Jan. 14

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Priceless

January 14, 2022

Serving Greater Delmarva Since 1984

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Internal Pick For New City Manager

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Resort Officials Talk Special Events

Ocean Beauty: Some recent trips to check out the beach and ocean in north Ocean City resulted in these beau-

tiful scenes.

Photos by Tyler Layton

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Fall Events Could Push Sunfest Date

See Page 15 • Photo by Chris Parypa

Cutest Pet Of The Month The winner of last month’s contest was Tessie, a 6-month-old border collie owned by Mike Rose and Katie Cathcart. See page 27 for this month’s contestants.

Submitted Photo


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SERVING DELMARVA FOR 60 YEARS

January 14, 2022


January 14, 2022

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Resort’s Summer, Offseason Special Events Discussed

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BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – With the calendar flipping over to 2022, resort tourism officials this week received an informal presentation on some of the recurring special events for the coming year along with a few new wrinkles. TEAM Productions’ Bob Rothermel on Monday presented his proposed lineup of value-added special events for the coming season, along with a series of proposed off-Broadway-style shows at the Performing Arts Center (PAC) next

fall and winter to bolster the off-season. Each year, Rothermel and TEAM Productions produces a wide variety of value-added special events for the town including fireworks and drone shows and concerts on the beach. During Monday’s Tourism Commission meeting, Tourism and Business Development Director Tom Perlozzo said a more formal presentation on the proposed special events with dates and funding was coming, but for now, he and Rothermel were looking for some direction from the commission. “We’re hoping for some direction with

January 14, 2022

the calendar,” he said. “We need to get out in front for the summer. We need to see where everybody stands for 2022.” Perlozzo said an exciting new wrinkle proposed for next offseason in conjunction with TEAM Productions was a plan to bring Broadway-style shows, concerts, comedians and other acts to the PAC. “We’re going to suggest spending some money in the offseason,” he said. “We’ve been working with Bob to bring 10 to 11 shows to the Performing Arts Center. We could have bus tours. We have a bunch of ideas.” Perlozzo said the funding needed to attract the shows at the PAC could come from a variety of sources, including Tourism Advisory Board (TAB) funding. “We can fund it with a portion of the TAB funding, or a portion of the convention center funding,” he said. “We can probably have 25 more event-days in the winter from September to April. We can promote as Broadway at the Beach or something like that.” Rothermel said he has had cursory discussions with some of the shows and acts proposed for the PAC next offseason, but he was waiting on some direction from the commission, and ultimately the Mayor and Council before pulling the trigger. “We’re talking about Broadway shows like Chicago, Fiddler on the Roof, maybe a Peppa the Pig children’s show, a couple of comedians,” he said. “They are all on hold waiting. I just need some direction.” Rothermel said the recent coronavirus uptick is wreaking havoc with the schedule for some shows that attract live audiences. “The big issue is the pandemic with shows getting shut down,” he said. “Some of the shows can’t find crews to work. It’s a cluster. One of the shows in the packet cancelled performances because members of the cast and staff members tested positive.” Perlozzo said the proposed dates and times for the shows at the PAC were forthcoming. “We can come back with a formal presentation,” he said. “We just want to make sure you’re comfortable with what we’ve done in the past. We’ll come back

with some funding recommendations.” Before narrowing down plans for next offseason at the PAC, however, the commission got a briefing on some of the value-added special events planned for next summer. For example, plans are moving forward for bringing the giant American flag back to the beach downtown on Memorial Day weekend, along with weekly drone shows and some limited fireworks shows. Last summer, elaborate drone shows replaced the weekly fireworks shows downtown at the Boardwalk and uptown at the weekly Sundaes in the Park event at Northside Park. There were still fireworks scheduled on the Fourth of July. However, the show did not go off as planned when one of the explosives inadvertently detonated during setup. Rothermel said the drone shows downtown and at Sundaes in the Park were well-received last year and plans are to bring them back this summer. “I thought the presentations went well,” he said. “I went to almost every one of the shows and the comments I heard from people walking away were phenomenal on the drone shows.” Rothermel last year pitched a twoyear commitment for the drone shows, but resort officials were reluctant to commit to two years until they were certain how the public would respond. With a plan to bring them back this year, Rothermel said it might be time to ramp up the quality and scope of the drone shows. “What we did last year was the bargain basement price,” he said. “We presented it as a two-year deal, but there was some angst about committing for two years. I’d like to do 25 shows this year.” Nonetheless, Rothermel said he has not abandoned the idea of bringing some fireworks shows back to the north end of town. “I’d like to think about bringing some fireworks back to Northside Park,” he said. “Maybe we can move the drone shows downtown, and maybe put 20 of them at the Boardwalk and split them up.” Councilman and commission member John Gehrig agreed with returning some fireworks shows to Northside Park, but SEE PAGE 6

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January 14, 2022

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Ocean City Voters Could Decide Council Salary Increase

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

OCEAN CITY – It remains to be seen if Ocean City elected officials will get their first raise in over three decades, but if it happens, it will likely be because the town’s voters supported the hike. Late last year, it was brought up during the public comment period of a Mayor and Council meeting that the salaries of the town’s elected officials should be increased, or at least explored. Ocean City councilmembers earn $10,000 per year, while the mayor’s position earns $30,000. The salaries were last increased in 1989. City Manager Doug Miller was tasked with researching a potential salary increase for councilmembers. Miller said his research supported an increase after he looked at elected officials’ salaries in other jurisdictions around the state of comparable size, or even some with smaller populations and less complex is-

sues. “I endorse that because you don’t get paid to the level of the municipalities that I’ve left,” he said. “The workload that you have and the complexities of the issues that you have to look at are so much higher than probably any of the municipalities in the state.” Miller explained how he reached the salary increase recommendation. In Annapolis, with a population of nearly 39,000, the council salary is $15,000 with a $1,000 expense allowance. In Rockville, with a population of over 64,000, the council salary is nearly $29,000. “I put together a methodology to try to come up with a number,” he said. “I admit it isn’t perfect, but I tried to look at Maryland municipalities and their size and complexities and look at what those municipalities paid. Our councilmembers get paid $10,000 a year. As I boiled down the methodology, I feel like your salaries should be more like $2,000 a month, or

FROM PAGE 4 questioned the overall philosophy of the free-added value special events for visitors. “I think we need fireworks at Northside Park for Sundaes in the Park,” he said. “I think we need a purpose for these summer shows. If we’re going to continue to do these value-added events, I think they’re a ‘nice to have,’ but I don’t think they are bringing people to town.” However, Rothermel said he believed the value-added events did bring visitors to town and enhance their overall experience. “I disagree,” he said. “I do think they bring people to town and they serve a purpose.” Gehrig said the town had two basic visitor demographics and suggested targeting the latter. “We basically have two groups of visitors,” he said. “We have a group that comes from far away as evidenced by the license plates from Ohio, for example. We also have a lot of weekend war-

riors.” Two years ago, a plan was hatched to schedule special events such as concerts and fireworks, for example, on Thursdays in an effort to extend the stay for those “weekend warriors”. Then, COVID hit and some of those ideas were put on the back-burner. Gehrig suggested going after that Thursday crowd again. “Now we’re in 2022,” he said. “Let’s take the plunge. We don’t need to have value-added events and we don’t need to give anything away. Let’s make the weekend our wheelhouse. When you think of Ocean City, you think of the weekend.” Perlozzo said the commission, and the full Mayor and Council, would soon get a more formal presentation. “These are just ideas,” he said. “We’ll put together an overall plan. We just want to get some of these things on the calendar and start making some offers because it’s competitive. I feel like we’re two months behind already. We just need some direction.”

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

… ‘We Just Need Some Direction’

January 14, 2022

$24,000 a year.” Miller explained there were a couple of ways to increase the salaries, if that was the desire of the council. “It’s entirely up to you,” he said. “You could do it by ordinance, which would have to be completed 60 days before the next election. You could put it on the ballot in November. That’s probably a cleaner way to do it. If it’s confirmed, all councilmembers would get a raise.” Councilman Mark Paddack said Miller’s research included a wealth of information on council salaries around the state, but did not mention the mayor. Miller explained the different forms of city government around the state made the mayor salary issue more complicated. “Some municipalities have a councilcity manager form of government, and some have a strong mayor form of government,” he said. “I’d have to delve into that a little more. It’s easier for the council. It’s not as easy for the mayor.” Nonetheless, Paddack continued to push for more information on the mayor’s salary. “I would suggest that we table this for today and ask the city manager to take a look at weak mayor positions, I guess is what they call it,” he said. “We are a council-city manager form of government with a so-called weak mayor. No disrespect Mr. Mayor. I know you’re a strong mayor.” Paddack said he supported putting the council salary increase issue before the voters in the form of a referendum. “I’m all for moving this forward to referendum in November 2022, if we’re going to do this and put it before the voters,” he said. “I think there is support among my colleagues to let us put it on a referendum and let the voters decide. Those are the ones we work for.” As far as Paddack’s push for the mayor’s position to be included for consideration, Mayor Rick Meehan pointed out he did not initiate the discussion. “Just for the record, I think this was brought up for review of the council salaries, and not the mayor’s salary,” he said. “It’s certainly nothing I had requested.” Councilman John Gehrig said the issue has been raised before over the years.

“I think former councils did not support an increase because they wanted less competition,” he said. “I think raising the salaries will increase the desire for more candidates as well. It is a lot of time.” The Mayor and Council meet weekly throughout the year for the most part. Each of the councilmembers also serve on multiple committees and commissions, and there are public appearances throughout the year. The council is also required to do a significant amount of research with their weekly agenda packets. Council President Matt James pointed out the time commitment, but said increasing the elected officials’ salaries could improve the town’s election process with potentially more candidates and, subsequently, more voters. “It’s a tremendous time commitment,” he said. “The last time the mayor and council salaries were raised was 1989. I wasn’t even born yet. I welcome competition. I think with the candidate turnout and the voter turnout we’ve seen in the last few elections, I think that more competition would be good. I welcome that.” Councilman Lloyd Martin agreed the salary increase issue should be put to referendum. “Let’s put it on the ballot and let the voters decide,” he said. “Let the people vote on it. I will say we don’t do it for the money. We do it because of our love for Ocean City.” Gehrig said at the current level of $10,000 annually for the council, and $11,000 for the council president, the pool of potential candidates was diminished because many could not afford the time commitment away from their regular jobs. “The reality is we lose money to be here,” he said. “There is only a small segment of the population that can afford to do that. It’s not a lot of money for the time commitment. None of use want to be up here forever. This isn’t a lifetime gig. It’s a small base of potential candidates.” After considerable debate, the council appeared to support the referendum idea, but no formal action was taken. Instead, Miller was directed to drill down a little deeper on his research and look into the mayor’s salary issue.

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McGean Likely Pick For City Manager

January 14, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – It was confirmed late Wednesday City Engineer Terry McGean is in line to replace City Manager Doug Miller, who has resigned. Barring any unexpected glitches, McGean will be announced as the next city manager in Ocean City at Tuesday’s Mayor and Council meeting. Miller, who was appointed to the position six years ago, will serve until the end of this month. McGean has been city engineer since 1990. He earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Texas A&M University. He is a member of numerous civil engineering associations and organizations. In his three decades-plus as city engineer, McGean has his fingerprints all over Ocean City. He played an integral role in the development of the resort’s beach replenishment program and the various convention center expansions over the years, including a current project. Other significant projects he is currently running point on include the Boardwalk re-decking project, the Baltimore Avenue corridor redevelopment program and the redevelopment of the downtown recreation complex, the new midtown firehouse plans and many others. McGean also oversaw the Boardwalk access point hardening project and the public boat ramp construction.

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He served as liaison for the parking revenue task force. McGean also manages the town’s annual canal dredging project. At three decades-plus, McGean is already eligible for the town’s special deferred retirement option program, or DROP, which is an option for some longtenured town employees to set their retirement benefits package at its current level while continuing to work for the city for a prescribed amount of time. Public Works Director Hal Adkins is also eligible for the DROP program. Under the town’s charter, Ocean City operates under a Mayor and CouncilManager form of government with the city manager acting as the chief executive officer. While the city manager acts at the direction of the Mayor and Council, the position handles daily operations. Miller was hired in 2016 after a nearly year-long recruiting and vetting process to replace then-City Manager David Recor, who resigned in 2015 during what was described at the time as a “mutual agreement.” Mayor Rick Meehan served as interim city manager during the months-long process to replace Recor. City Council President Matt James announced Miller’s resignation through a town-wide employee email on Dec. 27. McGean will become Ocean City’s sixth manager, preceded by Miller, Recor, long-time city manager Dennis Dare, Joe Braun and Tony Barrett.

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OC Bus, Tram Driver Recruitment Incentives Weighed

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – In an effort to stay in front of another anticipated labor shortage, resort transportation officials this week discussed incentives for retaining returning drivers and attracting new ones. For Ocean City, the departments most affected by last summer’s worker shortage were the transportation division; including bus drivers and Boardwalk tram operators; public works, including solid waste and maintenance; and recreation and parks. During a Transportation Committee meeting on Tuesday, Public Works Director Hal Adkins, and his staff, including Acting Transit Manager George Peaks, discussed a variety of options for retaining drivers and attracting new ones for

the municipal bus system and the Boardwalk tram. Both operations had their deployment schedules reduced last year because of the lack of staff. Adkins outlined some proposals for bolstering staff in the transportation division, including wage hikes and potential signing bonuses. In addition, last month the Mayor and Council approved accelerated increases in the pay grades for certain full-time and part-time town staffers. City Manager Doug Miller worked with Adkins and his staff on incentive packages to retain and attract new drivers. Miller cautioned against offering attractive signing bonuses for new drivers without incentivizing returning drivers. “We could create some hard feelings,” he said. “Just say you are a returning driver and the new guy gets a $500 bonus. I’d rather pay the existing driver

for recruiting a new driver.” Human Resources Director Katie Callan said the staff shortage issue is essentially town-wide and a blanket approach might be needed. “In an ideal world, it would be a townwide solution,” she said. “It will be difficult to implement. What’s the incentive for transportation? Is it different for recreations and parks, or the police department? I don’t think we’re going to find a one-size-fits-all.” For his part, Peaks said there are several options on the table. “We need to figure out what works best for us,” he said. “For us, it might be a retention bonus, or a loyalty bonus.” Callan agreed a healthy incentive program for existing and new drivers in the transportation department, particularly bus and tram drivers, would have to be handled carefully.

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“The unintentional consequences if we do something for the transportation department is the other departments are going to say what about us,” she said. “There would likely be a ripple effect.” Peaks said his biggest concern was municipal bus drivers. Despite staff shortages that limited deployments at certain times, Peaks said he was confident in a solid return from tram drivers and conductors next season. “I’m very optimistic with the adjustments in salaries for the tram division,” he said. “I think were will be a good return in that division.” Mayor Rick Meehan said filling the ranks of the tram operators should be a priority. “I think the tram division should be a priority,” he said. “It’s an amenity, and the revenue from the tram drives the department. We have a new fleet of trams and they need to be out there in the summer.” Adkins said a good source for recruiting drivers could be the retirees in the various civic organizations. “When it comes to the civic organizations such as the American Legion or the Elks, for example, I’ve asked George to reach out to their leadership,” he said. “We’re trying to figure out how they are communicating with their membership, whether its email blasts or a newsletter. We don’t want to go on a recruiting effort to one of their meetings and there are four people there.”


January 14, 2022

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Planning Commissioners Vote Against Rezoning For Townhome Community

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BERLIN – The Berlin Planning Commission voted 5-1 not to support a request to rezone commercial property near the intersection of Routes 818 and 50. The commission will forward a request to rezone 25 acres of commercial property on to the Berlin Town Council with an unfavorable recommendation. The rezoning has been proposed to allow for a 176unit townhouse development on the site. Several citizens and the owner of a local airplane business voiced opposition to the rezoning. “I don’t want my head on a pike for voting yes to this,” commission member Ron Cascio said. In October, developer Chris Carbaugh approached the commission to share plans for a 176-unit townhouse development on 25 acres at Route 818’s intersection with Route 50 westbound. He said in order for the project to move forward, he was seeking a rezoning of the land to R4 residential. The property’s zoning designation was changed in 2020 from industrial to commercial at Carbaugh’s request. At this week’s public hearing on the rezoning proposal, which was held virtually, Carbaugh told the commission he was proposing a mixed-use development that would feature commercial closest to Route 818 and residential behind it. “This conceptual site plan illustrates 176 townhomes,” he said. “It also incorporates several community amenities including a clubhouse, community pool and park.” Mark Cropper, Carbaugh’s attorney, told the commission the rezoning was being proposed based on a mistake in the current zoning. He referenced the county’s comprehensive land use plan, which indicates there is too much commercial property in the area. He said there had been even more added since the plan was written in 2009 and that if Berlin officials had been aware of that they wouldn’t have approved the rezoning to commercial in 2020. Carbaugh said the project would bring

January 14, 2022

projected yearly revenue of $1.45 million to the town (considering taxes, electric revenue, water revenue and wastewater revenue) and would bring more than $3 million in impact fees to the town. “This project has the potential financial benefit in the first year of development to produce $5 million for the Town of Berlin,” Carbaugh said. More than a dozen residents submitted opposition to the proposal. Some cited the strain it would put on the town’s resources while others said they didn’t want more growth. Others expressed concern about traffic safety at the intersection. “This site has been rezoned many times due to a ‘zoning mistake,’” resident Barb Stack said in her submitted comments. “Why is this a recurring mistake? The truth is the owner has not found a suitable use for the property. This is not the town’s burden.” The Maryland Department of Transportation (MDOT) Maryland Aviation Administration (MAA) also submitted concerns regarding the proposed development’s proximity to Bunting’s Airport. “The proximity to Bunting’s Airport, an MDOT MAA licensed commercial-use landing facility, is of paramount concern,” a letter from Ashish Solanki, director of the Office of Regional Aviation Assistance, reads. “Residential communities in close proximity to aircraft activity invites negative public perception of noise/vibrations, nuisance complaints and environmental complaints. Additionally, low flying aircraft perform aerial applications on farm communities in the area. Any densely developed community in the area would be dangerous to both the piloted aircraft and residences of the community.” Cropper said the property Carbaugh wanted to build on had been zoned R-3 residential when Bunting established his airport in 1980. He pointed out the Ocean City Airport was surrounded by residential development. He added that the MAA didn’t dictate zoning. Bunting Airport’s Robert Bunting and attorney Dirk Widdowson participated in Wednesday’s hearing to voice their oppoSEE PAGE 42

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January 14, 2022

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Irish Couple Discover Message In A Bottle From Ocean City

Page 12

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

The bottle was one mile off Ocean City in 2019 and found in Northern Ireland last week. Photos courtesy of Rita Simmonds

OCEAN CITY – Three years and more than 3,000 miles later, a message in a bottle has connected a local boy with new friends in Ireland. Ocean City resident Sasha Yonyak, 14, was contacted this week by a couple in northwestern Ireland after they found a message in a bottle he wrote in 2019. “I’ve made some new friends in Ireland,” Yonyak said. “It’s like a treasure washing up.” Belfast residents Rita Simmonds and Ciaran Marron were walking on the beach in Donegal last week when they stumbled upon a glass bottle. Upon noticing it contained a note and two U.S. one-dollar bills, they took it home and let it dry by their fireplace overnight. When they carefully spread open the yellowed piece of

paper after removing it from the bottle, they found a 2019 note from an 11-yearold Ocean City boy. The letter described his hobbies as well as his friends and family and asks the finder to call him. “He did such a good job sealing it thoughtfully with clingfilm and what looks like glue,” Simmonds said. “One day hopefully we can meet him in Donegal and show him the beach it landed on.” Though the number Yonyak listed on the note had been disconnected, Simmonds and Marron, who have a 14-yearold grandson of their own, were able to find Yonyak’s father on Facebook and connected with the family this week. Simmonds said they’d been determined to find him to let him know the bottle had finally reached shore. “All our friends and family want to know the kid who threw the bottle in the ocean,” Simmonds said. “He's already a celebrity

January 14, 2022

Sasha Yonyak was 11 years old when he decided to pass on the bottle he had found with a handwritten note of his own. Photo by Charlene Sharpe

here.” Yonyak said this week he’d forgotten all about the bottle until hearing from Simmonds and Marron. The news that it had been found brought back fond memories for him, however. He spent years fishing with good friend and neighbor Wayne Smith. Leaving a marina one day, they found a bottle in the water with two onedollar bills and a note that encourage the finder to “pass it on.” Because the note indicated the bottle had only been put into the water in Ocean City, Smith and Yonyak decided to go a step further. On their next fishing trip, they put a note from Yonyak in the bottle — the same one they’d picked up — with the two one-dollar bills and dropped it in the ocean a mile offshore. “We talked about how it might go into the Gulf Stream but we didn’t know where it’d end up because of the currents,” Yonyak said. Smith, 64, passed away in August. Vlad Yonyak, Sasha’s father, said recounting the story behind the message in the bottle gave his son a chance to remember all of the good times he had fishing with Smith. “There’s not many friendships like that,” Vlad Yonyak said. “Two people, very different, but they find something and have such a good time.” He said everyone was surprised to learn the bottle had ended up all the way in Ireland, more than 3,200 miles away. “The bottle, it floated through the friendship of Sasha and Wayne,” he said.

Belfast residents Rita Simmonds and Ciaran Marron discovered the bottle on a beach walk.


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 13


Restitution, Probation In Theft Case School System Monitoring Staffing

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BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

SNOW HILL – A local woman, charged two years ago after a theft scheme was discovered from a Berlin business, was ordered this week to pay $15,000 in restitution to the victims and was placed on supervised probation. Kimberly Ann Moore, 55, of Berlin, was charged in March 2020 with theft scheme over $100,000 after her employer, Action Island Imprinters, a screenprinting business in Berlin, discovered she had been absconding with company funds over a four-year period from Jan. 1, 2014 through Dec. 31, 2018. The parties later attended criminal mediation, during which it was agreed to amend the sole count of theft scheme over $100,000-plus, to “a person may not intend to defraud another, obtain

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goods, services, or anything of value without the consent of the cardholder.” Moore, with the consent of her defense and the plaintiffs, agreed to the charge modification. In October, Moore entered an Alford plea to the amended count. In an Alford plea, a defendant does not admit guilt, but acknowledges the state has enough evidence to gain a conviction. Back in Worcester County Circuit Court on Tuesday for sentencing, Moore was ordered to pay $15,000 in restitution to the victims, in increments of $2,100 and $12,900. According to court documents, the maximum amount of restitution that could have been ordered in the case was $25,000. The original charge of theft scheme up to $100,000-plus was a felony that came with a maximum jail term of 25 years or a fine up to $25,000.

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Wicomico County Schools Superintendent Dr. Donna Hanlin said officials continue to monitor staffing shortages. On Tuesday, Hanlin presented the Wicomico County Board of Education with an update on COVID-19 cases and staffing challenges within the school system. “I want to tell you what our current thinking is and what our current planning is,” she said. “As I’ve been saying all year, we are going to stay the course. We are going to do everything possible, and we are committed to keeping our schools open.” While she noted the school system is not currently seeing COVID spread within school buildings, it is reporting several staff illnesses and staff vacan-

January 14, 2022

cies. “Right now, we are concerned enough that we may need to close a school for those reasons, but we’re also watching that very carefully,” she said. “Dr. Briggs and I both get a report every day that shows us the percentage of staff who are out in any given building because that is a safety concern. We cannot operate a building if there are a certain number staff and support staff, not just teachers.” Hanlin highlighted recent staffing shortages at Delmar High School, which closed school for half the day Monday for lacking the necessary support staff. She said the school system will be communicating to teachers and families the importance of bringing laptops, activities and resources home each night in the event a school must go to virtual learning. “We are having to watch all areas of our organization in terms of employee groups to ensure that we can continue to run our schools safely,” she said. “Our hope is to be able to do that and to not close a classroom or school. We will not close the school system unless we are mandated to do so.” Hanlin added that should a classroom or school move to virtual learning, a bulk of the learning would be asynchronous. She noted, however, that the goal continues to be in-person learning. “We do know that is the best possible way to instruct students, for the vast majority of our students,” she said.


Logistics Issues With Events Could Force Sunfest Into October

January 14, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – With a series of special events stacked up on back-to-back weekends next fall, the annual Sunfest event could be moved back later into October. During a Tourism Commission meeting this week, members discussed the fall special events calendar. OC BikeFest is scheduled for its usual slot in mid-September. New this year is major three-day music festival Sept. 23-25 produced by internationally-known promoter C3 Presents. Wedged in is the annual wine festival event and the oftentroublesome unsanctioned pop-up motorized event. Then, there’s Sunfest, which has been held at the Inlet parking lot for 46 years. During Monday’s commission meeting, Tourism and Business Development Director Tom Perlozzo explained calendar changes may be necessary to accommodate all events. “The music festival would be competing with that H2Oi week,” he said. “Logistically, for the town, it’s sandwiched between Bike Week and Sunfest. We had a meeting to see what opportunities there might be.” Special Events Director Frank Miller explained moving Sunfest later into October could be the most efficient way of stretching the fall special events calendar. He explained Bike Week and the proposed C3 Presents event could likely share the same basic footprint and much of the same infrastructure needed for live music. However, the set-up for Sunfest is different and would require more time. “We’re trying to see how the C3 event can fit into our events calendar,” he said. “Unfortunately, it came to our realization that Sunfest couldn’t fit well with it. A couple of years ago we talked about moving Sunfest back. There are essentially two options for Sunfest. We can push it earlier in September, which is not desirable because of the Inlet lot parking revenue, or we can move it back later in October.” Miller said that proposed event calendar made more sense from the logistical standpoint. “It allows Wine Fest to move back into September where it has traditionally been,” he said. “It frees up Sept. 9-10 only for BikeFest, and it allows BikeFest to work together with C3 Presents. They share some of the same infrastructure and they have the same type of footprint and the set-ups are similar.” Councilman and commission member Tony DeLuca questioned whether the cart was being put before the horse. “Are you telling us the set-up and tear-down for these events are driving the schedule?” he said. “It seems to me we can lock down the schedule and look at solutions for some of these logistics issues.” Miller explained the magnitude of coordinating the events was causing a shift in the schedule. “What we want for tourism is driving

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

this,” he said. “It takes a higher priority. That causes Sunfest to be moved according to the proposed scenario. The logistics don’t work. We have to look at some type of modification.” Miller said he has been in touch with some of the demographics that typically support Sunfest and they appear to be okay with the proposed date changes. “I did have a conversation with some of the bus groups,” he said. “They were happier about the October dates than the earlier September dates.” Commission member and downtown restaurateur Kevin Gibbs said the later dates for October could create staffing challenges for businesses. “My staffing issues in October are abysmal,” he said. “It’s a real challenge to staff for four days. I don’t know that I can hold a staff together that late. This is too far back in October. I’d love to have the

customers, but it doesn’t make any difference if I can’t serve them.” Perlozzo said moving Sunfest was not optimal, but it might be the best option to accommodate C3 Presents. “Do I want to move Sunfest to October?” he said. “No, I don’t. It might be the only way to get it done. That may or may not be the best way, but we at least have to look at it. That [C3] event will be extremely beneficial to the town. It’s an international promoter. It will have acts never seen in town before. … I think we can put together the ideal tourism event calendar for the town. We can work out all of the logistics.” For his part, Miller agreed. “When it comes to Sunfest moving, my team is not entirely happy about it,” he said. “If we want C3 to come here, it’s worth exploring.” Councilman and commission mem-

Page 15

ber John Gehrig said moving events around to get the best bang for the town’s buck has always been a point of discussion. “We’ve talked about filling up hotel rooms for a long time,” he said. “This is a consequence of that.” DeLuca said he could support moving Sunfest if that was the only way to make the stacked events work, but he didn’t want the setting up and tearing down of tents and other logistical issues to dictate the town’s special event policy. “I didn’t say I liked it or didn’t like it,’ he said. “We shouldn’t let logistics drive the calendar. We can fix the logistics part of it.” After considerable debate, the commission voted to forward the fall special events calendar issues to the full Mayor and Council for a decision.


Commissioners Initiate Room Tax Increase Process Chamber Outlines

Page 16

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – County officials agreed to ask the state for the ability to raise the hotel room tax. The Worcester County Commissioners on Tuesday voted 4-2 to ask for a change in state law that would give the county the authority to increase the county room tax from 5% to 6%. The change is being pursued by the Town of Ocean City. “They would request that the county commissioners support them in requesting our local delegation to change at the state level the ability to raise the room tax 1%,” said Weston Young, the county’s chief administrative officer. “They’re not asking to raise it 1% but the ability to raise it 1%.” Mayor Rick Meehan last month sent the county a letter outlining the request, as the resort wants the ability to in-

crease the room tax. “The town is looking at future tourism-related expenses, including the potential investment by the town in a new indoor sports facility,” the letter reads. “The ability to increase the county room tax would allow us to plan accordingly for these future expenses.” Commissioner Joe Mitrecic noted that the increase would not affect residents. “This of course is a pass through to visitors of Ocean City,” he said. He added that Ocean City’s room tax was lower than rates in many other destinations. He said Ocean City’s room tax was currently 5% while Rehoboth’s was 8% and Atlantic City’s was over 13%. He said the room tax was 8.5% in Philadelphia. Commissioner Jim Bunting pointed out that the vote Tuesday was just to seek an amendment to state law so an increase could be pursued. If state

law gets amended, a public hearing would be required to actually raise the rate. “That has to be a unanimous vote,” Bunting said. The commissioners voted 4-2, with Bunting and Commissioner Chip Bertino opposed, to request the state law change. Commissioner Bud Church was absent. The state’s legislative session runs from Jan. 12 to April 11. “This change in state legislation needs to be made now so that when, and if, it becomes necessary to increase the room tax to cover future expenses we are in a position to do so,” Meehan’s letter to the commissioners reads. “An increase in room tax would need to be done at the beginning of the calendar year, to accommodate the hospitality industry, and legislative changes become effective on July 1 of any given year.”

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Legislative Priorities For Assembly Session

January 14, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Business leaders in Salisbury say issues involving employer mandates, workforce development and broadband top the list of legislative priorities for 2022. With the Maryland General Assembly convening this week, the Salisbury Area Chamber of Commerce has released its list of legislative priorities and critical issues for the 2022 session. “The regional business community continues to be adversely impacted by the pandemic,” said President and CEO Bill Chambers. “Legislative leaders in Annapolis must recognize the value of our small businesses throughout Maryland and craft legislation to promote a vibrant business environment across the board.” Chambers said Lower Shore businesses, including the chamber’s 700 members, are concerned about proposed employer mandates in the upcoming Maryland General Assembly session. The chamber’s priorities outline its opposition to unreasonably restrictive shift scheduling requirements, expanded paid leave mandates, new customer data privacy regulations and certain tax proposals. “The business community is concerned about any new taxes for the use of gasoline, natural gas and other greenhouse gases, increasing costs to taxpayers while having no impact on emissions originating in neighboring states,” Chambers added, “and the Chamber opposes any new taxes on services not currently listed in Maryland law.” Chambers noted the chamber also supported several legislative efforts in the coming session, including state transportation infrastructure projects, 5G and broadband accessibility, expanded career and technical education opportunities and a healthy balance to the unemployment insurance trust fund. He also shared the chamber’s support for resolving issues related to the application of sales tax on digital products and services. “In addition to onerous employer mandates, critical issues include greater investment in rural broadband, State investment in workforce development for the shore, and the resolution of interpretation issues surrounding the new ‘digital downloads tax’ passed in the 2021 General Assembly Session,” he said. The 2022 session of the Maryland General Assembly will convene on Wednesday, Jan. 12.


Police Activity Up In Ocean City For December

January 14, 2022

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OCEAN CITY – Ocean City’s police chief attributed an uptick in police activity last month to visitation and enforcement initiatives. In Monday’s meeting of the Ocean City Police Commission, Ocean City Police Department Chief Ross Buzzuro provided an update on police activity for the month of December. The department reported a decrease in citizen calls for service – from 545 in 2019 to 490 in 2021 – and an increase in officer calls for service. It should be noted officials used data from 2019, the most recent pre-pandemic year, to compare the town’s progress in the most accurate fashion. “We were up considerably in officer calls for service, from 1,107 in 2019 to 1,630 in 2021,” he said. “It’s a difference of 523 calls, which is fairly significant.” Buzzuro, however, noted the increase was likely the result of increased visitation to Ocean City during the month of December, as well as several traffic initiatives. “It’s not necessarily a negative thing,” he said. “We were very proactive, and we can see that in the numbers.” In the top 25 calls for service last month, Buzzuro noted that disorderly calls increased from 22 in 2019 to 40 in 2021, traffic stops increased from 347 to 582, and collisions increased from 26 to 35. “These are just some indicators that we most likely had a higher number of people in town than we did previously in the last two years,” he said. Under enforcement statistics, the department reported custodial arrests had increased from 76 to 108, drug arrests increased from five to 17 and weapons arrests increased from two to 19. When asked if most weapons arrests resulted from traffic stops, Buzzuro said they did. “With those increased number of car stops, that’s also what we are netting from those car stops,” he said. While the police department reported an uptick in activity for the month of December, Buzzuro said overall crime had decreased from the prior year. “Overall, a very challenging year,” he said, “but crime has definitely declined from where it was last year and from the December five-year average.” Officials noted that crime statistics continued to move in the right direction. “We’re optimistic for 2022,” Buzzuro added. “A lot of things are going on but we’re juggling things pretty well, and we’re in a good placing moving forward this year.”

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Seasonal Recruitment Woes Continue Harris Pushing For More H-2B Visas

Page 18

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

OCEAN CITY – Seasonal recruitment remains a challenge for the Ocean City Police Department (OCPD), according to Police Chief Ross Buzzuro. On Monday, Buzzuro told members of the Ocean City Police Commission recruitment for the upcoming summer season remained challenging. In its most recent testing date this month, the department reported having 14 new seasonal officer applicants and seven new public safety aide (PSA) applicants. “We still have two more of these testing dates, and we remain optimistic,” he said. “But it’s very challenging, to say the least.” For decades, the OCPD has enhanced its workforce with seasonal officers and PSAs during the summer months. And while interest in the seasonal program gained some momentum last summer, Buzzuro told commission members last month that recruitment efforts ahead of 2022 were slow-moving. Last year, Buzzuro noted, the department had a total of 144 officer applicants, with 45 hires, and 52 PSA applicants, with 48 hires. Through its Jan. 8 testing date, officials reported having a total of 74 seasonal officer applicants and 36 PSA applicants for the coming summer. Of the 14 new seasonal officer applicants at its Jan. 8 testing date, the department

reported having three failures. “We’re moving right along,” he said. Buzzuro, however, noted that the department continued to attract candidates, despite recent bouts of bad weather and an ongoing pandemic. He added that the OCPD also had a full complement of fulltime officers. “If there’s any silver lining or good news, it’s that we still are attracting people here,” he said. Officials note that recruitment challenges continued to plague law enforcement agencies, both locally and nationally. Just this week, for example, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan announced the expansion of his Re-Fund the Police Initiative. The three-year, $500 million investment has earmarked more than $200 million for historic salary increases and bonuses for law enforcement officers to help ensure more competitive compensation and to help with recruitment and retention, as well as police scholarship programs. “Even in the most progressive cities all across the country, leaders are now following our lead and admitting that instead of defunding, they need more investment in public safety,” Hogan said in a news release. “There is nothing more important than addressing the violent crime crisis in our state and our effort to re-fund the police and to give them the support and the resources they need to do their jobs more effectively.”

January 14, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – With uncertainties already surrounding the availability of a seasonal workforce for some key industries locally and across the Eastern Shore, Congressman Andy Harris (R-Md.) is imploring the federal government to release more H-2B visas. The H-2B guest worker program provides access to seasonal temporary labor to businesses in certain non-agricultural seasonal roles. Unlike the J-1 visas, the workers are generally not students and there is not a work and travel component connected to the H2B visas. The H-2B visa workers are seasonal and are relied upon heavily by the tourism, hospitality, landscaping, seafood and construction industries, for example. There are 66,000 H-2B visas made available each year, allocated in half for the summer season and half for the winter season. However, because of acute labor shortages in certain sectors of the economy, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has made an additional 22,000 H-2B visas available for the remainder of the federal fiscal year. Harris, who co-authored a bipartisan amendment along with Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (D-Me.) seeking the release of more H-2B visas, said

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the DHS secondary allocation is falling woefully short. Harris said the yearly cap is inadequate and the lottery system for allocating the visas is unfair in many cases. He pointed out the number of guest worker visas applied for stands at 136,000, with only 33,000 still available. Harris said the shortfall could be particularly hard on certain seasonal industries across his district on the Eastern Shore, including crab picking and processing plants. “In order to support the iconic crab houses of Maryland’s Eastern Shore and other seasonal businesses, Homeland Security Secretary Mayorkas and the Biden Administration must immediately release the additional H-2B visas for the second half of fiscal year 2022 authorized under the Harris-Pingree amendment,” he said. “Additionally, Congress must continue to work to pass a long-term, bipartisan solution to this chronic shortage of these desperately needed guest workers as I did with Senator (Barbara) Mikulski years ago. Without access to these visas, many American-owned seasonal businesses facing severe labor shortages will be forced to scale back or shutter their operations entirely, further driving up prices for goods and services, killing good-paying permanent American jobs and harming local economies.”

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school policies under review after Fed probe

January 14, 2022

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Following a lawsuit in Frederick County, the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) is taking active measures to prevent illegal and excessive use of restraint and seclusion in schools. Last month, the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced a settlement agreement with Frederick County Public Schools to address the discriminatory use of restraint and seclusion practices against students with disabilities under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. MSDE is now reviewing policies throughout the state. “The findings from the U.S. Department of Justice are appalling and unacceptable,” said State Superintendent of Schools Mohammed Choudhury in a news release. “MSDE will not tolerate any discriminatory or illegal action against any student. MSDE is reviewing its regulations, policies, and monitoring processes to ensure that no local school system illegally restrains or secludes any student. In all cases, restraint and seclusion should be a last resort, employed only in emergency circumstances. Given the potentially devastating physical and emotional impact of restraint and seclusion on students and staff, as well the disproportionate use on students with disabilities and students of color, MSDE will work with our local school systems to eliminate the illegal use of these practices and increase system capacity to provide effective, positive means of behavior management.” Choudhury said the settlement agreement in Frederick should serve as a reminder to local boards that concerns should be taken seriously and that the illegal use of restraint and seclusion would not be tolerated. Locally, officials said Worcester County Public Schools (WCPS) had a policy that was adopted in accordance with the Code of Maryland Regulations. “WCPS does not use seclusion unless it is an emergency situation,” said Carrie Sterrs, the school system’s coordinator of public relations and special programs. “Restraint is only used if it is indicated in a student's behavior intervention plan, which is a part of their individualized education program (IEP), and even then, it is used only as a last resort.” MSDE urges students and families concerned about the use of restraint and seclusion to reach out to their local boards of education and MSDE for support. Parents of students with disabilities who believe that their student has been illegally restrained or secluded may file a formal State Special Education Complaint with the MSDE's Division of Early Intervention and Special Education Services.

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Page 20

Group Holds 10th Annual Campaign

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

Some of the volunteers associated with the annual Christmas Spirit Campaign are pictured outside the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce office.

Submitted Photo

OCEAN CITY – The Ocean City Young Professionals celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Christmas Spirit Campaign with record participation. For the past decade, the Ocean City Young Professionals (OCYP) have offered the Christmas Spirit Campaign to ensure local children receive gifts at Christmas time. What started as an Ocean City and Berlin event now provides gifts for families in need throughout Worcester County. “The response is overwhelmingly positive,” said Megan Rynkiewicz, chair of the 2021 Christmas Spirit Campaign, a program of the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce. “People love being involved with this event and giving back to their community they love so much. The support from volunteers and donors is unbelievable.” The OCYP group, a gathering of emerging young professionals interested in getting involved in the community, kicked off the Christmas Spirit Campaign 10 years ago in purchasing gifts for slightly more than two dozen children. Now, the campaign provides gifts for more than 100. The program serves families in Berlin and Ocean City as well as those in Snow Hill and Pocomoke. OCYP members spend all year raising money to be able to purchase gifts each December.

January 14, 2022

Though kids in need were initially taken shopping by members of OCYP in the days before Christmas, COVID-19 prompted changes last year. Volunteers now shop for children and host a socially distanced drive-through gift pickup day. “This event is great for the community, from the committee that plans it, to the volunteers that make it possible, to the children and families it assists,” Rynkiewicz said. “While it brings people together for a common goal, it works to address just one of the needs of our community and helps assist during a tough time of year for a lot of local families.” She said the support from volunteers was unbelievable and that families were grateful for the event. She added that members of OCYP appreciated all of the donors that enabled the group to grow the campaign. “Even though this event takes place in December, it really requires yearround planning,” Rynkiewicz said. “We appreciate all of our donors and volunteers and this event wouldn't be as successful as it is without them. We always welcome new faces to our committee and if you are interested in getting involved with planning the 2022 event, please reach out to the Young Professionals of Ocean City with the Greater Ocean City, Maryland Chamber of Commerce.” For more information, look up Young Professionals of Ocean City, MD on Facebook.


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 14, 2022

sor in the altercation and she was arrested and charged with second-degree assault.

Traffic Stop Finds Meth OCEAN CITY – A Pennsylvania man was arrested for alleged possession of methamphetamine last week during a routine traffic stop. Around 12:30 a.m. last Thursday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer patrolling in the north end of town observed a vehicle allegedly driving erratically in the area of 120th Street. The officer followed the vehicle as it made a U-turn at 142nd Street and continued south on Coastal Highway. The officer then conducted a traffic stop of the vehicle at 134th Street. The driver was identified as a juvenile, who reportedly told the officer she swerved out of her lane because her car was lowered, and she didn’t want to damage the underside of her vehicle because of the storm drains in the roadway. The front-seat passenger, identified as Paul Beamesderfer, 40, of Lebanon, Pa., appeared to be under the influence and made furtive movements toward the floor on the passenger side of the vehicle, according to police reports. The juvenile and Beamesderfer were ordered out of the vehicle and complied. During a subsequent search, officers reportedly located a metal marijuana grinder under the front passenger seat. Officers also located a glass smoking device with white powder residue believed to be methamphetamine under the center console. The officer noted in the police report the smoking device was still warm to the touch.

COPS

Disorderly, Resisting Arrest

& COURTS Beamesderfer was taken into custody at the point. During a search of his person, OCPD officers located a plastic container in his pocket with suspected methamphetamine in it along with a red straw with white powder residue in it. He was arrested at that point for possession of a controlled dangerous substance. Beamesderfer was searched again prior to being placed in a holding cell at the Public Safety Building and a baggie of a white crystal-like substance was found in his sock.

Domestic Assault Arrest OCEAN CITY – A local woman was arrested on assault charges last week after allegedly getting into a physical altercation with her teenage daughter. Around 12:50 a.m. last Thursday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to a residence at 14th Street for a reported domestic incident. Upon arrival, the officer reportedly met with a female, individual identified as Sarah Weiss, 41, of Ocean City, who told the officer she called the police because she had been assaulted by her juvenile daughter.

According to police reports, Weiss was argumentative with officers on the scene and would not allow police to speak with her daughter, nor would she allow officers inside the residence to check on the welfare of her daughter. Weiss reportedly told officers the situation was now under control and no longer needed police assistance. OCPD officers did eventually go inside and noticed signs of an apparent struggle, according to police reports. The juvenile reportedly advised Weiss had grabbed her by her upper arms and pushed her into the couch. The victim told police she did pull Weiss’ hair in an attempt to get her off of her, according to police reports. OCPD officers reportedly observed a small cut on the juvenile’s face with fresh blood on it. Weiss reportedly told police she resides at the unit with her daughters and often has arguments with the juvenile victim. Weiss reportedly told the officer she did pull the victim’s hair and the victim pulled her hair during the altercation on the couch. Through the investigation, it was determined Weiss was the primary aggres-

OCEAN CITY – A Selbyville man was arrested last week after first acting belligerently at an uptown bar and later scrapping with police attempting to take him into custody for refusing to provide identification. Around 3:40 p.m. last Thursday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was dispatched to a bar at 132nd Street for a reported disorderly individual. The officer arrived and saw the suspect, later identified as Tobias Adams, 53, of Selbyville, talking to two employees near a rear door of the establishment. The officer approached and asked Adams for identification, but Adams started to slowly jog away from the officer, according to police reports. When Adams crossed into the roadway at 133rd Street while not in a crosswalk, he was cited for a minor traffic violation. After officers repeatedly asked Adams for identification, he reportedly refused to comply. Adams would not provide any identification, nor would he provide his name after repeated requests by officers, according to police reports. Adams was advised if he did not cooperate, he would be placed under arrest for failing to identify himself. Adams refused to comply and got up from his seated position on the curb and atSEE NEXT PAGE

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January 14, 2022

... COPS & COURTS tempted to walk away. OCPD attempted to stop Adams by grabbing his arms, but Adams continued to resist and attempted to twist away from the officers, according to police reports. Even as officers attempted to place Adams in a transport vehicle, he reportedly continued to resist. OCPD officers spoke with bar staffers, who told police Adams had been acting belligerently inside the establishment before their arrival. Adams was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Unsatisfied Customer Throws Shot Glass OCEAN CITY – A Delaware woman, apparently unsatisfied with her service, was arrested for malicious destruction of property last weekend after allegedly throwing a shot glass in the direction of a bartender. Around 2 a.m. last Sunday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to a bar for a reported malicious destruction of property. The officer met with a bar security guard, who advised a female suspect, subsequently identified as Kara Satchell, 37, of Milton, Del., had thrown a shot glass in the direction of himself and a bartender. According to police reports, the shot glass hit the bar and shattered, with glass hitting the guard and the bartender. Satchell agreed to speak with police about what had happened inside the bar. She reportedly told the officer she had been in the establishment with a friend and consuming alcoholic beverages. Satchell told police the bartender was taking long periods of time between each drink she was served, according to police reports. Satchell reportedly told police when she received her check at the end of the night before leaving, the bartender told her to fill out the tip line and that she didn’t care what amount she left, according to police reports. Satchell reportedly told police she felt targeted all night and had become angry. She told police she picked up the shot glass and threw it at the bar table in the area of the bartender, but had not directed it at anyone. She then paid her tab and left, according to police report. Satchell was arrested and charged with malicious destruction of property.

Tint Leads To Weapons OCEAN CITY – A Fruitland man was arrested last week after weapons were allegedly found in his vehicle during a stop for dark window tinting and loud music. Around 9:30 p.m. last Saturday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer patrolling in the area of 85th Street observed a vehicle with window tinting too dark to observe the driver or any passengers inside. The officer also noted the bass of the vehicle’s sound system was so loud it could be heard through the officers closed patrol vehi-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

cle windows and doors, according to police reports. The officer followed the vehicle before conducting a traffic stop at 70th Street. The officer made contact with the driver, identified as Dorrence Reid, 22, of Fruitland. According to police reports, Reid did provide his driver’s license, but became combative and questioned the reason for the stop. Reid did present his license, but when asked if it included his current address, he replied it did not, but continued to be aggressive and would not provide an updated address, according to police reports. While Reid was searching for the vehicle’s registration, the officer observed two metallic fighting-style knives in the center console cupholders. At first, Reid refused to give up the knives to the officer, but eventually put them on the passenger seat. The officer observed the two knives to have spring-assisted releases, according to police reports. The officer also allegedly observed in the vehicle a small, metal baseball bat only visible after the driver’s side door was opened and the seat reclined. OCPD officers also reportedly found marijuana throughout the vehicle, according to police reports. Reid was ultimately arrested and charged with possession of a concealed dangerous weapon and possession of the springassisted knives.

Fentanyl Suspect Sentenced OCEAN CITY – The second of two suspects, arrested last May in connection with a drug distribution ring out of various resort hotels, pleaded guilty last week to possession of fentanyl and was sentenced to 232 days in jail. In November, Melody Hines, now 33, of Selbyville, pleaded guilty in Worcester County Circuit Court to possession with intent to distribute fentanyl. She was sentenced to 10 years, of which five were suspended. Hines was also placed on supervised probation for three years upon her release. Last February, the Ocean City Police Department’s Narcotics Division initiated a controlled dangerous substance investigation into a local individual, Hines, who was reportedly selling heroin and fentanyl out of various Ocean City hotels. Last May 19, OCPD officers observed Hines run a red light uptown on Coastal Highway and initiated a traffic stop. During the traffic stop, OCPD officers requested K-9 assistance and the department’s K-9 Jappie and his handler responded to scan the vehicle. During the scan, Jappie gave a positive alert for the presence of narcotics in the vehicle. During the subsequent search, OCPD officers recovered over 200 bags of fentanyl and over $600 in currency. Also arrested in connection with the investigation was Eddy Roundtree, 53, of Lincoln, Del. Roundtree faced the same charges as Hines. Last week, Roundtree pleaded guilty to possession of fentanyl and will serve 232 days in jail.

Page 23

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Three Months, Probation For Pistol Whipping Incident

Page 24

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

SNOW HILL – A Pennsylvania man charged in July with first-degree assault after pistol-whipping another man was sentenced last week to three years, all but 90 days of which were suspended. Michael Taxacher, 29, of Connellsville, Pa., last Wednesday entered Alford pleas to reckless endangerment and carrying a handgun on his person during the incident last July 17. In an Alford plea, a defendant does not admit guilt, but acknowledges the state has enough evidence to prosecute the case. For the reckless endangerment plea, Taxacher was sentenced to three years, all of which were suspended. For the handgun possession plea, Taxacher was sentenced to three years, all but 90 days of which were suspended. He was also placed on supervised probation for two years upon his release. Around 12:40 a.m. last July 17, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers were dispatched to a reported assault in the area of 2nd Street and Bal-

timore Avenue. A witness reportedly told officers he had witnessed a fight between two groups of individuals and had captured a portion of the altercation on video. OCPD officers watched the portion of video and observed a male suspect later identified as Taxacher, pointing an object later determined to be a handgun at a male victim, who had his hands raised and was holding what appeared to be a shoe, according to police reports. While the victim was still standing with his hands raised, Taxacher allegedly walked toward the victim and struck him in the face with the handgun. Taxacher’s strike was a straight punch to the left eye with the front of the firearm. In the video, the victim is seen falling backward and remained on the ground for the entire segment, according to police reports. In the video, Taxacher is seen walking away from the victim while carrying the handgun down to his side, according to police reports. Taxacher was located and detained. The victim sustained major injuries to his face and left eye and was

January 14, 2022

transported to Atlantic General Hospital by Ocean City EMS. Before being transported, the victim was interviewed by Ocean City Police and admitted there had been a fight between he and Taxacher and other unknown males. The victim admitted at one point he pulled out a knife to defend himself because he feared for his life during the altercation. The victim could not remember at which point in the altercation he pulled out the knife, according to police reports. OCPD officers interviewed Taxacher, who reportedly told police he and his group, including their female companions, were walking home from a bar when they encountered the victim on the second-floor porch of his rental unit. Taxacher said words were exchanged and the victim came down from his porch, according to police reports. Taxacher said there was modest scuffle on the ground between he and the victim, and at some point, the victim pulled out a knife. Taxacher said his vehicle was parked about 50 feet away and he told his girlfriend to unlock it. Tax-

acher told police he opened the driver’s door and retrieved his handgun from the center console, according to police reports. Taxacher reportedly told police “I should have shot his [expletive deleted.]” Taxacher reportedly told police the gun was loaded, but he didn’t keep a round in the chamber. Taxacher told officers he racked the slide of his firearm as he walked back toward the victim, according to police reports. Taxacher reportedly told police “I’m scared to take someone’s life, but the dude had a knife,” according to police reports. Taxacher reportedly told police he had his gun drawn on the victim and told officers, “He’s lucky to be alive,” according to police reports. Taxacher admitted hitting the victim, but said he could not remember if he punched him with his hand or the weapon. Officers obtained the keys to Taxacher’s vehicle and retrieved the Sig Sauer 9mm handgun. A check with communications revealed Taxacher was the registered owner of the weapon. According to police reports, the gun had blood splatter and human tissue on it.

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Berlin Zoning Board approves new Home Variance Request

January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – The town’s board of appeals approved a variance that will allow for a new home on William Street. The Berlin Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA) voted 3-1 last week to grant a variance that will allow for construction of a new single-family home at 605 William St. BZA member Woody Bunting objected, noting that the lot was large enough to fit a slightly smaller house without a variance. “I don’t have a problem with the house,” he said. “I’m talking more about the kind of a precedent we set.” Attorney Mark Cropper told the board his clients were seeking a variance to the side yard setback requirement in order to put a manufactured home on the William Street property. The town’s code requires an eight-foot setback on each side of the dwelling, a requirement the proposed home meets, but also requires a combined 20 feet of setback. Cropper said the need for the minimum setback as well as the com-

bined setback was unusual. “This is a very unique provision of the code,” he said. “Everywhere I do land development I’ve never run into this.” Cropper said neighboring property owners did not object to the variance request. He added that the lot was not perfectly square and in order for the house to be aligned properly, the variance was needed. Bunting said the lot in question was 79 feet wide, when the town’s minimum was 70 feet.

Page 25

“You’re in here asking for a variance when you have a lot that’s nine feet wider than a majority of the properties allowed in an R-2 zone,” he said. “I don’t see in this particular case where there’s a hardship.” Cropper said his clients wanted to position the house on the lot in a way that was consistent with the neighborhood. “This house is what they believe to be most appropriate for this lot and for the neighbors, to keep property values

up,” he said. When Bunting said that most people had complied with the combined eightfoot and 20-foot setback requirements, Cropper said variances were site specific. “I don’t think a ruling in this matter with regard to this lot creates a precedent that would be binding …,” he said. “Variances are all each and of themselves site specific.” The board voted 3-1, with Bunting opposed, to approve the variance.

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Hundreds Of Bills Pre-Filed Before Legislature Convened

Page 26

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – With the opening of the Maryland General Assembly this week, over 400 bills of local and statewide importance were pre-filed in advance of the session. The Maryland General Assembly convened Wednesday, Jan. 12, and before the 90-day session is complete, state lawmakers will debate and ultimately vote on thousands of pieces of legislation, from the gravely serious to the somewhat mundane. As of late last week, already 220 bills have been prefiled in the Senate, with another 200 pre-filed in the House. State Senator Mary Beth Carozza (R-38) and Delegate Wayne Hartman (R-38C) filed a handful of early bills germane to the local area and across the state. While weighty social and economic issues will be debated during the 2022 session, some of the pre-filed bills are head-scratchers and others leave one wondering why they are not laws already. The following is a brief look at just some of the bills already in the hopper: Senate Bill 32: introduced by Carozza and cross-filed in the House by Hartman, would add Worcester County to the list of counties where an existing agricultural building used for agri-

January 14, 2022

Assembly Session Began Wednesday

tourism is not considered a change of occupancy requires a building permit. In the bill, an agricultural building is defined as structure designed and constructed to house farm implements, hay, grain, poultry, livestock or other horticultural products. Senate Bill 64: The bill pre-filed in the Senate by Carozza would exempt the repair, renovation, reconstruction or expansion of certain existing structures in the Beach Erosion Control District. Under the bill, the existing prohibition would not apply to the repair, renovation, reconstruction or expansion of an existing structure owned by the state or the Mayor and Council of Ocean City if the project does not result in any significant permanent environmental damage to the Beach Erosion Control District. House Bill 169: The bill filed in the House by Hartman would require the State Administrator of Elections to make arrangements with funeral directors, morticians and crematories in the state to receive reports of names and addresses of individuals who were Maryland residents at least a certain age at the time they died, and who died within

a certain period of time. The bill would require the State Administrator to transmit the names and addresses of the deceased individuals to the appropriate local boards of elections. Senate Bill 112: This bill would prohibit a person from collecting absentee ballots during an election in a certain container that is not a ballot drop box. The bill would prohibit an individual, organization, association, or political party from collecting absentee ballots in a container that has not been officially designated by the state or local boards of elections, or is labeled, marked or otherwise designated to appear to be an official ballot drop box. House Bill 1 would legalize the possession and use of marijuana by adults in Maryland beginning in July 2023. According to language in the bill, on or after July 1, 2023, an individual in the state who is at least 21 years old may use and possess cannabis. The bill states the General Assembly shall, by law, provide for the use, distribution, possession, regulation and taxation of cannabis within the state. House Bill 16: This bill would prohibit a person from leaving a dog outside

and unattended for longer than a certain period of time without access to a suitable shelter of suitable shade during certain weather conditions or extreme temperatures. Extreme weather conditions are defined as temperatures below 32 degrees, or conditions during which an active weather warning or advisory has been issued by the National Weather Service. A first violation would come with a warning, while a second violation would come with a civil penalty up to $500. A third or subsequent violation would come with a fine up to $1,000. House Bill 22: This bill would prohibit a veterinary practitioner, except under certain circumstances, from performing declawing procedures on a cat. Under the legislation, the state board shall refuse, suspend, or revoke any application or license and censure or place on probation any licensee after a hearing if a veterinarian fails to comply with the cat declawing prohibition. House Bill 34: This bill would prohibit an individual from committing the crime of indecent exposure within the sight of a minor who is at least two years old. Under the bill, a person who commits indecent exposure on conviction would be subject to imprisonment not exceeding five years, or a fine not exceeding $10,000 or both.

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January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 27

The Dispatch’s Pets of the Month

Pet’s Name: Concord, Quincy & Lexington Pet’s Age/Breed: 6-year-old black labs; 5-year-old chocolate Pet’s Owners: David and Nicky Lauricella

Pet’s Name: Fritz Pet’s Age/Breed: 9-year-old Dachshund Pet’s Owner: Chuck Myers

Pet’s Name: Buxton Pet’s Age/Breed: 3-month-old chocolate lab Pet’s Owners: The Fager family

Pet’s Name: Chloe Pet’s Age/Breed: 7-year-old English springer spaniel Pet’s Owners: David Galdun

EDITOR

STEVE GREEN The Dispatch presents the latest edition of its Pets of the Month Contest. Each month one special animal, or two, in some cases, is picked as the cutest photo of the bunch through a private vote of our staff. Here we present this month’s pets, submitted by our readers. On the front page is last month’s winning entry, Tessie, owned by Mike Rose and Katie Cathcart. Those interested in participating in future months’ contests are invited to send their lovable pet photo to us at editor@mdcoastdispatch.com (preferred) or to P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 or drop it off at our office in Berlin at 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Please be sure it’s a high-quality photo suitable for reproduction and to include your mailing address, the pet’s name, age and breed and the owner’s first and last name. The next series will appear in this space on Feb. 11.

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Who’s Where When COINS PUB 410-289-3100 28th St. Plaza On Coastal Hwy. Friday 14: Full Circle Saturday, Jan. 15: Lennon LaRicci & The Leftovers,

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Best Beats

DJ ROBCEE Fager’s Island: Friday, Jan. 14

On The Beach

CRABCAKE FACTORY BAYSIDE 302-988-5000 37314 Lighthouse Rd., Rte. 54 Selbyville, DE Friday, Jan. 14: Monkee Paw Tuesday, Jan. 18: Acoustic Campfire Wednesday, Jan. 19: Kevin Poole CRAWL STREET TAVERN 443-373-2756 Wicomico St. Downtown O.C. Friday, Jan. 14: Fuzzbox Piranha Saturday, Jan. 15: Rogue Citizens Sunday, Jan. 16: Karaoke with Jeremy

January 14, 2022

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CORK BAR Saturday, Jan. 15: TBA FAGER’S ISLAND 410-524-5500 60th St. In The Bay Friday, Jan. 14: DJ, Greg, DJ Robcee Saturday, Jan. 15: DJ, Greg, DJ Groove, People Playing Music Monday, Jan. 17: Bryan Clark HARBORSIDE 410-213-1846 South Harbor Rd., West O.C. Friday, Jan. 14: DJ Billy T Saturday, Jan. 15: The Dunehounds, DJ Jeremy Sunday, Jan. 16: Opposite Directions, DJ Billy T Thursday, Jan. 20: DJ Billy T

BRYAN CLARK Fager’s Island: Monday, Jan. 17

FULL CIRCLE Coins Pub: Friday, Jan. 14

BEATS BY STYLER Pickles Pub: Fridays, Sundays, Wednesdays & Saturday, Jan. 15

DJ BILLY T Harborside: Friday, Sundays, Thursdays

OCEAN CLUB 410-524-3535 10100 Coastal Hwy. In The Clarion Hotel Friday & Saturday, Jan. 14 & 15: On The Edge PICKLES PUB 410-289-4891 8th St. & Philadelphia Ave. Friday, Jan. 14: Beats By Styler Saturday, Jan. 15: Beats By Styler Sundays: Beats By Styler Mondays: Beats By Styler Tuesdays: Beats By Wax Wednesdays: Beats By Styler Thursdays: Beats By Wax SEACRETS 410-524-4900 49th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, Jan. 14: Late Last Night Duo, Stealing Savannah Duo DJ Bobby O, DJ Cruz Saturday, Jan. 15: John McNutt Band, Late Last Night DJ Bobby O, DJ Cruz

LATE LAST NIGHT Seacrets: Friday, Jan. 14 (DUO) - Saturday, Jan. 15

DJ GROOVE Fager’s Island: Saturday, Jan. 15

BLAKE HALEY Greene Turtle West: Tuesdays

KEVIN POOLE Crabcake Factory Bayside: Wednesday, Jan. 19

THE DUNEHOUNDS Harborside: Saturday, Jan. 15


September 24, 2021

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 63

Who’s Where When

SMOOTH & REMY Crabcake Factory Bayside: Wednesday, Sept. 29

THE DUNEHOUNDS Pickles Pub: Saturday, Sept. 25

THE CHEST PAINS Coconuts Beach Bar: Sunday, Sept. 26

LIVE WIRE (AC/DC TRIBUTE) Seacrets: Friday, Sept. 24

RICK & REGINA Coins Pub: Saturday, Sept. 25

LIME GREEN BAND Greene Turtle West: Friday, Sept. 24 Cocnuts Beach Bar: Saturday, Sept. 25

OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS Harborside: Sunday, Sept. 26

SCRAPPLE Crwl St. tavern: Saturday, Sept. 25

SHOTS FIRED Purple Moose: Sunday, Sept. 26

HOLLY MONTGOMERY BAND Fager’s Island: Friday, Sept. 24


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

SPORTS In The News

Sunset Marina and Sunset Grille recently presented the proceeds from the 2nd Annual Rena Bishop Broadbill Bash fishing tournament to Atlantic General Hospital and the John H. “Jack” Burbage Regional Cancer Care Center. This year’s tournament raised nearly $38,000, bringing the total contribution to nearly $70,000 in two short years. Pictured above, the winners from the tournament celebrate their winnings and their contribution to the hospital in Rena’s name. Submitted Photo

Decatur Girls Remain Unbeaten At 6-0

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Stephen Decatur’s girls’ varsity basketball team beat Bayside South rival Wicomico, 54-42, last week to remain unbeaten on the season.

After the win over Wicomico, the Seahawks’ record stands at a perfect 6-0. The two teams were tied at 12-12 after one quarter, but the Seahawks outscored the Tribe, 15-8, in the second quarter. Decatur outscored Wicomico, 14-5, in the decisive fourth quarter to pull away for the 54-42 win.

Decatur Wrestlers Split Two Matches

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – Stephen Decatur’s varsity wrestling team split two matches last week, topping Wicomico, 78-6, last Wednesday before falling to Cape Henlopen, 34-27, in an impromptu match last Saturday. Against Wicomico, Juan Hinojosa won at 106, Aaron August won a 113, Reid Caimi won at 126, Coby Drummond won at 132, Logan Intrieri won

at 138, Gavin Solito won at 145, Evan Haworth won at 152, Parker Intrieri won at 160, Noah Reho won at 170, Jack Quisguard won at 182, Alex Koulikov won at 195, Henry Brous won at 220 and Michael Rayne won at 285. Against Cape, Tyler Long won at 144, Noah Reho won at 165, Jack Quisguard won at 175, Alex Koulikov won at 190, Juan Hinojosa won at 106, Aaron August won at 113, and Coby Drummond won at 132.

Mallards Beat Arcadia, Fall To Royals

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

BERLIN – It was win one, lose one for Worcester Prep’s girls’ varsity basketball team this week with a 47-21 win over Arcadia, followed by a 43-34 loss to Delmarva Christian. The Mallards beat Arcadia, 47-21,

last week. Worcester led 11-2 after one quarter and 30-10 at the half and never looked back. Lily Baeurle led the way with 18 points. Myranda Beebe had 12 points and 10 rebounds, while Natalie Brushmiller scored 11 points and grabbed 15 rebounds. On Monday, the Mallards fell to Delmarva Christian for the second time this season, 43-34.

Page 29


Page 30

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 14, 2022

People in Society Visitors to the Schellville Enchanted Winter Celebration could warm up with hot beverages served by The Coffee House Crew.

by Jeanette Deskiewicz Featuring Those Helping Causes In The Resort Area

Selling the game tickets were Daniel Mihalisin and Chris Ciletti for the Knights of Columbus Bingo for Babies to benefit The Grace Center for Maternal and Women’s Health.

While providing information on the Jesse Klump Suicide Awareness & Prevention program at Saturday’s Ocean Pines Farmers Market, Donna Gleckler got a visit from Gaia and Alex Miller.

Knights of Columbus Ladies Auxiliary members, including Dee Matthews, Bernadette Sohn and Robin Pinkerton, are always on hand to help with Friday night bingo games.

At the weekly Ocean Pines Farmers Market, David Bean and David Joseph Deacon of DJ David & Company have plenty of seasonal vegetables available.

Conducting interviews for clerical and clinical staff at their recent job fair, were Jessica Wolf and Taylor Burkhead of the Atlantic General Health System

The Baked Food Trolley with Jamie Gelfo and Maggie McGraw offers breakfast and lunch options for shoppers at the Ocean Pines Winter Farmers & Artisans Market.

Schellville Elves Todd Hickman and Susan Anderheggen directed the crowd around the Magical Christmas Village and into the Maze of Merriment.

At last week’s Job Fair Adreion Packer and Jodi Bernier looked to fill open billing positions in the various offices around Atlantic General Hospital and Health System.

Over the holiday season, volunteers Christine Macysyn and Harold Missimer welcomed guests into the Schellville Enchanted Winter Celebration.


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 31

Business And Real Estate News New Coordinator Hired SALISBURY – The Strategic Communications Department has announced the appointment of Jessica Perry to the position of coordinator. Perry, who has been with TidalHealth since 2015, most recently served as the executive assistant to Chris Hall and the division of Strategy and Business Development. In that role she coordinated the TidalHealth Seniors membership program and its membership growth, produced the quarterly Wellness Wave magazine and a monthly e-newsletter, managed interns and volunteers, and community benefit reporting. Prior, she was a team member in Finance at TidalHealth Peninsula Regional and was the Marketing Assistant/Social Media Specialist and Photographer at TidalHealth Nanticoke, where she assisted on numerous community events and served as the principle writer for the department. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in English: Professional Communications from the University of Delaware; and is pursuing her Master’s in Business Communications through Wilmington University. She replaces Gwenn Garland who left the health system at the end of 2021.

Financial Officer Promotion SALISBURY – Hudson Behavioral Health has promoted Director of Accounting Rita Mecca to the position of Chief Financial Officer. Mecca joined the organization in 2021 and has a diverse accounting background spanning more than twenty years. In her role as Chief Financial Officer, Mecca is responsible for overseeing the financial operations of Hudson Behavioral Health, including $10M in annual revenue, 100-plus employees and 10 facilities throughout RITA MECCA Maryland and Delaware. “Rita has been effective and efficient as our Director of Accounting and has made a smooth transition, taking over as Chief Financial Officer,” said Leslie Brown, CEO of Hudson Behavioral Health. “As we continue to grow our presence on the Delmarva Peninsula, Rita will be a tremendous asset to our team.”

Interim Medical Officer Named

SALISBURY – Simona Eng, DO, was recently named the Interim Chief Medical Officer (CMO) of TidalHealth Peninsula Regional. Eng will now provide executive leadership for a medical staff of more than 300 physicians with privileges to practice medicine at the Salisbury, Maryland hospital. Eng succeeds Charles “C.B.” Silvia, MD, who retired from TidalHealth on Jan. 4. Eng, a hospitalist, first joined TidalHealth in 2001. She is a previous President of the Medical Staff, the first woman in the 125-year history of TidalHealth Peninsula Regional to serve in that distinguished role. Eng currently also serves as the Chairman of the Medical DR. Education and the Phar- SIMONA ENG macy, Nutrition and Therapeutics Committees, and is a Past Chief of the Department of Medicine. Eng received her medical degree from the Philadelphia School of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and completed her internship and residency at the UMDNJ School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford, New Jersey. She has been with TidalHealth’s Hospitalist service for 20 years, and has led that group as Medical Director since 2004. She is board-certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, and is a Fellow of the American College of Osteopathic Internists and a Senior Fellow in Hospital Medicine. Silvia, who had served as TidalHealth’s Vice President of Medical Affairs and CMO since 2011, was first granted privileges at TidalHealth Peninsula Regional in 1985 and managed a successful internal medicine private practice prior to joining the health system. “Drs. Silvia and Eng have been tremendous team members at TidalHealth for many years. We wish Dr. Silvia the best in retirement and are confident that Dr. Eng will provide excellent stewardship of this role until a full-time team member is identified,” said Steve Leonard, President/CEO of TidalHealth. “A national search has been underway for several months and we expect to have a candidate identified by early spring.”

Firm Adds New Employee SALISBURY – Gray Buffalo Consult-

Avery Hall Insurance and the Selective Insurance Group Foundation partnered to support the efforts of the Make Delmarva Foundation through a $500 grant. The Make Delmarva Foundation was selected by Avery Hall Insurance Group for the grant as part of the Selective President’s Club Matching Gift initiative, which allows premier independent insurance agents the opportunity to double their donations and make a bigger impact in their local communities. Above are Avery Hall Account Executive Lacy Messick and Make Delmarva Foundation President Jim Leether. Submitted Photo

ing, a business consulting firm that transforms businesses through accounting services and operational improvements, announced the addition of Jennifer West to the team. A 13-year, business owner, West’s responsibilities as a bookkeeper for the company include the management of financial reports, records, and general ledgers as well JENNIFER WEST as account reconciliations and supporting monthly, quarterly, half year and year-end financials. She will also assist with quarterly payroll reports and annual 1099’s. “I am excited to welcome Jennifer to the team and look forward to the insight she brings as an accomplished business owner,” said Sam Eastlack, owner of Gray Buffalo Consulting. “Her skill set, professional experience and readiness to learn and grow with the company makes her a valuable asset to the team.” West said, “I see a lot of potential with Gray Buffalo Consulting. I am looking forward to venturing out and meeting new people in the business community, learning about their operations and goals and working with Sam to help them take their businesses to the next level.”

Advanced Surgery Completed SALISBURY – Peninsula Orthopaedic Associates Surgery Center is the first facility on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to offer Mako SmartRobotics™. This advance-

ment in joint replacement surgery transforms the way total knee replacements are performed. Total knee replacements in the United States are expected to increase 189% by 2030, yet studies have shown that approximately 20% of patients are dissatisfied after conventional surgery. Mako Total Knee combines Stryker’s advanced robotic technology with its clinically successful Triathlon Total Knee System, which enables surgeons to have a more predictable surgical experience with increased precision and accuracy. “With Mako SmartRobotics™ for Total Knee Replacement, I know more about my patients than ever before, and I’m able to cut less. For some patients, this can mean less soft tissue damage; for others, greater bone preservation.” said Dr. Petrera. “Mako’s 3D CT allows me to create a personalized plan based on each patient’s unique anatomy all before entering the operating room. During surgery, I can validate that plan and make any necessary adjustments while guiding the robotic arm to execute that plan. It’s exciting to be able to offer this transformative technology across the joint replacement service line to perform total knee replacements.” “We are proud to be the first facility to offer this highly advanced robotic technology in our area,” said David Davies, CEO of Peninsula Orthopaedic Associates. “This addition to our orthopaedic service line further demonstrates our commitment to provide the community with outstanding healthcare.”

Stevenson United Methodist Resuming In-Person Church Services Every Sunday At 9 a.m. – Sunday School Back in Session

Stevenson United Methodist Church

123 North Main St., Berlin, Md. 410-641-1137 • www.stevensonchurch.org

– Service Also Livestreamed On Facebook


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Every Monday: TOPS Meeting 5-6:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Berlin. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support group promoting weight loss and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Call Rose 443-880-8444.

Every Friday: Bingo Knights of Columbus will host with doors open at 5 p.m. and bingo beginning promptly at 6:30 p.m. Held at the Columbus Hall at 9901 Coastal Highway, behind St. Luke's Church. Play every game for just $24. Light refreshments available. Call 410-524-7994 with any questions. Every Tuesday: Dancing The Delmarva Hand Dance Club holds dancing at the Selbyville Elks Lodge 2173 from 5:30-9 p.m. delmarvahanddancing.com. Every Wednesday: Bingo Elks Lodge 2645, corner of Sinepuxent Avenue and 138th Street in Ocean City. Has bingo all year. Doors open 4:30 p.m. with first game sharply at 6:30 p.m. Kitchen open for light fare. 410-2502645.

Jan. 14: Crab Cake Dinner Stevenson United Methodist Church will host carryout only, 4-6:30 p.m. Cost is $14, crab cake sandwich, green beans, baked potato, cole slaw; $24, two crab cake sandwiches, green beans, baked potato, cole slaw; and $10, crab cake sandwich. Jan. 14-15: Children’s Theater Ocean Pines Children’s Theater announced the upcoming production of the musical, Disney’s Frozen, Jr. Performances will be Jan. 14, 7 p.m. and Jan. 15, 3 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center, located in the Ocean City Convention Center. Tickets may be purchased through ticketmaster.com, or in person at the Ocean City Convention.

Through Jan. 15: Tree Recycling The Solid Waste Division of Worcester County Public Works will host its annual collection of Christmas trees. Area residents can drop off Christmas trees at the Central Landfill in Newark and the Berlin, Pocomoke, and Snow Hill Homeowners Convenience Centers at no cost. The trees will be ground into mulch for use at the Central Landfill.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Things To Do Jan. 15: Fried Chicken Dinner Drive-thru pickup only at New Hope United Methodist Church, 11 a.m.-until in Willards. Cost is $14 and includes mashed potatoes, greens, string beans, roll and dessert. Jan. 15-16: Festival Of Art Delmarva Art Expo returns to the Ocean City Convention Center, 40th Street, Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. A collection of many art forms from metals to canvas to fiber. Admission charge. delmarvaartexpo.com. Jan. 16: Winter Dinner Meeting The Worcester County Historical Society will meet at the Dunes Manor Hotel. Dinner guests will learn about Worcester County’s past from Dr. Ray Thompson, retired history professor at Salisbury University. He will speak to the members and guests about the early history of Worcester County. According to Thompson, the Eastern Shore has been fortunate to have the oldest continuous records in British-speaking America starting in 1632 to help people understand who the earliest settlers were. He called them hearty men and women who lived in the frontier environment away from civilization. His talk will look into who they were and their lifestyles and how they transformed the Eastern Shore. He will trace the movements of the settlers up the peninsula of Virginia into Maryland’s Eastern Shore and into Delaware. Doors will open for the event at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $29 per person and can be purchased by sending a check to Robert Fisher, WCHS Treasurer, 230 South Washington St., Snow Hill, Md. 21863. The deadline for reservations for the dinner, which is open to the public, is Jan. 9. Jan. 17: Club Meeting Democratic Women's Club of Worcester County’s regular meeting will be held at 10 am via zoom. Speaker is Delegate

Sherry Sample-Hughes. Email for login: suechallis68@gmail.com.

Jan. 18: Monthly Meeting American Legion Auxiliary Unit 166 will meet at 6 p.m. for social hour with meeting at 7 p.m. at American Legion Synepuxent Post 166, 23rd Street, Ocean City. If you have a family member that is a veteran or active military, join the mission to support veterans, active military, and their families. Current members and those interested in becoming a member are encouraged to attend. Jan. 20: NAACP Meeting The January meeting of Worcester County NAACP will be a 6:30 p.m. zoom meeting. COVID-19 Update presentation with Dr. Angela Gibbs M.D. The Omicron Variant will be discussed. Dr. Gibbs is a Board Certified Family Practice Doctor with over 25 years of medical experience. Email judymarieh55@gmail.com for zoom invite. Jan. 21: Oyster Fritter Sandwich Public is welcome to American Legion Post 123, 10111 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin from 2 p.m. till. Cost $9. Jan. 29: Breakfast Buffet AUCE breakfast buffet at the Whaleyville United Methodist Church located at 11716 Sheppards Crossing Road in Whaleyville. $8/adult and $4/child from 7-10 a.m. Buffet will include pancakes, bacon, sausage, scrapple, scrambled eggs, chipped beef, hash brown potatoes, toast, fruit and assorted beverages.

Feb. 12: Valentine Dinner Sons of the American Legion Post 166 23rd Street and Philadelphia Avenue to host, including N.Y. Strip steak and shrimp dinner, baked potato, vegetable, dessert and complimentary drink. Cost $20 per person. Tickets available at the Post or call 410-289-3166.

Things To Do activities are printed free of charge. To ensure that an event is listed in a timely manner, please

submit information as early as possible, since all items will be listed in advance as space permits. Be sure to include the date, name of event, time, location, address and a contact number. Email to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com; fax to 410-641-0966; or mail to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811.

January 14, 2022

Feb. 18: Spaghetti Dinner Berlin Fire Company will hold carryout dinner 4:30-7 p.m. featuring spaghetti with meat salad, salad and garlic toast for $12.

Feb. 18-20: Boat Show Sponsored by the Ocean City-Berlin Optimist Club, the 39th annual event will feature over 350 boats, 150 exhibitors and 50 boat dealers. Hours are 11 a.m.7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 18; 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 19; and 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 20.

March 3-6: OC Film Festival In partnership with the Art League of OC, this festival features films by local and international filmmakers of every background and genre. Screenings at multiple venues around OC. ocmdfilmfestival.com. March 11-13: Wool, Fiber Expo Ocean City Convention Center 40th Street, hosts this unique and upscale wool and fiber expo featuring many oneof-a-kind hand created products. Also on hand, we will have all the materials available to make the products. The expo will also offer classes and demonstrations taught by true artists. Hours, Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Admission.

March 12: Parade, Festival The 42nd Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Festival starts at noon at 60th Street. Everyone loves to be Irish at Ocean City’s famous parade. Marching units, floats, and local celebrities. At 11 a.m. there will be a fun festival with food, drink and merriment at the 45th Street shopping area. Free. delmarvairish.org.

March 18: Fried Chicken Dinner Berlin Fire Company will hold carryout dinner 4:30-7 p.m. (until sold out) featuring fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, string beans and roll for $12.

March 18-20: Annual Home Show Home, Condo & Outdoor show plus art & craft fair at the Ocean City Convention Center, 40th Street. Hundreds of pros offering thousands of ideas...decorating, remodeling, accessorizing, and more. Hours Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; and Sunday 10:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Admission. oceanpromotions.info.


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 33

COMMUNITY News In Photos

During December, the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean City-Ocean Pines collected food in the Ocean Pines Community Center parking lot. Pictured, from left, are Kiwanians Carolyn Dryzga, Food Drive Chair Candy Foreman and Kitty Wrench sorting some of the non-perishable goods donated to Diakonia for its pantry. Both Kiwanis members and the public made the donations.

Race Directors Rick Hundley and Ernie Felici, of Focus Multisports recently made a contribution of $1,250 to the Friends of Holts Landing State Park, after successful Bethany Beach Sports Weekend and the Coastal Delaware Running Festival events. Pictured, from left, are Bob Printz-Friends of Holts Landing State Submitted Photos Park and Felici.

Faith, Hope, Love Quilters of St. Matthews By-the-Sea United Methodist Church in Fenwick delivered 70 comfort quilts to patients of the DaVita Dialysis Center in Berlin last month. Pictured, from left, are Shawna Bandoch of DaVita and Shirley Loveland and Jeanie Higgins of Faith, Hope, Love Quilters. The quilters meet twice a month to make and donate quilts to various groups including medical center patients, veterans and others in need of love and comfort. With clippers, garden gloves and greens from their yards in hand, members of the Worcester County Garden Club braved the cold to decorate Historic St. Martin’s Church in Showell for the holidays. The Worcester County Garden Club is a member of Federated Garden Clubs of Maryland, Inc., a 501(c)(3) organization, whose mission is to provide support, leadership and education for garden clubs and the public about best practices for horticulture, conservation, and landscape design. Above, front from left, are Club President Deb Young, Suzy Young and Jan Owens; and, back, Mary Ellen Jefferson, Karen Trigger, Martha Bennett, Joan La Hayne, Alison Schweiger and guest Pam O’Donnell. Below decorating the interior were members Mary Ellen Jefferson and Martha Bennett.

Santa came to Ocean Pines in December for his annual breakfast with many youngsters of all ages, featuring pancakes, sausages, scrambled eggs, pastries and drinks. The Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City served a fine breakfast. It's a club tradition to volunteer to help out the Ocean Pines Parks and Recreation Department to make it a success. Pictured, from left, are former Kiwanian Barb Peletier, who still helps out, pancake flipper Mike Castoro, Santa, batter mixer Dave Landis and sausage cooker Candy Foreman.


Page 34

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 14, 2022

Chris Parypa’s Photo Of The Week:

Each week staff photographer Chris Parypa is tasked with submitting a photo from his vast library to be featured in this space. Above is an aerial photo from the winter of 2014 showing a partially frozen bay. To purchase any of Parypa’s photos, click over to www.chrisparypa.com.

BERLIN LIONS CLUB

WHOLE HOG SAUSAGE SALE SATURDAY

February 5, 2022 8 a.m.-until??? Sausage Only - $6/lb - Hot & Mild - 4lb Minimum $5 Bloody Marys, $5 Sausage & Egg Sandwiches Call 410-641-1064 to Place Pre-Orders Sponsored by Berlin Lions Club • South Route 113 • Berlin, Maryland

OCEANFRONT

OCEANFRONT

Antigua • 85th Street

Penthouse Townhouse, Beautiful Views of Ocean, Bay, Beach. 3BR/3BA, open floor plan first floor, granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances, nice size dining room off kitchen. Tasteful coastal decor, light and bright. Great Rental Income. $870,000

Century I • 99th Street

2BR/2BA Condo. Large, private ocean front balcony. Great midtown location near shopping, activities, restaurants. Building features indoor pool, fitness center, oceanfront deck area, onsite management, security, 2 high speed elevators. $538,000

Looking For New Listings! Call Keti To Sell Yours Today!

Keti Lynch

Associate Broker/MBA Bi-Lingual/GRI

6808 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 • www.shorepro.com

Toll Free: 800-492-5832 Cell: 443-235-5482 Fax: 410-524-4225


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 35

HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21 to April 19): Your batteries should be fully recharged by now, making you more than eager to get back into the swing of things full time. Try to stay focused so that you don't dissipate your energies. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): You're eager to charge straight ahead into your new responsibilities. But you'll have to paw the ground a little longer, until a surprise complication is worked out. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): Rival factions are pressuring you to take a stand favoring one side or the other. But this isn't the time to play judge. Bow out as gracefully as possible, without committing yourself to any position. CANCER (June 21 to July 22): Reassure a longtime, trusted confidante that you appreciate his or her words of advice. But at this time, you need to act on what you perceive to be your own sense of self-interest. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): You need to let your warm Leonine heart fire up that new relationship if you hope to see it move from the "just friends" level to one that will be as romantic as you could hope for. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): There's still time to repair a misunderstanding with an honest explanation and a heartfelt apology. The sooner you do, the sooner you can get on with other matters. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): Ex-

pect a temporary setback as you progress toward your goal. Use this time to re-examine your plans and see where you might need to make some significant changes. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): Some missteps are revealed as the cause of current problems in a personal or professional partnership. Make the necessary adjustments and then move on. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): Jupiter's influence helps you work through a pesky problem, allowing your naturally jovial attitude to re-emerge stronger than ever. Enjoy your success. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): Set aside your usual reluctance to change, and consider reassessing your financial situation so that you can build on its strengths and minimize its weaknesses. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): Some recently acquired information helps open up a dark part of the past. Resolve to put what you've learned to good use. Travel plans continue to be favored. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): Act on your own keen instincts. Your strong Piscean backbone will support you as someone attempts to pressure you into a decision you're not ready to make. BORN THIS WEEK: You embody a love for traditional values combined with an appreciation of what's new and challenging. (c) 2022 King Features Synd., Inc.

THE DISPATCH Crossword Puzzle

Estate Litigation Probate Estate Planning Civil Litigation Medicaid 9748 Stephen Decatur Hwy. #112 Ocean City, MD 21842 www.batielaw.com

443-856-4676 Monday-Friday

Business Succession Planning

Are You Getting Your Daily Buzz? Local News Articles Delivered Daily To Your Inbox

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING …

“I really enjoy getting the Daily Buzz articles. They are informative, helpful and well-written. This was a great idea. Thank you.” “Love the Daily Buzz”

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SIGN UP AT WWW.MDCOASTDISPATCH.COM AND JOIN THE 15,000-PLUS WHO RECEIVE THE NEWS BEFORE IT’S PRINTED

ANSWERS ON PAGE 46


OCEAN CITY vanishing

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 36

Things I Like... By Steve Green

Waking up to snow

Observing construction crews at work YouTube highlights of games I miss When the forecasters get it right

My teenager studying on his own The 10-Year challenge photos A memorable eulogy

Talk radio on a road trip Well-trained dogs

A clean house after a day of work A historian’s memory

January 14, 2022

WITH BUNK MANN

Rolling chairs were a familiar sight in Ocean City in 1920s and 1930s and were an early version of today’s Boardwalk tram. Many college students helped pay their tuition by pushing tourists up and down the Boardwalk in those wicker chairs on wheels. Rolling chairs originated in Atlantic City, N.J. and quickly made their way south. Dr. Francis Townsend, Sr. introduced them to Ocean City where he rented them for 25 cents an hour from his Washington Pharmacy on the Boarwalk at Somerset Street. Although gone from the resort scene since the World War II era, these chairs on wheels were a big attraction for several decades. A restored rolling chair is on display at the Ocean City

Life-Saving Station Museum. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishingPhoto courtesy Debi Thompson Cook oc.com.


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 37

The Dispatch Classifieds $15/Week for Minimum of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available) Deadline for Insertions, Cancellations & Payment is 3pm Tuesday Pre-Payment is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard

HELP WANTED SMALL ENGINE MECHANIC: Year Round, Competitive Wages. 443-754-1047. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– SALES ASSOCIATES: Looking for 2 full time and 1 part time positions. 2 shifts, day & night, plus weekends. No Vaccine Mandate Required. Apply in person. Red Light District, 12102 Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– DENTAL ASSISTANT: Small family dental practice seeking a Dental Assistant. Must be x-ray certified. Please send a resume to dentistryinthepines@gmail.com. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

NOW HIRING FULL TIME BARTENDER Call 410-726-7061 Or Apply Within at 56th Street

EXPERIENCED LINE COOK: $18/hour. Yellowfins Bar & Grill, Selbyville, DE. Call 302-436-0122. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– PART-TIME SECURITY JOB Secure premises and personnel, patrol property, monitor surveillance equipment, inspect building, equipment and access points, sign in co-owners and guests, maintain security log. Salary $13 to $14 per hour based on experience. Part-time, year-round position. Interested candidates should email Michelle Jones, Head of Security Atlantis at AtlantisHSOC@gmail.com or call 410-524-9100.

CARPENTERS & CARPENTERS HELPERS Must have:

Tools, Transportation, Driver’s License Exp. Required! PATTERSON & SONS BUILDERS

Call 410-641-9530

FRONT DESK ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT A beautiful award winning community in Ocean View, DE is seeking a self-motivated, driven, and goal-oriented administrative assistant. Must be organized and possess excellent verbal and written communication skills and be computer proficient in MS Office and have the ability to learn a variety of software programs. Excellent customer service skills are a requirement of the position. Previous experience in working with HOAs preferred but not required. Full-time, year-round, 40 hours/week. Interested candidates should email resume with salary requirements to: Susan.Brewer@casinc.biz or fax 302-537-4075 EOE

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

Fire Alarm Technician Entry Level Immediate opening. Good driving record. Electrical and/or computerrelated experience a plus. To apply contact us at jobs@firepro-md.com or call 410-213-1880 FIREPRO, INC Work With the Best Ocean City has to Offer ... We Invite You to be a Part of our Family!

Year Round Positions ~SERVER ~ROOM ATTENDANT ~MAINTENANCE ~HOSTESS ~HUMAN RESOURCES ASSISTANT TOP WAGES! EXCELLENT BENEFITS! HOUSING AVAILABLE! FAX RESUME & SALARY REQ. to: 410-723-9109 Online at www.clarionoc.com APPLY IN PERSON Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. CLARION RESORT FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL 10100 COASTAL HWY. OCEAN CITY, MD. 21842

Currently Hiring Manpower For:

Carpenter | Laborer | Painters Stucco & EIFS Mechanics Concrete Work o Experience preferred. o Tools, transportation & valid driver’s license are a plus. o Excellent pay and a competitive benefits package available. Please Apply Online: https://www.allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

Or Contact Our Office at 410-352-9800

INDIAN RIVER MARINA IS NOW HIRING! •NIGHTWATCH •BOATYARD •MAINTENANCE

Apply Online at delawarestatejobs.com For additional information, please contact the Marina office at 302.227.3071 AA/EOE

FULL-TIME PERSONAL BANKER

EOE M/F/D/V

Check Out The Dispatch Online E-dition: Free. Fast. Every Friday. www.mdcoastdispatch.com

Farmers Bank of Willards has a full-time Personal Banker position available at our West Ocean City location. Looking for professional and motivated individuals with extraordinary customer service skills. Cash handling experience & excellent computer skills a must. Please send resume to 12641 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD 21842 or email: jennie.rice@fbwbank.com Application cut off is 1-24-2022

HELP WANTED

“Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirmative Action Employer”

CONSERVATION TECHNICIAN/ MARINA TRAVEL LIFT OPERATOR

Position will be responsible for the daily operation and maintenance of the travel lift and forklifts. Duties will include the operation and maintenance of the marine travel lift, proper boat docking and large forklift operation plus daily supervision of the boatyard staff.

Apply online at delawarestatejobs.com

For further assistance, you may contact us by phone at 302.739.5458 or email at jobs@delaware.gov


Page 38

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Classifieds CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

RENTAL NEEDS

COMMERCIAL

YEAR ROUND RENTAL WANTED. DE/OC/WOC/OP area. Older local couple. Will pay year in advance. 410 422-1691. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

STORAGE WEST OCEAN CITY: 2 car garage with attached work room. 775 sqft. Call 410-7260075. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 2 Office/Retail Spaces for Lease. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

RENTALS

WEEKLY RENTALS Poolfront: $245 Efficiency: $275 2 BR Apartment: $350 3 BR Suite: $425

Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave.

410-289-8581

Commercial Office in Ocean Pines Area Approx. 1000SF Available Now 410-977-7254 GET YOUR DAILY BUZZ!

“Bee” in the Know! Read the News Before Its Printed Sign Up Now At: www.mdcoastdispatch.com

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Third Insertion VICTOR A. LEMBO, ESQ. 658 KENILWORTH DRIVE, #203 TOWSON, MD 21204 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19021 To all persons interested in the estate of RENEE A. PHIPPS AKA: RENEE ANTOINETTE PHIPPS, ESTATE NO. 19021. Notice is given that JACQUELINE L SOUTHERINGTON, 13212 OCEAN DRIVE, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842, was on, DECEMBER 20, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of RENEE A. PHIPPS, who died on AUGUST 29, 2021, with a will.

their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 20TH day of JUNE, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

(2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 31, 2021

JACQUELINE L SOUTHERINGTON Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 12-31, 01-07, 01-14

MICHELLE POSTIGLIONE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 12-31, 01-07, 01-14

Second Insertion Third Insertion JOHN P HOULIHAN, ESQ. JOHN P HOULIHAN, PA 560 RIVERSIDE DRIVE SUITE A201 PO BOX 272 SALISBURY, MD 21803 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19022 To all persons interested in the estate of MARY D NAPOLITANO AKA: MARY DAISY NAPOLITANO AKA: MARY SCOTT NAPOLITANO, ESTATE NO. 19022. Notice is given that MICHELLE POSTIGLIONE, 35 ESTHER AVENUE, CONGERS, NY 10920, was on, DECEMBER 23, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARY D NAPOLITANO, who died on DECEMBER 16, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 23RD day of JUNE, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication DECEMBER 31, 2021

PETER S. BUAS, ESQ. WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON, LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000227 LORI SAVAGE P.O. BOX 231 NELSONIA, VA 23414 Plaintiff vs. THOMAS J. WALL, JR. 602 DUN SWAMP ROAD POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 AND MAE LYNN WALL 602 DUN SWAMP ROAD POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 AND PUSEY RENTALS, INC. MORTGAGE HOLDER 1513 MARKET STREET POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 AND MCCREADY FOUNDATION, INC., JUDGEMENT HOLDER 100 E. CAROLINE STREET SALISBURY, MD 21801 AND TIDALHEALTH PENINSULA REGIONAL, INC. (FORMERLY KNOWN AS PENINSULA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER) JUDGEMENT HOLDER 100 EAST CARROLL STREET SALISBURY, MD 21801 AND WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND MAUREEN L. HOWARTH, COUNTY ATTORNEY GOVERNMENT CENTER, ROOM 1103 1 W. MARKET STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863

January 14, 2022 DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS ITEM NO. 45, ACCOUNT NO. 01024248, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION 55X54 E SIDE 209 SEVENTH ST POCOMOKE, DEED REFERENCE: 04184/00001, ASSESSED TO THOMAS J. WALL, JR. & MAE LYNN WALL Defendants ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the following property described below and located in Worcester County, sold by the Collector of Taxes for the County of Worcester and the State of Maryland to the plaintiff in this proceeding: ITEM NO. 45, ACCOUNT NO. 01-024248, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION 55X54 E SIDE 209 SEVENTH ST POCOMOKE, DEED REFERENCE: 04184/00001, ASSESSED TO THOMAS J. WALL, JR. & MAE LYNN WALL The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption have not been paid. It is thereupon this 1st of January, 2022 by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, ORDERED, That notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for three successive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to appear in this Court by the 4th day of March, 2022, and redeem the property described above and answer the Complaint or thereafter a final judgement will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances.

SUSAN S. TILGHMAN SEIDEL, BAKER & TILGHMAN, P.A. 110 NORTH DIVISION STREET SALISBURY, MD 21801 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19024 To all persons interested in the estate of SARAH G. CLARKE, ESTATE NO. 19024. Notice is given that STEVEN R. CLARKE, 109 SUNSET DRIVE, MOUNT HOLLY SPRINGS, PA 17065, was on, DECEMBER 29, 2021, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of SARAH G. CLARKE, who died on DECEMBER 20, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 29TH day of JUNE, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 07, 2022

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch

STEVEN R. CLARKE Personal Representative

Date of Publication JANUARY 07, 2022

True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 01-07, 01-14, 01-21

AND UNKNOWN OWNER OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS ITEM NO. 45, ACCOUNT NO. 01024248, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION 55X54 E SIDE 209 SEVENTH ST POCOMOKE, DEED REFERENCE: 04184/00001, ASSESSED TO THOMAS J. WALL, JR. & MAE LYNN WALL, THE UNKNOWN OWNER’S HEIRS,

Second Insertion

BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-07, 01-14, 01-21

First Insertion PAUL D WILBER, ESQ WEBB, BURNETT, CORNBROOKS, WILBER,


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com VORHIS, DOUSE & MATHERS, LLP 115 BROAD STREET P.O. BOX 910 SALISBURY, MD 21803-0910 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19026 To all persons interested in the estate of MARY ELLEN CROPPER, ESTATE NO. 19026. Notice is given that W. CARLTON CROPPER, PO BOX 246, NEWARK, MD 21841 and DEBORAH LYNN HAYES, 2936 BEAUMONT FARM ROAD, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22901 was on, JANUARY 07, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARY ELLEN CROPPER, who died on SEPTEMBER 07, 2021, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7TH day of JULY, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022

W. CARLTON CROPPER Personal Representative DEBORAH LYNN HAYES Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion COATES, COATES, & COATES B. RANDALL COATES ESQ 204 WEST GREEN STREET PO BOX 293 SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 19028 Notice is given that the REGISTER OF WILLS COURT of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PA, appointed TIKKIA M CRAWFORD, 832 VOILET STREET, NORRISTOWN, PA 19401 as the PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES of the Estate of ROBERT LEE PURNELL, who died on MARCH 21, 2021, domiciled in PENNSYLVANIA, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is B. RANDALL COATES ESQ, whose address is 204 W GREEN STREET, SNOW HILL, MD 21863. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that

date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 TIKKIA M CRAWFORD Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, TRUSTEE PINES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000196 VILLAS OF OCEAN PINES BORDERLINKS TIMESHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 11029 CATHELL ROAD BERLIN, MD 21811 Plaintiff v. EMERGE, INC. Defendant NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, this 7th day of January, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 8th day of February, 2022, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 1st day of February, 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: VOP=Villas of Ocean Pines Borderlinks Timeshare Owners Association, Inc. Condomimium Unit Br44 Time Interval 2 Price $50.00 Purchaser VOP Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion PETER S. BUAS, ESQ. WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON, LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000228 FS ENTERPRISES LLC 4841 CRAIN HIGHWAY UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 Plaintiff vs. ROBERT L. YOUNG 2027 CLEMENTINE STREET POCOMOKE, MD 21851 AND ABB, INC. 4702 SNOW HILL ROAD SNOW HILL, MD 21863 AND WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND ROSCOE LESLIE, COUNTY ATTORNEY GOVERNMENT CENTER, ROOM 1103 1 W. MARKET STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 AND UNKNOWN OWNER OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS ITEM NO. 85, ACCOUNT NO. 01032992, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION LOT 8 & P/O LOT 6 CLEMENTINE STREET PL HUGH MCMICHAEL SUBDIV, DEED REFERENCE: 03785/00149, ASSESSED TO ROBERT L. YOUNG, THE UNKNOWN OWNER’S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS ITEM NO. 85, ACCOUNT NO. 01032992, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION LOT 8 & P/O LOT 6 CLEMENTINE STREET PL HUGH MCMICHAEL SUBDIV, DEED REFERENCE: 03785/00149, ASSESSED TO ROBERT L. YOUNG Defendants ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the following property described below and located in Worcester County, sold by the Collector of Taxes for the County of Worcester and the State of Maryland to the plaintiff in this proceeding:

Page 39 ITEM NO. 85, ACCOUNT NO. 01-032992, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION LOT 8 & P/O LOT 6 CLEMENTINE STREET PL HUGH MCMICHAEL SUBDIV, DEED REFERENCE: 03785/00149, ASSESSED TO ROBERT L. YOUNG. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption have not been paid.

101 CLARKE AVENUE P.O. BOX 29 POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 AND WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND ROSCOE LESLIE, COUNTY ATTORNEY GOVERNMENT CENTER, ROOM 1103 1 W. MARKET STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 AND

It is thereupon this 1st of January, 2022 by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, ORDERED, That notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for 3 successive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to appear in this Court by the 6th day of March, 2022, and redeem the property described above and answer the Complaint or thereafter a final judgement will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances.

UNKNOWN OWNER OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS ITEM NO. 45, ACCOUNT NO. 01029363, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION PAR2 110 X 150 X 130.1 X 151.35 W/S R-359 POCOMOKE, DEED REFERENCE: 00101/00222, ASSESSED TO ALICE G. LANKFORD AND WINFIELD R. LANKFORD, THE UNKNOWN OWNER’S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST AND

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion PETER S. BUAS, ESQ. WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON, LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000229 FS ENTERPRISES LLC 4841 CRAIN HIGHWAY UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 Plaintiff vs. THE ESTATE OF WINFIELD R. LANKFORD 2027 BYPASS ROAD POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 AND ALICE LANKFORD 2027 BYPASS ROAD POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 AND MAYOR & CITY COUNCIL OF POCOMOKE CITY

ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS ITEM NO. 45, ACCOUNT NO. 01029363, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION PAR2 110 X 150 X 130.1 X 151.35 W/S R-359 POCOMOKE, DEED REFERENCE: 00101/00222, ASSESSED TO ALICE G. LANKFORD AND WINFIELD R. LANKFORD Defendants ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the following property described below and located in Worcester County, sold by the Collector of Taxes for the County of Worcester and the State of Maryland to the plaintiff in this proceeding: ITEM NO. 45, ACCOUNT NO. 01029363, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION PAR2 110 X 150 X 130.1 X 151.35 W/S R-359 POCOMOKE, DEED REFERENCE: 00101/00222, ASSESSED TO ALICE G. LANKFORD AND WINFIELD R. LANKFORD. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption have not been paid. It is thereupon this 1st of January, 2022 by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, ORDERED, That notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for 3 successive weeks, warning all persons interested in the


Page 40

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch Court for Worcester County,

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com property to appear in this Court by the 6th day of March, 2022, and redeem the property described above and answer the Complaint or thereafter a final judgement will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion PETER S. BUAS, ESQ. WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON, LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000001 ZST RENALS, INC. 207 WEST FEDERAL STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Plaintiff vs. PERRY K. MASCIANA 209 TEAL DRIVE OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 AND MARIA A. MASCIANA 209 TEAL DRIVE OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 AND MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC, JUDGEMENT HOLDER 350 CAMINO DE LA REINA, SUITE 300 SAN DIEGO, CA 92108 AND CHESAPEAKE UTILITIES, JUDGEMENT HOLDER P.O. BOX 1978 SALISBURY, MD 21802

ROSCOE LESLIE, COUNTY ATTORNEY GOVERNMENT CENTER, ROOM 1103 1 W. MARKET STREET SNOW HILL, MD 21863 AND UNKNOWN OWNER OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS ITEM NO. 50, ACCOUNT NO. 08004226, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION LOT TRADER BLDG COR GEO ISLAND LNDG RD & R-12 STOCKTON, DEED REFERENCE: 03793/00549, ASSESSED TO PERRY K. MASCIANA & MARIA A. MASCIANA, THE UNKNOWN OWNER’S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS ITEM NO. 50, ACCOUNT NO. 08004226, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION LOT TRADER BLDG COR GEO ISLAND LNDG RD & R-12 STOCKTON, DEED REFERENCE: 03793/00549, ASSESSED TO PERRY K. MASCIANA & MARIA A. MASCIANA Defendants ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the following property described below and located in Worcester County, sold by the Collector of Taxes for the County of Worcester and the State of Maryland to the plaintiff in this proceeding: ITEM NO. 50, ACCOUNT NO. 08004226, PROPERTY DESCRIPTION LOT TRADER BLDG COR GEO ISLAND LNDG RD & R-12 STOCKTON, DEED REFERENCE: 03793/00549, ASSESSED TO PERRY K. MASCIANA & MARIA A. MASCIANA.

AND

The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption have not been paid.

WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND

It is thereupon this 7th of January, 2022 by the Circuit

ORDERED, That notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for 3 successive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to appear in this Court by the 8th day of March, 2022, and redeem the property described above and answer the Complaint or thereafter a final judgement will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000161 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. ELLIS NORMAN, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000161 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2022 at 11:00 AM the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Unit 201

Time Interval 1

201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201

January 14, 2022 3 4 6 10 15 16 20 21 25 38 41 43 45 49

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: The full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such payment to be made by e-check or credit card. Bids for intervals will open at $50.00. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2022 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the payment made may be forfeited and the property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-6728107, or email at afletcher@mdpropertyattorney.com. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000184 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. JAMES HENDERSON, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000184 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2022 at 11:15 AM the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Unit 312 312 312 312 312 312 401 401 401 401

Time Interval 17 18 19 24 25 39 1 4 8 10

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from de-

posit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: The full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such payment to be made by e-check or credit card. Bids for intervals will open at $50.00. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2022 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the payment made may be forfeited and the property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-6728107, or email at afletcher@mdpropertyattorney.com. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000221 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. MICHELLE MARIA JONES, ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000221 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com CITY, MARYLAND the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2022 at 11:30 AM the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Unit 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 405 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406 406

Time Interval 11 14 15 16 17 39 43 47 49 50 52 2 7 9 10 12 14 17 19 20 40 45 46

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records.

purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the payment made may be forfeited and the property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-6728107, or email at afletcher@mdpropertyattorney.com. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000224 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff

The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids.

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD

Terms of Sale: The full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such payment to be made by e-check or credit card. Bids for intervals will open at $50.00. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2022 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the

By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000224 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at,

vs. MARY E. THOMPSON, ET AL. Defendants

302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2022 at 11:45 AM the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Unit 407 407 407 407 407

Time Interval 17 18 20 28 39

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: The full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such payment to be made by e-check or credit card. Bids for intervals will open at $50.00. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2022 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the payment made may be forfeited and the property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-6728107, or email at afletcher@mdpropertyattorney.com. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000005 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21843-3307 Plaintiff vs. GROUPWISE INC., ET AL. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-22-000005 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND the following described property located in Ocean City,

Page 41 Worcester County, Maryland, on SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2022 at 12:00 PM the following timeshare intervals: Condomimium Unit 408 408 408 409 409 408 408 408

Time Interval 17 21 36 17 18 20 22 36

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to

withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: The full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such payment to be made by e-check or credit card. Bids for intervals will open at $50.00. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2022 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the payment made may be forfeited and the property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-6728107, or email at afletcher@mdpropertyattorney.com. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JANUARY 14, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 01-14, 01-21, 01-28


… Berlin Commission Rejects Property Rezoning Request

Page 42

FROM PAGE 10 sition to the rezoning. Bunting said his planes — which are used for crop dusting as well as to fly advertising banners — are louder and fly lower than the planes at the Ocean City Airport. He said if a residential development was put in on the 25-acre site residents would complain and lawsuits would result. “It’s a no win situation for everybody involved,” he said. Widdowson said Carbaugh argued for commercial zoning in 2020 and less than two years later requested residential zoning. “This is piecemeal or spot zoning at its best,” he said. “It should not be allowed.” Cropper asked if Bunting would agree that Ocean City Airport was busier than his. “I’ve had days I’ve been busier than Ocean City Airport with the number of flights I’ve had,” Bunting said. “I’ve had

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

days where they’ve been busier than I have.” “I’ll try it again,” Cropper said. “On average, in a year, the Ocean City Airport has many more flights in and out than you will ever have off your property. Would you agree or disagree?” “Well that depends on how good a summer I have Mark,” Bunting replied, adding that on average an airport like Ocean City’s would have more flights. Cropper said Ocean City Airport operated successfully despite its proximity to residential homes. Bunting said that when his property was too wet and he’d operated out of the Ocean City Airport, there had been complaints. “The phone rang off the hook,” he said. Residents Marie and Gina Velong both voiced opposition to the rezoning. “There’s all kinds of reasons not to do this project but the biggest one is that’s

a commercial area, it’s not a residential one,” Marie Velong said. Cropper reiterated his belief that the 2020 rezoning of the subject property had been a mistake made because town officials weren’t aware of the surplus of commercially zoned land in the area. He said that while it was “almost humorous” that Bunting considered use of his airport to be as intense as use of the Ocean City Airport, some of the most valuable land in the county was nevertheless in proximity of the Ocean City Airport. He added that his client was willing to accept a rezoning to R-3 residential, as that is what the land was zoned when Bunting built his airport. Commission member Ron Cascio questioned why the proposed development was even being considered when there were likely jurisdictional wetlands on the property. Carbaugh said he was confident the land was buildable.

January 14, 2022

Cascio said he’d heard nothing but opposition to the project from citizens. He said the townhouses would increase traffic issues at the intersection and would push the town’s need to expand its wastewater treatment plant. “I understand where the property owner wants to try to make some money with this, I would too, but not under the condition the townspeople of Berlin are going to be burdened by this project,” he said. Commission member Pete Cosby said he didn’t want to see Route 50 turned into a commercial corridor like the one near Virginia Beach. He is disappointed by all of the commercial development leading into Ocean City and said he’d love to see the 25 acres stay a farm field. “I think our best shot at trying to preserve some appearance of ag or more rural use is to orient ourselves toward a residential use of this property,” he said. “I don’t want to see outlet shops out here.” Cosby said he didn’t like the townhouse proposal but that the commission could make changes when the project came for site plan review. Commission member Austin Purnell recognized the shortage of housing in the area but said he didn’t like the townhouse proposal. He said there were also infill opportunities closer to the town center. “I’d rather see single family over there,” he said. “How this is proposed, I’m not in favor of it.” Commission member Matt Stoehr said the financial information presented by Carbaugh showed the town’s potential income from the project but didn’t address the costs to the town for things like public safety. He added that 176 townhouses on the property would be too dense. “I’d like to see single family or a mixture like you see in Decatur Farms with a lower density,” he said. Cosby said the issue wasn’t whether the commission liked the townhouse proposal but rather was it better for Berlin to have the property zoned commercial or residential. Commission member Newt Chandler said that right now the commission had the power. “We can’t tailor these rezonings to every developer’s whim,” he said, adding that 176 townhouses were too many for the property. Cosby again spoke in favor of residential zoning. “I’d rather see a moderate residential development than commercial sprawl,” he said, adding that a shopping center could come up with the current zoning. Chandler said he’d rather see that than 176 townhouses crammed on 25 acres. He said if the property was rezoned the door would be open for multifamily units. “You’re shoving 10 pounds of cow manure into a 5-pound bag,” he said. “I’ve seen it happen before.” Chris Denny, chair of the commission, spoke in favor of keeping the property commercial. He said Bunting’s Airport had been established in 1980. “He was there first,” Denny said. The commission voted 5-1, with Cosby opposed, to give the rezoning an unfavorable recommendation.


County Sheriff’s 15% Salary Hike OK’d

January 14, 2022

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – The Worcester County Commissioners approved a 15% salary increase for the sheriff this week. On Tuesday, the commissioners approved a resolution to increase the salary for the Worcester County Sheriff to $101,200 following the election in November. Currently, the salary is $88,000. “Currently, the sheriff is one of the lowest paid of all county government department heads and the states attorney of Worcester County,” Sheriff Matt Crisafulli wrote in a letter to the commissioners. “Bringing this scale up puts the sheriff’s pay at a more equitable rate.” In 2015, the commissioners set the sheriff’s salary at $88,000. Crisafulli proposed an adjustment to the pay scale because the sheriff does not receive cost-of-living increases. A Maryland Association of Counties salary survey shows that the average statewide sheriff’s salary is $117,000. The average sheriff’s salary for the Eastern Shore’s nine counties is $101,333. Crsiafulli proposed a 15% increase to take effect at the start of the next term in December 2022.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

“This is still much lower than our state’s attorney’s office,” he wrote to the commissioners. “That elected office is paid based on 90% of the district court judges salary. Having this pay rate established is a fair and equitable rate for a position that garners the highest degree of accountability in our county.” The commissioners voted 6-0 to approve the salary increase. The commissioners also approved a resolution regarding salary increases for Worcester County Orphans’ Court judges. When the 2022-2026 term begins, judges will receive $9,500 per year. Commissioner Joe Mitrecic asked if the commissioners were required to look at their own salaries. Roscoe Leslie, the county’s attorney, said the resolution passed several years ago would give the commissioners the cost of living increase for the prior term. “Unless you take action otherwise it automatically occurs,” Leslie said. Commissioner Chip Bertino pointed out the commissioners currently received $26,000 a year. The cost-ofliving increase will bring the salary to slightly more than $28,000. “I didn’t want anyone to think we were going to get a monstrous salary increase if we didn’t act,” he said.

OC Offering Free State’s Attorney Space BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – The Town of Ocean City has offered office space for the Worcester County State’s Attorney as the resort moves toward implementation of a body camera program for police.

Five Commissioners Seeking Re-Election BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – With next month’s deadline nearing, five of the seven Worcester County Commissioners have filed for reelection. Commissioners Josh Nordstrom, Diana Purnell, Ted Elder, Chip Bertino and Jim Bunting have filed for reelection. Candidates have until Feb. 22 to file. The only non-incumbent to file so far is Thomas Gulyas, who has set his sights on the District 3 seat that’s been held by Commissioner Bud Church since 2002. As far as the Worcester County Board of Education, seats are up for grabs in District 1, District 4, District 6 and District 7. Incumbents Bill Buchanan (District 1) and Bill Gordy (District 4) are the only ones who have filed so far. Nordstrom, who began his career as a county commissioner in 2018, put rumors that he might run for delegate to rest when he filed for reelection as commisioner Tuesday.

County officials toured the resort’s public safety building last week at the invitation of Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan. The town’s offer of office space comes after Worcester County State’s Attorney Kris Heiser said the use of body cameras locally would force her office to hire more staff and acquire additional office space. “I think they recognize that their need and interest to go to body cameras sooner than I guess we would like,” said Weston Young, the county’s chief administrative officer. “They want to help offer space to accommodate additional positions.” Commissioner Joe Mitrecic told the commissioners Tuesday he and Young met with Meehan at the building last week. He said they would discuss the possibility with Heiser. “With the expansion of her office due to the body cams and that close proximity to the court house there, it might be a very opportune spot for her to put some offices for her staff that deals with that courthouse,” he said. Commissioner Chip Bertino said he didn’t like to be caught off guard with proposals. Mitrecic said he and Young had toured the space, nothing more. When the issue of budget impact came up, Young said details hadn’t been discussed but that he expected the county would be able to use the space for free. Bertino said the commissioners would need more information before making a decision. “Space like that is not easy to come by,” he said. “It’s nice we have an opportunity there but I don’t think we should be moving forward until it’s explained to the commissioners as to why we need it.” Mitrecic reiterated that at this point it was just an offer.

Page 43


Page 44

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

OBITUARIES Anthony David Smith BERLIN – Anthony David Smith, age 79, passed away on Jan. 2, 2022 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. Born in Washington, DC, he was the son of the late William Smith and Henrietta Dols. He was preceded in death by both of his parents, William and Henrietta Smith. Tony is survived by his wife of 37 years, Teresa West, and his four children, Nancy Getman, Brian (Veronica) Smith, Jennifer (Ryan) Ericson and David (TamANTHONY DAVID SMITH ara) Smith. Also surviving are his brother, Michael (Kathy) Smith, and his sister, Barbara Jefferies. He leaves behind six grandchildren, Grant, Reese, Kayla, Ashton, Liam and Avery. He served in the United States Army Reserves while establishing his career in information technology. He retired at the age of 59 and spent much of his time boating, skiing and pursuing interests in automobiles. A visitation was held at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin with Pastor Dale Brown officiating. He will be laid to rest during a private ceremony at Modest Town Cemetery in Modest Town, Va. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the American Heart Association, Tunnel to Towers Foundation or the charity of your choice. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care

of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Lee A. Rolfes OCEAN CITY– Lee A. Rolfes, age 65, passed away on Jan. 5, 2022 at home surrounded by his loving family. He put up a courageous fight against pancreatic cancer. Lee was born in Washington, DC and was the son of the late William W. and Virginia (Potter) Rolfes. Lee graduated from High Point High School Class of 1975. Following graduation, he attended carpentry trade school, married his high school LEE A. ROLFES sweetheart, Mary Sancomb, and they created a loving family. He was a larger than life character. He had an adventurous spirit that allowed him to travel and to enjoy life to its fullest. Lee’s greatest title in life was being called “Granddad.” He loved his grandbabies. His hobbies included home projects, fixing old Boston Whalers, hosting large themed parties, bargain shopping at Ace, CVS, and Acme, and repairing broken beach chairs. Lee enjoyed relaxing on the beach, listening to island music, and spending time with his family. He was a fixture at his grandkids’ games and activities. He was a retired carpenter of Union 132. Some of his professional accomplishments as a superintendent included working at the National Gallery of Art, George Washington University, Social

January 14, 2022

Letters To The Editor Eight Levels Of Control Editor: There are eight levels of control that must be obtained before you are able to create a social state, wrote Saul Alinsky in his book “Rules for Radicals” in 1971. 1 Control healthcare and you control the people. 2 Increase the poverty level as high as possible, poor people are easier to control and will not fight back if you are providing everything for them to live. Consider the illegal aliens flood. 3 Increase the debt to an unsustainable level. That way you are able to increase taxes, and this will produce more poverty. 4 Gun Control – Remove the ability for citizens to defend themselves from the Government. That way you are able to create a police state. 5 Welfare – Take control of every aspect of citizen’s lives like food, housing, and income. 6 Education – Take control of what people read and listen to – take conSecurity Administration, Folger Shakespeare Library, Maryland Casualty Project, FedEx Field, Nationals Park and the U.S. Mint. He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Mary Ellen Rolfes; one daughter, Jaclyn A. Kline and husband Vincent of Centreville; two sons, Lee A. Rolfes Jr. and wife Kasey of Weddington, N.C. and Richard L. Rolfes and wife Molly of Annapolis; three sisters, Linda Rolfes, and Leslie Wendorf both of Selbyville, Del. and Laura Scott of Queenstown, Md.; one brother, Larry Rolfes of Selbyville, Del.; and five grandchildren, Wyatt Kline, Anna Rolfes, Marylee Kline, Renee Rolfes and Chloe Rolfes. A visitation will be held at St. Luke’s Catholic Church, 9903 Coastal Hwy in Ocean City at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 15. A Mass of Christian burial will be held at noon on Saturday, Jan. 15 at Luke’s with Father Paul Jennings officiating. A reception will follow the service at The Knights of Columbus, 9901 Coastal Hwy, Ocean City. In lieu of flowers please send donations to Ocean City Beach Patrol in memory of Lee A. Rolfes. Make checks payable to OCBP, SRA, 109 Talbot Street, Ocean City, Md. 21843. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com.

Marvin Everett Long SELBYVILLE – Marvin Everett Long, age 84, of Selbyville died Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022 at Delaware Hospice Center in Milford in the company of his devoted wife and daughter. He was born in Selbyville and was the son of MARVIN the late Everett and Eva EVERETT LONG (Gray) Long. Marvin graduated from Selbyville High School in 1955 and Goldey-Beacom College in 1957. Marvin started his career in business at the Bank of New York in Man-

trol of what children learn in school like the critical race theory that divides us. 7 Remove the belief in the God from the Government and schools. No more then, will we be able to recite, “endowed by our creator…” 8 Class Warfare – Divide the people into the wealthy and the poor. This will cause more discontent and it will be easier to take (Tax) the wealthy with the support of the poor. How are we doing with all of these given the fact that a Niagara Falls of dependent humans are coming across our border everyday, from all over the world. We Americans better get our heads out of the sand and pray hard that Trump gets to stop this slide to socialism and then communism in 2024. If you think that socialism/communism for America would be a good thing, then you need to speak to a person who has lived under such a regime. Dennis Evans Berlin hattan, then started his own successful company in computer billing services. Deciding to move back to Delaware, Marvin sold his company and relocated home, where he became locally known as the proud owner/operator of Marvin’s Gardens and then in 1986, Marvin’s Market, a popular convenience store for locals and tourists alike. An active member of his community, Marvin was a dedicated member of Salem United Methodist Church in Selbyville, the Lafayette Masonic Lodge #14 in Wilmington and Tall Cedars. He was a proud veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. In addition to being a loving and supportive parent and grandparent, Marvin catered to the needs of those less fortunate in his area – delivering food for Meals on Wheels and providing Santa Claus duties for over 25 years to a large extended family. Marvin received his recreational pilots license and enjoyed flying, surf fishing, and golf. His greatest joy, however was spending time with his family. He is survived by his loving wife, Jane M. Long of Selbyville; a daughter, Kimberly Lewis and fiancé Scott Magee of Clarksville; four grandchildren, Quinn and Emily McCullough and Kade and Mason Lewis; a daughter-in-law, Kim McCullough of Rehoboth Beach; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by a son, Kent McCullough; a brother, Steven Long; and two sisters, Rosiene Stephens and Nancy Persolio. A visitation was held on Thursday, Jan. 13 at the funeral home. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 14 at Bishop-Hastings Funeral Home in Selbyville with Rev. Dr. James Van Der Wall officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, Del. 19963. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com.


January 14, 2022

The Dispatch Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 ONLINE WEBSITES: mdcoastdispatch.com facebook.com/thedispatchoc twitter.com/thedispatchocmd instagram.com/thedispatchocmd J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

NEWS DEPARTMENT SHAWN J. SOPER Managing Editor ssoper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHARLENE SHARPE Staff Writer/Copy Editor csharpe@mdcoastdispatch.com BETHANY HOOPER Staff Writer bhooper@mdcoastdispatch.com CHRIS PARYPA Photographer

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The Maryland Coast Dispatch (USPS #015125) is an official and legal newspaper for Worcester County. Periodical postage paid at Berlin, Maryland, and additional mailing offices. The Maryland Coast Dispatch, 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Md. 21811, is published weekly on Friday mornings, 52 weeks a year. Subscription rates are $260 per year. POSTMASTER: Please send change of address to Maryland Coast Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Maryland Coast Dispatch offices are located at Route 346 and Graham Avenue, Berlin, Maryland.

The Best Hire At The Right Time

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

How We See It

It makes sense for Ocean City to promote from within for its next city manager. Barring any major curve balls, 31-year City Engineer Terry McGean will be officially announced as Ocean City’s sixth city manager next week. McGean is a sound pick. We figured the job would be offered to McGean and/or Public Works Director Hal Adkins. Both men are experienced and know the city well. It’s a solid situation for Ocean City because both McGean and Adkins – who is nearing retirement – could do the job well with a seamless transition. With McGean, Ocean City can essentially move forward and skip a lengthy and expensive national search process. Ocean City Mayor and Council members are comfortable with the long-time department head. City staff and leaders know and respect McGean already. Unlike a new person, introductions will not be needed, and McGean should be able to transition well into the new position. The time seemed right for Ocean City to look within to fill the city manager’s post. Though we think the city did well with its selection of Doug Miller in 2016, national search processes are not always successful. There are many talented chief executives in the marketplace, but the fit must be right. In many cases, time is the only way to determine if the right person has been hired. Decisions on personnel often end up being educated leaps of faith. What’s on paper and presented in limited interviews is not always the reality. Ocean City knows this from previous experiences. McGean is the right man for the job at the right time. Considering his tenure already with the city, we would suspect this is a short-term gig for McGean, perhaps in the three- to five-year range. Steady leadership from a known, proven and familiar leader is just what Ocean City needs to continue moving it forward through an interesting transition. Many at City Hall maintain current Mayor and Council members are heavily involved in daily operations. The term “micromanaging” has been used to describe the elected officials’ handling of the city manager’s office. McGean is already familiar with operations and the personalities at play. A new person with a different background could find the dynamics unsettling and his or her past experiences could cause discord. Another reason supporting the internal promotion is Ocean City’s government is swelling, expanding further into the tourism sales industry. The new Tourism and Business Development Department is an expensive new operation, one that will need time to grow. Patience will be needed. McGean’s familiarity with all these current events coupled with his three decades of experience at City Hall make him a wise choice to lead the resort moving forward.

Page 45

Between The Lines by Publisher/Editor Steve Green The distance between Ocean City and Donegal, Northern Ireland is approximately 3,229 miles. It’s the distance a bottle – containing a handwritten note from an Ocean City boy and two, $1 bills – covered over the course of three years. The story is incredible. Then 11-year-old Sasha Yonyak was on a boat during the summer of 2019 with his neighbor Wayne Smith when he located a bottle floating in a marina. Inside the bottle was two, $1 bills and a note encouraging the finder to “pass it on.” It was clear to them the bottle they found was put in the water in Ocean City. Therefore, Yonyak and Smith decided to drop the bottle with a new note off the coast about a mile. The bottle evidently took a northern trek with the currents and was discovered last week by a couple walking on the beach in the northwestern Ireland town of Donegal. It must have been an incredible journey. The story is further highlighted by the fact Yonyak – now 14 years old – has a special story to fondly remember of his older fishing buddy who passed away last summer. Ocean City needs to get rolling on its special event planning. It’s midJanuary and there seem to be far too many uncertainties. Tourism and Business Development Director Tom Perlozzo acknowledged the resort is not where it should be with its event planning and calendar. “We’ll put together an overall plan,” he said this week to the town’s tourism commission. “We just want to get some of these things on the calendar and start making some offers because it’s competitive. I feel like we’re two months behind already. We just need some direction.” It was puzzling to see Ocean City does not have a solid grasp on its special events. Memorial Day weekend is less than five months away, and the resort’s special event calendar is in flux with tourism officials asking for direction on the weekly value-added summer events like the drones and fireworks shows. There will probably be more drone shows next summer, but it seems like discussions are just now starting. It appears as if the calendar flipped to the new year and there was a realization a lot of work remains, and some big decisions need to be made, especially when it comes to booking entertainment for proposed events. Equally surprising is the uncertainty surrounding a date for Sunfest. The inclination seems to be to push it into the second week of October to allow for a new music concert weekend to be held after bike week. Sunfest has been a huge event for Ocean City for decades. Moving it might not be a big deal for many, but it will not sit well with traditionalists accustomed to it kicking off the autumn season at the beach. Everything will surely get worked out with these special events, but there needs to be a sense of urgency. The term “cautiously aggressive” comes to mind with the Worcester County Public School’s revised approach this week to managing the pandemic. It’s clear the school system is looking to continue moving forward through the pandemic with an aim and focus on keeping kids in school. There will be positive cases among students and teachers and there will be close contacts who must quarantine as a result. The data will rise and fall with community spread. This just seems to be the new normal. However, with increased testing, different rules for the vaccinated and smart practices on protocol management, in-person learning can continue through positive spikes like we are seeing now. Since it’s not happening in many other areas of the state, the local school system deserves credit for not closing schools even when numbers hit high levels. Over the course of last week, Jan. 3-7, there were 194 new COVID-19 cases, including 48 alone at Stephen Decatur High School. However, some perspective is needed considering there are more than 6,650 students in county public schools and about 1,000 at Decatur High alone. Worcester County Public Schools is managing the pandemic right. Not overreacting to spikes and managing the positive cases in a reasonable manner. Changes will need to be made often to protocols as circumstances vary, but the course is proper so long as the focus remains on keeping kids in school as safe as possible. Adopting the CDC changes on quarantine protocols is an obvious change, but there other more practical changes being made as well to help families, like offering convenient PCR testing at local schools. For example, in his message this week to families, Superintendent of Schools Lou Taylor outlined a “change to our contact tracing protocol,” which illustrates the need to be fluid while moving forward toward progress. “… Worcester County Public Schools will now focus our contact tracing efforts on school activities where individuals are unmasked, such as lunch and athletics, as well as identifying household contacts,” he said. “We continue our commitment to notify families and staff when an individual in their cohort has tested positive. However, as individual contact tracing proves to be less effective when community transmission is high, our health staff will shift their efforts from investigating relatively low-risk in-school exposures to more critical activities like the identification, early isolation, and management of students and staff with active COVID-19-like symptoms.”


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Puzzle Answers

January 14, 2022

The Adventures of Fatherhood

by Steve Green

PUZZLE ON PAGE 36

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don’t know the Draheim family, but I think sharing the story on the minds of many the last couple weeks is important. It’s these sorts of unbelievably sad situations that should confirm for all of us tomorrow is not promised. We are all naturally guilty of losing sight of this realization. Life gets hectic and we get caught up in it. However, we should all take some time to reflect on 4-year-old Lakelyn Draheim’s journey and send our best wishes to her and her family. Below are some excerpts from a Caring Bridge page I have been following. For those interested in helping the family, there is a GoFundMe page (search Lakelyn Draheim) to help the family with expenses. Jan. 7: On Wednesday, January 5th, Lakelyn got home from school and we could not understand her. She was drooling and falling over. We called the ambulance and went to AGH. After an MRI (which she napped through), we were given the unthinkable news. Lakelyn had a brain tumor. Brain cancer was the given diagnosis from the ER doctor. We were transported by ambulance to DC Children’s Hospital immediately. Upon arrival, Lakelyn tested positive for Covid and Lance was told he could not go up to PICU with us. This was soul crushing. I stayed with Lakelyn over night alone and fought to get Lance to be with us. Lakelyn was sedated for another MRI to be used for biopsy. Lakelyn had Covid in December and it still showed up but with our testing documentation and clearance letters, we were able to get Lance up here on January 6th. This was vital for me as I was not handling this well by myself. Lakelyn was so happy to have her daddy. We were told that Lakelyn had an inoperable tumor in the center of her brain stem and that we would need a biopsy to determine how bad it was. Then we prepared for the biopsy proce-

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dure on January 7th. She was taken at 12:32 and we are currently awaiting her to come back to the room. Dr. Myseros (her neurosurgeon) came and talked to us and told us there were no complications during the biopsy but we don’t know how well it went until she wakes and we get results. Her nurses have been amazing. … She has won the hearts of her nurses as she does everyone. We love her with all of our hearts and need to hold on to the hope that this tumor is benign. We will update as we journey through this horrible storm with our one and old, baby girl Lakelyn. Jan. 8: Lakelyn made it through the night without any major problems. She has been getting morphine when she hurts as well as Tylenol. She is very determined. She could not hold her eyes open but was adamant that we were playing Uno and she won! She told me she was sorry she didn't let me win that one. She ate A LOT before bed including the pepperoni pizza she wanted. She is moving both arms and legs and is able to squeeze both hands which is a relief. Negative effects right now: she sees everything double and is very unstable and weak walking. She is trying very hard to be independent and told us to take the diaper off because she doesn't want to be like LB because she is a big girl. She is sleeping again now because we had to give more morphine after she went to the potty because her neck was really hurting. Plan for today: a fast MRI 3-4 min. If nothing is wrong on the MRI, move to regular floor. If she can get up and move around safely then we can get cleared to go home. So there are 3 checks we need to pass to get our baby girl back home. Jan. 8: We are on our way home! The MRI showed no issues with the biopsy so we can go home and try to begin the healing process and begin coping with how to deal with the next steps. We are absolutely terrified as we wait

for results. We are praying and hoping that this tumor is benign to allow Lakelyn a treatment less painful for her little body. Please God have mercy on our family as we are hurting and need comfort and grace. Jan. 10: Today was a rollercoaster. Started off very rough. We are just so worried. Then Mrs. Sally came over and had a spa day with Lakelyn and painted a birdhouse. Then we went to pray with Pastor Tim and Alana and took the kids to The World of Toys. I am so grateful for this supportive community. The donations and love and prayers are simply amazing and we cannot express our gratitude enough. Though we are stricken with unimaginable pain and certainly in our darkest days, the love and support around us keep us going the best way we can. Dr. Packer called and said that we will be going back up to DC to get the results on Wednesday. We are absolutely terrified and cannot pray enough that somehow, someway, this goes away. Keep the prayers coming. We need them so very much Jan. 12 update: We got the news no parent wants to hear. We are facing the unthinkable. Lakelyn has DIPG Grade 4 with H3K27M mutation. My only option for radiation is to move up to DC for her to get it. Be away from my family and friends and support system. There are many options for treatment and none are proven. Some have never even been done. We are lost. We are frozen. We are facing this red folder with tears of heartbreak and sorrow, looking at my precious baby with her pigtail braids and beautiful hazel eyes begging to go to dance class. How can anyone survive this pain?

(The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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January 14, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 47


Page 48

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

January 14, 2022