Dec. 3

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December 3, 2021

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Gradual Room Tax Change Okayed

See Page 13 • Photo by Chris Parypa

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Season Kickoff:

Berlin launched its holiday season last Friday with a tree lighting, a display of businessPhotos by Charlene Sharpe sponsored ice sculptures and an ice carving display.

See Page 16 • Submitted Photo

Ocean City Increasing Wage Rates

See Page 4 • Photo by Chris Parypa

Baltimore Avenue Design Chosen

See Page 6 • Photo by Chris Parypa


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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December 3, 2021


December 3, 2021

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OC’s Planned Wage Increases Aimed At Easing Staffing Woes

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BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – In an effort to recruit and retain employees during decidedly challenging times, resort officials this week approved accelerated increases in the pay grades for full-time and part-time town staffers. Ocean City’s full- and part-time employees could see modest increases in their paychecks after the Mayor and Council this week approved adjustments to the approved pay tables for staffers. Human Resources Director Katie Callan presented the proposed changes during Tuesday’s work session. It’s no secret Ocean City, like most jurisdictions and the private sector, struggled to fill out its staffing ranks this year for a variety of reasons linked to the pan-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

demic. For Ocean City, the departments most affected were public works, including solid waste and maintenance, the transportation division, including bus drivers and Boardwalk tram operators, and recreation and parks. Callan explained there were a variety of reasons for the pronounced labor shortage. “Market factors have changed significantly over the past two years,” she said. “In addition, COVID has negatively affected the availability of potential employees. Few J-1 and H-1 students have been available, former employees chose not to return due to the lingering uncertainty of COVID and federal unemployment made it less attractive to return to the workforce in a seasonal position. Additionally, the town has experienced difficulty hiring full-time employees at pay grade minimums.”

State mandates gradually increasing the minimum wage in Maryland have also contributed to the challenge. The state’s minimum wage has been steadily increasing to a peak of $15 per hour by 2025, and the increase at the bottom end of the town’s pay structure has moved the needle to the higher-grade positions. The town has a pay grade structure in place with grade 100 being the lowest and grade 130 being the highest. Grade 100 includes most entry level and parttime positions, which typically are paid minimum wage. The current minimum wage is $11.75 per hour, which is scheduled to jump to $15 by 2025. However, the pay grade adjustments presented this week recommend jumping to the state mandated $15 this year. Callan explained there are pay differ-

December 3, 2021

ences within the individual pay grades. For example, there is an average 56% spread between grade minimums and maximums to allow for an employee’s pay to advance with experience. Parttime positions are paid at the minimum of the grade. She also explained the increases in the minimum wage have resulted in the compression between the grades at the lower end of the pay table and the loss of the 5% spread between the lower pay grades. Resort officials last adjusted the town employee pay tables two years ago. Callan explained there were a variety of reasons she was coming back before the Mayor and Council this week seeking additional adjustments. “There are several reasons we are back in front of you two years later,” she said. “The summer of 2021 proved to be challenging with hiring, particularly with seasonal staff. There have also been aggressive increases in the minimum wage.” Adjusting the town’s pay tables comes at a significant cost. For example, the cost for jumping part-time employees to the $15 per hour minimum wage, which includes 800-plus part-time employees spread over 100-plus positions, would cost roughly $567,000 a year. The impact of the changes to the pay table for 66 full-time positions would come in at an additional $220,000, for a combined total of nearly $800,000 in the first year alone. In addition, Callan was recommending a market comparison study this year to the tune of around $15,000, along with a comprehensive pay study next year with an estimated cost of $25,000. Fortunately, there is an identified funding source for hiking the pay scales for town employees, at least for this year. Callan explained overages in the town’s Other Post-Employment Benefits, or OPEB, plan this year could be used to offset the recommended increases in the pay tables. The town’s OPEB came in around $1.2 million over what was budgeted this year. Mayor Rick Meehan said given the challenges the town faced this year with recruiting and retaining part- and fulltime employees, adjusting the pay tables across the board made sense at this time. “I think you’re being proactive,” he said. “We have to take a stance. We saw what happened last year. We can begin to use this for recruitment today. Now is the time to do it. It just accelerates what we’re planning to do.” Councilman Mark Paddack pointed out the state mandated the minimum wage increases, necessitating the subsequent need to adjust the town’s pay tables. “The public needs to understand this is an unfunded mandate from the state legislature,” he said. “We’ve been able to stay out in front of it, but it’s been challenging.” The council voted unanimously to approve the recommended pay table adjustments.


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Hybrid Baltimore Avenue Design Concept Advanced By Council

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

Lighting Up Berlin:

For many last week’s tree lighting ceremony and ice carving event was the first opportunity to see Berlin’s new tree lights that will stay up throughout the year. Photo by Charlene Sharpe

OCEAN CITY – After reviewing the nuances of the different options for the redevelopment of the Baltimore Avenue corridor, resort leaders this week approved a hybrid of sorts that takes the best elements from each of the alternatives. In recent years, a major renovation of the streetscape along the Baltimore Avenue corridor from North Division to 15th streets including undergrounding the utilities and widening the sidewalks, for example, has been on the town’s radar, but the issue is complicated. The project was

December 3, 2021

listed as a top priority in the recent capital improvement plan and will ultimately come with an estimated $20 million price tag funded through a future bond sale. In the fiscal year 2022 budget approved in the spring, $200,000 was included for preliminary design work, which will be refunded to the town when the next bond sale is complete. During Tuesday’s work session, City Engineer Terry McGean outlined the various design alternatives for the Mayor and Council. When the preliminary designs were presented during a public workshop last month, two alternatives were on the table. On Tuesday, McGean presented a third alternative that represented some of the comments collected during the public workshop along with written comments. Baltimore Avenue is somewhat unique in a variety of ways. For example, the original deeds show the right of way as 75 feet wide, but the current roadway only utilizes about 45 feet from curb to curb. A review of the ancient deeds for Baltimore Avenue reveal a no man’s land of about 32 feet in some areas that could ultimately be deeded back to the property owners along the corridor or used to widen the roadway and its sidewalks. Over the decades, however, private property has steadily encroached on the original right of way platted over a century ago. For example, in some cases, private businesses along the corridor have signs in the old right of way, while others have parking areas. In some cases, the long-forgotten right of way is just covered with grass or landscaping and isn’t necessarily utilized by the private sector. Each of the alternatives on the table include an expansion of the sidewalks and the inclusion of a utility strip that could be used for landscaping and the placing of utilities, for example. Each of the alternatives includes absorbing at least part of the 32-foot unimproved right of way. Under each of the plans, any unimproved right of way would be remanded back to the property owners. McGean explained the new property would count toward a parcel’s density allowance under the code, but would also be taxed. The key issues in each of the alternatives is the width of the sidewalks. Eight feet has been the preference, although the Ocean City Development Corporation (OCDC) has pushed for 10-foot sidewalks along that section of the corridor. For the record, Baltimore Avenue has already been improved with wider sidewalks and undergrounded utilities from North Division Street south to the Inlet, and from 15th Street north to 33rd Street. Another issue in each of the alternatives presented is landscaping and the need for some type of buffer between the sidewalk and the roadway from a pedestrian safety standpoint. Trees planted in the improved section from 15th Street SEE NEXT PAGE


… Buas Proposes Compromise

December 3, 2021

north did not fare well and in some cases impeded the widened sidewalks, somewhat defeating the purpose of the improvements. McGean explained alternatives wherein private property owners along that section of the corridor could be encouraged to plant trees or other landscaping in their unimproved sections of the right of way. In that way, the town could achieve the desired results in terms of aesthetics while maintaining an unimpeded eightfoot sidewalk. “Based on past experience on other portions of the Baltimore Avenue corridor, staff does not believe that landscaping is feasible within an eight-foot sidewalk,” he said. “However, the city could work with the adjacent property owners to install trees and other landscaping in the remaining unimproved right of way behind the sidewalks on a voluntary basis.” Councilman Peter Buas presented a hybrid proposal of sorts he believes will come with sidewalks of an appropriate width for the corridor, maintain a safety buffer between the sidewalks and the roadway and achieve the desired results with landscaping. “This is going to be the most impressive capital project we’ve done in some time,” he said. “This is probably the last time we should be talking about improving Baltimore Avenue. If we’re going to do it, and if we’re going to invest this money, we need to do it right.” Buas suggested wider sidewalks with staff and the consultant coming up with the best plan to landscape the corridor and maintain a pedestrian safety buffer. “I’m in favor of putting some kind of buffer between the eight-foot sidewalk and the road,” he said. “What I’d like to do is give the city staff the flexibility to do landscaping or whatever. I’d like to see 10 feet on both sides and give the staff and the consultant a two- to three-foot buffer to do whatever they see fit with landscaping or different types of pavers to differentiate the eight-foot sidewalk.” Buas made a motion to approve an alternative that includes a seven- to eightfoot sidewalk, and a two- to three-foot utility strip on each side of Baltimore Avenue with staff discretion to come up with something to protect the health and safety of the town. Buas’ motion also included moving the existing traffic signal at 7th Street to 5th Street to align with the existing signal at 5th Street and Philadelphia Avenue, offer landscaping incentives to property owners along that section of the corridor, look into a speed reduction on Baltimore Avenue and direct the planning department to look into the existing sign ordinance in the downtown area. McGean said the property owners along that section of the corridor could be incentivized to plant trees and other landscaping. He said the town would furnish the plantings and maintain them for a year, and after that, it would be up to the private property owners to maintain the landscaping. “If we wanted to do some trees, we could do that,” he said. “With the threefoot buffer, we can do some things that would be sustainable. We’ll work with the

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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designer to come up with something that’s aesthetically pleasing with the least amount of maintenance.” Buas said he seven- to eight-foot sidewalks with the two- to three-foot utility easement would afford staff the opportunity to figure out the best plan for landscaping the improved corridor and maintaining a safety buffer along the roadway for pedestrians. “I trust the staff to figure out the best plan,” he said. “It could be as simple as a different color concrete. The important thing is to keep the buffer and enhance the overall scope of the project. When you look down the sidewalk, all you should see is eight feet of uninterrupted walking space.” Mayor Rick Meehan said he supported the hybrid alternative put forth by Buas. “I support what Councilman Buas has put forward, not so much the trees, but just having that buffer and a place to put that decorative lighting,” he said. “Otherwise, it encroaches into the sidewalk and it’s far less than eight feet. It makes a significant difference, whether it’s 10 feet or nine feet. Just that little bit extra can make a significant difference. We are only going to get one chance to get this right and this is that chance. What he has proposed is a great compromise.” The council voted 5-1, with Councilman John Gehrig opposed and Councilman Lloyd Martin absent, to approve the hybrid alternative proposed by Buas.

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Continue Over Berlin Building Renovation Design Supported Talks Funding Needs For

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – With updated renderings presented this week, the Berlin Historic District Commission approved renovation plans for the building at the corner of William and Pitts streets. Though the commission okayed the changes to the former Goober’s Restaurant building last month, that approval was contingent on a look at updated renderings. Commission members said this week they liked what they saw. “I opened it up and I was like wow this is what I wanted to see,” commission member Nornie Bunting said. “This is what my eye was looking for. I like it.” The commission met in October and November to consider plans for the renovation of the corner building. Their concerns that the changes fit the town’s his-

The latest visual for the redevelopment earns high marks this week.

Submitted Rendering

toric nature prompted the latest rendition, which features stucco and an awning. Marcos Lopez and Brandon Tolan, who plan to open 410 Social Eatery and Barroom in the space, told the commission this week they wanted to maintain the town’s character and have their restaurant serve as a cornerstone in the

community. Bunting was quick to praise the new rendering, which features improvements but keeps the building recognizable. Commission member Mary Moore agreed, saying, “I think it’s really great.” She said the latest proposal didn’t try to make the building something it was not. Commission member John Holloway agreed, saying, “It preserves the look of the building.” Commission member Robert Poli also praised the design. “I really like the fact this building is basically helping to restore the historical nature of this town,” he said. “I like the contrasting colors. I like the way it fits in. … It’s going to extend Main Street right down to Pitts and William Street.” Commission Chair Carol Rose said she liked the lighting proposed as well as the illuminated sign planned.

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County Fire Service

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – With smoke billowing over his stove as growing flames jumped out of a pot of cooking oil, Berlin resident Josh Davis got his family out of the house and called 911. Within minutes, responders from the Berlin Fire Company were on the scene and had the fire extinguished. “All four of us were in shock, sitting outside and watching the fire take over our home of five years,” Davis said as he recalled the scary July evening. “The fire company response was instant, and they made sure we were safe, reassured us, brought us water and even shoes, and searched for our family pets who were trapped inside. They couldn’t have been more professional or handled it better, and my family is so grateful.” What if the fire company’s response hadn’t been so quick? When people call 911, they expect help to arrive. The growing cost of providing that help, however, has some fire companies concerned about their ability to respond to emergencies. Representatives from the county’s 10 fire companies banded together late last year to ask the Worcester County Commissioners for help. And while short-term improvements have been made in the months since, a county-wide workgroup is still trying to identify a permanent funding solution for fire and emergency medical services. Nearly a year after creating the Worcester County Fire and EMS Strategic Planning Workgroup, county officials are still trying to get a grasp on the financial issues facing local fire companies. Officials say they have to understand companies’ needs before they can determine the best way to fund them. “It’s been a learning process,” Commissioner Josh Nordstrom said. “I know we make progress every meeting.” In January, the Worcester County Commissioners agreed to form a workgroup to address fire and EMS funding. Members of the group included three commissioners – Nordstrom, Joe Mitrecic and Jim Bunting – as well as six fire company representatives and two county staff members. “The primary purpose of the Worcester County Fire and EMS Strategic Planning Workgroup is to open a dialogue between policy makers and fire and EMS professionals to identify the challenges we’re facing,” said Ocean City Fire Chief Richie Bowers. According to Bowers, the county is experiencing an increase in emergency calls, a trend that will continue as long as growth continues. Fire and EMS is also going through a transitional stage, as companies are moving from volunteers to paid personnel who are cross trained in fire and EMS. “You need funding to put career people on duty 24/7,” Bowers said. To address the fact that not all of WorSEE PAGE 10


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 9


… County Officials Seek Detailed Financials To Review

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

FROM PAGE 8 cester County’s fire companies were able to do that, one of the first moves the workgroup made was to recommend a funding increase to the Worcester County Commissioners. The commissioners added an additional $1.1 million to the annual EMS allocation for the current fiscal year. “That placed units in service,” Bowers said. Tim Jerscheid, assistant chief at Stockton Volunteer Fire Company, agreed. With the increase in funding, Stockton was able to expand its medic assist hours. There is now a responder in place

from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Previously, that shift ended at 3 p.m. “Since we implemented the program in July, 62% of calls we have a daytime person on,” he said. He added that the workgroup had helped ensure pay rates throughout the county weren’t so varied that some companies weren’t able to attract applicants for EMS positions. “We wanted it so everybody was in the same ballpark,” he said. Another workgroup recommendation related to per-run funding allocations. In the past, companies have received $1,000

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per run when they respond to a call. Because they’re not paid unless they arrive at the scene, some companies opt not to turn back even if they’re called off. As a result, the workgroup recommended creating a $500 per run allocation for situations when companies leave the station but are called off on the way. The commissioners voted 5-2 not to approve the new allocation last month. At the time, Commissioner Chip Bertino expressed strong reservations about making a financial decision outside of the budget process. He stressed that the county was also still waiting on financial information requested from each fire company. “At this point we don’t know what we don’t know,” he said. Worcester County typically spends close to $5 million a year supporting its 10 fire companies. While each company does submit financial information to the county each year, what has been required is not much—a one-page form listing revenues and expenses. Copies of the most recent records provided to the county obtained by The Dispatch include one- and two-page annual reports submitted by some companies as well as detailed audits provided by others. Along with the varying forms, companies don’t all operate under the same fiscal year. And while some share every detail of their financial situation, listing assets and including balance sheets, others provide the county with no more than a bare bones chart of revenues and expenses. The one-page report for Berlin EMS, for example, lists under “Revenue” the income associated with donations, EMS invoicing, the annual county grant, its annual town grant and banking interest. There’s no context to show how much is in the bank generating interest or how much EMS billed that went uncollected. “I think it’s important as we move forward to have detailed financial information that reflects the operations for each of the fire companies so we can compare apples to apples and make a determination how to best move forward,” Bertino said. Nordstrom said fire company representatives are working to provide supplemental information. “The companies have been working hard to get us the information we need,” he said. When the workgroup meets in Janu-

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ary, members are expected to review fire company financials as well as the impact of the extra funding provided by the county. “We’re heading in a great direction,” Jerscheid said. Eventually, the group will determine how the fire and EMS service should be funded long-term. Bowers said that roughly 80% of calls were EMS calls and that EMS districts would be considered. “Within those districts they’d figure out an assessment charge,” he said. “We need to talk about it.” Whether that will happen before the coming year’s budget is passed isn’t clear. “We’re working that way,” Mitrecic said. “We don’t have to pass the budget until June. We have time to work on it. The fire companies have a number in their head of what it costs to run each ambulance. We’re looking at the hard numbers to see if it’s more or less.” Nordstrom also said he couldn’t speculate as to whether changes would be implemented during the next budget. “We are preparing very well to have those discussions,” he said, adding that the commissioners were more educated now about what the fire companies’ needs were. “I think you’ll have commissioners, and administration, who have learned a lot more. We’re looking at all options. It’s been a learning process.” He said the fact that the county had to provide extra funding to ensure adequate EMS coverage throughout the county illustrated the disparities among the various companies. “It’s not just a one size fits all solution,” he said. He stressed that the workgroup was committed to finding a solution. “I’m proud to be a part of it,” he said. “It’s been very educational for me. I’m hoping I can be part of the solution.” Bowers too praised the group’s efforts. “It’s been a great opportunity for us to examine what the problems are,” he said. “It’s one of the first times fire and EMS has spoken with one voice, to have a direct conversation with the decision makers.” He said that while there was a ways to go progress had been made. “It’s important for the public to know the fire and EMS system is stronger today than it was yesterday,” he said.

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December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Alcohol License Board Signs Off On Embers Plans

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

A rendering of the proposed redevelopment of the Embers property in Ocean City is pictured.

Submitted Rendering

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SNOW HILL – The Worcester County Board of License Commissioners (BLC) approved the extensive changes planned for the Embers property this week. On Wednesday, the BLC, which oversees the sale of alcoholic beverages in Worcester County, voted unanimously to approve the changes planned for the site occupied by Embers Restaurant for decades. Redevelopment is set to transform the property into a more versatile space that will provide various dining and shopping opportunities. “We find that making these changes, having these different offerings, will allow us to better serve the community,” Taustin Group CEO Cole Taustin said. Taustin presented the board with renderings of a substantial three-story structure featuring multiple open-air patios and outdoor dining space. The project will include a café on the first floor as well as two outdoor bars. The bars do feature wall and glass barriers. “That is there for the comfort of our guests from wind and the comfort of our neighbors for any ambient noise,” Taustin said. Board members noted that while they’d sent out 200 letters to neighboring property owners regarding the Embers meeting, only two were in attendance Wednesday. Those two, Richard and Kimberly Brown, expressed concern regarding traffic in the area. “That access road from Coastal Highway is a choke point,” Richard Brown said. Taustin noted that the new building would feature less seating than the old Embers building had. He said the buffet had seated close to 900 people. He added that the new facility, with features like the café, would attract customers all day, not just at dinner time. “With this change in venue we’ve spread our business out over the course of the entire day,” he said. The café will open at 7 a.m. whereas Blu will open at noon. He added that the third-floor bars were open air and would operate seasonally. The board agreed to approve the changes but to consider entertainment for the third-floor on a by-request basis. “We’ve had no problems with the neighbors and we don’t want any,” said William Esham, BLC chairman. He acknowledged the traffic concerns but said the facility hadn’t grown in seating capacity and pointed out the Town of Ocean City had approved plans for the development.


Ocean City Council Approves Phased Room Tax Increase

December 3, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – After carefully reviewing and debating the options on the table, resort officials this week approved a gradual scaling up of the town’s room tax percentage in future years. In October, the Mayor and Council got an historic overview of the town’s room tax and how the revenue generated was distributed to the advertising and marketing budget for tourism promotion and the general fund for typical government expenses. As part two of that discussion during Tuesday’s work session, the elected officials were presented with three options on what to do with the room tax rate going forward in future years. The first option was simply leaving the room tax rate at its current level of 2% for fiscal years 2022 and 2023. The second option was keeping the room tax rate at 2% for fiscal years 2022 and 2023, scaling it up to 2.1% in fiscal year 2024 and again to 2.2% in fiscal year 2025. A third option, which did not get much traction, was raising the room tax rate to 2.6%. After considerable debate, the council ultimately voted on the second option. While most agreed it was now time to increase the room tax rate again going forward in future fiscal years, there was still the issue of how best to distribute the anticipated increase in revenue. Earlier this year, the town hired new Tourism and Business Development Director Tom Perlozzo to overhaul the tourism departments under one umbrella and begin developing strategies on how best to market the town and all it has to offer. In addition, the town is in the process of contracting with a new advertising agency after 10 years with the same firm that could shift marketing concepts. Currently, about 44 percent of room tax revenue is dedicated to marketing and advertising, while roughly 56 percent goes into the general fund to help cover the cost of tourism, such as increased fire and police services, public works, salaries and overtime, for example. Perlozzo said those types of decisions would fall on the Mayor and Council. “How it’s distributed is the issue as I see it,” he said. “We view this as a policy decision, not an operational decision. We need the flexibility to navigate the budget for advertising and marketing, for example. My recommendation is going to be Option 2. I don’t know that there is a department head in town that wouldn’t want more money.” Councilman John Gehrig said the roughly 56-44% split has proven effective and suggested it remain in tact e-

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ven with the proposed graduated increase in the room tax rate. Gehrig ultimately made a motion for Option 2, including a 40% share for advertising and a 60% share for the general fund. “The formula has worked,” he said. “Let’s keep that intact. That’s where we are right now. Keep that intact until we know what we want to do.” Gehrig explained the nuts and bolts of Option 2 and questioned if the timeline should be moved up for the graduated increases. “The scaled option is not impacting the fiscal year 2022 or fiscal year 2023 budgets,” he said. “We’re talking about fiscal year 2024. I can’t say I’m happy about that because it seems like it’s two years too late. I can go along with the scaled option. My concern has always been how do we dedicate those funds.” Gehrig said he favored keeping the current distribution formula intact, even if the room tax rate was hiked. “If something works, I don’t know if we need to mess around with it,” he said. “We have 56% of the room tax to help pay for the cost of tourism in terms of public safety and public works, for example. The other 44% covers the cost of doing business. That’s advertising and marketing.” In response to a question if the future room tax hike would cover the cost of adding the requested and approved new positions to his department, Perlozzo said he was not entirely certain all of that would be covered by the increase. “It doesn’t address everything,” he said. “It does address many of the things we’ve talked about with our tourism strategic plan. Generally speaking, I’m not sure where we’re paying for the people we’re going to be bringing in. If it’s coming out of room tax, that’s something we need to figure out.” When the room tax was last increased two years ago, the effective date was moved back to January because resort businesses had already set their summer rates. Gehrig said the well-thought-out plan for the graduated increases would allow the business community to adjust. “It gives clarity to our business community,” he said. “All of our businesses will know exactly what’s going on.” Council Secretary Tony DeLuca, who seconded Gehrig’s motion for Option 2, said he supported the formula for “sprinkling around” the anticipated increase between marketing and advertising and the town services needed to support increased tourism. He also made it clear he wanted a defined timeline for the graduated increases in the room tax. “I certainly support the scaled version,” he said. “I think sprinkling it aSEE PAGE 14

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… Graduated Plan Would Increase Room Tax In 2 Years

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FROM PAGE 13 round really covers the cost of public works and public safety. I don’t want to lose sight of the fact we need to lay the timeline out. I want it to be very clear. We still will need to go to the County Commissioners and Annapolis.” Councilman Peter Buas questioned if there was a plan in place on how best to utilize the anticipated increase in room tax revenue. “With the ultimate increase to 2.2%, is there a plan on how to use the increase in the advertising budget?” he said. Perlozzo said a defined plan would emerge when the marketing strategy shifted and the new advertising agency was hired. “There really is not a plan,” he said. “Originally, we assumed that the same

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formula for that half-percent was going to be used. We hypothetically don’t know what’s going to happen between now and 2024. We will have a new ad agency and they’re going to need funds for this versus that.” Buas said targeting the room tax revenue was somewhat nebulous because it was uncertain at this point what the plan will be. “You hire an ad agency that has a plan and they need X amount to get the job done,” he said. “It’s almost like we’re funding something we don’t know exists right now.” Perlozzo said while there is not a specific plan in place, there was an overall goal and direction going forward. “The bottom line is we will have a change in our marketing strategy,” he said. “We will be speaking with and en-

gaging with markets we have not done so in the past. We have traditionally cast a broad net. We want to fill in the shoulder seasons and the offseason. We have typically not spent any money after September 30 or before April 1. Meetings and conventions are perfect examples of an $18,000 budget, although there is a $7 million advertising budget, where we have not spent any money trying to fill up the convention center weekdays.” Buas countered it appeared to be counterintuitive to hike the room tax rate without a specific plan on how to spend the revenue. “It just seems premature, that’s all,” he said. “We need to see who the ad agency is, what they’re targeting and what their ask is. I certainly support year-round advertising. I’d just like to

December 3, 2021

work from the front end and not the back end.” For his part, Gehrig said the anticipated increase in room tax revenue would afford the town and its tourism department the flexibility to explore new marketing strategies, or seasonally-targeted strategies. “Typically, we’ve had one campaign, whether it was Rodney or the Fun Family,” he said. “We have a very diverse and broad visitor group. This will give us the flexibility to do that down the road.” Even before the Mayor and Council took up the room tax increase debate, members of the public were invited to weigh in. For example, Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association (HMRA) Executive Director Susan Jones said her group supported the increase. “This is an issue near and dear to our hearts, and it’s of extreme importance to us,” she said. “The idea is it is time to grow the room tax. A lot of destinations would like to be in the boat we’re in.” Jones said the HMRA also supported keeping the room tax revenue distribution formula in place. “We’ve been able to grow the average daily rates and occupancy rates,” she said. “We believe this is the formula that works. The pandemic changed vacation habits. People didn’t fly, but they got in their cars and came to Ocean City. This is how we continue to grow. The momentum is here now.” Former councilman Vince Gisriel said dedicating more of the room tax revenue to the general fund could result in a reduction of the property tax rate for local residents. In that way, the cost of tourism would be borne by the visitors. Gisriel also said the town should not be in the business of advertising. “I want to clear the air,” he said. “That half-percent increase generated more revenue that was ever anticipated. The advertising budget grew at a faster pace than the general fund budget. The function of government is not advertising and marketing. That’s a function of the private sector.” However, Councilman Mark Paddack said later the unique nature of Ocean City as a tourist destination made advertising and marketing a necessity in response to Gisriel’s earlier comments. “Ocean City is extremely unique in our clientele and what we offer,” he said. “Ocean City does need to be in the business or promoting our community. Our industry is tourism.” After considerable debate, the council voted 5-1 with Buas opposed and Councilman Lloyd Martin absent to approve the Option 2 plan for a graduated increase in the room tax rate by 2025. Mayor Rick Meehan praised his colleagues for their decision. “I’m glad we resolved this today,” he said. “What we’ve done is solidify our partnership with the business community.”


Hung Jury In Alleged Drug Dealer Trial

December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

SNOW HILL – The trial for a Snow Hill man arrested last April in Ocean City ended in a mistrial when a jury could not reach a verdict and will be rescheduled. Following a months-long investigation, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers last April arrested two local individuals for alleging dealing narcotics in the resort. Last February, the OCPD Narcotics Unit initiated a controlled dangerous substance investigation into the alleged dealing of Brandon Hudson, 32, of Snow Hill, who was reportedly selling cocaine at various local bars in Ocean City and from his residence. Last April 23, OCPD detectives executed the three search warrants after observing Hudson driving his vehicle. The search resulted in the seizure of roughly one ounce of cocaine, one-third of a pound of marijuana and nearly $13,000 in cash. As a result, Hudson was arrested and charged with possession with intent to distribute a schedule I controlled dangerous substance. Also arrested was Hudson’s roommate, identified as Erika Pletcher, 25, of Ocean City, on possession of CDS-not marijuana charges. On April 14, an OCPD officer authored three search and seizure war-

rants, which were signed by a District Court judge. Around 12:25 a.m. last April 23, the OCPD officer who authored the warrants observed Hudson driving a Ford Escape and requested other OCPD officers stop the vehicle and detain Hudson, who was issued the warrants. During a search of Hudson’s person, OCPD officers located eight baggies of suspected powder cocaine, according to police reports. During a search of the vehicle, OCPD officers reportedly located another glassine baggie of suspected powder cocaine on the driver’s side floor. After searching Hudson and the vehicle, OCPD officers responded to the residence on Bayshore Drive and located more bags of suspected powder cocaine. The cocaine was located in a bedroom in a gym bag containing men’s clothing and a document with Hudson’s name on it. In a backpack found on a couch in the living room, OCPD officers located roughly one-third of a pound of marijuana. The backpack also contained a large amount of U.S. currency, according to police reports. On Nov. 18, Hudson was tried before a Worcester County Circuit Court jury. However, the case ended in a mistrial when the jury could not reach a verdict and will be rescheduled. Pletcher is scheduled to appear for trial in January.

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Berlin’s Roaming White Hen’s Popularity Continues To Grow

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Berlin. Known for its historic buildings, small town charm and now — its wandering chicken. In recent weeks, residents and visitors have taken to social media to share sightings of a wandering white hen throughout the downtown area. Whether she’s peering into the toy store or soaking up the sun outside the health department, Althea’s antics are entertaining locals and tourists alike. “I’m thinking about getting shirts made,” said Erin Bilenki, who’s taken over care of Althea since finding her outside her shop one morning. “She’s a sensation.” Bilenki, who operates Health Freedom, located behind the municipal parking lot, adjacent to Artisans Green, said the hen, white with black trim on her neck, showed up on Artisans Green a little over a month ago. She shared the hen’s photo on social media and asked around regarding any missing chickens. When no one claimed the vagabond bird, Bilenki bought her a small coop so she’d no longer need to shelter

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under the store overnight. She christened the chicken Althea— after the Grateful Dead song—and has enjoyed the hen’s antics ever since. While she’s not exactly friendly, Althea now comes running, eager to be fed, when she sees Bilenki. She’s also started laying eggs in her new coop. Lacking chicken companions, she’s befriended a squirrel and rabbit in the neighborhood. “It’s really cute,” Bilenki said. And while Bilenki feeds the hen, she’s been adopted by the entire downtown. Shoppers stop to take her picture when they see her in the parking lot while local merchants catch her admiring her reflection in their glass doors. Ivy Wells, the town’s economic and community development director, posted “Chicken Crossing” signs to alert motorists to her presence. “Althea is ‘the’ definition of a free range chicken,” Wells said. Olga Kozhevnikova of World of Toys, snapped a picture of Althea outside her door last week and joked that it was her first customer of the day. Facebook fans loved it. “Smart chick, it’s a great store,” one chimed in. “Now we know why the chicken crossed the road,” wrote another. The health department followed suit, sharing an image of Althea outside its Berlin dental clinic. Wells said the hen now had quite the following. “Althea has become somewhat of a celebrity here,” she said. “The business owners have embraced her as a local. Just another thing that makes Berlin unique.”


Council To Review GIS Map Proposal

December 3, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – A favorable recommendation to have an engineering firm produce a resiliency study and GIS mapping of Fenwick Island now advances to the town council. On Tuesday, members of the Fenwick Island Infrastructure Committee had before them two proposals – one from AECOM and one from George, Miles & Burh (GMB) – to complete a resiliency study and GIS mapping of the town. While bid amounts were not discussed this week, the committee voted unanimously to advance AECOM’s proposal to the town council with a favorable recommendation. “While I find the GMB proposal to be a comprehensive plan … I just don’t know we can afford the Mercedes in the crowd, to be honest,” said Councilman Richard Benn, committee chair. In recent months, committee members have worked alongside officials to develop the scope of work for a proposed resiliency plan and GIS mapping project. Using funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), the goal of the project is to take a proactive approach to sea level rise and flooding through the development of short-, mid- and longterm solutions. Ahead of Tuesday’s meeting, representatives with AECOM and GMB submitted their proposals and bids to the committee for review. Committee member Tim Bergin said this week he favored AECOM’s proposal, as they had done extensive work for the town in years past. “Looking at all of that it does seem as if AECOM has significant experience in the town and has maintained information on behalf of the town …,” he said. “I feel AECOM has the better proposal and the better history.” Committee members Larry Bortner, Susan Brennan and Jay Ryan agreed. “There’s an old adage, ‘Better, faster, cheaper. Pick two,’” Ryan said. “I think both companies did a good job in their proposals … but there is one proposal that picks two. They are faster and cheaper. Since we are dealing with public funding, I think it’s our responsibility to be good stewards of that funding.” Brennan noted AECOM’s history with Fenwick Island could be a valuable tool in developing a resiliency plan and GIS map. “I do feel like since they are familiar with the town, that is a benefit at this particular time,” she said. Benn agreed, noting that AECOM had also included grant writing as part of its proposal. He added, however, that the town still needed some clarification on the use of ARPA funds for the project. “I think one of the questions we need answered before accepting the bid is if this will qualify for ARPA funds,” he said. After further discussion, the committee voted unanimously to forward AECOM’s proposal to the town council with a favorable recommendation.

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Page 17

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Buckingham PTA Offering Events To Support School

December 3, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

Buckingham Elementary School students show off some pottery they’ve made with the kiln the school’s PTA helped purchase. Pictured, from left, are fourth graders Brinton Wells, Lilith Wyler and Queen Bloeknight and first grader Cristiano Cervantes-Rodriguez. Photo by Charlene Sharpe

BERLIN – Buckingham Elementary School’s PTA is seeking community support for a variety of events this month. After weeks of work creating the school’s float for the Berlin Christmas Parade, Buckingham’s PTA volunteers aren’t slowing down yet. The organization has a fundraiser at Flagship Cinemas on Dec. 11 and is collecting supplies through next week for Santa’s Workshop, a school event that lets kids buy gifts for their family members for $1. Each year, the PTA raises money to support various causes at the Berlin school. Last year, the group’s efforts (along with support from the Berlin Arts and Entertainment Committee and the Ocean City-Berlin Optimist Club) helped buy a kiln for Buckingham’s art department. “The school appreciates all of the support from the community,” said Donna Pellinger, PTA president. “Otherwise these projects wouldn’t be possible.” The PTA is inviting families to Flagship Cinemas in West Ocean City on Dec. 11 for a showing of “The Polar Express.” Doors open at 9:30 a.m. for the 10 a.m. movie and families are encouraged to come in their pajamas. “We’re asking for a donation of $5,” Pellinger said. “Flagship Cinemas is being very generous in opening their doors.” The PTA is also currently collecting donations of gift bags, tape, fine-point Sharpies and gift tags to be used during Santa’s Workshop. Donations can be dropped off at the school. The event, held at Buckingham Dec. 13, 14,15 and 16, give kids a chance to buy gifts for their family members. “It teaches them about giving,” Pellinger said. The PTA recently completed fundraisers at Five Below and Chick-fil-A. The various efforts are geared toward providing funding to help Buckingham with a new project, One Grade One Book. “We have One School One Book but this one is specifically targeted for certain grades,” Pellinger said. The PTA also helps out annually in purchasing field day shirts and setting up teacher appreciation events. Pellinger said the group is grateful for the community support that allows the organization to continue to help the school. For more information, visit the Buckingham Elementary School’s PTA page on Facebook.


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 19


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

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December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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COPS & COURTS Drug Bust In Mystery Van OCEAN CITY – A Pennsylvania man was arrested on drug possession charges last week after psilocybin, more commonly known as mushrooms, were found in his van. Around 3:20 a.m. last Thursday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to the area of 59th Street for a reported suspicious person. The caller, a security guard for a residential property in the area, reported a van entering and exiting the parking lot several times. The security guard reported to police he heard the audible alarm coming from the van multiple times and observed its lights flashing. Upon arrival, officers located the suspicious van parked on 59th Street and identified the driver as Kyle Latch, 29, of Doylestown, Pa. According to police reports, Latch was in the rear seat of the van and was moving around in the passenger compartment. When officers shined their lights into the passenger compartment, Latch reportedly ducked rapidly behind the front passenger seat as if he was trying to hide himself or some contraband. OCPD officers asked Latch to step out of the vehicle and he complied. Latch, who appeared intoxicated, according to police reports, advised police he had traveled to Ocean City to visit his family for Thanksgiving and was going to sleep in his van until he was sober in the morning. A search of the vehicle revealed a marijuana cigarette near the radio on the dashboard along with a plastic container of loose marijuana less than 10 grams. Also, officers located a baggie of mushrooms in the rear pocket of the front passenger seat consistent with psilocybin, a controlled dangerous substance. Latch was arrested and charged with possession of CDS.

Cell Phone Dispute Leads To Arrest OCEAN CITY – A local man was arrested last week after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend during a dispute about a cell phone. Around 9:25 p.m. last Friday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers were dispatched to a convenience store at 120th Street for a reported domestic assault that had just occurred. OCPD officer met with a female victim who advised she had been assaulted by her boyfriend, identified as John Briddell, 23, of Ocean City. The victim reportedly told police she was in her residence at 126th Street when Briddell allegedly came home intoxicated, angry and aggressive. The victim told police Briddell slammed her TV and threw her clothes around the

room, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Briddell grabbed her arm and demanded she give him her cell phone. While the victim and Briddell were both holding onto the phone, Briddell put the victim in a chokehold, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Briddell wrapped his arm around her neck from behind, and although he did not squeeze her neck to the point she could not breath, she became very scared and frantic, according to police reports. The victim told police her vision became blurry and she began panicking. The victim told officers she believed 100% that if she did not give up the phone, Briddell would have escalated the situation and he probably would have killed her, according to police reports. The victim advised she was scared for her life and dropped the phone. Once the victim dropped the phone, Briddell reportedly released the chokehold. The victim then grabbed her bag and ran to the convenience store nearby to call her mother. The victim’s mother then called 911 on her behalf, according to police reports. The victim had bruising on her right arm and red marks on the left side of her neck consistent with her version of the incident, according to police reports. OCPD officers met with Briddell at the residence. Briddell admitted there had been a disagreement over the cell phone because it was in his mother’s name and the victim had run the bill up too high. Briddell advised his mother had told him to take the phone away from the victim because she no longer wanted to pay the bill for it, according to police reports. Briddell reportedly advised he had grabbed the victim’s wrist when trying to get the phone, but that the victim let go of the phone and they just began arguing verbally. Briddell told police no assault had occurred, but he had admitted grabbing the victim’s wrist. He was arrested and charged with second-degree assault.

Jail For Disorderly Conduct OCEAN CITY – A Virginia man, arrested in August after drugs were found on his person following a routine smoking citation on the Boardwalk, pleaded guilty last week to disorderly conduct and was sentenced to 30 days in jail. Around 2:15 a.m. on Aug. 21, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer patrolling in the area of Caroline Street and the Boardwalk observed an individual, later identified as Aaron Dubois, 35, of Burkeville, Va., smoking a cigarette in violation of the town’s SEE NEXT PAGE


December 3, 2021

... COPS & COURTS smoking ordinance. During an earlier encounter in the evening, Dubois reportedly approached the same officer and informed him he was aware of the town’s smoking ordinance on the Boardwalk and told the officer “you won’t catch me smoking on the Boardwalk,” before fist-pumping the officer, according to police reports. While the officer was preparing a citation for Dubois, he noticed large dollops and blotches of red stains on his clothing. When pressed about the red stains, Dubois reportedly told the officer they were ketchup stains, according to police reports. The officer told Dubois he believed the stains weren’t ketchup, but rather, blood. When Dubois began acting suspiciously and pacing around, the officer asked if he had anything on his person the officer needed to know about. After Dubois consented, the officer searched the suspect. In one pocket of Dubois’ shorts, the officer located a pack of cigarettes with two pipes in it. One was a glass smoking device and the other was a marijuana one-hitter, according to police reports. In the same pocket, the officer located a prescription pill bottle with Dubois’ sister’s name on it. Inside the pill bottle was suspected powder cocaine. At that point, Dubois was arrested for suspected controlled dangerous substances and paraphernalia, ac-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

cording to police reports. Once Dubois was in custody, the officer continued a search of his person. In another cigarette pack, the officer located a spoon containing white powdery residue on one side and burn marks on the other side. In Dubois’ wallet, the officer located a hand-rolled marijuana cigarette, according to police reports. While the officer was reading Dubois his rights, Dubois reportedly mocked him by repeating the same lines. When questioned about the contents of the pill bottle, Dubois reportedly told the officer it was baking soda, not cocaine. When other officers arrived on the scene to transport Dubois, he reportedly became irate and started screaming obscenities at the officers as they attempted to transport him. He reportedly attempted to pull away from the officers, and when he was unsuccessful, he braced his legs in an attempt to prevent them from loading him into the transport van and additional charges of resisting arrest were tacked on. Last week, Dubois pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct and was sentenced to 30 days in jail.

One Day Sentence In Motor Vehicle Theft Case OCEAN CITY – One of two suspects arrested in June after a license plate reader on the Route 50 bridge alerted on the stolen vehicle pleaded guilty this week to related charges and was sentenced to one day in jail. Around 4:35 a.m. last June 10, a li-

cense plate reader on the Route 50 bridge alerted Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers a stolen vehicle was entering the resort. OCPD officers observed the identified vehicle at the stoplight at North Division Street. OCPD officers attempted to stop the vehicle at 3rd Street to no avail. The vehicle sped northbound on Baltimore Avenue, and OCPD officers pursued until it reached 45th Street before calling off the pursuit because of safety concerns regarding vehicle speeds. After the pursuit was called off, OCPD officers observed the stolen vehicle turn onto Hitchens Avenue, where the occupants got out and fled on foot. The suspects were located a short time later and were taken into custody without incident. Jasmine Carter, 19, of Valley

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Lee, Md., was arrested and charged initially with motor vehicle theft, theft from $1,500 to under $25,000, reckless endangerment, obstructing and hindering, reckless driving in a wanton and willful disregard for safety, fleeing and eluding, negligent driving and numerous other traffic violations. On Monday, Carter pleaded guilty to obstructing and hindering and attempting to elude officers on foot and was sentenced to one day in jail. Antonius Cartnail, 21, of Lexington Park, Md., was charged with motor vehicle theft, theft under $25,000, obstructing and hindering and trespassing. Cartnail was also scheduled to appear for trial on Monday, but failed to appear and had a warrant sworn out for his arrest.

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Felony assault charge in road rage incident

December 3, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A local man was arrested on first-degree assault and other charges last weekend after allegedly pulling a knife on another man following a road rage incident. Around 5:15 p.m. last Saturday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a citizen report of a road rage incident resulting in a hit-andrun property damage crash. The victim reportedly told police Scott Williamson, 44, of Berlin, was driving a van southbound on Route 1 into Ocean City. The victim, who was operating a pickup truck made a lane change in front of Williamson, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Williamson became enraged. The victim reportedly told police Williamson, at first, followed him closely from the rear. According to police reports, Williamson then sped up to the left side of the victim’s vehicle and jerked his van into the victim’s pickup truck, causing the mirrors of each vehicle to strike each other. The victim reported called the police at that point. The two vehicles continued south before stopping at a convenience store at 85th Street. According to police reports, Williamson exited the driver’s side of his van with a knife in his hand, walked quickly toward the victim and opened the knife blade in an animated fashion. Williamson reportedly got within a foot of the victim, who was still in his vehicle with the doors locked. Williamson pointed the knife at the victim and yelled “Come on, get out of the truck,” according to police reports. Williamson then went back to his van, got a cell phone and re-engaged the victim by beginning to film him with it, according to police reports. Officers arrived and reportedly saw Williamson get in the driver’s seat of the van. When Williamson realized the police presence, he crawled under his van, according to police reports. An officer approached Williamson with his handgun drawn and ordered him to put his hands on his head. Williamson complied, and he was taken into custody without incident. The officer observed in plain view the knife in the center console. OCPD officers obtained witness statements and checked video footage from the convenience store, which corroborated the victim’s story, according to police reports. Williamson reportedly told police, “Yes, I grabbed that knife like an idiot.” Williamson said he held the knife in his right hand as he approached the victim, but the blade was not extended. Williamson was arrested and charged with felony first-degree assault, second-degree assault, reckless endangerment, carrying a dangerous weapon with intent to injure and numerous traffic violations.


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 25


Ocean Pines Officials Talk Short-Term Rental Changes

Page 26

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – The process for bringing a vote on short-term rental regulations to the community’s residents highlighted a recent board discussion. Now that the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors has voted to adopt Worcester County’s code on shortterm rentals, litter and noise into its Declaration of Restrictions, Director Frank Daly said it must now be decided how the association will bring the vote to its residents. “We passed a motion to change the Declaration of Restrictions and the voting for that was targeted to start for that in the fourth quarter,” he said. “Now we are in the fourth quarter, and I think we need a discussion on how to move that process forward.” Last year, an Ocean Pines work group began meeting with community stakeholders to draft proposed changes to the association’s architectural guidelines on short-term rental properties. According to association officials, there are roughly 180 short-term rentals in

Potential Referendum Could Gauge Community’s Will For Tight Controls

Ocean Pines. They noted, however, ongoing issues at three or four properties prompted the association to tighten controls on the short-term rentals. Ultimately, officials in Ocean Pines opted to incorporate the county’s shortterm rental regulations into its Declaration of Restrictions (DRs) with enhanced enforcement provisions, such as fines for property owners who violate the code. To that end, each section of the community will now be given the opportunity to vote for or against the adoption of such regulations into its DRs. “The other thing I’d also point out is there are five sections where this vote is not required,” Daly said, “as the Declaration of Restrictions already gives the board powers we are asking for to regulate short-term rentals.”

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During the Nov. 20 board meeting, Daly said Ocean Pines attorneys had outlined a process of working with the association’s Elections Committee on an initial mailing. “And then the way this process works is there can be subsequent mailings until we achieve the 50% plus one that’s required in the bylaws to change the DRs,” he said. “It seems to me we can have an initial mailing in the fourth quarter …” Daly added additional mailings could also be sent with assessments, or as a bounce-back card in the Ocean Pines Report. “I believe it is also possible the Elections Committee could look at ads in the local press, and I think that we could also consider for the Elections Committee – or I would like the Elections Com-

December 3, 2021

mittee to consider – emailing homeowners where we know the homeowner’s email …,” he said. “All of that has a tendency to suppress the cost that we have … to get the votes in each section." When asked about the number of votes each section would need, Daly said it would require the vote of a majority of homeowners. “For example, if there are 10 people in your section and five of them vote for it and five don’t vote, then you send out another mailing,” he explained. “And in that second mailing, if one person votes for it, you have the 50% plus one … That ends that section, it’s done, it’s incorporated in that section.” Director Colette Horn noted the association’s Strategic Planning Advisory Committee had used an online platform to conduct its recent homeowners survey. She questioned if it could also be used in the adoption process for shortterm rental regulations. “The Strategic Planning Advisory Committee survey was primarily done electronically, and we got over 1,800 responses, which is a phenomenal response rate for any survey,” she said. “I think we ought to consider electronic as well.” President Larry Perrone, however, shared his concerns. “I think the concern is this is not a survey, it’s an actual vote …,” he replied. “I think we have two issues here: the communication to the community, to let them know what this is all about and explain it, and I do think the Elections Committee has to be involved in the actual vote here, and I’m not sure if we have the capability at this point to vote electronically.” Following the discussion, Perrone appointed a board work group, consisting of himself, Daly and Director Josette Wheatley, to consider the voting process. “I think we should come up with a plan as to how we’re going to do this in conjunction with the Communications and the Elections committees, and then come back to the board with a plan as to how to implement,” he said.


Solar Regs Eyed For Early Next Year

December 3, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Officials say they plan to bring proposed solar regulations before the Wicomico County Council early next year. In a work session with council member last month, Planning, Zoning and Community Development Director Lori Carter and county attorney Paul Wilber presented an update on proposed solar regulations. “Staff has been working with legal to develop legislation on solar,” Wilber said. “It will have to go to the Planning Commission, as required, and then from … it will come back here to the council.” In 2020, Councilman Bill McCain brought the issue of solar development in rural areas to the council’s attention, arguing the importance of having regulations in the county’s zoning code before major solar energy projects came to Wicomico. And by August of that year, the council agreed to explore potential solar regulations with the county’s planning and zoning department. “A lot of companies coming here want to know what the playing field is,” Councilman John Cannon said at the time. “I think it’s important to establish that to a certain degree.” Back on the agenda for discussion last month, Wilber noted the Planning Commission would consider proposed solar legislation, but only after viewing proposed zoning amendments for dissolved

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

air flotation (DAF) agricultural storage tanks. Carter agreed, saying, “Hopefully we can get this moving toward the Planning Commission, and we can be back to you guys hopefully sometime in March.” Carter noted planning and zoning staff have looked at five other counties in developing solar regulations. “I think one of the good things about this is lots of other counties have already done this,” McCain added. “A lot of the work has been done. We’re not reinventing the wheel by any stretch of the imagination.” Council President Larry Dodd questioned if existing solar farms had to follow any regulations. “We’re seeing a lot of the smaller plots of land popping up with solar panels,” he said. “Do they fall under any type of legislation? Do they need permits or anything?” Zoning Administrator Clark Meadows noted large solar projects required the issuance of a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity through the Public Service Commission, charged with reviewing and approving new electric generation projects in the state. But smaller facilities – two megawatts or lower, he added – fell under the county’s jurisdiction. “They are by special exception under most zoning districts, through the Board of Appeals.,” he said. “All the pertinent inspections and permits by public works and planning and zoning apply.”

Page 27


OP Seeks Mailbox Help From Harris

Page 28

Board Denies Hiding ‘Anything From Anybody’ With Test Results

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 20121

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – While an anomalous test is to blame for reports that elevated levels of human waste were found in the community’s ponds, association President Larry Perrone disputed claims that the board and general manager were hiding the results. In a Nov. 20 meeting of the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors, Perrone provided an update on the results of water quality testing that was conducted in the community’s ponds. “I addressed the issue yesterday with the Environment and Natural Assets Committee, and I wanted to ad-

A cluster of mailboxes is pictured at White Horse Park in Ocean Pines.

Photo by Bethany Hooper

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – Ocean Pines Association President Larry Perrone said the condition of mailbox clusters within the community has been brought to the attention of Congressman Andy Harris’s office. In a recent meeting of the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors, Perrone announced issues with the mailboxes have been turned over to Harris’s staff. “There’s been a lot of discussion in

the community, and rightfully so, about the condition of the mailboxes …,” he said. “We submitted a constituent’s authorization form yesterday to Congressman Harris’ office. He has a staffer who will work directly with the United States Post Office and try to address the issues we have here.” Perrone added the constituent form also included a spreadsheet of all cluster boxes in Ocean Pines, as well as photographs showing current conditions. He noted that the post office, along with representatives of the public works department, would conduct a survey of

the association’s mailboxes to create a plan for replacement or maintenance. “At this point, this issue lies with Congressman Harris’s office,” he said, “and we’ll see what they can do for us.” In recent years, the condition of the Ocean Pines mailboxes has been the subject of committee and board meetings, candidate forums and social media

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dress it with the community,” he told attendees. Perrone asserted that about a month ago former committee member Marty Clarke “made an allegation on social media that this board was hiding test results from the community regarding testing that had occurred in the ponds in Ocean Pines.” “Normally, this board receives a lot of allegations on a routine basis, and normally we just don’t respond to them,” he said. “But this one I think was a little more serious.” Perrone said he wanted to address comments Clarke had made on the Ocean Pines Forum website. On Oct. 12, Clarke wrote, “What concerns me personally, as well as SEE NEXT PAGE

posts. In the November meeting of the Ocean Pines Budget and Finance Committee, for example, General Manager John Viola noted it would cost the association between $150,000 to $180,000 per year to repair the mailboxes. “That’s the ballpark we have right now,” he said.

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other members of our committee, is the lack of action and what would appear to be a case of the board sitting on these results. This north gate pond should have been roped off to public and pets and the cause of the human waste immediately investigated.” He followed up on Oct. 18, saying, “The fact is our committee asked over and over again for the results of the November report and didn’t get a copy from the [general manager] or the board ever.” Perrone said he and Director Colette Horn were in a meeting last December with General Manager John Viola when they received a call from former Director Tom Janasek, former board liaison to the Environment and Natural Assets Committee, notifying them a recent test of the ponds indicated high levels of human waste. “The initial report indicated that it was most likely an anomaly because the number was so high,” Perrone said. “We agreed at that point to go ahead and have the test redone, and we would wait and see what the second test results showed.” He then added that a second test was completed in December, but that the board never received the results of either the first or second round of testing. “About a month ago, coincidentally the day after Director Janasek had resigned, Marty Clarke had made these allegations on the Ocean Pines Forum, that the board had the results and that the board was hiding these results,” he said. “In fact, one email indicated the board was negligent for not putting up barriers or fencing around the pond. Clearly the board had not received the results.” Perrone said he received copies of a report dated Dec. 11, 2020 and a report dated Sept. 19, 2021, this month, and that those test results had been shared with Horn, Viola and Director Amy Peck, the current liaison to the Environment and Natural Assets Committee. “As expected, the second report indicated that the results from the first report was an anomaly and that there was no problem regarding human waste in the ponds,” he said. “It was disappointing that these allegations were made against this board and the general manager, that we were hiding these results.” Additional copies, Perrone said, would be made available to other board members. “I wanted to make sure the community understood this board did not hide anything from anybody …,” he said. In an interview this week, Clarke said he continued to stand by his comments. “Everything I said was true,” he said. “What [Perrone] said I said wasn’t written on the Forum,” he added.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

• Check the electrical service panel and wiring • Tighten screws and lugs on circuit breakers to ensure proper functioning • Apply Noalox on branch circuits’ aluminum wires • Check all outlets with tester for loose connections, open grounds, neutral wires, proper polarity

Page 29

• Test/inspect GFCI outlets and breakers • Check for double tapped breakers to eliminate overloading a circuit breaker • Survey for proper surge protection • Check smoke detectors and make recommendations for compliance with local electrical codes

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OC Christmas Parade Returns

Page 30

Life-Saving Museum Announces Holiday Open House Sunday

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Carousel Hotel Offering Family Fun

OCEAN CITY – Ocean City will bring the holiday spirit to Coastal Highway this weekend. The 38th Annual Ocean City Christmas Parade is returning to the holiday festivities on Saturday, Dec. 4. The holiday parade starts at 11 a.m. on Old Landing Road and marches northbound in the southbound lanes of Coastal Highway to the judges’ stand at 120th Street. The event will feature more than 60 units, including high school bands, antique cars, colorful holiday floats and more. “For almost 40 years, this parade has been an iconic event for Ocean City and we are happy to continue a tradition that is loved by so many,” said Ocean City Special Events Director Frank Miller. WRDE reporter Paige Marley and DJ BK from Radio Ocean City will be the Masters of Ceremony, providing a play by play of the parade for spectators. Professional judges will review bands and

other units in nine categories, with trophies being awarded after conclusion of the parade. A post-parade reception will be hosted by the Carousel Hotel, bringing additional family fun for participants and patrons alike. Festivities at the hotel will begin immediately after the parade’s conclusion and will include half-priced ice skating, a DJ playing continuous holiday music and free photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus. In addition, complimentary winter refreshments will be available. “We have more than 60 entries, and interest in participation has not slowed down,” Miller said. “An extra special thanks goes out to Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Coca-Cola, Food Lion, and State Highway Administration for helping us keep such a wonderful family-friendly event viable and free to participate.”

December 3, 2021

OCEAN CITY – The Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum will host a Holiday Open House on Sunday, Dec. 5, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The festive event is open to the public, and admission is free. In addition to open tours of the museum, a lineup of holiday activities promises to entertain visitors of all ages. “The Holiday Open House is an event that offers visitors the chance to tour the museum with free admission,” said Christine Okerblom, museum curator. “The event brings together local history and festive holiday activities that the entire family can enjoy.” At noon, families can enjoy story time with local author Katherine RusSpectators will not be permitted to watch the parade from the median area of Coastal Highway. Motorists are reminded that traffic pattern changes will begin at approximately 8 a.m. and traffic

key as she reads her book, “The A B Seas of Ocean City.” Ringing in the season of giving, Mr. and Mrs. Claus will stop by from 1 to 4 p.m. Visitors can even add an Ocean City twist to their Christmas trees by checking out the nautical ornament-making station. Finally, patrons looking for the perfect gift can take advantage of the museum’s one-day-only holiday sale, with red-tag items marked as 25% off. The local and visiting members of the community are invited to check out the cheerfully decorated museum for this exciting off-season event. For more details, visit https://www.ocmuseum.org/events/holidayopen-house.

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snow Hill offers Ice Rink Hours on Weekends

December 3, 2021

SNOW HILL – The Town of Snow Hill invites all to Sturgis Park for ice skating this month. The ice skating rink, located under the Sturgis Park Pavilion along the Pocomoke River, is open for $5 per hour, which includes skate rental. Upcoming hours of operation include Dec. 3, 5-8 p.m.; Dec. 4, noon-3 p.m.; Dec. 11, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Dec. 12, noon-4 p.m.; Dec. 17, 5-8 p.m.; Dec. 18, noon-3 p.m.; Dec. 22, 6-8 p.m.; and Dec. 27-30, 4-8 p.m. The ice rink was officially opened with last week’s tree lighting ceremony with local businesses participating with Black Friday sales and celebrating the occasion with their own holiday decorations. Last Friday’s event featured musician Nick Haglich and a visit from longtime local Santa, Richard Mills, followed by an invocation and a welcoming speech to the ceremony. Margot & Gabe Resto performed a few holiday songs.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 31

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December 3, 2021

BUSINESS And Real Estate News New Doctor Announced BERLIN – Atlantic General Hospital announced Dr. Christopher Farrell has joined Atlantic General Health System to provide advanced orthopedic care to the lower Eastern Shore. A subspecialist in hip and knee replacement, Farrell has more than 20 DR. years of extensive expe- CHRISTOPHER rience in the field and FARRELL has been board certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery since 2008. Farrell was a fellow in adult reconstruction at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, N.Y., after completing a knee fellowship in adult reconstruction and sports medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital, also in New York. Farrell graduated from Georgetown University Medical School in Washington, D.C., before entering his orthopedic surgery residency at Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, in Rochester, Minn. He joins Dr. M. Sean Hooker in practice at Atlantic General Orthopedic Surgery and will provide surgical procedures at Atlantic General Hospital’s Center for Joint Surgery.

Worcester Rebranding Campaign Honored SNOW HILL – Worcester County Recreation and Parks, Tourism, and Economic Development (RPTED) took home the Best Media Campaign and Best Website Awards at the 40th annual Maryland Tourism & Travel Summit in November. In the midst of a pandemic, RPTED professionals devised and launched a complete rebranding of these recently consolidated departments. This fully-integrated campaign was completed in just over a year and includes a media, marketing, and PR campaign, Welcome to Maryland's Coast – Worcester County. This rebranding won the Best Media Campaign Award. “We initiated a strategic planning and branding process to strengthen the county’s identity and integrate destination marketing and business attraction/retention,” Tourism and Economic Development Director Melanie Pursel said. “Despite a nationwide quarantine that shuttered travel and restricted business, the team moved forward and developed Maryland’s Coast…Naturally Cool. With the official brand launch in October of 2020, the real work began. All of the television, radio, outdoor, print, and web needed to be completely updated with the new brand. We are still expanding to other parts of our county, truly embodying the Live, Work, Play concept!” Under the umbrella of RPTED,

county staff also created a new website, which won the Best Website Award. This site redirects visitors to each of the three RPTED sites. These are 'Visit' to the tourism website, 'Choose' to the economic development website, or 'Play' to the recreation and parks website.” “This web address encourages people to learn more about Maryland's Coast, the only place in Maryland where the ocean meets the land,” Pursel said. In addition to providing visitors with people, places, activities, and events of interest, the sites are important tools for county staff. For example, the tourism website alone provides analytic reports that identify the number of visitors who are viewing the new website. During May 2021 there were over 8,300 visits, with over 15,700 views. Also accompanying the new website and newly-branded Visitor’s Guide is a new Go Coastal app.

Local Restaurant Group Co-Founder Will Retire OCEAN CITY – Off the Hook Restaurant Group announced this week Kevin Frey, co-founder and owner of Off The Hook, Just Hooked, Tailchasers, Hooked, and Hooked Up Raw Bar & Ale House as well as Taste Events, has announced his retirement. Co-Founder and business partner Steve Hagen will move into his new role as owner/operator upon Frey’s retirement on Dec. 1. “We want to thank Kevin for his many years of outstanding service and commitment to Off The Hook Restaurant Group,” said Hagen. “His stewardship and passion for our brands have earned him the trust and respect of each and every one of our employees and has left an indelible imprint on this Company. We wish him all the best in his well-deserved retirement.” Off The Hook Restaurant Group was founded in 2010 and has grown its portfolio to include five restaurants (Off The Hook, Just Hooked, Hooked, Tailchasers and Hooked Up) and a catering company (Taste Events). The mission is to serve the local community of Delmarva with “Farm to Table” dining in a high service, creative and comfortable atmosphere. Frey and Hagen built these companies from scratch with sheer determination and a tremendous amount of hard work from their employees and associates. “It has been my honor and privilege to work with our dedicated and passionate team for the past 10 years,” said Frey. “Now is the appropriate time for me to retire from Off The Hook Restaurant Group and for Steve to drive the company into the future. We have built five strong concepts and I am so proud SEE NEXT PAGE


December 3, 2021

... BUSINESS NEWS of the culture and quality people that make our restaurant group exceptional. I would like to acknowledge the hard work and dedication that we have received from our employees, both past and present. I have tremendous respect for Steve and I am confident that he will lead Off Hook Group to new heights for our teams and our guests.” Business will continue as usual at all locations.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch man for West Windsor Plainsboro Regional School District in New Jersey. He earned certification as an educational facilities manager from Rutgers University and as a stationary engineer from the State of Maryland. As superintendent, Hutchinson is directly responsible for planning, directing, and administering the day-to-day operations for the Maintenance and Mosquito Control Divisions. He also supervises and directs the overall management of the maintenance and repair activities for Worcester County facilities and grounds.

Hospital Earns Recognition Superintendent Named SNOW HILL – The Worcester County Commissioners appointed Michael Hutchinson as the new superintendent within the Maintenance Division of Public Works. “Mike is thoroughly familiar with Worcester County’s facilities,” Public Works Director Dallas Baker said. “His knowledge of building maintenance management and attention to detail make him the perfect choice as the new superintendent.” Hutchinson, who joined Worcester County Government (WCG) as the maintenance superMICHAEL visor in 2013, brings 29 HUTCHINSON years of experience in management to his new position. Prior to joining WCG, he served as the HVAC engineer at Wor-Wic Community College and as operations fore-

SALISBURY – TidalHealth Peninsula Regional in Salisbury is one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals for Vascular Surgery, according to new research released by Healthgrades, the leading resource that connects consumers, physicians and health systems. This is the eighth consecutive year that TidalHealth Peninsula Regional has been desig-

nated among America’s 50 Best Hospitals for Vascular Surgery (2015-2022). Additionally, for the sixth consecutive year (2017-2022), TidalHealth Peninsula Regional is in the top 10% of all United States hospitals for overall orthopedic services, and the recipient of the Healthgrades Orthopedic Surgery Excellence Award for the same six-year period. “TidalHealth’s greatest asset is our team of employees, medical staff, and volunteers. Our Healthgrades clinical successes are a direct result of their dedication and devotion to every patient and family member,” said TidalHealth CEO Steven Leonard. Every year, Healthgrades evaluates hospital performance at nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide for 31 of the most common inpatient procedures and conditions. For its analysis, Healthgrades evaluated approximately 45 million Medicare inpatient records for nearly 4,500 short-term acute care hospitals nation-

Page 33 wide to assess hospital performance in 31 common conditions and procedures. Hospitals cannot choose to opt in our out of a Healthgrades performance review. The hospitals that have achieved the Healthgrades America’s Best Hospitals or Clinical Excellence designations have demonstrated exceptional quality of care. “Consumers can feel confident in these hospitals for their commitment to quality care and exceptional outcomes. The recognition helps provide peace of mind when selecting a place for care,” said Brad Bowman, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Head of Data Science at Healthgrades. Additionally, TidalHealth Peninsula Regional earned 13 5-star designations for the care provided to patients. The Healthgrades 5-star ranking indicates those service lines are performing statistically significantly better than their peer services at other U.S. hospitals.


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

People in Society Locals Dave and Colleen Muckel checked out the new Overholt Room at Dry 85 during the grand opening night.

by Jeanette Deskiewicz Featuring Those Helping Causes In The Resort Area

Ocean Pines Chamber President Kerrie Bunting and Administrative Assistance Sherri Lassahn unveiled their new logo at the grand opening ribbon cutting for the Ocean Pines Visitor Center.

Shore United Bank representatives Laurie Tuel, Allison Parcels, and Lynn Hancock had lots of fun during the November OC Chamber Alive After Five held at Alley Oops.

Be sure to buy your gift card raffle chances from the OCVFD Ladies Auxiliary by Dec. 6 with Joanne Wagner, Brenda Parker, and Laura Anderson pictured selling tickets at the OCDC Christmas Carnival.

Volunteering at the OCDC Christmas Carnival were happy elves Lauren Taylor and Katy Durham helping out at the kids activity table.

Alley Oops bartenders Amy Carroll and Brittany Lund took care of the OC Chamber members attending the monthly Alive After Five event in November.

Dressed in their holiday best were Jody Falter and Vicki Barrett at the OCDC Christmas Carnival Candy Shoppe.

The Ocean Pines Visitor Center is also home to Coastal HR Solutions with Coordinator Kristin Staples and Owner Ashley Church celebrating at the ribbon cutting last month.

Just in time for holiday parties, Dry 85 now offers private event space in their new Overholt Room, with mixologist Rese Shambaugh and owner Lisa Bolter treating guests to menu samples during the grand opening.

At the grand opening ribbon cutting for the Ocean Pines Visitor Center were Melanie Pursel and Michele Burke of the Worcester County Office of Economic Development and Tourism.


First Christmas Cake Bake-Off Contest To Benefit LGBT Chamber

December 3, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

WEST OCEAN CITY – A new cake bake-off competition is expected to raise funds and awareness for the Maryland LGBT Chamber of Commerce. On Saturday, Dec. 11, organizers will host the First Annual Christmas Cake Bake-Off for a Cause, a fundraiser to benefit the Maryland LGBT Chamber of Commerce. Held at the Surfside Rooster, the event will feature local bakers participating in a cake competition, as well as a Stocking Raffle and activities for the whole family. “I think this is going to be a really exciting event,” said organizer Samantha Flynn, “and I think it will be a fun day for both our participants and attendees.” Flynn said money raised will be used to support and raise awareness for the chamber. Specifically, the fundraiser will allow the chamber to fully fund a membership for one LGBT+ professional and produce more programs in the community. “They want to create more visibility and awareness here on the Eastern Shore,” she said. Flynn said she met chamber representatives at a recent networking event across the Bay Bridge. That encounter, she noted, led to the creation of the Christmas Cake Bake-Off. “They were telling us how they were pretty new, and that they were trying to make an impact on the entirety of Maryland but didn’t have a lot of representation on the Eastern Shore,” she explained. “I decided to network with them and create ideas to not only bring them visibility to start building their chamber on this side of the bridge, but also be able to create a fundraising event to help support them.” Flynn said the bake-off competition will feature two categories. The cake creation category, she noted, will

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

judge cakes based on their appearance, while a flavor category will judge cakes based on their taste. “It will be regulated under Maryland cottage food laws, so it will be prepackaged and ready to be consumed …,” she said. “They will be able to vote for their favorite flavor and taste the creations.” Flynn added the event will also feature vendors, as well as a Stocking Raffle with prizes from local businesses. Other activities include a photo opportunity with Santa, and a gingerbread cookie decorating event for kids. “People can show up, or they can get pre-registration tickets,” Flynn added. “The event is free to attend, but the tickets just ensure a spot … Space is limited.” Flynn encouraged everyone to attend. She said she hopes to make the bake-off competition an annual fundraiser and grow the chamber’s presence on the Eastern Shore with the introduction of new events. “The chamber creates connections among LGBT+ businesses and government and community entities,” she said, “and creates inclusivity, fairness and prosperity within the community and in the business world.” The First Annual Christmas Cake Bake-Off for a Cause will be held on Saturday, Dec. 11, from 3-6 p.m. For more information, or to register to attend, visit “The First Annual OC Christmas Cake Bake-Off for a Cause” Eventbrite page, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-first-annual-oc-christmas-cake-bake-off-fora-cause-tickets-204124571087?fbcli d=IwAR3RaXvqD8oykT6BvRqzoWKhG9i4PozaVyof8iM8Lt1fvh8H ND1JTDia6E. Organizers are also looking for two more bakers and two more vendors to participate in the event. For more information, email occhristmasbakeoff@gmail.com. “Everyone is excited to be part of this event,” Flynn said.

Page 35

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

COMMUNITY News In Photos

The Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City has been ringing the bell for the Salvation Army's "Red Kettle" Holiday collections. Ever since the first WalMart opened on Route 50 in Berlin, the club has manned kettles. Since the beginning, the club received annual recognition for civic organizations hours worked and/or funds collected. Due to COVID, 2020 was the first year Kiwanis opted out. The club was recently recognized for its 2019 service with 90 hours of bell ringing, earning it the first-place award for civic groups. Pictured, from left, are group chairs Roy Foreman and Candy Foreman, Kiwanis Club President Tim Lund and Kiwanian Tom Southwell. Submitted Photos

The Worcester County Commissioners and members of the Robertson family gathered on the Worcester County Government Center steps to recognize the heroism of public safety personnel from the Maryland State Police Trooper 4 Paramedics, Pocomoke City Volunteer Fire Company, Pocomoke City Emergency Medical Services, Stockton Volunteer Fire Company and Worcester County Emergency Services and Tidal Health and Johns Hopkins medical staff for their multiagency response to rescue one-year-old Jackson who sustained a severe head injury in an ATV accident in Pocomoke in July. Those pictured include, first row, Tidal Health interim Emergency Department Clinical Manager Elizabeth Townsend, mom Kortni, Carter, grandfather Shannon and Jackson Robertson, and MSP Sergeant Sean Thistle; second row, Tidal Health Emergency and Trauma Services Senior Director Angie Brittingham, grandmother Melinda Robertson, PCEMS Director Mike Thornton and PCVFC Chief Dickie Gladding; third row, WCES Director Billy Birch, Commissioners Diana Purnell and Chip Bertino and PCEMS Lead Paramedic Ryan McCready; and, fourth row, Commissioners Josh Nordstrom, Bud Church, Ted Elder and Jim Bunting.

Wicomico Retired School Personnel Association, formerly Wicomico Retired Educational Personnel, collected toys and winter wear for the Salvation Army Holiday Distribution. Pictured are Judy Davis, community service; Nadine Teter, member; Cheryl Kennedy, luncheons; and Stewart Soper, treasurer.

On behalf of Coastal Hospice, Director of Advancement Tammy Patrick received a $1,000 donation from the Ocean City Lions. Pictured, from left, are Lions Club President Scott Stark, Patrick and Past President Mike Hooper.

Lions Club Past District Governor Lion Wayne Benjamin presented the International President's Certificate of Appreciation to Norm and Faye Cathell. They were honored for their work to transition the Berlin and Ocean City Lioness clubs to become certified lions clubs. Benjamin, left, is pictured with Past District Governor Norm Cathell.

Cricket Center Executive Director Wendy Myers and her service dog Josiah spoke at a Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City weekly breakfast meeting. Above, Club President-Elect Bob Wolfing presented a $500 check to Myers as Josiah takes it all in. The Cricket Center provides children and non-offending family members support, crisis intervention, trauma based therapy and medical intervention. It is located at the Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin.


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 37

The Dispatch Classifieds $15/Week for Minimum of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available) Deadline for Insertions, Cancellations & Payment is 3pm Tuesday. Pre-Payment is Required. We Accept All Credit Cards.

HELP WANTED JOHNNYS PIZZA: Now Hiring Driver! Apply within at 56th Street or call 410-726-7061 to apply. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– DENTAL HYGIENIST: Family Dental Practice seeking part time Dental Hygienist. Patient oriented, relaxed atmosphere. Please forward resume to dentistryinthepines@gmail.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Follow Us On Facebook Instragram & Twitter

CARPENTERS & CARPENTERS HELPERS Must have:

Tools, Transportation, Driver’s License Exp. Required! PATTERSON & SONS BUILDERS

Call 410-641-9530

AUTOMOTIVE If you are looking for a change, NOW is the time! We are an automotive business with several parts stores, service centers, and a used car dealership with multiple locations. We are now hiring for PARTS STORE ASSOCIATES for our location in Ocean Pines, Maryland. Great Pay and Benefits including Company Matched Retirement Plan.

Call 302-339-6910 POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES NOW HIRING MITIGATION CREW LEADER Must have relevant experience and clean driving record/ background. Based in the Berlin/OC area. Wage is BOE from $17-$22/hour. We offer paid training, vacation, and personal days, as well as a quality benefits package including health, dental, vision, and life insurance. Benefits after 90 days. Please call us to set up an interview at 410-251-1096.

CLUBHOUSE ATTENDANTS Beautiful community in Ocean View is seeking part-time year round Attendants to work in our clubhouse and fitness areas. Availability to include days, evenings and weekends. Excellent people skills a must! Some computer skills preferred. A perfect position for individuals looking for extra income. Send resume to: susan.brewer@casinc.biz EOE

FULL-TIME PERSONAL BANKER

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

FRONT DESK ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

FUNERAL ASSOCIATE / GROUNDSKEEPER

A beautiful award winning community in Ocean View, DE is seeking a self-motivated, driven, and goal-oriented administrative assistant. Must be organized and possess excellent verbal and written communication skills and be computer proficient in MS Office and have the ability to learn a variety of software programs. Excellent customer service skills are a requirement of the position. Previous experience in working with HOAs preferred but not required. Full-time, year-round, 40 hours/week. Interested candidates should email resume with salary requirements to: Susan.Brewer@casinc.biz or fax 302-537-4075 EOE

The Burbage Funeral Home located in Berlin, MD is looking for several individuals to join our funeral home staff. Some job duties include assisting funeral directors with funeral services, doing removals both during normal business hours and after hours, and maintaining funeral home grounds. Must be willing to work nights and/or weekends and be on call as needed. Also must be able to lift 100 pounds. A valid driver's license is required.

POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES NOW HIRING TRIM CARPENTER & FOREMAN. We offer paid training, vacation, and personal days, as well as a quality benefits package including health, dental, vision, and life insurance. Wage is BOE from $17-$30/hour. Based in the Berlin/OC area. What we require: -Valid Drivers License -Reliable Form of Contact -Background Check -Ability to Pass a Drug Test -Positive Attitude & Willingness to Learn

HELP WANTED

If you feel that you can fill one of these positions, please call us to set up an interview. We can be reached at 410-251-1096.

POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES

CONSERVATION TECHNICIAN/ MARINA TRAVEL LIFT OPERATOR

Position will be responsible for the daily operation and maintenance of the travel lift and forklifts. Duties will include the operation and maintenance of the marine travel lift, proper boat docking and large forklift operation plus daily supervision of the boatyard staff.

Apply online at delawarestatejobs.com

For further assistance, you may contact us by phone at 302.739.5458 or email at jobs@delaware.gov

Send resume to j.weldon@burbagefuneralhome.com

INDIAN RIVER MARINA IS NOW HIRING! •NIGHTWATCH •BOATYARD •MAINTENANCE

Apply Online at delawarestatejobs.com For additional information, please contact the Marina office at 302.227.3071 AA/EOE

Currently Hiring Manpower For:

Carpenter | Laborer | Painters Stucco & EIFS Mechanics Concrete Work o Experience preferred. o Tools, transportation & valid driver’s license are a plus. o Excellent pay and a competitive benefits package available. Please Apply Online: https://www.allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

Or Contact Our Office at 410-352-9800 Work With the Best Ocean City has to Offer ... We Invite You to be a Part of our Family!

Year Round Positions ~SERVERS ~HOSTESS/HOST ~BUSSER ~BANQUET SERVER ~BANQUET HOUSESTAFF ~CATERING ASSISTANT ~DISHWASHER ~ROOM ATTENDANT ~LAUNDRY ~MAINTENANCE

Farmers Bank of Willards has a full-time Personal Banker position available at our West Ocean City location. Looking for professional and motivated individuals with extraordinary customer service skills. Cash handling experience & excellent computer skills a must. Please send resume to 12641 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD 21842 or email: jennie.rice@fbwbank.com Application cut off is 12-13-2021

FAX RESUME & SALARY REQ. to: 410-723-9109 Online at www.clarionoc.com APPLY IN PERSON Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. CLARION RESORT FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL 10100 COASTAL HWY. OCEAN CITY, MD. 21842

“Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirmative Action Employer”

EOE M/F/D/V

TOP WAGES! EXCELLENT BENEFITS! HOUSING AVAILABLE!


Page 38

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

The Dispatch Classifieds

The Dispatch Legal Notices

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

Busy Ocean City Title Company Hiring Clerical Support/Receptionist Staff Person Full Time, Year Round Position. Requires Excellent Communication and Organizational Skills. Email resume to: Helene@Beachsettlements.com ROOMMATES

HOUSING NEEDS

94TH STREET HOUSE: Hot Tub. House in bad shape. Cheap rent or will accept work in lieu of rent. Must love dogs, other pets welcome. Prefer no drug addicts or sociopaths. Pls Call Rob 410-7265200. Best time to call after 4pm. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

SEEKING HOUSING: I am looking for a small apartment in Ocean City, Ocean Pines, or Berlin. Need ASAP. Please call 443-754-7054. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– LOOKING FOR ROOM RENTAL: Short to long term. Quiet, friendly, middle aged contractor, no bad habits. Working in Sussex and Worcester County. 302-470-5216. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

COMMERCIAL STORAGE WEST OCEAN CITY: 2 car garage with attached work room. 775 sqft. Call 410-7260075. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 1 OfficeRetail and 1 Warehouses. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 206 16TH STREET: 1180SF of retail space available. Very busy location (Layton’s Plaza). Was Hairworks for 38 years. Can be office, retail, or hair salon. Landlord will defer rent and help with buildout. Call 202-641-6166. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

FOR SALE ELECTRIC LIFT CHAIR: Burgundy color, cloth, electric lift chair. Barely used. $700, new $1100. Please call 443-519-9731. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

RENTALS

WEEKLY RENTALS Poolfront: $245 Efficiency: $275 2 BR Apartment: $350 3 BR Suite: $425

Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave.

410-289-8581

READY FOR THE HOLIDAYS? DINING ROOM SET FOR SALE Holiday Dinners just around the Corner! Beautiful solid wood dining set. Table seats 8-10 with two leaves. Lighted China Cabinet with glass shelving. (Chairs not incl’d.) Selling because moved & too big for dining area.

Must see! $575. Berlin. 443-880-8885

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Third Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18713 To all persons interested in the estate of DONALD VOID PRICE SR, ESTATE NO. 18713. Notice is given that MIRIAM PRICE, 113 E. FEDERAL STREET, SNOW HILL, MD 21863, was on, NOVEMBER 10, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of DONALD VOID PRICE SR, who died on DECEMER 01, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 10TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 MIRIAM PRICE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County

Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE MARIANNA BATIE, ESQ. 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

PATRICIA ANN KEARNEY Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 DAVID W BAKER ESQ Personal Representative

Third Insertion NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 18945 Notice is given that the CHANCERY COURT of SUSSEX COUNTY, DE, appointed KATHRYN ANN KEARNEY, 1512 FLORA COURT, SILVER SPRING, MD 20910, and PATRICIA ANN KEARNEY, 2610 SPENCER ROAD, ROCKVILLE, MD 20815 as the EXECUTORS of the Estate of WILLIAM ROBERT KEARNEY, who died on FEBRUARY 21, 2021, domiciled in DELAWARE, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is N/A. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 KATHRYN ANN KEARNEY Foreign Personal Representative

BRIAN P. COSBY, ESQ. P.O. BOX 600 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18979 To all persons interested in the estate of EVA N BUNTING, ESTATE NO. 18979. Notice is given that DAVID W BAKER ESQ, P.O. BOX 551, GEORGETOWN, DE 19947, was on, NOVEMBER 12, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of EVA N BUNTING, who died on AUGUST 10, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 12TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion GETZ LAW OFFICE, LLC LISA KUNITZ GETZ, ESQ. 26 S. MAIN STREET BEL AIR, MD 21014 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 18977 Notice is given that the COMMON PLEASE COURT of LEHIGH COUNTY, PA, appointed CHRISTOPHER P GAYLOR, 12822 FORESTVIEW COURT, SYKESVILLE, MD 21784 as the EXECUTOR of the Estate of DONALD H GAYLOR, who died on APRIL 08, 2021, domiciled in PENNSYLVANIA, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is N/A. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 CHRISTOPHER P GAYLOR Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000162 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. DAVID F. FERRERA, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000162 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 11:15 AM the following timeshare intervals:

CONDO UNIT

202 202 202 202 202 202 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 203 204

TIME INTERVAL

39 40 41 43 44 50 4 6 7 8 10 11 13 16 17 36 37 41 42 44 45 48 50 51 1

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County,

Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000169 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. ROWANTO A. MCKNIGH, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000169 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 11:30 AM the following timeshare intervals:

CONDO UNIT

301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 301 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 302 303

TIME INTERVAL

9 10 11 12 13 14 16 19 43 44 45 49 52 3 9 12 15 17 19 29 40 42 43 48 12

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107.

Page 39 Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000176 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. TIMESHARE REDEMPTION, LLC , ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000176 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 11:45 AM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 303 304 304 304 304 304 304 304

TIME INTERVAL

13 14 16 17 18 20 22 30 38 39 40 41 42 43 46 49 50 51 1 3 4 6 8 9 10

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000180 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307


Page 40

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff

dominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records.

OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff

vs.

The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids.

vs. THOMAS PALMER, JR., ET AL. Defendants

STEVEN C. PHOEBUS, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000180 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 12:00 PM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

304 304 304 304 304 304 304 304 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305 305

TIME INTERVAL

12 39 40 42 47 49 50 52 3 4 10 11 16 17 36 37 39 42 45 46 47 49 50 51

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each con-

Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000181 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000181 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 12:15 PM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

305 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 307 307 307 307 307 307 307 307 307 307 307

TIME INTERVAL

52 2 14 16 17 21 33 34 38 41 43 46 50 51 1 2 6 8 14 15 18 32 44 46 48

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and

Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000182 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC.

December 3, 2021 PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. QUINTESSA LASHUAN COPELAND, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000182 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 12:45 PM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

307 307 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 308 309 309 309 309 309 309 309 309

TIME INTERVAL

50 51 4 6 7 9 13 14 16 20 24 36 40 43 44 47 49 2 3 18 19 46 47 48 50

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to

withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Third Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000191 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PO BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. REGINALD W. STALLING, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000191 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on FRI-


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com DAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2021 at 1:00 PM the following timeshare intervals: CONDO UNIT

401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 401 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402

TIME INTERVAL

12 13 16 17 18 31 36 40 45 49 50 51 3 7 8 9 14 15 16 17 18 19 44

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final

ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443.672.8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 19, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 11-19, 11-26, 12-03

Second Insertion ALBERT J.A. YOUNG, ESQ. BROWN, BROWN & YOUNG, P.A. 200 S. MAIN STREET BEL AIR, MD 21014 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 23885 Notice is given that the REGISTER OF WILLS COURT of NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DE, appointed JAMES R. DEARWORTH, JR., 528 MOUNTAIN VIEW ROAD, NAZARETH, PA 18064, and JOHN W. DEARWORTH, 33 S. FORD AVENUE, WILMINGTON, DE 19805, as the EXECUTORS of the Estate of JAMES R. DEARWORTH, who died on OCTOBER 30, 2020, domiciled in DELAWARE, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is ALBERT J.A. YOUNG, whose address is 200 S. MAIN STREET, BEL AIR, MD 21014. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: CECIL COUNTY AND WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the fol-

lowing dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021 JAMES R. DEARWORTH, JR. Foreign Personal Representative JOHN W. DEARWORTH Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-26, 12-03, 12-10

Second Insertion B. RANDALL COATES, ESQ. COATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET PO BOX 293 SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18984 To all persons interested in the estate of MARGARET JEAN TINDLEY, ESTATE NO. 18984. Notice is given that KIMBERLY ANN ROLLEY, 6608 PITCH PINE DRIVE, SNOW HILL, MD 21863, was on, NOVEMBER 16, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARGARET JEAN TINDLEY, who died on OCTOBER 06, 2021, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the

Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 16TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication NOVEMBER 26, 2021 KIMBERLY ANN ROLLEY Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 11-26, 12-03, 12-10

First Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18980 To all persons interested in the estate of STEPHANIE A CHICCA, ESTATE NO. 18980. Notice is given that TRACEY L PARKER, 8517 MARSHALL CREEK ROAD, NEWARK, MD 21841, was on, NOVEMBER 16, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of STEPHANIE A CHICCA, who died on NOVEMBER 04, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or be-

Page 41 fore the 16TH day of MAY, 2022.

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 TRACY L PARKER Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17

First Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18985 To all persons interested in the estate of MARIAN T. CICERO, ESTATE NO. 18985. Notice is given that MARK D. CICERO, 2000 ROSETTA WAY, DAVIDSONVILLE, MD 21035, was on, NOVEMBER 17, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARIAN T. CICERO, who died on SEPTEMBER 08, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 17TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 MARK D. CICERO Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17

First Insertion JOSEPH E. MOORE, ESQ. WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18997 To all persons interested in the estate of MARK D LILJENQUIST, ESTATE NO. 18997. Notice is given that DAVID FLOYD LILJENQUIST, 10722 PINEY ISLAND DRIVE, BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813, was on, NOVEMBER 24, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARK D LILJENQUIST, who died on OCTOBER 15, 2021, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 24TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative


Page 42

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 DAVID FLOYD LILJENQUIST Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17

First Insertion RAYMOND D. COATES JR, ESQ. COATES, COATES & COATES, P.A. 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY SUITE 300 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19002 To all persons interested in the estate of JACK DUNLAP, ESTATE NO. 19002. Notice is given that JOHN JARVIS DUNLAP, 101 PINE STREET, BERLIN, MD 21811, was on, NOVEMBER 30, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JACK DUNLAP, who died on OCTOBER 19, 2021, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 30TH day of MAY, 2022.

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 JOHN JARVIS DUNLAP Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17

First Insertion B. RANDALL COATES, ESQ. COATES, COATES & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET PO BOX 293 SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19003

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 30TH day of MAY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 ANGELA NOELLE TRADER YOST Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17

First Insertion To all persons interested in the estate of MARY KATHERINE TRADER, ESTATE NO. 19003. Notice is given that ANGELA NOELLE TRADER YOST, 1847 UNIONVILLE ROAD, POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, was on, NOVEMBER 30, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARY KATHERINE TRADER, who died on SEPTEMBER 19, 2021, with a will.

SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

COURT, BERLIN, MD 21811, was on NOVEMBER 19, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of RIAL DUNTON LINE, who died on NOVEMBER 05, 2021 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 KAREN LINE RHOADES Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 12-03

ESTATE NO. 18990

First Insertion To all persons interested in the estate of RIAL DUNTON LINE. ESTATE NO. 18990. Notice is given that KAREN LINE RHOADES, 17 BEACH

AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC.

Records.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000145 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff v. ROBERT GLEESON, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES, BERLIN, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000145, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Villas of Ocean Pines, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 11:00 a.m., the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Unit Aj10 Aj10 Aj10 Aj10 Am13 Am13 Am13 Am13 An14 An14 Au21 Au21 Au21 Ay25 Ay25 Bc29 Bc29 Bf32 Bf32 Bf32 Bf32 Bf33 Bg33 Bh34 Bq43

Time Interval 15 9 39 49 3 7 9 11 18 47 8 11 18 10 13 17 48 6 9 14 17 15 52 42 10

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Villas of Ocean Pines Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land

The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-672-8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000196 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff v. EMERGE, INC. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES, BERLIN, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pur-


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch Worcester County, MD 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17

The Dispatch Legal Notices

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com suant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000196, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Villas of Ocean Pines, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 11:15 a.m., the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Time Unit Interval Br44

2

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Villas of Ocean Pines Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against

the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-672-8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000200 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff

Ar18 As19 Bi35 Bj36 Bo41 Bv48 Bz52

38 7 34 4 39 3 15

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Borderlinks I Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids.

v. PAUL COLLINS, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BORDERLINKS I CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000200, the undersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Borderlinks I Condominium, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 11:45 a.m., the following timeshare intervals: Time Condomimium Unit Interval Ae5 Ae5 Ae5 Aq17

14 20 43 15

Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-672-8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000206 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff v. MILTON HELLMAN, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN THE VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES, BERLIN, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000206, the un-

Page 43 dersigned Trustee, will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the Villas of Ocean Pines, located at, 438 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 12:00 p.m., the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Time Unit Interval Bf32 Bg33 Bh34 Bq43 Br44

25 32 17 34 4

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Villas of Ocean Pines Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A

secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2021 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-672-8107. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 03, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 12-03, 12-10, 12-17


Page 44

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

SPORTS Bayside Schools Bring Home State Titles In The News

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – The Bayside South and the Lower Shore enjoyed a strong state high school soccer playoff season with two conference teams bringing home state championships. Bennett won the state 3A Region championship last week, beating C. Milton Wright in the title game. The

game ended in a 0-0 tie, but Bennett won the game and the championship, 4-2, on penalty kicks. Bennett had beaten Stephen Decatur, 3-2, in the regional section championship. Parkside, another Bayside South school, won the state 2A Region championship last week, beating Harford Tech in the title game. Parkside had beaten Kent Island, 5-2, in the regional championship game.

Winterfest Of Lights 5K Run Returns

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The Winterfest of Lights 5K Run returns to Northside Park this week. The annual event will be held on Sunday at 5 p.m. Participants will run the 5K course through the modified Winterfest of Lights displays in the park.

Registration and packet pickup will be held at Bourbon Street on the Beach at 126th Street from 3:30 p.m. until 4:45 p.m. and the race goes off at 5 p.m. The post-run awards will also be held at Bourbon Street on the Bay following the race. Awards will be given to the top overall male and female racers along with the top finishers in the various age groups from 14-under to 70-over.

Barrett Named Conference Player Of Year

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Stephen Decatur’s boys’ varsity soccer team was rewarded for an outstanding fall season with several players named to the All-Bayside South teams including Player of the Year honors for James Barrett. The Seahawks went 11-3 on the season and won their opener in the state 3A-South playoffs before falling to rival Bennett. When the All-Bayside awards were announced last week,

Barrett was named Player of the Year in the conference. Wicomico’s Kory Lowe was named Coach of the Year. Joining Barrett on the All-Bayside South First Team was defender Justin Hicks. Forward Brogan Eastlack, who also served on Decatur’s outstanding varsity football team this season, was named to the All-Bayside South Second Team. Earning Honorable Mentions from Decatur were Miguel Cervantes, Sean O’Halloran, Owen Knerr, Colling Bunting and Gabe Geiser.

Briddell Hits Milestone 1,000th

Snelsire Earns Offensive Player Of Year Honors

: Former Stephen Decatur standout Gary Briddell collected his milestone 1,000th point in an early-season game last month. The senior Seagull achieved the same milestone during his high school career at Decatur. Photo courtesy Joey Gardner

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Stephen Decatur’s varsity football team was well-represented when the Bayside South awards were announced last week including Offensive Player of the Year honors for quarterback Ashten Snelsire. The Seahawks went 8-4 on the season and won two state playoff games before bowing out. Snelsire was outstanding all season and earned Bayside South Offensive Player of the Year honors when the conference awards were doled out last week. Defensive Player of

the Year honors went to Wicomico’s Jayce Freeman. Joining Snelsire on the All-Bayside South First Team were Zimere Handy, Brycen Coleman, Luke Mergott, Luke Scott, Jerry Grant, Marqui Henry, Kresen Muir, Logan Bradshaw and Brogan Eastlack. Earning All-Bayside Second Team honors from Decatur was Daegon Risser. Earning Honorable Mention from Decatur were Caden Shockley, Gavin Solito, Duncan Ely, A.J. Trimble, Khi Reid, Logan Tapman, Mike Rayne, Joe Buxbaum, Henry Brous, Austin Airey, and R.J. Brittingham.

Seahawks Earn All-Conference Honors

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Several Stephen Decatur girls’ varsity soccer players were recognized last week when the Bayside South awards were announced. Named to the All-Bayside South First

Team from Decatur were Mia Kemp and Morgan Sullivan. Named to the All-Bayside South Second Team from Decatur were Jessica Beck, Riley Wilson and Hannah Dang. Earning Honorable Mention from Decatur were Macy Seitz, Malary Andrews, Kayla Rocco, Katelyn King and Keely Catrino.

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December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 45

Things To Do Every Monday: TOPS Meeting 5-6:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Berlin. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support group promoting weight loss and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Call Rose 443-880-8444. Every Friday: Bingo Knights of Columbus will host with doors open at 5 p.m. and bingo beginning promptly at 6:30 p.m. Held at the Columbus Hall at 9901 Coastal Highway, behind St. Luke's Church. Play every game for just $24. Light refreshments available. Call 410524-7994 with any questions.

Every Tuesday: Dancing The Delmarva Hand Dance Club holds dancing at the Selbyville Elks Lodge 2173 from 5:30-9 p.m. delmarvahanddancing.com. Every Wednesday: Bingo Elks Lodge 2645, corner of Sinepuxent Avenue and 138th Street in Ocean City. Has bingo all year. Doors open 4:30 p.m. with first game sharply at 6:30 p.m. Kitchen open for light fare. 410-250-2645.

Dec. 3: iPad Basics From 10 a.m.-noon at the Ocean Pines library branch questions can be answered how to use or set up iPads. Drop in with questions.

Dec. 4: OC Christmas Parade Beginning at 11 a.m. with an extended route from Old Landing Road to 120th Street in the southbound lanes of Coastal Highway. Dec. 4: WPS Holiday Bazaar Worcester Preparatory School will host its 50th Annual Holiday Bazaar on a Saturday this year from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at the school’s field house.

Dec. 4: Sports Cards, Memorabilia Show A Legends Sports Show featuring a sports cards and memorabilia show will be held from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Westside Route 50 Shopping Center next to Hooper’s Crab House. An autograph session with Orioles Hall of Famer Al Bumbry will be held from 2-4 p.m. Later a night of sports talk with featured guests Bruce Laird, Ken Singleton, Al Bumbry and Tom Davis will be held with a dinner buffet. For tickets call Wayne Littleton, 410-723-2842, believeintomorrow.org. Dec. 4: Christmas Bazaar Stevenson United Method Church will host from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. with

vendors, a bake table, vegetable beef soup, pulled pork sandwiches, silent auction and white elephant table.

Dec. 4: Brass Quintet Concert Freeman Arts Pavilion will host a holiday concert with the University of Delaware Brass Quintet at its office. This free performance, which will begin at 3 p.m., will feature a mix of light classics and holiday pops. It will be held on the lawn of the nonprofit’s office, located at the main entrance of the Bayside community. Attendees should bring their own chairs. To register, visit freemanarts.org. Dec. 4: Christmas Concert The Capital Ringers led by Artistic Director Linda Simms, will perform a live free concert at 7 p.m. bringing in the holidays with over 200 bells and hand chimes at the Community Church at Ocean Pines.

Dec. 5: Salisbury Christmas Parade Mountaire Farms presents the 75th Annual event, hosted by the Salisbury Jaycees. Rain date is Sunday, December 12. The event begins at 1 p.m. with local bands, first responders, elected officials and more. The new parade route will start at Poplar Hill Ave. and run west up E. Main Street crossing to W. Main Street and ending at Mill Street. Dec. 5: Symphony Show The Mid-Atlantic Symphony will hold a holiday show at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center at 3 p.m. with doors opening at 2:30 p.m. Proof of vaccine must be shown to attend.

Dec. 5: Museum Open House The Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum will host a Holiday Open House from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The festive event is open to the public, and admission is free. In addition to open tours of the museum, a lineup of holiday activities promises to entertain visitors of all ages. https://www.ocmuseum.org/events /holiday-open-house. Dec. 7: Pearl Harbor Day Salisbury University history professor Dr. Dean Kotslowski will talk about Pearl Harbor on the anniversary of the event. 6 p.m. Zoom. Worcesterlibrary.org.

Dec. 9: Vaccine Clinics COVID-19 vaccination clinics for ages 5 and older will be held Thurs-

days from 4-6 p.m. at the Atlantic Health Center.

Dec. 10: Annual Christmas Concert Stevenson United Methodist Church will host at 6:30 p.m. featuring the church’s handbell choir, praise team and local talent. An offering will be taken for Grace Center for Maternal and Women’s Health.

Dec. 10: Christmas Concert At 7:30 p.m. the Pine Tones Chorus will present their Christmas Concert at Atlantic United Methodist Church in Ocean City, Baltimore Ave. and 4th Street. Classical favorites will be highlighted. The Pine Tones Chorus includes about 40 singers from Ocean Pines, Ocean City and nearby areas. June Todd and Jenny Anderson are the group's co-directors. Guest musicians will include Len Rubin, percussionist, and Tom Baione playing string bass. Admission is free and an offering will be received. After the concert, guests may enjoy refreshments in the church social hall.

Dec. 11: The Polar Express Wear your pajamas to see the movie at Flagship Cinemas. Doors open at 9:30 a.m. with movie beginning at 10 a.m. Concessions will be open. Suggested donation of $5 at the door to benefit Buckingham Elementary PTA.

Dec. 11: Comic Con Returns Held at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center, the convention features an exciting selection of guests and events sure to be a big hit with attendees. Special guests from the worlds of comics, TV, and more will be on hand to meet guests and sign autographs. Along with meeting guests, attendees will have access to anime screenings throughout the day, informative and entertaining panels, video game tournaments, a costume contest with prizes, and over two hundred booths full of geeky goods and independent content creators. Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission charge of $10 (kids under 9 free with paying adult). Dec. 11: Tea With Santa Poplar Hill Mansion’s Tea with Santa will be held from 1-4 p.m. Bring your children or grandchildren to have peppermint tea, punch and a bag of cookies and have a visit and picture taken with Santa and Mrs. Claus. See the house fully decorated for the holiday season with the theme of

The Polar Express. The event is free, but photos with Santa are $5 per mailing address (photos will be mailed after the event) with all proceeds going towards the preservation of Poplar Hill Mansion. Walk-ins welcome. Dec. 11: Desserts with Santa Located at 35606 Mount Hermon Road, Powellville UM Church will host an outdoor event from 5:307:30 p.m. Families are welcome to bring their child for pictures and desserts.

Dec. 11-12: Santa’s Train Wonderland Delmarva Discovery Museum will present from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Enjoy the train displays and decorations throughout the museum. Photos with Santa, who will arrive on the dock of Cypress Park on Dec. 11 at 1 p.m. Dec. 27-29: Bus Trip The 50+ Senior Center in Ocean City at 104 41st Street, is planning an overnight trip to Cape May. Contact Siggy at 410-289-0824 for further information.

Dec. 31: OC NYE Fireworks Promptly at midnight at Northside Park after a walking trail of Winterfest of Lights. Admission fee to Winterfest applies, fireworks free. Jan. 1: New Year’s Day Concert The Ocean City Performing Arts Center will host a brief meet and greet with Ocean City officials followed by a free concert.

Jan. 7: Cash Bingo The Bishopville Volunteer Fire Department Auxiliary will be holding a cash bingo at the main station. Tickets are $30 in advance or $35 at the door. Doors open at 5 p.m. and early birds begin at 5:45. Regular games begin at 7. Twenty regular games, two specials and jackpot. 50/50. Food and beverages available for purchase. Call 619-9229950 to reserve your tickets. Things To Do activities are printed free of charge. To ensure that an event is listed in a timely manner, please submit information as early as possible, since all items will be listed in advance as space permits. Be sure to include the date, name of event, time, location, address and a contact number. Email to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com; fax to 410-641-0966; or mail to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811.


Page 46

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

Chris Parypa’s Photo Of The Week:

Each week staff photographer Chris Parypa is tasked with submitting a photo from his vast library to be featured in this space. Downtown Ocean City is pictured here in a summer file photo. To purchase any of Parypa’s photos, click over to www.chrisparypa.com. This week's Photo of the Week is sponsored by Ørsted, the world leader in clean energy. Learn more at orsted.com/md-de

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December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21 to April 19): Your curiosity might not be appreciated by everyone. Expect some resistance in getting answers to your questions. But stay with it. You need facts in order to make important decisions. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): Some of the mystery surrounding your recent fiscal situation soon will be dispelled with a clear explanation. Use this new knowledge to help you chart a fresh financial course. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): Start your holiday gift-buying now. This will help avoid problems caused by possible mid-December delays. A family member has important information. CANCER (June 21 to July 22): Use a little more sense in how you plan to spend your end-of-the-year holiday dollars. Meanwhile, you continue to gain support for your stand on a workplace issue. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): Wearing that big, loving Lion's heart of yours on your sleeve leaves it unprotected. Let things develop a little more before you allow your emotions to spill over. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): You might feel you're not ready to patch up an unraveled relationship. But the longer you wait, the more difficult it will be for all parties to take the first healing step. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): Your end-of-the-year holiday plans could be disrupted by something out of your

control, but stay the course. Ultimately, things will settle back into a normal pace. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): Your honest approach to a workplace project earns you both respect and credit from those in charge. Meanwhile, that personal problem still needs to be dealt with. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): Money could be a little tight this month. This means the usually bargainoblivious Sagittarian should look for ways to save on end-of-the-year holidays. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): Examine the facts, and you might find that it's a wiser move to shift gears and redirect some of your goals before the end of the year. Someone close to you offers good advice. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): Be careful that your generosity is not abused. Find out more, both about the special favors you might be asked to grant and who is asking for them. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): You've come through a recent rough time in great shape. Congratulations. Now go out and enjoy your well-earned rewards. More good news comes in mid-December. BORN THIS WEEK: You aim for truth, and you usually find it. Your honesty earns you the friendship and respect of others. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

THE DISPATCH Crossword Puzzle

answeRs on Page 58

Page 47

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 48

Things I Like... By Steve Green The last day of Thanksgiving leftovers

vanishing

December 3, 2021

WITH BUNK MANN

Real conversations with my teen

The ice sculptures at Berlin’s tree lighting event Post-game press conferences

My son’s excitement for ringing the church bell Smell of a laundry room Homemade lasagna

Thick hooded sweatshirts

A party with a charcuterie board

Old expressions proved to be true Fresh raw oysters

Fager’s Island was the first bar and restaurant on the bayside in what was then the growing midtown area of Ocean City in 1975. John Fager changed the look of the typical local bar scene by adding large glass windows and a magnificent view of the Assawoman Bay at sunset. He combined good music and fine food with a relaxed Key West-style atmosphere and the rest was history. Over the next several decades, the midtown bayside would grow to host several popular bars and restaurants, but Fager’s was the first. Fager would later add two hotels to his operations as well as launch another successful brand in the Bad Monkey Bar and Grill in Ocean City and West Ocean City. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishinPhoto courtesy of John Fager goc.com.


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Page 50

Elizabeth Sledz Kangas BERLIN – Elizabeth “Betty” Sledz Kangas died at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin on Sunday, Nov. 21 at 81 years old after a brief illness, while struggling with dementia. Born on Feb. 27, 1940, Elizabeth was the daughter of Michael John Sledz and Veronica Sledz, and grew up in Baltimore, Maryland. Elizabeth was a proud graduate of Seton High School, Baltimore, and the former Villa Julie College in Stevenson. An avid reader, Elizabeth was wellknown for her impeccable grammar and handwriting, love of cats and the beach, particularly Ocean City, ability to play the piano beautifully and strong work ethic. She delighted in watching her grandchildren grow up. She was a devout Catholic and was a member of St. Luke’s Ocean City, St. Mark’s Church, Fallston Maryland and St. Ignatius Church, Baltimore, Maryland. Though Elizabeth spent most of her adult life as a resident of Harford County, Maryland, she retired to the DelMarVa beaches to be closer to her grandchildren. She was preceded in her death by her beloved husband of 25 years, Thomas William Kangas (d.1994), dear son, Peter Michael Kangas (d.2021), sister Joan Veronica Rhea (d.1992) and brother Michael J. Sledz Jr. (n.d.) and her parents (n.d.). She is survived by her daughter, Ann Thomas Kangas, and her husband, Frederick Canam, of Bethany Beach, Delaware, her daughter in law, Gwen Humphries Kangas, and her grandchildren, Tommy and Eleni Kangas, all of Frankford, Delaware.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

OBITUARIES A celebration of life will take place at a later date; please contact a family member for more information. Memorial gifts may be made to McDaniel College, the former Western Maryland College, where both of her children went to college: 2 College Hill, Westminster, Md. 21157; https://www.mcdaniel.edu/alumni/giving. Arrangements are in the care of Eastern Shore Cremation and Funeral Service, 504 Franklin Avenue, Berlin, Md. 21811. To send condolences to the family, please visit www.easternshorecremation.com.

Marilyn Guerrieri Levinson FENWICK ISLAND – Marilyn Guerrieri Levinson passed away peacefully at her home in Fenwick Island, Del. on Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2021. Born March 18,1926 to Faye and Michael Guerrieri in Brooklyn, N.Y. she moved to Berlin with her family as a young girl. Marilyn married Marvin Levinson and moved to Salisbury where they raised three daughters, Deborah, Shelley and Beth. She was active in MARILYN Beth Israel Synagogue, GUERRIERI Hadassah, Junior Board LEVINSON and many other charitable organizations. After moving to Fenwick Island, Marilyn continued to be active, and enjoyed

The Lunch Bunch and the Women’s Club of Keenwick. She was full of adventure, spunk and had a great fashion sense. Marilyn and Marvin traveled the world missing very few countries. Most recently in her 90’s Marilyn traveled to Lake Tahoe, Costa Rica and Florida all to celebrate her grandchildren’s weddings. Marilyn’s greatest joy and happiness came from her grandchildren – they could do no wrong. Marilyn is survived by her three daughters, five grandchildren and their spouses, six great-grandchildren, her brother and a sister-in-law, several nieces and nephews. She was pre-deceased by her husband. A private service was held on Nov. 19, 2021. Donations in memory of Marilyn may be made to Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, Del. 19963 or Temple Bat Yam, 11036 Worcester Hwy, Berlin Md. 21811. Arrangements are in the care of Holloway Funeral Home, P.A., 501 Snow Hill Road, Salisbury, Md. 21804. To send condolences to the family, please visit www.hollowayfh.com.

Frances Elizabeth Grafton OCEAN CITY – Beloved aunt, cousin and friend, Frances (Fran) Elizabeth Grafton, age 75, of Ocean City, died peacefully at home, on Nov. 25, 2021, surrounded by her family and friends. The world is diminished without her shining light of love and care for so many. Her family and friends cherish memories of her limitless caring and generosity. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Burlin Alfred and Elizabeth FRANCES ELIZABETH Ceclia (née Hall) Grafton. GRAFTON Fran was predeceased by her parents and her brother, Alfred Burlin Grafton. Fran was a life-long nurse and caretaker, often commenting she was born to be a nurse. After graduating from Eastern High School in 1964, she completed the Catonsville Community College Registered Nursing program, obtaining her registered nurse’s license in 1973. Fran began her long career as a pediatric nurse with The Johns Hopkins Hospital's Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore. She was devoted to the children she served, continuing to commute to Baltimore for her nursing shifts after she moved to Ocean City in 1977. She made the long commute for several years before shifting her focus to support her cousins, Joe and Marie Hall, in their restaurant and hotel businesses in Ocean City. In 1993, she returned to nursing full-time and joined Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin as a pediatric nurse in their outpatient clinic. She retired from Atlantic General in late 2012, after 20 years of service and touching many lives. Fran, true to her word, never truly retired nor slowed down. After leaving Atlantic General, she partnered in 2013 with Drs. Melissa and Glenn Arzadon to establish Arzadon Family Medicine in

December 3, 2021 Ocean Pines. She also continued to support the Hall family businesses until the closure of Hall's Restaurant in 2016. Fran was well-known and well-loved in the community. Wherever she went, she would recognize a child she once treated and immunized, a family for whom she cared, a former Hall’s employee or someone whose life she touched with her generosity of spirit and caring. Fran loved all things Disney, Ocean City, and Coca-Cola. She will be fondly remembered for her Coca-Cola kitchen, her Hummel and Disney collections. The Ocean City scenes in her front bay window were marveled at and enjoyed by friends and tourists alike. Fran leaves her cherished nephews, Darryl (Debra) Grafton of Fenwick Island, Del. and David (Karla) Grafton of Hartford, Conn.; her beloved cousin Catherine (Tony) Hall Devereaux and their daughter, Lilly of Ocean Pines, cousins Jeanne (Henry) Hall Conley of Solomons and Len (Linda) Hall of Ocean Pines; her dearest friend of 70 years, since kindergarten, Nancy Mendez of Ocean Pines; and her closest family friends, the Oberdorfer family of Minneapolis, Minn. She also leaves her greatnephews and great-niece, as well as numerous other family and friends, too many to name. In lieu of services or flowers, donations may be made in Fran's memory to Coastal Hospice, Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company, or The Cricket Center of Worcester County. The Grafton and Hall families are deeply appreciative of and thankful to the many family and friends who banded together to ease Fran's final days. The families extend a special thank you to the teams of caregivers at Tidal Health and Coastal Hospice.

Arleen Linda Pace REISTERSTOWN/BERLIN – Arleen Linda Pace, age 78, passed away on Saturday, Nov. 28, 2021 at Gull Creek Senior Living in Berlin. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of the late Howard and Ruth (Neistadt) Witt. She is survived by her beloved husband, Donald Pace, and children, Robin Thomas, and her children Brandon and Brooke Feuerman and Jake Thomas, and son Jonathan Bloom and his wife Stephanie and their children Colin and Lucas Bloom. Arleen had been a business woman, owning and operating AK Neckwear in Ocean City. She was also renowned for her dedication to the Ocean City Coupon Book. She adored living in Ocean City with her loving husband and two cats, Benji and Baby. A graveside service will be held on Friday, Dec. 3 at 1 p.m. at DuARLEEN laney Valley Memorial Gardens, 200 East Pa- LINDA PACE donia Rd, Timonium, Md. 21093. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, Jan. 23 at 1 p.m. at Temple Bat Yam near Berlin. A donation in her memory may be made to: Alzheimer’s Association, 1850 York Rd. Suite D, Timonium, Md. 21093. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.


Shore Gives More Breaks New Record With $300K Donated

December 3, 2021

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – The seventh annual Shore Gives More campaign raised a record-breaking $300,249 for 117 Lower Shore nonprofits this week. On Tuesday, more than 2,599 donations were made during the seventh annual Shore Gives More campaign. Each year, the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore (CFES) assists nonprofits in Worcester, Wicomico and Somerset counties in their fundraising efforts by providing a 24-hour online donation portal, marketing tools and support to help them reach their goals. The Shore Gives More campaign coincides with Giving Tuesday, a global day of giving that is celebrated each year on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving. “Nonprofits provide critical services to the local community, and fundraisers like Giving Tuesday help charities connect with donors,” said Erica Joseph, CFES president. “Giving Tuesday has become its own holiday in the nonprofit world, and the local generosity really shines a spotlight on how wonderful our local community is.” The Community Foundation launched its first Shore Gives More campaign in 2015 and raised nearly $7,500 in its first year. Since that time, the local fundraising event has grown to include more than 100 participating nonprofits and thousands of donors. Of the 121 organizations participating

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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24-Hour Effort Benefited 117 Charities

in this year’s campaign, Habitat for Humanity of Wicomico County was the top nonprofit with $16,065 raised. “As the area’s leading philanthropic resource, the Community Foundation understands the complexities around charitable giving, and we work hard to simplify the giving process for both donors and nonprofits,” Joseph said. “By giving through the Shore Gives More campaign, donors know their gifts will have an impact close to home.” In Worcester County, local nonprofits raised a total of $93,335, including prizes, according to CFES. The first-place participant, the Worcester County Education Foundation, received $14,435, while the second-place participant, the Art League of Ocean City, received $13,920.

“We are so amazed and thankful for the love and support we received for Giving Tuesday,” the Art League wrote on its Facebook page. “We surpassed our goal of $12,000 with a final total of $13,920. We were also ranked #2 on the leaderboards with the second highest donation amount out of 117 organizations! A huge thank you to all of our donors – we couldn't do it without you!” Other recipients of Tuesday’s Shore Gives More campaign include Diakonia ($12,660), Assateague Island Alliance ($4,460), Lower Shore Land Trust ($3,335) and the Calvin B. Taylor House Museum ($3,290). “We are so thankful that the Berlin community supported us on Giving Tuesday,” said Melissa Reid, president of the

museum board. “The Taylor House Museum believes in the importance of sharing local history, and the community’s support shows they value that as well. We are excited to expand our ability to share the stories of Berlin. And we are looking forward to creating new exhibits for next year.” The campaign received sponsorships from 47 ABC and Shore United Bank, which significantly increased the campaign presence. To learn more about the Shore Gives More Giving Tuesday campaign for local nonprofits, visit cfes.org or ShoreGivesMore.org to view individual nonprofit totals. “We are so thrilled with how this event turned out,” said Victoria Kent, marketing officer for CFES. “It is so fun to cheer on the nonprofits and celebrate their success, knowing how important every dollar raised is to their organization.”

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

WELCOME CHEERLEADERS SUNDAY BRUNCH 9:30a.m.-1p.m. WINTER SPECIALS

Sunday - Early Bird & NFL Specials All Day/Night Monday - Burger & Prime Rib Night Tuesday - Seafood Frenzy Night Wednesday - Mambo Italiano Night Thursday - Shrimp & “Lobsta” Night TUESDAY NIGHT TRIVIA DJ WAX • WEDNESDAYS • 10PM Sunday NFL Specials All Day & Night

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December 3, 2021

Best Beats On The Beach Who’s Where When atlantIC Hotel 410-641-3589 2 north Main st., berlin Mondays: Earl Beardsley

buxy’s salty Dog/ Dry DoCk 28 410-289-0973 28th st. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, Dec. 3: TBA

CaPtaIn’s table 410-289-7192 15th st. & baltimore ave. In the Courtyard Marriott Fridays: Phil Perdue CoIns Pub 410-289-3100 28th st. Plaza on Coastal Hwy. Wednesdays: DJ Wax

CrabCake FaCtory baysIDe 302-988-5000 37314 lighthouse rd., rte. 54 selbyville, De Friday, Dec. 3: Lost & Found Wednesday, Dec. 8: Brian Bishop Crawl street tavern 443-373-2756 wicomico st. Downtown o.C. Friday, Dec. 3: Shots Fired Saturday, Dec. 4: Fuzzbox Piranha Sunday, Dec. 5: Karoake with Jeremy

Dj robCee Fager’s Island: Friday, Dec. 3

beats by wax Pickles Pub: tuesdays & thursdays Coins Pub: wednesdays

Dj bIgler greene turtle west: sunday, Dec. 5

beats by styler Pickles Pub: Fridays, sundays, Mondays & wednesdays

Dj bIlly t Harborside: Friday, Dec. 3 saturday, Dec. 4 sunday, Dec. 5 thursday, Dec. 9

Dj tuFF seacrets: Friday, Dec. 3 saturday, Dec. 4

Cork bar Saturday, Dec. 4: Chris Burell

Fager’s IslanD 410-524-5500 60th st. In the bay Friday, Dec. 3: DJ Greg, DJ RobCee Saturday, Dec. 4: DJ Greg, DJ Hook Monday, Dec. 6: Bryan Clark

greene turtle nortH 410-723-2120 116th st. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, Dec. 3: TBA

Dj jereMy Crawl street tavern sunday, Dec. 5

bryan Clark Fager’s Island Monday, Dec. 6


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 53

Who’s Where When

FUZZBOX PIRANHA Crawl St. Tavern: Saturday, Dec. 4

ON THE EDGE Ocean Club/Clarion: Friday & Saturday, Dec. 3 & 4

HARBORSIDE 410-213-1846 South Harbor Rd., West O.C. Friday, Dec. 3: DJ Billy T Saturday, Dec. 4: Rogue Citizens, DJ Billy T Sunday, Dec. 5: Opposite Directions, DJ Billy T Thursday, Dec. 9: DJ Billy T OCEAN CLUB 410-524-3535 10100 Coastal Hwy. In The Clarion Hotel Friday & Saturday, Nov. Dec. 3 & 4: On The Edge

NOWHERE SLOW Seacrets: Friday, Dec. 3

THE DUNEHOUNDS Pickles Pub: Saturday, Dec. 4

OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS Harborside: Sunday, Dec. 5 Seacrets: Thursday, Dec. 9

FULL CIRCLE DUO Seacrets: Friday, Dec. 3

LOST & FOUND Crabcake Factory Bayside: Friday, Dec. 3

SHOTS FIRED Crawl St. Tavern: Friday, Dec. 3

PICKLES PUB 410-289-4891 8th St. & Philadelphia Ave. Friday, Dec. 3: Beats By Styler Saturday, Dec. 4: The Dunehounds Sunday, Dec. 5: Beats By Styler Mondays: Beats By Styler Tuesdays: Beats By Wax Wednesdays: Beats By Styler Thursdays: Beats By Wax SEACRETS 410-524-4900 49th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, Dec. 3: Full Circle Duo, DJ Tuff, Nowhere Slow Saturday, Dec. 4: DJ Cruz, DJ Tuff, Triple Rail Turn, Kono Nation Thursday, Dec. 9: Opposite Directions, DJ Cruz


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

December 3, 2021

STUDENTS In The News

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, Beverley Thompson’s Kindergarten class at Ocean City Elementary has been discussing thankfulness. Some of the things the students are thankful for include, family, friends, pets and the earth. Pictured are Georgia Horner. Vivienne Oladeji, Grace Vornicu, and Michael Pappas-Newhouse. Submitted Photos

Earlier this year, local artist Laura Jenkins visited Worcester Preparatory School to give a two-day Plein Air presentation for the fifth grade. She returned on Oct. 25 to help students create a watercolor painting of their own in WPS’s garden. Students pictured, front from left, are Vivian Spraul, Reed Grinestaff, Kaylin Zervakos, Artemiy Klimins, Emery Hammonds, Hannah Coyle and Samuel Poffenberger; middle row, Caroline Burbage, Zane Freih, Ella Conev, Kylee Hutton, Brax Giardina, Londyn Davy and Remy Leverage-Frye; and, back, Lower School Art Teacher Rebecca Tittermary, Sophia Mealy, Samuel Hafeli, Collin Hastings, Soren Poulsen and Jenkins. Below, Spraul, Zervakos and Hastings find the right color matches for their paintings.

Verena Chase with Assateague Coastal Trust’s Coast Kids program recently visited Lindsey MacWha’s sixth grade science class to present “What’s in the Water”. During the program students learned about point and non-point sources of water pollution, and how to perform basic water quality measurements. Pictured, from left, are Samantha Kuon, Eva Tekmen, Lily Lenhard, Lexi Davis, John Lynch, Arianna Dorfler, Noa Bouzaglo, Brooke Moore, Chase, Elena Gjoni, Vivien Ruggerio, Blair Moore, Nora Gorfinkel, Rani Yonker, Scarlett Shimko and MacWha.

Berlin Intermediate sixth grade students Ashton Conley and Stella Chester are creating expressive self-portraits using contour drawing and analogous colors.

Worcester Preparatory School’s third grade finished painting globe pumpkins as part of a term-long lesson in learning the concepts of maps and globes. Students learned how to read a map key, look for a compass, and identify different types of maps. To go along with the Halloween season, the globes were crafted out of pumpkins after students mastered identifying the seven continents, five oceans, equator and hemispheres. Students pictured with teacher Annie Seipp are Olivia Mason, Colt Duffie, Allen Martikyan, Mason Gerner, Tehal Pillai, Gavin Dennis, Bryan Anderson, Soloman Prosser, Eli Parker and Allie Kuon.


New 7-Eleven Store On Route 50 Denied Beer, Wine License

December 3, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – A request from the 7Eleven outside Berlin to sell beer and wine was denied by the county’s licensing board. The Worcester County Board of License Commissioners (BLC) voted unanimously to deny a request for a beer and wine license from 7-Eleven. Board members didn’t agree with applicant Mustafa Nawaz’s assertions that his wasn’t a chain store. “This business is run, financed and driven by 7-Eleven,” BLC member Charles Nichols said. Under the statute that governs alcoholic beverage licenses, the board is not allowed to issue licenses to chain stores. A 1979 legal decision, however, complicat-

City Reviewing Single Project Bid BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – In somewhat of a break from policy, resort officials this week acknowledged the lone bid for a bulkhead replacement project along the bay at 4th Street. The Mayor and Council had before them a bid opening for the repair and replacement of the town-owned bulkhead along the bay at 4th Street and Chicago Avenue. When City Manager Doug Miller and Council Secretary Tony DeLuca got to the podium in the council chambers, there was only one bid to open. Typically, if there is only a single bid for a capital project, the council rejects the bid and re-advertises the project for a second bidding cycle. “We did only receive one bid for this project,” City Engineer Terry McGean said. “It was advertised extensively. We did have a good turnout at the pre-bid meeting.” McGean explained the lone bid was from a reputable firm, Murtech, with whom the town has contracted extensively in the past. Despite the town’s informal policy on opening single bids for projects, McGean recommended moving forward with bid opening on Tuesday. “My recommendation would be to open the single bid,” he said. “If Murtech is unable to do this within budget, I’m going to have to redesign the project and the scope wouldn’t change substantially. It’s not like they would have a competitive advantage if it was rebid.” The failing bulkhead at 4th Street and Chicago Avenue was listed as a “critical” project in the fiscal year 2022 capital improvement plan approved earlier this year. It was budgeted at $450,000. Breaking from policy, the council voted to open the single bid from Murtech, which came in at $451,647. The council voted unanimously to acknowledge the lone bid for the 4th Street bulkhead project and remanded it to staff for further review and a recommendation.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ed the issue, and in the ensuing years several chain stores in Worcester County were able to get licenses. When Wawa sought a license to sell beer and wine around 2000, however, the board denied the request. When Wawa challenged that determination because various local chain stores sold beer and wine, the board acknowledged its mistake. Rather than have the board revoke those stores’ licenses, the state legislature grandfathered them in. Nawaz, who wants his 7-Eleven to be competitive with other stores in the area selling beer and wine, approached the board this week seeking a license. Hugh Cropper, attorney representing Nawaz, argued his client was an independent contractor. While there are corporateowned 7-Elevens, this isn’t one. Cropper said Nawaz was the one who hired and fired staff, paid them, trained them. He said the only things Nawaz’s agreement with 7-Eleven provided were the ability to use the trademark and the lease of the store. Tom Coates, the board’s attorney, questioned the franchise agreement. Nawaz confirmed the franchise fee would change if the store was issued a beer and wine license. Coates also brought up the fact the store was labeled with 7-Eleven signs and employees wore 7-Eleven uniforms. When Coates asked if 7-Eleven was allowed to inspect Nawaz’s store and audit it, Nawaz confirmed that the company was able to do so. Cropper said that many of the issues

Coates brought up were in any landlordtenant agreement. He stressed that if the store got a beer and wine license, 7-Eleven would get a higher rent but the rent would remain the same whether the store made $500 in beer sales or $5 million in beer sales. He said that regardless of previous court opinions, the board was governed by the statute. “You have to make your own determination,” he said. “It’s your interpretation.” BLC member Marty Pusey said she was having difficulty understanding Nawaz’s position because it looked like 7Eleven had a lot of control over the business.

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“It appears 7-Eleven has their hands on every aspect,” she said. Nawaz maintained he was an independent contractor and only wanted to be able to sell beer and wine as other area convenience stores did. “I’m the one financially responsible at the store,” he said. William Esham, chairman of the board, said that nevertheless 7-Eleven controlled how he operated the business. The board voted 3-0 to deny the request. Nichols said he considered the 7-Eleven a chain store. “They have a pecuniary interest in my view,” he said.

Your Source For Moldings


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Shore Gives More’s Growth Impressive The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 WEBSITES: www.mdcoastdispatch.com www.facebook.com/thedispatchoc J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

December 3, 2021

How We See It

It was a busy week of solicitations, starting on Black Friday, then Cyber Monday and finally Giving Tuesday. Though the commerce marketing was too robust to tabulate, more than 100 specific requests came into our inbox or through the mail on Giving Tuesday asking for donations to various causes, each of which have their own merits in serving different facets of the community. Over the last nine years, Giving Tuesday has grown into a billion dollar-plus day national program. In fact, it was estimated in 2020 more than $2.47 billion was given nationwide to local charities from more than 34 million people and businesses.

Locally, the Shore Gives More campaign serves as the primary Giving Tuesday giving effort – led by the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore (CFES) -- as most nonprofits are associated in some fashion with the campaign. The Shore Gives More effort has grown by more than 4,000% in seven years, starting at $7,500 in 2015 and this year raising in excess of $300,249 over 24 hours. Last year the event raised $269,627, representing an 11% singleyear increase. Under the Shore Gives More umbrella were 121 organizations. The top nonprofit recipient of donations this year was the Habitat for Humanity of Wicomico County with $16,065. In Worcester

County, local nonprofits raised a total of $93,335 with the Worcester County Education Foundation – the fundraising arm of the school system -- receiving $14,435 and the second-place participant, the Art League of Ocean City, gathering $13,920. The fundraising effort spearheaded by CFES continues to impress each year with its growth. The coordination, marketing and organization behind the campaign facilitates contributions to the various charities in a timely fashion. While the dollars are significant and will help them carryout their respective missions, the outreach and exposure the effort provides to local charities is immeasurable.

Letters To The Editor

NEWS DEPARTMENT SHAWN J. SOPER Managing Editor ssoper@mdcoastdispatch.com

CHARLENE SHARPE Staff Writer/Copy Editor csharpe@mdcoastdispatch.com

BETHANY HOOPER Staff Writer bhooper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHRIS PARYPA Photographer

SALES DEPARTMENT TERRI FRENCH Account Executive Entertainment Editor terri@mdcoastdispatch.com

JEANETTE DESKIEWICZ Account Executive jeanette@mdcoastdispatch.com

ART DEPARTMENT COLE GIBSON Art Director cole@mdcoastdispatch.com

DAVID HOOKS Graphic Artist/Webmaster dhooks@mdcoastdispatch.com

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OP Geese Not A Nuisance Editor: Euthanasia – the wrong word, a wrong choice. Reading today about the latest developments relating to wild geese in Ocean Pines, I am disheartened in a way I hoped I would never be again. A page 6 story in the Ocean Pines Progress newspaper discusses the abandonment of a special turf option used to discourage growth of wild geese populations and notes that other options could include increased shrubbery around ponds and “the one that no one likes, euthanasia.” Euthanasia? What a gross misnomer for the slaughter of innocent wild animals, living in bonded pairs, raising families of young, all so beautiful and graceful to see in this community originally built on wetlands that provided a natural home for such noble and impressive creatures. I still get a sick feeling when I recall the shock of the surprise overnight netting and gassing of hundreds of geese here a few years ago. An operation that was planned in secret by the so-called Environment and Natural Assets Committee and some leaders in the Ocean Pines Association, this cruel travesty created widespread outrage among many residents. Euthanasia is a term used to describe the merciful ending of life in patients human and animal that have agonizing and incurable conditions. Nowhere in the numerous dictionary definitions does one find usage to denote the killing of helpless creatures for human sanitary or convenience reasons. Instead of considering the horrible slaughter of hundreds of geese (again!) or trying various costly (and often ineffective) methods to reduce their number and the droppings they create – why not learn to co-exist and simply invest in methods of cleaning up after them?

Hire a daily or weekly cleanup crew for paths and walkways, maybe the pond shorelines too. Post signs warning people to watch where they walk. Perhaps create a few stations with small cans, wipes and plastic bags, as are used for dogs. Any or all of these measures could be implemented at reasonable cost. I love seeing the beauty of all the geese in Ocean Pines, daily watching them grow, along with the other wildlife that exists here. I am saddened by people who see the geese only as a nuisance and completely miss the point of the natural calming effect they can have on our minds and souls. Besides, the geese were here first. Susan Koski-Grafer Ocean Pines

Poor Road Work Planning Editor: (The following was sent to Maryland State Highway Administration) I live off Route 50 in Berlin at Seahawk Road. On several occasions the main intersection near us -- adjacent to Stephen Decatur High School -- has been blocked during the morning weekday rush hours, making it impossible to get to Route 50 East without driving into the highly congested area around downtown Berlin. Additionally, on the morning of Wednesday, Dec. 1, my wife and I had a 9:30 a.m. meeting in Ocean City. The roads were so backed up with traffic due to the repairs to Route 50 East near Walmart that it took us nearly an hour to get to Ocean City, where we almost missed our meeting. I can't imagine the problems this caused for those trying to get to Ocean City for work. To me, the planning of this work was pretty poor. It is not a high traffic season for Ocean City, so I can't see why this work cannot be done in the early afternoon when traffic is considerably lighter.

Also, I can't see why the entire Route 50 paving project has been going on for more than a month. I would appreciate an answer to my email. Bob Faszczewski Berlin

Good Samaritan Help Editor: I work at TidalHealth Cardiology North in Berlin and in a world where we all need some uplifting, my faith in mankind was restored today. A quite elderly patient coming in to our office today, had some car issues and a gentleman by the name of Will Manuel who owns Willow’s Concrete and Landscaping stopped on his way while taking his child to Buckingham Elementary School to assist our patient. Not only did he assist her and make sure that she arrived safely to our office, without being asked proceeded to drop his child off at school & stop back by our office to make sure that the patient could get home safely. He offered to drive her car to her house in Selbyville, followed by an employee who transported him back to his car at our office. Mr. Manuel you were a guardian angel to our patient that day and I cannot thank you enough. What a beautiful thing to teach your child – kindness to strangers. Your graciousness was above and beyond and you are a shining example to your child. May he and his family have a blessed holiday season. Donna Stigler Bishopville

Governor’s Missteps Editor: Over the past few months, Governor Hogan has been one of the loudest detractors of the Build Back Better Bill, including a social media campaign and a press tour involving an appearance on CNN’s State Of The Union. SEE NEXT PAGE


December 3, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Letters To The Editor Through these events, Governor Hogan has spent his interviews ranting about the Congressional Progressive Caucus and the Build Back Better Bill as “far-left.” After watching his interviews and following his social media campaign, I am very curious to see what part of the Build Back Better Agenda our governor finds as “far-left” and what exactly he opposes in the bill. Does Governor Hogan view universal preschool for 3- and 4-year-olds and affordable childcare as “far-left”? Even though the rest of the industrialized world already has universal pre-k and affordable childcare for their residents. Does Governor Hogan view four weeks of paid family and medical leave as “farleft”? Does Governor Hogan view taking action to address Climate Change like creating a Civilian Climate Corps that will create 300,000 green jobs in communities most impacted by climate change as “far-left”? Does Governor Hogan view Medicare expansion that will add coverage of hearing services to Medicare and improve access to home care for seniors and disabled Americans as “far-left”? Does our Governor oppose our seniors having hearing and home care? Does Governor Hogan view lowering the cost of Insulin from $600 to capping the price at $35 as “far-left”? Does Governor Hogan view funding to construct one million new and improved affordable housing units and housing vouchers to end the housing crisis as “far-left? Does Governor Hogan view the Monthly Child Tax Credit that cuts child poverty in this country in half as “far-left”? Does Governor Hogan view strengthened labor protections for workers as “far-left”? Instead of endlessly pandering to set up a vanity run for the US Senate or Presidency in 2024 that we all know will fail, Governor Hogan should do two things. The first of those things is to tell us what is so “radical” and what he opposes in the Build Back Better Bill. The second is for him to focus on the job he was elected to do here in Maryland instead of playing dress-up as a federal elected official that he clearly isn’t. Jared Schablein Pittsville (The writer is the chair of the Lower Shore Progressive Caucus.)

Redraw First District Editor: (The following letter was addressed to Maryland House of Delegates Speaker Adrienne Jones and Senate President Bill Ferguson.) We, the undersigned organizations, write to you today to express our support for a new Congressional map that restores balance to Maryland’s First District, and protects our democracy from radicals who would overturn the will of the voters for political gain. We urge you to use your power to create a competitive First District where anti-democratic extremists are not immune to accountability from the voters.

For over a decade, the First District has been represented by Congressman Andy Harris, an extremist who has shown himself to be a danger to democracy. His actions leading up to — and after — the insurrection on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 were inexcusable. Congressman Harris voted against the certification of several states that President Biden fairly won, helped stoke the violence that led to the attack, and has tried to minimize and cover up what happened that day. Harris even voted against giving the Congressional Gold Medal to the Capitol Police officers that saved his life. The First District did not always breed this kind of extremism. But after the last redistricting process in 2011, when the state legislature created a sprawling district that spans from Carroll County to Ocean City, Andy Harris was elected and subsequently shielded by the district’s partisan makeup from any semblance of accountability. This time around, we are calling on you to return the First District to the shape it held for the two decades that Wayne Gilchrest represented the district — a district based on the Eastern Shore with the inclusion of the Annapolis area, a region that has far more in common with the shore than areas north and west of Baltimore on the Pennsylvania border. The decision you make during the special legislative session in December is not just about the next election. It is about how communities are represented for the next 10 years, and it is about protecting our democracy. Had Andy Harris had his way in January, our country would have been thrown into a constitutional crisis the likes of which we have never seen, all because he refused to accept the will of the American people. The 2024 election could bring a similar battle, and in order to save our republic, we must ensure voters have the power to unseat dangerous members like Andy Harris. We are writing today because we would hate to look back with regret that we did not do more to save our democracy. At the end of the Constitutional Convention, Benjamin Franklin is said to have answered when asked what form of government we agreed to, “a republic, if you can keep it.” We hope we are able to look back at this time with pride that the state legislature did its job, and took action to keep our republic. Anne Arundel County Democratic Central Committee, Citizens Redistricting a Better Maryland (CRAB MD), D33 (Anne Arundel County) Democratic Club, Decency for District One, Democratic Club of Caroline County, Democratic Club of Kent County, Democratic Club of Queen Anne's County, Democratic Club of Wicomico County, Democratic Women's Club of Worcester County, Dorchester Democratic Club, Indivisible Worcester MD, Lower Shore Progressive Caucus, Our Revolution Baltimore City/County and NAACP Talbot County Branch.

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Between The Lines by Publisher/Editor Steve Green The conversation about masking in public schools at this week’s Maryland State Board of Education meeting was reflective of the general sentiments of society today. Nobody wants to wear a mask but currently they are needed until the protocols established by the authoritative bodies – like Maryland Department of Health and OSHA – are relaxed further. In the case of schools currently, students wearing a mask deemed a close contact to a positive student will not have to quarantine so long as they remain asymptomatic and submit to testing. If the same student was not wearing a mask next to a positive, he or she would currently need to quarantine, no matter of vaccination status, testing or symptoms. The mask is more important than vaccination and testing. This topic and many others were discussed at length this week at the Maryland State Board of Education meeting. In a 12-2 vote, the state board ordered the Maryland State Department of Education to create an emergency regulation to draft masking “off ramps” for state public schools. MSDE Superintendent Mohammed Choudhury said, “We can’t mask our children forever … I believe we can update our regs in a way that provides an off ramp for our communities based on where they are with vaccination rates … very important in all this is no single school should have to close because of COVID and quarantine should continue to be minimized. I don’t want to compromise on those as we move forward … The goal is create an off ramp.” Once the state department presents the regulations, the board will vote on the changes at a future meeting. If the emergency regulations are reviewed and approved, the local jurisdictions will then be able to opt out of the state mandate under the outlined guidelines, which will likely be linked in some shape to vaccination rates, frequent rapid tests and local transmission rates at the time. The state’s masking mandate for schools expires in February. Until the regulations are reviewed and approved, the state’s mask mandate continues for now. For the board’s edification, Choudhury reviewed a couple other states’ approaches to relaxing existing masking rules. He said Nevada is using the CDC transmission metric where any jurisdiction lower than “substantial” transmission spread can lift the mask mandate. For what it’s worth, in Maryland as of Nov. 30, there are no jurisdictions below substantial. Thirteen jurisdictions are classified as high (like Wicomico), while 11 are substantial (including Worcester). Additionally, he said Massachusetts is tying an easing of masking to vaccination rates of individual schools. He said schools with an 80% vaccination rate of staff and students can choose to lift masks if they choose in that northeast state. Anyone not vaccinated would need to mask in all efforts to ease mask requirements. Though there is much work to be done by education and health officials, there does appear to be a consensus to provide opportunities for local school systems to return to optional masking. The key is going to be what baseline metrics will be used to determine eligibility. High vaccination rates seem to be a certain requirement. On the subject of local control, School Board President Clarence Crawford said, “I have no problem with local control but there needs to be a match of local control with accountability and responsibility. I am all in favor local control. I don’t think anyone wants face coverings … but sometimes in leadership you have to do what is necessary, not what you would like to do.” My take is I don’t want my kids to wear facial coverings to school. However, I am more concerned about close contact quarantine time periods. Virtual learning and missing in-person school time upsets me more than asking children to wear masks. The state school system must convince health officials to lessen the importance of masks and place more stock in vaccination and testing. Government has always competed with private enterprise on staffing, especially so in Ocean City where there are thousands of low-paying seasonal jobs at businesses and in the public sector. It’s why Ocean City’s decision to increase base wages is not big news. In fact, it’s the obvious and only reaction to staffing woes of recent seasons. The only matter making it news is it will cost the city about $800,000 a year to increase these starting hourly rates to the $15 an hour minimum wage and other salary table adjustments. The city’s move will not likely have a huge impact on hiring next summer. Most private businesses are already offering far above the $15/hour minimum wage rate for lower level employees. It was common to see restaurants offering $18 to $20 an hour for dishwashers last summer. One hotel advertised last summer it would pay housekeepers $20 per hour and give a $1,000 bonus to those staying until Sept. 1 and more for Oct. 1. These sorts of creative offers confirmed the desperation. Many local business owners have been working on competitive packages to offer prospective employees in the spring to try and lock in staff early before the season. One package I saw this week was geared toward college-age applicants, offering a signing bonus for a mid-April commitment, a mid-season bonus and a late season retention perk involving funding the fuel needed to travel to and from college.


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

T

Puzzle Answers

December 3, 2021

The Adventures of Fatherhood

by Steve Green

PUZZLE ON PAGE 47

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his is Thanksgiving. The 13-year-old walks around a huge buffet featuring a variety of food. Like most Thanksgiving spreads, there is an abundance of food with too many offerings. He’s first in line because he’s starving. He sits down with two pieces of ham, some broccoli, three rolls and an orange Gatorade. Though trying to sneak bites (a roll disappeared on the walk back to the table), he waits for the blessing before diving in. He then wolfs down the small sampling of food on his big plate and pulls a stool up behind me as I eat because he prefers the “adult table” conversation. He maintains he’s full but he’s not. He just doesn’t like turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, deviled eggs, macaroni and cheese, sweet potato biscuits and “all the other stuff I don’t recognize.” Later when it comes to dessert he says he doesn’t like pie (or more accurately will not try) even one featuring chocolate and peanut butter, two of his favorites. Beckett likes vanilla milkshakes but not vanilla ice cream until he realizes there is chocolate syrup in the cupboard to add to it. A couple hours later, he asked what was for dinner, hoping it was barbecue sandwiches. As I was still at the uncomfortably full stage of post-Thanksgiving, I pointed out where he could find what he wanted. Since I never heard the microwave, I am guessing he opted for cookies for dinner. On the opposite extreme was Carson, who Pam spoils when it comes to food in a good way. Because he doesn’t eat dairy or gluten, she takes great care to ensure he’s not left out of all the Thanksgiving staples. He loves turkey, ham and deviled eggs so he was good to go on the main courses. However, she also made him dairy-free sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes and macaroni and cheese as his sides. He was so

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well taken care of he almost ate as much as I did. When it came for desserts, Pam got him his very own strawberry pie with gluten-free crust. He was blessed with an amazingly caring mom. Carson even likes leftovers. When Beckett came down for dinner the next night, his body language confirmed his disappointment when he saw a spread of Tupperware leftovers. His mood changed when he saw a plate of barbecue made for his dinner.

O

ur first foray into smash turkeys was interesting. Pam picked up six of these hollow chocolate delights from Dolle’s before Thanksgiving. The concept is you melt some of the provided chocolate and use it to help dress up your turkey with candy decorations, candy corns and other edible fun. After you have finished your creation, the idea is you smash it with the given mallet and then eat it. We thought it would be fun for the kids on Thanksgiving. Of the five turkeys created, it was interesting to note the different approaches. Beckett, 13, immediately bit off the turkey’s nose and ate the chocolate pellets before we could get them away from him for melting. He ate some of the other add-ons and could barely contain himself from smashing the turkey to pieces. We insisted he wait as his cousins and brother decorated their turkeys. All the while he was picking at the chocolate hole he had created at the nose. When the greenlight was given, he destroyed his turkey with reckless abandon sending chocolate pieces all over. Carson, 12, got into this activity, taking his time and focusing deliberately on his masterpiece. He worked hard on it. He was so focused he even let me take a picture of him at work. He did not

eat one piece of candy. He refused to bang on his turkey and instead insisted it be left out on display. It’s still on the counter a week later. Niece Peyton, 12, clearly has craftiness in her as she won the prize for best decorated turkey, creating a unicorn-turkey with a cleverly placed candy corn piece. Despite her pretty work, she didn’t have a problem breaking her turkey and taking home the treat for later. Nephew Reagan, 15, seemed to feign interest in dressing up the turkey. However, I blame his mallet-wielding cousin (Beckett) next to him for the distractions. Like his sister, he had no problem smashing his turkey into pieces in quick fashion. Granddaughter Zoe, 2, took after Carson with her turkey. She created a pretty turkey and preferred to take her chocolate treat home with her to New York. A couple days later, we got a video of her breaking into the turkey. It was fun to watch, as she was clearly torn on destroying her creation. She tapped it six times lightly before she finally got into it, thanks to her mom encouraging her nearby. She then took the biggest piece of chocolate for a snack before I assume it was put away for later. We had one leftover smash turkey we gave to a friend, who reported his young daughters fell into the decorate and smash category. Therefore, in the end, it was only Carson who could not bring himself to destroy his turkey. For now, it’s staying on the counter. The turkeys seemed to go well in our house, as a quick iPhone search by one of the kids led to the discovery of smash Santas for Christmas. (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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December 3, 2021

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December 3, 2021