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The Dispatch May 7, 2021

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The Bridge Miracle: A horrific accident on the Route 90 Bridge Sunday afternoon had a happy ending with no major injuries sustained despite a 2-year-old child falling into the bay before being rescued by a Good Samaritan. See pages 6-8 for full stories.

Photo by Campos Media

Berlin Project Excites Community

Resort Still Defending Topless Ban

Springfest Underway In Ocean City

See Page 23 • Submitted Photo

See Page 22 • Photo by Chris Parypa

See Page 58 • Photo by Chris Parypa


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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May 7, 2021


May 7, 2021

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Ocean City Lacrosse Event Moved Up To July For This Year Page 4

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Ocean City is still getting a major OC Lax Fest tournament this summer, but it will be about a month earlier than originally proposed. In December, the Mayor and Council approved funding for the new OC Lax Fest, the first in a series of outdoor and indoor lacrosse tournaments over the next few years produced by the Legendary Sports Group, which produces many of the larger lacrosse tournaments in the region and around the country. OC Lax Fest is designed to bolster the aging Ocean City Lacrosse Classic, which has been played in and around the resort since its inception in 1993, but has seen its popularity wane in recent years due to stiff competition from other

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

major tournaments around the country. For example, a major tournament in Lake Placid, N.Y., typically held the same weekend as the Ocean City Lacrosse Classic in August, has siphoned off some of the top elite teams. To that end, the Legendary Sports Group, led by a couple of lacrosse heavyweights in Hall of Famer Dave Cottle, who coached at the University of Maryland and Loyola University, and Dave Pietramala, who coached at Johns Hopkins and won two national championships, brought the concept of the OC Lax Fest to the Mayor and Council. The concept was to hold a major youth tournament for boys and girls during the week in advance of the traditional Ocean City Lacrosse Classic, which is still planned for this August. The concept is for lacrosse moms

and dads to watch their kids play all week in the OC Lax Fest youth tournament, and they suit up and play in the Ocean City Lacrosse Classic men’s and women’s tournaments on the weekend. In that way, the book-ended tournaments become a weeklong celebration of the sport compared to the traditional three or four-day Ocean City Lacrosse Classic. When the OC Lax Fest was pitched, and ultimately approved, in December, the tournament was set for the second week in August. Resort officials supported the concept, but the desire was to have the tournament in June. The feeling was the proposed August dates fell just after the White Marlin Open at a time when the resort is already crowded. There is already a significant youth

May 7, 2021

tournament in June and the feeling was the OC Lax Classic could be coupled with that event and really fill hotel rooms at a time of the year that needs bolstering. Ultimately, the August dates were approved for this year with the understanding the tournament would be moved to June in out years. However, the Legendary Sports Group is now requesting to hold the tournament in July for this year. Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association Executive Director Susan Jones, representing the Tourism Advisory Board (TAB) pitched the date change to the Mayor and Council on Monday. “It was presented before and you approved it,” she said. “However, they are now asking for the July 12-13 dates. As a tourism community, those dates look better. They think they can make it work in July. It’s for this year only. It’s not permanent. The ultimate goal is to have the tournament in June.” Jones explained the OC Lax Fest games would be played on fields in the county at-large for this year. She reiterated the goal is to have the tournament in June in the future, along with indoor tournaments each winter produced by the same group. “Northside Park is not available for the July dates,” she said. “The games will be played on fields out in the county. They are also working on an indoor tournament for next winter.” Jones urged the Mayor and Council, which has long desired attracting major sports events to the town as part of an image rebranding, to approve the date change for this year. “This is a group we can work with,” she said. “The goal is to attract large sports tournaments, and this group has a great track record.” Based on a recommendation from TAB, the Mayor and Council in December approved funding at $50,000 for the first year, $40,000 for the second year, and $30,000 in the third year. The tournament is expected to draw as many as 100 teams with 20 players each, along with their families and supporters, which should fill a lot of hotel rooms. With the games to be played out in the county for this year, Mayor Rick Meehan questioned of the tournament’s website and marketing materials would include a direct link to book rooms in participating Ocean City hotels, essentially known as a housing authority. “If the tournament is going to be held out in the county, I think it’s important that we have a housing authority,” he said. “It’s in our best interest.” Jones said a memorandum of understanding has not yet been established, but that could be a condition of approval. “The goal is not to always have it out in the county,” she said. “Their desire is always Northside Park. They’re just trying to get through this first year.” The council ultimately approved the date change for this year with the conditions from the prior approval in December still in place.


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Page 6

Good Samaritan Prevents Tragedy In Bridge Accident

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

The Route 90 Bridge was shut down for more than six hours last Sunday due to the multi-vehicle accident.

Photo by Rob Korb

OCEAN CITY – Thanks to the heroic efforts of all involved, including a Good Samaritan who leaped from the Route 90 bridge into the shallow water below, a two-year-old child ejected from a pickup truck teetering over the guardrail. Around 2:47 p.m. on Sunday, Ocean City Communications dispatched fire and police units to the Route 90 bridge for a multi-vehicle crash with multiple injuries. Worcester County Fire Marshal Rob Korb arrived on the scene moments after the collision occurred, grabbed his radio and advised incoming units there were five vehicles involved, including one hanging over the side of the bridge. A mass casualty incident was declared, and the call was upgraded to a rescue response. During the collision, a 2-year-old female was ejected with her car seat from the pickup truck teetering over the guardrail and landed in the bay below the bridge. A heroic witness, who has asked to remain anonymous, jumped from the bridge into the bay and rescued the child. The heroic witness and the child were picked up by the local pontoon boat and transported to the public boat ramp at 65th Street where paramedics awaited. The child was flown to Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore via Maryland State Police Trooper 4 helicopter. On Monday, the Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) reported the child remained in Johns Hopkins Hospital in stable condition. On Tuesday, Ocean City officials announced the child was released from the hospital and should recover. Seven others were injured in the multi-vehicle collision and were triaged on the bridge before being transported via ambulance to area hospitals. According to the OCPD release all the individuals who were transported to the hospital have been released. The Ocean City Fire Department secured the vehicle teetering over the edge of the guardrail with rescue tools, while paramedics treated the multiple priority patients. The Route 90 bridge was closed on both directions for several hours as first responders treated the victims and cleared the accident scene. Due to the complexity of the crash, the investigation is ongoing by the OCPD’s Traffic Safety Unit. Preliminarily, it appears multiple crashes may have occurred, according to the OCPD release. Local resident Joe Oertel was out on the bay with his wife, Tricia, and their youngest daughter, Alayna, and were the first to reach the Good Samaritan SEE NEXT PAGE


No Major Injuries For Ejected Child

May 7, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

OCEAN CITY – The good news is the 2-year-child ejected into the bay during Sunday’s multi-vehicle accident was released from the hospital on Tuesday, but the incident could trigger a renewed effort to dualize the dangerous highway. Around 2:47 p.m. last Sunday, multiple vehicles collided on the Route 90 bridge, leaving eight total injured, including a 2-year-old female child, who had been ejected with her car seat from a pickup truck left teetering over the guardrail and fell roughly 30 feet into the bay below. A Good Samaritan on the bridge saw the child ejected into the bay and jumped over the rail to save her before being pulled out of water by a local family boating nearby. By Monday afternoon, seven individuals injured during the collision had been released from area hospitals. By Tuesday morning, the 2-year-old child was released from a Baltimore hospital and is expected to make a full recovery. At the close of Monday’s regular meeting, Mayor Rick Meehan praised the selfless “humble hero,” as he is being called, and took the occasion to rekindle discussions about dualizing Route 90. Before he delved into the latter, however, the mayor had high praise for the Good Samaritan who leaped from the bridge into shallow water at his own peril to save the child. “One of the patients that was transported was a 2-year-old baby that was

ejected from one of the vehicles and dropped into the bay,” he said. “The incident was very difficult, but it would have been even more so if it hadn’t have been for an extremely heroic individual. This humble hero jumped from the bridge to rescue the child. There is no doubt this individual saved that child’s life.” Throughout the week, the humble hero preferred to remain anonymous. However, his identity is expected to be revealed at a press conference on Friday. As of Monday’s meeting, however, he was known simply as the “humble hero.” “We call him a humble hero and that really is the case because, at this point, the individual prefers to remain anonymous,” said Meehan. “We should send our heartfelt gratitude out to this individual and thanks from every person in this community.” Meehan said the positive outcome for all involved was welcome news in a persistent sea of negativity for the most part. “There’s a lot of negative news out there, but thankfully, although this was a tragic accident, it did have what can at least be deemed a happy ending,” he said. “Everybody survived, and everybody appears to be fine.” Meehan said Sunday’s incident proved again how quickly life can change in an instant and also praised the firstresponders for their efforts. “I hope tonight we all go home to our families and we remember how lucky SEE PAGE 8

holding the infant in the bay near the bridge after his courageous leap. Oertel gave a harrowing account of how his family, particularly Alayna, recognized there was something serious happening on the bridge and the family knew they needed to respond. “Our youngest Alayna was driving the boat and she noticed cars u-turning on the bridge,” he said. “It was Alayna that alerted us to the situation. We got under the bridge and saw the vehicle hanging over the side. We started driving down that way and saw a man standing in the water waving his arms.” Oertel said it was only after they had pulled closer to the man in the water that they realized he was holding a child. “We navigated as close as we could, and we realized he was holding an infant,” he said. “We were in rescue mode by then. We asked him if there was anyone else in the water. My wife, Tricia, dropped a ladder and took the child from the man, she handed it to me and Alayna wrapped it in a blanket. We pulled the man aboard the boat. The baby was crying, and the man appeared to be in shock a little. The water was cold, but I don’t think it was hypothermic.” Oertel said it wasn’t until later that

the family learned the man in the water had leaped from the bridge into the shallow water to rescue the child. “We didn’t realize the man had jumped from the bridge to save the child,” he said. “We thought he was the father at first. His own child was still up on the bridge and he called to her to tell her to stay right where she was. It was surreal. Every second counted.” Oertel said little was said as the boat raced to the public boat ramp. He said the family was thankful to be in the right place at the right time. “There really wasn’t any conversation,” he said. “We took off for the 66th Street boat ramp and the paramedics were pulling in right as we arrived. Luckily, we live here and we knew right where the boat ramp was. Other boaters in the area might not have known to head to the public boat ramp.” Oertel said they learned very little about the heroic rescuer. “We handed the baby to the paramedics and the man got out of the boat and walked over to one of the fire department SUVs,” he said. “That was the last we saw of him. We didn’t know until later that he had jumped from the bridge.” A video of the rescue can be found at mdcoastdispatch.com

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Page 8

… Mayor Salutes ‘Humble Hero,’ Renews Concerns

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Eight people were injured in last Sunday’s accident on the Route 90 Bridge.

May 7, 2021

Photo by Campos Media

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FROM PAGE 7 we are to have those first responders,” he said. “We should all be very thankful they were out there, and they were doing the job they were hired to do and that they want to do.” Meehan said Route 90 was closed in both directions for about six hours while first responders triaged and transported victims, secured the vehicle hanging over the guardrail and cleared the wreckage before the bridge could be safely reopened. “Our fire and police personnel worked on the scene for nearly six hours,” he said. “They didn’t leave until that entire area was secure. The bridge was closed down for about six hours.” While somewhat reluctant to broach the topic, Meehan took the opportunity to point out Sunday’s incident was another example of the need for the future dualization of Route 90 and its bridges. “As a side note, and I don’t want to piggyback on this too much, but the Mayor and Council have been very, very consistent in our approach that we believe Route 90 should be dualized,” he said. “If there was ever something that really exemplifies why that’s the case, this is it.” For years, Ocean City officials have expressed their desire to see Route 90 improvements, including expanding the highway and its bridges from the current two lanes to four to ease access in and out of the resort for the public, but perhaps more importantly for emergency services including fire apparatus and ambulances, for example. For years, State Highway Administration (SHA) officials have listened to and acknowledged the town’s pleas to expedite the dualization of the Route 90 corridor and it remains near the top of Worcester County’s priority list for state highway projects, but it appears no closer to becoming a reality. Route 589 is next up on the state’s list. “Not only maybe the accident might not have happened, but also the highway was closed down for six hours,” said Meehan. “If that had happened at a time when we were trying to evacuate the town of Ocean City, that would have created a catastrophe.” Again, with Sunday’s incident still so fresh, Meehan was somewhat reluctant to use it as a catalyst to renew the Route 90 dualization effort, but said it could be used to illustrate the importance. “I hate to utilize an incident like this to rationalize why something should be done, but hopefully, this will raise awareness and help move this up to the top of the list,” he said. “Not that I want to do it, but at least it’s an opportunity to point how serious this situation has become.”


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 9


Berlin Disc Golf Concept Supported

Page 10

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

An overhead look at Stephen Decatur Park in Berlin shows the proposed hole locations for the disc golf course. Submitted Image

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BERLIN – The Berlin Parks Commission this week endorsed a plan to bring disc golf to Stephen Decatur Park. The commission on Tuesday voted to support a proposal from local resident Austin Widdowson to set up a disc golf course at Stephen Decatur Park. “Parks are for everyone,” commission member Laura Stearns said. “This seems like a sport anyone can do.” Widdowson and Shawn Johnson, a professional disc golf player, approached the parks commission Tuesday seeking support for a plan to install disc golf equipment at Stephen Decatur Park. Widdowson said he’d met with Mayor Zack Tyndall and also visited Heron Park, the Northern Worcester Athletic Complex and Stephen Decatur Park before deciding on the latter as the ideal location. He envisions two disc golf courses at the park. “When we got to the park we realized the majority of the outer rim of the park is not being utilized,” Widdowson said. “We’re trying to fill those places in.” He added that the project wouldn’t cost the town anything, as he planned to donate the equipment, which essentially consists of elevated baskets that serve as targets for the discs—similar to Frisbees—players throw. Widdowson pointed out that none of the infrastructure was truly permanent.

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“This will allow us to ebb and flow with the process,” he said. Signage could be used to advise other park visitors that disc golf was being played in certain areas. He said Schumaker Park in Salisbury had multiple disc golf courses. “We’re very used to working in parks where there’s a lot of activity happening,” he said. Johnson agreed and said the sport had grown in popularity since the onset of the pandemic. “Since COVID this has been an activity most people agree is safe,” he said, pointing out that players were socially distanced. When asked what exactly disc golf was, Widdowson said players started at a tee that consisted of a square of pavers and then threw discs at elevated baskets three or four feet off the ground. “You basically in the least amount of throws try to get a Frisbee into a basket,” he said, adding that baskets could be installed along the borders of the park and would hardly be noticed by those who weren’t playing. While commission members expressed a few concerns, including the need for replacement equipment and the possibility of people getting hit with Frisbees, they voted unanimously to support the proposal. Widdowson plans to bring the project to the council and hopes to begin setting up the course this summer.

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May 7, 2021

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Page 11


OP Referendum Navy Lieutenant Died In Assateague Road Crash Ballots Due May 13

Page 12

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – A Virginia man has been identified as the deceased victim in a fatal accident on Route 376 in Berlin on Friday night, and three other victims remain hospitalized. Around 9:35 p.m. on Friday, Maryland State Police troopers responded to the area of Route 376, or Assateague Road, near Grey Fox Lane for a reported two-vehicle collision. Based on the preliminary investigation, officers believe a vehicle with six occupants made a U-turn in front of a second vehicle with one occupant, and the vehicles collided. The driver of the U-turn vehicle, identified this week as Hobart Kistler, 31, of Portsmouth, Va., was transported to Atlantic General Hospital where he died.

Four other victims in the first vehicle remained hospitalized as of mid-week, including two at Shock Trauma in Baltimore and one at Norfolk Sentara in Virginia. A third victim from the first vehicle remained hospitalized at TidalHealth PRMC as of mid-week, while a fourth has been released from the hospital. The driver of the second vehicle was an 18-year-old male from Berlin. The Worcester County Sheriff’s Office and the Maryland Natural Resources Police (NRP) assisted with the incident. Route 376 was closed for several hours due to the collision. Kistler was a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2013. After graduation from the academy, he completed his master’s degree at Johns Hopkins University before reporting to Navy supply school in Newport. He served tours

as the supply officer aboard the USS Louisville, deputy director of finance at the Office of Naval Reactors, military social aide to the president, and was serving as the retail services officer about the PCU John F. Kennedy. A Go Fund Me page has been set up in his honor, the proceeds of which will go to support Kistler’s wife and family through this difficult time. As of midweek, the fund had raised over $28,000 with a stated goal of $12,000. “Words alone will not suffice to describe the life of Hobart Kistler, but we will try,” the Go Fund Me page reads. “Hobart was a true American, honorably serving his country through service in the U.S. Navy Supply Corps. More importantly, Hobart was an incredible human being whose reputation crossed more social circles and networks than anyone could begin to imagine.”

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May 7, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – As the May 13 deadline nears, officials are encouraging Ocean Pines homeowners to submit their referendum ballots sooner rather than later. Currently, the Ocean Pines Association (OPA) Board of Directors can spend 20% of assessments – which is about $1.8 million in fiscal year 2020-2021 – on capital expenditures without a referendum. Homeowners, however, have until May 13 to cast their ballots on a proposed bylaw change that will lower that threshold to a fixed $1 million. “If you are mailing your ballots, you really need to factor in time for mail,” said OPA Elections Committee Chair Steve Habeger. In 2019, former board director Slobodan Trendic filed a lawsuit against the association after its board rejected his petition to hold a referendum to lower the board’s spending limit. And late last year, a Worcester County Circuit Court judge ruled the petition met OPA requirements and that the association was required to put the question to vote. “This started two years ago, and we are finally sort of at the finish line,” Trendic said in a public hearing in March. “Petition is a very important vehicle to the membership and that’s why I felt it was necessary to preserve our rights as members to voice our interest and to present to the board and to the membership either a proposal or action – or in my case a question – that requires, if approved, changing the bylaws.” Ballots were sent to the association’s homeowners last month with one question: should the bylaws be amended to limit capital expenditure spending to $1 million without a referendum. The ballots are due back by 4 p.m. on Thursday, May 13. Officials say ballots can be returned by mail or to the ballot box located in the Ocean Pines Police Department lobby at 239 Ocean Parkway. Association members, however, are encouraged to use the ballot box, because of current uncertainties with the U.S. Postal Service caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The ballot box is accessible 24 hours a day. “From our perspective there’s been no issues with the referendum, but with the postal system,” Habeger said. “We’ve had homeowners from southern Pennsylvania where it’s taken two weeks for ballots to get to them. We’re concerned about people being able to respond by the deadline.” All ballots, however returned, must be sealed in the return envelope provided in the mailing. Use of a different envelope or no envelope will void the ballot. Ballots will be counted next Friday, May 14 in the East Room of the Ocean Pines Community Center, starting at 10:30 a.m. The count is open to the public and will be recorded and posted to the association’s website, www.oceanpines.org.


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Former Coastal Bays Director Hired By Wind Farm Developer

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – With US Wind, one of the two companies pursuing an offshore wind energy farm off the coast of Ocean City, aiming to build bridges between stakeholders, the company has tapped a pair of familiar names and faces to handle the outreach. In 2014, US Wind acquired an 80,000-acre federal lease area off the coast of Ocean City to develop an offshore wind energy farm. In 2017, the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) awarded US Wind the Offshore Renewable Energy Credits, or ORECs, for the first phase of its MarWin project. Throughout the approval process, the company has conducted outreach with the community, recreational and commercial fishermen, conservation groups and other stakeholders. This week, US Wind announced it has hired two local community leaders with considerable experience in outreach to lead community liaison efforts in both Maryland and Delaware. Longtime Worcester County resident Dave Wilson will serve as the Maryland Development Manager for US Wind. According to a press release announcing the move, Wilson has spent 26 years building bipartisan relationships with both business and conservation communities to restore the coastal bays watershed, promote tourism and protect birdlife. Wilson served as both public outreach coordinator and executive director for the Maryland Coastal Bays Program, a member of the National Estuary Program. Throughout his career, Wilson has collaborated with elected officials, recreational and commercial fishermen, developers, scientists, residents and the media on projects benefiting Ocean City and the surrounding areas. “I’ve spent the bulk of my career working to advance projects that benefit both the environment and the residents of Ocean City,” he said. “I look forward to collaborating with elected leaders, residents and businesses to further US

May 7, 2021

Wind’s efforts to bring clean energy to Maryland.” Wilson sits on the Maryland Sea Grant External Advisory Committee and is the current president of the Maryland Bird Conservation Partnership. The former baseball player is also an avid fisherman, kayaker, and cyclist. His family has owned residential and commercial property in Ocean City for over three decades. US Wind has also hired Mike Dunmyer to serve as the Delaware Development Manager for the company. Dunmyer is an ocean environmentalist with an extensive business background. After a long career as a senior executive for a Fortune 500 company, Dunmyer served as executive director for Ocean ChamDAVE WILSON pions, a bipartisan political organization focused entirely on ocean health. Dunmyer served as a commissioner for the town of Dewey Beach, where he partnered with the Center for Inland Bays to address that town’s tidal flooding problems. Dunmyer has an MBA from Duke University and a bachelors in economics from Washington and Lee University. “I am honored to bring my business experience, passion for the ocean and the love of the Delaware coast to US Wind,” he said. “I share US Wind’s commitment to responsibly providing clean energy to the Delmarva region.” US Wind CEO Jeff Grybowski said the addition of Wilson and Dunmyer will help build bridges between the company and the Maryland and Delaware coastal communities. “Getting out into the community – sharing information about our project and hearing from our neighbors – is one of the highest priorities we have as a company,” he said. “As we work to provide clean energy, good-paying jobs and environmental benefits to the greater Delmarva region, Mike and Dave’s outreach will be critical component of US Wind’s success.”

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Worcester County Mulling Agritourism Changes

May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Local officials continue to explore ways to allow more agritourism in Worcester County. At a work session Tuesday, the Worcester County Commissioners instructed the county’s department of development review and permitting to work with economic development staff to develop agritourism regulations to be considered later this month. “There are a ton of opportunities that don’t make it here,” said Tom Perlozzo, the county’s director of recreation and parks, tourism and economic development. “Why? Our zoning. It’s difficult to work here.” Perlozzo and Melanie Pursel, the county’s director of tourism, told the commissioners they wanted to be sure they were aware of the array of economic development opportunities associated with agritourism. Perlozzo cited weddings that had been moved to Wicomico County instead of Worcester because of zoning issues and said he knew of a $6 million agritourism business that Worcester County had missed out on because its regulations were too stiff. Pursel said they wanted to make changes that could serve as a starting point to bringing agritourism businesses to Worcester County. “It’s not carte blanche, floodgates open for people to do whatever they want,” she said. “We want it to be reasonable. We want to maintain the integrity of the agricultural community we have here in Worcester County.” When asked if they were getting the cooperation they needed to come up with draft language, Perlozzo said he couldn’t answer that, as his department and the department of development review and permitting, headed by Ed Tudor, had different marching orders. “Our job is to generate revenues for the county,” Perlozzo said. “His job is to regulate it. Those two just don’t match up in a lot of circumstances.” Commissioner Jim Bunting, noting the three or four properties Perlozzo has said are seeking agritourism uses, asked why staff couldn’t focus on addressing those specific situations rather than creating county-wide regulations. He added that the farmers he’d spoken to didn’t support the proposed agritourism changes. “It’s COVID,” Perlozzo said. “All of our businesses have had to pivot. The farming community is not immune to that. Here’s an opportunity for our farmers to have added value, revenue, off their product as an accessory to their farm operation. Do I believe every farm is going to go out and have a wedding or put in a brewery? Not at all.” Bunting said he was interested in preserving farmers’ rights. “All I want to see is whatever you do does not affect the adjoining property owners’ rights as to farming,” he said,

Worcester County Tourism Director Melanie Pursel is pictured before the Worcester County Commissioners Tuesday. Photo by Charlene Sharpe

adding that in his time on the county’s board of zoning appeals, planning commission and now board of county commissioners he’d advocated for farmers. “The biggest thing in my whole career has been to save the farming part of Worcester County.” Perlozzo said his department had worked with farmers during the pandemic and had seen that they needed more

support. He said agritourism regulations would provide them with options. Ed Tudor, director of development review and permitting, said he’d put together the agritourism text amendment presented at the commissioners’ last meeting based on input from Perlozzo’s department and consultant Grow & Fortify. “Please don’t think because I wrote it

Page 15

I’m an advocate for it,” he said. Tudor expressed concern about unforeseen impacts of agritourism regulations. He said if a property owner was allowed to offer camping on an agricultural property, they’d have no reason to set up a conventional campground. He said a crop farm of 20 acres could potentially be developed with what might be referred to as a farm restaurant but could actually be a McDonald’s. “That’s the kind of thing I worry about,” he said. Commissioner Bud Church said he owned a farm and didn’t see any problem with creating allowances for agritourism. “There’s a golden opportunity for Worcester County,” he said. Commissioner Joe Mitrecic referenced a beautiful barn in Snow Hill that couldn’t be used for weddings. “They have to pitch a tent so they can have a wedding,” he said. He said Tudor’s department needed to work with Perlozzo’s team to come back with a bill that satisfied the needs of the farming community and economic development. “We just keep kicking the can down the road,” he said. The commissioners voted 5-0 to have staff work on draft agritourism language to bring back at the next regular meeting.


Group Pitches Painted Basketball Courts For Berlin

Page 16

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – A community group shared plans to reinvigorate Henry Park by transforming its basketball courts into a work of art this week. Members of the nonprofit We Heart Berlin met with the Berlin Parks Commission Tuesday to discuss a proposal to paint the basketball courts at Henry Park. Group members believe that with a bright and exciting paint job performed with the help of community members, area residents would have renewed interest in the park. “My big thing is … for when the youths come out there they’re not attracted to go sit underneath the pavilion and smoke marijuana, sell drugs, drink alcohol,” said Adrian Bowen of We

Heart Berlin. “That’s what’s been going on out there the past few years. Nobody’s even stepping foot on the basketball court.” Bowen and Carol Rose, both on the nonprofit’s board, told the commission the group wanted to paint the basketball courts to brighten up the park. Bowen said the plan was to work with Shelton Hawkins, an Easton native who’s promoting the international trend of turning basketball courts into murals, to paint the court at Henry Park. “We’re trying to give it some life and make it more inviting,” Bowen said. He told the commission he grew up playing basketball at Henry Park and now, as a father of four kids, he’d seen the park undergo a change. Local residents aren’t taking advantage of the park, particularly the basketball courts,

May 7, 2021

A rendering shows what is being proposed for the surface of the basketball courts at Henry Park. Submitted Image

like they used to, he said. Mary Bohlen, deputy town adminis-

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trator, said that wasn’t entirely accurate. She pointed out that Worcester County Recreation and Parks hosted a summer basketball program there. Bowen maintained that the courts weren’t getting as much use as they did in the past and said he just wanted to draw people to the park. He added that by involving the community in the project, residents would take ownership of it. He said the park in recent years was used by people smoking and drinking and that the basketball courts saw little play. “I disagree with that,” Bohlen said. “I think that’s way too broad a statement to say the courts are never used.” Commission member Laura Stearns said she thought the project would generate excitement. Bohlen said issues such as maintenance had to be considered, as that would be questioned by the town council before elected officials approved the project. “There’s nothing being said here and asked here they’re not going to ask,” she said. Rose said We Heart Berlin had information on the painting process that could be provided to officials and added that the group was applying for grants to fund the art installation, which would be the group’s first real project. She said that Hawkins had done successful basketball court murals in Easton and Cambridge. “We felt like for a very first project this was just special on many fronts,” she said. Commission member Patricia Dufendach said she thought the project sounded exciting but that she wanted to ensure it would do no harm to the park. Commission member Sarah Hooper offered similar comments, pointing out that when the paint faded it would needed to be fixed or removed. “We just want it to be successful,” Dufendach said. Bohlen said she would recommend the group wait to approach the town council with the project until its nonprofit status, applied for earlier this year, was official. “We’re waiting,” Rose said. “Everything is filed.” The commission voted unanimously to support the project.


Citizen Tip Leads To Four Arrests

May 7, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Four Maryland residents were arrested on various drugs and weapons charges last week after a local business owner reported their alleged suspicious activity in a vehicle near the Boardwalk. Last Thursday, a local Boardwalk business owner reported the suspects’ suspicious activity to the Ocean City Police Department (OCPD). The witness reportedly observed the suspects in a vehicle parked on 8th Street preparing a white, powdery substance on a digital RICARDO scale. THOMAS During the investigation, undercover officers observed the vehicle’s occupants go up to the Boardwalk, where they met with a different group of males. According to police reports, both groups were observed engaging in an apparent drug transaction, then parted ways and left the area in different vehicles. With assistance from DEANGELO patrol officers, both vehiWHITE cles were located, stopped and searched. The investigation led to the seizure of black tar heroin, powder cocaine, a digital scale, packaging materials, an undisclosed amount of currency, a 9mm handgun, and a loaded extended 30-round magazine. In addition, officers were able to apprehend a person wanted on a warrant and closed a hit-and-run property damage accident that occurred during the investigation. JORDAN Among those arrested WEBSTER during the incident were Ricardo Henderson Thomas, 36, of Temple Hills, Md., who was charged with possession of over 10 grams of marijuana, and controlled dangerous substance (CDS) possession with intent to distribute. Also arrested was DeAngelo White, 31, of District Heights, Md., who was charged with two counts of CDS possession-not marijuana, and two counts of possession of paraphernalia. He was released on personal recSAVION ognizance. Jordan WebGALLION ster, 20, of Beltsville, Md., was arrested and charged with possession of a firearm by a minor, loaded handgun on his person, and loaded handgun in a vehicle. Finally, Savion Gallion, 20, of Riverdale, Md., was arrested and charged with possession of a firearm by a minor, possession of a loaded handgun, possession of 10 grams-plus of marijuana, failure to remain at the scene of an accident involving property damage and operating a motor vehicle with an occupant under 16 not restrained by a seatbelt or child safety seat.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 19


Man Charged With Stealing Truck, Running Over Victim

Page 20

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A Dundalk, Md., man is being held without bond this week after allegedly stealing a rented box truck and running over the vehicle’s driver. Shortly before 1 a.m. last Saturday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer patrolling in the downtown area was dispatched to a food market on South Baltimore Avenue for a reported stolen vehicle. As the officer arrived on the scene, three males walked out of the

market and pointed south on Baltimore Avenue while frantically yelling “That is the truck,” and “That is the stolen truck,” according to police reports. The officer reportedly observed a white box truck with Ryder written on the side. The officer observed the vehicle turn west onto Somerset Street and activated the patrol vehicle’s emergency lights and siren in an attempt to make a traffic stop. The officer followed and observed the allegedly stolen box truck turn north onto Philadelphia Avenue in an area that is one-way southbound. The stolen truck

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continued driving directly at oncoming traffic on Philadelphia Avenue. At one point, the stolen truck drove north between two southbound vehicles, nearly colliding head-on with both, according to police reports. The driver of the stolen truck, later identified as William Hotaling, 52, of Dundalk, Md., reportedly continued to swerve between multiple lanes of traffic and showed complete disregard for the safety of any people or property in the area. Hotaling’s driving was extremely negligent and reckless, according to police reports, and the officer believed he was driving while impaired or intoxicated. The stolen truck finally stopped on Philadelphia Avenue and North Division Street. The officer had to give at least three orders for Hotaling to exit the truck before he complied. He reportedly stumbled and had trouble maintaining his balance when he did exit the truck, according to police reports. OCPD officers met with the renter of the truck, who provided a description of the man who had taken it, a description that matched Hotaling. OCPD officers interviewed four individuals at the store from whence the truck had been stolen. One of the men had been in the rear cargo area of the truck when it was taken. Initially, the males inside the store did not realize someone was stealing the truck. They assumed someone from their group was driving it when it started mov-

May 7, 2021

ing until they realized each of them were still there and accounted for, according to police reports. The man who was in the cargo area of the truck reportedly told police once he realized the truck was being stolen, he jumped out of the back of the truck and injured his wrist in the process. The man who had rented the truck reportedly told police he observed it drive around the block from Caroline Street to Philadelphia Avenue to Wicomico Street, where he ran and confronted Hotaling. The victim told police he opened the door and confronted Hotaling, but Hotaling shoved the victim back, causing him to fall on the ground. The victim said while he was on the ground, Hotaling allegedly put the vehicle in reverse and backed over his legs with the truck. Hotaling did not stop and proceeded north on Baltimore Avenue, which is when the initial officer arrived on the scene. The victim whose legs were run over was taken to Atlantic General Hospital with serious, but not life-threatening, injuries. The other victim who leaped from the stolen truck was also taken to AGH for treatment for his wrist. The stolen truck was valued at around $50,000. Hotaling was arrested and charged with unlawful motor vehicle taking, theft from $25,000 to under $100,000, reckless endangerment and second-degree assault. He also faces 22 traffic violations.


Officials Talk Tourism Issues With El Salvador Ambassador

May 7, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Hoping to foster a working relationship to ease the acute labor shortage in the resort, Ocean City and state officials last week hosted an El Salvador ambassador to discuss a myriad of common issues. Last Friday, Mayor Rick Meehan, along with State Senator Mary Beth Carozza and Delegate Wayne Hartman and other local officials hosted a visit to Ocean City from El Salvador Ambassador to the U.S. Milena Mayorga and her entourage. The day’s event, held in collaboration with the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, included a visit to City Hall and a working luncheon at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center. Recurring themes during the ambassador’s visit included the potential to bring seasonal workers from El Salvador and neighboring countries to Ocean City to augment the seasonal work force through the H-2B visa program. The Department of Homeland Security earlier this year increased the number of H-2B seasonal worker visas by about a third, or 22,000, to help offset a growing labor shortage in many industries, including hospitality. Near the close of Monday’s regular meeting, Meehan provided some highlights of the visit. “We were very fortunate to have the ambassador from El Salvador here in Ocean City,” he said. “She was here to talk about two things. The first is tourism and how we can share ideas. Secondly, we talked about the H-2B program. It’s a program similar in some ways and different in others to the J-1 program.” Earlier, during the public comment period of Monday’s meeting, a citizen raised concerns about bringing in seasonal workers from El Salvador and neighboring countries. However, Meehan said those concerns were unfounded. “There was a comment tonight about bringing people from that country here,” he said. “That’s a program that runs through the state department. They are vetted. It’s a very serious program on both ends, in El Salvador and here in the U.S.” U.S. employers are allowed to bring foreign nationals to this country to fill temporary, non-agricultural jobs with H-2B status. Unlike the J-1 visas, the workers are generally not students and there is not a work and travel component connected to the H-2B visas. The H-2B visa workers are seasonal and are relied upon heavily by the tourism, hospitality, landscaping, seafood and construction industries, for example. There are 66,000 H-2B visas made available each year, allocated in half for the summer season and half for the winter season. However, because of the acute labor shortage in certain sectors of the economy, the Department of Homeland Security has made available 22,000 additional H-2B visas for the remainder the federal fiscal year that ends in September, with 6,000 reserved for El Salvador and its neighboring countries Guatemala and Honduras. “There are about 66,000 H-2B workers in this country each year,” said Meehan

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

on Monday. “There is an additional allocation this year of 6,000 visas because of the labor shortage from El Salvador and neighboring countries. We’re looking to see if we would have access to some of those individuals.” Meehan said it was uncertain just how many, if any, H-2B visa holders would find their way to the Ocean City area, but last Friday’s visit by Mayorga was the start of a positive working relationship. It is unlikely any relief is coming for this season. “That’s yet to be determined because the whole system is run as a lottery system and it is very competitive, but we felt that we built a bridge and now have an association with another country,” he said. “The ambassador was terrific. It was really a good meeting and I think in the future it’s something that can benefit both countries and our city. Again, it’s a very safe, well-vetted program.”

Page 21

Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan presented a flag to El Salvador Ambassador to the U.S. Milena Mayorga during her visit last week. Submitted Photo

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Resort Still Defending In Court 2017 Ban On Topless Women

Page 22

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Opening arguments were heard in federal court this week in the appeal challenging Ocean City’s ordinance prohibiting female toplessness in public. In January 2018, a civil suit was filed in U.S. District Court challenging an emergency ordinance passed by the Mayor and Council in June 2017 prohibiting females from going topless in the same areas as men are allowed to go shirtless, including the beach and Boardwalk, for example. The plaintiffs in the case, including local resident Chelsea Eline and four others, argued the emergency ordinance passed by the Mayor and Council violated their constitutional rights allowing them, and ostensibly any other women who wished to do so, to go topless in certain areas of the resort where men are allowed to go shirtless. In April 2020, a U.S. District Court judge dismissed the case, essentially opining Ocean City officials have a better understanding of the public’s moral sensibilities of their residents and visitors regarding the issue of female toplessness. The U.S. District Court’s ruling

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

in the case relied largely on the precedent-setting U.S. v. Biocic case heard by the Supreme Court three decades ago. In June 1989, a woman was cited and fined $25 for going topless on a beach in the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in violation of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife regulations. After the U.S. District Court dismissed the civil suit challenging Ocean City’s topless ordinance, the plaintiffs in the case quickly filed an appeal in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit last May. On Wednesday morning, almost a year to the day since the appeal was filed, oral arguments were heard in the case. Attorney Devon Jacob, who represents Eline and the other plaintiffs, before Wednesday’s oral arguments were heard, explained the basis for the appeal. “This lawsuit is about confirming the legal right of women to be bare-chested in public in the same places that men are permitted to be bare-chested, for purposes other than breastfeeding,” he said. “This lawsuit seeks a declaration from the court that Ocean City’s ordinance violates the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment to the federal Constitution.”

May 7, 2021

Spring Beach Day: Warm temperatures and a westerly breeze created a beach day for many in Ocean City last Sunday.

Jacob said it was time for the Fourth Circuit to overrule Biocic, referring to the 1991 decision by the Fourth Circuit in United States v. Biocic which recognized protecting the public’s moral sensibilities as an important governmental interest and served as the basis for the U.S. District Court to uphold Ocean City’s 2017 ordinance prohibiting female toplessness in public places. Jacob argued, in practice, protecting the public’s moral sensibilities “permits a sexist ideology to be cloaked in legitimacy in the same way that nationalism legitimizes racism.” At the outset of oral arguments in the appeal on Wednesday morning, Jacob reiterated that point before the threejudge panel. “This ordinance is based on sexist ideology,” he said. “The fact that something makes somebody uncomfortable is not a reason to make a law. The public has consistently been demanding more and more equality under the law. Here, this government objective of public sensibility is an amorphous term that nobody seems to be able to define. When you look at Ocean City, basically, their argument is it would make people uncomfortable.” At the U.S. District Court level, attorney Bruce Bright, representing Ocean City, argued the Mayor and Council have a better understanding of the moral sensibilities of its residents and visi-

Photo by Chris Parypa

tors than the plaintiffs in the case, an argument that ultimately served as the basis for that court’s dismissal of the case. During oral arguments on the appeal on Wednesday, Bright relied on the same basic concept. “The Mayor and Council are well known in the community,” he said. “Everywhere they go, people come up to them to address public issues. By nature of their positions as elected officials, their job is to take the temperature of the public on a whole host of issues. They evaluate what the public view is and they legislate on that basis. That’s what they did in this case.” Bright outlined the timeline that led to the emergency legislation in 2017, including apparent public outcry when the female toplessness issue surfaced just prior to the summer season. Bright argued before the issue was raised by Eline in 2017, the Mayor and Council relied on public sentiment about the topless issue and addressing it through an ordinance had not been necessary. “Prior to then, the Mayor and Council did not see the need to specifically legislate on that issue because the sensibilities were what they were, and people conformed themselves to that,” he said. “Now, in the more modern era, someone came along saying they wanted to go topless on the beach in Ocean City and that necessitated addressing this issue legislatively.”

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'Private Funded Community Green Space' Plan Earns HDC Support

May 7, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Plans for an outdoor special event space received approval from the Berlin Historic District Commission. The commission on Wednesday approved plans for a community green space proposed by the owners of The Buzz Meadery. They’re in the process of purchasing a vacant lot on Jefferson Street and want to convert it to the Berlin Commons, a space they’ll host special events and invite the public to use. “We’re thinking of this as a private funded community green space,” said The Buzz Meadery’s Brett Hines. Hines and his wife Megan told the commission they wanted to purchase a lot currently owned by Habitat for Humanity of Worcester County—which a few years ago had plans to construct a mixed-use building on the site—and use it to host special events. Megan Hines, who pointed out both she and her husband were teachers, said they wanted to serve mead at the site on weekends during special events that could feature artisan and family farm vendors. “The Berlin Commons is not a tap house,” she said. “That’s not the primary focus.” Her husband, who likened it to a park with picnic tables, said that when they weren’t hosting events there, the space, which will be fenced in, could serve as outdoor seating for the public. He hopes to see people get carryout from local eateries and sit at one of the picnic tables to enjoy it. Commission member Mary Moore was quick to praise the concept. “I’m just very impressed with your creativity,” she said. Other commission members expressed concern about the portable toilet shown on the plan, but Planning Director Dave Engelhart said the code wouldn’t permit that anyway. When asked about how the property was going to generate revenue, Brett Hines said The Buzz Meadery had a state winery license. “We’re being extremely creative,” he said. “Under our Maryland winery license we’re allowed to do 32 special events a year that are three days in life. The local liquor board doesn’t have any jurisdiction on what we are doing. That is probably a surprise to a lot of people.” Hines said that alcohol wouldn’t be permitted at the space when The Buzz Meadery wasn’t holding events there. Carol Rose, chair of the commission, pointed out that as property owners they would be responsible for the property. Commission member Nornie Bunting expressed similar concern. “I’m just worried about excessive parties that could potentially happen,” he said. Megan Hines said they were plan-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ning to install security cameras on the property. Engelhart—who received 87 letters in support of the project and two in opposition—said he’d discussed the Berlin Commons proposal with the police chief and his concerns related to parking and enforcement issues after dark. “That whole section now is busy between the Atlantic Hotel, Globe, Pop’s, Lost Pantry,” he said. “It could be one big block party. That was his concern.” Brett and Megan Hines said security at the site was their primary concern as well and that they were open to any suggestions on how to ensure there were no problems at the property. “We live here with our kids,” Brett Hines said. “We don’t want that to be a nuisance.” Moore said she was envisioning the space as a place for couples to enjoy lunch, not a venue for a rock concert. “I see them as a very intelligent young couple with a very creative idea that will be an asset to Berlin,” she said. Brett Hines said they hoped to close on the property at the end of the month once they had plan approval from the historic district commission as well as the town’s planning commission. He said ideally the space would be open by July 4.

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A plan to convert a vacant lot at the corner of Jefferson and Gay streets into a community green space was endorsed by the Berlin Historic District Commission. Submitted Renderings


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Resort Special Events Approved

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

Council OKs Funding Requests

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Ocean City’s special events lineup is getting a few new additions after resort officials this week signed off on a handful of recommendations from the Tourism Advisory Board (TAB). Each year, Ocean City’s budget includes a $300,000 allocation to TAB, which reviews proposed special events and makes recommendations to the Mayor and Council on how best to use the funding. TAB typically recommends events that bring people into town, and fill hotel rooms, restaurants and other attractions. The council then has ultimate say. During Monday’s meeting, TAB submitted three special events for funding approval to the council, including a significant regional surfing championship, a Marine Corps Semper Fi bike ride and a major youth basketball tournament. The council ultimately approved funding for each of the special events recommended by TAB. The first event recommended by TAB and approved by the council is the Eastern Surfing Association (ESA) Northeast Region Championships.

The Delmarva ESA, which includes Ocean City, has moved from the ESA’s mid-Atlantic district to the northeast district. As a result, Ocean City is now a planned site for a future ESA Northeast District championship venue, according to Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association Executive Director Susan Jones, who represented TAB. “It has been held for 50 years,” she said. “Because Delmarva ESA recently joined the northeast district, that allows Ocean City to be a championship venue.” Jones said hosting the ESA Northeast District Championships represents a potential boon for Ocean City because of the large number of competitors it will attract, along with their families and friends and spectators. The surfing championship could represent as many as 1,000 room nights. “The ESA’s Northeast Regional brings nearly 200 surfing competitors from Maryland through Maine and the Great Lakes,” she said. “The event runs Friday through Sunday, with most competitors arriving on Thursday and leaving Sunday evening, with some staying until Monday.” The ESA Northeast District was seeking a three-year commitment from the town for the event, which the council ultimately approved. The town’s financial contribution to the surfing championships is $20,000, including $10,000 in the first year and $5,000 in years two and three. The second TAB-recommended event approved by the Mayor and Council on Monday was the Marine Corps League’s Semper Fi Bike Ride, which is entering its second year. The inaugural event was held last year and was highly successful, raising $10,000 for Marine Corps League (MCL) and America’s Fund charities. The event is a one-day bike ride on the Boardwalk for participants in multiple categories with the goal of raising funds for the designated charities. The Semper Fi bike ride, set for October, is expected to generate 500 to 600 room nights. The council approved a $5,000 financial commitment to the event, based on the recommendation from TAB. The third special event approved on Monday was the Premiere One Youth Basketball Tournament, which has been held in and around the resort area in recent years. In the past, the youth basketball tournament has been held on courts in both Ocean City and Snow Hill. This year, it will be a uniquely Ocean City event with all games played in the resort at the convention center and at Northside Park. Last year’s tournament was canceled because of COVID, and Premiere One was seeking to roll over the town’s commitment from last year. The town’s financial contribution is $12,000 for the floor rental. The event, scheduled for June, is expected to generate 1,700 room nights.


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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cops & courts The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

First-Degree Assault OCEAN CITY – An Ocean City man was arrested on first-degree assault and other charges last week after allegedly choking his girlfriend while she was holding an infant during a domestic incident. Around 8 p.m. last Thursday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was dispatched to a residence on Judlee Avenue for a reported domestic assault. Upon arrival, the officer reportedly observed a blue sedan leave from the front of the residence at a high rate of speed. While other OCPD officers were looking for that vehicle, the initial responding officer met with the female victim, who was holding her infant child, according to police reports. The officer immediately observed red marks on the victim’s neck consistent with hand prints, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police her boyfriend, identified as Travis Pugh, Jr., 25, of Ocean City, had dragged her around the room and choked her before leaving in the blue sedan the officer had observed upon arrival. The victim told police she was able to punch Pugh in

the mouth with a closed fist in self-defense prior to his leaving. As the officer was interviewing the victim, the front door reportedly swung open and the victim identified the person standing by the door as Pugh. The officer interviewed Pugh outside and observed him to have a bruised and lacerated lip. Pugh reportedly told police he believed the victim had been smoking marijuana again, and that he didn’t want her to do that around his infant daughter.

Pugh reportedly told police he bought a drug test from Walmart and wanted her to take it. When she refused, he got so angry that he grabbed her by the arm and attempted to pull her from the couch. Pugh said the victim refused to stand up, which is when she punched him in the mouth, according to police reports. Pugh became angry and left the residence and drove off in the blue sedan before returning. Pugh did acknowledge he initiated the physical altercation, according to police reports.

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OCEAN CITY – Two Maryland men were arrested on multiple charges last weekend after a fight that began at the Inlet lot and spilled over into the downtown area. Around 5:25 p.m. last Saturday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a reported fight at the Inlet lot. A witness had reported two men, later identified as Ellis Smith, 42, of Gaithersburg, Md., and Kwame Smith, 36, of Germantown, Md., were squaring up as if they were going to fight. OCPD officers arrived on scene and observed Ellis Smith lunge at Kwame Smith. Kwame Smith was able to avoid the attempted attack and the OCPD officers separated the two men. Ellis Smith then ran away toward the BoardSEE NEXT PAGE

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OCPD officers interviewed the victim, who told police a different version of the events. The victim told police Pugh did come home and demand she take a drug test because he thought she was smoking weed. The victim reportedly told police she was sitting on a bed holding her infant when Pugh left the room. Pugh then came back into the room, grabbed the infant from her arms and put the baby in a swing. The victim told police Pugh then grabbed her legs and tried to pull her off the bed. Pugh then grabbed the victim’s arm and began dragging her down the hallway and into the living room, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police she went back and grabbed her infant child and Pugh came back into the living room. The verbal argument continued until Pugh allegedly grabbed the victim by the throat with one hand and began choking her. The victim told police she could not breathe while Pugh was allegedly forcefully choking her while she was holding her infant. According to police reports, the victim told officers while she was being choked, she was able to hold the baby with one hand, then she used her free arm to connect to punches to Pugh’s mouth in self-defense. Meanwhile, the victim’s father reportedly showed up at the residence about that time and Pugh went outside to argue with him. The victim reportedly told police Pugh threatened to kill her father and said Pugh had a gun in the trunk of his car. A search of the vehicle’s trunk revealed a 12-gauge shotgun in a hardshell gun case, according to police reports. The victim’s father reportedly told police he did not know what the issue was, but he didn’t want Pugh and the victim fighting in front of his grandchildren. The victim’s father also told police Pugh had threatened to shoot him or kill him and that he had made similar threats in the past. During a subsequent interview, Pugh reportedly told police he had grabbed the victim’s throat and choked her for roughly five to 10 seconds. Based on the evidence and testimony, Pugh was arrested and charged with first- and second-degree assault and reckless endangerment. Following a bail review hearing on Monday, Pugh was ordered to be held without bond.

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May 7, 2021

walk, but Kwame Smith reportedly ran after him yelling “Do something then,” according to police reports. By now, a crowd had gathered around the scene and were moving away to avoid getting caught up in the altercation, according to police reports. The two men then ran to Baltimore Avenue and the argument continued. OCPD officers followed, and when Ellis Smith turned to Kwame Smith and yelled “let’s do this,” he was taken into custody for disorderly conduct. When Ellis Smith was being taken into custody, he reportedly pulled away from the officers attempting to handcuff him and a resisting arrest charge was added. Meanwhile, when officers attempted to take Kwame Smith into custody, he reportedly walked away from them and crossed the street. An OCPD officer grabbed Kwame Smith by his elbows and attempted to handcuff him. Kwame Smith reportedly braced his arms and refused to be taken into custody until OCPD officers had to execute a takedown to force him onto the ground. Even once on the ground, Kwame Smith reportedly continued to resist, but was finally detained. Kwame Smith was transported to the hospital for injuries sustained during the conflict before being taken back to police headquarters for processing. Each of the men were charged with second-degree assault, disorderly conduct, affray and resisting

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch arrest.

Wrong Way Driver Busted OCEAN CITY – A Lexington Park, Md., man was arrested on marijuana possession and open container charges last weekend after going the wrong way on a one-way street not once, but twice. Around 11 p.m. last Friday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer patrolling in the downtown area observed a vehicle traveling the wrong way on a one-way street not once, but twice. The vehicle traveled east on 1st Street before turning right on Baltimore Avenue, heading southbound. The vehicle also struck the curb along Baltimore Avenue. The officer stopped the vehicle in a motel parking lot and made contact with the driver, identified as Cameron Dexter, 20, of Lexington Park, Md. The officer observed several large chunks of marijuana on Dexter’s clothing and on the driver’s side floor board. The officer asked Dexter for his license, but Dexter reportedly told the officer he did not have his license on him, and that the vehicle was a rental from St. Mary’s County. A search of the vehicle revealed several more chunks of marijuana in between the driver’s seat and the center console. There was also an open can of alcoholic beverage in the center console, according to police reports. A background check revealed Dexter’s license had been suspended. Dexter was arrested and charged with open container, possession of marijuana over 10 grams and traffic offenses. The officer later weighed the marijuana collected from

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Dexter’s vehicle and it came in at over 20 grams.

Gun Found During Stop OCEAN CITY – A Michigan man was arrested on weapons charges and other counts last weekend after police observed him going the wrong way on Philadelphia Avenue. Around 3:30 a.m. last Saturday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer observed a pick-up truck traveling north in the southbound lanes of Philadelphia Avenue around 9th Street. The officer activated his lights and siren and finally stopped the vehicle around 12th Street. The officer made contact with the driver, identified as John Kimmel, 62, of Lake Orion, Mich. Kimmel reportedly

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told the officer he had been drinking at a bar at 8th Street, but had slept in the parking lot until such time as he felt he was okay to drive, according to police reports. The officer asked Kimmel to step out of the vehicle and when Kimmel opened the driver’s side door, the officer observed the handle of a firearm. Kimmel reportedly leaned toward the weapon and told the officer “my gun’s in the door,” according to police reports. OCPD officer pulled Kimmel from the vehicle and placed him in handcuffs, according to police reports. He was also found to be in possession of a switchblade-style knife, in violation of the town’s weapons ordinance. Kimmel was arrested and charged with weapons violations and traffic citations.

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Altered Tram Operation Headed To Approval For Season

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BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Resort officials this week approved on first reading an ordinance to alter the Boardwalk tram route and ultimately displace a street performer location. The Mayor and Council had before them on Monday a proposed ordinance that would allow the tram to enter and exit the Boardwalk at the existing ramp at 3rd Street. Because of the new tram operation, the street end at 3rd Street would be off limits to street performers, under the ordinance. The council unanimously approved the ordinance on first reading. Two years ago, the town completed a new public works facility along St. Louis Avenue between 2nd and 3rd Streets, for the purpose of, among other things, relocating the Boardwalk tram operation. Under the new plan, the trams are being stored and maintained at the St. Louis Avenue facility, and when they are in operation, they will cross Philadelphia Avenue and Baltimore Avenue and access the Boardwalk at the ramp at 3rd Street before starting their daily runs up and down from the Inlet to 27th Street. For years, the tram operation was housed at the town’s Whiteside facility in the south end of Ocean City and the

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

trams entered and exited the Boardwalk at South 1st Street. That procedure has now changed with completion of the new facility at St. Louis Avenue. A byproduct of the altered tram operation is the displacement of a street performer location at the end of 3rd Street and the Boardwalk. Over the last couple of years, street performers have successfully challenged the town’s old designated spaces program and lottery system on First Amendment grounds and freedom of expression.

As a result, street performers have had unfettered access to the street ends on the Boardwalk from South 1st Street to 9th Street with a couple of exceptions. North Division Street and Dorchester Street have remained off limits to performers because they are important Boardwalk access points for law enforcement, fire, ambulance and other emergency services, and the Beach Patrol, for example. The ordinance approved on first reading on Monday adds 3rd Street to

the list of areas off limits to buskers. Making 3rd Street the new access point for the trams and eliminating the space for street performers required a code change, which the ordinance presented on Monday will accomplish. The council voted 7-0 to approve the ordinance change on first reading. The trams did not run last year because of COVID restrictions, making this the first year for the new set-up. The trams are set to start running on the Friday of Memorial Day weekend.

OCEAN CITY – The Art League of Ocean City reminds high school seniors the deadline to apply for college art scholarships is this weekend. Several scholarships will be awarded, including the newly-funded Sidney M. Beckstead Scholarship for the Arts. For the inaugural year of 2021, the Beckstead scholarship will award $5,000 to one art student from Worcester County. Taylor Bank, where the fund is held, is contributing $500 towards the Beckstead scholarship fund and additional donations are being accepted. The Art League will also award sev-

eral $1,000 college art scholarships, continuing a tradition that began in 1991. These scholarships are funded by contributions from the Art League as well as from the Katherine Ellen Brown Fund administered by the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore. The deadline for students to apply for the scholarships is May 8. Students must be graduating high school seniors who are residents of Worcester County, including public and private school students and homeschoolers. The scholarship recipient must be pursuing a higher education in the creative arts from an accredited institution.

Applications are available at www.ArtLeagueofOceanCity.org/scholarship. With the one application, the Art League will consider students for both the $5,000 and the $1,000 scholarships. Questions on applications may be sent to katie@artleagueofoceancity.org. The Art League scholarship programs adhere to a nondiscrimination policy, in both principle and practice, and will not discriminate against candidates on the basis of race, creed, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, or physical challenge.

Art League Scholarships Deadline Near


Increased Public Safety Funding Sought At Budget Session

May 7, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Requests for public safety and education funding highlighted the county’s annual public budget input session this week. The Worcester County Commissioners on Tuesday invited the public to weigh in on the county’s proposed $218 million budget for the coming fiscal year. They’re set to begin work sessions to balance the budget, which currently features a shortfall of about $8 million, next week. “This shortfall must be reconciled either through reducing requested expenditures, creating additional revenues or a combination of both,” said Weston Young, the county’s assistant chief administrative officer. Young outlined the county’s estimated revenues and expenditures for the coming fiscal year. The bulk of requested expenditures, 51.1%, are related to education, while 17.9% are tied to public safety. Other costs include general government, health, public works, recreation and parks, municipal grants and retiree benefits. Most of the citizens who attended to share input focused on the importance of public safety and education funding. Melissa Mather recalled being held hostage when she lived on the other side of the state. She said if the county couldn’t protect its people, nothing else mattered. “The evil that’s going to come here,

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

from the cities, from other places, some of you may have never seen or witnessed,” she said. “It’s a very different world out there.” Caryn Abbott, citing the recent death of Delmar Cpl. Keith Heacook, expressed similar concerns. She said law enforcement agencies needed the personnel and equipment required to do their jobs. “I suggest you find more money to protect those that protect us all,” she said. She questioned whether spending millions on broadband was worth risking public and officer safety. Abbott said a new organization she was involved with, Worcester Backs the Blue, was focused on supporting law enforcement officers and wanted to meet with the county in the near future. “We have a right to be heard and you have a duty to the people,” she said. Chris Larmore, president of FOP Lodge 50 and a sergeant with the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, also stressed the need for funding for public safety. He reminded the commissioners of the death of Brian K. Heller, a deputy killed in a car accident while responding to a police call in 2000. “There were only two deputies working that night,” he said. “After 20 years, we’ve increased that number to three. One deputy for each end of the county, with a supervisor racing from one end of the county to the other to back those

deputies up.” He said the sheriff’s office needed the funding to convert the agency’s part-time positions to full-time positions so officers wouldn’t be stretched too thin. “This is a huge financial burden for you to bear and pass on to the taxpayers of this county,” Larmore said. “We understand that. It’s not a want or desire — it’s an absolute need.” Additional commenters during Tuesday’s hearing addressed education funding. Parents from the north end of the county as well as from Pocomoke and Snow Hill spoke in support of the school system. Superintendent Lou Tay-

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lor thanked the commissioners for their past support and asked them to continue providing the level of funding needed to support teacher retention, small class sizes, after-school programs and technology. He added that this year’s funding request was just 1.87% higher than last year’s request. “Our budget request is entirely rooted in what we believe to be in the best interest of students here in Worcester County,” he said. The commissioners are expected to begin balancing the proposed budget next week. Final budget adoption is scheduled for June 1.


OC’s $158M Budget Moves Forward

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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OCEAN CITY – Ocean City officials this week approved on first reading the proposed fiscal year 2022 budget at around $158 million, which will hold the property tax rate at the constant yield. The total budget for all funds is approximately $158 million, with the general fund making up around $91 million. The proposed fiscal year 2022 budget sets the property tax rate at the constant yield rate of .4561 per $100 of assessed valuation, which is slightly higher than the current rate of .4559. For the record, the constant yield is the property tax rate needed to generate the same revenue as the prior year. For many years, it was the town’s policy to set the property tax rate at the constant yield, but a couple years back resort officials broke from tradition and set the property tax rate at the constant tax rate, or the same rate as the prior year, representing a slight decrease. That was not the case this year, as the proposed budget sets the tax rate at the constant yield, which technically represents an increase of fractions of a penny. Before the council could vote on the proposed fiscal year 2022 budget, former councilman Vince Gisriel took the opportunity to weigh in on some key elements. Gisriel pointed out areas in the budget he perceived could be altered to lower the property tax rate. “I want to remind the council when you closed the books on fiscal year 2021, you had a favorable variance of $4.8 million,” he said. “Year after year, you underestimate revenue and overestimate expenses.” Gisriel pointed to the recently-approved capital improvement plan as an example of potential overspending in the budget. “Three things struck me the most in the capital improvement plan were Baltimore Avenue, the downtown recreation complex, the sports complex and all of these other projects,” he said. “When you add it all up, it’s something like $46 million. You’re looking at boatload of bond money in the next few years. I don’t think it’s affordable and it should be spread out.” Mayor Rick Meehan then systematically addressed some of Gisriel’s issues and concerns, starting with overestimating revenue. “One of the things that cause revenue to exceed what was budgeted is we don’t recognize grant money that we hope to receive prior to passing the budget,” he said. “We can’t recognize these grants until they are approved and received by the town.” Meehan pointed out property tax is not the driving revenue generator for the budget. “When you look at our budget, property tax accounts for less than 50% of our revenue,” he said. “Most of the revenue is generated from user fees and

May 7, 2021

the economic development of tourism. That’s were the room tax comes in. Most of the room tax goes to lowering the tax rate by covering these expenditures. The balance of that goes to keep tourism going.” One of Gisriel’s pet issues is fund balance, which typically far exceeds the town’s stated goal of 15%. Meehan pointed out coming out of COVID and the losses it produced last year, maintaining a healthy fund balance is now more important than ever. “Some of those projects you mentioned will be revenue generators, so we can maintain a very stable budget and a very stable economy,” he said. You mentioned we got COVID relief money to lower our losses. That was an unknown. If we hadn’t gotten that money, a lot of that fund balance would have been used to cover those losses. It’s important to have that in place to protect our citizens from those types of losses.” Also pointed out was the plethora of new hires and their impact on the budget. Meehan addressed that issue as well. “You asked about the hiring of 10 additional police officers and six firefighter-paramedics,” he said. “You asked if we can afford them. We can’t not afford them. We have to have that if we’re going to continue to provide the same level of public safety and services that our residents expect and deserve.” Meehan said the proposed budget meets the town’s needs, while maintaining a healthy fund balance, a rainyday fund of sorts. “The importance is to pass a balanced budget, a budget that is going to serve our community in total and have the reserves to plan, not only for the future, but for those things that are unexpected,” he said. “Every year, those occurrences happen more often than not.” Councilman John Gehrig agreed. “I think overestimating expenditures and underestimating revenue is a good budget practice,” he said. “Our tourism and marketing budget is generated from the room tax. About 60% of that goes to paying our bills. Without that, it would probably come from property tax, which accounts for around 46% of our budget.” Gehrig personally addressed Gisriel’s concerns about the potential cost of a sports complex, which is one of his pet projects. “We’re talking about investing $20 million to make hundreds of millions of dollars,” he said. “That’s a game changer. We’re making tough decisions about investing in our product. If we’re wrong, vote us out, but it’s better than making a decision like they’re doing in other places nearby where they’re discussing how much they’re going to raise taxes this year, to add to how much they raised taxes last year and the year before that.”


May 7, 2021

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Salisbury Confirms National Folk Festival Returning

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BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – A modified folk festival will return to downtown Salisbury later this year. Late last month, organizers with the National Folk Festival announced the event’s return to downtown Salisbury Sept. 10-12. “Over the past few weeks, we’ve had the opportunity to come together for the Salisbury Marathon, our first outdoor Third Friday and have had some return to normalcy. After being apart for so long, it has been such a joy to be with one an-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

other again, to feel the power of how events and arts can bring us together,” City Administrator Julia Glanz said in a recent press conference. “So today we are excited to announce that we will be hosting the 80th National Folk Festival in downtown Salisbury.” Last year, organizers were forced to suspend planning for the 80th National Folk Festival in response to the COVID19 pandemic. The event, which was slated to return Sept. 11-13 of 2020, would have marked the last year of a three-year residency in Salisbury. The National Folk Festival – a free, outdoor event produced by the National

Council for the Traditional Arts (NCTA) – celebrates arts, culture and heritage through live performances, workshops, demonstrations, children’s activities and more. In its first two events held in Salisbury, the festival reportedly attracted hundreds of thousands of attendees and generated millions of dollars in total economic impact. Now returning for its third and final year, organizers say the National Folk Festival will feature performances, special family and Maryland folklife programming, food and beverage concessions and more. The event, however, will have fewer stages and a smaller footprint. “Our community is on the right track to host this event in a safe way, taking into consideration all safety protocols that are needed …,” Glanz said. “Our businesses and residents are eager to come together to connect and help our local and regional economy continue to grow at the pace we saw prior to COVID.” NCTA Executive Director Lora Bottinelli said the hope is for the festival to spur economic recovery efforts in downtown Salisbury. Supported in part by the federal American Rescue Plan, the event has been identified as a driver for the recovery of the local, regional and state economy. “We know pulling this event off is going to have challenges. We know it’s going to take a huge group effort and a group lift,” she said. “And we know it’s going to be important for the community

May 7, 2021

on so many levels.” Caroline O’Hare, local manager for the National Folk Festival, said the event will be reconfigured to ensure the safety of all participants. But she noted there was still a desire from the community to host the festival this year. “The support for this festival is there,” she said. “It’s growing, and we’re excited we have a community that believes in this festival and believes in themselves.” Officials noted Perdue Farms and TidalHealth Peninsula Regional have renewed their sponsorships for this year’s event. The National Folk Festival is also seeking private support to match public investments made by the City of Salisbury, the American Rescue Plan, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Maryland State Arts Council. Festival performers and other event details will be announced later this spring and summer. Updates will be posted to www.nationalfolkfestival.com. “With the 80th National Folk Festival, the NCTA is thrilled to have the nation’s longest-running celebration of the roots, richness, and variety of American culture back in the heart of downtown Salisbury,” Bottinelli said in a statement. “Audiences can expect the same combination of diversity and excellence when we announce the artistic program later this summer. There will be performances, artist demonstrations, food and concessions, and more – something for everyone.”


Wicomico’s $161M Budget Features Tax Rate Decrease

May 7, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – A public hearing on Wicomico’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2022 highlighted this week’s county council meeting. On Tuesday, the Wicomico County Council held a public hearing on Acting County Executive John Psota’s proposed operating and capital budgets for fiscal year 2022. The spending plan – submitted to the legislative branch late last month – features a general fund budget of $161,144,944 and includes $14.1 million for the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office, $18.5 million for the Wicomico County Department of Corrections and $58.2 million for the Wicomico County Board of Education.

Wicomico Airport Awarded $1M Grants

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – More than $1 million in federal grants is expected to help fund operations at the Salisbury airport. On Tuesday, the Wicomico County Council voted unanimously to accept two grants from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) through the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriation Act. Officials say $1,023,818 in grant funding will be used for costs relating to operations, personnel, cleaning and sanitation, janitorial services and debt service payments at the airport, while $15,016 in additional grant funding will be used to provide parking, car rental and concession operators with some relief from rent and minimum annual guarantees paid to the county. Councilman John Cannon noted the county modified its concession agreements last year with four airport companies seeking financial relief during the COVID-19 pandemic. He questioned if the $15,016 would be used to offset that revenue loss. “Would this go to offset the benefits we gave them a few months ago?” he said. “I think we forgave some costs.” Airport Manager Tony Rudy noted the county could recoup some of that money with the grant award. He said officials were seeking clarification on eligibility. “It was the minimum annual guarantee that we relieved both the rental car agencies and the parking concession,” he said. “From my understanding, this only goes back until Dec. 27 of 2020. So carrying forward from there, we could probably recover some of those monies.” With no further discussion, the council voted unanimously to accept both grant awards totaling more than $1 million. “Every little bit helps,” Rudy said.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

“The primary focus of this budget is to identify and fund Wicomico County’s core service needs: public safety, public health, education and infrastructure,” Psota’s budget message reads. “Additionally, this budget was prepared with the recognition that all county stakeholders’ finances have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.” Officials noted the coming year’s budget would be funded by several revenue sources, the largest of which being local property tax revenue. The budget proposes a decrease in the real property tax rate, 91 cents per $100 of assessed value. However, since the proposed property tax rate is higher than the constant yield rate – or the tax rate that would generate the same amount of revenue as the previous year – a public hearing will be held at the next

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council meeting on May 18 at 10 a.m. In this week’s public hearing, Superintendent of Schools Dr. Donna Hanlin thanked council members for their continued support. She noted, however, that the county’s proposed contribution to the board of education could change in the coming weeks, as officials were still seeking the state’s guidance on maintenance of effort funding formulas. “This is the highest of the possible funding scenarios,” she said. “It’s very likely that figure will be slightly less than that. As soon as we know, you’ll know.” Hanlin also praised the school system’s teachers, classified employees and administrators for their efforts during this year’s budget process. “Through negotiations, they agreed to only a step on the salary scale and no cost-of-living increase in the coming

year,” she said. “It’s only through this successful collaboration and negligible increase in health care, and the hard work and dedication of budget managers to realign existing funds to meet priorities for the coming year, that we have been able to balance a maintenance of effort budget for FY22.” The proposed spending plan for fiscal year 2022 includes a revenue increase of $7.89 million, or 5.15%, over last year’s budget. That includes $3.98 million in federal American Rescue Plan funding and $4 million in general fund prior year revenue. Other notable expenditures include $12.5 million for solid waste, $11.7 million for roads and $6.3 million for WorWic Community College. The first of several budget work sessions begins on Friday.

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Security Guards Can Carry Batons Roofed Dining Area Plans Approved

Page 36

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Private sector security guards working in the resort will soon have another weapon in their selfdefense arsenal after resort officials this week approved an ordinance change allowing them to carry non-lethal batons. The Mayor and Council on Monday approved on first reading an ordinance change that will allow certified security officers working in Ocean City to carry a baton, a non-lethal weapon to defend and protect themselves. Often, private sector security guards working in Ocean City at hotels, shopping centers, condos or other private property find themselves in dicey situations with little behind their own hands and feet, for example, to protect themselves. Current state law allows certified security officers with a valid handgun permit who is in uniform traveling to and from work and while working on the property of their employer to carry a baton. Under Ocean City’s code, batons currently fall under the category of martial arts weapon and are illegal. The ordinance approved on first reading on Monday would alter the code to allow certified security officers who have a valid handgun permit to carry a baton while on the job. The issue was first brought up at the Police Commission, which sent a favorable recommen-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

dation to the Mayor and Council. Essentially, the ordinance change would give private security officers an option in between utilizing soft open-hand maneuvers during an incident before moving directly to deadly force. Councilman Mark Paddack said the proposed ordinance change brings Ocean City’s policy regarding batons for certified security officers in line with the state law. “This was a long time coming,” he said. “This was an oversight I was aware of before being on the council. I want to thank the Police Commission for bring forward a favorable recommendation to address this inequity that was occurring in our policy.” The issue was brought forth by Evan Avnet of Tactical American Security Consulting, whose company provides security to many properties in Ocean City. Avnet thanked the council for taking action, but suggested it could be taken a step further. “I would like to mention, perhaps at a later time, that we look at potentially approving also unarmed security officers being able to carry a baton,” he said. “The reason for this is unarmed security officers still have to go through Maryland State Police background checks and a security clearance card. This would apply to anyone who has a valid clearance card as well as being on duty.”

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – In yet another example of something borne out of COVID-19 becoming permanent, resort planners this week signed off on an unenclosed, roofed deck adjacent to a popular midtown restaurant. During the pandemic, the town has allowed businesses to create temporary outdoor seating areas to meet state restrictions on capacity, social distancing and indoor dining. As a result, many businesses came up with creative ways to expand their outdoor seating capacity and more than a few have decided to make those outdoor areas permanent. Such was the case this week when the Ocean City Planning Commission had before it a site plan approval request from Ristorante Antipasti at 31st Street to construct a permanent 1,340 square-foot open air, unenclosed deck with a roof on the south side of the existing restaurant. Ristorante Antipasti has been utilizing the area proposed for the new permanent deck as a temporary outdoor seating area during the pandemic. The additional square footage of the new deck does not exceed the

May 7, 2021

gross square footage of the existing restaurant, so there is no impact on parking for the establishment. Last month, the planners somewhat reluctantly approved a permanent outdoor seating deck for an uptown restaurant when it was learned the addition was going to displace required parking. That was not the case with the site plan approval request for Ristorante Antipasti this week. Zoning Administrator Kay Gordy told the commission the proposed addition met all of the zoning and code requirements, making its approval an easy one. Gordy said she also checked with State Highway Administration (SHA) to see if there were any concerns with ingress and egress. “SHA had no problems with it,” she said. “This is an outdoor dining area. It’s not going to have a bar or anything. It’s just a roofed dining area for people to sit outside.” Gordy told the commission the addition only makes permanent a temporary outdoor dining solution employed during COVID. “That’s the area they have been using for the COVID outdoor seating,” she said. “It doesn’t have any impact on parking or anything else. It’s not a big departure from what they’re doing now.”


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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May 7, 2021

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WEST OCEAN CITY – Event organizers say it is not too late to participate in the first annual Maryland Coast Bike Festival. On Saturday, May 8, community members are invited to join the inaugural Maryland Coast Bike Festival, a day-long celebration that begins and ends at the West Ocean City Commercial Harbor. “I think it will be a nice addition to the events being brought to Ocean City,” said event coordinator Salty Selt. “It’s a healthy, family friendly event that we hope to make an annual event.” The Maryland Coast Bike Festival will kick off with a series of scenic bike rides, Selt said. The Island Ride (17 miles) features a family friendly loop that explores the area around Assateague Island, while the Surf & Turf (35 miles) and Metric Century (62 miles) loop around Assateague Island and the scenic back country of Worcester County. The rides will begin and end at the harbor’s festival village, which will serve as a day-long party spot featuring live music, food, craft beer, kids’ activities, local vendors and demonstrations. Participants will also have an opportunity to join a cleanup in partnership with 4Ocean. A portion of event proceeds will support the nonprofit. “At the village we’re going to have something for everybody,” Selt said. Online registration to participate in the bike rides closed on Monday. But Selt noted people will still have an opportunity to sign up the day of the festival. Late registration will be held on-site from 6:30-8:30 a.m. “So far, participation is about double what we expected,” he said. “We will still have walk-up registration on Saturday morning with a $10 late fee applied.” It should be noted that the event will follow safety protocols consistent with guidelines set by public health officials and established endurance event experts. The Maryland Coast Bike Festival will begin with the Metric Century bike ride at 7:30, followed by the Surf & Turf ride at 8:15 and the Island Ride at 8:45. The start line will be open for all until 9 a.m. Every rider will receive a T-shirt, a free beverage coupon for a beer or soft drink, bike mechanics and course support, several well-stocked stations along the routes, que sheets and GPS maps, complimentary cold brew energy coffee, and free parking a short walk to the start and finish line. While there is a registration fee for the bike rides, Selt noted the festival village will be free to attendees. He said vendor space is also being provided free of charge to local businesses. “There’s still time if they have arts and crafts or items they want to sell,” he said. “Contact us on the website, and we’ll make room for them.” For more information on the Maryland Coast Bike Festival, visit marylandcoastbikefestival.com.


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Blood Bank Again Issuing Urgent Call For Donors

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – With less than a week’s supply remaining, the Blood Bank of Delmarva is seeking community donors. Last week, Blood Bank of Delmarva announced a regional blood shortage and called on donors to sign up for appointments at its local donor centers and pop-up locations. The Blood Bank said it currently has a 3.7-day supply of blood available for distribution, which is well below the seven-day supply needed by area hospitals. The state of the local blood supply mirrors a national shortage brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. “With thousands getting vaccinated each day, we are thrilled to watch our state recover from this catastrophic year,” said Patricia Killeen, Senior Executive Director and Vice President of Enterprise Optimization at Blood Bank of Delmarva. “Across the country, blood centers are reporting the same concerning trend: a decline in blood donations. As our region bounces back in strides this spring, we need everyone to make an appointment and donate blood to help save lives. While the end of the

Bayside Buildup: Pollen counts have been running high the last 10 days, as evidenced by this collection along

Photo by Chris Parypa

the bay in north Ocean City on Sunday.

pandemic is near, our struggle to fight for those in need continues.” Since last March, Blood Bank of Delmarva has reported a decline in blood donations as nearly all high schools, colleges, offices and community groups have had to cancel blood drives in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The strain on the blood supply became even more critical earlier this year, as snow storms and freezing temperatures challenged the organization’s collection ef-

forts. The region’s health care system requires between 350 to 380 people to donate blood each day in order to treat patients ranging from trauma victims to newborn babies and their mothers to cancer patients, according to the organization. Donors with type O and type A blood are especially needed as Blood Bank of Delmarva currently has a 0.7day supply of O positive, a 1.9-day supply of O negative and a 4.2-day supply

of A positive blood. The Blood Bank said it is taking extra precautions to help prevent the personto-person spread of COVID-19. People are not eligible to donate if they’re experiencing a cold, sore throat, respiratory infection or flu-like symptoms. To make an appointment, call 1-8888-BLOOD-8, or visit delmarvablood.org. Additional information on donor eligibility and COVID-19 precautions is available on the Blood Bank of Delmarva website.

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Major Donation Supports AGH Anniversary

May 7, 2021

BERLIN – Atlantic General Hospital Foundation is planning a modified version of its Anniversary Celebration due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The annual celebration is the local hospital’s largest fundraising event of the year, which commemorates its opening in 1993. In lieu of an in-person event, the fundraiser will rely on sponsorships, donations from its invitees, and proceeds from an online auction. The elimination of the overhead expenses of a traditional in-person party allows contributions from sponsors, like George and Emily Tunis, to go directly to support Atlantic General Hospital’s mission to provide a coordinated care system with access to quality care, personalized service and education to create a healthy community. The Tunises have generously donated $20,000 to the Anniversary Celebration this year. To date, they have given more than $50,000 through financial and in-kind contributions to the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation. The couple owns and operates Hardwire, LLC located in Pocomoke, a worldclass designer and producer of composite-based armor systems for the U.S. Army and Marine Corps, the U.S. State Department, U.S. law enforcement officers, and for critical domestic infrastructure protection. In 2012, George Tunis was named an Ernst & Young “Entrepreneur of the Year” for the State of Maryland. Emily Tunis joined Hardwire in January 2012 and has been involved in a variety of technology development programs focused on transitioning new systems to both military and commercial users. At Hardwire, she is responsible for business development and operations. She has been a member of the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation since 2016, co-chair of the Anniversary Celebration since 2017, and currently serves as the secretary for the Foundation Board of Directors. For more information, to make a donation, or view the auction for the anniversary celebration, please visit www.agh.care/agh28. All proceeds benefit Atlantic General Hospital Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization, and all gifts are tax-deductible as allowed by law. For more information, please contact Joy Stokes, Event Coordinator, at jstokes@atlanticgeneral.org or by calling the foundation office at 410-641-9671.

Check Out The Dispatch On The Web

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Pictured, from left, are Kam LaBrunda, AGH development coordinator; Michael Franklin, president and CEO of Atlantic General Hospital; George and Emily Tunis, owners of Hardwire, LLC; Sara Hambury, 28th Anniversary Celebration committee co-chair; Todd Ferrante, chair of the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation Board; and Toni Keiser, vice president of public relations for Atlantic General Hospital. Submitted Photo


County Seeking More Detailed Proposals On Broadband

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – County officials want more details from potential broadband providers before they decide to invest in expanding rural internet access. After hearing from representatives of Talkie Communications and Choptank Fiber last month, the Worcester County Commissioners discussed broadband options this week. They agreed to seek detailed proposals from each of the companies before moving forward. “We need to do this as fast as possible but I’m not going to say we’re going to go with this one or this one today until they give us a true proposal…,” Commissioner Jim Bunting said. “We need a proposal we can really look at and know the numbers are set.” After selecting Talkie as its broad-

Commissioner Discuss Funding Options

band partner last fall, the commissioners heard presentations from both Talkie and Choptank Fiber last month. Both companies are interested in providing high speed internet to the roughly 6,400 unserved homes in Worcester County. Commissioners this week questioned the specifics of each company’s plan, as the presentations included different costs — $37 million for Choptank and $51 million for Talkie — as well as types of infrastructure. They also brought up potential funding sources, as some commissioners want to use funding the county is expected to get through the American Rescue Plan while others want to bond the multi-mil-

lion-dollar cost. Bunting advocated for using some of the $10 million in federal funding the county is anticipating. “In my opinion it’s one of the best uses we could use it for,” he said. Commissioner Joe Mitrecic said he preferred bonding whatever the county was spending on broadband. “’Although I support broadband for the entire county I’m not as gung ho as my comrades here,” he said. Mitrecic said that if the cost was broken down, even if every one of the 6,400 homes that didn’t have broadband signed up, that would still cost $5,781 each with Choptank or $7,968.75 with Talkie. The possibility of the

May 7, 2021

companies paying the county back for an upfront investment, something both mentioned, would take years and years, he said. He added that the lifespan of each system also had to be considered. “I think we need to look at this real hard and get some real hard numbers,” he said. Commissioner Josh Nordstrom said he would be willing to consider bonding the project or using grant money but that he did want to see broadband access expanded. He said it was something his constituents wanted to see happen. “Now’s the time for action…,” he said. “We want to get this moving.” County staff said they would reach out to both companies to have them provide more detailed information so that each proposal could be compared side by side.

Fenwick Committee Reviews Commercial Design Guidelines

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – A resort committee reconvened this week after more than a year’s hiatus to review draft guidelines that will be used in the design of the town’s commercial district. On Wednesday, members of the Fenwick Island Ad Hoc Commercial District Planning Committee met with The Design Group’s Jeff Schoellkopf to discuss the town’s next steps in the development of commercial design guidelines. Councilman Richard Mais, committee chair, noted Wednesday’s committee meeting was the first to take place since the start of the pandemic. “We were fine-tuning everything when we paused for the last year, and

Elected Officials To Review Proposal

then we started again this spring,” he said. In 2019, the committee began working with Schoellkopf to better define Fenwick’s vision for the commercial district as it is redeveloped. Since then, committee members have focused their efforts on core issues such as building aesthetics, mechanical equipment, landscaping and parking, and have drafted voluntary guidelines and suggested ordinance changes that would suit the needs of commercial development while protecting residential property owners. “The fundamental difference is what’s

in the guidelines that are voluntary and what might be brought into the zoning code,” Schoellkopf said. This week, members presented a summary of recommended ordinance changes and voluntary design elements for the committee’s review with the goal of gathering feedback and suggestions. Proposed guidelines discussed this week include allowing decorative finishes such as porches or bay windows to encroach into front and side setbacks, requiring mechanical equipment to be screened from view, and continuing to allow residential buildings in the commercial zone.

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“There was some discussion about whether we wanted to continue to allow that and was there a danger of losing all of our commercial zone,” Mais said. “But I think we all agreed that the way we currently operate, where residential building is allowed in the commercial zone, would continue.” Committee members this week also discussed signage, noise and compact parking, among other things. Mais said the goal was to present the draft guidelines to the town council at an upcoming meeting. “This will be a recommendation to the town council,” he said. “It will go to them first.” During public comments, Mayor Gene Langan said he wanted to see more visuals explaining the proposed design elements. “One thing I think the council would like to see is if you have any preliminary sketches,” he said. “I’d like to see drawings.” Resident Gail Warburton said she wanted more design guidelines to be added to the town’s zoning code. “I’d like to see more of the items in the plan to be mandatory as opposed to being just encouraged,” she said. “Just saying they are encouraged isn’t going to get the job done.” Mais noted the committee would submit the draft document to the town council in the coming weeks. He said the town will hold a public workshop on the proposed guidelines before taking any further action. “We’re hoping to have a workshop where we can have some displays and some conversations,” he said. “It would be open to the public.” A copy of the proposed design guidelines is available for viewing on the town’s website, fenwickisland.delaware.gov.


Berlin’s Taylor House Museum Eyes Season Of Diverse Events

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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BERLIN – The Calvin B. Taylor House Museum will kick off the 2021 season with a schedule of new events aimed at increasing interest in the local landmark. As opening day nears on May 18, museum volunteers are prepping for a series of new events they hope will renew community interest in the facility. “We’re sort of that hidden gem that people aren’t aware of,” said Melissa Reid, president of the museum. The Taylor House Museum, located on Main Street in Berlin, is open each May through October to showcase local history. Though the museum hosted concerts on its lawn on Sundays during the summer for years, Reid said the museum’s team of volunteers decided it was time for a change. “When it started it was one of the few places you could see live music in Berlin,” she said. “It was something that was not happening in town. Now, there are so many opportunities for live music in Berlin.” While the museum will still host a concert on the lawn July 11, a variety of other events have been developed to showcase the facility throughout the summer and fall. In June, a weekendlong film fest will celebrate the movies of Berlin — Tuck Everlasting and Runaway Bride. Guest speaker Jack Gerbes from the Maryland Film Commission, who helped bring Tuck Everlasting to Berlin, will talk about the process Friday June 11. On Saturday June 12, Tuck Everlasting will be shown on the lawn while Runaway Bride will be shown on the lawn Sunday, June 13. Inside the museum itself, visitors will be able to see production notes, movie scripts and some crew items. “All of these artifacts will be on display,” Reid said. Following a concert from the Old School OC Band on July 11, the museum will host its popular Peach Festival on Aug. 7 and a family storytelling event on Aug. 8. In September, the museum will partner with The Greyhound, the book store on Main Street, to host a book festival. On Saturday, Sept. 12, Tracks author Maria Grosskettler will speak about the writing process. On Sunday, Grosskettler and three other authors whose books involve Berlin—Susan Ayres Wimbrow, Joe Moore and Mindie Burgoyne—will read from their works and offer book signings. In October, the museum will host a new event called Homecoming Harvest on Oct. 10 that will kick off Worcester County History Week. Because the Peach Festival has become so popular with visitors, Reid said the museum

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The Calvin B. Taylor House Museum will open the season on May 18. File Photo

wanted to offer an event geared toward locals. Homecoming Harvest will feature genealogy tables, performances by local music groups and oral history gathering sessions. Local nonprofits will also be set up. “We see it as showcasing our community,” Reid said. In focusing on history, Reid said the event would also provide a good alternative to Berlin’s annual schedule of special events, as most of those take place in the town’s commercial center. “Berlin is a good mix of commerce and community,” Reid said. “We can provide emphasis on community.” The Taylor House Museum will round out the year with a performance from the Ocean Pines Players, candlelight tours and classical Christmas events. Along with the new events, another change at the museum this year is the addition of some ticketed events that will be free to members. The guest speaker event on June 11 will be ticketed. Tickets will be $20 or free for members. Another ticketed event will be the address from author Maria Grosskettler. Reid said inclusion of some ticketed events was made to show members they were receiving some value for their membership. In the past, members received a newsletter and free admission to the museum. With the newsletter now online, Reid said an effort was made to create a few free-to-members events each year. “We realized this provided a good opportunity to give back to our members,” she said. For more information on the museum or to become a member, visit www.taylorhousemuseum.org. Information on volunteer opportunities is also available online. Interested individuals can volunteer at specific events or work as docents, which Reid said were always needed. “We want people interested in history,” she said, adding that volunteers didn’t need to have a background on Berlin history. “None of us know everything there is to know. We have a packet we give to docents.”

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Page 46

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Students In The News

May 7, 2021

Worcester Preparatory School’s Art Honor Society recognizes students who have shown outstanding ability in art scholarship, character and service. This year’s inductees included, front from left, Will Mears, Cole Lamson-Reich, Graham McColgan, John Arrington, Brugh Moore, Waverly Choy, Ava Gerachis, Summer Walker, Maddy Warren, Meredith Cummings, Bryn Elliott, Arusa Islam, Hannah Perdue, Ryan Brafman and Nathan Oltman; middle, Morgan Schoch, AnnaMarie Buas, Brooke Emeigh, Marshall Mumford, Bennett Tinkler, NAHS President Hannah Brasure, NAHS Vice President Hugh Thomas Cropper IV, Austin Cannon, Brice Richins, Nick Hearne, Charlotte Catapano, Sumira Sehgal, Morgan White, Anna Williams and Grace Baeurle; and, back, Assistant Head of School and Head of Upper School, Mike Grosso, technology teacher Nancy Raskauskas, middle school and upper school art teacher George Zaiser and Head of School Dr. John McDonald. Not pictured were inducted students Mason Brown and Sarah Butler. Submitted Photos

On April 1, 41 Worcester Prep students were inducted to the Pablo Picasso Sociedad Honoraria Hispanica and seven students were inducted to the Societe Honoraire de Francais Chapitre Bastille at the Spanish and French Honor Society Induction Ceremonies. New inductees of the French honor society were Lorelei Campbell, Carson Cebula, Tim Hebert, Brooke Phillips, Rory Pugh, Riley Schoch and Chris Todorov.

The International Thespian Society is the Educational Theatre Association’s student honorary organization to recognize high school student achievement in Theatre. Pictured with Assistant Head of School and Head of Upper School Mike Grosso, Drama/Dance Director Paulette DeRosa-Matrona and middle and upper school Music Director Christopher Buzby are inductees Grace Baeurle, Sydney Lamson-Reich, T.J. Bescak, Anders Taylor, Nick Hearne and Brooke Phillips.

Stephen Decatur High School Key Club Vice President Hailey Bowden presented David Gell, assistant principal of Berlin Intermediate School, with a Little Free Library. The club raised funds for building materials, assembled and will keep the library stocked with books.


May 7, 2021

John Joseph Brocato OCEAN CITY – John Joseph (Jack) Brocato, age 95, of Ocean City, passed away peacefully in the arms of his loving wife and children at his home on Monday, April 26, 2021. Born in Baltimore City, he was the son of the late John J. and Margaret (nee Lehr) Brocato. He is survived by his wife Mary E. Brocato (nee Kelmartin), and children, Theresa and husband Dr. William Valente, Rita A. Temes, John M. Brocato, Lori and husband Dr. Gary Bert, and Mary M. and husband Frank JOHN E. Ferrell. He was an JOSEPH BROCATO adored grandfather to eight grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, (with another on the way). Also surviving is his brother, Raymond and wife Mary Brocato, and many caring nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his beloved son-in-law, Simon Temes, four sisters and a brother. Jack attended church and grade school at Saints Phillips and James. He proudly graduated from Calvert Hall College in 1943, earning the highest mathematics achievement award in his senior year. He immediately joined the US Navy to serve during World War II and attended basic training in Bainbridge, Md. He was sent to Norman, Okla. to gain the skill of metal working and was then stationed in Key West, Fla., repairing sea planes that had suffered body damage. When the war ended, he returned to Baltimore to care for his family, as his father passed away at a young age. He met his true love Mary Elizabeth on the Boardwalk in Ocean City in 1947 and they were married the next year. He attended the University of Baltimore, followed by the University of Baltimore School Of Law. He graduated law school in 1954 and was admitted to the Maryland State Bar in 1955. He worked for the Baltimore City Traffic Engineering Bureau from 1948-1952 and formed a friendship with an executive at Equitable Trust Bank, who noted his potential. He was hired by Equitable Bank in 1952 as an Administrative Trainer and was promoted to Branch Manager. He attended the Stonier Graduate School of Banking and graduated in 1968. After a successful career and many promotions, he retired in 1984 with the title of Executive Vice President. He is often credited with bring Automatic Teller Machines (ATMs) to the Baltimore area. Jack enjoyed a long and happy retirement, travelling between his homes in Ft. Myers Beach, Fla. and Ocean City, where he was never far from the sea. He enjoyed crabbing and cruising on his pontoon boat. He was a member of the Kiwanis Club of Towson and of Ft. Myers for decades. He volunteered at the Kiwanis Thrift Shop in Ft. Myers, as the cashier and had a friendly word for everyone. A devoted member of St. Luke Church in Ocean City, he enjoyed helping with collections. Besides his family, to whom he was devoted, his other passion was walking. He could be seen every morning during the summer walking on Coastal Highway. He walked at least an hour each day, normally starting at sunrise. He will be remembered for his love of family, being outdoors, and his big smile that made anyone he met feel special. Often called

Obituaries

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

the happiest man that ever lived, he was the epitome of a life well lived. Services will be private for the family. A donation in his memory may be sent to St. Luke Church, 14401 Sinepuxent Ave, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Aaron Bruce Todd STOCKTON – Aaron Bruce Todd, age 47, of Stockton, died Tuesday, April 27, 2021 at home. Aaron was born in Salisbury and was the son of Bruce Robert and Starlett (Yost) Todd. After Aaron graduated from Stephen Decatur High School in Berlin, he served four years in the U.S. Army and was sta-

tioned at Fort Bragg, N.C. and Hanau, Germany. Aaron was honorably discharged as E-4 Specialist Top Rank where he engaged in electronics troubleshooting and repair, mechanics, and security. He was a self-employed auto mechanic; his business, Todd’s Auto Repair Performance, was based in Stockton. In addition to his parents, he is survived by one son, Kristopher Robert Todd and fiancée, AARON Ashley Sparling of StedBRUCE TODD man, N.C.; one brother, Jed Nathaniel Todd of Bishopville; one sister, Renee Todd; one grandson, Grayson Robert Todd; one grandfather, Lemuel Yost, Jr.; and his companion Tammy Jones.

Page 47 Services and viewing will be private. Aaron’s uncle, Gregg Alan Wilgus, pastor of LifeSong Christian Church, Manning, S.C., will officiate the graveside services. Aaron had a broad, contagious grin, hearty smile, and an upbeat positive attitude. He was happiest when working outdoors trouble shooting mechanical problems and repairing vehicles. Listening to country music, lifting weights, remodeling his home, commenting on political issues, discussing New Testament Bible passages and cruising in his green Lincoln were just some of the activities he loved to do. Aaron was an ardent Patriot, who cherished his freedoms; he also loved the Lord Jesus Christ and was baptized Aug. 30, 2015. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made in his name to Somerset Community Services, P.O. Box 18, Marion, Md. 21838, Memo: Aaron Bruce Todd, to assist adults with autism and other developmental disabilities in living as independently as possible. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com.


The Dispatch

Page 48

Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 WEBSITES: www.mdcoastdispatch.com www.facebook.com/thedispatchoc J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

NEWS DEPARTMENT SHAWN J. SOPER Managing Editor ssoper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHARLENE SHARPE Staff Writer/Copy Editor csharpe@mdcoastdispatch.com BETHANY HOOPER Staff Writer bhooper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHRIS PARYPA Photographer

SALES DEPARTMENT TERRI FRENCH Account Executive Entertainment Editor terri@mdcoastdispatch.com JEANETTE DESKIEWICZ Account Executive jeanette@mdcoastdispatch.com

ART DEPARTMENT COLE GIBSON Art Director cole@mdcoastdispatch.com DAVID HOOKS Graphic Artist/Webmaster dhooks@mdcoastdispatch.com

BUSINESS OFFICE Bookkeeper/Classifieds Manager classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com

The Maryland Coast Dispatch (USPS #015125) is an official and legal newspaper for Worcester County. Periodical postage paid at Berlin, Maryland, and additional mailing offices. The Maryland Coast Dispatch, 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Md. 21811, is published weekly on Friday mornings, 52 weeks a year. Subscription rates are $75 per year, $55 for six months. POSTMASTER: Please send change of address to Maryland Coast Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Maryland Coast Dispatch offices are located at Route 346 and Graham Avenue, Berlin, Maryland.

Gratitude For Courageous ‘Humble Hero’ The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

HOW WE SEE IT

On the minds of many this week were two major accidents occurring 48 hours apart and within 10 miles of each other. Though details were scant Friday night, it was clear there was at least one fatality in the accident on Assateague Road. A vehicle made an abrupt U-turn on the road in front of another vehicle, resulting in a horrific collision that killed a U.S. Navy lieutenant and severely injured at least two others. A GoFundMe page was set up this week to help the family and the goal was immediately reached and surpassed. It was a clearly a major loss for this family and his many friends in the service. Other individuals were also severely injured in the accident, and we hope for the best outcome possible for those individuals. On Sunday afternoon, it appeared initially the weekend was about to become even more grim when multiple vehicles collided on the Route 90 bridge, resulting in a truck striking the side of the bridge and nearly falling into the bay

below. It was immediately learned a young child strapped into a car seat had been ejected into the bay 30 feet below. A Good Samaritan witnessed the accident and immediately jumped into the water below, saving the child from certain drowning. A pontoon boat nearby witnessed the situation and immediately came to the aid of the man and child, transporting them to a nearby boat ramp for emergency medical care. Though there were early concerns about the child taking in too much water, it was learned Tuesday she was going to be fine and was being released from the hospital. In fact, all the individuals who were injured in the gnarly accident have been released from the hospital and have no significant ailments. It’s a remarkable story and it’s difficult not to marvel over how this situation could have easily been another fatal accident. If the collision had occurred at a different angle, the vehicle could have toppled over into the bay. If the vehicle

had struck the side of the bridge’s retaining wall in another fashion, the child in the car seat could have been crushed. If the accident occurred exactly how it did in the winter months, the child’s fate would have likely have been different. These are difficult hypotheticals to imagine, but inevitable thoughts to consider when all the various factors of this miraculous event are weighed. Perhaps it’s fine to just say faith, good fortune, courage, luck and divine intervention combined to create a true miracle. Though thoughts remain with the family and friends mourning the loss of a servant to our country, there is reason to celebrate the best human nature has to offer in the Good Samaritan who risked his own life out of instinct to save another. It’s an inspirational story and the man – known as the “humble hero” until he gets his spotlight at Friday’s press conference – deserves a lifetime of accolades for his actions last Sunday.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Pension Fund Thoughts Editor: I spoke at the pension hearing in March when Mr. Esham from Morgan Stanley presented his recent results and I recently read the articles written about that meeting in both of our local papers. For clarity, I felt compelled to address these matters in writing. First, for full disclosure, I have been a financial consultant for almost 40 years. At this time, I only wish to give the council a clearer understanding of its options and how they may affect our pension funds future return. No one has a crystal ball to predict what the next 15 years will bring. But if history is any guide, it is likely that we will not see the same type of market returns as we have seen the last 15 years. As we all know, the large Wall Street firms have their proprietary products and for obvious reasons, they attempt to use these products whenever possible. Much of the time these products have higher internal costs and investors are completely unaware of what they are paying much less how these expenses compare with similar alternatives. For example, many pensions have migrated a large portion of their equity exposure away from actively managed funds to much lower costing exchange traded index funds (typically less than .10-.15% in annual management fees). Another important fact is that index funds have outperformed the Wall Street proprietary investment products a large percentage

of the time (75%- 85% of the time). I will not go in to the reasons why this has occurred at this time, but the substantially lower costs have helped. Why do you think Vanguard’s assets have exploded with growth the past 10 years? If the council selects a consultant who uses exchange traded index funds covering essentially the same areas as the more expensive firm proprietary product the annual savings could easily be on the order of 35% to 40% of the total fees. This could be a savings of up to $400,000 a year. Over 15 years that would total up to $6 million. Raising the present Ocean City funds total value by over 3%. I have not reviewed the council’s Investment Policy Statement (IPS) but from what I understand, the current manager has underperformed the target of 7%, by (1.5%) for 15 years. The past 15 years the market has performed above its long-term averages. Either Morgan Stanly has not done a good job with their asset allocation or their investment performance is lacking or a combination of both. If the target for funding remains at 7% (which is optimistic looking forward) and the performance shortfall continues at (1.5%) per year, in 15 years there could be an additional $100 million shortfall in the two pension funds and the medical fund. This would be devastating. The other option is the town could lower the estimated gains and put in more money annually. It may be forced to do this anyway. Has the cur-

rent advisor discussed these things at all? The final point involved lack of proper disclosure. I do not believe anyone on the council understood the amount of fees being paid. Nor to my knowledge had the town ever been presented alternatives. Fees should be transparent and disclosed. When the town performs a Request for Proposals (RFP) I believe they should make it clear that they expect all submitters to disclose all fees. Tony Christ Falls Church, Va. Ocean City

No To Sanctuary Designation Editor: For the last 20 years, I have been a resident of Worcester County. Although our county is not a designated Second Amendment Sanctuary, I have never felt threatened because of this. According to Sheriff Matt Crisafulli, he “stands in solidarity with the law-abiding citizens of Worcester County, in support of our Second Amendments rights.” (according to The Dispatch). I’m not sure who the sheriff is speaking for, but two years ago this subject was discussed by our citizens at a big forum at the Ocean Pines Library. Sheriff Crisafulli tabled his Second Amendment Proclamation at that time due to the large number of law-abiding citizens saying, “No” to his proposal. Now two years later, during private meetings held due to COVID-19, this SEE NEXT PAGE


May 7, 2021

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR emerges again. I question the timing of the sheriff’s proclamation as citizens cannot assemble to express their concerns. Law enforcement officials in neighboring jurisdictions have already pressed their agendas upon the citizens of their counties and to be accurate, these proclamations have not been judged to be legally binding. Do we in Worcester County want this attempt by Sheriff Crisafulli pushed upon us as well? Let’s appreciate the good fortune of having exceptional city and state police, as well as the sheriff department, as community partners and law enforcement. The United States continues to be the leader in civilian gun ownership and no one’s Second Amendment rights seem infringed upon here in Worcester County. So as the summer is approaching, lets concentrate on welcoming our visitors and maintaining a friendly, safe community to enjoy. Judy Davis Ocean City

Safety Issues Need Attention Editor: I am writing to comment on your article regarding Beach Barrels in the April 23 edition of your paper. I attended the meeting where this and other site plans were reviewed and decisions issued. Aesthetics may have been addressed in the architectural drawings presented. No safety issues were addressed in this proposal for an addition. No brightly painted pylons or "bumper poles" are shown on this proposal that is in a parking lot and surrounded on three sides by traffic. Review by the Fire Marshall's Office should mandate numerous "poles" be added on the complete perimeter. Both businesses advertise "carryout liquor and food.” Recent pictures and accounts in several papers show car driving into business that did not have poles. Fortunately, no one was injured this time by a DUI. This is a high traffic area, close to bus stop/Fumes, etc. and very close to Coastal Highway. Ocean City needs to update where necessary. Is this political? It has been 25 or 30 years since it was written. Planning commissioner’s statement was true – "opening up Pandora's Box." The Planning and Zoning Commission was the only board that personally visited the site to see limited parking available at this site in a residential community. Robert R. Hemp Ocean City

Facts Wrong On Wind Editor: People like Ocean City. They like the water, except when it is coming down as rain during their vacation, or

Between The Lines

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

when it’s flooding St. Louis Ave during high tides. People like to come here in the summer because they can bake on the beach, cool off in the ocean, and crank-up the A/C in their hotel rooms during the hot, humid nights. Our elected officials want to protect Ocean City for future generations, but unfortunately they don’t have their facts straight. They are afraid that wind turbines 15 miles off shore will ruin the pristine view that Ocean City currently enjoys. They are ignoring the billboard boats floating by and blocking that view all summer long, along with the parasailers, advertising airplanes, speed boat tours and fishing boats, all within hundreds of feet of the beach. Those turbines at 15 miles will be barely visible to the naked eye during clear, low humidity days of early spring and late fall, and during the hazy, humid summer days will probably require binoculars to be seen. However, to protect Ocean City involves more than just the view of the water. The ocean levels are rising with global warming as the polar ice and glaciers are melting. The streets of Ocean City are only a few feet above sea level and will become covered with water in the not too distant future unless we stop global warming. Those hotel air conditioners need energy, which is presently generated in large part by fossil fuel generators creating greenhouse gases throughout Maryland. Those wind turbines would produce zero greenhouse gases. Burning fossil fuels also creates other byproducts which produce acid rain that kills aquatic vegetation throughout the coastal bays, where many vacationers engage in fishing, boating, sailing, kayaking and other water activities. Burning less fossil fuel will help improve the health of coastal bays and improve the environment around Ocean City. We applaud the efforts of the elected officials to protect Ocean City for future generations, but they should understand all the facts of the matter so they can make the best possible decisions. Cindy Dillon Ocean Pines (The writer’s submission is on behalf of the Lower Eastern Shore Sierra Club Executive Committee.)

To Our Readers: The Dispatch welcomes any and all letters from our readers. All letters are encouraged typed, but not required, and we reserve the right to edit each letter for clarity, accuracy and brevity. Letters should include writer’s name, address and day and evening telephone numbers. If we are unable to reach the writer, we will have to withhold the letter. Due to space restraints, letters under 500 words in length will be given top priority. Letters can be mailed to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811, emailed to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com or faxed to 410-641-0966.

Page 49

By Publisher/Editor Steve Green

Four years later and the Town of Ocean City is still spending money on legal fees defending its ban on topless women. The attorneys on both sides of the argument laid out their positions this week during the appeal of the U.S. District Court’s dismissal of the civil suit. Representing a small group of women who want to go topless in Ocean City, attorney Devon Jacob said, “This lawsuit is about confirming the legal right of women to be bare-chested in public in the same places that men are permitted to be bare-chested, for purposes other than breastfeeding. This lawsuit seeks a declaration from the court that Ocean City’s ordinance violates the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment to the federal Constitution … This ordinance is based on sexist ideology. The fact that something makes somebody uncomfortable is not a reason to make a law. The public has consistently been demanding more and more equality under the law. Here, this government objective of public sensibility is an amorphous term that nobody seems to be able to define. When you look at Ocean City, basically, their argument is it would make people uncomfortable.” Defending the Town of Ocean City, attorney Bruce Bright wrote, “The Mayor and Council are well known in the community. Everywhere they go, people come up to them to address public issues. By nature of their positions as elected officials, their job is to take the temperature of the public on a whole host of issues. They evaluate what the public view is, and they legislate on that basis. That’s what they did in this case … Prior to then, the Mayor and Council did not see the need to specifically legislate on that issue because the sensibilities were what they were, and people conformed themselves to that. Now, in the more modern era, someone came along saying they wanted to go topless on the beach in Ocean City and that necessitated addressing this issue legislatively.” The town is certainly well within its legal right to enforce this topless prohibition, and the women are within their rights to challenge the issue to the farthest extent possible. Unfortunately, the taxpayers are left holding the cost of defending the ordinance. The Worcester County Commissioners heard a bit of a different message at this week’s annual public budget input session. Typically, education supporters carry their organized message of the critical importance of funding support from the county for public schools to the commissioners. While there was some of that to be certain, the predominant concern seemed to be more about increasing funding for law enforcement. In his budget for the next fiscal year, Worcester County Sheriff Matt Crisafulli is seeking an almost 30% increase in funding to hire three new deputies and convert seven part-timers to full-time personnel as well as replacing 18 vehicles. In total, he’s seeking $2.2 million more than his last budget. While the commissioners are not likely to meet the request entirely, FOP Lodge 50 President Chris Larmore, a sergeant in the sheriff’s office, said the county should give the critical funding request all due consideration. He said the county’s population has grown while the sheriff’s office remains about the same size as it was back in 2000 when Deputy Brian K. Heller was killed in a car accident. “We have a right to be heard and you have a duty to the people … There were only two deputies working that night. After 20 years, we’ve increased that number to three. One deputy for each end of the county, with a supervisor racing from one end of the county to the other to back those deputies up … This is a huge financial burden for you to bear and pass on to the taxpayers of this county,” Larmore said. “We understand that. It’s not a want or desire — it’s an absolute need.” The financial numbers for Maryland casinos continue to impress. Some of the highlights included in this week’s monthly report were: •For the month of April, the Ocean Downs Casino, home to 604 slot machines and 18 table games, recorded $7.68 million in revenue, which is a 30% increase from April 2019. The 2020 numbers are tossed out because it was shuttered due to the pandemic. •In April, of the casino’s total revenue take, 89% is derived from slots with the remainder coming from table games. •As far as the six casinos in Maryland, Ocean Downs ranks fifth in revenue. For the month of April, the casinos in order of total revenue are MGM National Harbor (2,017 slot machines and 198 table games), $62.3 million (up 2.5% from April 2019); Live! Casino & Hotel (2,879 slot machines and 185 table games), $58.2 million (up 22% from April 2019); Horseshoe Casino (1,035 slots and 16 table games), $8.5 million (down .1% from April 2019); Hollywood Casino (604 slots, 16 table games), $8.52 million (a 37% increase from April 2019); Ocean Downs Casino (above); and Rocky Gap Casino (528 slots, 16 table games), $5.65 million (up 19% from April 2019). •Where does the casino revenue go? For Ocean Downs, 53% of the slots revenue stays with the casino, meaning for April the company keeps $3.64 million. The remainder of the slots revenue is distributed like this for April: 32% ($2.19 million) to the Education Trust Fund; 7% ($480,969) to horse racing; 5.5% ($377,904) to local impact grants; 1% ($68,709) to ML&G operational expenses; and 1.5% ($103,064) to small, minority, women businesses.


Company Aims To Meet Needs For Better Security Services

Page 50

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – After nearly a decade of operation, a Salisbury company continues to meet the demand for professional security. Since 2012, USTASC – Tactical American Security Consulting – has provided professional security services to clients across the state. From homeowners associations and apartment complexes to hotels and cannabis dispensaries, CEO and Chief of Operations Evan Avnet said USTASC employees are trained to handle any security need. “We are an immediate response because we are on-site for all activities,” he said. “For our clients, we are the first responders.” Avnet launched USTASC in 2012 after a 15-year career in law enforcement. Seeing a demand for personal protection, he started out by offering firearms training to civilians. By 2014, the company had grown to become a security provider. Today, USTASC offers security consulting, armed and unarmed security personnel, private investigations, firearms training, active shooter prevention and VIP protection. The company also provides security for special events, such as Ocean City Bike Week and the unsanctioned pop-up car rally. “We have grown by leaps and bounds

since we’ve started,” he said. Unlike many of its competitors, Avnet said, USTASC is outfitted with seasoned, trained professionals who utilize top-of-the-line equipment. He noted cars are equipped with GPS and Lytx dash cameras, and employees utilize body cameras and a computerized reporting system. USTASC staff also receive in-house training on firearms, community relations, diversity and liability. “We provide a much more professional security service than a majority of our competitors,” he said. Avnet said recent events – including Maryland’s repeal of the Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights and calls to defund law enforcement agencies – have challenged local police departments and their ability to respond to criminal activity. He said USTASC fills security gaps for clients by dealing with on-site nuisance issues such as trespassing and disorderly conduct. “We also work closely with the local police departments in accomplishing safety and security for our clients and their clients,” he said. With 75 full- and part-time employees, Avnet said USTASC staff have decades of experience in law enforcement and security. He said the goal is to double business in the next two years. “We want to expand to those clients who want a professional security com-

May 7, 2021

“We want to expand to those clients who want a professional security company … who value security for their properties, clients and customers,” said USTASC CEO and Chief of Operations Evan Avnet. Photo by Bethany Hooper

pany rather than just a warm body, who value security for their properties, clients and customers …,” he said. “Unfortunately for our clients, and society in general, they’re going to have to provide

more and more for their own security rather than relying on police response.” For more information on USTASC, visit www.ustasc.com or call 888-8134434.

Open 10am Thursday-Monday • Inside & Outside Dining Available

Happy Mother’s Day!

Mother’s Day Speicals Featuring Crab Stuffed Flounder, Crab & Shrimp Imperial, Beer Battered Fish Basket & A Special Treat For Mom!


annual Bowl For Kids’ sake Held

May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 51

Your Countertop Specialists

Big Sister Marie and her little sister celebrate at last week’s Bowl For Kids’ Sake event. Submitted Photo

OCEAN CITY – Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Eastern Shore (BBBSES) held its annual and longest-running fundraiser, Bowl For Kids’ Sake, on May 2 at the Ocean Lanes Bowling Center on 72nd Street. Shore United Bank and the Ocean City-Berlin Optimist Club each sponsored multiple lanes for this year’s event. Each year, BBBSES hosts this event, and 100% of funds raised go directly towards serving local children through professionally supported mentor matching and enrichment programs at no cost to the families we serve on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The participants in this year’s event included “Bigs” and their “Littles,” families, sponsors, and friends. This fun filled day gives the opportunity for local community members, companies, and youth to interact and bowl together. Bowl For Kids’ Sake is a sponsor and registration funded event, and those who were able to raise $50 were granted two free games (courtesy of Ocean Lanes), pizza (courtesy of Pizza Tugos), and a ninja

themed Bowl for Kids’ Sake T-shirt. The two-hour event included prizes for the highest scores, successful strikes and for those having the most fun. The winners were able to win gift cards from the Greene Turtle (three valued at $20 each), Alley Oops (valued at $40), Bonfire (four valued at $25 each), and Dandy Dons Bike Rental (valued at $25). All bowlers in attendance had the opportunity to bowl thanks to several charitable sponsors. Ayers, Jenkins, Gordy & Almand, P.A, sent a team and sponsored an additional lane as well as BBBSES Board members Michele Hughes and Allyson Bernard-Church, who sponsored a lane and additional bowlers, respectively. BBBSES is a nonprofit, youth development organization whose mission is to provide enrichment and create and support mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth. If you are interested in learning how you can become a mentor or contribute financially, go to www.shorebiglittle.org or give us a call at 410-543-2447.

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Page 52

Sports

Former Mallard Named Athlete of Year

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

In The News Former Worcester Prep standout Ross Dickerson last week was named the University of Tampa’s Male Athlete of the Year. Pictured above, Dickerson (right) faces off against a recent opponent. Photo courtesy of University of Tampa BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

Mallards Top Sussex Academy, 13-6

Decatur senior Olivia Brown recently finished third in the Interscholastic Equestrian Association National Finals event in Georgia. Pictured above is Brown (left) with IEA Team Coach Whitney Carmouche. Submitted Photo

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

After suffering a loss the Cape Henlopen back on April 24, the Mallards have responded with two straight including a 12-11 double-overtime win over Tower Hill last week and the 13-6 win over Sussex Academy on Monday, both on the road.

Worcester Girls Split Pair Of Games

BERLIN – Worcester Prep’s boys’ varsity team improved to 6-2 on the season this week with a 13-6 win over Sussex Academy on the road on Monday.

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Worcester Prep’s girls’ varsity lacrosse team split a pair of games this week, edging Salisbury School, 9-8, on Monday before falling to

BERLIN – Former Worcester Prep lacrosse standout Ross Dickerson last week was named the University of Tampa Male Athlete of the Year for the 2020-2021 season. Dickerson, who was outstanding as a faceoff specialist during his career at Worcester, was a three-time captain at the University of Tampa, where he set the NCAA record for faceoff winning percentage. In 2020, he was named the Inside Lacrosse Division II Player of the

Year and was also a First-Team AllAmerican. University of Tampa Head Coach Rory Whipple called Dickerson the vocal leader of his team. “He’s the hardest working player in our program,” he said. “He’s the heartbeat of our organization.” Dickerson was also a two-time Sunshine State Conference First-Team selection. He has been named to the SSC Commissioner’s Honor Roll twice and was awarded the SSC Specialist Player of the Week nine times during his career.

Saints Peter and Paul on Tuesday. The Mallards ended a two-game skid with the win over Salisbury School. On Tuesday they hung with the Sabres through much of the first half and trailed, 6-3, at the half before yielding eight unanswered goals in the second half.

Tough Guy Of The Year:

The Atlantic Physical Therapy “Tough Guy of the Year” award went to junior Luke Scott, who won Tough Guy of the Week honors twice during the regular season. Pictured above is Scott (center) flanked by coaches and APT officials. Submitted Photo


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 53


Business And Real Estate News

Page 54

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Cato Supports Schools SALISBURY – Hoping to accelerate the careers of kids interested in science, technology, engineering and math, Salisbury-based Cato Gas & Oil Co. has awarded $500 checks to 15 area local schools to support their S.T.E.M (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) programs. “These students are tomorrow’s scientists and engineers, and as an industry, we depend on them,” said Cato Gas & Oil Co. President Michael G. Abercrombie, Jr. “The sky’s the limit for our kids, and we’re always proud to help fuel their learning and support their career dreams.” Abercrombie said the company has long made it a priority to support the communities where it operates. This time, Cato Gas & Oil, owner of Goose Creek Convenience stores, made the donations in partnership with the ExxonMobil Educational Alliance, which has committed more than $34 million nationwide to fund math and science programs at schools in need. Cato’s latest donations will support S.T.E.M. programs at the following schools: Berlin Intermediate School, Crisfield High School and Academy, Kiptopeke Elementary School, North Salisbury Elementary School, Pemberton Elementary School, Parkside High School,

Delmar Elementary School, Phillip C. Showell Elementary School, James M. Bennett High School, N. Caroline High School, Benjamin Bannacker Elementary School, Salisbury Christian School, Mardela Middle and High School, Lake Forest High School and Worcester Preparatory School.

Year’s Top Producers Listed BERLIN – Keller Williams Realty of Delmarva Maryland recently announced its 2020 top producers. The yearly awards are based on the Gross Commission Earned (GCI) or the number of units, whichever is highest. The GCI is the total amount of commission money earned by an agent before associated expenses. The #1 Agent of the Year Winner is Melanie Shoff of the Ocean City office. She was the top agent in GCI, volume and homes sold for Keller Williams Realty of Delmarva. The #1 Team of the Year winner is The

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Fritschle Barker Group of the Ocean City office (Grant Fritschle, Jonathan Barker, Mark Barker, Clinton Bickford, Bryan Coates, Courtney Wright, Laurie Murray and Jackson St Jean). The team led in GCI, volume and homes sold for Keller Williams Realty of Delmarva. Additionally, The Fritschle Barker Group of the Ocean City office won the Quad Platinum Award. Taking the Double Platinum Award was The Windrow Group of Maryland (Erik Windrow, Bob Windrow, Nikki Rayne and Jennifer Kukel). Melanie Shoff of the Ocean City office won the Platinum Award. Individuals and teams receiving the Quadruple Gold Award are Sharon Daugherty Group of the Ocean City office (Sharon Daugherty and Annie Tingle) and The Moore Team of the Ocean City office (Michael Moore, Mary Moore, Tammy Hall and Michael Dodson). The Triple Gold Award winners for individuals and teams are The Britts Team

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of the Ocean City office (Nancy Britt, Gregory Britt, Lauren Britt Hudson, Kate Deckenback and Mandi C. Gaca Martenson); Michael Dunn of the Salisbury office; Lucido Global Team of Maryland (Audrey Serio, Franklin Serio, John Mead, Karen March and Shawn Whitehead) and Sheri Smith of the Ocean City office. The Double Gold Award winners for individuals and teams are Kim LucidoMcCabe of the Ocean City office; Mike Maykrantz of the Ocean City office; and Jay Pierorazio of the Ocean City office. Individuals and teams receiving the Gold Award are Billy Barr of the Ocean City office; Davis Strategic of the Salisbury office (Brett Christopher Davis, Aubrey Campbell, Darrell Walker and Charles Campbell); Tim Dennis of the Salisbury office; and Jimbo Weismiller of the Ocean City office. The Silver Award Winners for individual and teams are Brenda Archer-Nichols of the Ocean City office; Kelley Bjorkland of the Ocean City office; and Rusty Molnar of the Salisbury office. Individuals and teams that earned the Bronze Award are Bud Cumberland of the Ocean City office; Theresa Diefendorf of the Ocean City office; Rich DiFilippo of the Ocean City office; and Mia McCarthy of the Ocean City office. Other awards that were presented at SEE NEXT PAGE

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... Business News

May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch send; launched Leveraged Agent Services; hired Transaction Coordinator for Maryland Morgan Brown; offered group health and life insurance benefits to agents; migrated accounting services to cloud solution; hired marketing services virtual assistant, Regine; launched cardinal settlements; and MC785 profit shared $281,439. Leadership and staff were also honored at the annual meeting, including Walt Taraila, broker for Maryland and Delaware; Alishia Potter, Maryland Assistant Team Leader; Michael Moreland, Director of Operations for Delaware and Maryland; Bonni Burris, Maryland Market Center Administrator; Harold Cyr-Townsend, Director of Career Development; Mike Watson, Training/Compliance; Courtney Wright, Training; Nedra Johnstone, Maryland Agent Service Coordinator; Al Demerich, Accounting; Becky Herd, Accounting; David Tulloch, Accounts Payables; Morgan Brown, Maryland Transaction Coordinator; and Josephine Sipler, Delaware and Maryland Marketing Coordinator.

the event include Karen March of the Ocean City office winning Rookie of the year for Keller Williams Realty of Delmarva and Lauren Britt Hudson of the Ocean City office winning the 2020 Cultural Icon for Keller Williams Realty of Delmarva. The firm’s accomplishments in 2020 include opening our doors in Western Sussex with Griffin Higgins Team and Cornerstone Associates in Seaford, Delmarva Home Team in Delmar, and Bright Home Group in Laurel; opening the Rehoboth Beach office and bringing in the Joe Maggio Group; hiring a Director of Operations Michael Moreland; transitioned reception services to virtual assistant; hired an assistant team leader for Maryland, Alishia Potter; hired a Rehoboth and West Fenwick agent service coordinator, Krista Carroll; hired new Ocean City Agent Service Coordinator Nedra Johnstone; hired Transaction Coordination Virtual Assistant Kat; launched Whitecap Mortgage; rolled out new agent models “KW Your Way”; hired new marketing coordinator Josie Sipler; launched Falcon Secured Insurance; hired new bookkeeper Al Demerich; launched coaching company; hired Assistant Development Director Harold Cyr-Town-

Auction Sale Planned OCEAN CITY – Satellite Restaurants Inc., longtime owner of The Original Crabcake Factory in Ocean City, filed for bankruptcy protection last October due to the COVID-19 pandemic. During the past

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Page 55

seven months, it has tried to establish a reorganization plan to emerge from Chapter 11. Multiple legal obstacles have delayed this process and has caused the restaurant to evaluate other options for keeping the Original Crabcake Factory operating uninterrupted for the 2021 season and beyond. “We have considered all options and our most prudent choice given the situation is to proceed with a sale of the brand,” said CEO Johnny Brooks. “I have put my heart and soul into Crabcake Factory for 25 Years of my life. I feel at this point the only way to continue at this location is to maximize a sale and allow someone else take over the reins.” Qualified potential buyers can obtain more information by contacting Alex Cooper Auctioneers at www.AlexCooper.com. Potential purchasers will need to contact Alex Cooper in order to enter into a non-disclosure agreement for further information and to participate in the sale and receive information on the leases and contracts that may be assumed by the buyer as part of the purchase. The required opening bid starts at $325,000. It is unclear at this time whether Brooks intends to stay with the Crabcake Factory after the sale. In this sale format, any purchaser has the option to negotiate the options of the sale including employ-

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ment of Brooks, who is the general manager and executive chef, and other staff members. “Mr. Brooks has spent the last year year fighting the pandemic crisis coupled with multiple legal actions which, to his credit have not forced the location to close at any time,” said bankruptcy counsel Paul Sweeney. “As a result of Mr. Brooks’ hard work, the Crabcake Factory has been open seven days per week during the proceedings. The restaurant business is hard enough but this year has really tested the meddle of even the most seasoned professionals.” Brooks founded Crabcake Factory in 1996 after moving to Ocean City from Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Crabcake Factory Bayside in Fenwick Island was built and owned by Brooks until it was franchised and sold in 2018. “I have had several discussions with potential buyers about staying on. That remains to be seen,” said Brooks. “Crabcake Factory is in my DNA so we will entertain reasonable offers, but my main concern is to maximize the sale price of my brand and help any buyer with a smooth transition without any interruption in service.” Brooks hopes to conclude the bankruptcy court supervised sale prior to Memorial Day weekend to allow the new owners the prime tourism season. MVA LICENSED

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Stephen Decatur High School Key Club members Morelia Camacho, Lydia Woodley, Annabelle Derby, Maeze Donahue and Hailey Bowden held a yard sale fundraiser in April.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

People

By Jeanette Deskiewicz

FEATURING THOSE HELPING CAUSES IN THE RESORT AREA

Providing the “man” power for the Ocean City Presbyterian Church Rummage Sale, were Buzzy Baylis, Pete Hanes and Cliff Dypsky.

In Society

May 7, 2021

It takes a village to fight child abuse with Worcester County Sheriff Matt Crisafulli, State’s Attorney Kris Heiser, and Commissioner Joe Mitrecic all coming out to support The C.R.I.C.K.E.T. Center Walk for Kids.

The Fellowship of Christian Farmers International Karen Steele, Martha Reese and Ernie Reese spread their ministry at the 37th Annual Home, Condo & Outdoor Show.

Volunteers Joe Paska and Ken Schroyer welcomed visitors to the Vietnam Veterans Wall That Heals display in Ocean Pines on opening day.

Monthly rummage sales are back on for the summer with Sarah Dypsky and Carol Reese ringing up the purchases at Ocean City Presbyterian Church.

Getting things organized for the 8th Annual Walk for Kids, were Cindy Cook and Monica Martin of The C.R.I.C.K.E.T. Center.

Demonstrating their amazing non-surgical facelift serum at this year’s Home, Condo & Outdoor Show were Jonathan Mior and Elizabeth Maryn of Zero Gravity.

The C.R.I.C.K.E.T. Center Board President Deborah Travers, Executive Director Wendy Myers and Therapy Canine Josiah were all on hand for the Walk for Kids fundraiser last month.

Braving the cold to honor the brave, were Nancy Cartwright and Colleen Deptula at The Wall That Heals display at Worcester County Veterans Memorial Park.


Salisbury Mayor Featured At Memorial Day Service

May 7, 2021

BERLIN – The annual Memorial Day service in Ocean Pines will return to the Worcester County Veterans Memorial on Monday, May 31, beginning at 11 a.m. The ceremony this year will feature Salisbury Mayor Jake Day as the keynote speaker. Day recently returned from a yearlong deployment in East Africa with the Maryland National Guard and is one of only three full-time U.S. mayors ever deployed while serving in office. The music portion of the program will include Frank Nanna and the WWIIunes, featuring Todd Crosby. Randy Lee Ashcraft will perform a new song honoring the recent visit of The Wall That Heals, and the Delmarva Chorus will perform the “Armed Forces Medley,” honoring the Army, Navy, Marine, Air Force and Coast Guard. “We are very happy to be able to return to our normal ceremony, after having to cancel the event last year because of COVID-19 restrictions,” Veterans Memorial Foundation President Marie Gilmore said. “These ceremonies are one of the hallmarks of the foundation, as we have a duty and an obligation to honor our veterans.” Public parking will be available at Veterans Memorial Park on Route 589 and Cathell Road in Ocean Pines. Lim-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Worcester County Veterans Memorial off Route 589 is pictured.

ited seating will be available during the event and guests are encouraged to

bring chairs. For more information on the Wor-

Page 57

File Photo

cester County Veterans Memorial Foundation, visit www.opvets.org.


Page 58

Modified Springfest Back In OC

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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OCEAN CITY – It is officially the start of the season, as Ocean City’s Springfest Arts and Crafts Festival is now underway for its 30th anniversary. The public is invited to come to the resort for live music, art, crafts, food and more – all located adjacent to Ocean City’s Boardwalk and beach.

Springfest comes to life with a diverse variety of live outdoor musical entertainment all day long for four days. Visitors should bring their appetite as the event includes delicious offerings from famous Eastern Shore delicacies to a wide assortment of food, beer and wine. Springfest, one of the top Arts and Crafts Show in the United States, features over 250 vendors selling art and crafts. Springfest is located in the Inlet parking lot at the south end of Ocean City’s famous Boardwalk. Springfest is fun for people of all ages and admission to the four-day event is free, including all entertainment. Since parking in the downtown area is limited and there will be no parking in the Inlet parking lot throughout the event, the Town of Ocean City will offer Springfest transportation. The Coastal Highway Beach Bus will be operating for only $3 all day boarding. Take advantage of the town’s park and ride location on Route 50 in West Ocean City. Park your car for free and ride the shuttle to Springfest for $3 all day boarding. Both bus services are every 20 minutes from 6:20 a.m. to 11:35 p.m. Masks are required to ride and seated loads only. For more information about transportation, call 410-723-7606. The event will be modified to follow state and local heath guidelines but still offer the traditional Springfest favorites. Facial coverings and social distancing is required at the event. Guests must also enjoy their food and beverages while being seated. Hours for the popular free-admission event are Friday-Saturday, May 78 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 9, 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. For more information about Springfest 2021, call the Ocean City Recreation & Parks Department at 410250-0125, toll-free at 1-800-626-2326 or visit OCocean.com.


New Exhibits Featured In May At OC Center For Arts

May 7, 2021

OCEAN CITY – In-person First Friday art openings continue at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th St. bayside on May 7 from 5-7 p.m. as well as at the Art League’s new satellite gallery locations at the Princess Royale and Coffee Beanery. The events will maintain CDC guidelines and require masks and social distancing. The public is invited to attend. The Thaler Gallery at the Arts Center hosts “Expressive Plein Air Plus” by award-winning plein air painters Jim Rehak and Alison Leigh Menke. “Plein air” is a French expression meaning “in the open air,” used to describe the art of painting outdoors. Rehak, who lives in Seaford, Del., started with comic book illustration and progressed to oil painting while studying for his BFA at the Maryland Institute College of Art. During college summers, he worked as a portrait and caricature artist in Ocean City and was later an art director at a sign company, a freelance court illustrator, and a teacher. Rehak captures the seasonal changes of the landscape through his paintings. “Plein air painting is an ideal way to connect with nature and connect with myself,” he said. “The Eastern Shore has been a beautiful place to do just that.” Menke is an expressive impressionist who paints directly from life. Her approach emphasizes the importance of expressing a sense of light and place while showcasing the rich qualities of oil paint and brushwork. Born in Caracas, Venezuela and raised in Clarksville, Md., Menke graduated in 2010 from the University of Maryland with a degree in Art and Art History and studied abroad in Amsterdam and Greece. She has competed in nearly 100 national and international plein air competitions and festivals. Her commission work is permanently on display at the National Harbor in Washington, D.C., and she will be the juror for the Art League’s 2021 Artists Paint OC plein air event. The Galleria features a group show entitled “Up Close and Personal,” judged by photographer Brook Hedge, Coastal Camera Club member and resident artist at the Peninsula Gallery in Lewes, Del. The exhibit features closeup photography that puts the focus on moments that may be overlooked, and Hedge will award cash prizes to the winners. The Spotlight Gallery hosts fabric artist Dale Ashera-Davis of Berlin. Her interest in fabric began as a child and quickly moved into fiber art using commercial cottons as well as unusual materials such as dryer lint, copper roofing sheets, and found items. She hand dyes and prints many of her custom fabrics, combining cottons and silks to create one-of-a-kind pieces. Lisa Marie Penn answered the call for a free artist-in-residency for Studio E in May, and was chosen from many applicants. Born in Baltimore, she at-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

tended the Maryland Institute College of Art and opened “2 Hot Art Chicks Gallery” in Hampden before becoming an Amtrak train conductor and later moving to Ocean Pines. Penn specializes in the traditional art of Baltimore screen painting and will be teaching classes at the Arts Center on the technique in May and June. Wood turners Paul and Andrew Neeb of Pikesville, Md. are the artisans-in-residence for May. The brothers turned their love of the outdoors into creating lathe-turned art décor pieces inspired by nature, including intricate inlaid wooden bowls, birdhouses, platters, and custom walking sticks made from misshapen trees and vines they find on hikes. The First Friday receptions are now branching out to other points in North

Ocean City. The new Art League satellite gallery in the main lobby of the Princess Royale Oceanfront, 9100 Coastal Hwy., displays the paintings of David Simpson through May. Simpson was born and raised in West Ocean City and currently occupies an artist studio at the Arts Center as well as instructing classes in painting and drawing. A second satellite gallery on 94th Street is located less than a block from the Arts Center at the Coffee Beanery and will feature the work of Rebecca Morgan. Morgan is an illustrator and painter from the Eastern Shore who works between Maryland and Barcelona, Spain and is influenced by both cultures. She creates brightly-colored images to energize and uplift the viewer.

Page 59

The Art League’s new monthly online exhibit at ArtLeagueofOceanCity.org/online-exhibits/ features art by students of all skill levels created during the Art League’s online Zoom art classes. All shows will be on display until May 29. More information is available at www.ArtLeagueofOceanCity.org or by calling 410-524-9433. The Art League of Ocean City is a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing the visual arts to the community through education, exhibits, scholarship, programs and community art projects. Financial support comes through individuals and corporate sponsors, The Maryland State Arts Council, the Worcester County Arts Council, and the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore.


Community

Page 60

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

News In Photos

Diakonia Executive Director Bee Miller recently spoke to the Ocean City Lions Club about services offered. Diakonia is the only comprehensive provider of emergency services for men, women and families on the Lower Shore of Maryland and provides emergency housing and food assistance. Services have expanded to include case management, housing assistance, homeless prevention, and veteran services. Presenting the check, from left, are Lions 1st Vice President Scott Stark, President Mike Hooper, Miller and 2nd Vice President Bill Christmas. Family and friends of the late Worcester County Sheriff’s Office Deputy 1st Class Brian K. Heller recently presented a check for $3,000 for the endowed scholarship in his name, which benefits Wor-Wic Community College criminal justice students from Worcester, Wicomico or Somerset counties. Pictured, from left, are Dr. Ray Hoy, president of Wor-Wic Community College; Sheriff Matt Crisafulli of the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office; Heller’s mother, Connie Widmann, and her husband, Dave Widmann; and Heller’s daughter, Laura Jorgenson and her sons Jon, 5, Everett, 18 months, and Shane, 7. The scholarship fund was created in 2004 in memory of Heller, who died in the line of duty in 2000. Submitted Photos

Worcester County Education Support Personnel Association members, along with President Ivory Smith, helped distribute food recently at Ocean City Park and Ride. This event was sponsored by the Lower Shore Vulnerable Population Task Force.

The Republican Women of Worcester County had its general luncheon meeting on April 22, at Fager’s Island in Ocean City. Guest speaker was Worcester County State’s Attorney Kris Heiser, who is pictured with RWWC Executive Board members Jean Delcher, Susan Ostrowski, Beth Rodier, Mary Adair, Sandy Zitzer, Theresa Denshuick and Amy Mike.

American Legion Post 166 donated $8,000 in April to four local organizations – Worcester County Parks and Recreation Department, the Ocean City Parks and Recreation Department, Boy Scout Troop 261, and Coastal Hospice. Above, presenting the contribution to Scout Troop members Mason Foxwell, Bennett Brown, and Jeorg Leinemann were Post Commander Tom Wengert and George “Bo” Spicer. Below, post members Earl Hewett, George “Bo” Spicer, Bob Smith and John Granite present a check for $2,000 to Coastal Hospice Provider and Community Relations Liaison Ashley Sloan Halderman. Ashley spoke at the post’s meeting in April about Coastal Hospice programs.


‘Pinwheels For Prevention’ Added At Pines Entry Gates

May 7, 2021

BERLIN – Those entering Ocean Pines’ north and south gates last week may have noticed something a little different – a pair of colorful pinwheel gardens. Staff from the Berlin-based Cricket Center planted the gardens last month to help raise awareness for National Child Abuse Prevention Month and the “Pinwheels for Prevention” national campaign. The Cricket Center is the only child advocacy center for sexually and physically abused children in Worcester County. Cricket Center Executive Director Wendy Myers has planted pinwheel gardens in Worcester County since 2012. This is the first year that such a garden was planted at the Ocean Pines gates. “The pinwheel is a symbol of child abuse prevention, and it just reminds us of the happy and carefree childhood that we want for all kids,” Myers said. Myers said the center never closed and was able to continue supplying services each day, throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. She said reports of abuse trended downward during that time, but those statistics are now sharply on the rise. “The fact that kids were at home and not seeing professionals, certainly we saw a decrease in referrals from teachers and professionals who are mandated reporters, because the kids

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Cricket Center therapy dog Josiah is pictured in Ocean Pines

weren’t seeing these individuals,” she said. “Some of the abuse statistics lowered slightly, but now it’s certainly coming back and we’re seeing a huge increase in referrals, and in cases for physical and sexual abuse.” Since it opened in 2009, Myers said the center has served more than 1,500 victims of child abuse. “That’s a lot, especially when you

consider the number of children in our county,” she said. To help fight child physical and sexual abuse, Myers encouraged local people to visit www.thecricketcenter.com. “There’s a wealth of resources there for people to educate themselves and the people around them about prevention. Knowing the signs and symptoms of when a child is experiencing trauma

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Submitted Photo

and how to react responsibly is just really important,” she said. Pinwheel gardens at Ocean Pines' north and south gates will stay up through the end of the month. “Ocean Pines is proud to support this worthy cause, and we hope it helps raise awareness for Child Abuse Prevention Month,” Ocean Pines General Manager John Viola said.


Page 62

Best Beats

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

on the beach

BEATS BY WAX Buxy’s Salty Dog: Friday, May 7 Pickles Pub: Tuesdays & Thursdays Coins Pub: Sundays & Wednesdays Crawl St. Tavern: Mondays

Who’s Where When 45TH STREET TAPHOUSE 443-664-2201 4507 Coastal Hwy. Tuesdays: Aaron Howell Wednesdays: Aaron Howell (137th St. Tavern) ATLANTIC HOTEL 410-641-3589 2 North Main St., Berlin Mondays: Earl Beardsley BUXY’S SALTY DOG/DRY DOCK 28 410-289-0973 28th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, May 7: Aaron Howell Duo, 5 p.m. DJ Wax, 9 p.m. COCONUTS BEACH BAR & GRILL CASTLE IN THE SAND HOTEL 37TH & 38TH ST. 410-289-6846 Friday, May 7: Monkee Paw, 4-8 p.m., Saturday, May 8: Kevin Poole & Joe Mama, 4-8 p.m. Sunday, May 9: Shortcut Sunny, 3-7 p.m. Monday, May 10: Bob Wilkinson & Joe Smooth, 4-8 p.m. Tuesday, May 11: Dave Hawkins & Joe Mama, 4-8 p.m. Wednesday, May 12: Smooth Rhythm, 4-8 p.m. Thursday, May 13: Decade 80, 4-8 p.m.

DJ ROBCEE Fager’s Island: Friday, May 7 & Monday May 10 Crawl St. Tavern: Tuesdays

DJ ADAM DUTCH Purple Moose: Friday & Saturday, May 7 & 8, 2 p.m. Sunday, May 9 Thursday, May 13

KARAOKE W/DJ JEREMY Crawl Street Tavern: Sundays

COINS PUB 410-289-3100 28th St. Plaza On Coastal Hwy. Sundays: DJ Wax, 10 a.m. Wednesdays: DJ Wax, 8 p.m.

BEATS BY STYLER Pickles Pub: Fridays, Saturdays & Wednesdays

CRABCAKE FACTORY BAYSIDE 302-988-5000 37314 Lighthouse Rd. Rte. 54 Selbyville, DE Sunday, May 9: TBA Wednesday, May 12: Brian Bishop, 5 p.m. CRAWL STREET TAVERN 443-373-2756 Wicomico St. Downtown O.C. Friday, May 7: The Dunehounds, 9 p.m. Saturday, May 8: Lennon LaRicci, 9 p.m. Sunday, May 9: Karaoke w/DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. Monday, May 10: Beats By Wax, 10 p.m. Tuesday, May 11: DJ RobCee, 10 p.m. Wednesday, May 12: International Night w/Reckless Minds, 10 p.m. Thursday, May 13: TBA CORK BAR Sunday, May 9: Going Coastal, 4 p.m. FAGER’S ISLAND 410-524-5500 60th St. in the Bay Friday, May 7: Pop Stereo 6 p.m., DJ RobCee, 9 p.m. Saturday, May 8: Sons Of Pirates, 6 p.m. DJ Groove, 10 p.m. Monday, May 10: Side Project, 5 p.m., Bryan Clark, 6 p.m., DJ RobCee, 9 p.m. GREENE TURTLE WEST 410-213-1500 Rte. 611, West OC Saturday, May 8: TBA

KARAOKE W/WOOD Pickles Pub: Mondays

AARON HOWELL 45th St. Taphouse: Tuesdays Taphouse Tavern: Wednesdays

DJ GROOVE Fager’s Island: Saturday, May 8


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 63

Who’s Where When MULLIGAN’S 410-213-7717 12445 Ocean Gateway, West OC Thursday, May 13: TBA

THE DUNEHOUNDS Crawl St. Tavern: Friday, May 7

NEW CENSATION Ocean Club/Clarion: Friday & Saturday, May 7 & 8

BAD W/NAMES Purple Moose: Friday & Saturday, May 7 & 8

JOE SMOOTH & BOBBY WILKINSON Coconuts Beach Bar: Monday & Wednesday, May 10 & 12

OCEAN CLUB 410-524-3535 10100 Coastal Hwy. In The Clarion Hotel Friday & Saturday, May 7 & 8: New Censation OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 410-641-7501 1 Mumford’s Landing Rd. Ocean Pines Friday, May 7: Lauren Glick Band Saturday, May 8: Great Train Robbery PICKLES PUB 410-289-4891 8th St. & Philadelphia Ave. Friday, May 7: Beats By Styler, 9:30 p.m. Saturday, May 8: Honey Shine Mondays: Karaoke With Wood Tuesdays: Beats By Wax Wednesdays: Beats By Styler Thursdays: Beats By Wax PURPLE MOOSE 410-289-6953 Between Caroline & Talbot Sts. On The Boardwalk Friday & Saturday, May 7 & 8: Bad w/Names Friday & Saturday, May 7 & 8: DJ Adam Dutch, 2 p.m. Sunday & Thursday, May 9 & 13: 9 p.m. Monday, May 10: DJ Rut, 9 p.m.

HONEY SHINE Pickles Pub: Saturday, May 8

HIGH FIVE SWAN DIVE DUO Seacrets: Monday & Tuesday, May 10 & 11

GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY Ocean PInes Yacht Club: Saturday, May 8

AARON HOWELL DUO Buxy’s Salty Dog: Friday, May 7

SEACRETS 410-524-4900 49th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, May 7: My Hero Zero Duo, 5 p.m., Split Decision Duo, 8 p.m., Jah Works, 9:30 p.m. Saturday, May 8: Late Last Night Duo, 5 p.m., Benderz Duo, 8 p.m., Jah Works, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, May 9: Mike Newberry Duo, 6 p.m. Monday, May 10: High Five Swan Dive Duo, 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 11: High Five Swan Dive Duo, 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 12: Shake, Shake, Shake Duo, 6 p.m. Thursday, May 13: Opposite Directions, 5 p.m. Mars Duo (Feat. Ravon Reed For Go Go Gadjet), 10 p.m.


Page 64

Sundays: Berlin Farmers Market Main Street will be closed every Sunday through September from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. in downtown Berlin. A producers only market featuring produce, flowers, baked goods, art and homemade products. Free parking.

May 7-8: Vaccinations At Springfest The Worcester County Health Department will offer COVID-19 vaccine clinics near the food tent at Springfest in the Inlet parking lot on Friday and Saturday, May 7-8. Visit worcesterhealth.org to schedule appointments or call 667-253-2140.

May 8: Author Featured Local author Diana McDonough will be featured at the Greyhound Indie Bookstore and Art Gallery from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. When writing her first book, “Stuck in the Onesies,” McDonough had no idea how relevant the subject matter of race would be in 2020. The book shows how our country struggled to right wrongs, sometimes succeeding and oftentimes, not. “My Mother’s Apprentice” is the sequel to Stuck in the Onesies and tells the daughters’ story. One becomes a sensation in the 1970s reggae revolution in Jamaica and the other, a housewife and writer. Abortion and addiction complicate the survival of their friendship.

May 7-9: Springfest The Inlet will host the 30th Anniversary Springfest Thursday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Event features delicious food, live entertainment and unique arts and crafts. May 7-9: Jazz & Blues, Art & Booths The Berlin Chamber of Commerce will hold a scaled back version of its former Jazz and Blues Bash, featuring a threeday celebration of live jazz and blues music, wine, beer, spirts and food offerings. Live music will be offered throughout

Things To Do The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

the weekend. A one-day art show and sale will be held Saturday, May 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. www.berlinchamber.org

May 8: Maryland Coast Bike Festival Saturday, May 8, community members are invited to join the inaugural Maryland Coast Bike Festival, a day-long celebration that starts and ends at the West Ocean City Commercial Harbor. a series of bike rides, and participants can register for any of the three routes. The Island Ride (17 miles) features a family friendly loop that explores the area around Assateague Island, while the Surf & Turf (35 miles) and Metric Century (62 miles) loops around Assateague Island and the scenic back country of Worcester County. The rides will begin and end at the harbor, which will feature live music, food, craft beer, vendors, and paddleboard, skateboard and electric bike demonstrations. Online sign-ups are also open for cleanup volunteers and event vendors. Fees will be waived for local businesses.For more information, visit marylandcoastbikefestival.com.

May 8: Safe Boating Course The US Coast Guard Auxiliary is offering a one-day virtual Maryland Safe Boating Course, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Cost is $20.00. Register or get more information by calling Barry Cohen at 410-935-4807, or Email: CGAUXOC-@Gmail.com. May 13: Derby Day Tea Poplar Hill Mansion will host a special

May 7, 2021

May 14: 2nd Friday From 5-8 p.m., 2nd Fridays in Berlin are back with a new vibe. Live outdoor and indoor music, kids’ art, shops open late, plenty of restaurants offering outdoor dining. May 20: NAACP Meeting Worcester County NAACP will host a Zoom meeting at 6 pm. hosted by Larry Ryan, Worcester NAACP Executive Director for Environmental & Climate Justice. The title of the presentation is "How Climate and Racial Justice intersect." Look for Zoom link information on Worcester County NAACP Facebook page. 410-2131956

Derby Day Tea on May 13, 2021 at 11:30 a.m., as we celebrate the Run for the Roses. Don your best Derby Day hat and join us for some Kentucky food favorites including Fruit Cup with Mint Julep Dressing, Hot Brown Sandwiches, Benedictine Cucumber Spread Sandwiches, Deviled Eggs, Ham Scones with Bourbon Sugar and Apple Butter, Derby Day Pie, Kentucky Jam Cupcakes, and Race Day Hat Cookies, all while sipping hot or iced tea. There will be a special prize for best hat. The cost of the tea is $2 per person. RSVP is required and seating is limited for social distancing guidelines. Masks must be worn entering the Mansion, but may be removed at your seat. All proceeds go towards the preservation of Salisbury's oldest house. Call 410-749-1776 to reserve seats or for more information.

May 20-23: Spring Cruisin Car show featuring hot rods, customs, classics, street machines, muscle cars and more. Thursday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

May 13, 20, 27: Diabetes Education The Atlantic General Diabetes Center at Atlantic General Hospital will be offering diabetes self-management education classes through three, three hour sessions. From 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. the sessions will address blood glucose monitoring, foot care, nutrition, exercise, and other self-management skills to help individuals better manage their diabetes. A family member is invited to attend. The program is recognized by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for quality education, and program staff includes a registered nurse and a registered dietitian, both of whom are certified diabetes educators.

May 29: Kiwanis Car Show The first Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City Car Show will be held from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Ocean Pines Veterans Memorial Park. Registration is $15 per entrant, 9-10 a.m. There will be judged classes, trophies and awards. Food concessions.

May 22: Safe Boating Week The Ocean City Coast Guard Auxiliary will be hosting an event on the Boardwalk from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. to celebrate National Safe Boating Week. The auxiliary will be at Trimper’s on South 1st Street. Members of the auxiliary will be demonstrating knot tying, line heaving and proper fitting life vest. “Coastie," the remote-control teaching boat, will be there as well as a Coast Guard vessel, and more.

May 28-31: United Beams Of Light Thirteen beams of light will be displayed at dusk at N. Division Street in Ocean City to serve as a beacon for military personnel killed in service.

May 31: Memorial Day Event The annual Memorial Day service in Ocean Pines will return to the Worcester County Veterans Memorial on Monday, May 31, beginning at 11 a.m. The ceremony this year will feature Salisbury Mayor Jake Day as the keynote speaker. Public parking will be available at Veterans Memorial Park on Route 589 and Cathell Road in Ocean Pines. Limited seating will be available during the event and guests are encouraged to bring chairs.

$ 00

1 OFF

Any 3-, 4-, 5-Litre Wine Not Valid With Other Offers Or Discounts Exp. 5-31-21 • MCD

15% OFF

Cheers!

Any Case Of Wine

Not Valid With Other Offers Or Discounts Exp. 5-31-21 • MCD

10% OFF

750 ml/1.5 L Bottle Of Wine Not Valid With Other Offers Or Discounts Exp. 5-31-21 • MCD

BEER • WINE • SODA Open 7 Days A Week Mon.-Thurs., 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., 7 a.m.-10 p.m. & Sun., 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

Gas • Ice Cigarettes 410-641-2366 • Main St. & Old O.C. Blvd., Berlin, Md.


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 65

with Scott Lenox Hello all, and welcome back to another season of the Fish in OC fishing report here in The Dispatch. Big thanks to Editor Steve Green on providing three pages each week once again to bring you all things fishing related in and around Ocean City. I have to start this season’s first report on a somber note as I announce the passing of my dear friend Captain Franky Pettolina. “Franky” was owner and operator of Pettolina Marine Surveying, captain of Last Call Charters, president of the Ocean City Marlin Club and my very close friend. He was a regular contributor to Fish in OC magazine and website and our go-to on fishing and tournament related questions here in Ocean City. He is survived by his wife Jennifer, his mom Maddie, his father Frank and many of us adoring friends. He will be sorely missed by the local fishing community and many others. Rest easy old friend. The most important aspect of fishing is the weather and this winter and spring has featured some serious ups and downs. We had very warm days this winter and super cold days this spring,

so I guess the fishable days evened themselves out, but now the wind has been blowing more than we’d like and it’s been tough to get out on the water. Hopefully, the wind is blowing itself out and will leave us with nice calm conditions for the remainder of the season. There were enough calm days over the past few months for anglers to get out in the ocean and chase some warm water out in the canyons. Though no tuna were found on these trips, we did have the first mako of the season earlier than I’ve ever seen it this year. On April 7 the crew of the Seek and Destroy headed out toward the Norfolk Canyon where they found water as warm as 70.2 degrees. The guys did some trolling to try and find some tunas and just as they were about to call it a day the rigger popped, and the fight was on with a big fish. Ten-year-old Parker Williams was on the rod and when he got the fish boat side the crew was pleasantly surprised to see a 74inch male mako shark that was over the 71-inch size limit for male makos. They got the fish in the boat and it became the SEE PAGE 66

Steve Sweigert poses with his kids and a nice black drum caught and released on Assateague Island. Submitted Photos


Page 66

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

Top left, Parker Williams, 10, caught the first mako shark of the season on April 7 on the boat Seek & Destroy. Top middle, Jen Pettolina, Chris Evans and Ryan Freese had a great night of shooting snakeheads with Captain Marc Spagnola of Dusk to Dawn Bowfishing. Top right, Emily Blume landed this beautiful 44-inch, 49pound black drum while fishing the Assateague surf on April 11. Above left, anglers on the Morning Star with Captain Monty Hawkins have enjoyed some nice tautog fishing this spring. Above right, Mikey Johnston and the crew had a nice day with five keeper flounder after trolling the Thorofare. Opposite page, top left, this group had an awesome time catching nine keeper flounder with Captain Jason Mumford aboard Lucky Break Charters. Opposite page, top right, this angler caught a 22.7-pound tautog while fishing with Captain Chase Eberle on board the Chasin’ Tides Charters. Opposite page, middle left, this big 44-inch striper caught on the Oceanic Pier had to go back because is was over the slot limit, but the angler still got a thrill. Opposite page, middle right, the first flounder of the season was caught in the Thorofare on April 8 by Todd Hasco while using our chartreuse Deadly Double. Opposite page, bottom left, I need to give a mention in my first column of the season to my buddy, Franky Pettolina, who is gone way too soon but will never be forgotten. Opposite page, bottom right, this beautiful cod was caught on board the Fish Bound with Captain Kane Bounds.

. . Fish In OC

FROM PAGE 65 earliest crew to ever catch a mako out of Ocean City on rod and reel. One day later the first flounder of the season was caught up in the Thorofare by angler Todd Hasco. Todd was troll -ing our Fish in OC Deadly Double rig in chartreuse with a white Gulp when the 16 1/2”er jumped on in just 4’ of water. The guys put the net on the fish and dashed my hopes of catching the first flounder of the year. Congratulations to Todd and his crew. There haven’t been any more mako caught since the first, but flounder fishing has picked up nicely since the first fish was caught just about a month ago. The best bite is in shallow

water behind Assateague Island and in the Thorofare on double rigs like our Deadly Double and Double Trouble. Most fish are being caught in the outgoing tide by a combination of baits like Gulp, minnows, shiners and Otter Tails. Flounder fishing should get even better as more fish move into the bay over the next several weeks. There have been some rockfish and shad caught around the route 50 bridge and inlet area during the incoming tide over the past couple of weeks and we should see some bluefish mixing in as water temperatures rise into the 60s consistently. Casting artificial lures like spec rigs, bucktails, Roy Rigs or our new Fish in OC Thing•A•Ma JIG is the best way to catch all three species. Remember you are not allowed to harvest shad and rockfish must fall between 28 inches and 35 inches to be harvested and anglers are allowed one per person per day.

The most consistent fishing that we’ve seen this winter and spring has been for tautog over ocean structure. There are some keeper sized fish being caught in the bay on green crabs and sand fleas at the south jetty and the rocks at Martha’s Landing, but the fishing is way better in the ocean. We’ve seen plenty of fish from the Morning Star, Chasin’ Tides and Fish Bound over the past several months with some real jumbos mixed in. Captain Kane Bounds pulled a couple of 20-plus pound tautog over the rail this winter making it 14 twenty pounders for his boat since he’s gotten it including the world record fish of 28.5. Captain Chase Eberle recently had a 22.7-pound tautog and put over 35 double digit tog on his deck in the month of April alone. Tautog fishing has been very good and we’re hoping it will be the same for sea bass when that season opens on May 15.

We’ve got a couple weeks before tournament season starts with the Ocean City Marlin Club Memorial Day Tournament, which has been renamed in my friend Captain Franky Pettolina’s memory. Once tournament season starts, it’s game on most weekends as we have a jam packed schedule of fishing events for everything from flounder in the bay to white marlin and tuna in the canyons. I am looking forward to a great season and can’t wait to bring you the details. Don’t forget to check out my Daily Angle fishing report at www.FishinOC.com on a regular basis. Until next week, tight lines!! (The writer is the owner of Fish in OC and host of Ocean City’s fishing television show Hooked on OC. He has worked in the fishing industry and been fishing the waters in and around Ocean City for over 25 years.)


May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Page 68

Chris Parypa’s Photo Of The Week:

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

May 7, 2021

Each week staff photographer Chris Parypa is tasked with submitting a photo from his vast library to be featured in this space. Above, two mounted police officers make their way to the Inlet parking lot last weekend. To purchase any of Parypa’s photos, click over to www.chrisparypa.com.


The Dispatch Classifieds

May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

$15/Week For Minimum Of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available)

HELP WANTED FULL MOON SALOON: Now hiring FT/PT hostess, servers, dishwasher, kitchen staff. Great salary in family setting! Apply within at 12702 Old Bridge Road, WOC. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– BUILDING ATTENDANT: PT/FT. Summer season. Monitor pool and parking lot. Report to property manager. Good pay. Send resume to fred@paradiseoc.com or 410-250-1111. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– MAINTENANCE/CUSTODIAL: Large OC Association is looking for a fulltime person to join the on-site staff. Competitive Salaries & Benefits. Please fax resumes to (410) 723-0676 or email to dwilson@legumnorman.com ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– LANDSCAPE WORKERS NEEDED: Must have valid DL. Reliable transportation to work. Call 410-641-2177. The Moore Companies, Berlin, MD. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

meckservicesanddesigns@gmail.com

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––

CONDO CLEANER: Looking for independent cleaning person for small midtown condo. Call 443523-4512 and leave message. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

SUN N FUN MOTEL NOW HIRING FOR*FULL TIME 2ND SHIFT FRONT DESK CLERK 4PM-MIDNIGHT *DAYTIME HOUSEKEEPING

APPLY IN PERSON 29th St & Baltimore Ave. Mon-Fri 9am-3pm

Berlin’s Newest Eatery! Now Hiring: ALL POSITIONS Seasonal Part-Time Full-Time Call Matt at 302-593-4141 or email thesterlingtavern@gmail.com

PUT YOUR LOGO IN COLOR FOR JUST $10

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811

Deadline For Insertions, Cancellations And Payment Is 3 p.m. Tuesday. Pre-Payment Is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard. LINE COOK: Experienced Line Cook needed. Work with us in West OC! Assateague Diner+Bar. Competitive pay $13-$18/hour with pay bump. Text APPLY > 703.268.6444. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– SERVER: Hiring Servers ASAP. Must be 18+. Assateague Diner+Bar. West Ocean City Area. Good tips, fun summer job, $$$. Text APPLY > 703.268.6444. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– BALI-HI RV PARK: Bishopville, MD. RV Park Manager. 40 hours per week, $15 per hour. Full Time. Call 724-825-8746. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– C L E A N E R S / VAC AT I O N RENTALS: Needed for Ocean City and Ocean Pines. Experience preferred but not necessary. Text or call 443-397-1189. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– BALI-HI RV PARK: Bishopville, MD. Maintenance Man/ Groundskeeper. Grass cutting. Experience in plumbing and electric. 40 hrs/wk, $15/hr. 724-825-8746. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– FT OR PT: $16/hr. Weekdays. Meck Services and Designs is looking for someone skilled in landscape, hardscaping and general maintenance. Call Lisa at 302489-9229 or email -

Page 69

THE SPINNAKER NOW HIRING FULL-TIME SEASONAL: FRONT DESK HOUSEKEEPING MAINTENANCE/ BELLMAN Daytime & Evening Positions Available

APPLY IN PERSON 1800 Baltimore Avenue Monday-Friday 11am-4pm

The Dispatch Is On Facebook, Twitter And Instagram! Follow Us Today and Get News as it Happens!

NOW HIRING! ’S T OC CE WES UN PLA F K T MOSTO WORK E MA AND $ $$$

YEAR-ROUND FULL- OR PART-TIME

•HOSTESS •SERVERS •LINE COOKS •FOOD RUNNERS •BARBACKS Please apply in person. Greene Turtle West, Rt. 611, West OC 410-213-1500

I NDI A N R I V ER MA R I NA I S NO W HI R I NG! •NIGHT WATCH 3PM-11PM SHIFT

•GENERAL CLERICAL •SEASONAL MAINTENANCE Apply Online at delawarestatejobs.com For additional information, please contact the Marina office at 302.227.3071 AA/EOE


The Dispatch

Classifieds

Page 70

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811

The Castle in the Sand Hotel and The Barefoot Mailman are currently seeking applicants for the following positions for the 2021 season.

FRONT DESK STAFF NIGHT AUDITOR Experienced applicants are preferred, but not required. We require a satisfactory pre-employment background check by all applicants. Please contact Bob at 410-289-6846 for further information or to schedule an interview. Work With the Best Ocean City has to Offer ... We Invite You to be a Part of our Family!

Year Round Positions ~ROOM ATTENDANT ~LAUNDRY ~LOBBY ATTENDANT ~OVERNIGHT CLEANER ~HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISOR ~FRONT DESK AGENT ~NIGHT AUDIT ~RESERVATIONS ~PAINTER ~FRONT DESK SUPERVISOR ~FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGER ~MAINTENANCE ~EXECUTIVE SECRETARY ~HVAC Seasonal Positions ~SERVER ~BARTENDER ~HOSTESS/HOST ~BUSSER ~FOOD RUNNERS ~POOL ATTENDANT ~WAREHOUSE CLERK ~GRILL COOKS ~BEACH STAND ~SECURITY EXCELLENT BENEFITS! FAX RESUME & SALARY REQ. to: 410-723-9109 Online at www.clarionoc.com APPLY IN PERSON Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. CLARION RESORT FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL 10100 COASTAL HWY. OCEAN CITY, MD. 21842 EOE M/F/D/V

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch Delaware Learning Institute of Cosmetology in Dagsboro, Delaware is looking for COSMETOLOGY, ESTHETICS, AND NAIL TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTORS!

Must be available to work Mon.-Fri., 8:30am-4pm. We offer competitive benefits, like optional health care plans, dental and paid time off. Must maintain guest satisfaction, and ensure guest servicing is consistent with educational standards. Must provide and promote a positive learning environment for the student body. Must hold a valid DE license. Must have salon industry experience and ability to maintain composure and drive in a fast-paced, high stress environment. Must have a polished professional image. No phone calls please. Email resume and cover letter w/salary requirements: jcook@delawarecosmetology.com

CARPENTERS & CARPENTERS HELPERS

Must have: Tools, Transportation, Driver’s License

Exp. Required! PATTERSON & SONS BUILDERS

Call 410-641-9530

May 7, 2021

THUNDERBIRD BEACH MOTEL NOW HIRING FRONT DESK HOUSEKEEPING PM BELLMAN/ MAINTENANCE APPLY IN PERSON

Monday-Friday 9am-3pm Thunderbird Beach Motel 32nd Street, Ocean City

Currently hiring manpower for

•STUCCO & EIFS MECHANICS •CARPENTERS •CONCRETE BLOCK •COATINGS SPECIALISTS •FLAT CONCRETE •CONCRETE REPAIRS •PT WELDER •COMMERCIAL CAULKING •WINDOW & DOOR INSTALLERS •WAREHOUSE HELP (DRIVER’S LICENSE REQ’D) Experience Preferred. Tools, transportation & a valid driver’s license are a plus. Competitive benefit package available. Please apply in person at 11935 Hammer Rd, Bishopville, MD, or apply online: http://allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

AUTOMOTIVE GREAT OPPORTUNITIES! Large automotive center with auto parts/ marine store, service centers, and used car dealership, is now hiring for: ~Service Parts & Advisors ~Experienced Tow Truck Drivers ~Technicians ~Maryland State Inspector Excellent Pay and Benefits. Call: 302-344-9846

NOW HIRING DRIVER, BARTENDER, COOK & COUNTER Call 410-726-7061 for Interview

PART-TIME FRONTLINE ASSOCIATE Farmers Bank of Willards has a Part-Time Frontline Associate position available at the Talbot Branch, Ocean City location. Looking for professional and motivated individuals with extraordinary customer service skills. Cash handling experience & excellent computer skills a must. Please send resume to 12641 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD 21842 or email: jennie.rice@fbwbank.com Application cut off is 05-21-2021 “Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirmative Action Employer”

Come Join Our Winning Team! Now accepting applications for the following positions!

Reservationist Over Night Front Desk Front Desk Room Attendant Houseperson Laundry Attendant Room Inspectors Maintenance Server Cashier Barista Looking for experienced personnel with customer service skills. Must be flexible with hours. Email resume to jobs@carouselhotel.com or stop by and complete an application at the Front Desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check.

Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE


The Dispatch Classifieds

May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Classifieds Legal Notices PUT YOUR LOGO IN COLOR FOR JUST $10

$15/Week For Minimum Of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available)

Deadline For Insertions, Cancellations And Payment Is 3 p.m. Tuesday. Pre-Payment Is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard.

The Dispatch

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

THIRD INSERTION

NOW HIRING - YEAR ROUND COOK OCEAN PINES LOCATION

Call 410-726-7061 for Interview MONTEGO BAY MARKET 12903 COASTAL HIGHWAY

HIRING Evening Cashier Day & Evening Deli Personnel Please Emailmontegosuperthrift@gmail.com Or Apply In Person11am-4pm Monday-Friday

Berlin is a Great Place to Work! Take Advantage of Year-Round Employment Opportunities at

THE ATLANTIC HOTEL Now Hiring -

COOKS FOOD RUNNERS SERVERS HOUSEKEEPERS

Now Hiring

• DELIVERY DRIVERS Make Up To $20/Hour Full-Time or Part-Time Call 443-856-5652 or Apply In Person Downtown Location 710 N. Philadelphia Ave. SEASONAL OC HOTEL NOW HIRING FOR:

Seasonal Day or Evening Housekeeping Positions Evening Laundry Person

Now Hiring ALL POSITIONS Kitchen, Servers, Bussers, Hostess Apply in Person

RT. 54, FENWICK ISLAND

FT/PT - Year Round & Seasonal - Various Shifts Competitive Hourly Wage + BONUS Benefits Available

To Apply-go online www.petromg.com *Employment *Retail *OC MD *Cashier Wine Rack *Search *Cashier Sales Assoc.-Wine Rack Rt. 50 Wine Rack 12827 Ocean Gateway West OC, MD

Apply in Person IN THE OF FENWICK

SUMMER BEACH CONDOS #3 35TH STREET, OCMD Is Looking For-

PART TIME CUSTODIAL & LIGHT MAINTENANCE PERSONS Day Shift 7am-2pm 4-5 Days/Week Weekends A Must $11/Hour Night Shift 4pm-12am Weekends A Must $12/Hour **Must Be Able To Move Heavy Objects** If interested please contact Diana Whittington at 410-603-5627 to set up an interview.

RENTALS OC RENTAL: Fully furnished. 1BR, 1BA condo. $1750 per week. Utilities not included. No pets. 35th Street, Oceanblock. 212-6841723. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– YEAR ROUND RENTAL: Houses for rent in Salisbury, MD. Only 40 minutes from Ocean City. Rents are $900-$1200/month. Call 443373-5638. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– SUMMER SEASONAL: 1 room, Sleeps 2. May-September. Electric included. $8000. Call Tricia 443-610-4665. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

YARD SALES

NIGHT SUPERVISOR Now Hiring ALL POSITIONS Kitchen, Servers, Bussers, Hostess

APPLY IN PERSON South Location 31st St. Coastal Hwy. 410-289-2581 North Location 128th St. Coastal Hwy. 410-250-2304

Must be friendly & dependable

1-800-942-9042

2 North Main Street, Berlin, MD

HIRING AT BOTH LOCATIONS ALL POSITIONS INCLUDING MANAGEMENT

CASHIER/ SALES ASSOCIATE

Must Be Dependable. Call Seahawk Motel

Apply in Person at the Front Desk.

Page 71

FT, YEAR ROUND BENEFITS INCLUDE VACATION, SICK DAYS, HEALTH INSURANCE, 401-K. Competitive Hourly Wage + BONUS

To Apply-go online www.petromg.com *Employment *Retail *OC MD *Night Supervisor *Search *Night Supervisor-Wine Rack Rt. 50 Wine Rack 12827 Ocean Gateway West OC, MD

BATSON CREEK ESTATES: Community Yard Sale. Sat. 5/15 8am-noon. 20+ homes participating. Off Bayard Road and Rt 20 in Frankford, DE. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

SERVICES ABC POWERWASHING: 1 call we wash it all! Houses and trucks. Fully insured. Free estimates. 5+ years experience. Call 443-3738299. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

REAL ESTATE

COMMERCIAL FOR LEASE: Retail Banking Center with drive thru. Contact Brian Gamm. 443-880-2225. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 1 OfficeRetail and 1 Warehouses. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

MOBILE HOME FOR SALE: 14x45. Ground and 2 boat slips included in price. 2BR on 24th Street, OCMD. $299,000. Call 410-477-6073. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

ATTENTION DEVELOPERS

14.74 Acres For Approximately 45 Home Building Lots. Next to N. Gate Ocean Pines. $1,200,000

Call Garliss Real Estate 443-859-3210

LOOKING EVERYWHERE? CHECK HERE FIRST! THE DISPATCH CLASSIFIEDS!

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18697 To all persons interested in the estate of LLOYD MARTIN HEISER, ESTATE NO. 18697. Notice is given that DIANNA GREEN, 5839 WALLACE DRIVE, SNOW HILL, MD 21863 was on, APRIL 13, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of LLOYD MARTIN HEISER, who died on MARCH 23, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 13TH day of OCTOBER, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication APRIL 23, 2021 DIANNA GREEN Personal Representative

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 04-23, 04-30, 05-07

SECOND INSERTION

NOTICE TO MEMBERS OF ST. MARTINS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH BERLIN, MD 21811 A Charge Conference will be held on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 at 6:00 pm to vote on the church’s disaffiliation from the Methodist Denomination. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication APRIL 30, 2021 2x 04-30, 05-07

SECOND INSERTION

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18679 To all persons interested in the estate of FRANCIS ANTHONY PETTOLINA III, ESTATE NO. 18679. Notice is given that JENNIFER L. PETTOLINA, 9800 MOORING VIEW LANE UNIT 14, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 was on, APRIL 20, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of FRANCIS ANTHONY PETTOLINA III, who died on MARCH 22, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 20TH day of OCTOBER, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died be-


The Dispatch

Page 72

LEGAL RATES

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Legal Notices

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. fore October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication APRIL 30, 2021 JENNIFER L. PETTOLINA Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 04-30, 05-07, 05-14

SECOND INSERTION

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18687 To all persons interested in the estate of JOEY EISENMAN, ESTATE NO. 18687. Notice is given that MARY TOPAR, 29 BREEZEWAY LANE, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, APRIL 21, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JOEY EISENMAN, who died on MARCH 28, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication APRIL 30, 2021 MARY TOPAR Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 04-30, 05-07, 05-14

SECOND INSERTION

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 21ST day of OCTOBER, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication APRIL 30, 2021

HAROLD S. LINK, ESQ. 875 VICTORIA PARK DRIVE SUITE 303 SALISBURY, MD 21801

PATRICK JOSEPH ROBERTSON Personal Representative

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18709

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 04-30, 05-07, 05-14

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 21ST day of OCTOBER, 2021.

To all persons interested in the estate of CHARLENE ANORA ROBERTSON, ESTATE NO. 18709. Notice is given that PATRICK JOSEPH ROBERTSON, 13047 SELBY ROAD, BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813 was on, APRIL 21, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of CHARLENE ANORA ROBERTSON, who died on DECEMBER 31, 2020, without a will.

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

SECOND INSERTION

MARCH 28, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 22ND day of OCTOBER, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication APRIL 30, 2021 ANNETTE FORD Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 04-30, 05-07, 05-14

FIRST INSERTION

CHRISTOPHER S. ROBINS ESQ. ROBINS & ROBINS, P.A. 128 EAST MAIN STREET PO BOX 506 SALISBURY, MD 21803-0506

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18710

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18723

To all persons interested in the estate of CLEOLA BERNICE HENRY, ESTATE NO. 18710. Notice is given that ANNETTE FORD, 210 BRANCH STREET, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, APRIL 22, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of CLEOLA BERNICE HENRY, who died on

To all persons interested in the estate of PETER G. SULZER, ESTATE NO. 18723. Notice is given that JAMES SOTHERN SULZER, 12 BACK STREET, NANTUCKET, MA 02554 and STEVEN MILLS SULZER, 1287 CLARRY HILL ROAD, UNION, ME 04862 was on, APRIL 29, 2021, appointed

May 7, 2021 Personal Representative of the estate of PETER G. SULZER, who died on APRIL 1, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 29TH day of OCTOBER, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 JAMES SOTHERN SULZER Personal Representative STEVEN MILLS SULZER Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION

WILLIAM E. ESHAM III ESQ. AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, PA 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18724 To all persons interested in the estate of DARIN WOOTEN, ESTATE NO. 18724. Notice is given that WILLIAM E ESHAM III, 6200 COASTAL HWY SUITE 200,

OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 was on, APRIL 30, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of DARIN WOOTEN, who died on APRIL 15, 2021, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 30TH day of OCTOBER, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 WILLIAM E ESHAM III Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION

MELVIN J CALDWELL JR, ESQ. CALDWELL & WHITEHEAD PA 109 CAMDEN STREET P.O. BOX 4520 SALISBURY, MD 21803-4520 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18730 To all persons interested in the estate of PATRICIA A. EBEL, ESTATE NO. 18730. Notice is given that DANIEL C. EBEL, 5 CAMELOT


The Dispatch

May 7, 2021

Legal Notices

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

DRIVE, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, MAY 03, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of PATRICIA A. EBEL, who died on AUGUST 28, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 3RD day of NOVEMBER, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 DANIEL C. EBEL Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION

RAYMOND D. COATES JR, ESQ. COATES, COATES, & COATES, P.A.

6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 300 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18731 To all persons interested in the estate of ROBERT W. MOORE JR., ESTATE NO. 18731. Notice is given that CAMAS A. MOORE, 20433 REMSBURY PLACE, MONTGOMERY VILLAGE, MD 20886 was on, MAY 04, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ROBERT W. MOORE JR., who died on APRIL 17, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 4TH day of NOVEMBER, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 CAMAS A. MOORE Personal Representative

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION

SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18718 To all persons interested in the estate of GARY BERNARD APPEL. Notice is given that PEGGY MCDANIEL, 13 WANDSWORTH BRIDGE WAY, LUTHERVILLE, MD 21093, was on APRIL 26, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of GARY BERNARD APPEL, who died on MARCH 25, 2021 without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 PEGGY MCDANIEL Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House

One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 05-07

FIRST INSERTION

MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18720 To all persons interested in the estate of MELTON LEROY MARSHALL SR. Notice is given that DEANNA S JENKS, 327 SUNSET DRIVE, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842, was on APRIL 28, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of MELTON LEROY MARSHALL SR, who died on APRIL 11, 2021 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 DEANNA S JENKS Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County

Page 73 Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 05-07

FIRST INSERTION

MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. SE1297 To all persons interested in the estate of RUTH ELLEN FOULKS, ESTATE NO. SE1297. Notice is given that BARBARA VAUGHN, whose address is, 2811 STOCKTON ROAD, POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, was on MAY 04, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of RUTH ELLEN FOULKS, who died on DECEMBER 25, 1989 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 BARBARA VAUGHN Personal Representative True Test Copy

TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 05-07

FIRST INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000012 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. DOROTHY A. MATCHETT, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 29th day of April, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 31st day of May, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 24th day of May, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 18, #Ag7 Wk 14, #Am13 Wk 49, #Am13 Wk 09, #Bb28 Wk 43, #Bb28

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000016


The Dispatch

Legal Notices

Page 74

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

LEGAL RATES

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. DEBORAH ERTAFA, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 29th day of April, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 31st day of May, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 24th day of May, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare Wk 08, #An14 Wk 44, #An14 Wk 45, #Bf32 Wk 05, #Bg33 Wk 07, #Bg33 Wk 07, #Br44

Price $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000028 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff

vs. LOLITA MAXWELL, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 30th day of April, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 31st day of May, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 24th day of May, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare Wk 03, #Bq43 Wk 43, #Ag7

Price $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000037 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. SAMUEL PASCHALL, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 4th day of May, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties

mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th day of June, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 31st day of May, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals:

Timeshare Wk 05, #Ae5 Wk 09, #Ae5 Wk 37, #Aq17 Wk 01, #Bi35 Wk 03, #Bu47 Wk 10, #Bu47 Wk 19, #Bv48 Wk 46, #Bz52

Price $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION

MARK WITTSTADT, ESQ. QUINTAIROS, PRIETO WOOD & BOYER, PA 40 S DUNDALK AVENUE SUITE G 2 BALTIMORE, MD 21222 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-20-000321 MARK H. WITTSTADT JUSTIN T. HOY SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES 40 S DUNDALK AVENUE SUITE G2 DUNDALK, MD 21222 Plaintiffs vs. ERNEST J. BARNES 409 BONNEVILLE AVENUE POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Defendant NOTICE OF SALE (NiSi) Notice is hereby given this 5th day of May, 2021, by the Circuit Court of Worcester County, that the sale of the

property mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported will be ratified, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th day of June, 2021, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a daily newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks, before the 31st day of May, 2021. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $20,000.00. The property sold herein is know as 409 Bonneville Ave., Pocomoke City, MD 21851. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

FIRST INSERTION LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000041 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. THERESA A BUONOMO, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 4th day of May, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th day of June, 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 31st day of May, 2021.

May 7, 2021 The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare Wk 07, #Aj10 Wk 10, #Aj10 Wk 44, #Aj10 Wk 52, #Aj10 Wk 10, #Am13 Wk 49, #Am13 Wk 19, #An14 Wk 02, #Au21 Wk 03, #Au21 Wk 19, #Au21 Wk 20, #Au21 Wk 52, #Au21 Wk 02, #Ay25 Wk 07, #Ay25 Wk 16, #Ay25 Wk 16, #Bh34 Wk 44, #Bh34 Wk 45, #Bq43 Wk 52, #Bq43 Wk 49, #Bx50

Price $50.00Not Sold $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00Not Sold $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication MAY 07, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 05-07, 05-14, 05-21

DO YOU KNOW ... 7000 PEOPLE RECEIVE THE DISPATCH’S DAILY BUZZ EACH DAY? SIGN UP NOW: MDCOASTDISPATCH.COM


2020 Town Of Berlin Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

May 7, 2021

IS MY WATER SAFE?

We are pleased to present this year's Annual Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report) as required by the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). This report is designed to provide details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies. This report is a snapshot of last year's water quality. We are committed to providing you with information because informed customers are our best allies.

DO I NEED TO TAKE SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Water Drinking Hotline (800426-4791).

WHERE DOES MY WATER COME FROM?

The Town of Berlin pumps your drinking water from three separate wells in town, the source of this water is the Pocomoke aquifer, which is ground water drawn from about 125 feet below the earth's surface. An aquifer is somewhat like an underground sponge composed of rocks, sand and of course water. The area between the surface and the water helps to filter and purify the water before it actually reaches the aquifer and pumped into our system.

SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT AND ITS AVAILABILITY

The Town of Berlin has completed its well head protection report and passed an ordinance establishing protection areas and criteria. A copy of the well head protection program and ordinance is available at town hall.

WHY ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN MY DRINKING WATER?

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

PWSID # 0230001 • March 2021

and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity: microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses; organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems; and radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

HOW CAN I GET INVOLVED?

We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please feel free to contact Marvin Smith, Superintendent of Water at 410-641-2414 or email him at msmith@berlinmd.gov.

SOURCE WATER PROTECTION TIPS

Protection of drinking water is everyone’s responsibility. You can help protect your community’s drinking water source in several ways: •Eliminate excess use of lawn and garden fertilizers and pesticides - they contain hazardous chemicals that can reach your drinking water source. •Pick up after your pets. •If you have your own septic system, properly maintain your system to reduce leaching to water sources or consider connecting to a public water system. •Dispose of chemicals properly; take used motor oil to a recycling center. •Volunteer in your community. Find a watershed or wellhead protection organization in your community and volunteer to help. If there are no active groups, consider starting one. Use EPA’s Adopt Your Watershed to locate groups in your community, or visit the Watershed Information Network’s How to Start a Watershed Team. •Organize a storm drain stenciling project with your local government or water supplier. Stencil a message next to the street drain reminding people “Dump No Waste-Drains To River”or “Protect Your Water.” Produce and distribute a flyer

Page 75

for households to remind residents that storm drains dump directly into your local water body.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR LEAD

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Town of Berlin is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR NITRATE

Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, you should ask for advice from your health care provider.

WATER QUALITY DATA TABLE

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the calendar year of this report. Although many more contaminants were tested, only those substances listed below were found in your water. All sources of drinking water contain some naturally occurring contaminants. At low levels, these substances are generally not harmful in our drinking water. Removing all contaminants would be extremely expensive, and in most cases, would not provide increased protection of public health. A few naturally occurring minerals may actually improve the taste of drinking water and have nutritional value at low levels. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done in the calendar year of the report. The EPA or the State requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not vary significantly from year to year, or the system is not considered vulnerable to this type of contamination. As such, some of our data, though representative, may be more than one year old. In this table you will find terms and abbreviations that might not be familiar to you. To help you better understand these terms, we have provided the definitions next to the table.

For More Information, Please Contact:

Contact Name: Marvin Smith • Address: 10 William Street, Berlin, MD 21811 Phone: 410-641-3845 • Fax: 410-641-3576 • E-Mail: msmith@berlinmd.gov

A copy of report can be obtained at Berlin Town Hall, Berlin Library and at www.berlinmd.gov.

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Page 76

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Puzzle Answers

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The Adventures Of Fatherhood By STEVE GREEN

t’s been a week of male bonding. Pam spent the week in New York with our new granddaughter Lana, who was born last Thursday morning. This makes me a Pop Pop for the second time at the age of 45 and Pam far too young to be a two-time grandmother. Lana joins Zoe, 2, and her parents Steven and Trang at their beautiful home in Scarsdale, N.Y. How are Pam and I grandparents? It’s a question we get often. Pam raised Steven in what I call her previous life – her first marriage began when Steven was just a toddler. She raised Steven with his father. Steven is now a doctor in New York City and his wife, Trang, a nuclear pharmacist. We are incredibly proud of them and their young family. Pam is mom to three “boys” -- Steven, 40, Beckett, 12, and Carson, 11. Her journey to motherhood is worthy of a book and maybe one day I will write it. Or maybe this column has documented her parenting journey as well as mine over the years well enough. I believe God had a different plan for Pam when it came to motherhood and me becoming a dad. None of Pam’s three boys are her biological sons, as Steven is technically her stepson (though she understandably so does not view him that way) and Beckett and Carson were each adopted at birth by us. Just as she doesn’t refer to Steven as her stepson, we don’t think of Beckett and Carson as our adopted sons. They are our boys and we are raising them as our own. It’s how she raised Steven as well. Because Steven is such a wonderful, caring and devoted husband and father and overall a tremendous success in life, I often bow to Pam’s parenting discretion. I figure if she helped raise Steven, an excellent role model for my boys, she probably knows more

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about this parenting stuff than I do. Pam was unable to have kids the natural way. It was not meant to be, and we have a huge binder full of checks, credit card bills, invitro appointments and instructions, invoices and tests to prove we exhausted all options before deciding adoption was for us. The binder is in my office and I never peruse it. I suppose one day I might revisit the memories it holds. I remember all the trials and tribulations well enough though now. Rather than harp on the unfairness aspects – which certainly dominated our thoughts during our invitro struggles – I think it’s healthier to look at the journey spiritually. The fact she did not give birth to either of her three kids has nothing to do with the love she has for each of them, the bonds they have and her commitment and passion to each of them. Families are built in different ways and no two are the same. In fact, by virtue of our family tree, Beckett and Carson are uncles to little Zoe and newborn Lana. Hearing Zoe say she wants to swim with Uncle Carson and play ball with Uncle Beckett will warm any heart. It makes me laugh because I giggle each time I think of these boys being uncles at 12 and 11 years old, respectively. One night this week I enjoyed overhearing Beckett talk about his weekend plans. He said he couldn’t do this or that because we were going to New York to visit his nieces. I then listened as he explained the unique family dynamics to his friends on facetime. He explained it maturely. I could only hear so much as I eavesdropped from the other room, but I swelled with pride when I heard him say, “I know I am lucky.” Later that night I gave him a random hug and referenced the earlier call I overheard. He gave me a little lean in (more akin to a shoulder shrug) before accusing me of being a stalker for

eavesdropping on his private conversations. He has a way of keeping things balanced. I’d say there’s been some male bonding around the house with Pam away, but it’s basically been the same dynamics. It’s weird without her around and I’m sure things have fallen through the cracks around the house, but all has been smooth for the most part. We missed her but the place didn’t fall apart in her absence. I think she was needed more in New York to help the young family get acclimated to their new life. The night before she was to leave town Pam reminded me Beckett was going to church with a female friend and her family the next morning. She shared it so nonchalantly I thought she was joking. She said something along the lines of, “Beckett wants to go to church in the morning.” She then filled me in he was invited by the friend (not a girlfriend supposedly) to join her and her family at church. He would have to be ready to leave by 8 in the morning on a Sunday. Considering getting up each morning for school is a chore for him and he loves sleeping in I was shocked. Additionally, whenever we broach the subject of going to our church on Sunday morning the kids fight us. They argue they want to have a lazy morning since we are always rushing during the school week. I guess the right person was not asking. It was interesting he woke up without a lot of hassling on Sunday to go to church but on Monday morning it took him a half hour to get out of bed and I found him sitting in the shower asleep a few minutes later. (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Crossword Puzzle

ANSWERS ON PAGE 76

Horoscopes

ARIES (March 21 to April 19): You're the first sign in the Zodiac and like to take the lead wherever you go. But this time, you'd be wise to follow someone who has much to teach you. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): Your adversary hasn't given up trying to undermine you. Continue to stay cool -- someone in authority knows what's happening. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): Spring brings a positive aspect for relationships. Paired Twins grow closer, while the single set finds new romance -- perhaps with a Leo or Libra. CANCER (June 21 to July 22): Wavering aspects this week mean weighing your words carefully to avoid misunderstandings. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): You could soon be on a new career path in pursuit of those long-standing goals, but don't cut any current ties until you're sure you're ready to make the change. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): A former colleague wants to re-establish an old professional connection. It would be wise to make the contact, at least until you know what he or she is planning. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): A relationship that survived some rocky moments could be facing a new chal-

lenge. Deal with the problem openly, honestly and without delay. Good luck. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): A recent and much-appreciated change in the workplace inspires you to make some changes in your personal life as well. Start with a plan to travel more. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): A friend needs your kind and caring advice, but you need to know what he or she is hiding from you before you agree to get involved. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): Your circle of friends continues to widen. Expect to hear from someone in your past who hopes to re-establish your once-close relationship. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): Your aspects favor the arts. Indulge in whatever artistic expression you enjoy most. A workplace situation will, I'm pleased to say, continue to improve. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): Warning! Your tendency to let things slide until the last minute could have a negative effect on a relationship that you hope can develop into something meaningful. BORN THIS WEEK: You are both emotional and sensible. You enjoy being with people. Good career choices include teaching, performing and the clergy. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

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OCEAN CITY vanishing

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Things I Like ... By Steve Green

May 7, 2021

WITH BUNK MANN

The Good Samaritans in Sunday’s accident Time lapse videos

Events being held (even if modified) Watching my kids laugh together Opening a new computer

Good action on an offshore fishing trip

Seeing kids support each other in sports No rain on my days off

BBQ chicken slow cooked on a grill Smell of surf wax in a car Good-natured pranks

The Samoa and Mario’s were two of Ocean City’s most popular restaurants in the late 1960s. Located on Philadelphia Avenue between 22nd and 23rd streets, the Samoa moved two blocks north in 1969 and is now the location of a Sunsations store. Mario’s was a favorite of Ocean City’s locals and stayed open yearround serving some of the resort’s best steaks and Italian food for over 50 years. Mario’s closed forever on Sept. 24, 2005. The building was razed and the location is now a parking lot. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishinPhoto courtesy Vera Maiorana goc.com.

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May 7, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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May 7, 2021

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