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The Dispatch January 15, 2021

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OC Expects Boardwalk Tram To Run

Resort Officials Discuss Room Tax

Baltimore Ave. Next Up For Cameras

See Page 4 • File Photo

See Page 8 • Photo by Chris Parypa

See Page 10 • Photo by Chris Parypa


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Ocean City Planning To Bring Back Boardwalk Tram This Year

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 15, 2021

Service Incudes Mask Requirments

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Resort transportation officials this week debated the return of the Boardwalk trams this summer after being put on the shelf last year and the plan is for the popular service to be back up and running. The Transportation Committee on Tuesday held a discussion on a plan to bring back the Boardwalk trams. The trams were discontinued entirely last summer for a variety of reasons related to COVID. Early on, the governor’s restrictions on mass transit and amusements, for example, made operating the Boardwalk tram impractical. As some of the restrictions were eased as the state went through some of the early stages of its recovery plan, resort officials considered bringing back the Boardwalk trams at different points through the early summer. However, the tram service was fraught with challenges. Short of removing seats or benches, social distancing would have been

difficult. Another concern raised was the crowding the trams cause on the Boardwalk when it rolls through large groups of pedestrians. Finally, by mid-summer, the Mayor and Council voted to discontinue the service for the summer. On Tuesday, the transportation committee debated if and when to bring it back this summer. Operations Manager Steve Bartlett said he was moving forward almost as if it was going to be business as usual. “I’m going back to the hiring numbers for 2019,” he said. “I believe we’re going to be slower. I don’t think we’ll do much with the tram until after July 1. June has always been that way.” Bartlett said he will need 25 drivers and 25 conductors along with supervisors to get the tram operation up and running again. He said he was confident he would get those numbers before the Boardwalk tram operation really gets rolling for the season. “I will have the full complement ready to go,” he said. “The plan is to ramp up deployments in July. If the patrons are there and they want to ride the tram, we’re going to carry them.” When asked if he had returning tram drivers and conductors lined up, Bartlett said most have indicated they want to return and many are chomping at the bit to get back to it. “From my conversations, we might get 90% back,” he said. “People have missed an entire season. They aren’t happy, not because of the decision made, because it was the right thing to do, but not happy because they missed a summer of work.” Mayor Rick Meehan said the town will take all the necessary precautions with mask requirements and appropriate spacing where practical, but he fully anticipated the Boardwalk tram will be up and running this summer. “We are still going to have mask requirements on the trams,” he said. “We did what we had to do in 2020 for all the right reasons. As long as people are wearing masks, they can make their own decisions about the level of safe distancing they are comfortable with.” Bartlett said if the town was comfortable with restoring the Boardwalk tram service this summer, his crews will be ready. “My plan is to start the Friday before Memorial Day as if it were a normal year,” he said. “There might be lighter deployments, there might not be service on Springfest, but we’ll be ready to go.” A motion was approved to forward a favorable recommendation to the full Mayor and Council for a planned start to the Boardwalk tram season on the Friday before Memorial Day.


January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Council Supports Downtown Park Redevelopment Concept

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BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Resort officials this week signed off on conceptual plans to redevelop the downtown recreation complex, which will likely be done in phases over multiple years, although there could be tweaks in the final version. During Tuesday’s meeting, Recreation and Parks Director Susan Petito and consultant Tom McGilloway of Mahan Rykeil Associates presented to the Mayor and Council the conceptual plan for the redevelopment of the vast downtown recreation complex between 3rd and 4th streets along the bayside. The downtown park is bisected by St. Louis Avenue. The existing section to the east is already fairly developed with the Ocean Bowl skate park, basketball courts, a playground and other amenities.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Work Likely Phased Over Years

The section to the west is largely open space with long-abandoned ballfields and a waterfront bulk-headed area popular for recreational fishing. The park area to the west has been utilized for special events in the past, including visits from touring tall ships. Most recently, the open field was used for satellite viewing of the White Marlin Open last August. The large swath of open space in the otherwise densely developed downtown area has been utilized for many purposes over the years, but it is showing its age in recent years and is generally unpleasing and unwelcoming aesthetically. To that end, the Recreation and Parks Department two years ago initiated a process to begin redeveloping

the complex. With assistance from the Ocean City Development Corporation (OCDC), a consultant was hired to develop concept plans for the project with input from the Mayor and Council and the public. On Tuesday, the final version was presented to the Mayor and Council for review and possible revisions. “We worked this up at the committee level and thought it was time to bring it before the Mayor and Council and the public,” said Councilman John Gehrig, chair of the Recreation and Parks Committee. “If we hit a home run, we can start moving forward with it. This is just a recommendation. It doesn’t mean it can’t be revised along the way.”

January 15, 2021

Councilman Mark Paddack, who also serves on the committee, said the redevelopment design was a long time coming. “It’s been a long process,” he said. “It’s time to get moving forward with something. The residents and visitors downtown have been waiting for something down here.” For the east section, the plan includes an expanded skate park, relocating the existing basketball courts to the area of the park closest to Philadelphia Avenue and an improved inclusive playground area. The east section would be connected to the west section via the raised pedestrian walkway across St. Louis Avenue. There was some early discussion about closing that portion of St. Louis Avenue, but the idea got little traction. The section to the west would be less developed and more passive. It includes a vast flexible lawn in the center surrounded by trees for pick-up sports and other events, a playground area, a spot for a pavilion or future temporary band stage for future special events and new restrooms for the entire complex. The recreational fishing areas along the bulkhead would also be retained. The entire project is expected to cost around $3 million and would be done in phases as funding allows. There are considerable grants and other funding sources available, which could help offset the town’s expense and expedite some phases of the project. The proposed first phase would include much of the area to the west, while later phases would include the section to the east, including moving the basketball courts and expanding the skate park. The third and final phase would be the construction of the new restrooms, according to the plans presented. The Mayor and Council ultimately approved the concept plans in the interest of moving the project forward, although they did raise some concerns with certain elements of the project. For example, there was considerable discussion about whether moving the basketball courts was the right course. However, the consultant said moving the courts would facilitate easy pedestrian access through the entire complex. There were also concerns raised about the bayfront location of the restrooms. Some said the location could impact the pristine views of the bay, while others said the restrooms should be more centrally located in the complex. By and large, however, the elected officials endorsed the concept of redeveloping the property and agreed to move forward with it. The consultant said he could go back and tweak the plans somewhat to address the Mayor and Council’s concerns. McGilloway said the project was planned in phases for a variety of reasons, not the least of which was funding for the project. “It might be a year or so, and prob ably over a couple of years,” he said. “There are grants to consider and the permitting process to consider. It will have to be done in phases.”


Council OKs Higher Towers In Split Vote

January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A divided council this week approved modifications to five small-scale cell towers in northend residential areas to accommodate the growing demand for 5G service, but not before a larger debate about the proliferation of poles and other equipment. The Mayor and Council had before them on Tuesday a seemingly innocuous request from private sector company Crown Castle to modify its equipment on five existing poles in north-end residential neighborhoods to meet the growing demand for 5G wireless service. For the record, Crown Castle installs small cell towers and nodes around the resort and contracts with various wireless providers to provide the service The request on Tuesday was to modify the equipment on five existing poles in the Caine Woods and Little Salisbury neighborhoods. In some cases, the modifications included extending the existing cell nodes at the top of the poles higher to accommodate the higher demand for service, while in other cases, the changes included adding more equipment to the poles below the existing light fixtures. In either case, many on the council were not keen on the continued additions and their impacts on viewsheds in the residential neighborhoods. While most weren’t overly concerned with the modest request to modify five existing poles, some questioned when it will end as more equipment is added throughout town for increased demand. It’s a debate that has been ongoing in recent years every time Crown Castle comes back with a request to add more equipment. The town has in place an agreement with the company on where and when equipment can be installed, with most requests for commercial areas such as the Boardwalk, for example, handled by City Engineer Terry McGean and his staff and requests for more poles and

equipment in residential areas under the purview of the Mayor and Council. As far as Tuesday’s requests, Councilman Lloyd Martin said he preferred the option of making the existing nodes at the top of the poles higher rather than adding more equipment to the poles. “I just don’t want too much equipment on the poles in the residential neighborhoods,” he said. “If you go a foot or two higher, people won’t notice after a day or two. If you keep putting more and more stuff on the poles, it becomes more noticeable.” Crown Castle Government Relations Specialist Trey Spear said the company was cognizant of the concerns about the cell nodes and was working to minimize the impact. “In the Ocean City community, we’ve had several calls about the level of coverage,” he said. “More and more people are working from home or coming to their Ocean City homes to work remotely.” Spear said the company’s agreement with the town ensured some controls on the proliferation of the equipment and where it can be located. “I’m hearing concerns about adding more and more to the poles,” he said. “With our agreement with the town, we would need to come back to the Mayor and Council with any requests to do that.” Councilman John Gehrig said his concerns weren’t specifically with the request on the table, but questioned where and when it will end. “We can have somebody come in and put poles everywhere,” he said. “It’s always going to be more. We are fast heading to the point we’re going to have poles everywhere. With all of these buildings and all of this real estate, you would think we don’t need these poles all around our neighborhoods, but that’s where this is heading.” In the end, the council voted 4-3 with Gehrig, Council President Matt James and Council Secretary Tony DeLuca opposed.

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No Immediate Urgency In OC To Increase Room Tax

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A proposal to immediately raise the town’s room tax by a half-a-percentage point got little traction on Tuesday, although resort officials did agree to make a plan and begin the process for the future. On Tuesday, the Mayor and Council discussed a potential room tax hike. After an often-fierce debate, the council in 2019 agreed to raise the room tax from 4.5% to 5%. The increase took effect on Jan. 1, 2020. Then, the COVID19 pandemic hit and the fruits of the room tax increase have not yet been realized during a summer season curtailed by the pandemic. However, the Mayor and Council on

Tuesday had before them a proposal to hike the room tax rate again in the interest of offsetting revenue losses caused by the pandemic. Each half-percentage point would increase room tax revenue by an estimated $1.7 million, in a typical year, although 2020 was far from typical. There was some sense of urgency because the increase would first require the approval of the Worcester County Commissioners and, ultimately, the state legislature, which reconvened on Wednesday. However, while the idea was not dismissed entirely, the council on Tuesday ultimately voted to review budget and revenue projections, formulate a detailed plan on how to spend the projected revenue increase and potentially make a push for the rate increase a-

round this time next year in advance of fiscal year 2022. From the outset on Tuesday, there appeared to be little traction for an immediate attempt to raise the room tax rate. Mayor Rick Meehan pointed out the impact of the last room tax hike just two years ago had not yet been realized. “At this point, I’m not in favor of moving in this direction,” he said. “We need to look at the budget amendment, what revenue was last year and what is expected. This isn’t the time to raise the room tax and it shouldn’t be a go-to every time we need a little money. We haven’t yet seen the benefit of the last time.” Council President Matt James agreed.

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“That’s spot-on,” he said. “I agree with that. The last time we had this discussion, I asked for how it was going to be spent. Now is not the time to raise it.” Councilman Tony DeLuca, who raised the issue of examining a potential room tax hike last week, continued to point out Ocean City’s room tax was lower than most of the other vacation destinations in the region. “We can be proactive or we can be reactive,” he said. “We can make things happen, or we can let things happen to us.” DeLuca said he had conversations with reputable hoteliers who told him the average cost of a room in Ocean City from May to September was $200. He said the proposed room tax hike at that rate would result in an additional $1 per night. “It’s hard to imagine a visitor making a decision to come to Ocean City or not on one more dollar per night,” he said. “We would still have one of the lowest room tax rates of most of the vacation destinations. If we don’t do this, we need to look at selling surplus property or we have to look at expanding paid parking. That’s where we are right now.” Councilman John Gehrig pointed out his colleagues had ignored a plan on how best to spend the revenue from the last room tax hike just two years ago. At the outset of Tuesday’s meeting, the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association (HMRA) submitted a letter in opposition of a proposed room tax hike, a letter Gehrig referenced. “Instead of reinvesting in our product, into tourism and economic development, we spent the money,” he said. “The fact that we didn’t do that, I don’t blame the hospitality industry for writing the letter, we haven’t instilled the confidence to use the money to invest in our product.” Councilman Frank Knight said if there was a will among his colleagues to increase the room tax, time was of the essence. “I think if we’re trying to do this in this fiscal year, I’d like to get this moving,” he said. “Let’s get this tool in the tool box. I don’t see us ever considering paid parking and I don’t ever see us raising property taxes. We are going to need this sooner rather than later.” Councilman Mark Paddack said there was a plan in place to spend the additional room tax revenue. He pointed out some of the heat the Mayor and Council took for having a reserve fund exceeding the town’s stated policy and how some of those funds were going to be used to offset some of the losses from the pandemic. “I thought there was a plan,” he said. “The plan was to split the increase among marketing and economic development. The council has been attacked for having a robust reserve fund and then a little virus called COVID crashed into our economy. We’ve been able to draw from those funds so we wouldn’t SEE NEXT PAGE


… Resort Hotel Association Weighs In Against Proposal

January 15, 2021

have to raise taxes. Our resources in the public safety realm are very thin. There’s a lot more going on here than the public knows.” Councilman Peter Buas, however, said an immediate push for a room tax hike was unfounded until the 2020 figures were analyzed and future budget needs were projected. “I think it’s premature,” he said. “In the current climate, for us to raise room tax right now would be premature. There might be a time and place for it later.” DeLuca said even if it was not the will of the council to raise the room tax now, the town should begin the process of gaining support of the county commissioners to have in place for an eventual effort. He suggested asking for a room tax cap at 6%, even if the eventual plan was not to go that high. “We should ask Worcester County to raise our cap so we can control our own fate,” he said. “We can decide later to do it if the time is right.” Meehan said there was another budget amendment to get through for this fiscal year and the budget cycle for fiscal year 2022 was coming up. He suggested waiting to see how all those numbers shook out before pushing for another room tax hike. “We haven’t seen the numbers for 2020,” he said. “We need to go through that cycle. We haven’t seen that anticipated $1.7 million. We need to see where we stand before we consider this.” Councilman Lloyd Martin agreed. “I’m not sure there is a will among the county commissioners to raise things right now,” he said. “We need to get through this period and see where we are. This is just a little premature right now.” Gehrig said asking the county commissioners, and ultimately the state legislature, to approve a room tax hike without a detailed plan on how to spend the revenue was akin to putting the cart before the horse. “I think we need to plan first and get on board with the ask,” he said. “I think we might have this backward. We need to take our time and everybody will get behind this.” Ultimately, the council voted to formulate a plan on how best to spend the anticipated revenue, work out the timeline for approval from Worcester County and the General Assembly and decide to move forward with it later this year if that was the will of the majority of the council. Even before the room tax debate began on Tuesday, the Mayor and Council heard from two significant camps on the issue. The HMRA submitted a letter during the public comment period in strong opposition to any room tax hike at this time. “While we understand the city is experiencing a reduction in revenues due to the pandemic, we are completely against any increase in room tax,” the letter reads. “The hospitality industry is notably the hardest hit segment and we

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

continue to face operational restrictions limiting revenue opportunities. Some may believe a small percentage increase on room rates will not affect a visitor’s choice of destination. However, we believe otherwise. In our opinion, any perception of an increase will change choices given this environment. To raise room tax because we are lower than other destinations is not logical. We continue to lose ground to the Delaware, North Carolina and Virginia beaches. Why not market that we are the lowest?” The HMRA letter pointed out the resort’s hospitality industry is already under duress because of the pandemic and increasing the room tax rate could only contribute to that. “Now is not the time to push an increase as this would crush our hopes for a recovery,” the letter reads. “We have

no idea what increases the 2021 legislative session will deliver. It would be short-sighted and financially devastating to our members who have been mandated to spend significant funds to be able to operate under government-mandated restrictions.” However, Career Firefighter Paramedics Union of Ocean City, or IAFF 4269, President Ryan Whittington said at the outset of Tuesday’s meeting revenue generated by a proposed room tax increase could be utilized to bolster the town’s emergency services. “Any increase to our residents and visitors is not anything that a councilperson wants to do and it is never and easy decision, especially amongst a pandemic,” he said. “However, it is essential to note the changes the pandemic has created for us as a town. I believe a small

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room tax increase could be used to fund additional firefighters and EMS providers. The fire department needs at least 12 full-time fire and EMS providers and that’s only three people per shift to add an additional unit. Adding these personnel is extremely important, especially amid the pandemic. The pandemic has highlighted just how fragile our staffing is.” Whittington made an impassioned plea to nudge the room tax higher and utilize some of the revenue to add more personnel. “COVID will never go away, even with vaccines,” he said. “Your firefighters and paramedics have been on the front lines of this pandemic and have not wavered once. We need more help. We need more firefighters and EMS providers.”


Baltimore Avenue Next Up For Surveillance Cameras

Page 10

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Connectivity issues highlighted a discussion this week on the installation of surveillance cameras along a busy downtown thoroughfare. On Monday, City Engineer Terry McGean presented the Ocean City Police Commission with an update on the installation of City Watch cameras on Baltimore Avenue. “We’ve got the Boardwalk fully covered,” he told commission members this week. “The next highest priority area for

the department to try and get coverage on is Baltimore Avenue. The challenge for us with these cameras is connectivity.” In 2014, the town developed its City Watch surveillance camera system beginning with a handful of camera installations along the south end of the Boardwalk. Over the years, however, the system has expanded to cover the entire promenade, making it a powerful tool for law enforcement and emergency services personnel. In 2019, the town started planning for the next phase in its City Watch program. As part of the expansion, several installation sites were identified along Bal-

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timore Avenue. And in 2020, the town secured $66,000 in state grant funding to move the project forward. In a presentation this week, McGean told commission members the goal is to have seven new surveillance cameras installed along Baltimore Avenue by the start of the summer season. Locations include 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th, 16th, 23rd, and 27th streets. An eighth location, at 30th Street, has already been completed. “Everything on Baltimore Avenue we have funding to do it,” he said. McGean noted the biggest challenge has been connecting the new cameras to the City Watch system. While the plan is to attach the cameras to existing light poles, he explained they would need to connect to a fiber network. To that end, the town will partner with the private sector company Crown Castle. “As you know Crown Castle has installations all along Baltimore Avenue,” McGean said. “As part of our right of way use agreement with Crown Castle to allow them to install their small cells, wherever Crown Castle runs fiber the Town of Ocean City is entitled to two strands of what we call dark fiber. So we are entitled to access their fiber and then we have to provide the appropriate equipment to put a signal through.” While the company does not have fiber north of 12th Street, McGean said the town has put out a bid to run fiber to poles

January 15, 2021

at 16th, 23rd and 27th streets. “It may be a big benefit for Crown Castle for them to get some dark fiber off of us if they want to cost share,” he said. “I’ve reached out to them about that and they are supposed to get back to me.” Looking ahead, Ocean City Police Chief Ross Buzzuro expressed interest in having City Watch cameras at all entrance and exit points. He encouraged resort officials to explore cost estimates and funding sources as they move to the next phase of expansion. “Baltimore Avenue, being this next phase, is extremely important,” he said. “But I will also add the importance of the entrance and exit points as well. They are up there with Baltimore Avenue.” Officials noted surveillance cameras currently existed at the Route 50 and Route 90 bridges. Buzzuro, however, pointed to the lack of City Watch cameras at the north end. “It’s an additional layer of security for us,” he said. When asked if the town could partner with uptown businesses to utilize their surveillance cameras, McGean pointed to recent challenges. “There’s been numerous discussions,” he replied. “We can take any camera and put it in the system. Essentially, we just need the IP address of the camera. The hiccup with that in the past is getting agreements from the camera owners to allow that.”


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OCPD Finding More Interest In Seasonal Officer Jobs

Page 12

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – A positive report on recruitment and enforcement statistics highlighted a resort commission meeting this week. On Monday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) Chief Ross Buzzuro presented the Ocean City Police Commission with an update on seasonal recruitment efforts. For decades, the OCPD has enhanced its workforce with seasonal officers and public safety aides (PSA) during the summer months.

And while the department has reported a slight decline in the number of PSA applicants for this year, Buzzuro said recruitment numbers for seasonal officer positions have improved. “We are faring a little bit better than anticipated in regard to recruitment,” he told commission members this week. “Last year at this time we had 88 seasonal officer applicants. This year so far we’ve had 144.” On the PSA side, however, Buzzuro said the police department reported 52 applicants. “We had 64 last year,” he said. “We’re hoping the next couple events we have

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for hiring we have a good showing.” Capt. Elton Harmon anticipates the number of PSA applicants to increase as testing continued in January and February. “I think the numbers initially are good,” he said. “I also keep in mind that those who don’t make it through the entire (seasonal officer) process, we are also pushing them to the PSA side … I think the PSA numbers are a little deceptive right now. They will increase and balance out.” When asked about returning seasonal officers, Harmon said the department had hired several for full-time positions. “With a large hiring group … the numbers weren’t quite what they were in the past,” he replied, “but still strong.” In terms of full-time sworn officers, Buzzuro said the department was at full strength. “We have nine currently in the academy, and we had a lateral join us as well,” he said. “So we are right at 112.” Buzzuro told commission members this week the OCPD had reported a degree of success in hiring full-time officers this year, even as departments across the country continue to face officer shortages. “A number of agencies on the shore and beyond the state of Maryland are having significant problems, he said. “They have vacancies in their agencies.” Councilman and commission member Lloyd Martin attributed the agency’s success to the town’s seasonal officer pro-

January 15, 2021

gram. “We get most of those from our seasonal program,” he said. “And that’s what really helps us.” Buzzuro on Monday also presented the commission with a report on police activity for the month of December, as well as a comparison of municipal and parking citations issued by PSAs and officers over a three-year period. In 2018, officers and PSAs issued 4,385 parking citations and 886 payable municipal citations. And in 2019, officers and PSAs issued 5,143 parking citations and 614 municipal citations. In 2020, the department reported issuing 8,846 parking citations and 767 municipal citations. “In 2019, we had some of the lowest crime levels in almost 30 years,” he said. “We didn’t experience the activity that we realized or experienced on the Boardwalk in 2020, and yet the citations – even though we were dealing with all the significant issues that were downtown on the Boardwalk – our proactive stance bore out in these statistics.” Meehan continued to stress the importance of enforcing all city ordinances. “I think the consistent message we’re hearing … is just strict enforcement of all of our ordinances,” he said. “That means even the most minor of ordinances because if you establish the rules of the game early on they simply carry over. They also tend to, in some ways, discourage them mentally into other types of crimes.”

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Powerboat Races Worcester County Selects Broadband Vendor Returning To OC On May Weekend

January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The grand spectacle of offshore powerboat racing will return to Ocean City in early May after resort officials approved the event last week. On Jan. 4, the Mayor and Council approved the proposed Ocean City Grand Prix scheduled for the weekend of April 30 to May 2 as part of its consent agenda. The Ocean City Grand Prix is part of the larger Offshore Powerboat Association (OPA) summer-long series of events all over the country. In years past, the Ocean City offshore powerboat races have been held in September near the end of the OPA series. This year, the Ocean City Grand Prix will kick off the OPA’s series of 11 events all over the country. Locally, the event is produced by the Bull on the Beach, which typically has powerboats competing and has produced offshore powerboat racing in Ocean City off and on for years. The grand prix in May is actually a three-day event with a festival of sorts including meet-and-greets with the professional race teams, powerboat tours, parties and other activities beginning that Friday, April 30 and continuing through the weekend. The real action gets underway on Sunday, May 2, with two scheduled races in the open ocean just off the resort coast. The course is laid out between North Division Street and 12th Street with a start-finish line between 2nd and 3rd Streets. The first race begins at noon and the second race is scheduled to go off at 3 p.m. Each race will have between 15-20 powerboats competing in a wide variety of classes. For safety reasons, during the actual races only, no swimming will be permitted in the area. The viewing public will be allowed on the beach within the race footprint, but will be kept out of the water. Mayor Rick Meehan pointed out the Ocean City Beach Patrol typically handles the responsibility of keeping swimmers out of the ocean during the races, but Special Events Coordinator Lisa Mitchell said that issue has been addressed. “The beach patrol is willing to do whatever they can because they want to be in total support of an event like this as they have in the past,” she said. “However, the beach patrol will not yet be on duty at this time, so closing the beach will be difficult to manage within their department.” As this event is taking place prior to the OCBP seasonal duty, OPA event organizers will employ staff to patrol the beach and keep swimmers out of the ocean during each race. In addition, the OPA will place signage at each beach entrance within the race footprint.

SNOW HILL – Worcester County will partner with an internet service provider from Chestertown to begin expanding broadband access in rural areas. The Worcester County Commissioners voted unanimously last week to select Talkie, a Chestertown company, as the county’s broadband partner. “They’re not asking for anything from Worcester County,” said Brian Jones, the county’s IT director. The county issued a request for proposals in the fall in an effort to find a broadband vendor to partner with. “We had several responses by phone but when we started going through the process of where we’re located and so forth and what we’re expecting from the providers it dropped back to two,” Jones

said. Talkie and Bloosurf from Salisbury submitted formal proposals. The county sent those to its consultant, CTC Technology & Energy, for review. “They did an extensive grading process,” Jones said. “They basically came back with a recommendation of using Talkie.” He said Talkie, which has eight years of experience, had a strong plan to begin providing service in the southern portion of the county. While grants are expected to help, the company has proposed spending more than $1 million in its efforts. “They have an aggressive plan to move forward,” Jones said. When asked about Bloosurf’s proprietary rights to certain parts of the county, Jones said that was no longer an issue. “At this point most of everything they

Page 13

had on the table before has expired,” Jones said. He added that Talkie had plans to move forward with three locations in southern Worcester County and encouraged the commissioners to make their vendor decisions quickly. “There are some grants available today…,” he said. “We have to really jump on this pretty quick.” The commissioners voted unanimously to select Talkie as the county’s broadband partner. According to Jones, feedback regarding the need for broadband in rural Worcester County could help with upcoming grant applications. Talkie welcomes letters of support and communication citing residents’ and businesses’ specific broadband needs. Those interested in contacting the company can email sales@talkiefiber.com.


Delegates Introduce Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Bill

Page 14

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Legislation borne out of a local state delegate’s firsthand ridealong with law enforcement during last year’s pop-up rally would classify certain acts committed against police officers as hate crimes with enhanced penalties. During last September’s pop-up rally in Ocean City, Delegate Wayne Hartman witnessed with police officers the huge crowds of largely unruly, disrespectful visitors that wreaked havoc on Ocean City for the better part of four days. During the long weekend, 277 total arrests were made, including 127 on Saturday alone, when the unsanctioned event reached a crescendo. Hartman, a former Ocean City councilman, was no stranger to some of the carnage seen during the pop-up rally and, as a delegate, helped shepherd legislation through the General Assembly in years past including the special event bill and the exhibition driving bill. Appalled by what he saw during his twonight ride-along with law enforcement during September’s event, Hartman introduced a pre-filed bill protecting police officers and other first-responders under the state’s hate crimes statute. The pre-filed bill, co-sponsored in the House by Delegate Robert Long (R-Baltimore), has been assigned to the Judi-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ciary Committee and is set for a preliminary hearing on Jan. 19. It was also cross-filed in the Senate by Senator Jack Bailey (R-Calvert and St. Mary’s). The legislation, if passed by the General Assembly, which reconvened on Wednesday, would make certain crimes carried out against law enforcement officers and first-responders, such as many of the assaults seen during the September pop-up rally, hate crimes with enhanced penalties. During the most egregious portion of the event, law enforcement officers and first-responders were pelted with rocks and bottles, had their vehicles and equipment damaged and skirmished physically with offenders. For an offense that qualified as a misdemeanor, the penalty could be three years, up to a $3,000 fine or both. If the offenses were considered elevated to felonies, there are two ranges of penalties in the proposed legislation. One class of hate crime would include up to 10 years in jail and a $10,000 fine or both, while the most egregious hate crime defined in the legislation could result in a jail term up to 20 years or a $20,000 fine or both. Following his two-day ride-along during the pop-up rally, Hartman issued a video statement describing some of the illicit behavior and attacks on law enforcement and first-responders he witnessed.

“It was hard to describe and imagine what happened in Ocean City and the intensity and magnitude of it,” he said. “Oftentimes, those law enforcement officers were met with rocks, frozen water bottles, beer cans, fireworks, roman candles and so forth being shot at them. It was a scene I never expected to see in Ocean City.” That action prompted Hartman to file his hate crimes legislation. It’s important to note the bill, if passed, would apply to similar situations and circumstances statewide. “One thing I do want to do for law enforcement officers and first-responders is introduce a bill to the Maryland General Assembly to add law enforcement officers and first-responders to be protected under the hate crimes bill and make them a protected class,” he said. “That would be another tool that law enforcement would have next year. When they’re met with the behavior we saw this year, there can be increased penalties and these situations can be treated as a hate crime because that’s exactly what this is.” For its part, the Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) is fully in support of the legislation, obviously for its officers and first-responders, but also for their brethren around the state, OCPD Deputy Communications Director Ashley Miller said this week. “We wholeheartedly support any leg-

January 15, 2021

islation that provides additional protection to all first responders,” she said. “Over the last year, those in law enforcement and other first-responder positions have had a target painted on their back for the career path they have chosen. In 2020, we saw a shift in law enforcement support nationwide. Here in Ocean City, we saw a lot of the antipolice sentiment during June and the pop-up rally in September.” Miller echoed some of Hartman’s sentiments following his ride-along. “Delegate Hartman saw firsthand the anti-police sentiment when he rode along with our department during the pop-up rally,” she said. “During that weekend, law enforcement members had bottles, frozen water bottles, landscaping material, and fireworks thrown at them while they were carrying out their normal course of duties by bystanders.” Miller said the proposed legislation had its genesis in the pop-up rally, but could be utilized at other tenuous times in the resort. “In June, we encounter large groups gather around arrest scenes, yelling anti-police statements and hindering our officers’ duties,” she said. “As this legislation is introduced and progresses during this legislative session, we will keep a close eye on it. We hope to see an outcome that does offer additional protection to all first responders.”


January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 15


Street Speed Limit Reduction Sought OC Traffic Calming Plan Approved

Page 16

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Citing consistency and safety concerns, a resort commission this week agreed to reduce the speed limit along an uptown residential street. On Monday, the Ocean City Police Commission voted unanimously, with Council President Matt James absent, to reduce the speed limit on 94th Street from 30 mph to 25 mph. City Engineer Terry McGean said the recommendation to reduce the speed limit came after an uptown resident sent her concerns to the full Mayor and Council late last year. “The speed limit is 30 mph. The speed limit in the rest of Little Salisbury – the speed limit, frankly, on a lot of our other residential streets – is 25 mph,” he said. “So while I don’t think it makes a significant difference in terms of safety, in terms of consistency, in the neighborhood I do believe it’s reasonable to lower the speed limit on 94th Street from 30 mph to 25 mph.” The police commission – comprised of the mayor and three councilmembers – also serves concurrently as the Ocean City Traffic Commission, which regulates parking and pedestrian and vehicle traffic. McGean told members this week the recommendation needed commission approval. He ad-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ded the Ocean City Police Department had already agreed to the reduction. “From a safety standpoint, it’s not a huge difference, quite frankly, one way or the other,” he said. “Quite frankly, as a driver I’m not sure you’re going to notice the difference either. To me it was more about consistency.” Police Chief Ross Buzzuro also expressed his department’s support. “It may not seem at this point that it’s going to make much of a difference,” he said. “But for us it’s a win-win because any speed reduction will improve safety, there will be less accidents and possibly one less injury. So for all the right reasons, we’re in total agreement with the reduction.” Councilman Peter Buas questioned if any other residential streets needed to be addressed. “Are there any left that would be 30 mph residential blocks?” he asked. McGean said he wasn’t aware of any, but would review speed limits on every residential street. “After this meeting I’ll take a look and see if there are any other ones we can address,” he said. With no further discussion, the commission voted 3-0 to approve the speed reduction along 94th Street. Once a regulation is drafted, it will be signed by commission members and sent to the Mayor and Council for ratification.

January 15, 2021

Point-based System To Be Used

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The Ocean City Mayor and Council this week signed off on a point-based traffic-calming policy for certain streets in town plagued by speeding and reckless driving after a few adjustments were made to the plan presented in December. In December, City Engineer Terry McGean outlined for the Mayor and Council some short-term and long-term solutions for an ongoing problem of speeding and reckless driving on some of the main streets in the Caine Woods community, including 142nd Street and 139th Street in particular. There are varying degrees of traffic-calming, including non-physical changes such as increased enforcement, public outreach and more signage. There are also rather passive traffic-calming measures available such as speed humps, curb bump-outs and rumble strips, for example. Finally, there are more active, and likely far more expensive, traffic-calming measures such as traffic circles, roundabouts, raised crosswalks, and even, in some cases rerouting traffic or making certain streets one-way, for example.

In the wake of the issues raised in Caine Woods, McGean said he began exploring a formal policy to evaluate the streets in Ocean City when similar problems arise and identify just what level of traffic-calming is needed to rectify the situation. He presented the plan in December and, after hearing some of the council’s questions and concerns, set out to tweak the proposal. The plan includes a point-based system in which a street is given points on various prevailing traffic issues. The level of traffic-calming needed is commensurate with the number of points scored in the formula. Points would be assigned to a street based on a variety of factors, including the 85th percentile average speed. For example, if the average speed recorded above the posted speed limit was in the five- to seven-range, the street would be assigned five points. If the average recorded speed above the posted speed limit was 15 mph over the speed limit, the street would be assigned 25 points and so forth. Other factors for which points could be assigned, and traffic-calming measures would be recommended, include average daily traffic volume, the frequency of accidents along a given stretch and whether the street is used by non-local traffic as a cut-through to other major arteries, for example. Most major changes would fall under the purview of the Mayor and Council, but only after significant opportunities for the public to weigh in. Tweaking that level of public participation in the decision-making process was one of the changes McGean made in the plan presented in December to the one ultimately approved by the council on Tuesday. Originally, it was believed 75% was appropriate in terms of the number of people needed to weigh in on a proposed active traffic-calming measure. However, McGean said on Tuesday he adjusted the percentage. “The policy only requires written approval from 65% of residents along a street for active measures,” he said. “The Mayor and Council could waive the 65% requirement after a public hearing was held.” Complicating the evaluation process further are certain streets designated as primary response routes for emergency services, fire and police, for example. Many of the streets in Ocean City would qualify as primary response routes where significant traffic-calming measures could affect safety and response times. However, McGean tweaked that as well in the final proposal. “If passive measures have been installed that do not solve the problems, active measures could be implemented,” he said. “Those active measures would have to be approved by the fire chief.”


Museum Seeking Pandemic Stories January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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OCEAN CITY – A resort museum is seeking accounts of how the COVID19 pandemic has impacted community members. In an effort to collect firsthand accounts of the ongoing public health crisis and its impacts on everyday life, the Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum has launched a new project called “Save Our Stories.” Curator Christine Okerblom said the community is encouraged to submit their stories to the museum in written or audio form. “As a museum we are responsible for recording history …,” she said. “We wanted to accurately record how this pandemic affected our community.” In August, the museum began collecting stories as part of the “Save Our Stories” project. In the first phase of the project, Okerblom said, the museum conducted interviews with several resort leaders and townspeople, from the mayor to commercial fishermen and business owners. “There was this sense of pulling together and finding out how adaptable you are …,” Okerblom recalled. “This sense of unity and working as a team to get through something was a reoccurring theme we noticed.” Now, she said, the museum is seeking perspectives from other community members. “We are asking for submissions,” she said, “so any reflections they are willing to share with us about how this pandemic affected them.” Story submissions can be a specific experience, direct answers to prompts, or a combination, according to the museum. Prompt questions include “How did the news of the virus affect your summer vacation?”, “Did you have any positive experiences that were a result of COVID-19?” and “How did work change for you?”, to name a few. “Unlike our other projects, this does not have a deadline,” Okerblom said. “We are still living through this pandemic, and we want people to have the opportunity to reflect now and six months from now.” Okerblom said participants can submit written entries and audio recordings by visiting the museum’s website. Those who give the museum permission to publish could have their stories featured in future exhibits. All others will be archived as museum artifacts. “At the very least, they will be saved,” she said. To submit a story, visit ocmuseum.org and click on “Save Our Stories.” For additional information, contact Christine@ocmuseum.org. “They will be playing an active role in something that will help future generations,” Okerblom said. “I think having the community submit stories is an honest way of recording history.”

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Parking Concerns Stall North OC Redevelopment Plans

Page 18

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Although they appeared to like the concept, resort planners last week tabled a site plan approval for the redevelopment of the old Phillips Seafood House property uptown with a mixed-use residential and commercial project. The Planning Commission on Tuesday had before them a site plan review for the redevelopment of the old Phillips Seafood House property, which had housed the restaurant for decades. The plan included a multi-story, mixed-use project with 44 residential units of various sizes, along with some retail on the first floor including a small restaurant or coffee shop with some outdoor seating. Before the commission got into the nuts and bolts of the proposal, concerns were raised about the appropriate amount of parking available for the mixed-use residential and commercial project. The original Phillips property included three parcels, including the main locale that hosted the restaurant’s footprint, along with an adjacent parcel to the south for parking and another parcel on the north side of 142nd Street for additional parking. However, the project proposed on Tuesday did not include that remote north parcel, which had 78 parking spaces. Instead, it only included the main parcel and the satellite parking area to the south. The original Phillips restaurant required 200 parking spaces based on code requirements, but years ago had been granted a nonconformity

A rendering of a redevelopment project at the site of the former Phillips Seafood House in north Ocean City is pictured. Submitted Photo

of 30 spaces. The proposal presented on Tuesday requested a grandfathering of sorts on the existing nonconformity. However, it came to light on Tuesday the developer does not own the rights to the remote parking lot to the north of 142nd Street, which left a significant deficit in the amount of parking available for the proposed project. Uncertainty about the availability of that remote north parking lot was enough for the planning commission to table the site plan approval request until the developer can rework the parking calculations or adjust the design. Planning Commissioner Peck Miller said he was uncertain if the parking calculations were accurate without the remote

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north lot. “In the past, whenever we’ve done residential or condo units, we’ve always required adequate parking,” he said. “If you add up all of these units, that’s 86 parking spaces. That leaves six for the retail. I just don’t know. I need somebody to explain how that works.” Planning Commissioner Joe Wilson said he liked the concept of the project, but was also held up on the parking requirements. “I love the idea of the project,” he said. “Ocean City needs more of this. For me, it’s hard to make a decision without knowing who the nonconformity belongs to.” Planning Commissioner Palmer Gil-

January 15, 2021

lis said the mixed-use concept for the proposed project, including the residential component, differed from what existed on the site before, making adequate parking a key issue for approval. “We have a change of use,” he said. “That’s why we’re here tonight. With a restaurant, you have multiple means of transportation- the bus, Uber, walking or a vehicle. With all of the residential, you don’t have that. You have all of these residential units that will need a parking space, or multiple parking spaces.” The developer’s representative pointed out there is a significant amount of on-street parking available in and around the property. However, Planning Commission chair Pam Buckley said while that might be the case, that on-street parking could not be considered in the parking calculation. “There is a lot of single-family to the west of this property,” she said. “That’s a problem throughout Ocean City with on-street parking for residential.” It became clear the commission was not going to move forward with the site plan approval with the uncertainties surrounding available parking, including the ownership of the north remote lot. “The concern of the planning commission is the parking nonconformity was granted for all three parcels,” said a representative for the developer. “We’re only redeveloping two parcels. It’s safe to say we’re not going to get an approval tonight with those concerns.” With that said, the commission postponed the site plan review until those issues were resolved. For his part, project developer Christos Sarantis of Ocean Two LLC said he was hopeful he could return with a parking plan amenable to the commission. “Hopefully, we can move forward with this project,” he said. “I think it will be beautiful for that area of town. I’m just trying to incorporate some retail amenities. It would have been a mixed use, maybe a small coffee shop and some other uses for the residents.”

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Chamber Hosts Legislative Preview

January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Discussions on the local real estate market, state budget and vaccine distribution plan highlighted a preview session with members of the Eastern Shore delegation last week. Last Thursday, the Salisbury Area Chamber of Commerce held a virtual question-and-answer forum with members of the Eastern Shore delegation ahead of the 2021 General Assembly session. The topics, developed by the chamber’s government and business affairs committee, focused on several issues and gave representatives a chance to discuss bills that will be introduced to address challenges, particularly within the local business community. “Now more than ever we need to hear from those members what’s important, what they like, what they don’t like and what’s coming out of the General Assembly …,” said Del. Chris Adams. “It’s important, now more than ever, to show Marylanders how to govern during these difficult times.” When asked how the legislature could support the real estate industry and encourage homeowners to take advantage of a seller’s market, Adams said more was needed to address regulations that hinder development in Maryland. He noted that while demand was high inventory was low, and the costs of septic systems and mandated sprinkler requirements made it more expensive to build a home in Maryland. “The opportunity to invest is no better than it is now. The problem is supply and demand are way off …,” he said. “We can ask the question. But really the answer is something is amiss in our regulatory and environmental policies.” Members of the delegation were also asked how the COVID-19 pandemic would impact this year’s budget and, specifically, funding to implement recommendations from the Kirwan Commission – a state task force created to improve Maryland’s public school system.

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Del. Sheree Sample-Hughes told participants last week there would be a effort this session to override the governor’s veto of the plan, or to at least implement portions of the Kirwan Commission’s recommendations. “The state of Maryland is in a better position than we thought so originally … ,” she said. “Yes, we are going to take up some veto overrides and are keenly aware of what that looks like financially.” Del. Wayne Hartman, however, argued the recommendations needed to be implemented slowly over time. “I don’t think it’s affordable for the state and the counties,” he said. When asked if they supported a proposed tax on digital advertising, Sample-Hughes said it would bring in revenue for Kirwan recommendations. Opponents, however, said a tax increase would burden Maryland businesses already facing economic challenges. “This is the wrong time to put that additional burden on our businesses … ,” Sen. Mary Beth Carozza said. “We need to be sensitive to what COVID19 recovery looks like for small businesses.” Representatives last week also had a chance to talk about the state’s vaccine distribution plan and ways in which the delegation could inform the public. Sen. Addie Eckardt noted as of last Thursday more than 3,000 vaccine doses had been administered in Wicomico County. “Actually, the Eastern Shore has been ahead of the rest of the state,” she said. Other topics of discussion last week included redistricting, agricultural regulations, local septic system issues and broadband access. Members of the Eastern Shore delegation also encouraged constituents to contact them with questions or concerns. “This is a completely different environment we are going into,” Del. Johnny Mautz said. “It’s all hands on deck.” Del. Charles Otto agreed. “I ask you to be involved and keep informed,” he said.

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Berlin Library Seeking Sidewalk

Page 20

By BeTHANy HOOPeR

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – The Worcester County Library is looking to connect its Berlin branch to North Main Street with the construction of a new sidewalk. In a meeting of the Worcester County Library Board of Trustees on Tuesday, Library Director Jennifer Ranck announced preliminary plans for a sidewalk project. “There’s not a continuous sidewalk from Main Street to the branch …,” she told board members this week. “The town of Berlin has been helpful in getting this ball rolling.” In an interview this week, Ranck said the library will meet with town staff to discuss the logistics of installing a sidewalk that will connect North Main Street to Harrison Avenue using a grassy area of land between the two roads. “It’s all very preliminary,” she said.

Berlin To Give Property To Md.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

“The railroad complicates things and the utilities too … The town will help us to figure out property ownership and see if it’s even possible.” Ranck said this week it was not clear how much the proposed sidewalk would cost, but that the Worcester County Library Foundation would offer assistance. “It’s still in the planning stages,” she said. “We’re still trying to figure it all out.” On Tuesday, Ranck also provided an update on the library’s reopening plans. In March, all Worcester County Library branches closed to the public in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The library has slowly reintroduced services such as its “library to go” and “printing to go” programs. In November, the library opened its doors for a “grab and go” program, allowing patrons to make appointments to browse the library collection. Ranck told board members Tuesday the plan was to continue offering those services.

By CHARLeNe SHARPe

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – The Berlin Town Council agreed to give the Maryland State Highway Administration a piece of property to allow for improvements at the intersection of Bay Street and Route 113. The council on Monday voted unanimously to convey 630 square feet of property to the State Highway Administration (SHA) and at the same time approved a trio of easements meant to allow improvements at the intersection of Route 376 and Route 113 to go forward. “We can’t wait to see the finished product,” Mayor Zack Tyndall said. Town staff said SHA was seeking easements on both sides of Route 376 as well as the conveyance of .014 of an

January 15, 2021

acre of land at the intersection of Decatur Street and Route 376 in order to complete geometric improvements in the area. SHA wants to increase the width of Route 376 for roughly 700 feet so the administration can lengthen the right turn lane onto Route 113 north. “One’s a temporary easement and the other two are perpetual easements,” said Dave Engelhart, the town’s planning director, of SHA’s request. “This is to enable the widening of that intersection and that corridor of Bay Street/Assateague Road.” Town Administrator Jeff Fleetwood said that as part of the project SHA would be reconstructing the sidewalk near Dollar General. “That existing sidewalk that runs east down 376, I think we all know it’s a sidewalk basically to nowhere then it picks up again,” Fleetwood said. “State Highway has assured me that when this is finished that sidewalk will be contiguous.” He added that the easements and conveyance being considered would not prevent the town from eventually aligning Decatur Street and Flower Street. “We’re not losing that as an option,” Fleetwood said. The council voted unanimously to approve the conveyance and easements. “These improvements can only enhance and make our community safer,” Councilman Dean Burrell said.

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Worcester Teachers Return To School Hogan To Introduce Relief Legislation First Group Of Students Back Tuesday Stimulus Payments Included For Some

January 15, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

NEWARK – A week after teachers and staff returned to schools, some students are expected to return to in-person learning next week. Worcester County Public Schools will welcome back a first wave of students Tuesday, Jan. 19, according to Superintendent Lou Taylor’s latest announcement. “Since my last message to you, we have been working diligently to further safeguard our schools to ensure your child and our faculty and staff are able to safely begin the transition to in-person learning,” Taylor said in a message Jan. 8. Though schools were initially set to resume in-person instruction at the start of the new year, Taylor delayed the return when rising COVID-19 rates prompted the Worcester County Health Department and the Worcester County Teachers Association to advise against reopening. This week, the positivity rate statewide was 8.53% Wednesday while the case rate was 53.39 per 100,000. In Worcester County, the positivity rate was 12.39% Wednesday while the case rate per 100,000 was 77.34. The county’s positivity rate has trended downward

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since Jan. 3, when it hit 16.22%. “As I shared with you last week, all faculty and staff at our schools received a customized training last month,” Taylor said in his Jan. 8 message. “This week, we have put into place additional supports and precautions to bolster our already comprehensive safety protocols and procedures.” Teachers and staff returned to schools Jan. 11 as students remained engaged in distance learning. Taylor said he planned to bring a first wave of students back Jan. 19. “Schools have already made contact with the families of those students in that first wave,” he said. “I also want you to understand that this timeline relies heavily on no unforeseen circumstances occurring and no major changes in our local COVID-19 metrics.” Taylor went on to ask families to do their part as students returned to schools. “Please complete our screening tool honestly each day,” he said. “Make sure your child is properly masked; remind them of the importance of keeping a physical distance of 6 feet or more from others; and please keep your child home when sick. I cannot stress to you how important your help is to making sure your child, our teachers, and staff can remain healthy and safe.”

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Gov. Larry Hogan announced on Monday a comprehensive $1 billion COVID-19 relief package that will directly benefit hundreds of thousands of Marylanders and small businesses if approved by the state legislature. The emergency Recovery for the Economy, Livelihoods, Industries Entrepreneurs and Families, or RELIEF ACT of 2021, introduced by Hogan would include direct stimulus payments to about 400,000 Marylanders totaling $750 for families and $450 for individuals with low- to moderate income levels. The direct relief payments would be available to those who filed for the Earned Income Tax Credit. The RELIEF Act of 2021 would also repeal state and local tax on unemployment benefits. The proposed relief package would also provide $300 million in sales tax credits for small business. Eligible small businesses could see relief from sales tax at $3,000 per month for four months, or a total of $12,000. About 55,000 small businesses in Maryland would benefit from the relief package. “This pandemic has caused tremendous struggles for Marylanders,” said Hogan. “The primary focus of the 2021

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General Assembly session is to provide immediate relief for families and small businesses. I’ve directed our team to explore every possible avenue as we face unprecedented economic hardship.” Hogan said Maryland’s proposed COVID relief package in intended to supplement federal stimulus packages for families and small businesses struggling to stay afloat in the midst of the pandemic. He urged state lawmakers to act quickly on the relief package when the General Assembly session opens on Wednesday. “This is targeted direct relief to fill in the gaps,” he said. “I’m asking the legislative branch to assist by immediately passing this relief package. I can’t imagine anything more important. Struggling Maryland businesses and families cannot afford the partisan bickering seen in Washington.” Hogan will introduce the RELIEF Act of 2021 as emergency legislation when the session opens on Wednesday and urged his colleagues in the state Senate and House not to drag their feet on passing the legislation. “The events of the past 10 months have wreaked havoc on the nation’s economy and Maryland has not been immune,” he said. “Maryland’s economy has been resilient, but still many are struggling and in need of relief.”


Report Details Resort’s Grim Bus Ridership numbers

Page 22

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – As expected, municipal bus ridership in Ocean City took a huge hit last year due to the state restrictions and the public’s reticence for enclosed tight spaces, but the losses were offset somewhat by decreases in expenses. The Ocean City Transportation Committee had before it on Tuesday an overview of ridership, revenue and expense figures for 2020 and no one appeared surprised by the sharp decline. Transit Director Mark Rickards said December 2020 was down about 41% compared to the same month last year. In terms of year-to-date ridership, the average month in 2020 was down around 70% to 80% percent. He said the December 2020 ridership numbers at a 41% decrease represented a flattening out of sorts. “Looking at the seven-year average, 2020 was the lowest I think any of have ever seen, but it was expected with the circumstances,” he said. “Now, there is nowhere to go but up. It’s nothing to be

ashamed of. We all did our jobs under difficult circumstances. We still had pretty good numbers in the summer with over 400,000 riders.” Council Secretary and committee member Tony DeLuca said there was reason for optimism going forward. “The uptick in encouraging,” he said. “It looks like the percentage of decline is flattening out. Are we going to be adding more deployment?” Rickards said the current bare-bones deployment plan has 40-minute service times with one bus going north and one bus going south. Largely because of the current state restrictions on restaurant and bar stop times at 10 p.m., the service concludes each night at 11 p.m. “That’s basically what we were doing last winter,” he said. “It cuts off at 11 p.m. and starts again at 6 a.m. We’re not adding deployments on the weekends for now. That will continue through April 11 unless things change between now and then. We might ramp up on St. Patrick’s weekend.” Mayor Rick Meehan asked if the schedule could be adjusted if there are changes in the state restrictions be-

tween now and April. “We are very flexible,” said Rickards. “We can ramp up pretty quickly if things change and restaurant hours change.” Rickards explained on the revenue side, the town took an obvious hit, but not to the extent ridership numbers dropped. He said revenue was down around 73% compared to the 80% drop in ridership. However, payroll and operational expenses were down because of fewer deployments. In a nutshell, it appears ridership was down 80%, revenue was down 70% and expenses were down about 60%. All in all, Rickards said there was roughly $1.8 million in ridership fares lost because of COVID, but that loss was offset by cuts in expenses. With the 2020 transit stats in the books, Public Works Director Hal Adkins said it was time for the “crystal ball” conversation about 2021. The current rules in place in Maryland for mass transit include the wearing of masks for patrons, drivers and staff, capacity limitations and wipes on buses. Adkins said deployment levels going forward will depend on the town’s direction with re-

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January 15, 2021

gards to marketing and tourism. “We at public works don’t currently follow all of the issues with tourism,” he said. “What message are we sending out for spring and summer? That will affect what we do. We need to put ourselves in a position to be ready.” In answer to a question about bus capacity, Operations Manager Steve Bartlett said the buses for the most part have been running at about 25%. He said the drivers have some discretion with their comfort level in terms of capacity. Meehan said those capacity limitations could be lifted somewhat if COVID restrictions are eased down the road. “Looking forward, we should adopt a plan with no standing on the buses, with riders spaced where possible and wearing masks,” he said. “As long as everyone continues to wear masks and follow the other directives, we should get back to capacity seating with no standing.” Bartlett said he had a core group of about 68-72 municipal bus drivers last year. In a typical year, the town seeks to employ and train about 160 drivers. Bartlett said the goal is to get back to that number, but there are still challenges. “The process has become more complicated,” he said. “You have to have an appointment for anything at the DMV. You have to have appointments for the pre-screen drug tests. If somebody came to me fully-credentialed, it would still be a three-week process. We’re going to be starting at the end of the month and we hope to be at fullblown capacity by mid-March.” In terms of ridership predictions for the coming season, Meehan said it will depend on what is going on with the pandemic. “I don’t see people right now jumping back on public transportation,” he said. “I think it’s going to be a gradual thing until people get comfortable again.” Rickards said it could take years to get ridership numbers back to pre-COVID levels. “It will be a challenge to get our ridership back,” he said. “It will be a yearby-year process. It might take three years to come all the way back.”

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Page 23


Royal Farms Plans Off Route 589 Advance

Page 24

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – County staff reviewed plans for a Royal Farms on Route 589 and a cottage court on Route 611 this week. The Worcester County Technical Review Committee held a teleconference Wednesday to review two upcoming projects. The committee discussed the Royal Farms planned for Route 589 next to Walgreens and also looked at a proposal for Shorepoint Cottage Court, a development of 52 cabins planned for 9543 Stephen Decatur Rd. Jeff Harman of Becker Morgan Group told the committee the proposed 5,154-square-foot Royal Farms would include a car wash and eight gasoline

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pumping stations. “It would be our typical Royal Farms store you’d expect,” Harman said. He added that developers had been working closely with the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) throughout the planning process. “We have been working on this project for a year and a half recognizing one of the key things was access to Route 589,” he said. Harman said that after much negotiation, the project was moving forward with an entrance on Route 589, though approval is still needed from the Maryland Board of Public Works. The gas station will be accessible by entrances on Cathell Road as well. “We’re also providing the cross connection to Walgreens that was envisioned many years ago,” Harman said.

Though the committee referenced the need for a loading area, Harman said Royal Farms stocked its stores through the front door so didn’t need a designated loading space. In West Ocean City, Shorepoint Cottage Court is being planned for vacant land on Route 611. The project would consist of 52 units, each 390 square feet. “We’re providing an amenity in the center which would be a pool beach area,” said land planner Bob Hand. Though the committee had some minor questions about access, Hand said he would work closely with SHA in designing the property’s entrance. Shorepoint Cottage Court will go before the Worcester County Planning Commission for review before moving forward.

Building Permits Increased 33% In 2020 Over 2019

January 15, 2021

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – The town saw an increase in building activity in 2020, according to an annual report presented this week. Planning Director Dave Engelhart told the Berlin Town Council on Monday that the town again saw a jump in permits during the last calendar year. “Overall I think this is a good trend to have,” Engelhart said. As he does at the end of every year, Engelhart tabulated permit totals as 2020 came to a close. He told the council that in 2020 there were a total of 308 permits issued, representing a 33% increase over the previous year. That is the largest number in recent years, as the town reported 232 permits in 2019, 195 permits in 2018 and 235 permits in 2017. As far as new home construction, Engelhart said there were five new single-family homes built in 2020. That is a decrease from last year, as the town had nine new single-family homes in 2019. “That was a busy year,” Engelhart said. In 2018 the town permitted six new single-family homes while in 2017 that figure was also six. Engelhart said the town had also added a number of other dwelling units, such as apartments and town houses, in recent years. “The four-year total is 274 so you could say we’ve become a lot busier,” Engelhart said. He said Census data showed that in Worcester County, there were 2.3 residents per dwelling unit. “I think in Berlin we probably have a little more density than that if you think about all the school children,” he said. “All the schools seem to be at capacity or growing toward it.” Engelhart said he thought the upward trend in permits was a good thing. “It shows our ability to add infill property where we have services — water, sewer, electric,” he said. “It also shows our popularity and our vitality. Overall I think this is a good trend we have. It keeps us busy and also helps with the tax base, helps with our different utilities and of course fees and paying for them.” As far as 2021 activity, though the Berlin Planning Commission’s January meeting was canceled, the board is expected to convene in February to consider plans for an Auto Zone proposed for the site of the former McDonald’s on Route 50 near Seahawk Road.


Cops & Courts

January 15, 2021

Multiple Arrests In Midtown Melee

OCEAN CITY – A handful of people were arrested for a midtown disturbance early last Sunday including two for possession of a loaded handgun. Around 1:45 a.m. last Sunday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to the area of 88th Street for a reported group of disorderly individuals. A 911 caller complained the group was disorderly and it appeared there was going to be a fight, according to police reports. When officers arrived, they reportedly observed numerous people standing around a Dodge Ram truck. The driver of the truck allegedly revved its engine loudly, attracting the attention of the officers. An OCPD officer approached the truck with his emergency lights activated and identified the driver as Tresvante Bivens, 22, of Salisbury, and the passenger as Da’quawn Waters, 22, also of Salisbury. While the officer was interacting with the two occupants, he detected a strong odor of marijuana coming from the passenger compartment, according to police reports. The officer reportedly asked Bivens and Waters to get out of the vehicle. A search of the vehicle revealed a Ruger 9mm handgun and plastic baggie of marijuana less than 10 grams. The handgun’s magazine was loaded, but there was no round in the chamber. When interviewed, Bivens and Waters each told police they were old friends who had just reconnected and were hanging out in the truck to make plans. Bivens acknowledged owning the truck, but denied knowing anything about the handgun. Waters also denied knowing anything about the gun. Based on the evidence and their testimony, Bivens and Waters were arrested on multiple weapons charges. During the same incident involving the potential fight at 88th Street, OCPD officer allegedly observed a female suspect later identified as Alexius Horsey, 22, of Pocomoke, screaming at an occupant in a parked vehicle. According to police reports, Horsey could be heard screaming from at least 200 feet away in violation of the town’s 50-foot noise ordinance. Horsey was located about 15 feet away from the truck involved in the handgun violations. According to police reports, Horsey was told repeatedly to stop yelling or she would be arrested, but the orders only appeared to rile her up more and she directed an expletive-laced tirade at the police officers. When OCPD officers finally attempted to arrest Horsey, she reportedly resisted and swung her arms and refused to sit on the curb as directed. Her screaming was echoing off the

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surrounding buildings in the area, according to police reports. Horsey reportedly refused to provide any identification or her name. When the officers told her she was going to have to provide a name to the commissioner, and ultimately a judge, Horsey reportedly said, “I don’t give a [expletive deleted] about no judge,” and “I don’t give a [expletive deleted] about no commissioner,” according to police reports. She was arrested for disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace and resisting arrest.

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Hotel Disturbance OCEAN CITY – A Salisbury woman was arrested on disorderly conduct charges last weekend after allegedly causing a ruckus at an uptown hotel. Around 11:50 p.m. last Saturday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to a hotel at 123rd Street for a reported assault. The officer met with the alleged victim and hotel staff in the lobby. While the officer was speaking with hotel staff about the alleged incident, he observed numerous people exiting the hotel, along with multiple cars attempting to leave the parking lot, according to police reports. The officer approached a vehicle and made contact with Taysha Maddox, 31, of Salisbury, who was very upset and yelling, according to police reports. Maddox reportedly said numerous times she had done nothing wrong, but she had been identified as the suspect in the alleged incident. Despite being given numerous lawful orders to lower her voice, Maddox’s screaming and yelling only intensified, according to police reports. OCPD officers observed a male walking in the parking lot and Maddox reportedly aimed her continued yelling and screaming in his direction. When Maddox refused to obey orders to lower her voice and stop yelling and screaming, she was ultimately arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace.

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FROM PAGE 25 came enraged when he viewed a picture of her ex-boyfriend. The victim told police Morales had slapped her on the right side of her head, face and ear. The victim’s daughter was on the scene and witnessed the assault and provided an account of the events the corroborated the victim’s story. For his part, Morales acknowledged there had been an argument, but denied striking the victim. Based on the evidence of an apparent assault on the victim, along with the testimony of the victim and her daughter, Morales was arrested and charged with second-degree assault. Last week, he pleaded guilty to second-degree assault and was sentenced to three years, all but 58 days of which were suspended. He was also placed on probation for three years.

Guilty Plea For Rock Throwing OCEAN CITY – An Ocean City man, arrested in October after throwing rocks at an uptown business, pleaded guilty last week to intoxicated endangerment. Around midnight on Oct. 27, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was patrolling in the area of the Starbucks at 123rd Street and was typing a report when a loud bang was heard. The officer looked around and did not initially determine what caused the loud noise, which sounded like two hard

January 15, 2021 objects hitting each other, according to police reports. The officer went back to typing the reports and heard the same loud bang two more times. The officer reportedly moved the patrol vehicle closer and observed a suspect later identified as Albert Dennis, 39, of Ocean City, holding fistsized planter’s rocks in both hands while facing the Starbucks. According to police reports, the officer observed Dennis hiding behind a bush on the sidewalk east of the business before throwing another rock at its window. When Dennis saw the officer, he dropped his remaining rocks and started to walk away. When the officer approached Dennis, he reportedly put his hands up in a “don’t shoot” motion, according to police reports. The officer motioned for Dennis to come back and he complied. According to police reports, Dennis exhibited signs of intoxication. Dennis reportedly told police he had too much to drink at a bar at 131st Street and told the officer he was walking home and wanted to throw rocks at Starbucks and other businesses. He reportedly told the officer he had only thrown rocks at the coffee shop so far. Dennis reportedly told the officer, “It was my fault,” and “That was my mistake.” The officer went to assess the damage and found three large planter’s rocks in the patio in front of the Starbucks’ door. The rocks were reportedly part of the landscaping in the business’s patio area. The officer observed three gouges and scratches in the door of the business. Last week, Dennis pleaded guilty to intoxicated endangerment.


OC Cited For Open Meetings Violation Over Towing Change

January 15, 2021

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – The state’s Open Meeting Compliance Board (OMCB) last week issued an opinion the town violated the Open Meetings Act when it didn’t properly report significant changes to the towing ordinance passed in September. In September, the Mayor and Council passed a trio of ordinances amending the town’s towing policy including a new fee structure and other elements in advance of the upcoming pop-up car rally and the fall Cruisin event. Specifically, the ordinances reflected changes to the fee structure for impoundment of certain vehicles during times when the special event zone was in place along with a defined process for removing a towed vehicle from the impound lot. During the Cruisin event in October, a participant was cited for allegedly having an unsafe vehicle and was impounded at a rate of $985. The participant, Jay Mills, was also charged $100 to tow his vehicle out of the impound lot. Mills later attempted to appeal the fees, but learned the ordinances passed a month earlier removed the appeal process. Mills then went back to the Sept. 8 meeting agenda and minutes and learned the towing ordinances were passed as emergency legislation. He filed a complaint with the OMCB alleging the town violated the Open Meetings Act because it did not appropriately make known the changes to the towing ordinance. Last week, the OMCB released its opinion determining the town had violated certain sections of the act. During Tuesday’s work session, Council President Matt James read a statement into the record announcing the OMCB opinion. “The complaint alleged the council violated the Open Meetings Act on September 8, 2020 by amending the town’s towing ordinance without adequate notice to the public, and that the written minutes of said meeting did not indicate that the council discussed the ordinance before adopting it,” he said. “The

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board concluded the council violated section 3-302.1 of the Open Meetings Act by omitting a known topic or item of business from its September 8 agenda as the agenda should have alerted the public, by way of a separately listed item, that the council would be considering the ordinances as ‘emergency,’ which would have made them effective immediately.” James said the OMCB determined there was a violation of the act, but the town was in compliance with other salient portions of the act. “The board concluded this information should have been on the agenda even though the bill summary sheets in the agenda packet did alert the public that the ordinances could be adopted as emergency legislation,” he said. “The board concluded the council was in compliance with the portions of the act requiring reasonable advance notice of their meeting and making the agenda available in a timely manner. The council has signed the opinion and will submit said signed copy to the board as required by the act.” An opinion of the board is strictly ad-

visory. The board will state its opinion on whether the Open Meetings Act was violated and explain its reasoning. The board has no authority to issue orders or impose penalties. According to the complaint, on Oct. 9, Mills was pulled over in the special event zone because his vehicle was deemed unsafe and did not have a hood, according to the complaint. However, he pointed out in the complaint his historic vehicle was 100% compliant and tagged appropriately as a street rod. He also pointed out his 1929 vehicle did not require a hood. Regardless, Mills’ vehicle was impounded with a $985 fee. He was also reportedly charged $100 to tow the vehicle out of the impound lot. Mills said in the complaint he accepted the citations, paid the fees and towed his vehicle out of the impound lot, trailered it and returned home. Once back home, Mills sent in the citations and pleaded not guilty to get an appearance before a judge to contest the fees. In the complaint, Mills said he went to the town’s website to figure out how to file an appeal and notified the

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town via email he intended to appeal. However, he got an email in reply stating there was no appeal process because the emergency ordinance passed in September removed the appeal process for a police-directed tow in a special event zone. “This removes all due process from an appeal of wrongful impoundment during said special event and makes the officer the judge and jury,” he said. “I would please like some help with this as it just does not seem right or lawful. It seems the Town of Ocean City is using this bill to their benefit and not the way it was intended to be used. I also believe they violated the Open Meeting Act with their town ordinance change and not providing the new town ordinance to the public before said event.” The OMCB opinion released last week marked the second time in the last seven months the Town of Ocean City has been deemed in violation of the Open Meeting Act. In June, the OMCB deemed the town was in violation of certain portions of the act during oftenclosed meetings regarding the renewal of the pier franchise agreement.

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Anthony Robert Ferrese, Jr. SEAFORD – Anthony Robert Ferrese, Jr. “Tony,” age 88, died Monday, Jan. 4, 2021 at Tidal Health Nanticoke in Seaford, Del. Born in Scranton, Pa., he was the son of the late Anthony Robert Ferrese, Sr., and Rose Cerra Ferrese. He was preceded in death by his wife, Norma May Shockley Ferrese, in 2020. He is survived by his children, Robert A. Ferrese (Shelley), of Summerville, S.C., Debo- ANTHONY rah Ann House (Dwight) ROBERT of Middletown, Md., Carol FERRESE, JR. Linton (George “Fuzzy”) of Myersville, Md., and Victoria Ferrese “Vicky” of Millsboro, Del. There are 10 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren. Also surviving is a brother, Fred Ferrese (Ruth) of Hickory, N.C., and sister-in-law, Alice Amos. There are numerous nieces and nephews, including a very special niece, Rosemary Britton of Elkton, Md. He also leaves his beloved pets, Roxie and Petey.

Obituaries

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Also preceding him in death were his siblings, Joseph Ferrese, Katherine Ellwood, Sadie Thomas and Philomena Bozeman. Mr. Ferrese had been a factory worker with Chrysler Automotive in Elkton and had been a service manager for Hoover Vacuum Cleaner Company. He was an Army Veteran, serving in Korea. He was a sports enthusiast and had been a star athlete. Tony always had a joke to make people laugh. He was loved by all who knew him. A mass of Christian Burial was held on Friday, Jan. 8 at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Berlin. Interment was on Monday, Jan. 11 in Bethel Cemetery in Chesapeake City, Md. In lieu of flowers, a donation in his memory may be made to: Wounded Warriers, P.O. Box 7585517m, Topeka, Kan., or the American Cancer

Society, 1315 Mt. Hermon Rd., Salisbury, Md. 21804. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Mindy Quinn Zimmer BERLIN – Mindy Quinn Zimmer of Berlin passed away peacefully on Jan. 9, 2021. She was born on July 31, 1966 in Baltimore. In 1989, she moved to the Eastern Shore and became a cherished member of her beloved community. Owning several MINDY QUINN salons, Mindy was pasZIMMER sionate about her work and her clients. She was a devoted mother to her children, Damian and Alora Lockhart, be-

January 15, 2021 loved daughter of Marty Quinn, cherished sister to Erin Cerf and John Quinn, and life-long soul sister to Michelle Flayhart and Carol Hallinan. She will be missed by her family, countless friends and her spiritual community. A Celebration of Life will be announced at a later date. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home. Condolences may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

Lisa Rene Uffelman BERLIN – Lisa Rene Uffelman, age 65, passed away peacefully January 5, 2021 at Atlantic General Hospital. She was born Oct. 10, 1955 in Levittown, Pa. to Milton and Mary Heuberger. Lisa graduated from York Catholic High School in 1973 and from York College in 1977. After college, she met the love of her life Michael Allen Uffelman. They married in Annapolis on Sept. 11, 1982. For many years Lisa worked as a real estate agent in York, Pa. with Ed Saxe Real Estate and then with Century 21. She was a very caring person and found her calling working for Visiting Angels in York, Pa. Lisa also loved the beach and LISA RENE moved from York, Pa. to UFFELMAN Ocean Pines, Md. in 2011. Because of her devotion to helping people, she went to work for Home Instead Senior Care. Lisa also had a soft spot for animals, especially dogs. Her dogs Katie and Ellie May Clampett filled her life with much happiness and contentment. She had a great sense of humor and would pull pranks on many of her friends. Lisa was so full of the loving grace of friendship. A friend to all, with a memory for keen detail that could span 50 some years. She knew all and remembered all and would lavish us with fond memories, long ago forgotten by most but not by our dear Lisa. Her laugh was infectious, no one could laugh like her or make you laugh like her. Lisa is predeceased by her parents, Milton and Mary Heuberger, and her brother, Carl Heuberger. She is survived by her loving husband, Michael Uffelman; sisters Tina Lowry of Smyrna, Del. and Candy Nusbaum and husband Bruce of Millersville, Pa.; and many nieces and nephews. Donations can be made in Lisa's honor to the Worcester County Humane Society, P.O. Box 48, Berlin, Md. 21811 or Online: https:/lworcestercountyhumanesociety.org Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home. Condolences may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

Joyce Marie (Saylor) Nesbit OCEAN PINES – Joyce Nesbit, age 73, passed away peacefully on Saturday, Jan. 9, 2021 with her loving family at her home in Ocean Pines. Joyce was predeceased by her parents, Melvin and Mae Saylor, and her brothers, Buddy Saylor, Ronnie Saylor and David Ennis. She is survived by her husband, John (Buddy) Nesbit; daughter Kristen Thomas, son Brian NesJOYCE bit; brother Anthony PaulNESBIT etti; five grandchildren, Brittany (Josh), Kelsey, Edward, Lauren and Shane; and SEE NEXT PAGE


... Obituaries

January 15, 2021

six great-grandchildren. Joyce married her best friend and the love of her life (Buddy Nesbit) on Aug. 3, 1968. She attended Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, Md. followed by working in Admissions at University of Maryland-College Park. After moving to Cary, N.C., Joyce worked for a financial planner and in her spare time, began collecting and then selling Longaberger baskets. Upon the retirement of her husband Buddy, she moved to Ocean Pines, where she joined many different clubs and programs making many great friends over the years. While living in Ocean Pines, she worked at the Crazy Ladyz clothing boutique and continued to make friends with the store clients. Her favorite activities included traveling, boating, crafting, beaches and palm trees, and gatherings with friends and family. She enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren at "grammy camp". Due to COVID-19, a private burial will be held at Greenbelt Cemetery in Greenbelt, Md. A Celebration of Life to honor Joyce and share fond memories will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in memory of Joyce to Coastal Hospice, PO Box 1733, Salisbury Md. 21802 is appreciated. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home. Condolences may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

James Edward Swagler, III OCEAN CITY – James Edward Swagler, III, born Aug. 28, 1943, passed away from cardiac arrest on Dec. 24, 2020. Jim grew up in Parkville Md. and married his high school sweet heart, Kathy Swagler. They were married for 54 years. He was the beloved father of Jim Swagler IV (spouse Kelly Zajdel Swagler) of Pittsville and Kara Yoder (spouse Lee Yoder) of Long Green, Md. He was the adoring grandfather of Katrina Leigh Yoder and Karli Noelle Yoder. Jim was passionate about fishing and racJAMES ing. He was the Area 12 EDWARD Director of the Maryland SWAGLER, III Charterboat Assoc Atlantic, licensed charter boat Captain in the Chesapeake Bay

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 29

Lights No More:

The Town of Ocean City’s parks department has been working at Northside park to dismantle the Winterfest of Lights decorations including the centerpiece tree. Photo by Chris Parypa

and Atlantic Ocean. He raced his drag cars up and down the East Coast, was a member of NHRA, IHRA, Mason Dixon Classic Chevy's, OC Cruzers, and DelMarVa Late Greats. He was partner in the boat repair business Jim's Marine in Ocean City. He will be dearly missed by his family and friends. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in his memory to The Kidney Project, UCSF Foundation, P.O. Box 45339, San Francisco, Calif. 94145-0339 or https://pharm.ucsf.edu/kidney

Howard Lee Tyndall, Jr. BERLIN – Howard Lee Tyndall, Jr., 89, of Berlin, passed away on Sunday, Jan. 10, 2021 at TidalHealth Peninsula Regional in Salisbury. Born in Chincoteague, Va. on Aug. 13, 1931, he was the son of the late Howard Lee Tyndall, Sr. and Lillie Mae Tyndall. Mr. Tyndall graduated in 1948 from Buckingham High School in Berlin and went on to earn his Mas- HOWARD LEE ter’s Degree in education TYNDALL, JR. from Salisbury Normal School, now

Salisbury University. For most of Howard’s life, he was a teacher in the Baltimore County, Indian River and Worcester County school systems. Howard was a US Army Veteran during the Korean Conflict. Howard is survived by his brother, William Frederick Tyndall (Barbara) of Conway, S.C.; nieces Saundra Goff (Gary) of Lusby, Md. and Deborah Downey (Keith) of Salisbury; and nephews Jay Tyndall (Theresa) and Michael Tyndall (Joanne), both of Ocean Pines. He is also survived by several very special friends who he considered family. In addition to his parents, Howard was preceded in death by his sister, Betty Mae Palmer. A private graveside service will be held at Sunset Memorial Park in Berlin. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in his memory to the Berlin Public Library, 13 Harrison Avenue, Berlin, Md. 21811. Arrangements are in the care of Holloway Funeral Home, PA, 501 Snow Hill Road, Salisbury, MD 21804. To send condolences please see hollowayfh.com.

Brian Michael Stawinski OCEAN CITY – Brian Michael Stawin-

ski, 52, of Ocean City, passed on Sunday, Jan. 10, 2021. Born on Dec. 24, 1968 in Minneapolis, Minn., he was the son of Albert Edward Stawinski and Judith “Judy” Bisi. Professionally, Brian served as a chef for 15 years in Ocean City and Berlin area serving many of the local restaurants. Prior to coming to Ocean City, Brian served restaurants in Atlanta, Georgia and Kill Devil Hills, N.C. Brian was an avid fan of the Baltimore Ravens, Orioles and Atlanta Braves. He enjoyed skateboarding, billiards and bowling. He enjoyed his furry feline friends, espeBRIAN cially Shorty. MICHAEL Brian is survived by STAWINSKI his parents, aunts, uncles, cousins and many friends. Brian is survived by his forever friend, Donna Martz of Berlin. Brian was preceded in death by his stepfather, Gene Bisi. Interment will be private. A memorial service will be conducted at a later date in Dundalk. Please share memories and condolences with the family at www.hollowayfh.com.


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The Adventures Of Fatherhood By STEVE GREEN

ome of the best parenting advice I ever got was to enjoy the kids while they are young and simple because it only gets harder. When I was swimming in dirty diapers, sleepless nights and toddler tantrums over nothing, it was the last thing I wanted to hear. Life was tough then, but it required physical grit as opposed to today’s psychological warfare. These days with my kids, 12 and 11 years old, I get it now. In fact, I never would have imagined a time when my neurotypical child, Beckett, 12, would be more complicated than his autistic little brother Carson, 11. Though Carson comes with a host of challenges, including limited independence and verbal apraxia which makes him nearly nonverbal, it’s the tween in the house who is on my mind most of the time these days. In many ways, Carson is simpler. He has severe limitations and social anxieties, but he’s more predictable and easily satisfied in his home doing what he enjoys. His older brother is a complicated being on the verge of puberty who is always testing his parents with actions and words that hover between outright disobedience and simply testing limits. He’s a good kid with a solid moral compass, but he is easily influenced by others and often loses his way. He forgets who he is and gets distracted by things in life that are not good for him. Parenting him while he works through all these changes in his life has become a constant source of anxiety for us. It’s a difficult time. As prone to do in times of conflicts, I did some online research this week on the whole concept of how parents work through these instincts to help their children when what they really need is some tough love. From coaching him for many years, I have learned Beckett is not one to heed advice. His mother and I can guide him and offer recommendations from our ex-

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perience on how to go about this or that, such as studying for a test or practicing hard to get more playing time in a sport. He seems to think he knows more than us and the general principles that have steered us our entire lives will not work for him. He almost always replies with, “I know, I got it” but the reality often is he doesn’t know, and he certainly does not have it. He has to learn through his own experiences. He will fail consequently. It’s only then will he change his approach. One example to share this week was an instance in school when he was blindsided by a history test. I watch his school portal to make sure he’s on top of his assignments, but I never saw anything about a test until the score was posted. He did far worse than normal because he didn’t study. He didn’t even know there was a test. It’s the poor effort and disorganization that frustrates his parents. If he studies hard and puts in the time and doesn’t do well, that’s one thing. It’s another matter altogether to simply forget about a test (or in his case not even be aware of it) and then shrug his shoulders when I told him what he got and say, “phew I thought I did much worse.” I didn’t handle that response very well. It was the day after this conversation I started doing some research and came across an article on huffpost.com headlined, “You Need To Teach Your Kids To Fail. Here’s How.” Here are some excerpts: “Failure is part of life, and if our children don’t have the opportunity to fail or make mistakes, they’ll never realize they can bounce back. That’s what resilience is all about,” said Michele Borba, an educational psychologist and author of “UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World.” “Your child doesn’t learn to bounce back because you told them they could but because they experienced it. Then when the problems get really huge, they’ve got that gumption inside to realize, ‘Hey I

can do this!’ … When your child makes a mistake, don’t berate the child for the mistake but make it into a question of ‘What are you going to learn from it?’ ‘What’s one way you could do that differently?’” “The most effective teaching tools we have require kids to get frustrated and work through it to the other side,” said Jessica Lahey, a teacher, journalist and author of “The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed,” pointing to the concept of “desirable difficulties” ― educational tasks that require a considerable but ultimately desirable amount of effort in order to enhance long-term learning. “To benefit from desirable difficulties, kids have to be able to get frustrated, redirect themselves, take a breath, reread the instructions and stick with it long enough that they can overcome that frustration and actually feel that sense of competence when they actually work it out,” she noted. Lahey encouraged moms and dads to parent from a place of trust and focus on “autonomy supportive parenting” (giving kids more control over the details of a task and allowing them to get frustrated and work through it) rather than “directive parenting” (laying out exactly how to do things and making them follow through). “We as parents are really good at trying to make our kids feel confident. But confidence is like this empty optimism,” said Lahey. “Competence ― when kids actually push through, figure something out, try something, screw it up, do it again, and get to a place where they really achieve something ― that’s where real self-esteem lies, not in someone telling you you’re smart over and over again.” (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 WEBSITES: www.mdcoastdispatch.com www.facebook.com/thedispatchoc J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

NEWS DEPARTMENT SHAWN J. SOPER Managing Editor ssoper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHARLENE SHARPE Staff Writer/Copy Editor csharpe@mdcoastdispatch.com BETHANY HOOPER Staff Writer bhooper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHRIS PARYPA Photographer

SALES DEPARTMENT TERRI FRENCH Account Executive Entertainment Editor terri@mdcoastdispatch.com JEANETTE DESKIEWICZ Account Executive jeanette@mdcoastdispatch.com

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The Maryland Coast Dispatch (USPS #015125) is an official and legal newspaper for Worcester County. Periodical postage paid at Berlin, Maryland, and additional mailing offices. The Maryland Coast Dispatch, 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Md. 21811, is published weekly on Friday mornings, 52 weeks a year. Subscription rates are $75 per year, $55 for six months. POSTMASTER: Please send change of address to Maryland Coast Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Maryland Coast Dispatch offices are located at Route 346 and Graham Avenue, Berlin, Maryland.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

HOW WE SEE IT

Patience Required With Vaccinations

The distribution is not happening as fast as anyone would like, but patience is a must when it comes to the COVID19 vaccination process. Within a few hours of an initial announcement being released to the media, Atlantic General Hospital’s 300 vaccination slots for a phase 1B clinic this Saturday were filled and a wait list of more than 850 existed by mid-week. Though some may appear apprehensive about the vaccines, it’s clear most citizens are anxious to get their shots as soon as possible. Confirming the point is the notion individuals are trying to skirt the system to get vaccinated earlier than applicable. Several instances have been reported locally as well as regionally of people showing up at first-responder vaccination opportunities trying to hoodwink health officials to receive shots months before their turn. There is reason to be anxious. The vaccination rollout is happening much slower than it should, but the good news is three vaccinations (which require two doses) are available at this point and a potential one-dose vaccination is doing well in clinical trials. Amid rampant demand we must maintain our collective cool. Rural areas like Worcester County are doing a much better job of administrating the vaccines than metropolitan areas, but the issue is it’s a numbers game for hospitals and health departments. For example, according to a Maryland Department of Health COVID vaccine summary as of Jan. 12, Atlantic General Hospital had received 1,000 shots and given 717 for an administered rate of 72%. Over in Salisbury, TidalHealth Peninsula Regional had received 7,475 with 60% administered (4,459). Conversely, 5,000 doses have been delivered to the Greater Baltimore Medical Center at an administered rate of 45% (2,251). Gov. Larry Hogan and state health officials understand the timeline is not as swift as it should be. Phase 1B should be started statewide by February with the second phase beginning in March and the general public sometime in the summer. Thirty percent of Marylanders are expected to be vaccinated by May and 60% by September. While it’s frustrating to note the delays and this expansive timetable, we must be patient and understand health officials are working with state and federal regulators to secure as many doses as possible each day. We must remember one year ago the public did not even know about this virus. What’s happened scientifically since March has been a marvel, and we must now individually maintain reasonable expectations.

Page 31

By Publisher/Editor Steve Green

It’s going to be interesting over the next few months to observe and report on how Ocean City is preparing for the summer of 2021. It’s almost as if the resort is hoping for a normal season with a huge asterisk attached to all facets of operations. All planning is just that at this point, and everything is contingent upon the status of the pandemic by late spring, specifically the extent of restrictions in place come June. Though the hope is for a “normal-ish” summer season, it’s fool’s gold at this point to think society will be back in full swing in five months. A realistic hope would be for incremental steps toward normalcy in 2021 and an eye on 2022 to be when most aspects of society are back in swing. As far as Ocean City goes, one change being planned for the upcoming summer is the return of the Boardwalk tram. It’s a welcome development and a sign toward righting the times. The tram is a user choice. If individuals are not comfortable riding it, they don’t have to pay the fee. For those who suffer from mobility concerns, it’s going to be a welcome sight. Another preparation underway involves bus transportation. As expected, bus ridership in Ocean City nosedived last year. Ridership dropped 80% for the calendar year amid capacity restrictions and safety concerns. It’s probably going to be a similar situation in 2021, but the city still needs to plan to hire drivers in the event more capacity is allowed. The city has been running buses at about 25% capacity since the pandemic. There are hopes more capacity will be allowed by the summer, but the question remains whether the public’s comfort level is high enough to board an enclosed bus for transportation. As Ocean City Public Works Director Hal Adkins put it, a realistic approach needs to be tempered with some wishful thinking. “I think we’d be lucky to see a 30% increase this summer over last summer,” Adkins said during a meeting this week. “I don’t see it jumping back by 50%. I’m just being realistic.” Transit Director Mark Rickards is probably right when he said, “It will be a challenge to get our ridership back … It might take three years to come all the way back.” Phillips Foods is continuing its slow migration away from Ocean City, which was its home base for many years in the early days of the private company. Back in 2018, Phillips Seafood House in north Ocean City underwent a rebranding as a Mexican cantina. The concept flopped, and the property was put up for sale. The property was sold in January of 2020 for $2.2 million to Ocean Two LLC, which has plans for a mixed-use project involving 44 luxury residential units with retail and dining on the ground floor. It was announced this week the Beach Plaza Hotel was being closed for good. There is a contract on the property, but the sale has not been made official yet, according to state records. Though the deal is a complicated one, the Beach Plaza Hotel announced on its Facebook this week it will not reopen and the most recent restaurant to lease the inside space, Ocean 13, will be exploring new locales. The future of the property is unknown, but demolition of the landmark structure on 13th Street appears inevitable with redevelopment taking place over the next few years. The Facebook message from the hotel read, “The time has come to say goodbye; the Beach Plaza Hotel has now permanently closed our doors. “Through our time on the Ocean City Boardwalk, we’ve loved getting to know all our guests who stayed with us year after year. From long family vacations and fun-filled getaways to wedding celebrations and quick weekend escapes, the Beach Plaza Hotel was an inviting home for thousands of travelers across the years. Thank you for building your memories with us - we’ve absolutely loved being a part of it. “… The Phillips family would also like to thank the hundreds of employees who have worked with us over the years. From housekeeping and maintenance to front-desk staff and management, you’ve all worked together seamlessly to deliver a wonderful experience for our guests. Thank you for your years of loyal service.” A room tax increase in Worcester County for this year appears unlikely. The timing is not right and operators within the hospitality industry do not even support it. In advance of this week’s discussion about a potential room tax increase, the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association expressed its disapproval through a letter from Executive Director Susan Jones. A portion of the letter read, “… we are completely against any increase in room tax. The hospitality industry is notably the hardest hit segment and we continue to face operational restrictions limiting revenue opportunities. Some may believe a small percentage increase on room rate will not affect a visitor’s choice of destination; however, we believe otherwise. In our opinion, any perception of an increase will change choices given this environment. To raise a room tax because we are lower than other destinations is not logical. We continue to lose ground to the Delaware, North Carolina and Virginia Beaches. Why not market that we are the lowest? “Now is not the time to push an increase as this would crush our hopes for a recovery. … It would be short sighted and financially devastating to our members who have been mandated to spend significant funds to be able to operate under government mandated restrictions.”


Business And Real Estate News

Page 32

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Schell Brothers Partnership LEWES – Schell Brothers is partnering with Beebe Medical Foundation to spread kudos throughout the medical community during the month of January. Beebe team members and the community will have the opportunity to grant kudos and show gratitude for Beebe heroes through the Project Kudos Powered by Schell Brothers program. Project Kudos is an opportunity to show appreciation and gratitude to our local healthcare heroes by giving them kudos via social media. For each kudos received by Beebe Healthcare Heroes, Schell Brothers will donate $1 to Beebe. Each kudos on social media must be tagged @beebemedicalfoundation and @projectkudospoweredbyschellbrothers in order to count towards the donation. In January 2020, Schell Brothers started the Kudos for a Cause Campaign. Each month they partner with a different charity to help spread happiness and raise money for a nonprofit organization. Schell Brothers is harnessing the power of social media to make people feel awesome by doing good. In addition, for each kudos they will place a pinwheel at Beebe Healthcare’s Margaret H. Rollins Lewes Campus as a visual reminder and thank you for the hard work and dedication of Team Beebe in our community.

“Project Kudos is excited to spread our message of positivity and support local charities in 2021. We are thrilled to be partnering with Beebe in January and are excited about their mission, their expansion plans, and their commitment to community,” said Alyssa Titus, Marketing Director Schell Brothers. In addition to creating your own kudos post, you can give kudos to Beebe Heroes by commenting under the posts related to the campaign on Facebook and Instagram or by filling out a digital sticker and sharing it on your page. “We are so honored and excited to partner with Schell Brothers to spread kudos to our team members. Our Beebe Heroes have been working tirelessly to keep our community healthy and safe throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. We are grateful to our community and fellow civic organizations for the support and compassion they’ve demonstrated...” said a Beebe statement.

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Practice Adds Physician SALISBURY – Peninsula Orthopaedic Associates (POA) has announced the addition of Dr. Anthony Falvello as the newest provider at POA. Falvello brings over 10 years of orthopaedic excellence to the practice and will enhance accessibility to quality orthopaedic care specifically in Sussex County. Falvello will be serving the Southern Delaware communities with POA offices located in Seaford and Millsboro and provide patients with an unmatched orthopaedic experience for a wide range of injuries and conditions. Falvello specializes in total hip and knee joint arthroplasty, orthopaedic trauma as well as general orthopaedics. Falvello performs direct anterior total hip arthroplasty and focuses on narcotic sparing as well as rapid recovery hip and knee replacements. Falvello will also be on staff at TidalHealth Nanticoke and performing on call services as well as or-

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Financial Officer Appointed SALISBURY – SHORE UP! Inc. has announced the appointment of Elmira Whittington-Brown to serve as chief financial officer for the Community Action Agency. A native of Crisfield, Md., Brown has worked over 30 years in the field, with all of her experience gained at SHORE UP! SEE NEXT PAGE ROOFING

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Social Security Benefit Changes Instituted In New Year Wealth Of Knowledge

January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY COLLIN MACOMBER

BERLIN – The Social Security Administration (SSA) recently announced a new cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) starting in 2021. Beneficiaries can expect a 1.3% increase in income payouts, which is actually smaller than the COLA increase was for this year. For single households, that’s an average increase of about $20 a month; $33 for married retirees. Among older Americans who work and

also have begun drawing Social Security benefits, the earnings limit for those younger than full retirement age will increase to $18,960, which means the SSA will deduct $1 from benefits for every $2 earned above that amount. For those who will reach full retirement age during 2021, their earnings limit increases to $50,520. For this group, on earned income that exceeds the $50,520 threshold, the SSA will deduct $1 from benefits for every $3 earned (until the month the worker turns full retirement age). Once you’ve reached full retirement age —

She replaces former administrator of fiscal management, Bruce Wharton, who passed away July 2020 after a 41-year tenure with the agency. Brown worked in an interim capacity until her official appointment. “After 34 years at SHORE UP!, Elmira has demonstrated her knowledge of Fis-

cal Management, as well as her fervor for the agency and the community we serve,” said Executive Director Freddy L. Mitchell. “She learned from a seasoned professional, and I have no doubt she will continue her diligent work ethic in this new capacity.” The Norfolk State University graduate began working with SHORE UP! in 1986 as a fiscal office manager and has assumed every position in the fiscal office since that time.

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which is based on your birthdate — there is no limit; you can earn as much as you like without it impacting your Social Security benefits. If you believe your future retirement income won’t be enough to meet your needs, give us a call. We can help identify potential retirement income gaps and create a strategy using a variety of insurance products to help you work toward your long-term goals. COLLIN Unfortunately, more MACOMBER than 40% of retirees depend on Social Security benefits as their sole source of income. Without it, the number of elderly poor would increase by more than 200%. Among the nation’s population of more than 328 million, 48 million receive Social Security retirement benefits. That number that will continue to grow in the coming years as the large baby boomer population retires from the workforce. While the SSA has warned for many years that Congress must act to make

HERE’S MY CARD

changes to the program before the Social Security Trust Fund is projected to be depleted (in 15 years), this is a sensitive issue often avoided during election years, which come around every two years. While some conservative politicians have expressed the need to reduce benefits to reduce the nation’s deficit, that’s not a popular stance. Other proposals include increasing the maximum income subject to FICA taxes, which fund Social Security benefits; raising the retirement age; or paying benefits only to lower-income retirees. Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency. We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. (The writer has been part of the Key Financial team for over 15 years. Their entire team can be reached at 410-629-0357. MVA LICENSED

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT PAMELA GREEN

443-235-6249 • ARTISTICRENOVATIONS.COM

WAINWRIGHT’S TIRE CENTER INC. AUTO

SALES & SERVICE Custom Wheels Computer Wheel Alignment Lube & Oil Change Shocks & Struts

Exhaust Systems Air Conditioning & Brake Service Road Service – Truck & Farm

410-641-2000 • 18 Broad St. • Berlin

BLINDS/SHADES

PHONE: 410-641-4561 • FAX: 410-641-0966 EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@MDCOASTDISPATCH.COM

CLUTTER ANGELS “Anything you don’t have time to do CLEANING SERVICES

Clutter Angels can do For You!”

HOME SERVICES & PERSONAL ASSISTANTS

• Move In/Move Out Cleaning • Housekeeping • Packing/Unpacking • Errands

• Transporting/Donations • Downsizing/Organizing • Grocery Shopping • Dry Cleaning/Laundry

VETERAN & SENIOR SERVICES

• Companion Care • Mail/Help with Bills • Meal Preparation

WASTE & SEPTIC SERVICE SEPTIC PUMP OUTS AS LOW AS $225 Septic Installation, Service & Pumping Hydro Jetting | Drain Fields & Pump Stations Porta Potty Rentals | Roll-Off Dumpsters | Grease Traps

2kuzlandonseptic.com

2kuzlandonsepticservices@gmail.com | 410.957.0379

HOME IMPROVEMENT

• Laundry • Shopping/Errands

Jackie Sarbu, Owner • 410.422.4826

ONE FREE HOUR

WITH 5 HOUR PURCHASE

MAINTENANCE SERVICES

10% OFF

SENIORS & VETERANS

HANDYMAN/ASSEMBLY SERVICES

443-871-6643 sro2handymanservices.com

ASSEMBLY • HANDYMAN MAINTENANCE • INSTALLATIONS Residential • Commercial • Vacation Home • Rentals

Ken Walsh – 410-641-3762 est. 1977 • MhIC 8465 www.WalshHomeImprovementInc.com

Specializing In: Custom Additions, Kitchens, Baths

Brokered Boats Wanted CLEAN LATE MODELS UP TO 32 FEET BOAT & MARINE SALES

Low Fees ~ Great Results

RT. 113 BOAT SALES - 302-436-1737 Haul out and Transport Services Available


Page 34

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 15, 2021

The Charles R. Jenkins Chapter of the National Honor Society at Worcester Preparatory School inducted 42 new members in November. The honor students were Kate Abbott, Austin Airey, Grace Baeurle, Lily Baeurle, Ayush Batra, Myranda Beebe, Hannah Brasure, AnnaMarie Buas, Alex Bunting, Austin Cannon, Anna Carpenter, Charlotte Catapano, Hugh Thomas Cropper, Brooke Emeigh, Ethan Griffith, Nick Hearne, Aria Islam, Sydney LamsonReich, Carter McCabe, Graham McCabe, Anna McDonald, Marshall Mumford, Ava Nally, Nathan Oltman, Hayes Peterson, Vincent Petrera, Brooke Phillips, Camden Rayne, Brice Richins, Ashlyn Roselle, Riley Schoch, Sumira Sehgal, Jarett Sofronski, Anders Taylor, Bennett Tinkler, Jack Tucker, Chelsea vanVonno, Megan Waller, Michael Wehberg, Tristan Weinstein, Morgan and Anna Williams. Submitted Photos

Students In The News

Worcester Preparatory School students and faculty did not let the pandemic stop them from giving back to the community this past holiday season in a variety of ways. Above, in lieu of the annual Pajama, Gift, Food and Toy Drives, the WPS Student Government Association collected monetary donations from Lower/Middle/Upper School students totaling $5,526 to distribute to Diakonia, Inc. and Atlantic United Methodist Church in Ocean City; The Joseph House and HALO in Salisbury; Berlin First Baptist Church and Stevenson United Methodist Church Spirit Kitchen in Berlin; the Food Bank of Delaware and the Seaford Community Food Closet in Delaware. Below, first graders created colorful cards for the residents of Peak Healthcare at Hartley Hall Nursing Home in Pocomoke City. At left, students in Mrs. Burg’s French 3 and 4 classes composed holiday letters written in French to residents of a senior living home in Gatineau, Québec. At left, bottom, even with a year full of challenges, the school’s creative team -made up of Lower School music director Joanie Brittingham and art teacher Mrs. Rebecca Tittermary, along with Middle/Upper School music director Christopher Buzby, and art teacher George Zaiser -- coordinated efforts to produce multiple virtual programs combining art and music to share the gifts of their talented student artists and choral vocalists. Some fifth graders are pictured with Brittingham while filming the manger scene for the virtual Lower School musical, “Just One Candle.”


The Dispatch Classifieds

January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

$15/Week For Minimum Of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available)

HELP WANTED

Upcoming Yard Sale? The Dispatch is the BEST way to get the word out! Print & Online

We have an opening for an Automotive Maryland State Inspector at our Ocean Pines Goodyear. EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS! Please Call 302-344-9846

MAINTENANCE: F/T, Y/R, 32-40 hours/week. Dependable. Handyman with good skills. Must have transportation/tools. Send resume to fred@paradiseoc.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

P/T ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: Tuesdays and Thursdays AM only. Filing, scheduling, and other admin duties. North Salisbury area. Call 443-871-6634. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

•YARD MAINTENANCE •PAINTING •POWER WASHING 410-251-3425 410-202-2545

Legal Notices

BOAT CAPTAIN/MATE - WEST OC PART-TIME MAY-SEPT 2021

Great opportunity for retired Captain or someone qualified looking to make some extra $$$$. Job duties include taking boat owner bay and offshore fishing and cruising on 273 Everglades CC. Would also be responsible for picking up bait and anything else needed for that day. Looking for weekends and some weekdays. Great opportunity for the right person. Call or text 410-404-7118 with your per hour wage offer.

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

THIRD INSERTION MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

Currently hiring manpower for

Please apply in person at 11935 Hammer Rd, Bishopville, MD, or apply online: http://allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

TOWN OF WILLARDS WASTEWATER/WATER TREATMENT OPERATOR The Town of Willards has an immediate opening for a full-time Wastewater Treatment or Water Treament Operator for its wastewater and water treatment systems. The selected candidate must be able to work days with flexibility to work nights, weekends, and holiday work schedules. The applicant is preferred to have a MDE Class 4 Water License and/or Class 5A Wastewater License but other MDE Class Licenses may be considered. If you are interested and meet the requirements, please contact The Town of Willards for additional informaton. The Town of Willards 7344 Main Street, Willards, Maryland 21874 Email: townofwillards@wicomico.org Telephone: 410-835-8192 Facimile: 410-835-3549

COMMERCIAL

FOR LEASE: Retail Banking Center with drive thru. Contact Brian Gamm. 443-880-2225. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 1 OfficeRetail and 1 Warehouses. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– UPSCALE MIDTOWN OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT: 2,130 sq.ft. No CAM fees. 443-880-2225. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

The Dispatch

Call 302-539-8686 ext. 3014

Experience Preferred. Tools, transportation & a valid driver’s license are a plus. Competitive benefit package available.

SERVICES Ceja’s Landscaping & More!

AUTOMOTIVE - GREAT OPPORTUNITIES! Large automotive center with auto parts/marine stores, service centers and used car dealership, is now hiring for: - PARTS ASSOCIATES We offer EXCELLENT PAY & BENEFITS!

•STUCCO & EIFS MECHANICS •CARPENTERS •CONCRETE BLOCK •COATINGS SPECIALISTS •FLAT CONCRETE •CONCRETE REPAIRS •PT WELDER •COMMERCIAL CAULKING •WINDOW & DOOR INSTALLERS •WAREHOUSE HELP (DRIVER’S LICENSE REQ’D)

PUT YOUR LOGO IN COLOR FOR JUST $10

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811

Deadline For Insertions, Cancellations And Payment Is 3 p.m. Tuesday. Pre-Payment Is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard.

MARYLAND STATE INSPECTOR

Page 35

RENTALS

SNOW HILL: Cozy 2BR cottage. Upscale renovation, central air, W/D, hardwood floors, ceramic. Downtown, walk to everything. No Pets. $850/month. 410-651-2118. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WINTER RENTAL: 26th St., Bayside, 2BR, 1BA condo. Clean and Cozy. Furnished. Non smoking. $700 per mo + elect. & sec. dep. Water incl. Call 443-373-5638. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

HOUSING NEEDED GOLDEN SANDS CONDO: Individual seeking condo for long term lease. Call 410-812-5273 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

WEEKLY RENTALS Poolfront Room $215. Efficiency Room $245. 2 BR Apartment $350. 3 BR Suite $400.

Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave.

410-289-8581

ROOMMATES

SEEKING ROOMMATE: Downtown OC, 1st. St. Private BR, Shared BA & Kitchen. Family atmosphere. Refs req’d. $150/week + $150 sec. dep. includes utils. Lv. msg. 443-754-5667. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18524 To all persons interested in the estate of BARBARA E. WEITZEL AKA BARBARA E. EBERSBERGER, ESTATE NO. 18524. Notice is given that MARTIN L MUSELLA, 171 INDIAN TRAIL, ARAPAHOE, NC 28510 was on, DECEMBER 22, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of BARBARA E. WEITZEL, who died on AUGUST 28, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. 5 All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the

Register of Wills on or before the 22ND day of JUNE, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 01, 2021


The Dispatch

Page 36

LEGAL RATES: Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

MARTIN L MUSELLA Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-01, 01-08, 01-15

THIRD INSERTION

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18525 To all persons interested in the estate of ANTHONY G. POTUTO, ESTATE NO. 18525. Notice is given that LENA TUCCI, 17 TREMONT TERRACE, WANAQUE, NJ 07465 was on, DECEMBER 14, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ANTHONY G. POTUTO, who died on SEPTEMBER 29, 2020, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 14th day of JUNE, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unen-

Legal Notices

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

forceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 01, 2021 LENA TUCCI Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-01, 01-08, 01-15

SECOND INSERTION

WILLIAM E. ESHAM III ESQ AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, PA 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18536 To all persons interested in the estate of ROBERT F BELTER, ESTATE NO. 18536. Notice is given that DEBORAH RITZ, 11 HENRYS MILL DRIVE, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, DECEMBER 28, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ROBERT F BELTER, who died on AUGUST 17, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 28th day of JUNE, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 08, 2021 DEBORAH RITZ Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-08, 01-15, 01-22

SECOND INSERTION

B. RANDALL COATES ESQ COATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18537 To all persons interested in the estate of MARY LUCILLE HUDSON BROWN, ESTATE NO. 18537. Notice is given that KENNETH W BROWN, 207 IRONSHIRE STREET, SNOW HILL, MD 21863 was on, DECEMBER 29, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARY LUCILLE HUDSON BROWN, who died on DECEMBER 21, 2020, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 29th day of JUNE, 2021. Any person having a claim

against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 08, 2021 KENNETH W BROWN Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-08, 01-15, 01-22

SECOND INSERTION

MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, SUITE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18540 To all persons interested in the estate of ANITA LOUISE COOLIDGE, ESTATE NO. 18540. Notice is given that SHEILA RAE COLMAN, 26294 CREEKWOOD CIRCLE, LONG NECK, DE 19966 was on, DECEMBER 30, 2020, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ANITA LOUISE COOLIDGE, who died on NOVEMBER 26, 2020, with a will.

January 15, 2021

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 30th day of JUNE, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 08, 2021 SHEILA RAE COLMAN Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-08, 01-15, 01-22

SECOND INSERTION JAMES H. PORTER JR, ESQ 111 VINE STREET POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18541

To all persons interested in the estate of HARRY CARROLL WILLIAMS, ESTATE NO. 18541. Notice is given that AUDREY G. WILLIAMS, 2240 BY-PASS ROAD, POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 was on, JANUARY 04, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of HARRY CARROLL WILLIAMS, who died on SEPTEMBER 06, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 4th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 08, 2021 AUDREY G. WILLIAMS Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-08, 01-15, 01-22


The Dispatch

Legal Notices

January 15, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

LEGAL RATES

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966.

FIRST INSERTION AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, PA WILLIAM E. ESHAM III ESQ 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 18542 Notice is given that the CIRCUIT COURT of ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA, appointed HELEN M BURNS AKA HELEN G BURNS, 517 OAK HARBOUR COURT, JUNO BEACH, FL 33408, and STEVEN A WYNKOOP, 5620 8TH ROAD NORTH, ARLINGTON, VA 22205 and WILLIAM A WYNKOOP, 7107 VELLEX LAND, ANNANDALE, VA 22003, as the EXECUTORS of the Estate of CHRIS T SARRIS, who died on OCTOBER 1, 2020, domiciled in VIRGINIA, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is WILLIAM E ESHAM III, whose address is 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch

Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 HELEN M BURNS Foreign Personal Representative STEVEN A WYNKOOP Foreign Personal Representative WILLIAM A WYNKOOP Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

FIRST INSERTION

VICTOR H LAWS ESQ LAWS, INSLEY & BENSON, P.A. 209 E. MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 75 SALISBURY, MD 21803-0075 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18457 To all persons interested in the estate of ELAINE WAUGH, ESTATE NO. 18457. Notice is given that MARILYN HUGHES, 3425 JENNINGS CHAPEL ROAD, WOODBINE, MD 21797 and RONALD C. WAUGH, 5 HARLAN TRACE, BERLIN, MD 21811 was on, JANUARY 05, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ELAINE WAUGH, who died on AUGUST 23, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 5th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 MARILYN HUGHES Personal Representative RONALD C. WAUGH Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

FIRST INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000232 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. ALEXIS FITZPATRICK, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 11th day of January, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause

Page 37 closure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of February 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of February, 2021.

to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of February 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of February, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 20, #Be31 Wk 23, #Bu47 Wk 49, #Cb54 Wk 34, #Bv48 Wk 30, #Ak11 Wk 03, #Bz52 Wk 48, #As19 Wk 01, #Cb54 Wk 18, #Bu47 Wk 44, #Bj36 Wk 41, #Be31 Wk 24, #Bv48 Wk 23, #Aa1 Wk 31, #As19 Wk 26, #Aq17 Wk 30, #Bo41 Wk 22, #Aq17 Wk 13, #Bz52 Wk 45, #Be31 Wk 18, #Cb54

$1000.00 $1100.00 $50.00 $1100.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $1100.00 $1000.00 $1100.00 $1000.00 $1100.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

FIRST INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000252 BORDERLINKS I TIME INTERVAL OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. RALPH CRIPPS, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 12th day of January, 2021, that the fore-

The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 13, #Ak11 Wk 20, #Ak11 Wk 40, #Ak11 Wk 41, #Ak11 Wk 44, #Ak11 Wk 11, #Aq17 Wk 36, #Aq17 Wk 50, #Aq17 Wk 13, #Ar18 Wk 41, #Ar18 Wk 47, #Ar18 Wk 50, #Ar18 Wk 06, #As19 Wk 09, #As19 Wk 11, #As19 Wk 12, #As19 Wk 42, #As19 Wk 46, #As19 Wk 47, #As19 Wk 08, #Ba27 Wk 09, #Ba27 Wk 41, #Ba27 Wk 10, #Bi35 Wk 17, #Bi35

$50.00 $1000.00 $1000.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

FIRST INSERTION

LESLIE LOBOS, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MD C-23-CV-20-000239 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff vs. ANTHONY FRISBY, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 13th day of January, 2021, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceeedings, made and reported by Leslie Lobos, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th

day of February 2021, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of February, 2021. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Timeshare

Price

Wk 04, #Bf32 Wk 08, #Aj10 Wk 43, #Bc29 Wk 22, #Aj10 Wk 32, #Am13 Wk 04, #Bc29 Wk 08, #Bc29 Wk 16, #Bf32 Wk 13, #Ad4 Wk 44, #Bc29 Wk 49, #Bq43 Wk 47, #Bq43 Wk 07, #Bq43 Wk 07, #Bf32 Wk 03, #Bq43 Wk 01, #Bf32 Wk 24, #Bg33 Wk 12, #Bb28 Wk 16, #Ag7 Wk 51, #Am13 Wk 21, #Bg33 Wk 47, #Am13 Wk 48, #Am13

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $1100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $1000.00 $50.00 $50.00

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

FIRST INSERTION

RAYMOND D. COATES JR, ESQ COATES, COATES, & COATES, P.A. 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 300 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18554 To all persons interested in the estate of THERESE NICETAS SMITH VESSA, ESTATE NO. 18554. Notice is given that CATHERINE MARY VEZZA, 130 N 8TH STREET, COLUMBIA, PA 17512 was on, JANUARY 11, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of THERESE NICETAS SMITH VESSA, who died on DECEMBER 3, 2020, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 11th day of JULY, 2021.


The Dispatch

Page 38

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

LEGAL RATES

January 15, 2021

Legal Notices

Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. Deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information, call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or

Stevenson United Methodist Resuming In-Person Church Services Every Sunday At 9 a.m. – No Sunday School – Social Distancing & Masks Required

Stevenson United Methodist Church 123 North Main St., Berlin, Md. 410-641-1137 • www.stevensonchurch.org

– Service Will Be Livestreamed On Facebook

$ 00

1 OFF

Any 3-, 4-, 5-Litre Wine Not Valid With Other Offers Or Discounts Exp. 1-31-21 • MCD

15% OFF

Cheers!

Any Case Of Wine

Not Valid With Other Offers Or Discounts Exp. 1-31-21 • MCD

10% OFF

750 ml/1.5 L Bottle Of Wine Not Valid With Other Offers Or Discounts Exp. 1-31-21 • MCD

BEER • WINE • SODA Open 7 Days A Week Mon.-Thurs., 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., 7 a.m.-10 p.m. & Sun., 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

Gas • Ice Cigarettes 410-641-2366 • Main St. & Old O.C. Blvd., Berlin, Md.

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 CATHERINE MARY VEZZA Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

FIRST INSERTION

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18547 To all persons interested in the estate of BRENDA REVELS, ESTATE NO. 18547. Notice is given that CEAIRA M. REVELS, 706 NINTH STREET, POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 was on, JANUARY 08, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of BRENDA REVELS, who died on JANUARY 11, 2020, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 8th day of JULY, 2021.

3603 SAND ROAD, SNOW HILL, MD 21863 was on, JANUARY 07, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of BETTY LOU PUSEY HITCH, who died on OCTOBER 31, 2020, with a will.

Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 CEAIRA M. REVELS Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

FIRST INSERTION

B. RANDALL COATES ESQ COATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 18546 To all persons interested in the estate of BETTY LOU PUSEY HITCH, ESTATE NO. 18546. Notice is given that MICHAEL C. HITCH SR.,

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7th day of JULY, 2021. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 15, 2021 MICHAEL C. HITCH SR. Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x, 01-15, 01-22, 01-29

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January 15, 2021

Horoscopes

ARIES (March 21 to April 19): Single Lambs looking for romance could find Cupid especially accommodating this week. Paired partners also find their relationships benefiting from the chubby cherub's attention. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): Keep your keen Bull's eye focused on your target, and shake off any attempt to turn your attention elsewhere. You should get some news later in the week that might answer some questions. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): Your early enthusiasm for a project might have been somewhat premature. Although you feel positive about it, you might need more information in order to make an informed decision. CANCER (June 21 to July 22): Taking on a new responsibility might seem like the politically correct thing to do. But even with the promise of support, was it the wisest? Consider reassessing your upcoming decision. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): Apply yourself to completing your task despite all the distractions that might be interfering with your work. Then reward yourself with a weekend of fun shared with people who are close to you. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): A business agreement from the past might need to be looked at again. Use this unexpected development to check out other matters related to it. A weekend venture proves to be rewarding. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): Don't ignore that uneasy feeling about mak-

OCEAN CITY vanishing

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

ing a commitment. It could be a case of understandably cold feet, or a warning that something isn't as right as it should be. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): A colleague could be more supporting of one of your efforts. But it's up to you to make the case for it, and that could mean opening up a secret or two, which might be a problem for you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): Expect some good news about a relative you've been worried about. But don't expect the full story to be told -- at least not yet. A workplace matter might face shifting priorities. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): Despite some anxious moments, you could have good reason to be pleased with how things are turning out. An endof-the-week call might hold some interesting information. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): A long-overdue expression of appreciation could be offered soon. But admit it: You never really expected it would happen, right? Meanwhile, keep your weekend options open. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): It's a good time to dive right into a new challenge, whether it's learning a computer app, or how to drive a stick shift, or making a new friend. Whatever it is, good luck. BORN THIS WEEK: You see the wisdom in honesty, and you help others appreciate your vision. Š 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

Things I Like ...

Page 39

WITH BUNK MANN

The Belmont Hotel was a landmark on Dorchester Street for many years. Located just a few steps off the Boardwalk, it was built by Lambert Ayres in 1897. Lizzie Hearne bought it in 1902 and she and her descendants ran it and later its attached sister hotel, the Hearne, for more than 100 years. The Belmont-Hearne, as it came to be known, was reputed to be the last hotel in Ocean City to offer the American Plan (meals included with the cost of your room) to its guests. The hotel had a loyal following and many of its guests returned annually, some for over 30 or 40 years. The Belmont-Hearne was demolished in November 2004 to make possible the construction of the Belmont Towers condominium. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishinPostcard from Bunk Mann’s collection goc.com.

The Dispatch Crossword Puzzle

By Steve Green

Mondays after a Ravens win When the last Christmas decoration is put away

Learning something new about the area

Teacher who show how much they care

Stepping into a warm house on a cold day Randomly bumping into a friend in an unexpected place

Remote start on an early morning Proud wearers of eye glasses

Working outside without my phone Warm peanuts A night fog

ANSWERS ON PAGE 30


Page 40

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January 15, 2021

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