurpose production Porsches were no match for such barely streetable competition machines as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL and Jaguar C-Type racers. Worse, companies such as Gordini and OSCA were fielding the same type of racers – “production” cars stripped down and practically devoid of creature comforts – in direct competition with Porsches at the class level as well. There was obviously no future for production-based Porsches against such competition; only a dedicated sports racer could solve the problem, and Glockler had already shown the way, collaborating with Porsche on a series of German championship-winning specials that 34

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wore the Porsche nameplate. Indeed, the most famous of the Glockler specials was widely promoted as a Porsche, even appearing on the company stand at the Geneva and Frankfurt auto shows in 1953. Unlike the rear-engined production 356, the 550 followed both the original Porsche and the Glockler designs, its engine mounted ahead of

the rear axle in a simple ladder-type frame layout. To accommodate the design, the entire powertrain and rear suspension was reversed, placing the engine ahead of the transaxle and using leading rather than trailing arms to operate the torsion bars. The front suspension was typical Porsche, with trailing arms and transverse torsion bars.

The first two prototypes used alloy bodies built by Weidenhausen of Frankfurt, who had earlier dressed the Glockler cars. The goal was to enter them at Le Mans in June 1953, but in a rain-soaked trial race at the Nurburgring on May 31, Walter Glockler’s cousin Helm staved off entries from Borgward and East Germany’s EMW to make the first


prototype, 550-01, a winner on its very first outing. That victory and a 1-2 class win at Le Mans were accomplished with the 1500 Super engine, which developed 80 HP on pump gasoline. The two prototypes were raced in Europe for the rest of the season, during which they made another appearance at the Nurburgring along with a third prototype. It did not race, but onlookers noted the distinctly harsh bark emanating from its single large exhaust outlet, the source of which was a brand new powerplant designed in conjunction with the 550: the Type 547 engine. Designed with considerable input from Dr. Ernst Fuhrmann, an expert engineer who later became chairman

of Porsche, the 547 was much more than the 356’s 1,500 CC 4-cylinder air-cooled boxer engine; it was the first Porsche engine to use twin camshafts per cylinder bank. Conventional thinking dictated an end-mounted chain or gear drive system that would have added to the overall length of the engine. However, Fuhrmann wanted to ensure that the Type 547 would fit within the confines of a regular production 356, an inspired foresight that soon spawned the legendary Carrera. Fuhrmann drew on his experience with the ingenious and ill-fated Cisitalia Grand Prix car to design a diabolically complicated cam-drive system using nine drive shafts and 14 bevel gears to route the

crank’s rotation first to the exhaust cams and then to the intake cams. The entire affair was tightly packaged between the cylinder banks to further complicate the 547, which also bristled with roller crank bearings, dual distributors for its twin-plug combustion chambers, twin Solex 2-barrel downdraft carburetors and a highly efficient dual-inlet cooling fan arrangement. The 547’s unparalleled complexity meant that it took a skilled mechanic over 120 hours to assemble one; Fuhrmann himself once observed that it took a minimum of 8 hours to properly set the timing if one was lucky, and up to double that if tolerances were not exactly right. The first

Type 547 engines produced 110 HP at 7,000 RPM but subsequent tuning revisions eventually raised that figure to 180 HP. This incredibly complicated yet powerful and reliable engine was at the heart of the 550 legend, which grew by leaps and bounds. Soon after class wins at the Mille Miglia, Le Mans and the Carrera Panamericana in 1954, Porsche began building customer cars using alloy bodies by Wendler. Late in 1955 Porsche improved the 550’s high-speed stability by replacing the ladder-type frame with a lighter and far stronger space frame. This 1955 550/1500 RS Spyder, chassis number 550-0077 is believed to be the first car fitted with the new space frame S AT U R DAY

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chassis. In January 1956 the car was delivered to Belgian race driver Christian Goethals, and in February 1956 was featured by Porsche as the Brussels Salon Auto Show Car. Goethals actively campaigned the car in Europe, winning the 1500CC class at the GP des Frontiers in Chimay and the Coupe de Salon in Montlhery among numerous excellent overall showings. Chassis no. 550-0077 was later sold to Franklin Rudolph, who shipped it to the United States in 1973. In late 1989 it was acquired by collectors and present owners Peter and Cheryl Dunkel, who later commissioned a full restoration that was completed by Bill Perrone’s Part Shop in Hun36

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tington Beach, California, and Jim Ansite’s Ansite Inc. in Los Alamitos, California. The car’s engine restoration was completed by Bill Doyle, the world’s leading authority on the 547 4-cam engine. Porsche historian and author R. Stephen Heinrichs has determined that three different 4-cam Type 547 engines were installed in the car by the Porsche factory, and that the present engine, which bears both the stamped factory internal number 212 and the serial number 90089, was the third and final engine installed, after the car was delivered to Goethals. It is correctly equipped with dual Solex 40 PPJ double-downdraft carburetors and mated to a racing-spec 4-speed

gearbox. During the restoration the Dunkels decided to have Bad Company of Sun Valley, California, paint the car in a later factory Metallic Silver, with Blue rear fender scallops and the Porsche name emblazoned across the front bonnet for high visibility during vintage track events. A prominent and interesting detail is the list of races run by original owner Goethals painted on the aluminum tonneau cover as part of the restoration. The cockpit demonstrates the stark simplicity of the 550’s design, with Blue fabric upholstery on the seats and inner door panels, a three-point roll bar; banjo-style steering wheel, floor-mounted shifter and pedals, tach, speedometer and oil temperature and fuel gauges.

Chassis no. 550-0077 is a wellknown member of the Porsche community. In 2011 it was shown at the Quail Lodge Porsche Race Car Classic to benefit lung cancer research and at Rennsport, the largest-ever gathering of 550 and 4-cam Porsches, where Brian Redman and other judges gave 550-0077 an award for its history and restoration. That same year it was also named winner of the Design Achievement Award at the Dana Point Concours d’Elegance in Orange County, California. Now being offered after 25 years in the Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection, Porsche 550/1500 RS number 550-0077 is a seminal machine in Porsche’s long and storied racing history.


550-0077 Racing Record Race Date

Race

Start Number

Pilot

Pilot 2

Car Class

Results Overall

Results Class

13th May 1956

Spa GP Spa, Francorchamps

7

Goethals, Christian

S 1500

7

3

20th May 1956

GP des Frontieres, Chimay

28

Goethals, Christian

S2.0

4

1

27th May 1956

1000 km Nürburgring

44

Rousselle, Freddy

Goethals, Christian

1500

DNS

29th June 1956

Rheims 12 h Rheims. GP France

26

Goethals, Christian

Goethals, P.

s1.5

8

21st July 1956

Solitude

24

Goethals, Christian

5th August 1956

Nürburgring GP, Germany

44

Goethals, Christian

16th September 1956

Avus GP Berlin, German Sportscar Championship (round 6)

22

Goethals, Christian

S1.5

1st October 1956

Namur Citadelle de Namurs

Goethals, Christian

1600

2

7th October 1956

Montlhéry Coupes de Salon

Goethals, Christian

S1.5

5

58

2

Rousselle, Freddy

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LOT

S135

1962 CHEVROLET BEL AIR LIGHTWEIGHT BUBBLE TOP

409 CI V-8 WITH EXPERIMENTAL FACTORY SERVICE PACKAGE, ALUMINUM FRONT END, 572 ORIGINAL MILES

A

fter pumping up the 348 CI Whead V-8 to 409 CI for 1961, Chevrolet built on the newfound strengths of the higher-displacement engine in 1962. The newest version of the 409 featured a dual plane aluminum intake manifold with two inline Carter AFB 4-barrel carburetors. This was matched to raised-port cylinder heads with larger valves, higher compression 11.4:1 pistons and heavy duty forged connecting rods for a factory rating of 409 HP. A new GM service package designed to improve high-RPM breathing was also made available, consisting of a new higher-lift cam, strengthened valve

springs, longer exhaust valve pushrods and free-flowing exhaust manifolds. These developments were followed by the release of new lightweight aluminum body pieces, followed by a new engine upgrade, the Mark 1 Service Package, also known as the Z11 upgrade. This last upgrade, which boosted power to 425 horses and qualified the car for Factory Experimental racing, used a hotter solid lifter cam with matching valve springs, new heads with raised rectangular intake ports and a new two-piece, super high-rise intake manifold lacking a lifter valley cover, as would be used on the Z11 drag

SERIAL NO. 21637A138203 ESTIMATE: $150,000 - $200,000

racers in 1963. Those rare body and engine pieces are found on this unrestored, highly original lightweight 1962 Chevrolet Bel Air Bubble Top coupe. An original factory radio and heater-delete car with all-aluminum front end parts and the original matching numbers engine block, it shows a mere 572 original miles on the odometer. The look of this old-time stormer is classic factory: Tuxedo Black paint, Red interior with bench seat, 4-speed floor shifter and column-mounted 7,000 RPM tach, and Mickey Thompson slicks on painted steelies with dog dish caps. S AT U R DAY

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LOT S136

1909 LOCOMOBILE MODEL 40 TYPE I DEMI TONNEAU

2010 MEADOW BROOK CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE BEST IN CLASS


LOT S136

1909 LOCOMOBILE MODEL 40 TYPE I DEMI TONNEAU 2010 MEADOW BROOK CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE BEST IN CLASS CHASSIS NO.2376 ESTIMATE: $500,000 - $750,000

N

ot long after the turn of the 20th century, the “Best Built Car in America” carried the name Locomobile. At the time one of the most expensive and elegant automobiles manufactured in the United States, the Locomobile became the favored conveyance of the East Coast aristocracy and the West Coast/Hollywood elite, including Charlie Chaplin, Tom Mix and Cecil B. DeMille. The Locomobile had its birth in the takeover of the fledgling Stanley Motor Carriage Company by Cosmopolitan Magazine publisher Brisben Walker in 1899. Walker’s subsequent partnership with his neighbor, Amzi Lorenzo Barber, soon fell apart; both went on to build and sell practically identical cars whose design had originated with the Stanley Brothers, but it was Walker’s version, the Locomobile, that went on to success. This Locomobile 4 passenger Demi-Tonneau was built on the Model Type 40 I chassis, which is the rarest and most desirable model type. With a 40 HP inline-4 engine on a 123-inch wheelbase, the Model I was the biggest and fastest model produced by Locomobile during the early 1900s “Brass” period. The coachwork is factory original and beautifully restored. Collector Walter McCarthy purchased the car in the late 1960s, maintaining it in his 42

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collection for three decades. Richard King acquired the car from Walter in the 1990s and then restored it for the 2004 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. In 2007 it was acquired from Richard King by Michael Longfield. This Locomobile is a marvelous example that characterizes the essence of what these Locomobile automobiles represent; power, beauty and excitement. It has received many prestigious awards, including 2nd in class Pebble Beach 2007, 1st in Class Meadow Brook 2010.

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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

LOT

S137

1963 PORSCHE 356B CARRERA 2 COUPE

MATCHING NUMBERS 4-CAM ENGINE, RARE SUNROOF, FULLY RESTORED BY A WELL KNOWN PORSCHE EXPERT

T

he 356B Carrera 2 debuted to cheers at the 1961 Frankfurt Auto Show. Demand was so extreme for this low-production, highestperformance version of the Porsche 356 that after Road & Track pulled strings to secure one for testing, it concluded that "as a whole, the Carrera 2 is certainly one of the most desirable GT cars produced today; it is not cheap... but it should delight the owner looking for a car of high quality and exceptional roadworthiness." The core of its capabilities was a lightweight alloy four-cam engine that was derived directly from the units made

famous by powering the 1953 and 1954 Mexican Carrera Panamericana road race class-dominating 550 Spyders. While those 550 Spyder factory racers received 1,498cc versions delivering 137 HP and 95.5 lb-ft of torque, the new Carrera 2 model boasted a larger 1,966cc engine pushing 152 HP and 131 lb-ft of torque. Stopping distances were also greatly reduced from the initial Carrera, courtesy of disc brakes, making it the first production Porsche without drums. This amazing and well-known 1963 example is one of 1,782 Porsche 356B Carrera 2 Coupes produced and one

SERIAL NO. 124875 ESTIMATE: $375,000 - $425,000

of an infinitesimal number built with a sunroof. It carries the Carrera logo on the fenders, indicative of its history as a car specified for European delivery. Fully restored by a Porsche marque expert, it retains its numbersmatching four-cam engine, tool kit and competition headlight stone guards. Owned by respected Porsche collectors Peter and Cheryl Dunkel since 1988, this car has been featured in many publications, including The Complete Book of Collectible Cars by Richard Langworth.

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LOT S138

1984 LOTUS TYPE 95T JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL 1 OF 4 BUILT BY TEAM LOTUS, DRIVEN BY NIGEL MANSELL IN THE 1984 FORMULA 1 SEASON


LOT S138

1984 LOTUS TYPE 95T JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL

1 OF 4 BUILT BY TEAM LOTUS, DRIVEN BY NIGEL MANSELL IN THE 1984 FORMULA 1 SEASON SOLD ON BILL OF SALE ESTIMATE: $500,000 - $600,000

T

his 1984 Lotus Type 95T John Player Special is one of four such cars built by Lotus for the 1984 Formula 1 season. Designed by Frenchman GÊrard Ducarouge, the 95T helped re-establish Lotus as a Formula 1 contender. The first newly designed Lotus F1 chassis since the 1981 88, the 95T was the third generation F1 Lotus to employ Renault’s supremely powerful V-6 engine using twin KKK turbochargers and a Lotus/Hewland FGB 5-speed manual transmission. It also took full advantage of contemporary construction techniques and ground effects design, using a one-piece Kevlar upper body over a carbon fiber monocoque and ground effects undertray. Suspension followed common contemporary F1 practice with double wishbone control arms, pull-rod operated inboard coil springs and shock absorbers and front and rear anti-roll bars. A compact and carefully packaged design, the 95T was 166 inches in overall length, 84.5 inches wide and just 39.5 inches high. Riding on a 105inch wheelbase and weighing in at just 1,188 lbs, the 95T was capable of over 210 MPH, with 1,100 HP on tap for qualifying and approximately 700 in race trim from the 1,492 cc V-6. Resplendent in its Gold-on-Black John Player Special livery, the 95T was the 48

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first regular Team Lotus ride for future World Champion Nigel Mansell, who answered the faith placed in him by his late mentor, Lotus founder Colin Chapman, by qualifying second at the Monaco Grand Prix, taking the pole at the Dallas GP and finishing in the top ten driver standings for the first time in his career. The 95T thus helped establish Mansell’s stature in F1; today he still rates fifth in all time Formula 1 career Grand Prix wins with 31. This historically significant Turboera Grand Prix Lotus is no trailer queen. Renowned engineer Dean Sellards was retained to restore the car’s twin-turbocharged Renault V-6 engine to top tune, and the car has been upgraded to accept a starter jack and the electronics set up to run off a laptop computer, making it perfectly suitable for vintage F1 parade laps and events such as the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

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LOT

S139

1967 SHELBY GT500 FASTBACK

SERIAL NO. 67400F8U01274

427 SIDE OILER V-8, FACTORY 4-SPEED, 1 OF 66 FINISHED IN BRITTANY BLUE WITH PARCHMENT INTERIOR

T

he 1967 edition of Shelby’s GT established its racy demeanor with distinctive front and rear styling that gave the car a much more aggressive presence than the original ’65-’66 models. The nose was extended by three inches with fiberglass components that exaggerated the factory Mustang look, with twin driving lights mounted in a unique grille, usually centrally located. A fiberglass hood with twin scoops and hood hold-down pins further emphasized the departure from stock, as do upper and lower body side scoops, while at the rear, the tail received a fiberglass trunk lid with an integrated spoiler and 1967 Mercury Cougar

taillights. The Shelby GT uses the Décor Group interior with a sporting wood-rimmed steering wheel, Hurst shifter, and integrated roll bar with inertia roll shoulder harnesses like those developed for the F4 Phantom fighter jet, a first for any production car. The overall treatment was highly successful in reinforcing the Shelby’s image as a racing machine for the street. This GT500 is a unique and welldocumented Shelby Mustang with history listed in the Shelby American World Registry. It is offered from the collection of Major League Baseball all-time great, Omar Vizquel. Delivered new in Brittany Blue with

Parchment interior, this GT500 is one of 66 built in this trim and color competition per the Deluxe Marti Report, which is included with the car. It was equipped from the factory with the 4-speed manual transmission, power steering, power brakes, fold-down rear seat, shoulder harnesses, AM radio, un-louvered hood, Detroit Locker rear end, 15-inch steel wheels, and of course, the iconic inboard headlights, which were exclusive to the 1967 model year but famously not available on cars not delivered new in California or New Jersey, nor those built near the end of the production run. Sometime in the 1970s, the original

ESTIMATE: $160,000 - $180,000

428 engine had to be replaced, so the owner sourced and installed a genuine 427 Side-Oiler, which the car carries to this day. The 427 was professionally rebuilt in 2006, and the car has been driven fewer than 1,100 miles since. In addition to the aforementioned Deluxe Marti Report, this GT500 comes with the invoice for the engine rebuild, additional maintenance records from its time in Mr. Vizquel’s care, Shelby American World Registry history, and short letter from the previous owner, Mr. J.R. Medley who owned the car from 1979 till 2006 when Mr. Visquel acquired the car. S AT U R DAY

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LOT

S140

1940 PACKARD 120 STATION WAGON

SERIAL NO. I393I2042

AACA JOSEPH PARKIN AWARD FOR BEST PRE-WAR PACKARD IN THE EASTERN DIVISION

P

ackard took a tentative step into the station wagon market in 1937 with a 6-cylinder model before introducing the 1940 Model 120 to appeal to moneyed customers with a desire for a luxury touring wagon. Typical of contemporary Packards, the 120’s modern chassis and powertrain incorporated a smooth-running engine with a dualthroat downdraft carburetor, 3-speed manual transmission with optional overdrive, independent front coil and solid rear leaf spring suspension and hydraulic front and rear drum brakes. The

Hercules Body Company of Evansville, Indiana, supplied the new Packard’s freshly redesigned coachwork, which featured a more ornate rendition of the classic Packard grille and restyled side grilles and hood louvers. Additionally, the Packard’s 282 CI inline-8 L-head engine benefited from a new cylinder head design for improved intake flow. A 10-year nut and bolt restoration was completed on this prizewinning 1940 120 station wagon in 2005 that included rebuilding the engine and transmission, overdrive, radiator, front and rear

suspension, brakes and electrical components including the wiring harness. The body, its number tag 143 still intact on the coachwork indicating it as the 43rd body built by Hercules, is painted the original factory color of Inverness Green, which was available only in the early stages of production. It also boasts several desirable options including dual side mount spares with metal covers, front and rear bumper guards and Grille guard and a locking gas cap with Packard script. In addition, brand new wood was used in the restoration

ESTIMATE: $150,000 - $175,000

and finished to the high level of quality as befits an American automotive icon. Handsome wood-grain accents on the dash and windshield frame complement the interior, which also features beautifully finished wood paneling, sharp Tan upholstery, dual heaters and a push-button Packard radio. The quality of the restoration has earned the car high honors, including AACA National Junior and Senior awards in 2006 and 2007 and the AACA Joseph Parkin award in 2008 for best pre-war Packard in the Eastern Division. S AT U R DAY

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LOT S141

1990 FERRARI F40 BERLINETTA

ONE OWNER SUPERCAR SOLD NEW AT LOS GATOS FERRARI, DRIVEN ONLY 473 MILES SINCE NEW


LOT S141

1990 FERRARI F40 BERLINETTA

ONE OWNER SUPERCAR SOLD NEW AT LOS GATOS FERRARI, DRIVEN ONLY 473 MILES SINCE NEW SERIAL NO. ZFFMN34A9L0086602 ESTIMATE: $800,000 - $1,000,000

O

n July 21, 1987, automotive journalists from around the world assembled at the civic center near Ferrari’s Maranello headquarters for an audience with the Old Man himself. The occasion: the unveiling of the Ferrari F40 Berlinetta, the result of Ferrari’s instruction to his engineers to build the best car in the world. The F40 was indeed a technological tour de force, combining superbly executed engineering conventions with brilliant innovation. Its maximum speed of 201 MPH necessitated Pirelli’s all-new Z-rated P700 tires mounted on centerlocking F-1 style aluminum wheels, behind which reside huge Group C-derived 13-inch Brembo brakes. The otherwise conventional all-independent A-arm/coilover suspension bore the added benefit of automatic ride height adjustment, a concession to the changing road conditions the F40 would face in the real world. The F40’s 3.0L twin turbo 4-cam V-8 made no such compromises, boasting 478 HP at 7,000 RPM while delivering its maximum 425 lb-ft of torque at just 4,000, making it docile at low speeds yet ready to instantly launch the car forward with overwhelming ferocity. Sculpted in carbon fiber for minimal weight and maximum downforce, the F40’s stunning Pininfarina bodywork has gained iconic status in the intervening years, more for its artful forms 56

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than its aerodynamic efficiency; so too its strictly functional cockpit with its highly bolstered seats, simple padded steering wheel, gated shifter and analog instruments. Sold new by Ferrari of Los Gatos on June 21, 1991, this one-owner 1990 Ferrari F40 has been driven just 473 miles. Accompanied by it’s original window sticker, this supercar received its first service on October 6, 1992 at 459 miles and was then placed in storage, where it remained until April 26, 2013. One of only 1,311 produced from 1988 to 1992, it is a superb, virtually untouched example of the last Ferrari commissioned by Enzo Ferrari before his passing on August 14, 1988, barely one year after he introduced the F40 as the world’s fastest production automobile.

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LOT

S142

1931 BENTLEY LE MANS SPECIAL

CHASSIS NO. B84FV

ALL ALUMINUM BODY MODELED AFTER THE FAMOUS BIRKIN BLOWER, BENTLEY MARK VI CHASSIS AND SUSPENSION

W

hile naturally aspirated Bentleys dominated endurance racing in the early 20th century and W. O. Bentley himself rejected supercharging as a perversion of his creations, the so-called “Blower Bentleys” are the best known to date in the popular automotive culture despite never having won a major race. In fact the Blower Bentley was the brainchild of “Bentley Boy” Henry “Tim” Birkin, who was well-known for his never-ending quest for more power in his racers. Against W.O.’s express 58

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wishes, Birkin and his fellow Bentley Boy Woolf Barnato set up shop in Welwyn in 1929 to begin producing supercharged Bentleys, the first of which used crankshaft-driven blowers built by famed English engineer Charles Amherst Villiers. When Birkin was granted permission by Barnato – a multiple Le Mans winner and, not coincidentally, a part owner of Bentley – to enter a team in the French classic, albeit in a different class than the factory 6.6 L cars so as not to compete directly with

W.O. The effort ended badly; both of Birkin’s cars suffered blown engines, and W.O. was irate to learn that the cars’ appearance then obligated him to build another 50 supercharged cars for homologation. Designed to race at Le Mans, the most famous Blower Bentley, the Birkin Monoposto, actually scored the first win for a Blower Bentley on the Brooklands race track in 1930 and held the Brooklands speed record at 137.96 MPH from 1931 to 1934. That historic racer is recreated in the superb machine offered here,

ESTIMATE: $225,000 - $300,000

which is built on a Mark IV chassis and suspension and uses a multiplecarbureted Rolls Royce/Bentley eight cylinder engine in concert with a 4-speed transmission. The distinctive aluminum bodywork duplicates the Birkin Monoposto design as raced by Birkin at Brooklands. Titled as a 1931 Bentley, this unique Le Mans Special beautifully evokes the spirit of the Bentley Boys era.


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LOT

S143

1960 PORSCHE 356B REUTTER CABRIOLET

MATCHING NUMBERS 1600CC ENGINE, PROFESSIONAL RESTORATION, PORSCHE CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY

F

irst introduced in 1948 and produced until 1965, the Porsche 356 established the marque as a serious sports car manufacturer with an unparalleled racing pedigree. Over 76,000 were built in that 18-year period; the 356 was succeeded by the 356A in 1954 and then the 356B in 1959, the vast majority using bodies built by Karosseriesfabrik Reutter & Co. of Stuttgart. Established in 1906, Reutter enjoyed a long association with Porsche that began in 1932 with the prewar VWs and continued until it was acquired by Porsche in 1963. Production of this 1960 Porsche 356B

Reutter Cabriolet was completed on June 14, 1960. A complete rotisserie restoration was begun on the car in 2011 and completed in May 2013. No detail was left unattended; new floor pans were installed while retaining the original engine cover, trunk lid and other sheet metal. The matching numbers 1,600cc flat-4 engine, transaxle and front and rear suspension were all rebuilt, and the car was finished correctly according to the Porsche Certificate of Authenticity in rare Aetna Blue paint purchased from renowned Porsche experts Willhoit

SERIAL NO. 153669 ESTIMATE: $145,000 - $160,000

Porsche Restoration of Long Beach, California. The car’s Light Grey interior is also factory correct. It is fitted with a Blaupunkt 3-band AM/ FM/short wave radio and a rare and desirable VDM steering wheel, and shows the same excellent fit and finish as the exterior body panels. This desirable Reutter Cabriolet has been driven fewer than 100 miles since the completion of the restoration. It is offered with the Porsche Certificate of Authenticity, a tool kit and restoration receipts.

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LOT

S144

1969 FORD MUSTANG BOSS 429 FASTBACK KK #1687, VERY ORIGINAL CAR DELIVERED NEW IN LAFAYETTE CALIFORNIA

B

y the late '60s Detroit’s muscle cars were in open competition on the streets and race tracks of America. In NASCAR, Ford’s solution to stiff competition from Chrysler’s Hemi was a new 429 CI engine featuring hemispherical combustion chambers and huge valves to improve breathing. Rather than installing the new engine in the midsize Torino, Ford chose to homologate the 429 in the Mustang, in the process creating the ultimate “pony car.” Specially built and heavily modified by Kar Kraft of Brighton, Michigan, the resulting Boss 429 is widely regarded today 62

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as one of the rarest and most aweinspiring Mustangs ever built. Kar Kraft number 1687, this extremely original early production 1969 Boss 429 was built on April 10, 1969 and was sold new by Lafayette Auto Sales Co. in Lafayette, California, on May 13, 1969 to a San Francisco attorney. According to its accompanying Marti Report, it was finished in Royal Maroon with Black Clarion Knit Vinyl Hi-Back Bucket seats, a 3.91 Traction-Lok rear axle ratio, and a four-speed close ratio manual transmission. Other optional features on this well-equipped Boss 429 included

the Visibility Group, E70-14 raised White letter belted tires, power front disc brakes, power steering, Deluxe Interior Decor Group, center console, AM radio, deluxe belts and warning light, color-keyed racing mirrors, competition suspension, functional front air spoiler and a trunk-mounted battery. Given its limited production run, the Boss 429 was and remains a tremendously desirable muscle car. With unparalleled presence and performance, it is certainly one of the most enduring performance icons ever to come out of Detroit.

SERIAL NO. 9F02Z172957 ESTIMATE: $225,000 - $250,000


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LOT S145

1964 SHELBY 289 INDEPENDENT COMPETITION COBRA

CSX2487, 1ST IN CLASS AND 4TH OVERALL AT LAGUNA SECA IN 1967


LOT S145

1964 SHELBY 289 INDEPENDENT COMPETITION COBRA 1ST IN CLASS AND 4TH OVERALL AT LAGUNA SECA IN 1967 CHASSIS NO. CSX2487 ESTIMATE: AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

T

he Shelby Registry historically has made a distinction between official Shelby team racers and Cobras campaigned in competition by privateer owners, referring to the latter as Independent Competition Cobras. This 1964 Shelby Cobra 289, s/n CSX2487, began its well-documented independent racing career after its first owner returned it to the dealer within a couple of months as being “too much to handle.” CSX2487 was invoiced to Shelby American on July 9, 1964 and shipped aboard the SS Loch Gowan to Los Angeles, where it was ordered by Hayward Ford Motors with Class A accessories (minus Whitewall tires) a luggage rack, antifreeze and freight for a total of $5,501.55. It was purchased by L.G. Sullivan and registered with the Black plate “MKE 868.” After Sullivan returned the car in late 1964 it was purchased by Dick Pichinino, who arranged financing through the Lockheed Credit Union after convincing management – with considerable difficulty – that the Cobra was indeed a “bona fide automobile.” After painting the car White, Pichinino modified it for autocrossing, a hobby both he and his wife pursued enthusiastically for the next two years. During that time CSX2487 acquired its first important modification when Pichinino, searching for heavy duty competition wheels, learned of a set 66

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of American Racing 5-spoke wheels custom made for the late Shelby driver Ken Miles, who unfortunately never picked them up. Pichinino bought the wheels and mounted them on 2487 using custom adapters. Consistent success on the autocross circuit led Pichinino to turn his eye to the more challenging and competitive road racing arena. The 289 was bal-

anced and blueprinted and fitted with roller rockers, oversized valves, Weber downdraft carburetors and Nassau headers with straight-through side pipes. Shot-peened and balanced halfshafts were installed and 3.77 and 4.10 gearsets procured; larger brake cylinders, Koni shocks, sway bars and other mods were added and the car was lowered. Finished in White with

a wide Blue stripe, the newly prepared Cobra was completed with flared fenders, a hood scoop, racing windscreen and driver’s roll bar. Beginning in late 1967 and continuing through 1969, Pichinino raced the car mostly at Cotati, Laguna Seca and Sears Point, always with the then-popular phrase “Here Come Da Judge” splashed across the rear fenders.


CSX2487 compiled an admirable record as an independent racer. It won first place in A/Sports Racing at Laguna Seca with Al Norman at the wheel, showed well against professional competition in the inaugural Sears Point event in April 1969. Later that season again at Sears Point, Pichinino drove the car to 1st in class and 4th overall after starting 12th on the grid; at Cotati he took 2487 to a documented 165 MPH. Throughout that time he also used it for the commute to the office, later declaring in a 2004 interview that he would “drive it to work on Thursday and win races with it on the weekends.” A close encounter with a Porsche at Sears Point put 2487 in the wall, injuring driver Al Norman and prompting Pichinino to retire the car from competition.

After a period of storage, Pichinino began restoring the car, which he had stripped down to its component parts. In 1989 it was purchased in its unassembled state by Scott McCluskey of Dubuque, Iowa, through Stauffer Classics of Wisconsin, then by Johnson Autohaus of Minnesota, who sold it to collector and vintage racer Robert Bodin of Wayzata, Minnesota. Bodin completed a comprehensive and fully documented restoration, during which time SAAC board member Rand E. Bailey convinced him to retain the Cobra’s original aluminum body – complete with evidence of its altercation with the Porsche at Sears Point – to maintain the car’s integrity. After a series of business setbacks, Bodin reluctantly decided to sell 2487, S AT U R DAY

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advertising the car in December 1991 as “Best in the World, Independent Comp. Car.” Resplendent in Guardsman Blue with White stripes, 7.5- and 9.5-inch Halibrand wheels, FIA scoop, quick jacks and updated racing equipment, the car was purchased by noted Midwest vintage racer John Constable, who maintained it in immaculate condition while competing at Road America, Black Hawk and the Milwaukee Mile.

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Among its many public appearances, in 1994 it took 1st in class at the SAAC Northwood Region time trials; in 1997 it earned a Gold Standard award with a score of 438.5 of 450 points, and at SAAC 28 in Nashville, Tennessee, it won the People’s Choice Award. Its next owner, Mike Henneberry of Watertown, Wisconsin, purchased 2487 in June 2002. One of a rare few Competition Cobras still with the orig-

inal body, it exudes the air of a proud old warrior whose glory days included feasting on Corvettes and putting paid to Ferrari’s dominance in sports racing, with the scars to prove it; and yet it remains impeccable in presentation. Long a crowd pleaser at Road America, select shows and SAAC meetings, Henneberry declares that of his personal collection of the best sports cars of the 1960s, CSX2487 is at “the top

of the food chain.” This documented Independent Competition Cobra is accompanied by important historical artifacts including the aforementioned “Ken Miles Mags,” and period photographs from the 1960s.


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S146

1967 CHEVROLET YENKO SUPER CAMARO 450

YS739 DICK HARRELL CONVERSION, ONE OF THE MOST DOCUMENTED 1967 YENKOS OF ONLY 10 KNOWN TO EXIST

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fter years in obscurity, this 1967 Chevrolet Yenko Super Camaro 450, number YS739 and one of only 10 known, is one of the most well-documented Yenkos in existence. It was reintroduced to the world at the 2008 Forge Invitational Muscle Car Classic in Kingsport, Tennessee, as a prize “barn find.” Unrestored and painted Red, the car was a product of the collaboration between Don Yenko and drag racer Dick Harrell, whose Kansas City Performance Center handled the conversion of factory-built SS396 Camaros into L72 427/450 HP-powered Yenko stormers. After its Forge debut 70

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the car was completely refurbished over the following year by its owner, restoration specialist Mike Slaughter, who was amazed to discover it intact and unmodified, a true wonder given that most Harrell-built Yenkos were changed to one extent or another for drag racing. Heads-up competition was clearly the purpose of the Yenko-Harrell conversion; beyond the switch to L72 power, this Yenko 427 Camaro used Mickey Thompson tube headers, Traction Master traction bars, an R/C bellhousing, a fiberglass Stinger hood with hold-down pins, Stewart Warner

tach and gauges, Autolite plugs and wires and “427” exterior badges. Purchased new at Burt Chevrolet in Englewood, Colorado, on August 1, 1967, the car was originally finished in Butternut Yellow with a standard Black interior. Mike Slaughter, an automotive paint rep who well knows how to use his products, resprayed the car with award-winning skill in his own shop using BASF Glasurit paint. The car retains its original quarter panels, roof and floor pans, with NOS sheet metal only used where necessary. Dean Davis of Moline, Illinois, built up the 427 CI engine using all the

SERIAL NO. 124377N241669 ESTIMATE: $350,000 - $400,000

correct pieces, most importantly the correct-code Holley 3910 780 CFM 4-barrel carburetor, achieving a dynotested 500 HP; a Muncie-shifted M21 4-speed and 12-bolt 4.10 Positraction rear end complete the driveline. Since its completion by Slaughter in 2009, this rare machine has received Legends Certification from the American Camaro Association; the Muscle Car and Corvette Nationals Day Two Concours Diamond Award and Chevy VetteFest Gold Spinner Concours honors with 998 of 1,000 points. It was chosen as a finalist for the GoodGuys Muscle Car of the Year award


in Kansas City in 2009 and Loveland, Colorado, in 2010 and won Best Paint in the Super Chevy Gold Class in both 2010 and 2011. Featured in the April 2010 issue of Muscle Car Enthusiast and The Complete Book of Camaro by David Newhardt, the car was praised by Super Chevy Magazine as “one of the rarest and most valuable Yenko Super Camaros in existence.” Most importantly for one of only 10 remaining 1967 Yenko 450 Super Camaros, this legacy muscle car is fully documented. It was “certified original” by Larry Christensen, who issued complete inspection reports both during and after the restoration. It is accompanied with the labor invoice from Dick Harrell to Yenko, an invoice from the sale of the car by Yenko to Burt Chevrolet and two copies of parts invoices from Yenko.

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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

LOT

S146.1

1958 PORSCHE 356A SPEEDSTER RACE CAR CHASSIS NO. 84333, OWNED BY PETER AND CHERYL DUNKEL FOR THE PAST 25 YEARS

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hen Max Hoffman, the lone American importer of Porsches, suggested the company could significantly improve sales by offering a more stripped-down, performance-oriented and affordable version of the 356 Cabriolet, he had no idea that the resulting Speedster model would become one of the most iconic and frequently replicated cars in history. Introduced in 1954, the Speedster differed from the 356 Cabriolet by specifying lightweight bucket seats with fixed back rests, a quickly detachable cut-down windscreen, removable side curtains and a rudimentary top. A heater and

tachometer were specified as optional equipment. All Speedsters were built at the Reutter coachbuilding facility in Zuffenhausen. Even before photos ran in magazines of James Dean racing his with the SCCA (not to mention on the public roads of Los Angeles), Speedsters had already become the must-have sports car. This 1958 356A chassis 84333 is a prime example of a T2 series vehicle, considered by many enthusiasts as the most attractive and desirable off all Speedsters. Respected Porsche collectors Peter and Cheryl Dunkel have owned and campaigned the car

SERIAL NO. 84333 ESTIMATE: $225,000 - $275,000

for over 25 years. Logging impressive results with numerous racing clubs across the country and exhibiting ongoing investment in engine and chassis development, 84333 is recognized as one of the most competitive and best track-prepared 356s in the world. It stands in turn-key, race-ready condition and is eligible for most appropriate class competition in major events. Capable of catching and passing many larger displacement vehicles in faster classes, it is a perfectly balanced vehicle ready to take checkered flags and earn concours ribbons. S AT U R DAY

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LOT

S147

1971 DODGE HEMI CHALLENGER R/T

SERIAL NO. JS23R1B242313

ORIGINAL 426/425 HP HEMI, 4-SPEED, ONE OF ONLY SIX KNOWN REMAINING EXAMPLES FACTORY FINISHED IN BLACK

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t took five long years for Chrysler to respond to the Ford Mustang with the E-body Cuda and Challenger, but the wait was worth it to many Mopar fans when they saw the new lineup included the mother of all street engines, the 426/425 HP Hemi V-8. Hemi Challengers were exceedingly rare; this 1971 Hemi Challenger R/T, an original example with complete documented owner history, is one of just 70 built and one of only 49 known extant today. It is one of just six remaining examples factory finished in Black and, remarkably, it is also the only one known to still

wear its original factory paint. The car was purchased new by a Joplin, Missouri, speed shop owner who displayed the car to attract customers; perhaps its most interesting owner was Susan Willey of Ohio, who bought the car in 1979, racing it at local tracks and maintaining it herself until selling it in 1993. Since then it has been stored and carefully maintained in Arizona’s car-friendly climes. Along with the standard R/T features that include high backed bucket seats, Rallye instruments and heavy duty suspension and brakes, this exceptionally rare original Hemi

ESTIMATE: $300,000 - $400,000

Challenger is equipped with its original drivetrain. The 426 Hemi engine was rebuilt in 2003 and is backed by a 4-speed manual transmission and the A34 Track-Pack Dana 60 rear end with 3.54 Sure Grip differential. It also retains the original interior, glass, seats, headliner, and carpeting. Showing fewer than 64,000 miles, this highly original Hemi Challenger is a prime candidate for any great Mopar collection.

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LOT

S148

1936 CORD 810 SPORTSMAN

SERIAL NO. 8102386

LYCOMING 288 CI V-8, 4-SPEED MANUAL, FRONT WHEEL DRIVE, COMPLETE RESTORATION

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egal styling and mechanical innovation made the Cord 810/812 automobiles the equivalent of automotive royalty, presenting a distinct departure from established conventions of styling and mechanical engineering. Errett Lobban Cord, head of the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg juggernaut, wanted to position an ACD car between the ever-popular Auburn and the majestic Duesenberg models. His first effort, the magnificently styled and innovative L-29, sold over 4,000 units before production finally succumbed to the economic depression caused by the stock market

crash of 1929. That looked to put an end to the Cord brand name, but E.L. Cord would not relent, and designer Gordon Beurhig pencilled the gorgeous 810, basing it on a design originally intended as a “junior” Duesenberg. The new Cord’s most obvious strength was its innovative styling, which capitalized on the car’s Miller-inspired combination of front wheel drive and independent front suspension for its ground-hugging stance and streamlined appearance, both properties well demonstrated by this rare and beautiful 1936 Cord 810 Sportsman. Built on a 125-inch

ESTIMATE: $175,000 - $215,000

wheelbase, the front wheel drive Cord’s list of innovations is highlighted by the 2-barrel Lycoming 288 CI V-8 engine under its streamlined “coffin-nose” bodywork, which also featured pontoon fenders, a hidden gas cap, hideaway headlights and tapering contours. This convertible coupe’s Maroon finish is highlighted by chromed bumpers and wheel covers and complemented by a Black leather interior incorporating needle gauges on an engine-turned bezel and an electric pre-select shifter on the steering column. S AT U R DAY

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S148.1

1932 HUPP COMET #4 INDY CAR

SOLD ON BILL OF SALE ESTIMATE: $350,000 - $400,000

DRIVEN TO 5TH PLACE AT THE 1932 INDIANAPOLIS 500 BY RUSS SNOWBERGER

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ussell Snowberger isn’t the household name of some of his contemporaries, even among fans of the era’s racing. But as anyone who drove against the builder/driver could attest, he was among the best who ever raced and a fixture of Indy Car racing for more than 50 years. He started racing in 1921 at age 20, on the dirt tracks of Mid-Atlantic fairgrounds, but quickly graduated to higher levels of competition. By 1928, he had joined the American Automobile Association and qualified for the Indianapolis 500 in a Marmon. He led that race for four laps before retiring 78

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with supercharger failure, but he was back every year for the next 14 races. Snowberger’s immense skill-he landed in pole position for 1931--could have landed him a ride with any of the large teams of the era, but instead, he resolutely pursued his own course, with homebuilt race cars that proved every bit the equal of the mighty Studebakers, Duesenbergs and Millers of the era. For the 1932 race, he did have sponsorship, of a sort, as Hupmobile wanted to field an entry and convinced Snowberger to remove the Studebaker engine from his

1931 chassis, and replace it with a quad-carbureted Hupmobile Eight stamped HC001 that Snowberger prepared for the race himself. The Hupmobile Comet improved Snowberger’s qualifying speed by 2 MPH over the prior year and he started in fourth position. He finished 200 laps on the lead lap and tied for his best ever-finish, fifth place and an average speed of 100.791 mph. He finished the season fourth in points overall. Despite the fantastic result, Hupp ran out of sponsorship money and in 1932 Snowberger returned the race engine (the only Hupmobile engine

to run the Indy 500) and other parts. Hupmobile sold the engine in 1933, and it ended up in the famous Bonneville Hupp, a speedster which hit 146 MPH at Bonneville. Many years later, Russell Snowberger’s son John, with an understandable interest in vintage race cars, resurrected the Comet around the original Hupp engine that finished the 1932 Indianapolis 500 race. After completing a restoration (one of two of his father’s cars he restored), John Snowberger returned with his own son to Indy in 2009. Together, they ran Russ Snowberger’s Hupmobile Comet at


the Brickyard in the parade before the race, 77 years after its last run there. For five years straight starting in 1930, Russell Snowberger finished in the top five at Indy, every one of those in a homebuilt car. Ira “Cotter Pin” Vail was asked in Automobile Quarterly to name the five best drivers, in ability, against whom he had driven. He listed Louis Chevrolet, Tommy Milton, Ralph DePalma, Frank Lockhart and "my fifth one will surprise you, because I have to include Russ Snowberger due to his great mechanical ability. As a mechanic-driver, he was the best.”

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LOT

S149

2008 MERCEDES-BENZ SLR McLAREN ROADSTER PRESENTED IN AS-NEW CONDITION WITH ONLY 145 MILES

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he 2008 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Roadster can rightly be described as an encore performance that was worth the fifty-year-plus wait. The SLR name refers to the heralded days of the 1950s when M-B sports cars and Grand Prix racers dominated racing with Juan Manuel Fangio and Stirling Moss at the controls and the equally legendary Alfred Neubauer managing the team, while the McLaren aspect is a much more recent contribution reflecting the intimate co-operation between the two parties in modernday Formula 1. Most notably, the SLR

McLaren is a marvel of carbon fiber engineering processes that allow the most extensive use of the space-age material in any production car made to date, resulting in low weight, extremely high torsional stiffness, occupant safety and outstanding ride characteristics. The SLR McLaren follows the blueprint established by its Fifties progenitors, combining Formula 1-inspired styling and mechanical engineering with unparalleled interior accommodations. The car’s hand assembled supercharged and intercooled 5.5 liter 617 HP V-8 engine rockets it to 60 MPH in 3.6

seconds and a top speed of 207 MPH with an assist from the paddle-shifted, electronically controlled AMG Speedshift R five-speed automatic transmission. Exclusive standard equipment includes fully leather-upholstered carbon-fibre bucket seats; dual-zone automatic air-conditioning; a highquality BOSE premium sound system; a multifunction sport steering wheel with gear-change paddles, and a navigation system with integral radio and CD player. With an original MSRP of over $500,000, this 2008 SLR McLaren Roadster has been driven a mere 145 miles since new.

SERIAL NO. WDDAK76F48M001617 ESTIMATE: $325,000 - $350,000

Stunningly as-new in every detail, it features rare non-metalllic Pure Black paint, 19-inch Turbine wheels, XL dirver and passenger seats, and it comes complete with the original car cover, hand books and Carfax

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LOT S150

1938/39 DELAGE D8-120 AÉROSPORT COUPE COACHWORK BY LeTOURNEUR et MARCHAND


LOT S150

1938/39 DELAGE D8-120 AÉROSPORT COUPE COACHWORK BY LeTOURNEUR et MARCHAND CHASSIS NO. 51617 | ENGINE NO. 51617 ESTIMATE: $2,950,000 - $3,500,000

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mperious and strong-willed, Louis Delage ran his automobile company from its founding in 1905 to its liquidation at the height of the Great Depression with unbending authority. The graduate of the École Nationale d’Arts et Métiers spent two years at Peugeot before starting his own Paris firm in partnership with fellow engineer Augustin Legros. Delage pioneered the exploitation of racing success to sell cars, first earning national acclaim by taking 2nd place at the 1906 Coupe des Voiturettes de L’Auto. Rapid expansion followed. Bolstered by wartime profits, Automobiles Delage emerged from WWI poised to establish a line of luxury automobiles and to maximize sales with more racing victories. After winning the 1927 Grand Prix World Championship at almost crippling expense, Delage turned his attention to producing beautifully engineered chassis and drivetrains clothed by Europe’s leading coachbuilders and prized by such owners as entertainer Josephine Baker and Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie. By the 1930s the majestic French marque was hemorrhaging both money and disaffected talent, and in 1935 Delage was forced to liquidate its assets, which were eventually purchased by Delahaye. The first new design of the Delahaye era, the D8120, was also the most memorable. 84

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A Delage Company file photo of 51617. Image from same photoshoot featured on page 105 of Richard S. Adatto and Diana E. Meredith's "Delage Styling and Design"

Built on a Delahaye chassis, the D8120 was the only 8-cylinder-powered car in the entire Delage-Delahaye range. Its chromed flex-pipe exhaust system, sweeping voluptuousness and regal countenance made it the belle of the Concours d’Elegance circuit and an immortal classic, once again attracting the ministrations of the top designers, most notably LeTourneur

et Marchand, who created the elegant Aerosport coupe offered here. Long considered the most attractive design in Delage history, the Aerosport was the work of the brilliant Marcel LeTourneur, who today ranks alongside the renowned Jean Bugatti as one of the greatest young French designers of the 1930s. Just 12 Aerosport coupes were built (not counting

the less attractive notchback coupes), all featuring long hoods, flowing fenders and a unique roof design incorporating dramatic downwardsweeping pillarless side windows. At almost 18 feet in length, the Aerosport was a large but beautifully styled and proportioned automobile whose lightweight alloy body easily enabled prolonged cruising at highway speeds.


The final iteration of the Aerosport, design number 5941, was reserved for this car, chassis number 51617. A late Series 2 car with a lower roofline, it is the 11th built of the series of 12 cars, eight of which remain extant today. Recently imported from Copenhagen by a Sarasota, Florida, museum, its entire history and ownership are very well chronicled.

Ordered by French aviation pioneer and manufacturer Felix Amiot, the car was delivered to LeTourneur et Marchand on February 1, 1939 and completed later that spring. At the beginning of the German occupation in June 1940 the car was requisitioned by the Wehrmacht for a German officer and sent to occupied Denmark in September 1940. After Denmark’s S AT U R DAY

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51617 offered for sale at Count Schulin's DAPA Company before being sold to Hans Jorgen Beier in 1956, who would own it for the next 57 years.

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liberation in May 1945 the car was confiscated by the newly re-established Danish government, where it assigned a new documented title number D838120 with engine number 51617 (both remaining with car today) and sold it to national resistance hero Jens Lillelund. It passed then to Danish industrialist Knud Vilhelm Count Schulin, who demonstrated the Aerosport’s performance when he almost succeeded in outrunning the police on his way to catching a ferry; the incident, which ended with a record-setting fine, was reported in the national media, immortalizing both the Aerosport and its driver in Danish automotive lore. The Count’s company, DAPA, manufactured heavy truck trailers; the Delage was parked outside a DAPA factory with a “For Sale” sign when it was discovered by its next owner, prominent Copenhagen attorney Hans Jorgen Beier in 1956. Beier had the somewhat run-down Delage fully restored in 1957, and again in a two-year project completed in 1999. A most enthusiastic owner and caretaker, Mr. Beier amassed a huge collection of handbooks, instruction manuals and historic marque information, all of which accompany the car. After 57 years of single ownership, in 2013 the car was imported directly to Florida, where it was rallied and shown at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in non-judged display-only status. Always carefully maintained, this magnificent French automotive objet d’art still presents in excellent condition today. S AT U R DAY

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LOT

S151

1954 JAGUAR XK120SE ROADSTER

SERIAL NO. S673642

MATCHING NUMBERS 3.4 LITER SIX CYLINDER ENGINE, COMPLETE PROFESSIONAL RESTORATION

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ew cars are as widely recognized throughout the world decades after the end of their production life as Jaguar’s XK series of sports cars, and yet it is often forgotten that these wonderful machines were created almost incidentally, to promote an engine that had been designed for Jaguar’s larger passenger cars. Work had begun during the war on a new engine platform that had as its main target excellent breathing. After smaller displacement XF and XG experimental engines came the four and six cylinder XJ units and, finally, the 3.4L XK twin overhead cam inline-6,

which was finalized in 1948. The MkVIII saloon for which it was intended was still a full two years away from production, so Jaguar decided to introduce the engine in a lightweight production sports car. When the aluminum bodied XK120 debuted at the 1948 London Motor Show it became an instant sensation whose impact was furthered by early race wins, many of them scored by young British racing star Stirling Moss. This exemplary 1954 Jaguar XK120SE has been driven a mere 2,000 miles since a complete professional restoration. A matching numbers example in excep-

ESTIMATE: $100,000 - $130,000

tional condition, it features beautiful Red paint over excellent bodywork, complete new Grey leather upholstery and restored gauges. The canvas top, frame and latches are all new, as are the tonneau cover, storage bags and windows and chromed wire wheels. Superbly presented throughout, this XK120SE also boasts the SE-spec engine with dual exhaust and higher power output, making it the best performer in the XK120 range.

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S152

2006 FORD GT

SERIAL NO. 1FAFP90S46Y41286

DRIVEN 46 MILES SINCE NEW, ONE YEAR ONLY TUNGSTEN GRAY, ALL PAPERWORK INCLUDED

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orn at the dawn of Ford’s Total Performance program in the early 1960s, the Ford GT40 wiped away 20 years of international racing dominance by Ferrari and established the Blue Oval as the new power on the world’s race tracks. The 427-powered GT40 MkII racers finished 1-2-3 at Le Mans in 1966, beginning a four-year winning streak at the Circuit de la Sarthe and a drought for Ferrari in the 24-hour classic race that continues to this day. When it came time for Ford designers and engineers to create a supercar for the 21st century, they turned to the GT40 for their inspiration. The

result was the sensational Ford GT, a low production supercar that picked up where the GT40 left off as the culmination of Ford’s world-beating engineering prowess. This 2006 Ford GT is a rare limited edition Tungsten Grey model built to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Ford’s historic 1966 Le Mans victory. First shown in 2004 on Ford’s “Performance Trilogy” show cars – the Ford GT, the Shelby Cobra roadster concept and the new 2005 Mustang GT – the color was a hit with customers attending that year’s North American International Auto Show, prompting its choice for

ESTIMATE: $275,000 - $300,000

the Le Mans commemorative model. The most remarkable feature of this ultimate Ford, however, is its odometer reading of just 45.8 careful oneowner miles that makes it one of the lowest-mileage examples available. Powered by Ford’s superb 5.4L/550 HP supercharged V-8 and 6-speed manual gearbox, the car is truly “new in the wrapper” and equipped with a McIntosh sound system and BBS forged alloy wheels. Included with the car will be the window sticker, hang tags, GT books, sales brochure poster, a trickle charger and fitted car cover. S AT U R DAY

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LOT

S153

1961 PORSCHE 356 CABRIOLET

SERIAL NO. 159595

MATCHING NUMBERS 1600CC FOUR CYLINDER ENGINE, 4-SPEED MANUAL TRANSMISSION

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he final iteration of Porsche’s landmark 356 appeared in 1963 at the now-traditional Frankfurt Auto Show. Step by step over fifteen years the 356 had gone from a rather rudimentary device to a fully realized sporting machine of unparalleled refinement and quality. As always, few alterations were evident in its appearance, which included the previous T6 changes that included a larger glass area and fender-located fuel filler. The interior showed small but important detail changes, involving such items as new lever-type heater controls to replace the former VW-like control

knob and deeper, more form-fitting bucket seats and, in the coupe, an even larger back window. The most important mechanical update was 4-wheel disc brakes used on the Carrera 2 and identified by a new wheel design and specific hubcaps. Enthusiasts welcomed this new feature, which brought the 356’s stopping capabilities more in line with its increasing speed potential. Engine choices were simplified to the standard 1600S, the 1600SC replacing the Super 90 and the overhead cam Carrera 2. This 1964 356C Cabriolet is powered by a matching numbers 1600cc motor and

ESTIMATE: $140,000 - $180,000

possesses all the features and modern comforts of the most driver friendly of the open 356 models. In addition it features the same White paint worn by the last 356 – also a Cabriolet – to leave the assembly line in September 1963.

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LOT S154

1930 DUESENBERG MODEL J TORPEDO PHAETON

UTILIZED AS A LIMOUSINE BY E.L. CORD’S WIFE, UPGRADED COACHWORK BY FRAN ROXAS


LOT S154

1930 DUESENBERG MODEL J TORPEDO PHAETON UTILIZED AS A LIMOUSINE BY E.L. CORD’S WIFE, UPGRADED COACHWORK BY FRAN ROXAS CHASSIS NO. 2276 ESTIMATE: $850,000 - $1,000,000

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red and August Duesenberg were already renowned race car and engine builders when they founded the Duesenberg Motor Company in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1913. After relocating to a larger facility in New Jersey in 1917, the Duesenbergs built a special 16-cylinder engine to propel a Land Speed Record car to an amazing 158 MPH at Daytona Beach. The following year they designed and built a Bugattiinspired 180 CI inline-8 engine using a single overhead camshaft and three valves per cylinder, which in 1921 powered the only American car ever to win the French Grand Prix. Duesenberg racers won the Indianapolis 500 three times in a four-year period ending in 1927, by which time the company had been purchased by E.L. Cord. Cord’s plan for his new acquisition was to capitalize on the Duesenberg brand and engineering acumen to produce “The World’s Finest Motor Car.” That grand goal was realized when the new Duesenberg J was unveiled at the 1928 New York Auto Show. Bearing engine number J-255 and serial number 2276, this 1930 Duesenberg Model J was originally fashioned with Judkins Company limousine coachwork and delivered new to William Sandow. Duesenberg owner and historian Randy Ema has confirmed that by 1935 the car was used by E.L. Cord’s wife before it 96

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was purchased in 1937 by John W. de Noira, whose Pacific Auto Rental in Hollywood had become a major source of rental cars for the booming movie industry. As a result, this Model J is perhaps the most filmed of any Duesenberg, having appeared in at least 14 Hollywood productions, including The Great McGinty (1940), Pocketful of Miracles (1951), Al Capone (1955), Party Girl (1958), Howard Hughes (1977), The Gangster Chronicles (1981) and City Heat (1984). In 1985 it was purchased from Pacific Auto Rental by Fred


and Dave Weber, who commissioned the highly respected award-winning coachbuilder and restorer Fran Roxas of Chicago to upgrade the coachwork in the style of a Walker LaGrande Torpedo Phaeton while retaining its complete rolling chassis, drivetrain and numbered firewall. The car has resided with a series of owners; it was also once a part of the famed Blackhawk Collection. In 2007 it became part of a noted North East collection, where it received comprehensive detail work that included replacing the Black cloth top and improving the fit of the rear windows. In the last decade it has made numerous show appearances to wide acclaim, winning the title of “Most Outstanding Open Car, 1921-1930” at the 2008

Greenwich Concours d’Elegance. A genuine American classic with a wellestablished history and outstanding provenance, this 1930 Duesenberg Model J is an exquisite machine that perfectly embodies Fred Duesenberg’s and E.L. Cord’s original concept of “The World’s Finest Motorcar.”

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S155

1957 PORSCHE 356A SPEEDSTER

SERIAL NO. 83769

1600CC MOTOR BUILT BY 356 SPECIALIST STEVE SCHMIDT, EQUIPPED WITH WEBER CARBURETORS

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orsche’s timeless 356 Speedster was everything Max Hoffman envisioned in a car literally made for American-style sports car racing. This 1957 example offers more power and performance than was even available when it was built, while still remaining true to its rich Porsche heritage. The car combines show-quality presentation and appeal with extremely solid mechanicals in what the owner describes as “the ultimate driver’s Speedster.” Ruby Red paintwork compliments a Black vinyl trimmed cabin fitted with proper German-made square weave carpet98

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ing and Coco mats over rubbers. All instruments have been rebuilt and calibrated. A Nardi wood rimmed steering wheel and shifter knob are pleasant accents. Weather equipment includes a high bow Haartz cloth top with side curtains and a full tonneau cover with half-zip for touring or open storage. Performance is provided by a solid 1600cc engine build by highly respected 356 specialist Steve Schmidt in 1997. Schmidt added Weber carburetors for increased power; since then the drivetrain has served fewer than 10,000 miles. The 356C-type disc brakes were properly retrofitted for

better stopping ability, and covered with 5½ x 15 inch painted wheels and crested hub caps. The electrical system was also updated to a modern 12-volt using an Optima battery, Y&Z wire loom and compatible lights, signals and switches. The tool kit, jack and spare are all included. Past awards include a score of 322.6 in Concours judging at the Central Coast Region 2007 Concours at the Coast and an Exterior 69.6/70 – Interior 59.6/ 60 during the 2009 Wash and Shine. A prime candidate for shows, tours, rallies and even vintage racing, this Speedster is an absolute thrill and

ESTIMATE: $180,000 - $225,000

will be accompanied with its Porsche Certificate of Authenticity.


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This corpo car repres rate ra e ce tea nts the b m e Follow made the sponsors ginning o h f decisi Corve ing Gulf on toip when the Gulf Oil's tte, it 's in go rac co c r w e i e d n Ford G n i g. mpany T40s t on to spble succe and th s o e Porsnsor the fs with th che 91 amous e 7 Mira G ge. ulf

LOT S156

1961 CHEVROLET CORVETTE GULF RACE CAR BACK-TO-BACK SCCA B-PRODUCTION NATIONAL CHAMPION IN 1961 AND 1962


LOT S156

1961 CHEVROLET CORVETTE GULF RACE CAR BACK-TO-BACK SCCA B-PRODUCTION CHAMPION IN 1961 AND 1962

SERIAL NO. 10867S105391 ESTIMATE: $1,350,000 - $1,750,000

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ack-to-back SCCA B-Production National Champion in 1961 and 1962, this Gulf Oil-sponsored 1961 Corvette was the most dominant Corvette racer of its time and the first formally sponsored Corvette champion, winning almost every race it entered. It is one of two delivered by Yenko Chevrolet to the legendary Grady Davis, who ordered them equipped with the RPO354 fuel-injected 283/315 HP engine, Borg Warner 4-speed transmission, Positraction rear end, heavy duty brakes and suspension and quick steering adapter. Both cars were then prepared with the so-called Sebring Racing Package, which was supplied courtesy of Zora Arkus Duntov and consisted of a 37-gallon fiberglass fuel tank, hood louvers, headlamp covers, and auxiliary front anti-sway bar. The Gulf Corvette made its competition debut on March 25, 1961 at the Sebring 12 Hours driven by Don Yenko and Ben Moore, who took it to 3rd place in the GT 3000 class. Yenko followed that up with consecutive SCCA B-Production victories at Virginia, Cumberland, Bridgehampton, Dunkirk, and Lime Rock. The Gulf Corvette’s record was interrupted in July at the Meadowdale National, where it was discovered under protest to have an aluminum flywheel, an oversight resulting from its preparation for FIA competition. The SCCA 102

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penalized Yenko, suspending him from competition for six months. Having invested the full might of Gulf Oil’s Research and Development arm in the car’s success, Grady Davis immediately turned to “The Flying Dentist,” Corvette specialist Dr. Dick Thompson, who followed Davis’ instructions to “win every race here on” for the B-Production championship with victories at Bridgehampton, Indianapolis, Thompson, Road America and Watkins Glen. Yenko was still on probation when the 1962 season began with the Marlboro “Refrigerator Bowl” in January, and Davis had assigned Dick Thompson to drive the new 327-powered A-Production Gulf Oil Corvette. Ben Moore took over for Yenko, beating Bruce Jennings’ potent Porsche 356 Carrera to take 3rd place overall. Yenko returned to the driver’s seat in February 1962 and at season’s end was crowned the SCCA B/Production champion for the second consecutive year. This historically significant racing Corvette made an astounding 11 trips to victory lane in its pursuit of the SCCA B-Production National Championship. It was discovered in 1990 and meticulously restored to its 1961 Sebring configuration by noted photographer and author Richard Prince. It has since won the NCRS American Heritage Award, was part of the Bloomington Gold Special Collection and has been inducted into the Bloomington Gold Hall of Fame. It received its latest award in 2013 when it was inducted into the Bloomington Gold Great Hall. S AT U R DAY

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S157

1969 SHELBY GT500 FASTBACK

SERIAL NO. 9F02R482095

FORMERLY OWNED BY CARROLL SHELBY FROM 1999-2000, DOCUMENTED WITH THE SHELBY INVOICE AND ORDER FORM

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y 1969 the Shelby GT had made the full transformation from hard-edged, scrappy SCCA rocket to a refined performer whose stillconsiderable muscle – in both small and big block configuration – was accompanied by a high level of trim and a fulsome list of options that included a decidedly vibrant color pallette. As remarkable as it seems looking back from the present with a muscle car lover’s nostalgia, only 18 1969 Shelby GT500 coupes were factory finished in this car’s stunning Grabber Yellow paint. Even more noteworthy is its provenance, which includes owner-

ship by the man who created the legend, Carroll Shelby. Fully documented, it features a matching numbers 428/335 HP Cobra Jet engine with a close ratio 4-speed transmission and 3.50 Traction-Lok rear axle, one of only three in this car’s combination of features. In 2003 the car showed just 4,317 miles on the odometer, and the Cobra Jet engine had just been rebuilt before the car’s purchase by its present owner. In the ten years since then, the owner has completely restored the car in nut-and-bolt fashion. Many original Ford OEM factory parts were found and used in the restoration of

ESTIMATE: $145,000 - $175,000

this car, which was brought as close to showroom condition as possible, including its Décor Group interior, Competition Suspension and Goodyear Polyglas GTs on Shelby wheels. In addition to paperwork dating back to 1969, the car is accompanied by a copy of the State of California Release of Liability buyer form signed off by Carroll Shelby, who purchased the car in 1999.

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LOT S158

1968 CHEVROLET CORVETTE L88 CONVERTIBLE ORIGINAL BORN-WITH L88 427/430 HP ENGINE, FRAME-OFF NABER BROTHERS RESTORATION


LOT S158

1968 CHEVROLET CORVETTE L88 CONVERTIBLE

ORIGINAL BORN-WITH L88 427/430 HP ENGINE, FRAME-OFF NABER BROTHERS RESTORATION SERIAL NO. 194678S419379 ESTIMATE: $750,000 - $850,000

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or three years from 1967 to 1969, the most powerful Chevrolet Corvette Regular Production Option available was the L88, a compendium of competition-oriented pieces headlined by the 427 CI aluminum-head V-8 engine packing forged steel crank and rods, forged aluminum 12.8:1 compression, a radical high lift cam actuating large valves and a single Holley 850 CFM 4-barrel carburetor on a dual plane aluminum intake manifold. The L88 leapt out of the gate with outstanding performances at Daytona, Sebring and Le Mans, where it set an all-time production class speed record. In a bold misdirection meant to discourage interest in the fire-breathing L88, Chevrolet rated the engine at 430 HP, five fewer than the Tri-Power equipped L71 at over twice the cost, in order to keep it out of the hands of the general public. In reality, the L88 generated well over 500 horses when properly tuned and fed a diet of high-octane fuel. Still in possession of its original factory installed engine, this 1968 Chevrolet Corvette L88 is one of only a handful of Tuxedo Black L88 convertibles known to exist out of the total production years of 1967, ’68 and ’69, fewer than half of which were convertibles. Its no-hit body was restored by well-known Nabers Motors in Houston, Texas. After its frame-off, nut-and-bolt res108

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toration was performed, this 16,000 mile L88 received the high honor of being Bloomington Gold certified and invited to many Bloomington Gold Special Collections. It is finished as-original in Tuxedo Black, still retains its original black leather seats with most of its original interior and sports Rally wheels and an auxiliary hardtop. Other options on the NCRS authenticated original documents are K66 transistorized ignition, 3.70 Positraction rear axle, M22 4-speed manual transmission, White soft top, Soft Ray tinted glass, F41 suspension, J56 power brakes and N11 off-road exhaust. The car’s extensive documentation includes the original order sheet, dealer invoice, Protect-O-Plate, and several registrations including the 1968 title application.

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S159

1949 CADILLAC PHANTOM WAGON

SERIAL NO. 6354833

2013 GRAND NATIONAL ROADSTER SHOW AND DETROIT AUTORAMA FIRST IN CLASS, BUILT BY JIM ‘BONES’ NOTEBOOM

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ne of the most famous and highly awarded automotive customizers of the last 50 years, Jim “Bones” Noteboom has also been one of the most prolific. A member of the Grand National Roadster Show Hall of Fame, Noteboom created an exclamation point in his long and successful career with this car, a 1949 Cadillac that is the latest of his creations to carry the name “Phantom Wagon.” Built in 18 months, the Phantom Wagon is based on a 1949 Cadillac Coupe Deville donor car. The front grille, front and rear bumpers are brilliantly adapted 1955 Pontiac items, which are 110

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joined up front with 1956 Oldsmobile headlights. A 1954 Chevrolet station wagon was tapped for the roof, which Noteboom blended into the Caddy’s rear body by massaging the area between the rear fenders and the rear side window frames, which he handfabricated along with the rear door for an impressively clean overall look that seems factory built. A pioneer of air suspensions when he was still a teenager, Noteboom installed a Fatman front clip and air bags at all four corners, finishing the rolling stock with Tru-Spoke chromed wires and Coker wide Whitewalls. Power

is vintage Cadillac in the form of a gorgeously sculpted 390 CI big block mated to a Hydro-Matic transmission, but it’s the House of Kolor Copper Penny paint and stunning mixture of Pearl White tuck-and-roll and leather Copper accents that keep commanding one’s attention. Testifying to the quality of Noteboom’s vision and talents, the car was awarded First Place at the 2013 Grand National Roadster Show and Detroit Autorama in the Radical Custom Wagon Class, Best Engineered at the Sacramento Autorama and Coolest Custom at GoodGuys Del Mar.

ESTIMATE: $100,000 - $125,000


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2005 PORSCHE CARRERA GT ROADSTER

NUMBER 879, AN ORIGINAL TWO OWNER SUPERCAR DRIVEN JUST 7,763 MILES SINCE NEW

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orsche’s all carbon fiber, 605 HP V-10 Carrera GT was famously conceived on the platform of a still born Le Mans race car project. And, with a 0-60 MPH time of 3.5s, standing quarter mile in 11.2s at 132 MPH, 205 MPH top speed, forged magnesium center-locking wheels, carbon ceramic brakes, 6-speed manual transmission with ceramic clutch, and an all aluminum engine that features forged titanium connecting rods, forged pistions, and Porsche’s VarioCam timing system that allow the big V-10 to spin to a spine-tingling 8,000 RPM, the Carrera GT is a mod-

ern performance icon that no serious supercar collection can be without. Indeed, Road & Track hailed it as “the best road-going Porsche, ever.” The example seen here, #879 of approximately 1,270 built, is presented in GT Silver Metallic with Dark Grey (black) full leather interior and has been driven a mere 7,763 miles from new. It has had just two owners and has been immaculately kept, never raced, abused, wrecked, or repaired in any way. The car is all stock and original, and it is equipped from the factory with Bose premium audio and GPS navigation, all leather

SERIAL NO. WP0CA29845L001415 ESTIMATE: $370,000 - $400,000

3-spoke steering wheel, and carbon fiber shifter. This car sold for $448,280 when new. It is complete with a spotless CarFax history report, two remote keys, the center lock wheel tool, and the factory Porsche-crested roof panel storage bags.

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Sir Stirling Moss behind the wheel of 6S089

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S161

1966 SHELBY GT350 RACE CAR

SERIAL NO. SFM6S089

#89 OF 252 CARRY OVER CARS FROM 1965, FORMERLY OWNED AND RACED BY SIR STIRLING MOSS

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here are few more ringing endorsements for any competition car than having been chosen by Sir Stirling Moss to satisfy his considerable skill and unflagging competitive urges. That is the story of this 1966 Shelby GT350, SFM6S089, which Moss owned and drove in vintage competition from 1993 to 1999. The car spent its early years in San Antonio, Texas, before being purchased by Steve Barnes of Boston and subsequently then-owner of Aston Martin Peter Livanos of Greenwich, who had it converted to R specification by Chris Liebenberg of Danbury, Connecticut. Having previously been smitten by the experience of driving a

GT350 at the Monterey Historics, Moss offered to purchase 6S089 from Livanos, a friend and fellow vintage racer, and signed the FIA Historic Vehicle Identity Form for SFM6S089 issued in 1993 to close the sale. Moss first raced the car in the Targa Tasmania, after which he used it in many races and tours in both North America and Europe. The car always performed well against serious vintage competitors; in fact Moss is on record more than once stating that it was his favorite car for historic racing, high praise not only for the GT350 in general but also for this car in particular. Moss sold the car in 1999 to C.G. Gardner, who continued to campaign it

in Europe at such famed venues as Spa and the Nurburgring. After subsequent ownership by Ron Proler of Houston, Texas, and then a private collector, the car remains in excellent race-ready condition. It is blindingly fast and dependable, as one would expect from a car that has been driven by one of racing’s all-time legendary figures. It is listed in the Shelby Registry and comes with substantial documentation including many records from Moss’ extensive personal files and a film in which Moss and his wife Suzie discuss the car’s history. To put Sir Stirling’s choice to own and race this car in the proper perspective,

ESTIMATE: $450,000 - $600,000

we must recount that he is arguably the greatest race driver of his era, winning 212 of the 529 races he entered, including 16 Formula One Grand Prix races and the legendary Mille Miglia. In an era when generalist drivers prevailed, Moss was the most versatile of all, driving 84 different makes of car in his professional racing career including Jaguar, Maserati, Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari, Lotus, Vanwall and Porsche. It is not unreasonable to suggest that Moss’ ownership rates as high as any formal award or endorsement available from any self-appointed automotive authority, if not significantly more so. S AT U R DAY

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S162

1913 PEERLESS MODEL 48-SIX ROADSTER

A POWER SOURCE FOR THE LA JOLLA MINING COMPANY IN CALIFORNIA WITH A FASCINATING DISCOVERY STORY

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his 1913 Peerless Model 48-Six roadster was the subject of one of the most fascinating recovery operations in the history of the automobile. Originally purchased by an official of the La Jolla Mining Company in California, at the end of its useful life on the road it was driven to the head of a working gold mine in the San Mateo Canyon, where for years its hearty 116

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and reliable T-head inline-6 engine served as a power source. Eventually the car was discarded on the site, where it was left to the elements and almost consumed by the surrounding forest. Serendipitously, it was discovered from the air in the early 1960s by helicopter pilot Ed Seville, a California-based member of the Horseless Carriage Club of America.

During an HCCA regional tour in La Jolla in the summer of 1965 Ed Seville related his discovery to Peerless enthusiast and collector Merl Ledford, Jr., who immediately began plotting the car’s retrieval. It was during the planning process that one of Ledford’s children dubbed the car the “Old Man of the Mountain.” After an epic threemonth search the car was located and

CHASSIS NO. 13269 ESTIMATE: $325,000 - $400,000

a team was sent in to attach a lifting cradle. The car was hoisted free of its resting place by a large helicopter flown by an experienced Alaska bush pilot, who flew it to a waiting trailer. Ledford soon began a restoration that included fabricating a new body. After 15 years and completing 90 percent of the work, Ledford passed away, and the restoration was assumed by


Gerald Luckow of Portland, Oregon, who finished the work in time to exhibit the car at the 1984 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. The Peerless was then placed on extended display in a small mining museum, and in 2008 it was purchased by a private collector, who sold it in 2010, after which it was once again restored and the color changed to its present Royal Blue. A genuine pleasure to engine and a hit wherever it appears, this 1913 Peerless not only brings with it a fascinating history, it is a superbly restored artifact from the dawn of the American automobile industry.

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S163

1963 MODENA SPYDER CALIFORNIA FROM "FERRIS BUELLER'S DAY OFF" FULLY RESTORED AND OFFERED BY FORMER PRESIDENT OF MODENA DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

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n the early 1980s California entrepreneurs Neil Glassmoyer and Mark Goyett founded Modena Design and Development in El Cajon to manufacture the Modena Spyder California, a Ferrari 250 GT Spyder-based sports car that far exceeded the quality and finish of other independent offerings of the time. An early mention of the new creation in a car magazine drew the attention of Hollywood director John Hughes, who was in the planning stages of making Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, in which a valuable sports car would have a pivotal role. Neil Glassmoyer recalls the day Hughes contacted him 118

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to ask about seeing the Modena Spyder. “The first time he called I hung up on him because I thought it was a friend of mine who was given to practical jokes. Then he called back and convinced me it really was him, so Mark and I took the car to his office. While we were waiting outside to meet Hughes this scruffy-looking fellow came out of the building and began looking the car over; we thought from his appearance he must have been a janitor or something. Then he looked up at a window and shouted, ‘This is it!’ and several heads poked out to have a look. That scruffy-looking fellow was

John Hughes, and the people in the window were his staff. Turned out it was between the Modena Spyder and a Porsche Turbo, and Hughes chose the Modena.” “They gave us 4 weeks to build the movie cars,” Glassmoyer recalls. “I always say we built two and a half cars; two were interchangeably used as Hero and stunt cars and one was a rolling fiberglass shell that was used in the destruction scene. This car was actually intended for the stunt work, but both saw action, and both wound up with broken front suspension bolts because the big jump scene took nine

SERIAL NO. GT1651

ESTIMATE: $250,000 - $300,000

takes between the two cars.” The partners sold Modena Design and Development soon after the release of Ferris Bueller, but in 1988 Neil Glassmoyer leapt at the opportunity to buy back one of the movie cars, which he has owned ever since. Based on the prototype Spyder California design by Scaglietti, the Modena incorporated the original’s steeply raked windshield, inset front turn signals, deep horizontal front grille, prominent hood scoop, front fender vents and sweeping profile. Beneath the fiberglass skin was a very sturdy rectangular steel tube frame designed by the late Bob Webb,


an accomplished Indy car fabricator who worked on Brooks Stevens’ 1952 Excalibur race cars and later on Roger Penske’s all-conquering Zerex Special. Mounting independent front suspension and a solid rear axle with 4-link attachments, a Panhard rod and coil-over shocks, Webb’s chassis was described by Car and Driver as "remarkably rigid, more so in fact than many factory convertibles.” Today this Modena Spyder California is without question the best one extant, Glassmoyer having completed a 10year restoration in 2010. What started as a very good car has become a truly excellent Grand Tourer with a few key upgrades contribute to that assessment; the original 1963 260 CI Ford V-8 (which allowed the car to be officially titled as a 1963 Modena) has given way to a balanced and blueprinted 351 V-8 bored out to 427 CI and fitted with an Eagle forged steel crank, I-beam connecting rods, forged J&E pistons, Trick Flow twisted wedge aluminum heads and roller rockers. The resulting 500 horsepower launches the 2,650-lb Modena in exhilarating fashion while being kept under control by a refined suspension – comprising independent front A-arms, variable ratio power rack and pinion steering, a 4-link live rear with Panhard rod and Aldan nitrogen-charged adjustable coilovers – and Wilwood power ventilated disc brakes all around. Scorching Red paint, chromed Borrani wire wheels and a new Tan leather interior combine for a stunning presentation made even more impressive in such details as vintage Smiths instruments, wood-rimmed Nardi steering

wheel, authentic hardware and superb craftsmanship. A genuine hand-built GT of the highest quality, this Modena Spyder California is as close as one can come to experiencing the look and feel of an almost inaccessible Italian classic, with the added attraction of being one of the most famous movie star cars of all time.

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S164

1965 PORSCHE 356 CABRIOLET

SERIAL NO. 161966

ORIGINAL 1600CC ENGINE AND 4-SPEED TRANSMISSION, 1 OF 588 CABRIOLETS PRODUCED IN 1965

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his outstanding and exceptionally rare 1964 Porsche 356C Cabriolet is a fine example of the last of the 356 era, which ended to make way for the freshly minted 911. The 356C was the ultimate refinement of the 356 series that had begun with a single prototype 15 years previously with heavy reliance on existing VW components. By the time of the 356C, there was nothing left of the original; in its place was a magnificent and unique sports car that was the glorious result of carefully considered step by step development and mind-boggling quality controls. As the 356 saga 120

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was coming to an end, author Karl Ludvigsen noted that the Porsche had become almost freakishly reliable, with an average warranty repair cost of only $8.38 per car, “the lowest in history for Porsche and incredibly low for any car.” The accompanying Porsche Certificate of Authenticity confirms the car’s correct Light Ivory over Black leather combination as well as its original matching numbers drivetrain comprising the 1,600cc dual carbureted “C” pushrod engine rated at 75 HP and a 4-speed gearbox. This signified the end and closed the chapter on the legendary 356

Porsche. This car is one of only 588 Porsche Cabriolets produced in 1965 before the model’s extinction in 1966. Recently this car had a comprehensive freshening by German Tech of Western Florida. It is considered by collector Rick Davis to be one of the finest driving, shifting, cornering and overall performing vehicles of virtually any 356 on the road today.

ESTIMATE: $150,000 - $175,000


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S165

1908 ISOTTA FRASCHINI TIPO FENC TWO SEATER BELIEVED TO BE 1 OF ONLY 2 TIPO FENC EXAMPLES IN EXISTENCE

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he 1908 Isotta Fraschini Tipo FENC is one of the ground-breaking automotive designs of the early 20th century. Long thought to have been designed by Ettore Bugatti, the FENC was instead the roadgoing development of the racing FE designed by Italian engineering pioneer Giuseppe Stefanini. Born in 1870 and educated in Turin, Stefanini moved to Milan in 1900 to work with Cesare Isotta and Vincenzo Fraschini, who had been importing cars from France. When Isotta-Fraschini was incorporated in 1904, Stefanini began development work on overhead cam engines. His first 122

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creation, a monstrous 17.2 L inline-4 in the IF Tipo D, lasted but one lap in the 1905 Gran Premio di Brescia. Working under the demanding guidance of chief engineer Giustino Cattaneo, Stefanini’s chassis and engine designs then went in the opposite direction and, in 1908 he created the Tipo FE for entry in the Grand Prix des Voiturettes at Dieppe. Powered by an elegantly designed 1.2 L OHC inline-4 and weighing a mere 1,342 pounds, the jewel-like FE’s superior handling and 60 MPH top speed sounded the death knell for the locomotive-like racers of the period and became the prototype for the small

high-performance sports car that became the Continental standard. The FE’s success quickly led to the production of the FENC, which featured an increase in engine capacity to 1.32 L, improved gear drive components, a 4-speed transmission and fenders. One of only two known to exist today, this exquisitely restored 1908 Isotta Fraschini Tipo FENC, chassis number 6023, was discovered by American collector Jeffrey Vogel, who around 1985 managed to purchase the two cars, both of which required careful restoration. Chassis No. 6023 was later acquired by Robert M. Rubin,

CHASSIS NO. 6023 ESTIMATE: $150,000 - $200,000

who meticulously restored it to “semiracer” specification, carefully replicating pieces such as the gearbox and oil tanks as necessary. The car’s inline-4 OHC engine, bearing serial number 10, consists of mostly original parts. Its configuration, with cross-shaft drive to magneto and water pump, conforms to original FENC specification. A rare artifact of the early 20th century Italian automotive Renaissance, this extraordinary machine qualifies for major vintage racing events and shows around the world and will add significantly to any collection of early sports automobiles.


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S166

1964 PORSCHE 356C COUPE

SERIAL NO. 318379

MATCHING NUMBERS 1600CC FOUR CYLINDER ENGINE, FULLY RESTORED 56,500 MILE COUPE

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his 1964 Porsche 356C coupe is an outstanding car with 56,500 well-cared-for miles. Chassis number 318379, it carries engine number 713662 that corresponds with the included Porsche Certificate of Authenticity. The Karmann body is completely rust free, retaining the original floors and rocker panels. The doors, engine cover and front bonnet have been removed from the car, stripped down to bare metal, correctly prepared and repainted in code 6413 Black, then finished with three layers of clear coat. The resulting finish is near showroom condition with nearly perfect body

gaps and seams throughout the car. The interior has also been refreshed and presents in splendid condition. The dash was repainted in Black, new door panels installed along with complete new Red front and rear seats, and the carpets replaced with originalspec Red Porsche square weave material made in Germany. The matching numbers C-spec 1,600cc flat-4 pushrod engine, clutch and 4-speed gearbox offer ample performance, as do the 4-wheel disc brakes that became standard equipment with the advent of the C model. All the glass is original to the car and undamaged; the body bright

ESTIMATE: $80,000 - $100,000

trim, chrome pieces remain in very good condition. The car comes with five chromed steel wheels including the spare wheel and tire, leather holddown belt, jack and original 6-volt electrical system. Road&Track Magazine put the 356C in its proper historical context with these comments: “Gradually, and part by part, Porsche adopted bits, pieces and complete assemblies of its own. Today nothing remains in the way of VW parts, though there are many similarities in arrangement and construction. The modern Porsche is unique, it has had a tremendous success and it deserves it.� S AT U R DAY

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S167

1970 FORD MUSTANG BOSS 429 FASTBACK

KK #2192, ROTISSERIE RESTORATION IN 2001 AND REFRESHED TO MCA GUIDELINES IN 2009

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he mighty Ford Mustang Boss 429 served to homologate Ford’s 429 CI “Semi Hemi” engine for NASCAR competition. Ford commissioned the building of the Boss 429 to Kar Kraft, whose Brighton, Michigan, facility converted 428 Cobra Jet and Super Cobra Jet Sportsroof models with extensive modifications to the front suspension, moving the shock towers and inner fenders to make room for the engine block and exhaust manifolds. The battery was relocated to the trunk and a special sway bar added at the rear to help balance the 429’s heft. The result was one of the 126

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rarest and most powerful Mustangs ever built and today one of the most highly prized muscle cars from that magnificent era. Built on September 29, 1969 and delivered new on November 11, 1969 by Hull Dobbs Ford in Memphis, Tennessee, this 1970 Boss 429, KK #2192, is powered by a correct Boss 429 engine from KK #1864 backed by a 4-speed manual transmission and 3.91 Traction-Lok rear end. Finished as original in Grabber Blue with a White interior, it also features the Boss-9 specific Competition Suspension, power steering and front disc brakes, Deluxe Décor

Group and AM radio. It received a rotisserie restoration completed in 2001 and in 2009 was refreshed to MCA guidelines by highly respected East Coast Mustang restorer Hunter Williard. In addition to its highly detailed engine bay – including the correct pollution control system – the car boasts all the correct chalk marks, overspray and paint dabs as delivered in 1970.

SERIAL NO. 0F02Z112807 ESTIMATE: $225,000 - $275,000


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S168

1963 CHEVROLET CORVETTE SPLIT WINDOW COUPE 327/300 HP V-8, 4-SPEED MANUAL, 1 OF 278 PRODUCED WITH FACTORY AIR CONDITIONING

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fter 10 years building the Corvette’s reputation with constant improvements and an enviable competition record, Chevrolet rocked the automotive world with the all-new 1963 Corvette Sting Ray. The car represented a giant leap forward in answering the American market’s surging demand for a true high performance sports car that also incorporated the many creature comforts that were so much a part of the production passenger cars of the day. The automotive press hailed the new Sting Ray for the superior handling and roadholding produced by its new independent 128

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rear suspension, and judged that the performance of its small block engines – the only real holdover from the first generation C1 series – as even more explosive than in the past. Car Life Magazine joined Road & Track, Motor Trend and other periodicals in lauding the car’s impressive performance. The new Corvette surpassed even some top European sports car with well-designed bucket seats, adjustable telescopic steering and the availability of such comforts as optional leather seating and air conditioning, but its most talked-about feature was its incredibly bold styling, especially that

of the unique Split Window Coupe that has become arguably the most desirable of all Corvettes. This is an exceptionally rare example of that revolutionary design, one of only 278 1963 Corvettes produced with factory air conditioning. Mostly unrestored and always well maintained, it is powered by a matching numbers L75 327/300 HP small block engine backed by a 4-speed manual transmission and is finished in correct Ermine White with a Blue interior featuring AM/FM radio and power windows.

SERIAL NO. 30837S117038 ESTIMATE: $100,000 - $135,000


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S169

1969 PONTIAC FIREBIRD 400 CONVERTIBLE

FACTORY EQUIPPED WITH MORE THAN 30 OPTIONS, UNDERWENT A THREE YEAR PROFESSIONAL ROTISSERIE RESTORATION

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istinguished by its bodycolor “Endura” front end and chromed dual-inlet grille, the 1969 Firebird has become an enduring favorite with muscle-era Pontiac fans and collectors thanks to its combination of muscular styling, balanced performance and generous option list. Engine choices began with a 250 CI inline 6 and 350 CI V-8 configurations, but the real fun began by ordering one of four 400 CI engines ranging in power from 330 to 345 HP. Regardless of choice, the Firebird offered something special for every taste, from sporty economy car to 130

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stoplight bandit to full-on luxury conveyance. The latter two are combined in this very well-equipped 1969 400 convertible, the subject of a threeyear rotisserie restoration completed by GM Sports of San Jose in January 2013. Finished in Starlight Black over the original sheet metal, the car is powered by Pontiac’s venerated 400 CI V-8 engine backed by a Turbo Hydra-Matic 3-speed transmission. Its attractive triple Black color scheme is perfectly complimented by Rally 5-spoke wheels, a popular Pontiac option here wrapped in BF Goodrich Silvertown Redline rubber

for an extra touch of elegance. PHS documentation shows that this rare Firebird was produced with over 30 factory options. In addition to power steering and brakes and factory air conditioning, it is fitted with vinyl bucket seats, woodgrain steering wheel, console and dashboard trim, power windows and soft top, rare cruise control, tilt steering column, AM/FM radio with power antenna, in-dash clock, tinted glass, remote driver’s outside mirror and spare tire inflation kit.

SERIAL NO. 223679L106536 ESTIMATE: $80,000 - $100,000


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S170

1970 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE CONVERTIBLE

454/450 HP V-8, M22 4-SPEED TRANSMISSION, PROFESSIONAL ROTISSERIE RESTORATION

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he 1970 Chevelle remains a classic of the original muscle car era. Not only could it be had with a variety of powerplants up to and including the famous 454/450 HP big block V-8, it was also in any configuration a handsome devil, one of the most attractive styling exercises in perhaps GM’s strongest period ever. The 1970 Chevelle offered here demonstrates all the strengths of Chevy’s all-time muscle machine in convertible form, having been the recipient of a professional rotisserie frame-off restoration by JV Enterprises of Azusa, California. Much emphasis was

placed in the two-year restoration on date code correctness, which is evident throughout. The combination of Black Cherry Red paint, White stripes and convertible top gives the car a sporty look enhanced by the correct 5-spoke wheels and Goodyear Polyglas tires, while the Black interior incorporates all the period touches: round-faced gauges including 7,000 RPM tach, bucket seats and console with Muncie shifter and SS badges on the tilt steering wheel and door panels. Cowl induction was a necessity for feeding the 454/450 HP V-8, here skillfully detailed right down

SERIAL NO. 136670B188926 ESTIMATE: $175,000 - $200,000

to the factory-style smog equipment and Tonawanda engine plant decal, and driving through a Muncie M22 4-speed manual transmission to a 3.31 Positraction rear end. All the details are correct in this very sharp restoration, from the flawless White convertible top by Convertible Services to the underbody finishes. This big block Chevelle convertible comes complete with the Protect-O-Plate.

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S171

1957 PORSCHE 356A SPEEDSTER

SERIAL NO. 83154

1500CC FOUR CYLINDER ENGINE WITH 4-SPEED MANUAL, RESTORED BY PORSCHE EXPERT DENNIS FRICK

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he first production car sold under the Porsche marque, the 356 launched the German automobile manufacturer on its trajectory to international success. Designed by Ferdinand Porsche’s son Ferry, the first prototype, completed in 1948, was an open roadster, every detail of which delighted the elder Porsche, who gave the project his unequivocal approval. The 356 grew in popularity both in Europe and in America, where transplanted Austrian auto importer Max Hoffman promoted the Porsche brand to the high-dollar customers visiting his showroom on New York

City’s Park Avenue. By 1956 Porsche had sold an astonishing 10,000 356 coupes and convertibles, and the car had already gone through enough improvements that a new designation, the 365A, had been introduced. The most significant 356A variant was the Hoffman-inspired Speedster, a genuine thoroughbred sports car that broke the American market wide open for the German manufacturer. The gorgeous Reutter-bodied 1957 Porsche 356A Speedster offered here has seen extensive touring that includes the splendid Colorado Grand Rally. It was acquired by its previous

owner from Paul Russell of Massachusetts following a restoration by noted Porsche specialist Dennis Frick of Pennsylvania. Combining eye-catching Red paint with a Blueand-Tan cockpit and Black soft top, it is driven by a period-correct 1,500 CC engine with a newly refurbished fuel system and rolls on chromed 4.5-inch wheels with original-style bias ply tires; a set of performance radials on 5.5-inch wheels is included for touring, which is further accommodated by a new Blue tonneau cover, side curtains and rain hat. The Nardi wood-rimmed steering wheel

ESTIMATE: $210,000 - $260,000

can be replaced with the included original piece. A Porsche Certificate of Authenticity, tool kit and extensive documentation are also included.

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1932 ROLLS-ROYCE PHANTOM II HUNTINGTON LIMOUSINE COACHWORK BY BREWSTER & CO. OF NEW YORK, LEFT HAND DRIVE, 1 OF 17 IMPORTED TO THE U.S. IN 1932

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ew York’s Brewster & Co. coachbuilders were known for their extraordinary quality. After having been a builder of bodies for American Springfield-built Rolls Royces, they were later acquired by Rolls Royce in order to provide additional body styles that the Springfield factory couldn’t produce. When the Depression made it impossible for Rolls Royce to build its new Phantom II in America, they were imported from Derby, and most ended up fitted with Brewster bodies. At the 1931 Chicago Auto Salon, Brewster exhibited four bodies for the Phantom II, including a Huntington 136

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Limousine, described in Autobody as “a 7-passenger enclosed limousine... finished in Oxford Blue with black trim. The passenger compartment will have tan "heathertone" upholstery, a harmonizing rug and lap­ robe, damascened bronze hardware with tan inlay and Karolith knobs matching the mahogany of the marquetry panels.” By 1932, importation and production had slowed to a crawl, and only 17 Phantom IIs were imported. However, at least one of those was a rare left-hand-drive chassis equipped with the stunningly expensive Huntington Limousine body, for Mrs. R. Waverly Smith, better known

to posterity as Jennie Sealy. The name should ring a bell to South Texans, as the Sealy & Smith Foundation is still active in Galveston, where John Sealy’s name is prominently on the local hospital. Jennie Sealy married Galveston attorney Robert Waverly Smith (and with him and her brother John, established the Foundation), and relocated to New York. Robert Smith had bought his first Brewster in Galveston as early as 1919, so it’s little surprise that his wife ended up with one later on, as well. Although her husband had died by that point, Mrs. R. Waverly Smith took delivery of chassis no. 251AJS, her new

CHASSIS NO. 251AJS ESTIMATE: $165,000 - $195,000

1932 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Brewster Huntington Limousine on Christmas Eve, 1932, at her home at the Ritz Carlton in Glen Cove, Long Island. At her death in 1938, she bequeathed the bulk of her estate to the Foundation, and it was sold on December 1, 1939 to Mr. F.B. Pratt of Long Island. By 1955, it had passed into the hands of one Robert Wilbur of New York, who advertised it in The Flying Lady for $1,200, a reasonable price for a then-outdated limousine. His advertisement showed the car much as now, in black with blackwall tires and steel disc wheels. By the '70s, the car was in Florida,


where it was acquired by the consignor in 1977. It has undergone continual mechanical and cosmetic refurbishment in the subsequent years. The odometer reads 66,428 miles, likely reflecting original miles, with approximately 2,000 miles since a rebuild of the 7.7-liter engine by Dale Powers Automotive of St. Petersburg, Florida. More recently, a summer 2011 service included valve adjustment, replacing the electrical fuel pump system, and cleaning and repairing the original starter. The autovac unit has been cleaned, repainted and reinstalled; however, fuel is delivered through the electrical pump system. The engine bay has been detailed, and a restored interior includes the original wood trim. Body and chassis have been correctly and sympathetically restored. A vanishingly small number of important Full Classic coachbuilt limousines have survived. Many were scrapped in the war, while others had their bodies removed as fashions changed. Chassis no. 251AJS is not only in the same configuration as when it was built, it retains all its original components and has a known history since new. With the outstanding performance of the Phantom II chassis married to the most elaborate and expensive coachwork that Brewster could devise, there are few events at which this car would not be welcome.

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S173

1998 DODGE VIPER GTS-R

SERIAL NO. 1B3ER69E5WV401084

8.0 LITER V-10, 6-SPEED MANUAL, 1 OF 100 BUILT, ONE OWNER WITH ONLY 3,700 MILES

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sing such production engine components as the block, cylinder heads, and crankshaft of the stock 8.0L V-10 engine, Team Viper racing engineers added more teeth to Dodge’s second-generation Viper supercar in the form of the GTS-R. The chassis was re-engineered by British sports car manufacturer Reynard Motorsport’s Special Projects Division chief engineer Paul Brown, who tossed out much of the road-going version’s heavy tube steel frame and fiberglass inner structure in favor of strong and lightweight carbon fiber. A rear wing, rear diffuser and front

splitter were installed to improve aerodynamics and scoops and vents added for increased engine and interior cooling. The result was a 700 HP monster that won five FIA GT Championships between 1997 and 2002 and established the Viper as a mainstay in both American and European road racing. In 1998 the GTS-R became the first American car to win at Le Mans in three decades and the first production-based American car ever to grace the winner’s circle there. That same year Dodge built 100 roadgoing versions for sale to the public, an impressive example of which is

ESTIMATE: $100,000 - $125,000

offered here in this all original oneowner coupe that shows only 3,700 miles on the odometer. Finished in Stone White with Viper Blue stripes and a pristine Black interior with Blue highlights, it packs a 460 HP version of the mighty Viper V-10 engine with a 6-speed manual gearbox and uses a high rear spoiler, rear diffuser and BBS-style wheels borrowed from the GT2 racers.

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S174

2003 SALEEN S7

SERIAL NO. 1S9SB18113S000028

ALL ALUMINUM 427/550 HP V-8, CARBON FIBER BODY, DRIVEN ONLY 6,702 MILES SINCE NEW

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teve Saleen made his reputation in the mid-1980s by taking Ford’s Mustang and transforming the meek pony car – its so-called High Output engine in 1984 was rated at 175 HP – with re-engineered aerodynamics, suspension and steering. Saleen quickly proved that his creation was not simply a fluffed-up road car when he took the trophy at the grueling 24-hour race at Mosport, Canada. After years of planning, in 2000 Saleen announced his entry into the world of production supercars with the S7. A collaboration between Saleen, designer Phil Frank and Ray Mallock Engineering, the S7

was the car that established Saleen as an independent automotive manufacturer of both road and race cars. The tunnel-tested carbon fiber body designed by Frank features a long tail that assists in creating tremendous downforce, channelling air from the twin front radiators over internal wings to the “gills” below the doors; a massive rear diffuser works with the S7’s rear spoiler to plant the car on the road all the way up to its 200-plus MPH top speed. Getting there requires horsepower, and that’s where the S7’s 427 CI engine comes into play, delivering 550 HP and 525 lb-ft of torque and

ESTIMATE: $300,000 - $350,000

a redline of 6,500 RPM using components specially machined in-house. A totally new all-aluminum version of that powerplant, built to the original specifications, powers this shining example of Saleen’s limited production, hand built, American-made supercar. Built in 2003 and now with 6,702 miles on the odometer, the car is in pristine mechanical and cosmetic condition. Iridescent Candy Red paint, exclusive polished aluminum Saleen wheels and a cocoon-like Tan leather cockpit highlight this arresting machine’s many qualities. S AT U R DAY

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S175

1957 CHEVROLET CORVETTE

SERIAL NO. E57S100989

DUAL QUAD 283 CI V-8 WITH 4-SPEED TRANSMISSION AND AUXILIARY HARDTOP

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orvette came of age in 1957 when Chevrolet gave it the engine to match its improved handling and refined styling, the latter judged by many enthusiasts as the most aesthetically pleasing of the first generation. The base engine was enlarged from the 195 HP 265 CI V-8 to the new 4-barrel equipped 283/220 HP small block, a hotter version of which produced 270 horses. An early fuel-injected version generated 250 horsepower, but the car reached a new height in May 1957 with the introduction of a more developed Rochester fuel-injection system that put out a 142

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dependable 283 horsepower at 6200 RPM. Much was made in Corvette advertising about the new milestone of 1 horsepower per cubic inch, a record at the time. Fuel injection was costly, however, and buyers flocked to the optional 245 and 270 HP engines that featured dual Carter 4-barrel carburetors on an inline aluminum intake manifold. After its mid-run introduction the new 4-speed manual transmission, the first ever in a Corvette, became one of the most popular options and was soon swapped in to a number of factory 3-speed cars. The optional auxiliary hardtop from

the factory, now in its second year, was another highly popular item that was ordered with almost two thirds of the Corvettes produced that year, which also saw the last appearance of single headlights in a Corvette. This beautiful Onyx Black convertible incorporates a dual-quad 283 CI engine, a 4-speed manual transmission and matching Black hardtop. Silver coves and a Red interior highlighted by full wheel covers and Whitewall tires complete this handsome first generation Corvette.

ESTIMATE: $75,000 - $100,000


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S176

1925 ROLLS-ROYCE SILVER GHOST PALL MALL TOURER PART OF THE PETTIT COLLECTION SINCE THE MID-1960S, BEST OF SHOW AT THE 1976 RROC NATIONAL MEET

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ecords supplied by the RollsRoyce Owners’ Club confirm that S88LK was delivered new on May 12, 1925, to John R. Thompson, Sr. of Lake Forest, Illinois. Purchased through B.E. Adams, this Silver Ghost was specified as a Pall Mall Tourer, one of the most desirable open body styles offered by Rolls-Royce Custom Coachworks. RROC records show the car was owned by W.L. McCutchen of Virginia from 1951 until the mid1960s when it joined the Pettit Collection and was displayed for a number 144

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of years at the Motoring Memories Museum. In 1974, Mr. Pettit commissioned John Griffin of Montgomery, Alabama, to perform a complete restoration to a very high standard so as to be competitive at judged events. The car was sound to begin with, making the restoration process straight forward. In fact, the bodywork was in such good condition that only a section of the original wood- frame inner structure behind the passenger doors required replacement. After much consideration, Mr. Pettit decided to

finish the car in its current livery of Ivory with Black trim, a handsome choice for the stately lines of the Pall Mall coachwork. Chassis S88LK made its postrestoration debut at the 1976 RROC National Meet in Williamsburg, Virginia, earning Best of Show honors as well as an award for the Most Silent Silver Ghost, high praise for Mr. Griffin’s expert work. Between 1978 and 1980 the Pall Mall won a series of AACA and CCCA First Prize awards at such major events as the National

CHASSIS NO. S88LK ESTIMATE: $325,000 - $375,000

Fall Meet in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Always regularly maintained, S88LK presents exceptionally well. The car is accompanied with a historical file that contains extensive restoration records (receipts, material samples, drawings, etc.); AACA, RROC and CCCA documents and correspondence between Mr. Pettit and classic car specialists such as John Griffin, Bill Hirsch, E. Hugh Mearns and Frank Cooke. Not only do these documents offer a fascinating insight into the restoration of S88LK, they


clearly illustrate Mr. Pettit’s remarkable passion for and appreciation of fine automobiles. Eligible for countless events, historically significant and finely built, this magnificent Rolls-Royce is among the most versatile and rewarding of all pre-war automobiles. Having benefited from decades of appreciative ownership, this elegant Silver Ghost is sure to reward its new owner with tremendous pride of ownership and many enjoyable years of vintage motoring.

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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

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S177

1954 INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER R140 WOODY THE ONLY KNOWN SURVIVING EXAMPLE WITH ITS ORIGINAL WOOD BODY WORK

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nternational Harvester built on its huge success of the Farmall tractor lineup with the creation of a new line of trucks that began with the L-Series in 1952. That was replaced by the RSeries in 1953, a bewilderingly expansive array of vehicles that included the Travelall, a large capacity people and equipment mover that was a precursor of the modern SUV. Typical of IH, 146

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the R-Series were robust conveyances that could be adapted to the most demanding work and environments, but perhaps none were tougher and more durable than the three woody-bodied one-and-a-half ton 4-wheel drive wagons built in 1954 for the Army Corps of Engineers, who ordered them to be fully equipped for survey and exploration work in the wilds of North Da-

kota. These highly specialized trucks are probably the rarest and most unique of the International Harvester R140 Series vehicles. This towering (8 feet tall) machine, chassis number 787, is the only example that survives today with its original wooden body work, 240 CI inline-6 cylinder engine, winch and fender-mounted siren. When it was discovered it showed 41,241

SERIAL NO. SD240787 ESTIMATE: $150,000 - $200,000

miles on the odometer. It has since been through a meticulous frame-off restoration and remains exceptionally clean with excellent wood work, a clean and roomy cabin and outstanding paint and brightwork. The vehicle has been proudly owned by Dunkel Bros. Machinery Moving for the past 20 years and is being offered from the Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection.


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S178

1962 VOLKSWAGEN 23 WINDOW DELUXE SAFARI BUS

METICULOUS RESTORATION IN MARCH 2013 WITH NO MILES SINCE, MATCHING NUMBERS ENGINE, 4-SPEED MANUAL

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olkswagen took advantage of the growing popularity of the Beetle in North America when it introduced the Type 2 transporter, more commonly and affectionately known as the Volkswagen Bus. It suited Beetle fans perfectly, building on the same platform with a roomy box-like body that seemingly shared the Beetle’s happy-go-lucky but industrious nature. It even used the same platform, including the basic chassis and suspension, air-cooled horizontal-4 engine and 4-speed transaxle. The

real strength of the design was its versatility; unusually spacious to North American drivers, it was adaptable to both passenger and utility needs and indeed was the forerunner of the modern sport-utility vehicle. The Volkswagen Bus enjoyed so much popularity after its debut in 1950 that in 1956 Volkswagen opened a new factory in Hanover to handle increased demand. By 1961 the 1200cc engine produced 40 HP, yet its light weight allowed it to perform on even ground with its new competitors,

the Ford Econoline and Chevrolet’s Corvair-based Greenbreier, neither of which could match the skylight windows and roll-back sunroof of VW’s 23-window Safari Bus, which is still a favorite for the broad vista it provides out on the open road. The delightful Green-on-Green 1962 Volkswagen Safari 23-window bus offered here was the recipient of a complete restoration with no expense spared and meticulous attention to detail. No miles have been put on the vehicle since its completion in

SERIAL NO. 891303 ESTIMATE: $160,000 - $200,000

March 2013. It retains its matching numbers flat-4 40 HP engine and 4-speed transmission and is offered with complete photo documentation of the restoration.

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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

LOT

S179

1940 PLYMOUTH P10 DELUXE WOODY WAGON FRAME-OFF RESTORED UTILIZING THE ORIGINAL WOOD PANELS

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lymouth styling leapt out of the Depression-era doldrums in 1939 with an across-the-board revamping by Raymond Dietrich, the great coachbuilder who then headed Chrysler styling. 1940 Plymouths changed again, with new “speed line” fenders, smoother proportions, horizontal bar grilles and sealed beam headlights. Trunk back sedans became a thing of the past, replaced by fastbacks that offered more luggage capacity. At 137 inches, the long-wheelbase P10 models provided a versatile platform for a number of different body styles ranging from a 5-window coupe to

a 7-passenger limousine. The P10 woody station wagon offered high style and functionality for buyers whose driving spanned both town and country. Low sales figures meant relatively few were sold, making examples like this P10 Deluxe from the Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection very rare. The result of a frame-off restoration on a solid car, it is one of only 3,146 P10 woody wagons produced in 1940 at an original retail price of $970. A structural feature as well as cosmetic, the original wood has been retained and presents beautifully, its steam bent roof bows

SERIAL NO. AP10255970 ESTIMATE: $60,000 - $90,000

and warm-toned paneling matched by matching interior upholstery. The Beige exterior finish is accented with Brown painted wheels wearing Firestone wide Whitewalls and Plymouth hub caps, a nice Black vinyl roof and Black running boards providing sharp contrast. Plymouth’s economical 210 CI flathead 6 cylinder uses a single downdraft carburetor and mates to a column-shifted 3-speed manual transmission. Rear access is by an upper and lower tailgate, with the spare tire mounted behind the back seat. S AT U R DAY

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S180

2008 CHEVROLET CORVETTE CUSTOM

SERIAL NO. 1G1YY26W885124432

CUSTOM CARBON FIBER BODY OVER C6 CORVETTE CHASSIS WITH CLASSIC CHEVROLET DESIGN ELEMENTS

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elding design elements from three instantly recognizable classic Chevrolet models, the unique 789 is a highest quality, fully manufactured custom car built on a high performance C6 Corvette chassis by No 2 Alike (N2A) in Orange County, California. The painstakingly finished conversion melds the "hooded eyes" and chrome front bumper of a '57 Bel Air with a mid-section that's reminiscent of a '58 Impala plus the "bird in flight" rear tailfins of a '59, and thus the 789 name. The body is made of a carbon fiber composite and finished to show

quality, while underneath is totally factory original Corvette down to the ABS brakes, traction and stability control systems, airbags, creature comforts, 6-speed paddle-shifted automatic transmission, and of course the 6.2L 430 HP V-8. This car is equipped from new with the $4,505 3LT Option Group, which supplied driver seat and steering wheel memory functions, dual sport seats, Bose audio with in-dash 6CD changer, tilt/telescopic steering column, multi-function steering wheel, Heads-Up Display, side impact airbags, and integrated garage

ESTIMATE: $90,000 - $120,000

door opener. The interior was further customized by N2A with blue leather seat inserts and custom floor mats, plus custom chrome wheels and a MagnaFlow exhaust system were added. This unique custom Corvette 789 offers the best of classic motoring with modern performance, safety, and comfort in a package that stands out from any crowd.

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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

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S181

PORSCHE 936 JUNIOR

ESTIMATE: $30,000 - $50,000

LIMITED EDITION, 1:2 SCALE

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orsche commissioned the creation of this miniature 936 in celebration of the win at Le Mans. With only about 100 of the 936 Jr. built, most were disbursed among Porsche’s drivers, team members and other company officials. With exceptional attention provided to the detailing of this replica kart, the end result is one to impress. 154

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The body is an expertly molded single piece of fiberglass, save for the independent rear wing, and is powered by a 5 HP Briggs and Stratton flathead with a manually operated foot clutch. The transmission features two forward speeds plus neutral and reverse. Rack and pinion steering, disc brake, limited slip rear axle, 4-wheel coil suspension, working high/low beam

headlights, turn signals, horn, taillights, brake lights, electric and pull starters, and remote choke control are just some of the long list of additional features packed into this roaring 1:2 scale replica.


LOT S182

1967 CHEVROLET CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

ORIGINAL NUMBERS MATCHING 427/435 HP, 4-SPEED, BLOOMINGTON GOLD CERTIFIED AND DUNTOV MARK OF EXCELLENCE AWARD WINNER S AT U R DAY

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1967 CHEVROLET CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

ORIGINAL NUMBERS MATCHING 427/435 HP, 4-SPEED, BLOOMINGTON GOLD CERTIFIED AND DUNTOV MARK OF EXCELLENCE AWARD WINNER SERIAL NO. 194677S111979 ESTIMATE: $400,000 - $600,000

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riple Black and highly awarded, this 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 435 HP Tri-Power convertible has everything for the discriminating collector. Powered by the venerated L71 427/435 HP Tri Power-equipped big block V-8, it retains original drivetrain incorporating a 4-speed manual transmission and 4.11 Positraction rear end. Restored by the Naber Brothers in 1995 and completely re-restored by mid-year specialist Elio Martin in 2012, all date-coded components are correct and the car easily passed the new judging criteria for confirming engine originality instituted at Bloomington Gold in 2012. A rare radio delete example with all-original window glass, it is properly equipped for the ultimate in roadgoing Corvette performance with the F41 Special Front and Rear Suspension (including the original shock absorbers), N11 Off-Road Exhaust System and Auxiliary Hardtop. Its mixture of Tuxedo Black paint, Black soft top and interior and Red Stinger are the stuff of dreams for mid-year Corvette collectors, who will also appreciate the car’s non-DOT Blackwall tires on Rally wheels. This superb collector Corvette has amassed an impressive list of awards that includes double Bloomington Gold Certification, the Gold Spinner and a total of six NCRS 156

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Top Flight Awards, its lowest score of the six an impressive 98.5 points (it scored 98.8 in 2012 judging). Besides achieving the resulting Triple Crown, it has also earned the NCRS Performance Verification Award and the Duntov Mark of Excellence Award. It retains the original factory trim tag and is documented with the original dealer invoice, a notarized letter from the original owner and selling dealer, a copy of the original MSO, an NCRS Shipping Data Report confirming the dealer paperwork and a record of the full chain of ownership including photographs of the car since new.

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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

LOT

S184

1988 FERRARI TESTAROSSA

SERIAL NO. ZFFSG17A6J0074941

ORIGINAL CAR WITH 27,200 MILES, PURCHASED NEW BY PETER AND CHERYL DUNKEL

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he Ferrari Testarossa evoked both high praise and disappointment when it was introduced to the public at the Paris Auto Show in 1984. Some thought its large proportions, single driver’s side mirror and “cheese grater” side grilles were too radical; others appreciated Ferrari’s continued use of the famous flat-12 Boxer engine that was the heart of the Testarossa’s predecessor, the 512 Berlinetta Boxer. In fact the midmounted 4.9 liter estarossa engine was an improvement upon the 512 unit, employing new heads with 4 valves per cylinder, Magneti Marelli’s 158

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new Multiplex electronic ignition and Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, together producing an increase of 50 HP over the 512 version to 390 at 6,800 RPM and 362 lb-ft of torque at 4,500 RPM. The aforementioned side intake grilles proved early on to be the new car’s most contentious feature, but they accommodated the side-mounted radiators that solved a major problem in the 512, which was the heat conducted into the cockpit by the engine cooling pipes along the sides of the passenger compartment. And while bearing no resemblance to the racing Testa Rossas of the 1950s,

the new model gave away nothing in terms of performance and is now certainly considered a credit to its legendary name. This unrestored original 1988 Testarossa has been a part of the Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection since new. One of only 8,177 built between 1984 and 1991, the car is finished in the rare and attractive combination of White with a Coffee and Cream interior and, with just 27,200 original miles on the odometer, is in excellent condition.

ESTIMATE: $50,000 - $75,000


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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

LOT

S185

1954 PORSCHE ALLGAIER A133 DIESEL

SOLD ON BILL OF SALE

COMPLETE RESTORATION BY A FORMER PORSCHE-ALLGAIER FACTORY WORKER

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s popular and universally respected as Porsche is today, it is a little-known fact that one of young Ferdinand Porsche’s first aspirations was to build a device that would replace the oxen and horses that were so much a part of European farm life. The appearance of his first designs for a “Volksschlepper” or “People’s Tractor” coincided with the first of the Volkswagen project, likely also as part of Adolph Hitler’s National

Socialist agenda. In his notebook Porsche wrote that “Tractors must have a low purchase price. Secondly, they must have low maintenance cost. Thirdly, they must be of universal application in agriculture. Sturdy, powerful and foolproof…” It was these last requirements that are thought to have inspired the rudimentary fluid coupler that was years ahead of other tractor designs. In 1946 field testing by the British in Austria proved the

superiority of Porsche’s design, stating in reports that “the small Porsche tractor represents an important step forward in tractor design.” The Austrian government appointed former Porsche engineer Heinz Altenberg as liaison between Porsche and Irwin Allgaier, whose older tractor designs were badly in need of an update. This jewel-like 1954 Porsche Allgaier A133 3-cylinder diesel tractor is the evolution of the milestone postwar AP17

ESTIMATE: $25,000 - $40,000

and AP22, the latter of which featured the distinctive styling and “bullnose” engine cover that would become a trademark of Porsche tractors beginning in 1954. A nut-and-bolt restoration by a Northern Italian gentleman and former Porsche-Allgaier factory worker, this extraordinarily rare A133 is being offered from the Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection.

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S186

1930 PACKARD DELUXE EIGHT 745 DUAL COWL SPORT PHAETON SHOWN AT THE 1993 MEADOW BROOK CONCOURS d'ELEGANCE AND THE 1999 PACKARD CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

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ackard’s 145.5-inch wheelbase Deluxe Eight was aimed at the discerning customer. Long wheelbase Eights of the era were typically draped in coachbuilt bodies, whether supplied by an independent builder, or in Packard’s case, their unusually complete factory catalog of custom bodywork as well. As befitted what was America’s largest luxury car maker, Packard offered a complete lineup of cars. The Seventh Series Deluxe Eight was its top offering, available in 11 semi-custom and individual custom factory bodies; among those, the dual cowl body type

451 was the absolute pinnacle. This Dual Cowl Sport Phaeton was delivered October 15, 1929, likely to someone who wouldn’t have been able to afford it two weeks later. The new line of Eights was marked by important design and engineering changes, most notably the Custom’s longer wheelbase and a 4-speed transmission. A Detroit Lubricator updraught carburetor, plated, rounded headlamps, Watson Stabilizer shock absorbers, new gauges and thermostatic radiator shutters made identification easy. The big, incredibly well-built 384.8 CI engine was factory rated at 39.2 HP

and modern dyno tests have revealed about 75 HP, but the long-stroke Eight has been shown to deliver a massive 350-plus-ft-lbs of torque. In the late 1970s, Ontario Packard collector Preston Featherstone purchased this 745 from a San Diego owner, and brought it home for refurbishment. His efforts landed him at Meadow Brook in 1993, and subsequent events elsewhere in North America before passing along stewardship to a private collector. Dual Cowl Phaetons have always been the most sought-after of Full Classics. Equipped with dual

SERIAL NO. 187369 ESTIMATE: $175,000 - $225,000

spotlamps, dual sidemounts, Martin Whitewall tires and Pilot-Ray driving lamps, this immense, powerful and imposing Packard has kept a low profile since participating at the 1999 Packard Centennial Celebration in Warren, Ohio, and the 1999 Old Car Fesitval in Dearborn, Michigan, and the 2006 Packard Nationals in Detroit.

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S187

1965 PORSCHE 911 COUPE

SERIAL NO. 303474

FORMERLY OWNED BY DR. GOODMAN, PARTICIPATED IN THE 1967 SEBRING 12 HOURS

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y 1967 Porsche was engaged in the world of international prototype racing with full force, going from strength to strength with such giant-killers as the 904, 906 and 910 endurance racers, all of which showed up to battle Ford, Ferrari and Alfa at the 1967 Sebring 12 Hours. In the middle of this pack of Prototypen was a small contingent of production 911 coupes running in the GT2 class. This Signal Red 1965 911 coupe was part of that group, qualifying 35th on the grid with a time of 3:27.400 and 164

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finishing in 20th place overall at the hands of German co-drivers Sepp Greger and G端nter Besier. Owned by a Dr. Goodman, it was raced by Greger at Sebring 1967 and again in 1968, when it failed to finish. The car was then used by Dr. Goodman to commute to the hospital where he was a resident physician, during which time he had Porsche-Air air conditioning installed by a local Porsche dealer. After years in storage the car was complete and sound but in need of a restoration. The car is

now completely restored to its 1967 Sebring configuration, including the original matching numbers 2.0 L engine complete with the original Solex 4-D downdraft carburetors, and the early 901 5-speed gearbox. The original sheet metal (including the rolled sheet steel rear wheel flares) and floor pans have been retained, as have the wood dash, wood-rimmed steering wheel and 1965 date-coded competition seat belts. The car is finished with Michelins on extra wide chrome plated steel wheels, driving

ESTIMATE: $175,000 - $225,000

lights, a competition mirror and the same number 41 it wore at Sebring in 1967.


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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

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S188

2008 FORD F750 WORLD CRUISER

SERIAL NO. 3FPXU65X98V689657

THE ULTIMATE MULTI-PURPOSE RECREATIONAL VEHICLE/HAULER BUILT BY PETER DUNKEL TO BE LIKE NO OTHER TOY ON EARTH

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s a partner in Dunkel Bros. Machinery Moving of Alameda, California, Peter Dunkel is no stranger to big toys. He has moved everything from CNC machines to fighter planes, satellites and, perhaps most sensationally, the Space Shuttle Endeavor from LAX Airport to the California Space Center. Having gone through the trials of building and owning several motorhomes and big rigs, Dunkel drew on his experience to produce this Mother of All Multipurpose Vehicles. Dubbed the World 166

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Cruiser, it represents an investment of over $6 million; that’s at least three times the original budget, but to Dunkel it was worth every penny, because the result outperforms anything remotely like it – if in fact there is anything else remotely like it out there, a dubious assumption at best. As the project developed, Dunkel found “a lot more avenues to make and create something better. Let’s just say the art piece got larger and we had to throw the budget out the window because we were going somewhere no

one had ever tried to go.” The World Cruiser’s most obvious feature is its sheer physical enormity. Built as both a motorhome and a heavy duty hauler, the truck was widened 22 inches to accommodate a large vehicle in the back, yet through careful choice of materials and components, it is half the weight of a conventional motorhome while maintaining full functionality and maximum towing capacity. The cab is mounted on a separate chassis that floats on an air ride system mounted

ESTIMATE: $450,000 - $650,000

on the main chassis to maximize comfort and achieve the smoothest possible ride. Onboard utilities – heated air and water, electricity and lighting – are all weak points in a conventional motorhome. Peter Dunkel approached each challenge with due diligence to arrive at the best solution. For example, he invested $20,000 in wiring and components to make sure the electrical system was bulletproof, because that is what it cost to meet that goal. And to eliminate the risk of fire and explosion inherent with


propane, he installed an on-demand hot water system that is both instant and efficient. Dunkel has anticipated the needs of life on the road, which is at its best when you are fully prepared. Dual auxiliary fuel tanks carry a total of 60 gallons of fuel, and there is plenty of carrying capacity for just about any contingency; with a half-inch diamond plate base, the rear bed will tote over 4 tons of cargo, with more storage boxes placed strategically around the truck’s perimeter and below the battery and fuel tank. There is a spare tire carrier, on-board air compressor and a hoist for the most heavy duty emergency repairs, and a water-tight, air-pressurized generator and storage compartments for extra backup. All electrical compartments are centralized and an industrialgrade wireless remote controls every automated feature. The World Cruiser is lavishly appointed for fun and relaxation on the road, including roomy sleeping quarters, a full service bathroom with shower, a complete kitchen with stove top and sink and a livingroom area complete with a couch and flat screen TV. And for those no-holdsbarred tailgate parties, there is a Kenwood Supreme Entertainment sound system with flip up exterior speakers and an exterior 10-inch subwoofer to rock the neighbourhood. It takes awesome power to move this self-contained rolling fortress, a requirement Dunkel answered with a Caterpillar diesel engine rated at 300 HP and 1,200 lb-ft of torque and

mated to an industrial-strength Allison 6-speed automatic transmission. This power team enables highway cruising at an effortless 70 MPH, making the trip from point to point a genuine pleasure. At home or in the wild, there is no other toy on Earth like Peter Dunkel’s incredible Ford F750 World Cruiser.

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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

LOT

S189

1990 VOLKSWAGEN VANAGON GL WESTFALIA RARE 4-WHEEL DRIVE SYNCRO EDITION

P

erhaps the ultimate evolution of the world-famous Volkswagen T-model, or Minibus, was the allwheel drive Vanagon Syncro model, which was built and sold in very limited numbers from 1985 to 1992. The Vanagon Syncro built on the appeal of the original Volkswagen bus with a long list of amenities for outdoor enthusiasts, including a pop up roof, refrigerator, sink, and stove, with the added benefit of 4-wheel drive that could take the Syncro where no 2-WD Vanagon would dare go. In

fact the Syncros were very specialized vehicles, so different from the regular Vanagon that Volkswagen contracted the task of producing them to Austrian manufacturing conglomerate Steyr-Daimler-Puch, who also built the Mercedes-Benz Gelandewagen SUVs. This original 1990 Vanagon GL Westfalia Syncro is being offered from the Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection. Purchased new by the Dunkels in 1990, it has been driven just 64,129 miles and presents in as-new condition as a result of always having been

kept indoors; even the pop-up roof looks like it just came from the showroom. Finished in Dark Blue with a Grey interior and powered by VW’s dependable 2.1 liter engine mated to a manual transmission, the Syncro is generously outfitted with such conveniences as Captain’s chairs with armrests, power windows and locks, air conditioning, cruise control, tachometer, three electrical outlets and rear window defogger. Heavy duty alloy wheels and radial tires provide excellent off-road service. Even an

SERIAL NO. WV2ZB0253LG072348 ESTIMATE: $30,000 - $40,000

outdoor awning is included, making this rare and charming outdoor mascot perfect for camping in every conceivable outdoor environment.

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LOT

S190

2007 BENTLEY AZURE CONVERTIBLE

11,113 MILES WITH RECENT MAJOR SERVICE, OPTIONAL CHROME WHEELS

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he full size Azure is based on the Arnage sedan platform and was the most expensive model Bentley offered in 2007, with a base MSRP of $335,585. The example seen here is finished in stunning Beluga Black with sumptuous Linen hued leather interior and a black fully lined and insulated power-folding soft top. It is very well equipped with optional extras that took its as-delivered retail price to $350,085 when it was sold new in Dallas, Texas. Factory options include Burr Oak veneers and matching Burr Oak wasterails with Bentley logos and chrome

SERIAL NO. SCBDC47L47CX12118 ESTIMATE: $160,000 - $180,000

trim inlays, two-tone leather steering wheel, upgraded chrome 7-spoke wheels, chrome mirror caps, and steel mesh Lower Bumper Matrix. This Bentley has been immaculately kept and received its complete 5-year major service at the official Bentley dealer in November of 2012 with fewer than 300 miles driven since.

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LOT

S191

2006 SUNDOULOS SPORTSTAR

SERIAL NO. CA498846

ONE-OF-A-KIND PROTOTYPE SHOW CAR WITH CORVETTE LS1/425 HP V-8 AND PORSCHE 5-SPEED GEARBOX

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he SportStar is a custom designed ground up one-off concept show car prototype powered by a midmounted Corvette LS1 5.7 Liter 425 HP V-8 engine with power transmitted through a Porsche G 50-52 fivespeed transaxle. The chassis and suspension were originally designed for endurance racing but rules changes altered its course for street use. The SportStar is registered in California under Regulation SB100 and is smog exempt. The chassis is a composite of 4130 Chromoly bonded to composite honeycomb panels for a super-strong rigid structure. All major body deco172

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rative and trim components, such as head light assemblies, light frames and components, tail lights, grills, instruments, wheels and cockpit chrome are custom designed and meticulously crafted for the SportStar’s unique look. The SportStar A-arms and bulkheads are CNC machined from billet 2024 aluminum blocks. Shocks and suspension feature rocker arms designed to function as a 24hour endurance race car suspension. The ultra-long billet aluminum front A-arms mount in the center of the chassis, which result in very little camber change through the suspen-

sion travel range. The design is a sporty, classy and elegant retro 1930s look. Paint is custom “Blue-Black” Spies Hecker acrylic series 293 base coat blend. Aerodynamics features include a front splitter to direct air to sidemounted rear radiators aft of the cab for far superior airflow. The rear wing is central mounted and the entertainment / navigation system is an Alpine TME DVD with a 6.5” LCD screen. It has been driven only for special events and has been shown in several Concours d’Elegance events in the super car group. Design and

ESTIMATE: $175,000 - $225,000

construction time was approximately five years. The only one like it in the world, SportStar has been featured in numerous magazines and has served a purpose to help raise awareness and funding for worldwide charities such as Free Wheelchair Mission.


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S192

1924 FORD HOT ROD RACE CAR “THE ELIMINATOR” WELL KNOWN WEST COAST RACER OFFERED FROM THE COLLECTION OF BROCK AND PAMELA YATES

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lthough legendary automotive writer Brock Yates has long been associated with the Eliminator, before he bought the car in 1997 his only contact with it was as a young Navy recruit watching sports car races at Montgomery Field near San Diego in 1956, by which time it was a fixture in California sports and oval track racing. When first assembled for California Roadster Association (CRA) short track racing in 1950 by Sherman Oaks, California, rodder Jay Chamberlain, it featured a 1924 Ford T-bucket body with early '20s chassis and running gear, and a sleek 174

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nose fabricated by Indy car body builder Emil Deidt. It was rendered obsolete before it was completed when CRA short track rules were changed to allow tube frames, and Chamberlain sold the rolling chassis to Frank “Duffy” Livingstone, who with his partner Paul Parker installed a Ford flathead V-8, Cadillac 3-speed and Bendix-style front brakes to race it as a sports car. In 1956 Livingstone’s muffler business was thriving, and he replaced the ancient flathead with a new 265 CI small block Chevy, which engine builder Tim Timmerman built up

and hooked to a Borg Warner T-10 4-speed. Running in both SCCA C-Modified and Formula Libre, the Eliminator began competing with and besting much more modern machinery driven by America’s top drivers. Its crowning moment came at the 1959 Los Angeles Herald Examiner International Grand Prix at the Pomona County fairgrounds, where it qualified 19th in a field of 57 cars, drew as high as 8th and finally finished in 11th against such stars as Carroll Shelby, Ken Miles, Dan Gurney and Phil Hill, all driving the newest European exotics.

SOLD ON BILL OF SALE ESTIMATE: $175,000 - $200,000

By 1960 Livingstone had established the Go Kart Company to answer the booming new karting craze (ergo the prominent Go Kart logos on the Eliminator’s engine cover). He placed his aging hot rod in storage and eventually sold it, after which it passed from one shop to another over more than 20 years, most of that time in the dry Arizona climate. In 1996 Brock Yates found the car advertised in Hemmings Motor News. He quickly purchased the partly restored car from Tom Murphy of Phoenix and turned it over to Pete Chapouris’ famed SoCal Speed Shop. With


generous assistance from Duffy Livingstone, SoCal performed a minimal restoration to prepare the Eliminator for the 1997 Monterey Historic Automobile Races, where its brilliant showing against period Ferraris and other exotica garnered the Chopard Award for Best Performance. The Eliminator was subsequently upgraded for vintage competition by Riter Restoration in East Rochester, New York, while maintaining such details as the old USAC and NHRA decals and the front brake scoops formed by slicing a Japanese WWII army helmet in half! After several years on the vintage racing circuit the Eliminator was retired to the show circuit, scoring yet another major achievement when it won its Road Racing Hot Rod class at the 2003 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance with collector-restorer Barry Brown at the wheel, Duffy Livingstone in the passenger seat and Yates perched on the old racer’s still-dented rear deck.

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From The Peter and Cheryl Dunkel Collection

LOT

S193

1950 WESTCRAFT CORONADO TROLLEY TOP TRAVEL TRAILER BEAUTIFULLY RESTORED EXAMPLE WITH KITCHEN DINETTE AND PRIVATE SLEEPING QUARTERS

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he Westcraft Manufacturing Company of Los Angeles and later Burbank, California, manufactured two different lines of trailers: Westwood and Westcraft. The earlier Westwood brand models included the Coronado, Montecito, Monterey, Tahoe and Sequoia. The Westcraft series included the Coronado, Montecito, Shasta, Sequoia and Yosemite models. Westcraft built its earlier Westwood models from 1946 through 1948, the designs for each of the successive model years being unique

from previous versions, all of which were identified by a rather plain-looking “bread loaf” appearance. In 1949 the Westcraft Company discontinued the Westwood models and began focusing exclusively on five completely new “Pullman” or “Trolley Top” models. Both the earlier Westwood and the later Westcraft series were top-quality trailers built using aircraft construction techniques with aluminum rib frames, and were valued by discriminating buyers who appreciated their aluminum

exterior panelling, which were of a heavier gauge than such competitors as Spartan, Aero Flite, Silver Streak and Airstream. Many vintage trailer enthusiasts consider the Westcraft trailers of the late 1940s and early 1950s to be some of the best travel trailers ever built, and today they are highly sought after by vintage car and woody owners who want to experience the travel trailer lifestyle as it was then. This 1950 Westcraft Coronado Trolley Top is a beautiful restoration that possesses great nostalgic

SERIAL NO. 50C7389 ESTIMATE: $35,000 - $45,000

charm. The two-tone Gold and White exterior reflects common Westcraft practice, and the interior woodwork, a company hallmark, must be seen to be believed. The kitchen is equipped with a sink, oven and range (not hooked up). Located at the front, the living area features a couch, panoramic windows and overhead storage; at the tail end is a private sleeping quarters with a double bed. Wood slatted blinds on most of the windows add even more to this wonderful vintage trailer’s '50s appeal. S AT U R DAY

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LOT

S194

2006 FISKER TRAMONTO CONVERTIBLE

SERIAL NO. WDBSK76F36F11664

1 OF ONLY 15 EXAMPLES DESIGNED AND PRODUCED BY FISKER COACHBUILD BASED ON A MERCEDES-BENZ 600SL AMG

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oday the name Fisker evokes images of the sleek hybrid luxury Karma coupe that debuted in January 2008 at the North American International Auto Show. But Henrik Fisker has been a top designer since his early days at BMW, where he conceived the Z07 concept car and the production Z8 Roadster before becoming Design Director at Aston Martin. Fisker realized a dream of designing a car bearing his name with this car, the Fisker Coachbuild Tramonto convertible. Based on the 2006 Mercedes-Benz 600SL, it benefits from the technological strengths of that advanced

platform to produce a uniquely shaped two-seat, open-air exotic. The 600SL’s excellent engineering flexes its technological muscles from within the Fisker designed body, which capitalizes on aluminum and carbon fiber to achieve its shape, fit and finish while relying on selective use of steel to enhance strength and torsional rigidity. The myriad array of Mercedes-Benz's finest technological innovations, from the power-retractable hardtop to Active Body Control (ABC), remain untouched – as do safety systems, including crumple zones and airbags. At the same time,

ESTIMATE: $100,000 - $175,000

the Tramonto has become something much more, and the differences go beyond what meets the eye. Inside, all seat and fascia surfaces are expertly hand trimmed and hand stitched, in a selection of super-premium, soft yet durable Italian leathers. Milled aluminum highlights the center stack, where every Tramonto is individually numbered and, in this case, signed by Fisker himself for the new owner Monterey weekend. Ultimately only 15 of these fabulous machines were built, a fact that makes its owner a member of a particularly exclusive club. S AT U R DAY

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180

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LOT

S195

1953 CHEVROLET CORVETTE ROADSTER #83 OF 300 PRODUCED, ORIGINAL AND UNRESTORED WITH ONLY 4,300 MILES

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nly six months after the Harley Earl-designed Corvette debuted at the Motorama at New York’s Waldorf Astoria, Chevrolet’s dream car started production. Production may be the wrong word, though, as the entire run was hand-built in Flint, Michigan, before a production line was established. Surviving first-year Corvettes are incredibly rare. After all, Chevrolet only built 300 and while unsurprising they’ve survived at a high rate, that means there are only about 225 known to remain. Among those, Corvette no. 83 has

attained near legendary status. Apart from prior celebrity ownership by country music immortal Alan Jackson, the odometer shows just over 4,300 miles, and there’s every indication those are actual miles. All 1953 Corvettes were equipped identically: Polo White paint over a Sportsman Red interior and a black canvas top; high-compression 150 HP, 235 CI Blue Flame Special fed by triple Carter YH carburetors, and the mandatory “optional” Powerglide transmission, heater and signal seeking WonderBar AM radio. A previous examination of no. 83

by a marque expert revealed that it appears to have retained its original engine, with a casting number indicating a June 8, 1953 casting date, correct for the serial number range and about three weeks before the first production car would have been assembled. Cylinder head numbers also indicate it was built in 1953, and cosmetic condition corroborates the mileage. All trim appears to be present, and both chrome and the interior are strong. Careful inspection will reveal no signs of damage repair to either the frame or hand-laid fiberglass body, and the suspension and

SERIAL NO. E53F001083 ESTIMATE: $250,000 - $300,000

running gear appear substantially original, as well. Any serious American car collection has a ‘53 Corvette, and with only a finite quantity, it can be hard to find one worth displaying. Listed in the Corvette Action Center and C1 Registries, serial no. 83 is not only presentable, it’s unrestored, making it a crown jewel among early Corvettes.

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LOT

S196

1932 FORD PHAETON STREET ROD

SERIAL NO. 1708236 ESTIMATE: $150,000 - $200,000

PORSCHE FOUR CAM 4.5L V-8, CUSTOM BUILT BY PAUL NEWMAN

I

f the ultimate goal of building a custom hot rod is to create a one-of-akind expression of both show and go, then car builder Paul Newman nailed it when he completed the 1932 Fordbased "Deuception" for Los Gatos, California, customer Jerry Brassfield. Brassfield contracted Newman in 1986 to begin design and construction of a street rod that would meld the best of Porsche's Teutonic power and handling engineering with wild looks drawing inspiration from the classic all-American '32 Ford. Five years later, the project yielded a result worthy of a feature story in the July 182

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1991 issue of Hot Rod Magazine. At first glance, it is apparent that Deuception's wild custom fiberglass Phaeton body finds its foundation in the form of a 1932 Ford Victoria, but with a chopped top. Fenders, running boards, three-piece hood and grille shell are hand-formed in metal. Supporting the body is a trick backbone frame of 1.25-inch mild steel tubing. Suspension pieces were custom crafted utilizing 4130 chrome-moly. Instead of finding the usual Ford flathead or small block Chevy under the hood, Deuception showcases the potent water-cooled four-cam 4.5L

V-8 engine and 3-speed automatic transaxle out of a 1981 Porsche 928. Just to shake things up, the V-8's stock fuel injection was tossed in favor of eye-catching quad carburetion. For reining in the speed, behind the fat Momo wheels (16x8 front; 16x13 rear) with Porsche logos, are the rotors and calipers built by Porsche specifically for its fastest contemporary production car: the 930. Inside, the driver and passenger will find Connolly leather was used not only for the seats, but also the matching custom luggage pieces. Deuception truly is a benchmark period example

of state-of-the-art California-style street rodding.


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LOT

S197

1964 VOLKSWAGEN SAMBA 21 WINDOW BUS

1600CC ENGINE, 4-SPEED MANUAL TRANSMISSION, PROFESSIONAL ROTISSERIE RESTORATION

A

mong lovers of the iconic “Samba” microbus, the 1962-67 models are prized for their combination of split-window styling, which disappeared in the next generation, and the more powerful optional 1500 “Fifteen” engine. These 21-window Splitties also have a larger, more convenient tailgate and rear windshield, making maneuvering and parking a far less stressful proposition. Innumerable options and configurations were available to the Microbus buyer in the mid '60s. In addition to the 23- and 21-window Transporters, one could also choose a solid-rear

Delivery Van with doors (sliding or clamshell) on one or both sides; the High Roof Delivery; the Pickup; the longbed Pickup, the "dubbele kabine" double cab Pickup; Kombi campervan; and other, even more esoteric options like an enormous, folding panoramic sunroof. Chassis 1145145 was scheduled for production on August 6, 1963, and delivered to Seattle, Washington. The data plate indicates is was a Model 241, which was configured with eight seats, a full middle seat and right side cargo doors. As a U.S.-spec model, it had six pop-out windows, American bumpers

and safety belt mountings. Originally built in Blue White over Turquoise, the only change during a bare-metal, rotisserie restoration by KAO Auto Styling in Las Vegas, Nevada, was to a brighter White upper exterior color, over a stunning tri-tone Como and Phosphor Green interior. The rotisserie, bare-metal restoration saw all new Safari-style window glass installed, plus a later 65 HP, 1,585cc crate engine. The interior is fully restored with authentic German square weave carpet. Since restoration, it has been in a climate-controlled private collection, and should thus still be in

SERIAL NO. 1145145 ESTIMATE: $100,000 - $130,000

as-restored condition. Unlike some vehicles that come into and out of favor with changing tastes, the Samba is as wildly popular today as it was when built. In fact, as soon as 21-window Splittie production ended in 1967, it became an instant classic, and has remained so ever since.

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LOT

S198

1923 ROLLS-ROYCE SILVER GHOST CABRIOLET de VILLE COACHWORK BY BARKER & CO. OF LONDON, FORMERLY OWNED BY FRANK COOKE

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ive-position tops were popular wherever the weather was changeable, as well as among owners of big cars who didn’t want the trouble and expense of having different bodies for summer and winter driving. The terms Salamanca and Cabriolet de Ville are often used interchangeably for this body style; however, the traditional 4-5 seat arrangement favored and employed here by Barker is the Cabriolet de Ville, where a Salamanca will seat two more. Either will have a full cloth top, roll-up windows and folding B-pillars. With everything in place it is a fully enclosed limousine, complete with roll-up glass divider for the chauffeur’s

compartment. Removing the top over the driver creates a Sedanca de Ville; while conversely, the passenger compartment can be exposed as a Victoria or Landaulette. Rolling down the divider, stowing the window pillars and folding the top back entirely yields a topless Sedanca of immense presence and grace. Rolls-Royce introduced the Silver Ghost in 1906, and improved it incrementally through its 19-year run. In truth, it is properly the 40/50 Model, but a famous all-silver car from 1907 lent its name informally to the entire line. As a very late production 1923 Silver Ghost, this car benefits from servo-assisted front

brakes and 4-speed transmission, as well as the model’s 7.5-liter inline-six engine. 35NK was long in the custody of Frank Cooke, a technical director of the Rolls-Royce club of America, and whose Vintage Rolls-Royce Garage in Massachusetts was a mecca for lovers of the marque. It was restored in the early 1980s by owner Al Kohnle, and appears to have been carefully maintained since then. Browsing through old issues of club gazette The Flying Lady shows 35NK at events throughout the years and has been part of a noted New Mexico collection. Relatively recent use on tours has demonstrated this Silver Ghost’s fitness

CHASSIS NO. 35NK ESTIMATE: $150,000 - $200,000

for driving, as well as the versatility of the Cabriolet de Ville top. London’s Barker & Co. Ltd. was the semi-official coachbuilder for RollsRoyce, as C.S. Rolls preferred their bodywork to all others. It is here applied to the last of the Silver Ghosts, the magnificent Flying Lady that earned Rolls-Royce the reputation it has enjoyed to this day.

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LOT

S199

1969 LOLA T-163 CAN-AM RACE CAR

SERIAL NO. SL163/20

PILOTED BY STEVE WEAVER TO SCCA VICTORIES AT MICHIGAN AND INDIANAPOLIS IN 1970

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he legendary British race car designer and constructor Eric Broadley formed Lola to supply competitive cars to teams around the globe. Choosing only to sell to private owners, rather than campaign a factory works team, proved the right decision, as Lola is now England's longest-serving and most successful manufacturer of racing cars. Between 1958 and 2013 Lola's competition record is simply staggering: 6,758 entries in nearly 2,300 races, with twothirds finishing the race; 512 outright wins; 315 additional class wins; and over 1,000 podium finishes. 188

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After successfully developing Formula Juniors and Formula 1 cars on its own, Broadley's team worked with Ford on the Lola MK6, which led to Ford's request for the company to take the design lead on the Ford GT40. Lessons learned on the eventual Le Mans-dominating GT40 immediately paid dividends with Lola's own legendary T70, which won the inaugural Canadian-American Racing Series in 1966. As the fastest race series in the world, competition in the Can-Am was fierce and dangerous. Though Lola replaced the aging T70 with the T160 in 1968, increasing competition

required continued development for the 1969 season. The resulting car was called the T163, an advanced open racer with a lightweight alloy monocoque structure. Chassis SL163/20 was delivered to American Lola importer Carl Haas on June 6, 1969. Its first owner, G Auto USA didn't utilize the car, so in 1970 it was sold to SCCA racer Steve Weaver of Indianapolis. Weaver drove SL163/20 to 3rd place in the SCCA Central National Division points standings, with two outright wins at Michigan and Indianapolis Raceway Park. At the completion of the sea-

ESTIMATE: $225,000 - $275,000

son, Weaver sold the SL163/20 chassis to Gregory Hodges, who campaigned it in SCCA California events. In 1973, Tony Settember acquired the car and entered it in the 1973 Laguna Seca Can-Am, where it blew a head gasket on just the second lap. SL163/20's last appearance in Can-Am was under the ownership of Charles Semple, whose driver Bob Kemple qualified for the 1973 Riverside race but failed to start. After retiring from active racing, the car had a number of documented owners within America, New Zealand and France, who displayed it in their personal collections. In 2009,


SL163/20 returned to California when it was sold to its latest owner. He had the car prepared for vintage racing by Toluca Lake Historics. With recent appearances and continued eligibility at great vintage racing events, SL163/20 offers the opportunity to compete in exciting Can-Am reunion classes. It is powered by a potent carbureted 358 CI 1968 small block Chevrolet engine, with dry sump lubrication and magneto ignition. A Hewland LG 600 5-speed gearbox and Hewland differential transfer power to the 15x16 rear alloy wheels. Fast and nimble, courtesy of rack and pinion steering, SL163/20 is a perfect match for vintage motorsports collectors and those looking to upgrade to an ultimate vintage racing experience.

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LOTS S200 - S202

ROAD ART S200 1963 TEAM SHELBY COBRA JACKET

S201 1960s ERA PORSCHE SLED

ESTIMATE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

ESTIMATE: $800 - $1,000

S201.1 1970 PORSCHE AROVA 212 SKI-BOB

S202 PORSCHE LEATHER LUGGAGE SET

ESTIMATE: $2,000 - $2,500

ESTIMATE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

LOT

One of the most collectible pieces of Cobra memorabilia in the world. Custom made for Shelby Race Team Member Burney Russell.

LOT

Porsche Design in collaboration with the Arova Company produced a limited supply of this revolutionary and patented snow glider.

190

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LOT

A fine example of a Porsche fiberglass sled produced in the mid 1960s built complete with grab handles and cushion.

LOT

3 Piece leather set designed and produced for Porshe 356 vehicles prior to 1960. Luggage interior finished with signature Porsche plaid design.


ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF LOTS

DESCRIPTION

LOT #

DESCRIPTION

LOT #

2007

BENTLEY AZURE CONVERTIBLE

S190

1971

DODGE CHALLENGER R/T

S125

1931

BENTLEY LE MANS SPECIAL

S142

1971

DODGE HEMI CHALLENGER R/T

S147

1936

CORD 810 SPORTSMAN

S148

1998

DODGE VIPER GTS-R

S173

1949

CADILLAC PHANTOM WAGON

S159

1930

DUESENBERG MODEL J TORPEDO PHAETON

S154

1962

CHEVROLET BEL AIR LIGHTWEIGHT BUBBLE TOP

S135

1924

FORD "THE ELIMINATOR"

S192

1970

CHEVROLET CHEVELLE CONVERTIBLE

S170

1932

FORD PHAETON ROADSTER

S196

1953

CHEVROLET CORVETTE ROADSTER

S195

1933

FORD AUBURN SPECIAL

S133

1957

CHEVROLET CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

S175

2008

FORD F750 WORLD CRUISER

S188

1961

CHEVROLET CORVETTE GULF RACE CAR

S156

2006

FORD GT

S152

1963

CHEVROLET CORVETTE SPLIT WINDOW COUPE

S168

1969

FORD MUSTANG BOSS 429 FASTBACK

S144

1968

CHEVROLET CORVETTE L88 CONVERTIBLE

S158

1970

FORD MUSTANG BOSS 429 FASTBACK

S167

2008

CHEVROLET CORVETTE CUSTOM

S180

1954

FERRARI 750 MONZA SPIDER SCAGLIETTI

S132

1967

CHEVROLET YENKO CAMARO

S146

1990

FERRARI F40

S141

S150

1988

FERRARI TESTAROSSA

S184

1938/39 DELAGE D8-120 AÉROSPORT COUPE

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ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF LOTS CONTINUED

DESCRIPTION

LOT #

DESCRIPTION

LOT #

2006

FISKER TRAMONTO CONVERTIBLE

S194

1999

MERCEDES-BENZ CLK60 GT RENNTECH WIDEBODY

S123

1932

HUPP COMET #4 INDY CAR

S148.1

2008

MERCEDES-BENZ SLR MCLAREN ROADSTER

S149

1937

INGALLS SPECIAL ROAD RACE CAR

S122

1963

MODENA SPYDER CALIFORNIA

S163

1954

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER R140 WOODY

S177

1969

PONTIAC FIREBIRD 400 CONVERTIBLE

S169

1908

ISOTTA FRASCHINI TIPO FENC TWO SEATER

S165

1957

PORSCHE 356A SPEEDSTER

S171

1982

JAGUAR XJR-5 GTP RACE CAR

S129

1957

PORSCHE 356A SPEEDSTER

S155

1954

JAGUAR XK120 ROADSTER

S116

1958

PORSCHE 356A SPEEDSTER RACE CAR

S146.1

1954

JAGUAR XK120SE ROADSTER

S151

1963

PORSCHE 356B CARRERA 2 COUPE

S137

1967

JAGUAR XKE ROADSTER

S127

1962

PORSCHE 356B NOTCHBACK COUPE

S128

1909

LOCOMOBILE MODEL 40 TYPE I DEMI TONNEAU

S136

1960

PORSCHE 356B REUTTER CABRIOLET

S143

1969

LOLA T163 CAN AM RACE CAR

S199

1964

PORSCHE 356C CABRIOLET

S153

1984

LOTUS TYPE 95T JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL

S138

1964

PORSCHE 356C COUPE

S166

1985

MARCH/BUICK 85G GTP RACE CAR

S124

1965

PORSCHE 356C CABRIOLET

S164

1962

MERCEDES-BENZ 190SL ROADSTER

S131

1955

PORSCHE 550/1500 RS SPYDER

S134

192

S AT U R DAY


ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF LOTS CONTINUED

DESCRIPTION

LOT #

DESCRIPTION

LOT #

1965

PORSCHE 911 COUPE

S187

1964

SHELBY 289 INDEPENDENT COMPETITION COBRA

S145

1987

PORSCHE 911 TURBO SLANTNOSE

S130

1966

SHELBY GT350 RACE CAR

S161

1981

PORSCHE 936 JUNIOR

S181

1967

SHELBY GT500 FASTBACK

S139

1954

PORSCHE ALLGAIER A133 DIESEL

S185

1969

SHELBY GT500 FASTBACK

S157

2005

PORSCHE CARRERA GT ROADSTER

S160

2006

SUNDOULOS SPORTSTAR

S191

1940

PACKARD 120 WOODY STATION WAGON

S140

1962

VOLKSWAGEN 23 WINDOW DELUXE BUS

S178

1932

PACKARD DELUXE EIGHT 745 DUAL COWL PHAETON S186

1964

VOLKSWAGEN SAMBA 21 WINDOW BUS

S197

1932

PACKARD TWIN SIX DUAL COWL PHAETON

S126

1990

VOLKSWAGEN VANAGON GL WESTFALIA

S189

1913

PEERLESS MODEL 48-SIX ROADSTER

S162

1950

WESTCRAFT TROLLEY TOP TRAVEL TRAILER

S193

1940

PLYMOUTH DELUXE WOODY WAGON

S179

1932

ROLLS-ROYCE PHANTOM II HUNTINGTON LIMOUSINE S172

1923

ROLLS-ROYCE SILVER GHOST CABRIOLET de VILLE

S198

1924

ROLLS-ROYCE SILVER GHOST PALL MALL TOURER

S176

2003

SALEEN S7

S174

S AT U R DAY

193


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Monterey 2013 - Saturday Catalog Cars