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FALL FALL 2012 2014 WINTER 2015

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

WORLD’S BIGGEST

GEM SHOW $120 MILLION

E C O N O M I C

+

I M P A C T

TUCSON MAN & WOMAN OF THE YEAR AND FOUNDERS AWARD

SPECIAL REPORT:

NORTHWEST HEALTHCARE EXPANDS THROUGH GREATER TUCSON

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WINTER 2015 • $2.99 • DISPLAY UNTIL 03/30/15


BizLETTER

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Winter 2015

Volume 6 No. 4

Publisher & Owner

Steven E. Rosenberg Brent G. Mathis

Creative Director Photo: Steven Meckler

Tourism in this region has an annual economic impact of $2 billion and events have always been central to this success. The crown jewel of events is the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase. People from 25 countries and seven continents attend this event that’s attracted global attention for 60 years. The most recent report commissioned by Visit Tucson shows a whopping annual economic impact of $120 million. Kimberly Schmitz files a fascinating indepth report on the biggest gem show on the planet. Glittering gems and minerals, intriguing fossils and much more will be on display at some 40 shows throughout the city. This year our urban core will shine bright, with the first sparkling modern streetcars and a new one-week pass to accommodate gem show visitors and locals. Visit Tucson is the region’s destination-marketing organization that works to attract more events and expand our substantial tourism base, which means more jobs and increased economic impact to come. Visit Tucson recently partnered with country crooner Randy Houser, who filmed his hit video “Like A Cowboy” at Old Tucson. VP of Marketing Allison Cooper leveraged every angle to drive more country fans to the Visit Tucson website. These efforts earned an outstanding achievement award from the Western Association of Convention & Visitors Bureaus. From riding on two wheels at El Tour de Tucson, to riding bucking broncos at La Fiesta de los Vaqueros, this town has a long list of events that drive tourism. This issue highlights the 25th anniversary of what is now known as the Tucson Association of Realtors Shootout, the latest PGA Champions Tour and the inaugural Tucson Jazz Festival. The Amerind Museum attracts visitors with stunning art and artifacts of native cultures from Alaska to Argentina. The research and tourism treasure dates to the 1930s. Healthcare is the centerpiece of our special report, with in-depth coverage by Dan Sorenson and Mary Minor Davis. The Northwest Healthcare system now spans the metro area, including two hospitals, six urgent care centers, physician offices – and soon – the region’s first freestanding emergency center. CEOs Kevin Stockton of Northwest Medical Center and Jae Dale of Oro

Valley Hospital share their vision for the future of healthcare and their ongoing commitment to meet or exceed national standards for specialized care. The Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson is one of the nation’s strongest chapters with 420 members and several national awards. SHRM-GT focuses on training and networking for HR professionals through monthly events, the annual Innovation in the Workplace awards and a nationally prominent speaker each spring. Mark your calendars for Feb. 7th and a Loews Ventana Canyon gala, as Greater Tucson Leadership honors Man of the Year Bob Elliott, Woman of the Year Helaine Levy and Founders of the Year Jim Murphy. The landmark resort has been managed by Loews Hotels and Resorts since it opened 30 years ago. In November, Loews became majority owner of the resort, with the founding Estes family retaining a small ownership interest. This is a wonderful sign that corporate America is bullish on investing in Tucson tourism. Creative genius Chris Gall is the focus of BizBUZZ. This illustrator and author is our own Desert Disney. His fanciful books have legions of followers around the globe. Netflix and DreamWorks discovered Gall’s Dinotrux books and plan to produce 300 episodes featuring animated creatures that are half dinosaur and half monster truck. Learn more about this hometown artist and his astounding success. Who knows, maybe his Dinotrux critters will be at Toys “R” Us by Christmas 2016? Keep this guy on your radar! Steven E. Rosenberg Publisher & Owner BizTucson

Biz

Contributing Editors

Gabrielle Fimbres Donna Kreutz Diane Luber Dave Petruska

Contributing Mike Serres Technology Director Contributing Chow Editor Edie Jarolim Contributing Writers

Larry Copenhaver Mary Minor Davis Gabrielle Fimbres Jay Gonzales Chuck Graham Edie Jarolim Kate Maguire Jensen Tara Kirkpatrick Donna Kreutz Christy Krueger Larry Lucero Teresa Neil Nowak Monica Surfaro Spigelman David B. Pittman Steve Rivera Kimberly Schmitz Dan Sorenson Eric Swedlund Valerie Vinyard Romi Carrell Wittman

Contributing Photographers Carter Allen

Stephanie Epperson Adam Gonzales Kris Hanning Amy Haskell Brent G. Mathis Steven Meckler Ali Megan Chris Mooney Tom Spitz

Member:

Arizona Builders’ Alliance Greater Oro Valley Chamber of Commerce Tucson Advertising Federation Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Tucson Metro Chamber Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (TREO) Visit Tucson

BizTucson Phone: 520.299.1005 Subscription Information:

www.BizTucson.com subscriptions@BizTucson.com Advertising information:

Steve Rosenberg 520.299.1005 or 520.907-1012 steve@BizTucson.com BizTucson is published quarterly by Rosenberg Media, LLC. ,Tucson, AZ © 2015 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in columns or articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

POSTMASTER:

Please send address changes to: BizTucson, 4729 East Sunrise Drive, #505 Tucson, AZ 85718.


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BizCONTENTS

FEATURES

194

WINTER 2015 VOLUME 6 NO. 4

COVER STORY: 96

BizTOURISM World’s Biggest Gem Show

BizTECHNOLOGY 166 Here Comes the Sun King

DEPARTMENTS

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4 27

BizLETTER From the Publisher

38 42

BizTOURISM Country Croonin’ Tucson Style BizMUSIC January Jams – Inaugural Jazz Festival

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BizMILESTONE 25 Years of Awesome Soccer

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BizSPORTS PGA Tour Champions Tour

56 62

BizCULTURE Celebrating Native People

BizECONOMY 176 VXI Global Solutions BizEVENT 178 Up with People Celebrates 50 Years

BizINSPIRATION 180 #BPOSITIVE Campaign to Kick Cancer BizSTARTUP 182 Forward Boost – $1.44 Million Grant BizCOMMERCIAL 184 Makeover Magic – Whole Foods

BizMILESTONE Gootter Foundation Scores First Down

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BizHEALTHCARE Building on Sinfonia’s Success

BizCOMMERCIAL 102 CCIM Annual Forecast Preview BizCOUPLE 120 Commercial Real Estate Royalty BizMILESTONE 124 Four Generations Shape Firm BizBENEFIT 128 Real Heart of Valentine’s Day BizTRADE 130 New Arizona Trade Office BizDEVELOPMENT 163 Premium Outlets Coming to Marana

BizMILESTONE 164 UA Tech Park Celebrates 20 Years Spring 2011 Winter 2015

BizMILESTONE 172 A School That Works

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BizSPORTS 170 Greens Revolution

BizBUZZ Chris Gall’s Fantastic Success

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168 UAS and Fiber Optics Firms

BizECONOMY Strategic Growth – TREO, Raytheon 187 TREO Workforce Development BizARCHITECTURE 192 UA’s Historic Old Main Renovated 194 196 BizPHILANTHROPY UA Receives $50 Million Endowment 198 BizTOURISM Loews Now Owns & 200 Manages Resort BizGREEN 202 Driven to be Green

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ABOUT THE COVER

World’s Biggest Gem Show Creative design by Brent G. Mathis

BizAWARDS Copper Cactus Award Winners BizHONORS Man of the Year – Bob Elliott Woman of the Year – Helaine Levy Founders Award – Jim Murphy BizGOVERNMENT Tucson Metro Chamber Events BizCHOW Food for the Soul BizTRIBUTE Fred Dawson

103 BizSPECIAL REPORT Society for Human Resource Management SHRM-Greater Tucson

105 109 118

HR For the 21st Century Innovation in the Workplace Awards Daisy Jenkins Makes Listeners Happy

131 BizSPECIAL REPORT Northwest Healthcare Expands Through Greater Tucson 136 144 146 150 152 156 158 160

Bringing Care Where People Live & Work Focus on Excellence at Every Level NMC Leads in Robotic-Assisted Surgery Advanced Care for Moms & Babies Patient Engagement Improves Outcomes Laparoscopic Weight-Loss Surgery Getting Back in the Game Treating Sleep Disorders


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Lock-Griffith Group at Morgan Stanley

Purpose...Guidance...Care Marc H. Lock

Senior Investment Management Consultant Senior Vice President Financial Planning Specialist Financial Advisor marc.h.lock@morganstanley.com

Wayne F. Griffith, CFP®

Senior Investment Management Consultant First Vice President Financial Advisor wayne.f.griffith@morganstanley.com

www.morganstanley.com/fa/lockgriffithgroup 5255 East Williams Circle Suite 5000, Tucson, AZ 85711

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERTM and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S. < < Spring © 2014 Morgan<Stanley Smith 8 BizTucson 2011 Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

520.745.7038 www.BizTucson.com CRC954910 06/14


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BizBUZZ Dinotrux Characters on Netflix

Chris Gall

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Illustrator & Writer

Tucson’s Chris Gall wrote and illustrated the wildly successfully Dinotrux, a fantastical tale about creatures – half dinosaur and half truck – that roamed the earth for millions of years. With 500,000 copies in print and translations in Japanese, Portuguese, Italian and Korean, Dinotrux is now going Hollywood. DreamWorks Animation and Netflix are turning Gall’s Dinotrux books into a 300-episode series to stream on Netflix for three years starting in the spring of 2015. continued on page 28 >>>

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BizBUZZ continued from page 27

By Kate Maguire Jensen Award-winning illustrator and writer Chris Gall attributes some of his phenomenal global success to what he learned in Tucson in the mid-’80s. He was working full time as an art director for Nordensson Lynn Advertising, then one of the biggest agencies in Tucson, when he was invited to illustrate a cover for the Tucson Weekly. He was one of the first artists to illustrate a cover for the publication and with that and the ones that followed, he was soon winning national awards. He was invited to the prestigious Society of Illustrators show in 1987 and received an award of excellence from Communication Arts Magazine in 1988. But it wasn’t just the awards that launched his career. It was the discipline he learned at the advertising agency. “Working in advertising made me a much more mature, creative person. It taught me to get up early in the morning – I had to be bright-eyed and bushy-tailed at 8 o’clock. It taught me to respect deadlines, to be organized, to listen to my clients – not just to my

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Working in advertising made me a much more mature, creative person. It taught me to respect deadlines, to be organized, to listen to my clients – not just to my inner art child.

– Chris Gall, Illustrator & Writer

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BizBUZZ

continued from page 28 inner art child. And I got a chance to write – I wrote my fair share of headlines at Nordensson Lynn.” In 1989 at age 28, he hired an agent in New York and left the ad agency business to work as a freelance illustrator, based in Tucson. Yes, it helped that he had already built a national reputation but still the transition was not easy. And the hardest part? “Being alone all day. I felt like I’d been sent to my room and couldn’t come out. I was good friends with the FedEx guy.” But since he married Ann Courtney Gall 19 ago, he’s lived and worked as part of a creative couple and has a built-in sounding board. He admits that working from Tucson has been an “interesting roller coaster.” “I probably should have moved to New York when I got out of college. If

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you are living in Manhattan or West Hollywood, you’ll have more opportunities than you have here. But you pay a price for that – I just didn’t want to do that.” Technology made it so much easier. His first agent had to force him to get an answering machine, then a fax machine. The next 10 years were good for Gall. He was hired to do illustrations, billboards, murals and logos, working for Time magazine, Newsweek, the New York Times, Washington Post and Nike. It was a great run but he saw that the market for illustration was changing. Like any successful entrepreneur, he had an eye on the future. “If you don’t wake up at least once a week, thinking about how you’re going to reinvent yourself, time will sweep you

away. I knew that if I didn’t morph my business, something was going to bite me. And I wanted to be in a place that still valued illustration.” So he decided to pursue book publishing. Fortunately for Gall, he had a hook – that and crazy talent plus a bit of luck. Gall is the great grandnephew of Katharine Lee Bates, author of “America the Beautiful.” While he was growing up, a copy of her poem, written in her own hand, was hanging in the family living room. Gall wrote a book proposal illustrating the words. This was right after 9/11 and American pride and patriotism were running high. It is a stirring tribute to the country’s history and heroics. He shared the proposal with a friend who had a friend who was a major children’s literary agent – and continued on page 32 >>>

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BizBUZZ

I knew that if I didn’t morph my business, something was going to bite me.

Dinotrux Series to Debut on Netflix Worldwide In June DreamWorks Animation and Netflix announced they were “bulldozing back to a prehistoric world of epic proportions with the debut of Dinotrux – an all-new action-packed original series featuring hybrid dinosaur-construction characters who are set to build and battle over three seasons, beginning in Spring 2015. “Based on Chris Gall’s award-winning book series – the first of which was named by Publishers Weekly as 2009’s Children’s Book of the Year – DreamWorks Animation’s Dinotrux is set in a fantastical world filled with lava-flowing volcanoes, lush forests and a megaton cast of loveable characters who are half-dinosaur, half-mechanical construction vehicle and all fun,” according to the press announcement. The series will air on Netflix, the world’s leading Internet television network providing more than 53 million members in nearly 50 countries access to two billion hours of TV shows and movies. Netflix began developing original programs, especially for children, including Turbo FAST in 2013, followed by King Julien, Puss in Boots and Veggie Tales in the House in 2014, as well as DreamWorks Dragons, set to air in 2015. Gall said, “Dinotrux is the story of an ancient race of trucks that existed millions of years ago, long before civilized man arose but after the age of dinosaurs.” Dinotrux was published in 2009 by Little, Brown and Company. Characters include Tyrannosaurus Trux, Scraptors and Tow-aconstrictors. If Dynotrux is a Netflix hit, they could well become the next sought-after toy craze. Gall recalled sitting in construction traffic surrounding by big earthmovers. He thought they looked like dinosaurs and wondered “what if that truck wasn’t made but had ancient ancestors and actually evolved through time.” That ah-ha moment set his creative gears in motion. 32 BizTucson

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– Chris Gall, Illustrator & Writer

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had a book deal in 10 days. Timing was critical. “If I had done this proposal in a different year, things could have turned out very differently.” “America the Beautiful,” his first book, was a Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Book of the Year. Now Gall has completed nine children’s books – six are in print and three will be out by this summer. His books, like his illustrations, have all won awards. Though he loves all his books and characters, Dinotrux is his favorite – and not just because it became a phenomenal success. It makes him laugh. Soon fans will have the opportunity to see Gall’s characters come to life on TV through Netflix. In 2008, before Dinotrux was even published, DreamWorks approached Gall’s agent about buying the film rights and eventually a deal was done. Last summer, DreamWorks sold that option to Netflix, which is developing 300 hours of exclusive programming based on Gall’s Dinotrux characters. The shows will be released in bundles over three years – part of a major move by Netflix to develop original shows for kids. Gall is acting as a “congenial consultant” to Netflix, ensuring the characters look cool, not like Barney. And he said they do “look great.” Overall, Gall is satisfied with what he’s accomplished but reminds us that even though he gets to spend his days writing and drawing, it is work. “There’s suffering involved – and always a bit of self-doubt. But when I get to interact with children who are crazy about one of my books, I see what it was all for. Of course, it’s for them.”

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BizBRIEF

NB|AZ’s Pintor Selected for Top Leadership Fellows Program Lesli Pintor, National Bank of Arizona’s senior VP and regional commercial manager, has been selected for the distinguished International Women’s Forum Fellows Program 2014-2015. Pintor is one of 36 women around the world to be accepted. The program provides creative, multidisciplinary training aimed at developing leadership and strategic management capabilities. Over the course of a year, fellows convene for 20 days, including a week of executive education training at Harvard Business School. Pintor was selected based on her leadership at the bank and in the community. She is the leader of the bank’s Tucson Women’s Financial Group and also volunteers with many community organizations.

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BizAWARDS

IMPACT Awards

Honor PR Pros The Southern Arizona Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America celebrated the accomplishments of local public relations professionals with its annual IMPACT Awards. Two Best in Show prizes were awarded by PRSA. Russell Public Communications was honored in the Tactics category for Metzger Family Restaurants’ “Gio Taco Totally Unexpected and No Rules Tacos!” Best in Show in the Campaigns category went to Pima Association of Governments’ Sun Rideshare for “Drive Less. Save More.” The Public Relations Professional of the Year award was presented to Libby Howell for her outstanding body of public relations work and service to the industry. The 2014 IMPACT Award winners are: Tactics Categories Special Events – Groundbreakings/ Grand Openings

Russell Public Communications for Metzger Family Restaurants’ “Gio Taco Totally Unexpected and No Rules Tacos!”

Strongpoint Marketing for the “Copper Queen Community Hospital Emergency Department and Facility Dedication and Grand Opening in Bisbee”

Publicity/Promotions – Feature Stories

Russell Public Communications for Fox Restaurant Concepts’ “Wildflower: Local Food Inspiration”

Interactive Communications – Website

Strongpoint Marketing for the “DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun Website Redesign”

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continued from page 36 Publications – Newsletters and Magazines

Tech Parks Arizona for the Tech Parks Arizona special section in BizTucson

Publicity/Promotions – Media Relations

Russell Public Communications for Fox Restaurant Concepts’ “National Tequila Day!”

Russell Public Communications for Ventana Medical Systems’ “Principles for Patient Safety”

Tactics Certificates of Excellence were awarded to:

Storyteller Public Relations for “Dr. Scott Goes to Washington” op-ed placement in the Washington Post

Storyteller Public Relations for Tucson Tamale Company’s “What’s In Your Food? The GMO-free fare at Tucson Tamale Company”

Strongpoint Marketing for “Rodger Ford, Entrepreneur: New Book Release”

Campaign Categories Image or Brand Identity

Pima Association of Governments’ Sun Rideshare for “Drive Less. Save More.”

Storyteller Public Relations for “Saint House Rum Bar: New Downtown Restaurant”

External Communications Campaign

Strongpoint Marketing for Tucson Values Teachers’ “2013 Teacher Workforce Study”

Campaign Certificate of Excellence was awarded to:

Bolchalk Frey Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations for the Tucson Jewish Community Center Capital Campaign “Investor Relations Campaign”

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BizTOURISM

Country Croonin’ Tucson Style Randy Houser Duos with Visit Tucson

PHOTOS: TIIU LOIGU

By Gabrielle Fimbres The video premiered June 28 on CMT and CMT.com, and There could perhaps be no better way to showcase Tucson’s the album has yielded three consecutive No. 1 hits, with “Like charms than a hot new video from chart-topping country mua Cowboy” getting rave reviews. It was ranked by Rolling sic artist Randy Houser. Stone magazine as one of the top 25 country music songs in In April 2014, the singer and songwriter partnered with Vis2014, and Country Weekly magazine had it in its Top 10 best it Tucson in the making of his “Like a Cowboy” video, filmed songs of 2014. at Old Tucson Studios and other scenic spots around town. Visit Tucson’s objectives for the project were to increase The ballad is featured on Houser’s latest album, “How Counawareness for Tucson, garner 30 million cable television and try Feels.” 10 million online impressions through video views in the first The video has gone viral, with more than a million views year and activate a viral “Kick Off Your Boots” sweepstakes on YouTube, showcasing our glorious landscape. A sign propromotional campaign across social platforms using Houser’s claiming “Welcome to Tucson” greets viewers in what is called likeness to draw country fans to enter to win a Tucson getaway. Houser’s “epic” video, set in the 1800s. Houser’s strong ties to Tucson Visit Tucson worked closely were beneficial to the relationwith Team Two Entertainment, ship with radio stations in Visit Houser’s production team, durTucson’s key feeder markets in ing the weeklong filming of the “Like a Cowboy,” video and promoting the contest. negotiated product placement – To help celebrate Tucson’s through CMS Nashville – of the starring role in “Like a Cowboy,” “Welcome to Tucson” sign, givVisit Tucson brought Houser ing the ballad a sense of place. back to Tucson on Dec. 14 for an And what a sense of place it exclusive, live performance at the is – with mountain ranges kissed Fox Tucson Theatre, where he by the sunrise, towering saguaros arrived to a red-carpet welcome and classic Western scenes from and a packed house. He was preOld Tucson. sented with a stunning portrait Visit Tucson was honored in of himself with the “Welcome to Tucson” sign featured in the vidSeptember by the Western Assoeo, painted by renowned Tucson ciation of Convention and Visiartist Diana Madaras. tors Bureaus with an outstanding “When I shot the ‘Like a Cowachievement award for the marketing efforts. boy’ video in Tucson earlier this “Tucson has a very rich film year, I was just blown away by history dating back to 1939,” how beautiful it is and how much said Allison Cooper, Visit Tucthe city has to offer,” Houser has son’s VP of sales and marketing. said. “Now I go back there every “It was a natural fit to have Tucchance I get.” This portrait by Diana Madaras was presented to son become intrinsic to the plot Randy Houser during his concert at Fox Tucson continued on page 40 >>> of ‘Like a Cowboy.’ ” Theatre. A country music blogger wrote that while www.BizTucson.com

Houser “was born a long ways from Tucson, Arizona, it could easily be his adopted hometown.” Photo courtesy Visit Tucson

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BizTOURISM

When I shot the ‘Like a Cowboy’ video in Tucson earlier this year, I was just blown away by how beautiful it is and how much the city has to offer. Now I go back there every chance I get. – Randy Houser Country Music Artist

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Cooper said she hopes that Houser’s music video will ignite a strong emotional connection with millions of country music fans and inspire them to explore the unique experiences that Tucson offers as a travel destination. In addition to the filming at Old Tucson, several other local businesses benefited from production. Cook & Company Signmakers produced the video’s prominent “Welcome to Tucson” sign, designed by Visit Tucson’s marketing department. The Steven Meckler Photography studio served as the soundstage for vocal track recordings. The cast and crew were treated to a catered lunch from El Güero Canelo, starring the restaurant’s popular Sonoran hot dog. And Casino del Sol Resort hosted a VIP meet and greet and private poolside concert for local Houser fans. “For the 1800s, there’s no place like Old Tucson,” said the video’s producer and co-star William Shockley. “There’s history that you just can’t find anywhere else.” Hundreds of classic films and TV shows have been made at Old Tucson, including “Tombstone” and the beloved John Wayne flicks “Rio Bravo” and “McLintock!” The video highlights what movie producers already know – Tucson is a great place to film. The area is dotted with locations made famous onscreen. The foothills landscape plays as much of a role as David Duchovny in the offbeat coming-of-age film, “Goats.” Head north to find locations used in “Three Kings” and south for views found in “The Hangover Part III” or Tim Roth’s upcoming borderlands film, “600 Millas.” The university area was the setting of “Revenge of the Nerds,” and the ’50s noir film, “A Kiss Before Dying” – just to name a few of the films that helped put Tucson on the cinematic map. Always versatile, Tucson has been portrayed as Tijuana, Texas, Kuwait and even 1970s Saigon. The Tucson Film Office’s most requested location – the airplane “boneyard” at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base – was even “relocated” onscreen to Washington D.C., for Michael Bay’s second “Transformers” film.

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Clockwise â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Burt Bacharach, singer, songwriter, composer, record producer and pianist; Joey DeFrancesco, jazz organist, trumpeter and vocalist; Arco Iris Sandoval, pianist and composer; JD Souther, musician, singer-songwriter and actor

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January Jams Inaugural Jazz Festival Brings Swing to Tucson

PHOTOS COURTESY HSL PROPERTIES TUCSON JAZZ FESTIVAL

By Chuck Graham Fletcher McCusker wants to make Tucson cool again. He figures a jazz festival could put some swing in the city’s step and be a catalyst for stirring up downtown business in January. “I’ve been involved with the Telluride Jazz Festival for about 10 years,” said McCusker, board chairman of Tucson’s Rio Nuevo district and a vigorous advocate for downtown business. “That one started small just like this one. I’ve seen the impact a festival like this can have.” “The mayor decided he wanted to have a downtown jazz festival in January, specifically to boost tourism,” said Yvonne Ervin, who left her job at the University of Arizona to become executive director of the inaugural Tucson Jazz Festival, set for Jan. 16-28. “In February we always have the gem show and the rodeo. In March there is Tucson Festival of Books,” said Ervin. “But there is nothing in January. I said if you can raise $100,000 in six weeks, I’ll quit my job and do the festival.” They did and she did. That was last summer. By the middle of September all the acts were booked. Most famous among them is songwriter Burt Bacharach, not exactly a jazz monster but certain to sell a lot of tickets. The more proper jazz list includes organ master Joey DeFrancesco with legendary drummer Jimmy Cobb, Grammy-winning vocalist Dianne Reeves, jazz noir flugelhorn romantic Dmitri Matheny, 1920s traditionalists The Hot Sardines octet and tasteful crooner Allan Harris with a tribute to Nat “King” Cole. Reeves and The Hot Sardines are UApresents concerts and www.BizTucson.com

Bacharach is presented in conjunction with the Rialto Theatre. Coming from way outside the mainstream is young Robert Glasper, pianist and innovator, experimenting with jazz hip-hop fusion, R&B and other energetic blends. Here to represent the hipper side of rock ’n’ roll are songwriter JD Souther, who made essential contributions to the Eagles, working in a jazz duet setting with pianist/composer Billy Childs. “We wanted the list to have jazz credibility, first of all,” said Dan Coleman, music publisher and the festival’s coartistic director. “But we also wanted to appeal to the widest possible audience to establish the festival as an annual event.” Most events in Tucson’s fledgling festival will be held in the city’s heart along the stretch of Congress Street going east from the Fox Tucson Theatre to the Rialto Theatre and Club Congress. Eager to take the credit as instigator for getting jazzy with Tucson’s “brand” is Elliot Glicksman, a local lawyer and frequent fundraiser for many causes. “I’ve always been a big jazz fan,” he said. “My dog is named Miles Davis. I kept telling the mayor a jazz fest would be great for the city. What inspired me initially was seeing the quick growth of the book fair.” Early this year, Glicksman took his longtime friend Mayor Jonathan Rothschild to a northside nightspot to hear a jazz group that included pianist and UA music faculty member Jeff Haskell. Wouldn’t you know, Haskell brought along longtime friend Ervin. continued on page 45 >>>

BizMUSIC

HSL PROPERTIES TUCSON JAZZ FESTIVAL Friday, Jan. 16 8 p.m. at Fox Tucson Theatre Jimmy Cobb with Joey DeFrancesco Quartet & Tucson Jazz Institute Ellington Band with Arco Iris Sandoval Saturday, Jan. 17 8 p.m. at Rialto Theatre Robert Glasper Experiment Sunday, Jan. 18 7 p.m. at Fox Theatre Dianne Reeves Sunday, Jan. 18 8 p.m. at Club Congress Dmitri Matheny Jazz Noir Monday, Jan. 19 Free concerts downtown 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 20 8 p.m. at the Arizona Inn Armen Donelian Wednesday, Jan. 21 7:30 p.m. at Crowder Hall Tribute to Benny Goodman with clarinetist Dave Bennett and the Jeff Haskell Trio Thursday, Jan. 22 8 p.m. at Rialto Theatre Latin Jazz Night Friday, Jan. 23 8 p.m. at Fox Theatre The Hot Sardines Saturday, Jan. 24 8 p.m. Fox Theatre JD Souther with Billy Childs Sunday, Jan. 25 7 p.m. at Fox Theatre Allan Harris Long Live the King Nat “King” Cole tribute Wednesday, Jan. 28 7:30 p.m. at Fox Theatre Burt Bacharach www.tucsonjazzfestival.org Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 43


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continued from page 43 That very evening ideas were tossed around and pieces started clicking into place. The mayor said he would be honorary chairman. Glicksman and friends raised the $100,000. Ervin changed her life to be the executive director. Haskell and Coleman stepped up as the festival’s co-artistic directors and before you could ask “who’s the headliner?” Humberto Lopez of HSL Properties said he would sign on for five years as the title sponsor. The 13-day event’s official name became the HSL Properties Tucson Jazz Festival. Ervin is best remembered for jumping into the fledgling Tucson Jazz Society as director in the late 1970s while still a UA music student. In 1981, TJS founded and continued the Primavera Festival, celebrating women in jazz, which became the nation’s longest running annual women’s jazz fest, enduring more than 20 years. In 1993 in Nogales, the birthplace of legendary bassist Charles Mingus, Ervin organized that city’s annual Jazz on the Border: The Mingus Festival, which has become an annual event. By 1998, when Ervin left for New York City, she had built TJS into one of the country’s largest jazz societies. In New York, Ervin’s fundraising efforts brought in more than $10 million for various social service agencies working to prevent teen pregnancies, help homeless people with AIDS and other causes. “I’ve known Yvonne a long time,” McCusker said. “I knew if she was involved in a Tucson jazz festival, it would happen. She is so connected.” Without giving the rear-view mirror a second look, Ervin plunged ahead, drawing up a $400,000 budget and lining up sponsors. Organizationally the festival is operating under the umbrella of the TJS, which will receive 8 percent of all sponsorship dollars. “We know from our own studies that each person at the festival will probably spend about $30 on nonevent expenses such as dinner, parking and so on,” said McCusker. “What made Telluride successful was the concert events ended at 9 p.m., so afterward everybody went to local restaurants and bars for more music, food and drink. “We’re hoping that happens here.”

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BizMILESTONE

25 Years of Awesome

Soccer Shootout Scores $3+ Million Economic Impact By Steve Rivera Bill Viner remembers it all too well. For three straight days, he and a group of devoted soccer parents rose way before the sun and crisscrossed the city, putting up soccer goals at Tucson parks and fields. That was the winter of 1991 and the birth of the Fort Lowell Shootout. A quarter of a century later, the annual soccer spectacle, now called the Tucson Association of Realtors Shootout, draws more than 10,000 families and fans – some from other countries – with an annual economic impact between $3.3 and $3.5 million. More than 2,000 hotel nights are expected to be booked for this year’s event, held Jan. 16-18. While some of the volunteers who place the goals and prepare for the event have changed, it remains one of Tucson’s iconic events – one that takes nearly year-round preparation to pull off. “When you start these types of events you always hope they are going to (last a long time), but what is remarkable is that the people who have come after me have done a terrific job in making this an outstanding community event,” said Viner, a founder of the Shootout and

CEO at Pepper Viner Homes. It isn’t the only signature Tucson event created with Viner’s help. He and his wife, Brenda, were among a small group of literary visionaries who founded the Tucson Festival of Books in 2009. The festival quickly grew to one of the largest events of its kind in the nation. It’s that kind of vision that contributed to the staying power of the three-

It’s a huge showcase for Tucson.

– Phil Tedesco, CEO Tucson Association of Realtors

day soccer event. It’s been “25 years of Awesome,” as the promotional poster says. Diana Cannon, tournament director, said she knew it would last in part because “it’s one of a kind” and no tour-

nament she knows of offers the “activities on the Friday night that we do. It’s a special excitement that comes along with it.” Viner created the event after traveling with his family and soccer-playing son, Andy, to soccer events that proved to be lacking in activities save for the actual games. Viner helped dream up the tournament’s Parade of Athletes – a soccer Olympics where dribbling, juggling and accuracy in the sport are highlighted. It’s patterned after opening ceremonies at the Olympic Games, and a favorite among athletes and families. “We wanted to create something that had more atmosphere, that was a little different than any other tournament in Arizona,” Viner said. “We wanted to bring kids from around the state to our community.” Today participants from New Mexico, Texas, California and Nevada are the norm. More than 350 teams are expected this year – nearly triple the 112 teams that took part the inaugural year. The Shootout, presented by Fort Lowell Soccer Club, has evolved into a citywide event covering 45 fields and drawing soccer players ages 6 through continued on page 48 >>>

1. Opening Ceremonies, 1991 2. First Soccer Olympics, 1991. 3. The Tucson Association of Realtors Shootout draws teams from around the region and even the world. 4. The Shootout provides a weekend of competition for young athletes. 5. The annual parade is a favorite event among players and fans. 6. 1993 – Ruben Fernandez and his wife, Irene, headed up the tournament for several years. 7. 1991 – First year. Arizona Daily Star photo. 8. 1993 – Founder Bill Viner.

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Photos Courtesy Tucson Association of Realtors Shootout


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continued from page 46 14. It’s common to see teams from Mexico and other countries taking part. The event transcends soccer. Cannon, now in her 15th year associated with the tournament, said one of her fondest memories is hosting a team from Taiwan whose young athletes served as ambassadors for their country, playing soccer around the world. “The cultural interchange with the teams was so memorable,” Cannon said. “Even though they didn’t speak English and our guys didn’t speak their language, it was so heartwarming that through the game of soccer there was camaraderie and friendship.” Angel Natal, director of sports for Visit Tucson, said the TAR Shootout “has an excellent balance of local and visitor participation. “The City of Tucson Parks and Recreation team has done an excellent job of cultivating an excellent relationship with this event,” Natal said. “It’s a testament to the investment the TAR Shootout makes back to the community.” TAR is in the middle of a three-year, $82,500 agreement to serve as title sponsor. “We’re proud to be the sponsor because of the economic development component,” said Phil Tedesco, CEO of Tucson Association of Realtors. “It’s a wholesome event that brings families together,” Tedesco said. “It’s a huge showcase for Tucson.” Cannon said families often say that the Shootout is one of the best soccer experiences of their lives. “What they always mention is the Friday night activities,” she said. The Shootout sees former participants who are now coaches bringing their teams to play in the event. Marking the 25th anniversary in January will be fireworks and other surprise activities to celebrate the event’s enduring success. “It has matched any expectations I had about the tournament,” Viner said. “But did I really think that it was going to 360 teams? I don’t even think I thought in those terms. It was all about creating an event that was different.”

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BizBRIEFS

New Book Has Trivia, Bucket List for Diehard UA Hoop Fans

With men’s basketball season heating up, the new book “100 Things Arizona Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die” is a must-read for University of Arizona Wildcat fans. Written by veteran Tucson sports writers Steve Rivera and Anthony Gimino, the book has everything UA fans need to know about their powerhouse basketball program. With a forward by legendary coach Lute Olson, the book features not only trivia, but also breakdowns of some of the most remarkable games and behind-the-scenes stories of the team’s greatest players and coaches. Go to www.triumphbooks.com/100thingsarizona for more information. Biz

Skin Spectrum Adds Third Doctor

Northwest side cosmetic dermatology office Skin Spectrum has added a third doctor to its roster of skin and aesthetic experts. Dr. Faiyaaz A. Kalimullah joined the practice this summer after completing his residency at University of Arizona Medical Center. Kalimullah joins board-certified dermatologists Dr. Jody Comstock and Dr. Tina Pai. “Getting the chance to join Skin Spectrum and practice alongside dermatologists with the experience of Dr. Comstock and Dr. Pai is an amazing opportunity,” Kalimullah said. “They are at the forefront of cosmetic dermatology, especially in the area of nonsurgical facial rejuvenation.”

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From left

Tom Kermabon

GM, Omni Tucson National Resort

Brandt Hazen

PGA Tour Liaison, Tucson Conquistadores

Joe Brossart

Tournament Chair, Tucson Conquistadores

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BizSPORTS

Back to the Future Omni Tucson National Resort Preps for Champions Tour

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Steve Rivera

Talk about good timing. Tom Kermabon, the new GM at Omni Tucson National Resort, was just a few days into his job in June 2014 when the PGA Tour announced a Champions Tour event was coming in March. “This is all very cool,” Kermabon said. “I’m learning because I know how important all this is here.” It’s professional golf in Tucson, so of course it’s important. And it’s back to where the PGA Tour has a hug-like feel at Omni Tucson National, home of more than 30 PGA Tour events. When the World Golf Championships – Accenture Match Play Championship was moved from Marana’s Dove Mountain to

San Francisco and took the PGA Tour’s top golfers with it, the Tucson Conquistadores worked quickly to land a Champions Tour event. The Tucson Classic will be an 81-player field competing for $1.7 million, with 255 Charles Schwab cup points going to the winner. “While the Accenture Match Play tournament was very positive for the region, the fan experience was not great,” said Chuck Huckelberry, Pima County administrator and a key figure in bringing the event here. “In the final rounds, it became difficult to follow leaders or even walk the course. Omni Tucson National is a great open course that allows the fans to follow

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BizSPORTS continued from page 53 their favorite players.” The no-cut format features three days of competition March 20-22, with players and amateurs participating in pro-am events March 18 and March 19. The match play event did not have pro-ams. “To be that close to some of the best in the game is exciting,” said Tucson Conquistadores member Russ Perlich, who has participated in many pro-ams. “And the interaction between you and the pro, and the insights they give, is invaluable. It helps with your golf game and it is fun.” Kermabon is hoping it will be fun. All indications are Tucson and all parties involved are thrilled to continue to bring professional golf to Southern Arizona. Tucson has played host to a pro golf event since 1945 in various forms, returning to its home where it was last known as the Chrysler Classic of Tucson. “The history of this is great,” Kermabon said. “I’ve worked at some landmark properties, and this is a landmark

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property, too. That’s what intrigued me about it (in coming to Tucson).” As Kermabon gazed upon the course from the 18th hole, he envisioned great golf with great crowds. “We’re ready to do this,” he said.

The importance of professional golf remaining here in Tucson is beyond words.

Brandt Hazen, PGA Tour Liaison Tucson Conquistadores

So are the Conquistadores, masters of putting on PGA Tour golf events. For more than 40 years the Conquistadores operated the Tucson Open, then helped with the sales and leadership of the WGC-Match Play. “The importance of professional golf remaining here in Tucson is beyond words,” said Brandt Hazen, the Con-

quistadores’ PGA Tour liaison. “With all the losses we’ve had (in Tucson through the years), it’s of paramount importance economically and helps (continue) to promote Tucson.” While there were no clear-cut figures or economic impact studies done on the Match Play event, and the worldwide media coverage was always trumpeted, the mid-March event will still have an effect, just on a smaller scale. The Conquistadores’ mission hasn’t changed: bring the best golf it can to Southern Arizona and raise money for local charities, including The First Tee of Tucson, Boys & Girls Clubs of Tucson, YMCA and others. The group has raised more than $29 million in 52 years. “We could do it in other ways, but why we like golf so much is because, yes, it’s a great sport, but it also promotes Tucson,” Hazen said. “And that’s important. “The (pros) have embraced the fans and know that the fans at the event embrace them. It’s good for Tucson. It’s an event the Conquistadores want to hang their hat on and hopefully have it for years to come.” Biz

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1 1. The 50th wedding anniversary party of William Shirley Fulton and Rose Hayden Fulton, held in Dragoon, January 1966 2. Amerind Museum, Research Center & Art Gallery 3. Landscape and views surrounding Amerind Museum

PHOTOS: COURTESY AMERIND MUSEUM

4. Amerind Library

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Celebrating Native People from Alaska to Argentina By Monica Surfaro Spigelman In the boulder grandeur of Texas Canyon, the Amerind Museum and Fulton-Hayden Memorial Art Gallery achieve their own majestic proportion – thanks to a dream nurtured by founders William Shirley Fulton and Rose Hayden Fulton in the 1930s. Seventy-seven years after its founding, Amerind still attracts scholars, inspires engaging exhibitions and maximizes a visitor’s encounter with cultures and history. “What holds Amerind together is that core idea based on a sense of place – southeastern Arizona,” said Christine Szuter, who became Amerind’s executive director this fall. “Amerind is unique among other regional institutions because it is a research center, museum, library, laboratory and art gallery set in the stunning Texas Canyon landscape. The combination of all that makes Amerind a truly exceptional place to visit and work.” Amerind continues to reflect its founding vision, she said. William Fulton was the president of

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a Connecticut brass foundry when he and his wife, Rose, traveled to Arizona between 1906 and 1917. Those early trips sparked in William an avocation in archaeology, so much so that the Fultons purchased land in Texas Canyon near Dragoon, about 60 miles from Tucson, in 1930. This became their FF Ranch, a campus of mission-style architecture designed by Arizona Inn architect Merritt Starkweather. On Nov. 26, 1937, Fulton founded the nonprofit Amerind Foundation – a name derived by shortening the words American Indian. At first, the collection consisted of his field notes, books and objects like the desert Hohokam 5-inch ceramic bowl with a red-on-black embedded star design that became the foundation’s logo. Fulton envisioned an institution dedicated to promoting knowledge and understanding of the Americas’ richly varied cultures – a native peoples’ museum. Over the next three decades, the collections mushroomed to more than continued on page 58 >>> Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 57


BizCULTURE

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1. Shoshone painted elk hide. A gift to William Shirley Fulton from H. L. Ferguson of Fishers’ Island, N.Y.  Acquired by Ferguson in Wyoming in 1905.  Anthropologist Arthur Woodward identified the piece as the work of Charlie Washakie, circa 1890. Photo by Joe Koslowski 2. Hopi carved figurine of a Butterfly Maiden or perhaps a kachina doll of Palhikwmana (Butterfly Maiden) katsina. Photo by Joe Koslowski 3. Ramos Polychrome parrot effigy jar, excavated at Casas Grandes, one of the largest prehistoric sites in the greater Southwest. 4. “On the Trail,” an oil painting by Olaf Wieghorst. The painting was conveyed by Elizabeth Fulton Husband to the Amerind Foundation in recent years. Photo by Joe Koslowski 5. This Hohokam pot was excavated near Gleeson, Ariz. Its appealing design became the logo of the Amerind Foundation. 6. Yellow Bird Dancers took part in Amerind Museum’s Autumn Fest 2014

continued from page 57 20,000 objects reflecting 13,000 years of history and cultures from Alaska to Argentina. Fulton’s work attracted Charles Di Peso, who earned the University of Arizona’s first doctorate in anthropology and joined Fulton in 1952 as Amerind’s first executive director. Fulton and Di Peso collaborated with other institutions in massive research, including one project with the Mexican government in northern Mexico’s Casas Grandes – a prehistoric site that became one of the most comprehensive studies in North American archaeology. Reports published as a result of this work continue to be primary resources for understanding southwestern borderlands history. After the passing of both Fultons in the 1960s and Di Peso in 1982, a succes58 BizTucson

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sion of executive leadership built upon the Fulton legacy. In 1985, Amerind’s second executive director, Anne Woosley (now CEO of the Arizona Historical Society), filled 6,000 square feet of museum space with interpretive exhibits, and for the first time opened its doors to the public. A fine arts gallery of primarily Native American and Western artwork (originally opened in 1960) was revitalized. John Ware became Amerind’s third executive director in 2001. He addressed deferred maintenance of aging facilities and rebuilding the repository for Amerind’s priceless collections – creating climate-controlled, state-of-the-art storage. Ware expanded the focus on research, building upon an advanced seminar series to gather experts in archaeology/anthropology. He also began digitizing the library’s 25,000 references and developed a resident scholar pro-

gram. A membership and public education program began in 2003. Szuter was director of the University of Arizona Press when she first worked with Ware to create the Amerind Series in Anthropology, the published findings from Amerind’s advanced research seminars. When Ware retired to Santa Fe, N.M., this summer, Szuter was named Amerind’s executive director. Research still forms the core of all that emanates from Amerind. “Research results make it possible to create exhibits and interpret the 25,000 items within the Amerind collections,” she said. “Research makes it possible to add a depth of understanding to the art that graces the walls of the Amerind Art Gallery and to write books that emanate from the Seminar House. Research creates materials that are housed in the Amerind Library and Archives. continued on page 60 >>> www.BizTucson.com


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BizCULTURE

Amerind is unique among other regional institutions because it is a research center, museum, library, laboratory and art gallery set in the stunning Texas Canyon landscape.

– Christine Szuter, Executive Director, Amerind Foundation

continued from page 58

“The power of research and in-depth analysis leads to the creation of new knowledge and new understanding of the past and of our collective cultural heritage.” Szuter envisions four initiatives as Amerind continues its founders’ vision to promote the cultural heritage of the Americas through research, education and conservation. “The first, indigenous culture and archaeology, builds on Amerind’s core focus and foundation on Native Americans,” she said. “The second, borderlands, builds on Amerind’s physical location and history. The third, community engagement, creates new partnerships for leveraging current resources and brings diverse community voices into the museum and art gallery, and the fourth, the digital world, offers ways to expand membership and philanthropy to reach people who are not able to travel to Dragoon.” The original Fulton house is now renovated and converted into seminar quarters that are available for corporate or private rentals when seminars are not in session. In October the Fulton-Hayden Memorial Art Gallery reopened 4,000 square feet of exhibit spaces with wheelchair accessibility, revamped lighting and climate control. The nonprofit Friends of Western Art, dedicated to supporting the awareness of Western art in Tucson and Southern Arizona, collaborated with Amerind to conserve the collections and renovate the lighting system. The Fulton-Hayden collection includes household names of Western art, including William Leigh, Frederic Remington and Carol Oscar Borg, plus contemporary Native American artists including Bunky Echo-Hawk, Melanie Yazzie, Terrol Dew Johnson and Emmi Whitehorse. In this visually-arresting complex, the combinations of ancient and modern artifacts, art objects, textiles and documents leave visitors absorbed and amazed in equal measure.

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

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We are so very proud to be working with the University of Arizona. More students are recruited to Raytheon Missile Systems from the University of Arizona than any other university in the world.

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Taylor W. Lawrence President Raytheon Missile Systems

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BizECONOMY

Strategic Growth

Raytheon, TREO Zero in on Economic Expansion By Tara Kirkpatrick An escalating global impact lies ahead for Tucson’s Raytheon Missile Systems – provided that the business has room to grow. That was the message from Taylor W. Lawrence, president of Raytheon Missile Systems. Lawrence was the keynote speaker at the Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities’ annual fall luncheon at the Hilton Tucson El Conquistador Golf & Tennis Resort. TREO has set a five-year collective goal of facilitating the creation of 40,000 jobs for the region, with a vision of all economic development groups – public and private – directing activities, programs and policies aimed at accomplishing this goal. Lawrence said Raytheon is “proud to be part of TREO’s mission” of developing the regional economy and lauded plans for the creation of a critical aerospace corridor. “As we look ahead, Raytheon will become even more global,” Lawrence told the audience of business professionals, elected officials, nonprofit leaders and state, regional and community leadership. “One of our biggest concerns has been our ability to grow here in Tucson.” Those concerns led Raytheon in July 2010 to pick Huntsville, Ala., over Tucson for a new missile integration facility. Raytheon opened the new $75 million plant at the Redstone Arsenal in November 2012. www.BizTucson.com

“We were looking at where we could integrate our next generation of missiles,” Lawrence said. “We needed a facility to handle that, and a large buffer zone. We could have built it here – if we had the buffer zone. We ended up in Redstone. They had a lot of open land, and the state put together a good incentive plan. This state was not competitive in the incentive package.” To prevent this from happening in the future, Pima County in 2012 paid $6 million to buy 382 acres of land south of the Raytheon facility for a buffer zone for its manufacturing operations. “We are working to develop a solution to more effectively manage our current operation,” Lawrence said. “That work needs to be unimpeded.” The effort took another step forward in November when the Tucson Airport Authority agreed to sell Pima County a key piece of land critical in the creation of the buffer zone. (See related story, page 66.) Raytheon Missile Systems, one of Raytheon Company’s four businesses, posted $6.6 billion in earnings in 2013 and is the region’s largest private employer with more than 9,000 people at its Tucson headquarters. During his keynote address, Lawrence highlighted Raytheon’s Tomahawk Cruise Missile program as integral to the fight against the terrorist group ISIS.

“Tomahawk is a modern marvel – and it’s made right here in Tucson. The missiles have performed flawlessly,” he said. “It’s been our nation’s weapon of choice.” He also extolled Raytheon’s expertise in kill vehicles – state-of-the-art projectiles designed to destroy ballistic missiles in space. “It’s literally been described as hitting a bullet with a bullet,” he said, noting that Raytheon’s kill vehicles have achieved 35 successful intercepts, going five for five last year alone. “Our Tucson operation will continue to play a pivotal role” in the production of this protective weapon, he said. Raytheon, which Lawrence said is constantly looking for new ways to innovate, is also pursuing work in hypersonic missiles that travel at five times the speed of sound and can be sent across the world in a matter of minutes. Such missiles would heat to more than 3,000 degrees and travel 1 to 2 miles a second, he told the audience. “It is such a fast and hot missile. It is a challenge we are willing to tackle,” he said. “Raytheon is concerned about making the world a safer place.” Lawrence became Raytheon’s local business president in 2009 after serving as Raytheon’s VP for engineering, technology and mission assurance. “I’m grateful to be a part of this community,” he said. “The desert is unlike any other continued on page 64 >>> Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 63


We have to make sure we operate in a pro-business environment. The pursuit of high-quality jobs should be everybody’s focus. This is an aggressive but doable agenda – but it will only work if we are all in it together. –

continued from page 63 place in the world.” In October, the Pima County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved planning for a proposed 16-mile Sonoran Corridor between Interstate 10 and Interstate 19 as part of a greater plan to provide that crucial space for Raytheon to expand. County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry called it “the most important transportation improvement for economic expansion in decades.” “There can be no doubt in anyone’s mind where we are going and what needs to be done,” Lawrence told the TREO audience.

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Joe Snell, President & CEO, Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities

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Lawrence called on business leaders to continue revitalizing downtown, and he praised the University of Arizona, saying Raytheon depends heavily on the school. “We need highly qualified engineers,” Lawrence said. “We are so very proud to be working with the University of Arizona. More students are recruited to Raytheon Missile Systems from the University of Arizona than any other university in the world. We can’t attract without the UA.” The goal of building education and talent in the region is at the forefront of TREO’s 2014 Economic Blueprint Up-

date, a revisit to Southern Arizona’s first directive penned in 2007, said TREO President and CEO Joe Snell. The Blueprint Update sets a five-year goal for the creation of 40,000 direct and indirect jobs through the collaborative efforts of regional partners – particularly higher wage jobs producing products for export. Its four crucial focus areas are talent, infrastructure, business environment and healthcare. “The talent issue is job No.1 for us,” Snell told the audience, adding that 2,500 skilled jobs in this region are going unfilled because of a lack of qualified workers.

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In terms of infrastructure, Snell said the region must be “connected to the global marketplace.” With Mexico’s burgeoning economic growth that is attracting investment from China, Southern Arizona must capitalize on the potential trade opportunities. For example, the Port of Guaymas – roughly 335 miles south of Tucson – is expanding to become the second largest seaport in Mexico with the capacity for more than 30 million tons of cargo. Mexican officials are seeking solid Arizona ties. “We cannot get bypassed,” Snell told the audience, envisioning Tucson as a convergence center for goods and services. Snell said he and other officials are involved in a concentrated effort to recruit quality companies to Tucson. TREO is also providing more assistance to local businesses with the knowledge that 80 percent of the region’s economic growth will come from companies already established here. TREO’s efforts have resulted in a 54 percent increase in the last four years in its “pipeline” – the group of promising

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companies TREO works with on a daily basis to attract here, or if already here, to help expand. Asked later about the pipeline, Snell said, “The increase we are experiencing is a result of increased outreach, sales and marketing of the Tucson region and helping ‘connect the dots’ – in other words, linking companies to resources they need for job and investment growth.” Among the 2014 highlights of growth in the region, aided by TREO:

• • •

Duralar Technologies, a nanotechnology company that makes ultra-hard coatings, chose Marana for its U.S. headquarters. Hydronalix, a maker of unmanned rescue watercraft in Sahuarita, has expanded. Ascent Aviation, a premier airplane maintenance and storage company at Tucson International Airport, continues to grow with new contracts for service.

BizECONOMY Announced at the luncheon, Shared Services Center, an affiliate of Northwest Medical Center that provides business office support, is adding 200 jobs to the region.

“We have to make sure we operate in a pro-business environment,” Snell said. “The pursuit of high-quality jobs should be everybody’s focus. This is an aggressive but doable agenda – but it will only work if we are all in it together. We have the assets needed to recover from the recession, but we only ‘win as one.’ ” TREO Chairman Guy Gunther told the audience that the TREO team is consistently working with corporate site selectors who might consider Tucson and is zeroing in on what is essential to attract and create more jobs. “TREO is very much about linking people and linking projects,” Gunther said. “We are very lucky as a region to have this team.”

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BizECONOMY

Tucson Airport Authority Approves Land Sale By David B. Pittman Tucson Airport Authority has agreed to sell a 52-acre strip of land to Pima County to create a road around Raytheon Missile Systems and allow for construction of a four-lane Aerospace Parkway south of Tucson International Airport. The move, the first of three land deals that are necessary, is designed to start a chain of transportation and high-tech business development improvements. The four-mile parkway will cost an estimated $12.7 million and be funded by the Pima County Regional Transportation Authority. The proposed land sale is part of a package of interlocking legal agreements needed to allow for:

Relocation of Hughes Access Road

Possibility of future expansion at Raytheon’s Tucson headquarters, the company’s primary missile manufacturing facility and Southern Arizona’s largest private employer

Infrastructure improvements required to move forward with plans for a future aerospace, defense and technology research and business park near Raytheon and the airport

“Raytheon strongly supports Pima County’s plan to develop an aerospace and defense corridor south of our airport plant site,” said John Patterson, a Raytheon spokesman. “We believe the proposed corridor will attract other high-tech businesses and help secure the region’s economic future. Moving Hughes Access Road further south will enable the county and the U.S. Air Force to establish buffer zones around our plant site so we can maintain current operations and grow if business conditions warrant.” County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry said the county intends to move swiftly to build the parkway. continued on page 69 >>> 66 BizTucson

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We believe the proposed corridor will attract other high-tech businesses and help secure the region’s economic future.

John Patterson Spokesman Raytheon Missile Systems –

continued from page 68 The goal is to complete construction by the end of 2015. John H. Moffatt, director of the county’s strategic planning office and Huckelberry’s right-hand man on the project, said the land sale is just the beginning of the county’s plan “to create aerospace and high-tech business improvements along with an international transportation and logistics hub” intended to bring huge regional economic benefits. The sale price of the airport land, which is being negotiated, must be approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. FAA regulations require the price to comply with the agency’s definition of fair market value. “The Tucson Airport Authority has been working with Pima County and the City of Tucson on this initiative to create jobs and economic growth for the benefit of the entire region,” said TAA President and CEO Bonnie Allin. The airport and county hope for quick approval by the FAA following the OK of an environmental assessment for the parcel. Moffatt said Allin and TAA have been instrumental in expediting the environmental process to meet FAA requirements. Pima County’s efforts to expand the buffer area around Raytheon’s airport campus began after the missile giant chose Huntsville, Ala., over Tucson as the site of a new manufacturing plant in 2010. Raytheon officials said a key reason for its move to Huntsville was the lack of buffered space at its Tucson facility.

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BizWORKFORCE

Partnerships Help Industry Sectors Grow Pursuing Shared Opportunities By Larry Copenhaver There is strength for job creation from within an industry. Competing companies in a specific sector can work together to create prosperity and wealth. That’s the message consultant Lindsey Woolsey of the Woolsey Group brought to a forum of about 150 key Pima County business and government leaders held at Tucson Electric Power headquarters downtown. The Woolsey Group is a research and technical assistance firm that has guided communities across the nation to better connect education and training to the needs of those areas’ job markets. It’s about forming sector partnerships, Woolsey told the by-invitationonly gathering. It’s about learning strategies that might help businesses be more

competitive – and go a long way toward narrowing the talent gap that plagues many local firms and dampens growth. The strategy calls for working together as partners, to serve the needs of both industry and job seekers. These partnerships form links between businesses, economic development groups, workforce training groups and educational programs and strive to work together on shared growth opportunities. Forum organizers – Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities, or TREO, and the Pima County Workforce Investment Board – figure that the strategy can be a game changer. TREO is a private-public partnership that promotes economic growth in and around Tuc-

PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

Guy Gunther Vice President Operations, CenturyLink

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son. The Workforce Investment Board consists of members appointed by the Pima County Board of Supervisors to provide recommendations of local workforce policy and oversight of Pima County One-Stop Career Center. “Through the Workforce Investment Board, we have created partnerships working together to improve the economy in that particular sector,” said Gregg Johnson, who helped coordinate the two-hour forum. Johnson, campus director at University of Phoenix, serves on the TREO board and the WIB board. “We’ve been working on this for two years, and it’s just coming together. Businesses are working on their needs. They are doing their planning for jobs that they are going to need in the future.

Gregg Johnson, Campus Director, University of Phoenix


“These businesses discuss all elements of economic development – yet not in a competitive environment,” Johnson continued. “They approach this more in a cooperative environment – focusing on common interests, common needs, areas where they specialize. They help each other in moving forward. “It’s where businesses in a common sector – like healthcare or bioscience or defense – actually work together on opportunities for the future,” Johnson said. “For example, in Phoenix there is a sector partnership – the Healthcare Sector. And there is a sector partnership in the Kingman area that is going quite well.” “The vision that TREO and Pima County’s Workforce Investment Board have in building these sector partnerships is a stellar idea,” said forum attendee Aric Meares of Azbil BioVigilant, a local company that can instantaneously and in real time detect, count, size and determine the status of microbial material. “I am encouraged and I want to be part of it. I am encouraged by the consultant and I hope business leaders will listen.” Meares came up with an analogy of sharing for the good of all: Once there was a variety of connections for early electric appliances, and there was likewise a variety of ways to connect appliances to circuitry. But the industry got together and standardized the con-

nection – a simple plug into the socket – and the entire electrical industry prospered because their appliances worked in virtually every home and store in the country. In reality, though, the most common thread is a huge need for training, experience and higher education. Woolsey

It’s where businesses in a common sector – like healthcare or bioscience or defense – actually work together on opportunities for the future.

– Gregg Johnson Campus Director University of Phoenix

said one in four adults lack the basic literary/numeracy skills needed to get a job. Forty-two percent of adults have no post-secondary credentials. Meanwhile, a survey indicated that 64 percent of

Ann Weaver Hart, President, University of Arizona

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companies cannot find qualified applicants for management, scientific, engineering and technical positions. “What we are trying to do is develop opportunity to create wealth above that minimum-wage level,” Johnson said. In this context, wealth is created through jobs that provide sustainable wages – a wage that sustains life above a subsistence level. “Where sector partnerships work well, they actually network in a way that quality jobs are created.” Addressing those needs is critical, said Bev Price of HealthTrio, a healthcare information technology and services company, who attended the event. She said she was impressed by the idea and effort. “It’s a good first step to get groups together – different companies from the same type of environment – to speak about their issues. That just does not happen normally. But if you are going to move forward, everything has to have a beginning.” Price figures the next step is another meeting – one with competitors and a mediator to help direct questions. But she cautioned that “people will not open up and talk about initial problems like this within their business until they have established a comfort level that what is being discussed is for the betterment of their company.”

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John Marques, UA Health Network, with Jonathan Rothschild, Mayor, Tucson

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1. Old Main, photo by Jacob Chinn/UA Alumni Association 2. Old Main, photo courtesy of Special Collections, the University of Arizona Libraries, University of Arizona Photograph Collection 3. Architect Corky Poster during the opening celebration. Photo by Beatriz Verdugo/UANews 4. Old Main interior. Jacob Chinn/UA Alumni Association 5. Old Main interior. Jacob Chinn/UA Alumni Association

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BizARCHITECTURE

Old Main Makeover

Historic UA Building Restored to Old Glory By Dan Sorenson

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Old Main – the 123-year-old heart of the University of Arizona campus and the only building known to every UA student since the land grant university was founded decades before statehood – is now as close to the way it was back then as it’s been in many decades. Turns out it was a great building from the start, according to Corky Poster of Poster Frost Mirto, lead architect on the recent $13.5 million Old Main renovation by Sundt Construction. That’s not to say Old Main had not fallen into some disrepair, and also disrespect. The original cruciform design – two floors of long, wide, high-ceilinged, intersecting hallways lined by big rooms with high windows – had been partitioned off into a maze of offices and rooms with drop ceilings and little of its original spaciousness and dignity. Outside, however, it looked much the same. The reddish tan brick walls, made from Santa Cruz River clay, stood straight. The foundation of massive gray stone blocks quarried southwest of Tucson did its job. The three-level, metal-shingled roof and the wrap-around second-floor veranda shaded the building and kept the elements away from the core. “The exterior, they didn’t mess with,” Poster said of the building’s treatment by earlier masters. “The interior, they messed with. The interior was not treated very respectfully over time.” But aging – both the physical decay and loss of status – happens a little at a time. The roof and veranda took a beating. Our torrential desert rains nibbled

at parts of the foundation. More noticeably, other buildings popped up on campus – larger, taller buildings with refrigeration and elevators. Old Main didn’t become Old Main until 1927. Before that it was known as University Hall, and originally, Main Building, according to a UA published history of the building. Various colleges and programs moved in and out of Old Main in the early part of the last century. In 1937, it was home to the Graduate College’s offices, the departments of art, French, mathematics, history and political science – and the mailing bureau. No surprise then, in 1938, a city inspector condemned the “overcrowded and under-maintained” building. With no funds for repairs, it stood unused until 1942. That’s when the U.S. Navy, gearing up for World War II, paid for some improvements so it could host the Navy Indoctrination School and the UA ROTC program (which stands for Reserve Officer Training Corps). In 1953, ROTC took over most of the building. In 1972 Old Main was listed on the National Registry of Historic Places and got a first-floor remodeling to host the Dean of Students, along with air conditioning, modern lighting and an elevator. “In 2006 there was a pretty substantial renovation of the first floor. Eightyfive percent of it stayed in place,” Poster said. “We just built on that. We didn’t undo any of that.” Following its latest renovation, one of the original uses returned. UA President continued on page 72 >>> Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 71


BizARCHITECTURE

PHOTOS: GARY MACKENDER, UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

continued from page 71 Ann Weaver Hart and her administrators now occupy a suite of offices at the north end of the second floor. Throughout all of that history, early and late, the outside of the building remained mostly unchanged. The Joseph Wood Krutch Garden of desert plants was moved around the building and a fountain was added. But someone from UA Risk Management office noticed a problem during a homecoming event, said Rodney Mackey, the project manager for Old Main’s restoration who represented UA on the renovation team. The entire second floor veranda of Old Main was sagging and swaying under the weight and rhythmic groove of the UA marching band. And that’s about the time the veranda was made off limits and people started talking seriously about what should be done to preserve the oldest building on campus. Poster, a distinguished professor emeritus at the UA College of Architecture & Landscape Architecture, said that veranda is “one of the best things about the building. The skirt the architect designed for the building bore the brunt of the sun and the wind and the rain. I’ve been known to refer to the veranda as ‘heroic’ because it sacrificed itself to protect the building.” The veranda did such a good job of protecting the building’s core that many original components remain. The tall windows that naturally light the rooms are original. Not only that, many of them have the original glass, the same glass that students looked through more 72 BizTucson

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than a century ago, when there were no other buildings – and very little town – to see outside those windows. Besides restoring the veranda’s structural integrity, redoing the roof with handmade metal shingles to match the originals, some work to improve drainage around the foundation and the replacement of some stone, Old Main’s core was relatively untouched in the renovation. Inside, Poster and Mackey said, it was more a matter of putting things back than changing them. In most cases the original pieces were still there. And where they weren’t, as in the case of some wainscoting that had been removed, Poster said they were able to match the wood color and grain of the original walls. “We tore it down to just the cruciform, these four quadrants,” Poster said. And what they found was respectable, solid workmanship. “This is post-railroad,” Poster said. “They had the ability to bring in Douglas fir (for flooring) from Oregon. The roof came from Pennsylvania. But the brick was made locally, made from clay from the Santa Cruz River.” “We had heard there was dirt between the floors, but we just didn’t believe it,” Mackey said. “But we pulled up the floors and there it was,” Poster said. “It was used for sound insulation” so clicking heels wouldn’t be heard downstairs. Poster said 2.5 inches of soil was placed on shelves on the edge of the joists under the flooring.

You can tell Poster loves the building and respects those who designed and built it. He understands its significance – now and then. “Old Main wasn’t just the central point, it was the only point,” Poster said. “It was the first building authorized by the (Arizona Territorial) legislature in 1887, occupied in 1891. It was built over four years. It’s not four years of construction, but it was probably four years of money. ” In those first years, when Old Main was used for classrooms and administration, there were no other buildings on campus – and few off campus in that area. Poster said the UA area was cut off from downtown by the railroad until 1916, when the Fourth Avenue underpass was built. “And then the neighborhoods developed in between,” Poster said. Poster admires the original architect, James Miller Creighton, but someone back in the day did not. The architect’s name was left off the building’s dedication plaque. It contains familiar Tucson founder names – Roskruge, Mansfeld, Franklin, Samaniego. And the contractor, M.J. Sullivan, is listed as designer and superintendent. But no architect. Poster, aware of the sometimes tumultuous relations between professions in the building business, speculates that “they must have had a fight.” Fortunately Creighton’s sturdy Late Territorial Victorian design overarched petty rivalries from more than a century ago and remains the heart of the campus, ready to welcome new generations for decades to come. Biz www.BizTucson.com


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BizPHILANTHROPY

UA Receives $50 Million Endowment Agnese Nelms Haury Estate Funds Environment, Social Justice

A $50 million gift from the estate of Agnese Nelms Haury will support and expand University of Arizona environmental and social justice programs for faculty, students and visiting scholars for generations to come. The Haury gift – one of the largest in UA history – pushed the $1.5 billion Arizona Now fundraising campaign past the billion-dollar threshold. “We knew what Mrs. Haury’s interests were – social justice and the environment – so we had that palette to work from,” said Joaquin Ruiz, dean of the College of Science. “It was clearly a gift from heaven in that regard. We have huge strengths in the environment and social justice as it relates to environmental issues. That’s a sweet spot for us – so the funds come at a time we can take a variety of disparate programs and create synergies between them.” The Haury gift, announced on Sept. 19, will fund, in perpetuity, a wide slate of people and programs in areas she held most dear. The Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice will support endowed chairs, faculty fellows, visiting fellows, graduate scholars,

an undergraduate engagement fund, Southwest studies, a research fund, plus conferences at Biosphere 2. “Many of the other large donations to the university have been in what I think are the obvious areas – business, medicine, law, science and engineering,” said Diana Liverman, co-director of the UA Institute of the Environment. “What is so special about Mrs. Haury’s gift is it funds the environment and social science. It’s quite rare to get that sort of gift in these areas, but those are the things she cared about – the state of

These programs were designed specifically to capitalize on current UA strengths that align with Haury’s interests.

– Diana Liverman Co-Director, Institute of the Environment University of Arizona

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society and the changing environment. That’s distinctive.” A longtime benefactor of the UA, Haury has given generously to the School of Anthropology and to the Southwest Center. It was her $9 million donation that built the new stateof-the-art Bryant Bannister Tree-Ring Building. “Mrs. Haury was a very modest woman. The tree-ring facility is not named after her, but the first director of tree-ring lab,” Ruiz said. “She may not have wanted her name on the endowment either, but I think it’s very important her name is on it. She had a very interesting life, and naming it for her honors not only that, but her legacy as well.” Before her death in March at the age of 90, Haury directed her advisers to distribute her trust estate to charitable organizations that would carry on the purposes and causes that she supported during her lifetime. Those advisers – Tammy Barnett, Greg Gadarian and Mary Mangotich Grier – selected the UA and the UA Foundation for implementation of a program focused on the environment, Southwest culture, human rights and social justice. “Mrs. Haury was all about people. Throughout her life, she really loved people. So we focused on people – from students to faculty and to a program that brings in students and faculty from other places,” Ruiz said. The gift reflects the same type of strategic philanthropy Haury engaged in throughout her life. Through the Agnese N. Lindley Foundation (established in 1982 after the death of her continued on page 76 >>> www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

By Eric Swedlund


Agnese Nelms Haury Philanthropist

Agnese Nelms Haury Agnese Nelms was a twin born in Houston, Texas, in 1923. She studied in Fontainebleau, France, and earned degrees from Bryn Mawr College and Wheaton College. During her career she was a researcher, editor, author and philanthropist. She traveled the world researching and writing for the United Nations, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and other organizations. Her ties to the University of Arizona began in the mid-1960s when she moved to Tucson and worked with UA archaeologist Emil W. Haury on excavations at Snaketown, a large, ancient Hohokam settlement in the Gila River Valley of Southern Arizona. They remained close friends and colleagues and married in 1990. Haury also participated in archaeological excavations in Cyprus, Germany, Greece, Israel, France, Jordan, Mexico, China, Turkey and Mongolia.

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continued from page 74 second husband, Denver Lindley), she funded a diversity of projects – from the preservation of cultural artifacts and biodiversity to the support of human rights for immigrants and Native Americans. “We tried to look at what she cared about during her whole life, which was a big part of designing the programs,” Liverman said. “She did have her own foundation for about 10 years, so we looked at what she funded under that.” An oversight committee will guide the Haury programs, allowing for changes over time to best serve both the university and Haury’s legacy. “We all feel this should be a living endowment in the sense that over time we may want to shift priorities in the program to things that are timely,” Ruiz said. “What you see today may not be the exact program 10 years from now – which is good because sometimes endowments can become stale.” The four initial Haury Chairs in Environmental and Social Justice are renowned UA faculty professors – poet Alison Hawthorne Deming, Mayan archaeologist Takeshi Inomata, hydrology and water resources expert Peter Troch and atmospheric scientist Xubin Zeng. The six inaugural Haury Faculty Fellows are Maribel Alvarez, anthropologist, folklorist, curator and community arts expert; Kevin Bonine, Biosphere 2 director of education and outreach; Laura López-Hoffman, whose research crosses the disciplines of natural resources, public policy and law; Brian Mayer, who specializes in environmental sociology; Nina Rabin, director of the Bacon Immigration Law and Policy Program, and Scott Saleska, whose research bridges the gap between localscale ecological interactions and broader biogeochemical processes. “We focused on broad thinkers who are working across boundaries, who have high reputations and represent the fields of the endowment,” Ruiz said. “Everybody is extraordinary at what they do.” Haury’s career as researcher, editor author and philanthropist took her all over the world. That aspect of her life led directly to the visiting fellows component of the program that will bring individuals or teams of scholars work76 BizTucson

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BizPHILANTHROPY ing in the environment or social justice to work collaboratively at the UA. “The exciting thing about the program is not only does it support some of our best in the university, but it will be bringing in a lot of people as visiting scholars, which always benefits a university to have new thinkers come in,” Ruiz said. Liverman said, “These programs were designed specifically to capitalize on current UA strengths that align with Haury’s interests. We’re already one of the top universities in the country for the environment. We have hundreds of faculty working on a wide range of environmental issues and many of those are essential to a sustainable Arizona – things like water issues, energy policy, issues around protecting the Western landscape and the wild areas,” she said. The Haury gift will also boost programs that don’t typically earn federal research grants or receive support from other philanthropists. “This also allows us to explore some new areas,” Liverman said. “Some of the areas Mrs. Haury cared about aren’t areas where there are big grants available. Some are regional issues where you’re not going to get National Science Foundation funding, so that component of her gift is very valuable. “We have people looking at trade, immigration, cultural connections along the U.S.-Mexico border. That’s an area Mrs. Haury cared a lot about, this area as a border area, and we have a lot of strengths in those areas and around poverty and food insecurity as well.” The Haury endowment will fund scholars for generations to come. Though the programs focus on the environment and social justice, they are not limited to any particular college or department. “The trustees wanted elements of the program to be universitywide – not just in the colleges that she had supported, but also to be competitive on an annual basis,” Liverman said. The UA Institute of the Environment fit perfectly with the goals of the Haury donation. “We were brought in to help with that broader effort and had several programs we could show to the trustees to convince them there were some really outstanding things that could be done with the money,” Liverman said.

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Loews Now Owns and Manages Landmark Resort Derek H. McCann

GM Loews Ventana Canyon

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BizTOURISM

Multimillion Renovation Coming This Summer By Edie Jarolim Talk about a seamless transition. When a hotel changes hands, the staff usually worries about the impact of the new owners’ policies on their day-today routines – and on their job security. That didn’t happen when Loews Hotels & Resorts took majority ownership in Loews Ventana Canyon Resort on Nov. 1. “In fact,” said Derek H. McCann, the resort’s GM, “if we hadn’t told the team members that the property had been acquired by Loews, they wouldn’t ever have known.” This lack of acquisition drama – and trauma – is the result of several factors, including the fact that Loews Hotels has managed the award-winning foothills property since it opened in December 1984. According to McCann, “Loews’ philosophy is to manage properties as though they owned them. As managers, they ask, ‘Is this going to generate additional revenue for the owner, is it going to save them money?’ They are always looking for the best possible outcome.” In addition, the relationship between Loews Hotels and the former owners, the Estes family – who still hold a minority interest – is longstanding and close. Both parties have an abiding personal affection for the award-winning Tucson resort, notable for the striking way it blends into its stunning Sonoran Desert setting. Loews Ventana Canyon was the first hotel that Jonathan M. Tisch saw through from inception to completion after he returned in 1980 to the hospitality company his father, Bob Tisch, and uncle, Larry Tisch, founded in 1946. Now chairman of Loews Hotels, which owns or operates 22 luxury properties in the United States and Canada, Tisch was then the head of development at the hotel division of the considerably smaller family business. That year he got a blind call from Jack Rodman, who represented a Los Angeles-based consulting accounting www.BizTucson.com

firm, regarding one of their clients – the Estes Company. Bill and Shirley Estes were looking for a hotel operator to build a property to serve as the centerpiece of their planned residential development in Tucson. Tisch was familiar with Scottsdale and Phoenix, but said “quite honestly, I had to look at a map to see where Tucson was.” He soon got to know and like the city and the Estes family very well, coming out for several site tours, including one by helicopter to get the literal overview. “At one point I brought my father out here and we completed the business side of the transaction,” Tisch said. Even as the Loews Corporation and his role in it grew, Tisch frequently came to check on Loews Ventana Canyon’s operations. “Thirty years later and it is still an architectural wonder,” he said on a recent visit. “The ideas that went into some of the spaces are still very relevant in terms of what the customer wants today.” Bill Estes died in 2009 but “Shirley has continued a strong relationship with Jon Tisch and is highly respected within the Loews company,” McCann said. “Not many owners have held onto a hotel for 30 years and kept the same management company for that long.” The fact that the Estes Company still retains a small ownership percentage is “important to Shirley and important to us,” McCann said. “Shirley is very highly regarded in Tucson and at the resort. Having her wisdom and her years of experience is very valuable to me and to the rest of the team.” McCann, who took over as GM in February of 2014, also has a personal connection to the resort. “I had my honeymoon in Loews Ventana in May 1997,” he said. He was thrilled to be able to “come full circle” after working for Gaylord Hotels in Texas and Tennessee for the past decade. “This is such a unique and beautiful facility,” he said.

“That’s not an opportunity you turn down.” The continuity of principals and day-to-day operations aside, there are changes afoot, but nothing that was not planned under the old ownership – to wit, a multimillion dollar renovation. “The renovation was being discussed before,” McCann said. “With the acquisition it’s moved to the front of the line.” But even the renovation isn’t going to be very disruptive. Slated for the slower summer season of 2015, the changes will not involve jackhammering or major construction. It will primarily involve a refreshing of the guest rooms with “soft goods, new carpeting, new vinyl, new paint,” McCann said. “The design will be more contemporary but still retain the sense that we’re in Tucson.” Similarly, the lobby will get a new look – one that will make it more welcoming. The beloved flagstone floor will stay in place, but huge area rugs might be introduced for a homier feel, and the front desk, which is very traditional, will be replaced by a pod design. “It will give the team the ability to get out from behind the desk and greet our guests and be much more interactive,” McCann said. And while the restaurants will get a similar updating, their concepts will remain essentially the same – which will be a huge relief to Tucsonans. Referring to the Flying V, McCann said, “It has a tremendous following in town. On any given night at least 50 percent of business is local.” McCann’s own experience proves that point. “When I bought my house here, about a mile a way from the resort, the people we bought it from said they loved going there every Friday night. The seller also said, ‘Don’t tell my cardiologist – but I eat the ribs every Friday.’”

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Neb Yonas

GM Chapman Automotive Group Tucson

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BizGREEN

Driven Green

to be

Chapman Automotive Team Champions Environmental Stewardship By David B. Pittman It’s not uncommon for automakers and dealerships to boast of environmentally friendly vehicles featuring reduced emissions and increased fuel efficiency. Yet it is rare to turn the focus on the dealership itself, setting higher, more all-encompassing standards of “green” environmental policies and community stewardship. That company is Chapman Automotive Group Tucson, which has undertaken efforts that have:

• Reduced the company’s overall water and energy consumption

• Slashed its bottled water purchases by 60 percent •

over the last three years

Increased recycling efforts by placing large, attractive recycling boxes in all of its showrooms and beneath the desks of everyone in its sales force

• Curtailed paper usage by printing on both sides of • •

pages when possible, greater usage of email and computer storage, and reductions in the multiple copying of contracts Planted hundreds of trees on behalf of customers in partnership with Tucson Clean & Beautiful Assisted and donated to various other nonprofits including Habitat for Humanity, the Humane Society of Southern Arizona and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

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None of this could have been accomplished without the work of the Green Team, a volunteer group of Chapman employees from all five of its Tucson dealerships that continues looking for ways to make the company’s policies and practices greener and more sustainable both internally and in the community. “I like to say that Chapman Automotive is the ‘Holy Green,’ instead of the ‘Holy Grail,’ of corporate environmental stewardship,” said Gina Murphy-Darling, aka Mrs. Green, the creator and voice of Mrs. Green’s World Radio Network. Murphy-Darling said that while Chapman encouraged the formation of its Green Team, “the positive things that are being done are not because of a corporate mandate, but are staff-initiated efforts. The Green Team has taken on a life of its own. Credit goes both to Chapman’s leadership and the employees.” Neb Yonas, GM of Chapman Automotive Group Tucson, always believed it was important that the company’s environmental initiatives be guided in a grass-roots effort by employees. “This is purely voluntary,” he said. “I haven’t sent a memo out saying ‘from now on nobody drinks from plastic water bottles.’ This comes from our employees making suggestions and exploring ways to be more environmentally friendly, while still providing the comfort our customers are used to and expect. “From management’s perspective, we have so many things we must keep on top of and to put this on department managcontinued on page 82 >>> Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 81


continued from page 81 ers to enforce is not a task that is needed. It has a more lasting effect if there is buy-in from everyone from the ground up. The Green Team is something that is not only surviving on its own, but it is growing and it doesn’t have to be monitored.” Initially there were seven members of the Green Team. That number now fluctuates between 12 and 16 members. “Green Team members come from all five of our dealerships and serve in different capacities, such as receptionists, sales people and parts guys,” Yonas said. “These people are very dedicated

and they are good communicators. They go to the meetings and then speak to their peers and let them know what is going on. They are friendly people that know everyone at their stores. They do a good job.” Chapman Automotive is among Murphy-Darling’s sponsors and in return she serves as a consultant to Chapman on how to save money through the utilization of eco-friendly policies. She has worked with the Green Team, helping to bring in speakers from community organizations, including the Community Food Bank, Local First, RISE Equipment Recycling, Tucson Clean & Beautiful and Habitat for Humanity.

“The auto industry is much greener than it used to be in terms of reduced emissions and fuel efficiency – but with Gina we’ve taken it a little bit further,” said Yonas. “Green means more than just small carbon footprints. It also means doing some community work and helping make our community more sustainable.” One of Chapman’s most successful community efforts has been its Trees for Tucson partnership with Tucson Clean & Beautiful. At three Chapman dealerships – Honda, Acura and Volkswagen – auto buyers are offered the choice of a gift bag or a tree that can be planted on their property, a public park or other

This is purely voluntary. I haven’t sent a memo out saying ‘from now on nobody drinks from plastic water bottles.’ This comes from our employees making suggestions and exploring ways to be more environmentally friendly, while still providing the comfort our customers are used to and expect. – Neb Yonas, GM, Chapman Automotive Group Tucson

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BizGREEN

Green means more than just small carbon footprints. It also means doing some community work and helping make our community more sustainable. – Neb Yonas, GM, Chapman Automotive Group Tucson

public site. “This program is very popular with our customers,” said Yonas. “Planting the trees is more costly than providing goodie bags, but it has a lasting value that results in people remembering Chapman. We are going to expand this program to our other dealerships soon.” B.J. Cordova, director of communications for Tucson Clean & Beautiful, said the program has resulted in hundreds of trees being planted throughout Tucson. “We have a very positive relationship with Chapman Automotive and we are extremely happy to work with them,” Cordova said. “Chapman’s participa-

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tion has had a significant effect in the last year and we’ve continued to see the number of trees being planted increasing.” Fifty-five Chapman employees and some of their family members recently took part in a Green Team Build Day with Habitat for Humanity Tucson. In addition, Chapman provided a $5,000 donation to Habitat. “We are so grateful to have Chapman Automotive as a partner and a resource,” said T. VanHook, CEO of Habitat for Humanity Tucson. Chapman also has hosted five Pick a Pooch days for the Humane Society of Southern Arizona. Chapman opened various showrooms on Saturdays for

members of the community to come in and adopt pets. A spokesperson for the Humane Society said Chapman’s efforts resulted in finding homes for about 40 pets, with Chapman not only providing the space for adoption events, but paying the adoption fees, as well. Chapman’s latest effort was partnering with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society for its Light the Night event. In less than two months members of the Green Team raised more than $8,000 for the cause. That, combined with a Chapman corporate donation, resulted in a contribution of $15,000 to the nonprofit. Chapman was recognized at the event as Outstanding Corporate Sponsor. Biz

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BizMILESTONE Rich Rodriguez is the recipient of the 2015 Philanthropic Award from the Steven M. Gootter Foundation. In only his third year as head football coach at University of Arizona, Rodriguez had the Wildcats in the top 10 in the nation, playing in the 2014 Fiesta Bowl, and he brought the Territorial Cup back to UA by beating arch rival Arizona State University to win the Pac-12 Conference South Division championship. He has been involved in the Gootter Foundation since arriving in Tucson.

Rich Rodriguez

Head Football Coach University of Arizona

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Gootter Foundation’s First Down Honoring Rich Rodriguez By Valerie Vinyard Rich Rodriguez, head football coach for the University of cure for sudden cardiac death, the leading cause of natural Arizona Wildcats, will receive the Philanthropic Award from death in the United States. the Steven M. Gootter FoundaClaudine Messing is Andrew’s tion at its 10th anniversary gala on wife, Gootter’s sister and VP of the March 7. Rodriguez served as the foundation. Her husband said she is honorary chair of last year’s gala. “the heart and soul of the founda“Coach Rodriguez got involved tion.” immediately when he arrived in She explained how the foundation Tucson three years ago,” said Anwas established so quickly. “Friends drew Messing, president of the and family were motivated by the Gootter Foundation. “I don’t even grief. It was such a tragedy to all of think he had been on the football us,” she said, noting that the foundafield yet. In the short time he’s been tion is entirely run by volunteers, so in Tucson, he’s embraced the com“every dollar can go to research.” munity.” Bobby Present was the president Ten years ago, Steven M. Gootter of the Gootter Foundation until died unexpectedly of sudden cardiabout two years ago. He played tenac arrest at age 42. He went out for nis with Steven and has known the a morning run with the family dog Gootter family for years. and never made it home. Though “With a lot of hard work and the young athlete’s death remains some luck, we really were able to Steven M. Gootter with a shock to friends and family, much find people who were committed daughter Sophie and son Max good has come from the tragedy. to funding SCD research,” PresThe Gootter Foundation was established within months. To ent said. “The volunteers have deep roots in this community. date, it has raised about $3.5 million for research in finding a continued on page 86 >>>

PAST HONOREES

Clockwise – 2014 Honorees Humberto and Czarina Lopez, 2007 Honorees Robert and Penny Sarver, 2009 Honoree Dr. Gordon Ewy, 2012 Honorees Dr. Gulshan and Neelam Sethi, 2013 Honoree Ginny Clements, 2008 Honoree Bazy Tankersley, 2011 Honorees Alfie and Allan Norville and 2010 Honoree Bobby Present

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BizMILESTONE

Coach Rodriguez got involved immediately when he arrived in Tucson three years ago. I don’t even think he had been on the football field yet. In the short time he’s been in Tucson, he’s embraced the community.

– Andrew Messing President, Steven M. Gootter Foundation

continued from page 85

Consequently we were able to find a lot of people who had access to discretionary charitable dollars.” Those dollars resulted in a number of grants awarded to new and established researchers. One grant to Stanford University is narrowing the cause of sudden cardiac death to 40 specific genes, paving the way toward developing a test for it. Present remains most proud of the foundation’s relative speed – about seven years – in raising $2 million to endow a chair at the UA Sarver Heart Center. In 2012 Dr. Jil C. Tardiff was named the Steven M. Gootter Endowed Chair for the Prevention and Treatment of Sudden Cardiac Death at the center. While researchers pursue a cure for SCD, the Gootter Foundation has installed more than 150 automated external defibrillators “where people work, play and pray at nonprofits throughout the community,” Andrew said. Each AED costs between $1,200 and $2,000. AEDs also have been installed in some patrol cars in Tucson, Marana and Pima County. The foundation did this because AEDs have made an impact in other cities. Andrew cited two U.S. cities – Rochester, Minn., and Seattle – that have survival rates five times greater than average, primarily because AEDs are in the cities’ patrol cars. Police often are the first on the scene, so having that equipment at the ready makes a huge difference. AEDs are effective because they’re very easy to use – and the device won’t provide a shock unless the heart needs it. “It’s like having a fire extinguisher,” Claudine said. “We hope it’s never used, but it’s there if you need it. We know they save lives.” In 2012, the foundation launched its “Be a Lifesaver” campaign. Since then, public service announcements by former UA basketball great Steve Kerr and Tucson Mayor continued on page 87 >>> 86 BizTucson

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continued from page 86 Jonathan Rothschild have helped spread the word about what to do if you encounter someone who has experienced sudden cardiac arrest. It’s called the 3 C’s – check, call 911 and compress. Andrew said other breakthroughs are being made, including the discovery that inducing hypothermia in people temporarily can prevent brain damage. Robert Charles was placed in a hypothermic chamber temporarily after experiencing an episode on the tennis court. About four years ago, he collapsed after serving the ball. A series of lucky events – a friend who knew CPR, access to an AED and a cardiologist who happened to be there – saved his life, said his wife, Ann Charles. “If one of those things went wrong, he would not be here,” said Ann, who met Claudine and Steven’s mom shortly after her husband made a full recovery. Now she’s on the Gootter Foundation’s board of directors and executive director of the Kaimas Foundation, a major funder for the “Be a Lifesaver” campaign. Kaimas is funding the campaign’s January kickoff on the big island of Hawaii. Her goal is for downtown Tucson to be saturated with AEDs, especially because many large events take place there. “I want someone to be no more than 200 yards away from an AED,” she said, estimating that 40 more AEDs would be needed to accomplish that. Some would be roving and some already are in place. She sees Tucson serving as a role model for communities nationwide. “We’re trying to be a template for other cities,” she said. “You see other cities doing this – but they’re not doing it to the extent that we are.” Andrew Messing agreed. “It is a testament to Steve Gootter that our foundation has really thrived. Steve was an amazing person whose life was taken too soon. He had so much promise.”

Biz

10TH ANNUAL GOOTTER GRAND SLAM GALA Saturday, March 7, 6:30 p.m. The Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa $175 per person Sponsorships available www.gootter.org www.BizTucson.com

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

From left

Dr. Kevin Boesen CEO, SinfoníaRx

Fletcher McCusker

CEO, Sinfonía HealthCare Corp

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BizHEALTHCARE

Building on Sinfonía’s Success Adding Medication Management to Home Healthcare By Eric Swedlund problems are flagged for outgoing calls, which the company’s A spinoff from the University of Arizona’s College of Pharpharmacists make to consult with patients. macy is bringing millions of clients to Sinfonía HealthCare “Patients have a lot of different doctors, and one of the Corp and has already tripled the nascent company’s revenues things they do now that’s a relatively new phenomenon is go to more than $24 million. pharmacy shopping,” Boesen said. Developed at the UA, the medication management software Problems with medication management have become a sebehind SinfoníaRx is at the core of a novel business model that rious issue. Drug-related problems come at a cost of $200 bilsearches out potential red flags with prescription medications lion annually in the United States, and then routes problems to a call and the leading cause of hospital center staffed with pharmacists to provide corrective consultations. readmissions is medication error. At the time of the license to “Healthcare is complicated. SinfoníaRx, the program and the It’s confusing,” Boesen said. “It’s an opportunity to contain and retechnology were likely “the most duce a lot of unnecessary healthmature” the university has ever care costs.” launched, according to UA’s Tech At the UA, the Medication Launch Arizona, which moves inManagement Center needed help ventions, technologies and intellectual property from the laboramanaging the surge in need and tory into the marketplace. volume, particularly in terms of Dr. Kevin Boesen, SinfoníaRx software development and paCEO, founded the Medication tient outreach. Boesen started Management Center in 2006 as to look for commercialization partners three years ago. Interest an assistant professor at the UA’s came from venture capital firms College of Pharmacy. The initial on both coasts for a traditional focus was on Medicare, which spinout – but Boesen wanted to had just launched its prescription maintain the relationship with the drug benefit plan. UA. “The way we do it is the most “To have faculty making the comprehensive way that you can – Fletcher McCusker patient calls and consultations ofdo it,” Boesen said. “Every time a CEO, Sinfonía HealthCare Corp fers credibility,” he said. “They prescription is filled, that patient’s wanted to take everything out, data is run through the set of which probably would have meant leaving Tucson.” algorithms and analyzed for safety, drug interactions, adherBoesen met Fletcher McCusker shortly after McCusker ence, gaps in care and ways to reduce costs.” launched Sinfonía and though initially the interest cenBased on that assessment, about 50 to 60 percent of patients have potential problems with medication and about tered on adding the prescription management services for half of those cases need intervention, Boesen said. Potential continued on page 90 >>>

The timing couldn’t be better given the Affordable Care Act and the interest in medications. Nobody was really looking at how those things interacted, interfered or combined. Now that’s a huge focus at every level.

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continued from page 89 Sinfonía’s home-based patients, the talk soon turned to spinout potential. “Fletcher really understood that vision. He’s always been a proud supporter of the UA and a big supporter of keeping businesses in Tucson – so he’s the ideal partner,” Boesen said. McCusker founded Sinfonía in February 2013, a new venture to follow his work with Providence Service Corporation, which he began in 1997 and as chairman and CEO expanded into a billion-dollar-a-year national public company. He started Sinfonía with the vision of creating a multifaceted home healthcare provider that works across the spectrum from nurses to hospice care. Medication management fit perfectly. “With our geriatric patients, we know managing medications is a huge problem,” McCusker said. “Particularly with older people living independently at home, they often aren’t capable of managing their own medications. So we became enamored with this system.” In the fall of 2012, UA President Ann Weaver Hart began a reorganiza-

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Every time a prescription is filled, that patient’s data is run through the set of algorithms and analyzed for safety, drug interactions, adherence, gaps in care and ways to reduce costs.

– Dr. Kevin Boesen, CEO, SinfoníaRx

tion of the technology transfer operation, recruiting David N. Allen from the University of Colorado to direct Tech Launch Arizona. The Medication Management Center was the first university priority for privatization.

“We were the only local bidder and we bid as a joint venture,” McCusker said. “We spun out the administration, legal, marketing and customer service aspects – but the College of Pharmacy continues to man the call center and the UA is a huge shareholder. It’s nice that the UA is a research institution because they have unbelievable data to track results.” McCusker hired an advertising agency and began to aggressively market the company, hosting conferences and traveling, even internationally, to recruit clients. The business exploded. With the addition of SinfoníaRx in November 2013, Sinfonía has grown from 2 million patients to more than 7.5 million patients and revenue more than tripled in nine months – from $8 million to more than $24 million. “The timing couldn’t be better given the Affordable Care Act and the interest in medications,” McCusker said. “Nobody was really looking at how those things interacted, interfered or combined. Now that’s a huge focus at every level.”

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BizHEALTHCARE As the nation’s largest medication management company, SinfoníaRx has 5.9 million patients nationally, making 50,000 to 100,000 calls a week recommending changes in prescription management. SinfoníaRx expects to grow to 7 million patients by the end of 2015, Boesen said. In addition to the 150-person UA call center, housed in the old Tucson Electric Power building at 220 W. Sixth St., SinfoníaRx has 20-person call centers at the UA health campus in downtown Phoenix and Ohio State University. The call center staff is composed of pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and pharmacy students, with more complex or more serious calls routed to the pharmacists. In order to operate nationwide, the call center is licensed as a pharmacy in all 50 states, a process that took 18 months to complete, Boesen said. The process starts with the health plans. Some send data daily, while some send it weekly. After the software identifies potential problems, they’re categorized based on the level of urgency and the level of complexity. After the con-

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sultation, SinfoníaRx sends a summary and information on recommendations to the patient, to the provider and the health plan. In terms of serious health risks, SinfoníaRx gets about 1,000 alerts each week about patients being prescribed two medications that should never be taken together, Boesen said. SinfoníaRx still has huge opportunities to grow, Boesen said, with capacity for 20 million patients under the current call center levels. The software is scalable and the call center could still grow in Tucson and could also expand through other partnerships with toptier pharmacy schools. In addition to the medication management, the company calculates the return on investment in terms of healthcare cost savings. By tracking the implementation of recommendations and prevention of adverse events, the company projects the cost savings for every intervention. In the first quarter of 2014, that amounted to $29 million. Since moving to Sinfonía, the savings have topped more than $250 million.

“The people driving this are big managed-care payers. We just showed up and said ‘This is what we do’ and we’ve landed several large new contracts within the last nine months,” McCusker said. Maintaining a partnership with SinfoníaRx is also a boon to the UA. One hundred pharmacy students enter the UA each year and over the last nine program years, hundreds have been trained in medication management. “It brings a lot of notoriety to the College of Pharmacy,” Boesen said. “We’ve done national and international speaking. And the way we do the volume we can do, we’ve had interest from other countries – particularly Saudi Arabia, Canada and New Zealand.” Both McCusker and Boesen are optimistic about the prospects for SinfoníaRx. “There are a number of things people like,” McCusker said. “We kept it in Tucson. We kept it downtown. And there’s still plenty of opportunity for us to expand.”

Biz

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BizBRIEFS

Third Annual Songfest Showcases World-Class Talent The 2015 Tucson Desert Song Festival will take place at various venues throughout the region Jan. 15-Feb. 1. Now in its third year, the festival will explore “the exquisite sorrow and defiant laughter of life and love,” according to festival organizers. The festival is known for “bringing together Tucson’s leading arts groups and internationally celebrated guest artists in a series of events celebrating classical voice at its highest level,” said Cynthia Hansen, festival spokesperson. The festival has garnered attention on a national level, Hansen said, noting that it has now been rated by USA Today as one of Tucson’s Top 10 best events. This year is no exception. Tamara Mumford, Anthony Dean Griffey, Susan Graham, Katie Van Kooten, Heidi

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Grant Murphy, Angela Brower and Corinne Winters are just some of the exceptional talent that will be performing during the two-week event. The Tucson Symphony Orchestra, Tucson Chamber Artists, the Arizona Friends of Chamber Music and the Arizona Opera will also participate, presenting such classical works as “Don Juan,” “Der Rosekavalier,” Orff’s “Carmina Burana” and “Canción Amorosa: Songs of Spain.” In a festival exclusive, the Tucson Guitar Society will unite guitarist David Leisner and tenor Rufus Müller to perform the works of Benjamin Britten, Franz Schubert and Manuel de Falla as well as David Leisner’s own works. Festival guest artists will join with the University of Arizona School of Music to conduct master classes. Faculty and

students will provide a series of lectures and recitals. All of these events are open to the public. For the third year, the festival will include a songwriting competition for students in grades K–12. Students are invited to submit original songs with melody and lyrics. A panel of UA School of Music educators will judge the submissions, and finalists will be invited to perform their compositions in a showcase recital at the UA School of Music on Jan. 17. Cash prizes are given to the top winners. Tickets to festival performances are available through the individual participating organizations. More information about the 2015 festival is available at TucsonDesertSongFestival.org, and at 1-888-546-3305.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


Miraval Announces New Leadership Team Laura McIver

World-renowned Miraval Arizona Resort & Spa has announced its new leadership team, with Laura McIver as GM, Grant Bruce as spa director and Jill Harlow as director of marketing. McIver comes to Miraval from the

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Grant Bruce

Belmond El Encanto Hotel in Santa Barbara, Calif., where she oversaw the propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s large renovation project and achieved the Forbes Five-Star accolade. Bruce has worked in management at a number of high-profile spas, including

Jill Harlow

Canyon Ranch Spa at The Venetian in Las Vegas and W Chicago Lakeshore. Harlow previously worked for RED Development, where she executed marketing initiatives for several Arizona destination properties.

Biz

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TAA Announces Retail and Restaurant Opportunities in 2016 Owners of locally based retail businesses and restaurants interested in operating at Tucson International Airport are being sought by the Tucson Airport Authority to attend informational meetings. Meetings are being planned for Spring 2015 in preparation of official requests for proposals, or RFPs, that will go out in late 2015. Any new concessions in the airport would open in mid-2016. TIA has six airlines serving 15 nonstop destinations daily. More than 3.2 million passengers annually pass through the terminal. Construction and professional services are purchased pursuant to the guides outlined under Arizona Revised Statues, Title

34. Additional guidelines may apply dependent upon various funding services. TAA is an independent, nonprofit organization operating TIA and general aviation reliever Ryan Airfield. TAA has sustained its operations since its origin in 1948 from airport generated revenues without the use of local taxes and continues to invest millions of dollars each year in safety, security and facility infrastructure that drive job creation and economic activity. The two airports currently support 35,000 jobs, house more than 100 tenants and serve a diverse mix of aviation and nonaviation businesses, as well as military and government operations.

Biz

For information about RFPs and meeting dates and times, business owners can enter their information in the online Interest List Form located on FlyTucson.com at www.flytucson.com/tucson-airport-authority/business-opportunites/construction-andprofessional-services/interest-lists/.

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BizBRIEFS

Tucson J Selected for North American Talent Development Program The Tucson J has been selected to take part in a pilot program designed to help Jewish Community Centers throughout the nation and in Canada build talented workforces. The JCC Association, or JCCA, has selected nine JCCs to pilot this program aimed at identifying, attracting, developing and retaining skilled professionals to build a larger pool of talent to lead their organizations into the future. Also participating are JCCs in Los Gatos and Long Beach, Calif.; Alberta, Canada; Jacksonville, Fla.; Indianapo-

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lis, Ind.; Rockville, Md.; East Hills, N.Y. and Houston, Texas. The program launched in September 2014, when Todd Rockoff, president of the Tucson J and a selected talent management leader participated in a training workshop at JCCA offices in New York. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are honored to participate in this pilot and to have the opportunity to invest in helping all of our staff grow and reach their potential. We are creating a learning community where our staff has a real opportunity to grow,â&#x20AC;? said Rock-

off, who oversees nearly 200 employees at the Tucson J, which for more than 60 years has provided wellness activities, cultural arts programs, early childhood education and more. The goal of the year-long program is to assist JCCs in developing a culture of staff engagement and learning. JCCs will work with staff to determine which skills individuals should focus on and develop, and track their progress. JCCA will provide guidance through workshops and webinars in which staff can participate. Biz

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WORLD’S BIGGEST

GEM SHOW $120 Million Economic Impact

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BizTOURISM

PHOTOS: COURTESY TUCSON GEM, MINERAL & FOSSIL SHOWCASE

By Kimberly Schmitz

www.BizTucson.com

Tens of thousands of people flock to Tucson from all seven continents and more than 25 countries in late January for the annual Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase – the largest and arguably best event of its kind on the planet. They depart a few weeks later, leaving the city richer by millions of dollars. Last year alone this mega-treasure hunt – consisting of some 40 different shows throughout the metro area – generated an estimated $120 million in direct spending. International media exposure – through television coverage and a barrage of travel and trade articles and advertisements – calls attention to this 60-year jewel of an event and the sunny Southwestern city that hosts it. People from around the globe gather here for two plus weeks in late January and early February to share, display, learn about, buy and sell everything from fossils and meteorites to native cultural artifacts, clothing, rare mineral specimens, sculpture, art, photography – and of course – glittering gems and finished jewelry. The Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase occupies the rough-cut space in the center of a Venn diagram created by the intersection of tourist attraction, professional conference, geology lesson, state fair, museum collection, education seminar, esoteric exhibits, food fest and shopping extravaganza. Most locals have heard of this colossal event – yet few realize its profound impact. Misconceptions abound – including the belief that the majority of the money that is spent during the extravaganza leaves with the attendees. Not so. The reality is that showcase visitors spend millions at local businesses, numerous local jobs are generated and more than $10.7 million in tax revenue is collected. Economic Impact Visit Tucson, the region’s destination marketing organization, funds studies of the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase to reveal the event’s economic impact on the region. FMR Associates, a Tucson-based international research firm, conducted studies on the showcase in 2000, 2007 and 2014. The firm conducted more than 1,000 interviews with attendees, and the same research model was applied to each year of the FMR evaluations.

Here’s the crux of the findings: The 2014 Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase generated an estimated $120 million in direct spending – up from $100 million from the 2007 event and $76 million from the 2000 event. This statistic alone makes the showcase the single most financially beneficial event in the region, according to FMR Associates Research Manager Andy Wellik.

• He added, “The biggest comparative surprise relates to total direct expenditures associated with the 2014 showcase. Compared to our 2007 study, there were 18 percent fewer shows and 12 percent fewer exhibitors in 2014, yet direct expenditures grew 20 percent overall – from $100 million in 2007 to $120 million in 2014.”

There’s more: Buyers represented the lion’s share of financial impact with an estimated $70 million in direct spending. Owners and exhibitors respectively spent $23 million and $27 million overall.

• •

The 2014 showcase featured 40 individual shows and about 4,500 exhibitors while the 2007 showcase had 49 shows and roughly 5,000 exhibitors. Overall attendance dropped from 55,000 in 2007 to just fewer than 50,000 in 2014 – yet individual show attendance increased by nearly 11 percent.

• Many

showcase participants have become area residents. However, 50 percent of owners, 84 percent of exhibitors and 54 percent of buyers are from outof-town. Lodging is by far the largest expenditure by the three groups surveyed for a total of $30 million. Last year, show owners reported spending an average of $221 per night on lodging (up from $182 in 2007), while exhibitors paid $129 per night (up from $119) and buyers paid $133 per night (up from $109).

• The FMR study also indicates that many

attendees increased the number of days they stay in Tucson. Buyers stayed an average of 8.5 days, about the same as in 2007, but exhibitors stayed 17.5 days (up from 16) and owners stayed 12.1 days (up from 11.5). continued on page 98 >>> Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 97


PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

BizTOURISM

New 7-Day Streetcar Pass An unlimited-ride seven-day pass will be will be introduced by the Sun Link modern streetcar for people attending the 2015 Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase, said Jeremy Papuga, transit services director for the City of Tucson. There are four gem shows on or very near Tucson’s streetcar stops – most of which are hubs for the Gem Ride shuttle as well. There also are three major hotels and nine bed and breakfasts along the streetcar routes, as well as numerous restaurants, bars and shops, Papuga said. While the price is not yet set, the new seven-day pass will cost between $12 and $15. Papuga said this new option will improve convenience and introduce or further connect showcase attendees to the University of Arizona Main Gate, Mercado San Agustín and downtown. Until now streetcar riders could only purchase passes good per ride, for one day, 30 days, a semester or a year. He said the seven-day pass will be evaluated to determine whether it will be permanently available in the pass product line. Biz 98 BizTucson

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continued from page 97 The 140+ page report from the 2014 event study is public record and available at www.visittucson.org/media/researchfacts/event-profiles. Trickle Down Resorts and hotels aren’t the only beneficiaries of the showcase. Attendees also book privately owned bed and breakfasts, rent condos or apartments, and stay with friends or family. Marion Hook, co-owner of Adobe Rose Inn, said “Over the last 10 years, we’ve been booked over 90 percent for the month of February. Half of that, of course, is the two weeks of gem show.” All six Adobe Rose Inn rooms have been booked during the showcase since she purchased the bed and breakfast in 2003, and she said her B&B compatriots enjoy similar occupancy. Her guests, like buyers John Connely, a collector and retired lapidary jewelry designer, and Paddie Harris, a gemologist, have been coming to the gem show for more than 20 years. Many book their rooms for the following year before leaving. Hook said there is definitely a “trickle down” effect of showcase attendee spending – especially in restaurants. “We only serve breakfast. So our guests have to eat out the other two meals of the day.” Showcase attendees also report spending significant money on transportation, equipment rental, entertainment, sightseeing, food and beverage. This means that gas stations, restaurants, grocery stores, boutiques, malls, attractions – and the people permanently and temporarily employed by these businesses – see the benefit of this spending. Maurice Destouet, VP and GM of Pueblo Gem & Mineral Show and River Park Inn said, “We hire a huge number of additional staff people (during the showcase). In previous years I hired neighbors and friends who were unemployed at the time. It was nice to see the impact of the event in a direct manner and to see these people participate in the growth of the economy.” Claudette Myers, owner of Desert Bloom Boutique downtown, said she plans for customers who tend to return to her shop year after year during the showcase. “I buy everything months ahead of time, keeping in mind these customers who come back every year.” Her sales stay fairly even throughout the year, but

she feels that her showcase clientele – mostly buyers and gallery owners – “do create a bump in business for me.” In some cases, the shows contribute more directly to the community. The Tucson Gem & Mineral Show is the pioneer of the showcase. It began as a bit of a tailgate rock-hound swap meet in an elementary school parking lot in 1955. Today it is one of the two “main events” presented at the Tucson Convention Center. Chair Paul Harter said, “TGMS is a local show. It is promoted and put on by residents of Tucson and surrounding communities. All of the money from this show stays in Tucson and Southern Arizona. Throughout the year, the money supports local mineral museums, education programs and scholarships for geology-related programs of study.” After digesting all this, if the question of how the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase positively impacts the region still lingers – think taxes. In 2014 the showcase injected $10.7 million in sales, bed and rental car taxes into the community in just 2½ weeks. These taxes support Tucson and Pima County infrastructure – including, but not limited to, road maintenance, police, fire personnel and administration. Great Experience, Greater Returns Significant numbers of showcase attendees report extending their stays for personal travel in Tucson and throughout the state. Many also report returning to Tucson on non-business-related trips at other times of the year or have future plans to do so. These findings illustrate that the showcase provides benefits beyond Tucson and Pima County, and that the city provides experiences to business travelers that are so positive, they choose to return for leisure travel. The tourism industry likes to call these travelers “brand ambassadors” who share the ever-powerful word-of-mouth referrals to their favorite travel destinations. B&B owner Hook recalled that a longtime guest “referred the Poet Laureate of Louisiana to stay with us.” What brings showcase attendees back? Some say our weather. Others point to the scenery or the myriad available activities. All agree that it’s the Tucson experience. TGMS Chair Harter said, “The city of Tucson is a gracious host. People continued on page 100 >>> www.BizTucson.com


Just Do It – Seeing is Believing From the JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa on the west to the Tucson Expo Center on the east, there are trunk shows, parking lot pavilions, grand ballrooms and exhibition halls filled with intriguing rocks and bedazzling baubles as far as the eye can see. Don’t be intimidated. This is an amazing, not-to-be-missed experience.

PHOTOS: COURTESY TUCSON GEM, MINERAL & FOSSIL SHOWCASE

The team at Visit Tucson has created tools to help anyone – from novice rock hounds and seasoned gemologists to the residents of Tucson – find their way around. Visit Tucson publishes a Showcase Guide available at the visitor center in La Placita downtown, and at most show locations once the showcase begins. The guide includes a map, comprehensive listing of shows and Gem Ride shuttle-stop locations. Learn more at VisitTucson.org/ Gemshow. There you can search for shows that will offer specific features to narrow the choices to a manageable number. Tech-sperts now also have the option of downloading the Tucson Gem Shows app for mobile devices which features show, shuttle and map information, along with dining, display and product searches. There are shows featuring only beads, fossils, minerals or high-end gems, while others mingle all that and more. Most shows are open to the public, though some are for qualified buyers only. Many offer both public and wholesale admittance. Qualifications for wholesale-only

shows vary from show to show.

upon phenomenal rarities.

The largest wholesale-only show is put on by the American Gem Trade Association at the Tucson Convention Center Feb. 3 to 8, attracting 3,000 exhibitors and 8,600 buyers eager to refresh their inventory after the holiday season.

Every year, opening day at the TGMS – Friday morning – is Kid’s Day, open to all area schoolchildren.

If detailed planning isn’t how you operate, hone in on two shows that truly feature something for everybody. Excellent “starter” experiences are the cornerstone and pioneer Tucson Gem & Mineral Show at the Tucson Convention Center and the Pueblo Gem Show at River Park Inn. The theme of the 2015 TGMS is “Minerals of Western Europe” and it runs Feb. 12 through 15. This is the grand finale to the showcase. Organizers are expecting Western European mineral specimens from private collections rarely available for public viewing. For 50 years, the Smithsonian Institute has participated in the TGMS. Smithsonian curators typically donate two exhibits – “one that is educational and one that is super-flashy. They always bring the bling,” said Paul Harter, TGMS chair. TGMS and the Smithsonian don’t reveal the upcoming year’s exhibit until just before the show opens, letting curiosity and imagination run wild. In previous years the showpieces were the 45.52-carat deep blue Hope Diamond, a NASA Moon Rock, a Tucson Ring Meteorite and a Fabergé collection – giving thousands of people the opportunity they may never have had to lay eyes

Pueblo Gem and Mineral Show at the River Park Inn is considered one of the most diverse shows. It takes place from Jan. 30 through Feb. 11 at the eight-acre property on the freeway Frontage Road between Congress and Cushing streets. For more than 35 years, this show has dazzled. Free and open to the public, exhibitors from around the world occupy most of the grassy twoacre inner courtyard, many of the hotel’s rooms and the featured Mineral Building and Jewelry Pavilion. A new Pueblo Gem and Mineral Show tradition is the complimentary lecture series called the Tucson Mineral Lectures, held at the courtyard of the Mineral Building over two nights. Perusing treasures from bead strands to squash-blossom necklaces and opals to dinosaur eggs can work up an appetite. Food vendors in the courtyard, an on-site restaurant and food trucks in the parking lot will refill attendees’ tanks and fuel the treasure hunt anew. After growing for 60 years, the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase is something that must be experienced to truly be appreciated. People travel here from around the globe to see this extravaganza – an event that for many defines Tucson.

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BizTOURISM continued from page 98 are friendly, outgoing and welcoming. I think it’s one of the main reasons why people come to visit.” Another appeal is convenience. Tucson is an easily navigable city, made more so the past seven years by Gem Ride – a free shuttle that stops at a significant number of shows. The icing on the experiential cake for the 2015 showcase, many believe, will be the addition of Sun Link, Tucson’s modern streetcar. Before it began running, “I don’t think people quite understood the benefit of the modern streetcar to downtown,” said River Park Inn’s Destouet. “It’s exciting to see it operating and doing well. It will have the same effect on the gem show – especially for the Golden Triangle of the downtown shows.” Visit Tucson President & CEO Brent DeRaad said, “Gem show visitors will look at downtown through a different lens now that the modern streetcar is running. Over the years, they have witnessed the transformation of our urban core – through the terrific new bars, restaurants and other businesses that

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have opened in anticipation. The better we translate that experience during the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase and the rest of the year, the more visitors we will attract and the more revenue will be generated.” Stepping It Up Every few years the rumor surfaces that the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase will be leaving Tucson. Not likely. Those in the know say the showcase is here to stay for the everlengthening foreseeable future. In fact, all indications are that the showcase is set to continue to grow – if not in size, certainly in prestige and permanency. The number of individual gem shows fluctuates from year to year. There have been as many as 48 shows in nearly as many locations in the past. At press time, there were 39 shows on the books for 2015. The Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase is the apex of the gem show circuit. There is no other that compares in size, attendance, prestige and vibe. Continued investment in infrastructure and experiential improvement only further solidify this sentiment.

In 2014, Tucson developer Allan Norville announced plans to build a 140-room hotel, apartment complex and a center to house three museums – including a gem and mineral museum – on eight acres behind the Tucson Convention Center. He also plans to break ground in March 2015 on a permanent 120,000-square-foot exhibition hall and likely host a gem show on adjacent property he already owns. In 2016, Eons Expo, owners of the 22nd Street Mineral & Fossil Show, plan to break ground on a 150,000-squarefoot, three-story co-op near the show’s tent site. They plan to offer 86 “business condos” for sale and use remaining space as a high-end gem show annex and year-round exhibition space. Eons operates other large and successful gem shows in Denver and New Jersey. They strategically selected Tucson as the ideal location to launch this avant-garde concept. These projects are brilliant harbingers of the Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase’s ongoing focal point in the global gem and mineral industry.

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BizCOMMERCIAL

2015 Commercial Real Estate Forecast By David B. Pittman Interested in discovering where the Tucson area commercial real estate market is headed in 2015? If so, don’t miss the 24th annual CCIM Commercial Real Estate Market Forecast Competition. The event, which is organized and presented by the Southern Arizona Chapter of CCIM, will be held Feb. 10 at the Tucson Marriott University Park. CCIM stands for Certified Commercial Investment Member. Local CCIM chapter president Brandon Rodgers and Greg Boccardo, who takes over as president in 2016, said earning the CCIM designation conveys a knowledge and expertise in the field of commercial real estate that is recognized positively by commercial brokers throughout the world. “It is the gold standard for commercial real estate education,” said Rodgers, who specializes in industrial properties for PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services. “If you are going to be an investor or a real estate commercial broker, this is the Ph.D. of our business,” said Boccardo, a commercial real estate broker, developer and contractor. The annual forecast is prepared by panel members representing various commercial real estate sectors, including retail, office, industrial, multifamily, land and finance. Each panel consists of well-established real estate brokers and financial professionals who will participate in question-and-answer sessions and provide their prognostications on where interest rates, vacancy levels, land costs, construction prices, investment income and other important factors influencing the local real estate market are headed. Organizers of the event say those at102 BizTucson

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tending will leave with a better understanding of current conditions in the local market, how commercial real estate sectors are most likely to experience emerging business opportunities, and how metro Tucson’s outlook compares to other cities. About 375 people attended last year’s event and organizers expect about the same number this year. The event is open to the business community, academia, government officials and the general public.

24TH ANNUAL CCIM FORECAST COMPETITION & LOCAL LEGENDS Presented by CCIM Southern Arizona Chapter Tuesday, Feb. 10 Tucson Marriott University Park 800 E. Second St. Registration – Begins at noon Program – 1 to 5 p.m. Networking reception – 5 to 6:30 p.m. RSVP by Jan. 31 Members $90 Non-members $100 Table of 10 $900 After Feb. 1 Members $100 Non-members $120 Table of 10 $1,000 Day of Event $125 sazccim@tucsonrealtors.org

For the fifth consecutive year the event will also honor legends of Tucson’s commercial real estate market. Past honorees have included Louise Foucar Marshall, Roy P. Drachman, Bill Estes, Donald Diamond, Roy Long, Chuck Pettis, Sonny Solot, George H. Amos Sr., George H. Amos Jr., Simon Kivel and Peter Herder. Major sponsors of the event include National Bank of Arizona, Wells Fargo Bank, Realty Executives, CoStar Group and Title Security. The Southern Arizona chapter, which has 142 members, is one of 56 local CCIM chapters operating nationally. Local members value the networking opportunities of belonging to the CCIM chapter. In addition to the annual forecasting event, members have a chance to develop relationships with bankers, engineers, appraisers and others active in the commercial real estate industry at local luncheons. James Robertson, a past president of the Southern Arizona CCIM and a CCIM designated broker with Realty Executives, said there are more than 9,000 CCIMs in more than 1,000 markets worldwide. Robertson, who played a key role in organizing and planning the 2015 forecasting event, said the CCIM designation serves as “a calling card of knowledge and professionalism” to all those working in the commercial real estate field. The CCIM Institute, which is based in Chicago, issues the Certified Commercial Investment Member designation following completion of an online learning and testing process that typically takes about two years to complete, Robertson said.

Biz www.BizTucson.com


SPECIAL REPORT 2015

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Innovation Workplace

PHOTO:CHRIS MOONEY

in the

Society for Human Resource Management – Greater Tucson


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BizHR

HR for the 21st Century SHRM-GT Provides Training & Networking Support By Christy Krueger The field of human resources has evolved significantly since the days when the primary role was hiring and overseeing payroll and benefits. Today, HR professionals focus on talent management, company culture, organizational development and training to build highly engaged teams. The Society for Human Resource Management is a national organization with 485 chapters that support those in human resources through training and networking programs. SHRM of Greater Tucson is one of the country’s strongest – with 420 members and several merit awards from the national association. Because of high member participation, SHRM-GT is able to maintain almost a dozen active committees, present a top-notch awards ceremony every fall and bring in national speakers. SHRM-GT holds monthly workshops that attract more than 100 attendees. “We strive to have continuous education. These workshops provide information, processes and best practices with takeaways that allow members to apply what they learn in their workplace. It helps attendance stay high,” said Jeanie G. Merideth, SHRM-GT executive director. Its mission is to provide HR-related information, education, expertise and influence. “Having the number of committees with their high level of activity and program development is unique compared to many other SHRM chapters,” said Ann Berkman, past president of SHRM-GT. Merideth owns Merideth Associates Management and has worked with professional and trade associations since 1986. She said SHRM-GT stands out www.BizTucson.com

because of its level of volunteerism. “They’re very hands-on,” she said. “It has to do with their sheer numbers. Even having a management company working with them is unique, and they win chapter awards regularly.” SHRM-GT’s professional certification committee puts together study groups to prepare members for rigorous certification testing. In the past, SHRM members received designations through a national institute that granted three levels of certification – PHR (professional of human resources), SPHR (se-

2015 Events The Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson presents events throughout the year including: Monthly Workshops/Lunch Second Tuesday of every month except April, September and November DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Tucson – Reid Park 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 13 Workshop DV is Costing Employers Money DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Tucson – Reid Park 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. Annual Employment Law Update April National Speaker September Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace November

nior professional of human resources) and GPHR (global professional of human resources). Starting this year, SHRM will have its own independent certification arm, granting two designation levels – SHRM-CP (certified professional) and SHRM-SCP (senior certified professional). “Tests are rigorous and draw on realworld HR experience,” said Garrett Kowalewski, SHRM-GT’s 2014 president. Typical success rates nationwide for first-time test takers, he said, are around 50 percent. “Our study groups have about a 90 percent success rate.” One of the largest programs of the year is the Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace awards ceremony in November. The 2014 event took place at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Tucson – Reid Park, where attendees packed the ballroom to hear keynote speaker Daisy M. Jenkins and to honor the winners in four categories. Award categories represent some of the vital roles played by HR departments in the 21st century, Kowalewski said. “Today, we still do payroll and benefits – but we also drive talent management and are involved in legal and regulatory compliance and make strategic contributions. Diversity and inclusion is an HR business function that creates a stronger team and environment. Process improvement and technology are fundamental to productivity.” Every quarter the legislative committee sends members a newsletter reporting on current issues important to the industry, such as legislation changes, pending and resolved federal and state cases, and upcoming issues. The dicontinued on page 106 >>> Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 105


BizHR

What we do is important. This organization is well managed and very influential on a global scale. We build and improve entire workforces and leadership teams.

– Garrett Kowalewski, 2014 President

Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson

continued from page 105 versity and inclusion chair and volunteers keep members informed about topics such as hidden or unconscious bias. The membership committee recruits new members and presents an orientation meeting the first Tuesday of every month with presentations by both membership and chapter engagement representatives. They are introduced to SHRMGT and its range of committees. In 2011 and 2013 SHRM-GT was awarded Membership Star status by the national association. The 2013 commendation read, “Although our economy continues to be challenging, your chapter was able to overcome these challenges and positively advance SHRM membership in 2013. Many chapters experienced declining membership during the year, so your state’s ability to maintain or realize growth is to be highly commended.” One of SHRM-GT’s newest committees is community relations. “They work with the media, go to job fairs and try to get the association name out into the community,” Merideth said. “We’re striving to be a resource for companies that need to develop their HR practice.” In the spring the chapter holds an employment law update where attorneys speak about new laws that may affect members in their HR positions, such as the latest on medical marijuana. And every fall it hosts a national speaker presentation for the business community. “We get heavy hitters from the international speakers circuit. These are not just HR, but business topics, and the public can come,” Kowalewski said. He emphasized the importance of SHRM’s function both locally and nationwide. “What we do is important. This organization is well managed and very influential on a global scale. We build and improve entire workforces and leadership teams.”

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BizAWARDS

Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Community Impact Awards

Criteria: The winning company demonstrates a commitment to community volunteerism through human resource programs, makes a significant impact on programs that support workforce needs and acts as a role model within the community to create positive change through human resource efforts. 1. Golden Goose

Thrift Shop Small Company

Thanks to the help of hundreds of volunteers, Golden Goose Thrift Shop donated 100 percent of its profits over the past 11 years to local programs benefiting children, seniors and families in need. The nonprofit organization has developed a highly effective system for recruiting, training and retaining its volunteer workers, including regular orientations and cross-training efforts. This brings purpose to the lives of many seniors, valuable job skills to teens and young adults, and teaches the meaning of community service to all involved. Golden Goose store manager Stephanie Urdiales said, “Our staff is mostly volunteers, so we’re sharing this with about 500 people.”

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2. Arizona’s Generation & Transmission Cooperatives Medium Company

Arizona’s G&T Cooperatives provides power generated by its 605-megawatt plant to six member cooperatives across the Southwest, totaling 155,000 electric meters. For the past four years, employees have assisted in teaching and organizing the Launch into Life program, a financial management and workforce development educational opportunity for high school students. Participants regularly score exceptionally high gains in their pre-to-post program evaluations in knowledge and life skills, demonstrating the great impact of Arizona’s G&T Cooperatives’ efforts. Company representative Emery Silvester said, “This award is recognition of four years of hard work that truly brought the community together to help support youth.”

Diversity and Inclusion Awards

3. Pima Community

College Desert Vista Campus Large Company

One of the primary goals of PCC Desert Vista is to make connections with the local business community to identify workforce needs, then build educational programs that fill these needs. Career training is offered in locally in-demand areas such as aviation technology, culinary arts and behavioral health. One of the methods PCC uses to form relationships with local employers is inviting them to serve on advisory committees. In addition, PCC Desert Vista offers grants to low-income adults who train in healthcare positions, creating a win-win solution for students and local businesses. Kathleen Marks, program manager, academic services, and Brian Stewart, academic dean, accepted the award. “A number of people worked on this program for three years,” Marks said. “It’s an award for them. It was grass-roots,” Stewart added. Other Finalists • Abrams Airborne Manufacturing • Cadden Community Management • YMCA of Southern Arizona

Criteria: Honorees have a track record of strengthening community relationships, adding measurable value to the company and benefiting the employees’ quality of life and work life through an environment of diversity and inclusion. 4. The Offshore Group Small/Medium Company

Headquartered in Tucson, The Offshore Group is a leading provider of Mexico outsourcing solutions, helping manufacturers establish low-cost, low-risk operations. The company’s HR manager, Kate Goldman, has introduced new ways of thinking to the workplace, thus creating a more diverse and inclusive company culture. Examples include hiring more female workers, creating a lactation room for new mothers and changing the names of holidays celebrated at the company to encompass more faiths and backgrounds. These changes have made employees feel more valued and appreciated. Carla Quevedo, HR generalist, and Pedro Valenzuela, director of import/ export operations accepted the award on behalf of Goldman. “We’re proud of Kate,” Quevedo said. “We are honored,” Valenzuela said.

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BizAWARDS Headquartered in Tucson since 1996, Mister Car Wash is the largest car wash chain in the nation, with nearly 5,000 employees in 14 states. It supports numerous Tucson organizations by providing individuals in sometimes overlooked populations with opportunities for employment. Many who are disabled, those in refugee programs, youth and veterans are finding rewarding careers with Mister Car Wash. And, in turn, they’re inspiring more team-building within the company. John Torre is manager of talent acquisition. He said, “I’m super proud of the work we do, especially in the diversity category.”

cists throughout the nation. A majority of its staff members work in the Tucson office. ABR recently implemented a continual-process-improvement philosophy that led to better communication between departments, increased productivity and employee involvement. Specifically, the IT department went from zero software development projects in 2013 to 11 completed in the first six months of 2014. ABR achieved a savings of $400,000, and employees feel more energized, productive and engaged. Karyn Howard, director of HR and administration, said, “The entire staff deserves this award. It’s a huge honor. It was a huge team effort. We can’t do it on our own.”

• Linda Lohse Managing Director Tucson Foundations

Other Finalists

7. Arizona Canning

• Lea Marquez-Peterson President/CEO Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

• Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona

5. Mister Car Wash

Judges for 2014 SHRM-GT Awards These 12 business leaders served as judges for the 2014 Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Awards presented by the Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson: • Gary M. Bridget Human Resources Director Town of Oro Valley • Lola Kakes Founder, EffortlessHR • Cathy Kloos Human Resources Director Safeway of Arizona • John P. Lewis CEO Commerce Bank of Arizona

• Barbara McClure Executive Director IMPACT of Southern Arizona • Gail Painter-Weidman Global Diversity & Employee Rights, The Boeing Company • Dave Perry President/CEO Greater Oro Valley Chamber of Commerce • Robert D. Ramirez President/CEO, Vantage West Credit Union • Hailey Thoman Executive Director Linkages

• Cadden Community Management

• JW Marriott Starr Pass Tucson Resort & Spa

Technology/Process Improvement Awards

Criteria: Winning companies have implemented a system that enhances employee processes, improves employee participation in a program, realizes cost savings and has resulted in measurable change. 6. American Board

• Kay Williams Educator University of Phoenix

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of Radiology Small Company

This 80-year-old, physician-led nonprofit organization certifies diagnostic radiologists, radiation oncologists and medical physiWinter 2015

Company Medium Company

As the U.S. affiliate of Mexico-based Conservas La Costeña, Arizona Canning Company is the secondlargest supplier of canned beans in the U.S. Its stateof-the-art Tucson facility manufactures canned foods. ACC managers felt the company’s HR processes had become outdated and were no longer efficient. With the goal to improve the integrity and accessibility of employees’ benefits and payroll information, three areas were upgraded – online benefits enrollment, the human resources information system and online personal time off requests. The changes led to higher accuracy, increased productivity and more convenience for employees.

Arizona Canning’s HR manager Elaine Jackson said, “I’m very proud of our work and happy to share with our team.” 8. University of Arizona

Facilities Management Large Company

After performing a review of its workforce, UAFM determined that in 10 years, 60 percent of its employees would be retirement eligible. Coupled with a shrinking local labor workforce in the trades, department heads realized an immediate change was imperative. To address the looming skills gap, UAFM established a registered apprenticeship program. Once implemented, along with a succession plan, the department attained a significant reduction in the cost of filling vacant positions. Active employees became more engaged in their work through mentoring. And more Tucsonans are being given opportunities for training, education and employment without leaving town. These new workers will continue the UA tradition of quality work and dedication, benefiting the entire community. Jenna Elmer, UAFM assistant director of HR, said, “This took a lot of hard work and involvement from lots of people in facilities management.” Other Finalists • The Offshore Group • University of Arizona Campaign for Common Sense • Xeridiem

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Leadership Individual Awards

Criteria: Individuals in this category must demonstrate the ability to lead through challenges, adapt to change and inspire a workplace culture of accountability and engagement. 9. Sharon Lurtsema

CorporateCARE Solutions

Small Company

Three years after forming CorporateCARE Solutions, Sharon Lurtsema launched her agency nationally. CorporateCARE Solutions partners with employers to offer child and adult backup care for employees’ families using a nationwide network of caregivers. For Lurtsema, the implementation of technology has been essential, allowing for almost immediate response times to client requests, the ability to offer 24/7 availability and for building an extensive network of providers. Employees who receive the benefit of Lurtsema’s services through their employer have peace of mind that capable caregivers are at home with their loved ones. As a result, workers become less distracted, increase their productivity and often feel more valued. “I’m in a little bit of shock,” Lurtsema said. “We just launched this year. It’s so exciting.” 10. Ryan George Simpleview

Medium Company

As founder and CEO, Ryan George developed innovative cloud-based management systems for destination marketing professionals who promote cities and regions to travelers and meeting planners. The importance of these systems is their ability to be accessed and www.BizTucson.com

upgraded from anywhere at any time. George’s passion for technology keeps him involved in the development of all Simpleview products and services. He fosters leadership among his directors and encourages open communication between staff members. He said, “We get a lot of awards, but the ones most special are those that apply to people. This one means a lot to me.” 11. John Torre

Mister Car Wash

Large Company

John Torre stands out as a leader in numerous ways, but he is most passionate about helping others and connecting with the community. He forms partnerships with local organizations, such as Goodwill, Beacon Group and Our Place Clubhouse, providing job opportunities to those they serve – populations that he feels are often underutilized in the workplace. Torre has been a strong representative of the company and has increased its visibility in the region. He’s also a believer in leading with integrity and inspiring others to do the same. Upon receiving his second 2014 Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Award, Torre said, “I’m fortunate to work for a great company surrounded by people who work hard.” Other Finalists • Fanni Acosta Town of Marana • Karyn Howard American Board of Radiology • Suzanne Machain Town of Marana • Jennifer Martin JW Marriott Starr Pass Tucson Resort & Spa

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Board of Directors/Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson

Ann P. Berkman* Assistant Human Resources Director, Town of Marana Berkman’s responsibilities with the Town of Marana include development and administration of town-wide programs and systems that support leadership and talent development, performance management and organizational development. She also oversees benefits, leave management and onboarding. Her positions with SHRM-GT are past president and membership chair.

Keli Brinke Founder, Career Transitions This 2-year-old company provides support for professionals seeking a career transition. Brinke guides her clients through their job search, helping them find their focus and teaching them how to market and brand themselves. She is the SHRM-GT chapter engagement committee co-chair and volunteers with Tucson Metro Chamber as an ambassador and a member of the new business growth committee. Brinke helped launch “This is Tucson,” a local movement promoting Tucson with the goal of recruiting and retaining top talent for the area.

Ila Cipriani** Executive Administrative Director, Goodwill Industries of Southern Arizona Cipriani directs the human resources, safety and administrative functions for more than 500 employees as they carry out the mission of providing services, training and jobs for individuals in the community who have barriers to employment. She is currently chair of SHRM-GT’s professional development committee while also serving as an advisory board member for Pathfinder Strategies.

Chris Dominiak* Benefits Analyst, University of Arizona Dominiak is a liaison between the benefits unit and University Information Technology Services of the University of Arizona. Using PeopleSoft HRIS, he monitors benefit transactions, researches and resolves issues and ensures accurate benefit deductions for the university’s 12,000 benefits-eligible employees. His responsibilities with SHRM-GT include secretary/treasurer and co-chair of the programs committee. Dominiak is a member of Eller College Associates, which is an alumni volunteer program at UA.

Trish Kordas VP of Human Resources & Development, Tucson Federal Credit Union Kordas drives the development and execution of the HR&D strategic plan to support business strategies in the company, including policies, procedures, systems and initiatives. Kordas is SHRMGT president for 2015. In addition, she works with community organizations such as Southern Arizona AIDS Foundation and domestic violence awareness and cancer research charities.

Garrett Kowalewski CEO, Staff Matters Kowalewski is responsible for the overall direction of Staff Matters, including staff management, customer service, operations and human resources. He is also an individual contributor in a sales and account management capacity for the company’s technical and professional services division. Kowalewski served as SHRM-GT’s president in 2014. Other local organizations he’s active with include Southern Arizona Leadership Council and Arizona Technology Council’s Ambassador’s Committee, Southern Arizona. *Certified Professional of Human Resources

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Board of Directors/Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson

Bonnie Mattes** Human Resources Adviser, American Red Cross Mattes performs as adviser and consultant for the American Red Cross West division, supporting 300 employees in both the blood collection and call center groups, and she assists with various task forces across the country. She serves as chair of the SHRM-GT legislative committee.

Jeanie G. Merideth Executive Director, Society for Human Resource Management Merideth is owner of Merideth Association Management, which handles the everyday functions of professional and trade associations, including serving as executive director of SHRM-GT.

Linda Pitney Human Resources Generalist, CARF International Pitney supports CARF’s goals by performing HR activities that contribute to organizational effectiveness and are in compliance with company policies and other applicable regulations. Pitney is chair of SHRM-GT’s workforce readiness committee, which offers high school students workshops and projects related to job search and career skills. She volunteers as events coordinator of CARF’s wellness committee. In 2013 and 2014 the Wellness Council of Arizona recognized her as a Champion of Worksite Wellness. *Certified Professional of Human Resources

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Board of Directors/Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson

Lori Prince ** Director of Human Resources, Focus HR Prince oversees the full HR function for Focus HR and fulfills the human resource needs of its 250-plus clients on a consulting basis. She was co-chair of the 2014 SHRM-GT Celebrating Innovation in the Workforce awards committee. In addition, Prince is an instructor at the Arizona State University Lodestar Center School of Nonprofit Management for The Art of HR Management program.

Janet Rico Uhrig ** Director of Talent Acquisition, Recruitment & Retention – Human Resources Tucson Unified School District Uhrig coordinates the district’s efforts in the recruitment of qualified diverse individuals to fill vacancies across the academic and business-related functions, recently implementing a new applicant tracking system. Her roles with SHRM-GT include 2012–2014 diversity and inclusion committee chair and 2014 VP. She is the SHRM-GT president-elect for 2016. She volunteers with Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona and for the Superior Court training/education program. Gladys Walker ** Human Resources Manager, Lasertel Walker is responsible for overseeing multiple HR functions, including compensation and benefits, recruitment, training and employee relations programs. She supervises the implementation of processes and policies in compliance with corporate strategies to ensure that financial and strategic goals are attained. Walker served as co-chair of the 2014 SHRM-GT Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace committee. During the previous year she was a finalist for an award. *Certified Professional of Human Resources

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BizHR

Daisy Jenkins Makes Listeners Happy By Christy Krueger Daisy M. Jenkins took the stage by dancing to Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” – her self-proclaimed theme song. Jenkins was the keynote speaker at the Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace awards event presented Nov. 13 by the Society for Human Resources Management of Greater Tucson. Her attention-getting introduction was followed by an entertaining, interactive presentation about innovation and collaboration in the workplace. She emphasized HR’s role in leading employees toward company goals by recognizing the innovators, encouraging collaboration within the workforce and making employees feel valued. “HR can no longer use yesterday’s lenses to select top talent. Today’s best and brightest talent also come with tattoos, piercings and dreadlocks,” she said. “If we’re not careful in our selection paradigm, HR becomes an impediment to bringing in top talent that can lead to a company’s competitive advantage.” Jenkins spent 28 years with Raytheon Company and Hughes Aircraft Company, holding various positions, including VP of human resources at Raytheon Missile Systems in Tucson. She was the first director of global diversity at the company’s Massachusetts headquarters. Jenkins then became executive VP and human resources officer for Carondelet Health Network. She is now president of Daisy Jenkins & Associates, which specializes in human resources consulting and development coaching. “To keep people, you must make them feel valued and recognize how their contributions align with the company’s goals. HR must be involved,” Jenkins said. Biz 118 BizTucson

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BizCOUPLE

Commercial Real Estate Royalty He’s a guiding force in commercial real estate. She was named the queen of small business loans. Between them, George and Margaret Larsen have helped Tucson grow up. With nearly 45 years of commercial real estate experience in Tucson, George has survived the valleys and celebrated the peaks of the market. He has had a front row seat for Tucson’s transition from a town to a city. George and Margaret have been partners for more than 20

years with Don Baker in Larsen Baker, a Tucson commercial real estate firm. Over the years, Larsen Baker and its partners have amassed a real estate portfolio of more than $340 million of Tucson and Southern Arizona commercial real estate properties. Their company provides property management services to 367 businesses in 47 shopping centers and offices that it owns and leases – from Walmarts to mom-and-pop shops. The com-

pany has partner/investors in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Australia. Married 25 years, the Larsens’ accents – hers a refined Texas drawl, his distinctly Midwestern – reveal clues to their roots. George is from Chicago, the son of a homebuilder. He studied English at Rutgers University and attended the University of Iowa for its Writers’ Workshop. With the Vietnam War looming, George volunteered as a U.S. Army combat engineer. “By the continued on page 121 >>>

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Images Courtesy FORS architecture + interiors

PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Gabrielle Fimbres


time I mustered out of the Army, my parents had relocated to Phoenix,” George said, relaxing with Margaret in the living room of their glorious 1929 El Encanto home. He enrolled in Arizona State University and earned an MBA. His first job offer came from Tucson, at that time a town of about 260,000 that he had never visited. He quickly fell in love with Tucson. “The weather is gorgeous and the outdoors are so close to the city.” He bought some real estate and was soon hooked. He started Indevco Realtors, sold it, and went to work for Tucson Realty & Trust in 1980. Margaret grew up in San Angelo, Texas, and left the Lone Star State for the University of Denver. She earned her MBA in finance and worked in computer sales, while investing in real estate on the side. At 30, she decided it was time for a change. She sought guidance from a book geared to help people decide where to live. Tucson was the winner. “I wanted to get into commercial real estate. In 1985 when I made my decision, Tucson had a booming real estate market.” By the time she got here, the industry was crashing. But she, too, fell in love with Tucson. “I never looked back. Tucson was a welcoming, fun community with a lot of opportunity.” Margaret landed a job at Grubb & Ellis, working as one of only two female brokers in that office. Later she joined Business Development Finance Corporation as a Small Business Administration lender. The Larsens have plenty of tales to tell. “Once we helped a Saudi Arabian prince buy land in Hidden Valley,” George recalled. “He flew in on his private jet. We watched the all-male entourage get off the plane, but we could not decide which one was the prince. Finally, we decided he was the only one not carrying a briefcase.” George witnessed the apartment building boom of the early ’80s. “About 15,000 apartments were built

in 1985 – way too many. It was driven by tax considerations,” George said. “If you invested $1 million, you might get a $2 million deduction on your income tax.” Those were the boom years, “the years when we were all partying at the San Francisco Bar & Grill, the Boardroom, the Solarium and Bobby McGees. Everybody was making money.” Then came the Tax Reform Act of 1986. “The tax incentives stopped, which knocked 15 to 20 percent off the value of most commercial properties,” George said. “Most investors put down only 20 or 25 percent, so basically the law wiped out all of the investor’s equity. That was the birth of the Resolution Trust Corporation and a real estate recession that lasted four years.” And that was when Margaret showed up in Tucson, ready to make a killing in the real estate market. The two met on a blind date in 1987. They married two years later. Margaret spent a decade at Business Development Finance Corporation. “I did Small Business Administration lending. A reporter once decided to call me ‘the queen of SBA loans’ – a title that was announced on the pages of the Arizona Daily Star.” George ran Best Commercial Real Estate during the RTC recession. “We were all struggling, but there were bargains. Many properties were repossessed by the RTC, and some were available at 10 cents on the dollar.” About this time, Don Baker joined George and the Best team. Don, who is starting his 40th year in commercial real estate, had worked in his hometown of Venice, Calif., before coming to Tucson. As a pilot, he flew for work, often stopping in Tucson to visit his in-laws. “I really saw the opportunity in 1985 of where this community could go,” Don said. “You could see the Southwest was going to grow.” And grow it did. Over the next three decades, George and Don, backed by Margaret, have been involved in many

high-impact deals. Among their most recent acquisitions is the 83,000-square-foot Muscular Dystrophy Association building on Sunrise Drive, now called The Offices at La Paloma. A partnership sponsored by Larsen Baker acquired the property for $9.1 million in March 2014 and is repurposing the office for multiple new tenants. The estimated initial cost of building the property was $32 million. That purchase came not long after Larsen Baker sold River Center for $24.7 million after buying it 15 years earlier for $6 million. Other shopping centers they own include Crossroads Festival, Williams Center, Tucson Place and Circle Plaza. “Our company likes to acquire and renovate old shopping centers,” George said. “We look for great locations that need a lot of work.” They recently acquired the southwest corner of Oracle and Wetmore roads. “This was a bad shopping center at one of the best intersections,” George said. Today it is home to an all-new Buffalo Wild Wings, Men’s Wearhouse, Firehouse Subs, Chuze Fitness and others. Larsen Baker also builds from the ground up, including at Orange Grove and Thornydale roads in a partnership with the Buck O’Rielly family. While George and Margaret respect each other’s opinion and share a fierce work ethic, family comes first. They were a bit older when they became parents. George was 50, Margaret 38 when Olivia was born. Olivia is now a sophomore at Williams College. “Before you have a child, you see parenting as a sacrifice,” George said. “But when you actually have a child, you find parenting is the most fulfilling thing you can do. Even when business was demanding, our family was together for dinner every night.” George said Margaret’s attention to detail makes her a great businesswoman. Margaret said George’s optimism makes him a great businessman. continued on page 122 >>>

Larsen Baker recently purchased the Muscular Dystrophy Association building, now called The Offices at La Paloma.

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BizCOUPLE

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continued from page 121 They both praised Don Baker for making their partnership what it is today. “I love to go out and find the deals, and Don loves to make sure every one of our 67 checking accounts balance every month,” said George. “It’s a great partnership.” “They are like family,” Don said of Margaret and George. “And George has been a remarkable partner. He is well respected in our community and respectful in the way he treats people.” George runs his end of the business with little electronic help. He dislikes computers and cell phones, and has never sent or received a text message. “George does a lot of his analysis on the back of a napkin, while Don and I are running the spreadsheets,” Margaret said. Over the years, the Larsens have given time to nonprofits. Margaret is on the board of trustees and served as board president of The Gregory School, which recently changed its name from St. Gregory College Preparatory School. She was also on the board of St. Michael’s School, is a past chair and a guardian angel with Angel Charity for Children and was president of the board of National Charity League. George volunteers with the Rotary Club and La Frontera and is active with the Southern Arizona CCIM Chapter – the organization that educates and designates commercial real estate specialists. He is an emeritus senior instructor for the CCIM Institute. Margaret also has that coveted designation. “A lot of young brokers consider George a mentor,” Margaret said. George Stamos met the Larsens as he was getting started in the business when the elder George was “the father of commercial real estate.” For 15 years, the two Georges have played tennis every Wednesday. “In between sets we talk about real estate, and he gives me tips on life. “I owe everything I know about commercial real estate to him,” said Stamos, who has transitioned from broker to investor. “He has been like a father figure to me. He is intelligent, generous and has a huge, huge heart. If you look up mentor in the dictionary, you’ll find a picture of George Larsen. He and Margaret are wonderful people.” Biz Winter 2015

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PHOTOS: AMY HASKELL

Larry Gibbons

VP, Tucson Division Arizona Wholesale Supply

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BizMILESTONE

Four Generations Shape Firm Wholesale Company Celebrating 70 Years By Christy Krueger Any company that carries on through multiple wars, recessions and major technological changes must have something above par going for it. In the case of Arizona Wholesale Supply, it comes down to good old family values, according to Larry Gibbons, the founder’s great-grandson and current VP of the Tucson division. “Our longevity is because of our corporate culture – don’t take advantage of anyone, treat employees and customers well. It’s important to build honesty, integrity and trust,” said Gibbons, who began working at the family-owned business when he was a teenager – as did his grandfather before him. E.A. “Tommy” Thomas started the appliance company in Phoenix in 1944. “Tommy was selling crank-style washing machines door-to-door. He visited ranches and had a demo washing machine on a platform on the front of his pickup,” Gibbons said. “He gave live demonstrations and the wives insisted on having one.” Terry Thomas, Gibbons’ grandfather, became Tommy’s first employee at

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the age of 14, working in the warehouse preparing products for delivery. “By the mid-1960s Terry took over as owner/CEO,” Gibbons said. “He had a lot of accounts that would sell to consumers and he had an exclusive with G.E. for appliances. We were a distributor.” The firm opened its Tucson location in the late 1970s and in the 1980s added light bulbs, phones and electronics to its product list. “As the wholesale model died off in the mid-1980s and early 1990s, the business changed,” he said. “We decided to become a subcontractor for builders in order to remain sustainable.” Today Arizona Wholesale Supply sells primarily to the homebuilding industry – homebuilders, remodelers, cabinet companies, designers and architects – relying almost entirely on repeat and referral business. Custom builders, production home builders, remodelers, architects, and designers send clients in to select finishes and they pay Arizona Wholesale Supply directly. Production builders pick the base appli-

ance packages and homebuyers visit the showroom to choose upgrades. Gibbons got his start with the company building the ever-changing showrooms in Phoenix alongside Don Meisner, director of construction. The company now has two showrooms in Phoenix, one in Scottsdale and the 8,000-square-foot facility in Tucson on Ina and Shannon roads. There, clients can view the products grouped by brands – such as Wolf, Sub-Zero, Viking, Whirlpool, Kitchen Aid and Maytag. In 2000, Gibbons moved to Tucson to attend University of Arizona, where he earned an undergraduate degree in agricultural economics and did two years of graduate study in animal sciences before receiving his MBA from the University of Phoenix. While working at the family business, he also pursued a career on the professional rodeo circuit. The company did very well during those years, he said. Dozens of photos surround his desk bringing to life his continued on page 126 >>>

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BizMILESTONE continued from page 125 numerous out-of-office adventures – on safari, deep-sea fishing and scuba diving. Then the recession hit and sales began to slide. Thomas strongly suggested Gibbons find ways to increase business. He tried advertising and marketing to attract residential retail clients, but it did very little, he said. “I thought – we’re selling flooring in Phoenix, so why not here? It’s a way to add business in Tucson. We invested in it, changed the showroom, and it’s been a wonderful addition,” Gibbons said. About this time he began networking more and joined the Tucson Conquistadores, which he believes is one of the best things he’s ever done. “It has been wonderful for friendships and what we do for the community and the kids.” He also belongs to the National Association of the Remodeling Industry, Southern Arizona Home Builders Association and American Society of Interior Designers. Gibbons, 32, credits much of what he knows about running a company to family members and employees. “Terry is very smart and by listening to him he

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Our longevity is because of our corporate culture – do not take advantage of anyone, treat employees and customers well. It’s important to build honesty, integrity and trust.

– Larry Gibbons, VP, Tucson Division Arizona Wholesale Supply

has indirectly taught me how to think about a business. Bill Parks, who runs the mother ship in Phoenix and is my mentor, is not family, but he’s taught me that clients are the lifeblood of business, and you have to always listen and they will teach you about business.” The 106 employees the company has statewide (eight in Tucson) are priceless assets, Gibbons said, and he does his

best to keep them. “Some have been here 20 to 30 years.” To show his appreciation for their loyalty and hard work, Gibbons passionately supports a company tradition of offering four-year scholarships to any of the state’s three universities for dependents of employees. Those who have worked full time at Arizona Wholesale Supply for at least two years qualify. On Nov.13, Gibbons and staff threw a “thanks to partners and friends” 70th anniversary celebration in the Tucson showroom. Guests were treated to cooking demonstrations and food sampling by three of Tucson’s Top Iron Chefs – Maria Mazon of Boca Tacos y Tequila, Albert Hall of Acacia Real Food & Cocktails and Ryan Clark of Agustin Kitchen. Attendees also enjoyed drinks, live music and prizes. Gibbons looks forward to more anniversary celebrations and continued growth for years to come. “It’s important for us to build long-lasting relationships and to continue being successful as the housing market picks up.”

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BizBENEFIT

Andy Lopez

Kennedy Cooper

Howard Stewart

Real Heart of Valentine’s Day

New Twists for Annual Heart & Stroke Ball Fundraiser By Tara Kirkpatrick The Heart & Stroke Ball, a Valentine’s tradition in Tucson for 56 years, has a potent, corporate energy behind it this year, driven both by its chairs and a new management team who want the message sent that there really is no “face” of either heart attacks or strokes – they strike anyone from athletes to CEOs. What’s crucial, though, is knowing your personal risk for both heart disease and stroke. That’s what chairs Steve and Lori Banzhaf and the new leadership at the American Heart Association-American Stroke Association hope patrons walk away with on Feb. 14 – that, and one glittering, memorable party. “We are very honored and humbled to do this,” said Steve Banzhaf, an attorney and retired market president and private client adviser of Bank of America in Tucson. His wife, Lori Banzhaf, executive VP for Tucson Metro Chamber, agreed. “We care about this community and we believe in the mission of the American Heart Association. Both our families have been struck by heart disease and stroke. It’s become very real to us.” The “Heart of Gold” themed ball, which will be held at the Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa, features some exciting 128 BizTucson

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changes this year – Las Vegas-style gaming will replace the live auction, which traditionally engages only a handful of patrons, the Banzhafs said. Winners will cash in their chips from the 20 blackjack and roulette tables for exclusive, one-ofa-kind experiences and quality prizes, such as trips to Ireland, Bora Bora, Las Vegas and Disneyworld. When the doors open that evening, rather than red, the room will be adorned in lustrous gold detail, “like you’ve never seen it before,” said Lori, who has orchestrated events for more than 25 years and previously owned an event planning firm, Monsoon Market-

Steve & Lori Banzhaf

ing. For entertainment, The Groove Merchants, a Scottsdale-based band, will provide the music for three dance floors at the ball. “People in this community have giving hearts,” she said. “We’re trying to create something a little new this year with the Las Vegas gaming and the gold theme.” The Banzhafs met with numerous past ballgoers to find out – after enjoying the events in years past – what new things they would like to see for one of the longest-running heart balls in the country. The Heart & Stroke Ball will spotlight the poignant stories of three prominent heart disease survivors. University of Arizona baseball coach Andy Lopez underwent surgery for a 90 percent-blockage in his left main artery, often called the “widowmaker.” Howard Stewart, CEO of AGM Container Controls, suffered and survived a heart attack. Finally, Kennedy Cooper, a young athlete who collapsed in a high school weight training class, was saved by her coaches who immediately performed CPR. “We have a preconceived notion that heart disease only affects those who smoke or who are out of shape,” Lori said. “All of these people took care of themselves. They were doing all the www.BizTucson.com


right things, but they didn’t know their symptoms.” Added Steve, “Educate the community – that’s our No. 1 focus.” They want the night’s message to be relevant to all. “We brainstormed about this for a long time,” Lori said. “What do we want people to know? What’s the takeaway? What do we want this event to look and feel like?” Their meticulous approach, driven by the same corporate sensibility that has made them both successful in business, is also reflective of the new management team at the AHAASA. Lindsay Welch was named executive director in May and Robyn Sullivan has taken over as development director for the Heart & Stroke Ball. Both are passionate about communicating the local impact of the AHA-ASA, which retains 75 percent of proceeds from the Heart Ball and other affiliated events such as Go Red for Women, Jump Rope for Heart and the Heart Walk for research and education initiatives. The organization has invested more than $57 million in research projects – 11 at Arizona institutions – in the Western States Affiliate, to which it belongs. “We really do have a new pulse for what we are doing here, a renewed excitement,” said Welch. In Tucson alone, 27 percent of residents are obese and 23 percent of adults smoke, while 47.5 percent of all deaths were due to cardiovascular disease, according to AHA-ASA figures. “Those are large numbers for this community,” she said. The AHA-ASA has set a 2020 goal of improving the cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent while reducing deaths from heart disease and stroke by 20 percent. Aiding the workplace could be one significant step toward that goal. Any business that buys a table at the Heart & Stroke Ball, at a cost of $5,000, can request a customized, “fit-friendly worksite” consultation for employees, which can include walking and exercise programs, healthy eating solutions, stress management and other tools to boost employee health. “We come in and give them our resources for the benefit of all their employees,” Sullivan said. The organization also has successfully lobbied for two new state laws over the past few years. Under the first new mandate, passed in 2014, all Arizona newborns will undergo a pulse oximetry test to detect low oxygen levels, which can signal a heart malformation. The other law, the Joint Use of School Ground provision, passed in 2012 and keeps school basketball courts and playgrounds open for use during nonschool hours. Also, beginning this year, schools have guidelines in place to teach CPR, although it is not mandatory. The AHA is working toward mandatory CPR training for seventh-graders.

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THE HEART & STROKE BALL Saturday, Feb. 14, 5 p.m. $275 per person The Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa tucsonheartball.ahaevents.org www.BizTucson.com

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BizTRADE A portion of the Arizona delegation that traveled to Mexico City for the opening of the Arizona State Trade and Investment Office.

New Arizona Trade Office to Boost Cross-Border Opportunities By Larry Lucero

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omy by supporting exports and attracting foreign investment. Progress was made on critical transportation issues, with Mexico revealing plans to invest in its Route 15 highway, leading from central Mexico to the border at Nogales. The investment will smooth the transportation of goods from Mexico and its ports into the U.S. through Arizona. ADOT Director John Halikowski said, “The commitment by the Ministry of Communication and Transportation of Mexico to spend more than a billion dollars over the next three years to modernize the road connecting central Mexico, including the states of Sinaloa and Sonora, to our border means they recognize the potential of our trade corridor. We are their gateway to the western United States.” Margie Emmermann, executive director of the Arizona-Mexico Commission, said, “The State of Mexico is a manufacturing giant in Mexico and through our universities and business networks, we are looking to refine our collaborative efforts and competitive advantages for the entire corridor. In turn, that allows us to compete in the global marketplace.” Additional Arizona-Mexico developments include:

• The creation of

a stakeholder group to promote rail alternatives for the movement of cargo both northbound and southbound through Nogales.

• A

commitment by the Ministry of Communications and Transportation to support the development of a new port of entry at Douglas/Agua Prieta and the expansion of the San Luis II Port of Entry at San Luis, Ariz.

• Confirmed advances to needed improvements to the Mexican side of the Nogales-Mariposa Port of Entry.

• A

commitment to strengthen tourism between Arizona and Mexico. An AOT study in 2007 showed an average of 65,000 Mexican residents traveled to Arizona every day, spending $7 million at Arizona stores, restaurants, hotels and other businesses.

Arizona’s new trade office complements Arizona’s existing office in Hermosillo, which is a collaboration between the Arizona Commerce Authority and the Arizona-Mexico Commission. The Mexico City office is led by the Arizona Commerce Authority in partnership with the City of Phoenix. Additional funding partners include Maricopa Association of Governments, City of Tucson and Visit Phoenix. Larry Lucero, president of the Arizona-Mexico Commission board of directors, was among the Arizona delegation that took part in the trade mission to inaugurate the Arizona State Trade and Investment Office in Mexico City. He is senior director of government relations and economic development at UNS Energy Corporation and subsidiary Tucson Electric Power.

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PHOTO: COURTESY ARIZONA-MEXICO COMMISSION

Arizona took a significant step toward spurring trade opportunities that will make the region more competitive with the opening of the new trade and investment office in Mexico City in October. A delegation of 70 Arizona leaders took part in a trade mission to inaugurate the Arizona State Trade and Investment Office in Mexico, led by the Arizona Commerce Authority, the Arizona-Mexico Commission, Arizona Department of Transportation, Arizona Office of Tourism and the City of Phoenix. The delegation also held strategic meetings with Mexican public and business leaders, focused on issues critical to Arizona and Mexico – transportation, tourism and economic development. The meetings culminated with pledges by Mexican officials to spend the equivalent of $1 billion on highway improvements to expedite the shipment of goods from central Mexico into the United States. The governments also finalized a plan to invest $6.8 million implementing U.S. technology, equipment and training to enhance the efficiency of the military inspection station north of Hermosillo, which inspects more than 1,000 trucks daily. Adding to the infrastructure investments, Mexican federal leaders also announced that ProMéxico will open an office in Phoenix. ProMéxico is the Mexican federal government agency responsible for promoting Mexico’s participation in the international econ-


SPECIAL REPORT 2015

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Northwest Healthcare Expands Through Greater Tucson

Northwest Medical Center and Oro Valley Hospital


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Healthcare Closer to Home Plus Nationally Accredited Specialized Care

PHOTO: TOM SPITZ

By Donna Kreutz Northwest Medical Center and Oro Valley Hospital are the hospitals in an ever-expanding community health system that now includes satellite urgent care centers dotting the metro area, along with physician offices and other facilities to serve patients throughout Southern Arizona. These flagship hospitals are the anchors of a network that is expanding to bring healthcare to the places where people work and live – including east and west sides and Green Valley. The next expansion will be a freestanding emergency center in Vail. This healthcare network has steadily expanded the scope of specialty services that meet rigorous national standards – ranging from chest pain and cardiac care to strokes, joint replacement, breast health, spine care and bariatric surgery. Also offered are a freestanding women’s center, special-care nursery, pediatric emergency care and in-patient rehabilitation services. New programs include sports medicine, senior behavioral health and occupational medicine. This is comprehensive contemporary healthcare designed to meet the specific needs of the greater Tucson community.

2 Hospitals

6 Urgent Care Centers +1 Freestanding ER Coming Soon By Dan Sorenson Two hospitals in northwest Tucson have steadily expanded their medical facilities and capabilities over the past five years and now serve patients throughout the metro area and as far away as Sierra Vista. In addition to the flagship hospitals – Northwest Medical Center and Oro Valley Hospital – this growing healthcare network now has six urgent care centers, including one in Green Valley, as well as physician offices and other facilities. Next up is the area’s first freestanding emergency department – a $7.2 million facility to be built in Vail. Construction is scheduled to begin in February. “We have been serving more than just northwest Tucson for many years. This is another example of our commitment to expand healthcare in the greater metropolitan area,” continued on page 138 >>>

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BizHEALTHCARE

Northwest Healthcare

Expands to Serve Greater Tucson

Jae L. Dale

CEO Oro Valley Hospital

Kevin Stockton

CEO Northwest Medical Center

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BizHEALTHCARE Area’s First Freestanding Emergency Center Northwest Medical Center plans to build the first freestanding emergency department in greater Tucson. Ground will be broken in February for the $7.2 million facility in Vail. Construction should be completed by late 2015. The Northwest Emergency Center at Vail will offer emergency medical care 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Board-certified or board-eligible emergency physicians, registered nurses and other patient care providers will staff the center. More than 30 new jobs will be created to serve patients at the new center, including registered nurses and staff for lab, imaging, admitting and environmental services. Kevin Stockton, CEO of Northwest Medical Center, said this new facility “will provide faster access to emergency care for people living in the Rita Ranch and Vail areas.” The facility will have 12 private patient rooms and be equipped with radiology and lab services. This center will treat patients with illnesses and injuries that require a higher level of care than what is available through urgent care facilities, he said. The emergency center will be built in the Houghton Town Center at the intersection of Houghton and Old Vail Roads. The developer of the Houghton Town Center is Diamond Ventures. “Southeast Tucson is growing rapidly, so providing services like emergency care is an important part of our strategic plan for this community center,” said Shannon Murphy, director of sales and marketing for Diamond Ventures. Dr. Jim Hassen is medical director of the emergency department at Northwest Medical Center. He said, “Our team of emergency physicians is looking forward to being part of this exciting new venture. This facility will be a first in Tucson. We look forward to offering high-quality emergency care at a location convenient for residents in the southeast area of the metro region.”

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continued from page 136 Oro Valley Hospital, at 1551 E. Tangerine Road, celebrated its 10th anniversaid Kevin Stockton, CEO of Northwest sary on Jan. 12. It has a growing campus Medical Center. of its own, including an adjacent medical “Both Northwest Medical Center and building with offices for 65 physicians. Oro Valley Hospital have patients that The 146-bed hospital continues to grow come from areas as far south as Sierra in services and recognition – including Vista,” said Jae L. Dale, CEO of Oro an 18-bed Level IV trauma certificaValley Hospital. They also come from tion and pediatric-prepared emergency Pinal County. department, a 17-bed senior behavioral “It’s becoming more of a destination, health unit, a certified total joint proa real magnet. They’ll bypass a couple gram, sleep center and accreditations for of hospitals to come to us. We’re not chest pain and stroke. just serving the northwest community. Perhaps the single most telling statisWe have stronger and stronger connectic defining the scope of the Northwest tions to the outlying areas.” Dale said Healthcare network is this number – that’s particularly true for elective sur2,600. gery. “They may have “We have 2,600 ema neighbor that had a ployees in our health good experience.” For system,” Stockton said example, “we have one – and that’s only countof the strongest oring regular employees thopedic programs in at the two hospitals, town.” staff at other facilities Patients do have on those campuses and choices, particularly if that growing network they’re already making of urgent care centers. the trip to Tucson from What Stockton calls out of town, Stockton “the team” goes beyond added. “It’s word-ofthose 2,600 employees mouth marketing. Ofto include physicians ten they talk among who have privileges at their friends and they’ll the hospitals, voluntalk to the physician teers and emergency who goes to the hospiservice providers. tal where they want to Northwest Medical go. If they need some Center is the adminiskind of procedure, trative base hospital for – Kevin Stockton, CEO they’ll see what Oro several EMS and fire Valley or Northwest Northwest Medical Center agencies who provide Medical has done to elservice to the community. evate the services in certain specialties.” While Northwest Medical Center and In the ever more consumer-oriented Oro Valley Hospital are the key hospitals healthcare market, both Northwest in the healthcare system, the network exMedical Center and Oro Valley Hospital pands into – and even beyond – the surhave set out to attract patients by estabrounding community. Those six urgent lishing what are known as “centers of care centers span from the northwest excellence” in several specialties over the to the Catalina foothills, to the westside past eight years. on Silverbell Road near Speedway BouNorthwest Medical Center, formerly levard and to the Duval Mine Road in Northwest Hospital, is now 30 years old. Green Valley. The 300-bed facility has been steadily Maintaining quality in a network of adding national accreditations – for that size, both in terms of the number of bariatric surgery and joint replacement highly specialized professionals and mulas well as centers for heart failure, chest tiple physical locations, requires borrowpain, stroke, spine surgery and breast ing approaches used in other industries. imaging, including the first 3D mamStockton said, “We have initiated some mography in Tucson. The campus, at lean management principles, working 6200 N. La Cholla Blvd., also includes a with frontline staff to identify barriers to freestanding women’s center with labor and delivery, and a special-care nursery continued on page 140 >>> for babies born 28 weeks and above.

We’re trying to get the care in the places people live and work – so that patients seek out care before they get into the emergency room.

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Northwest Medical Center

BizHEALTHCARE

Oro Valley Hospital

By the Numbers • Salaries, Wages and Benefits – $173.7 million • Taxes Paid – $19.3 million • Uncompensated Care – $54.9 million Northwest Healthcare also provides a variety of free services to the community including:

• Periodic cholesterol screenings • Periodic flu shot clinics • Periodic sports physicals • Pregnancy testing • Annual stroke screening • Monthly health education seminars Source: Northwest Healthcare, 2013

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continued from page 138 them doing their jobs.” The goal “is to provide the best and quickest care to the patients. It’s multidisciplinary, not just in nursing but pharmacy, transportation, and other clinical areas that impact our patients.” Maintaining quality while attaining efficiency to control costs requires extending systems outside the hospitals, according to Stockton and Dale. “The trend in healthcare is that hospital systems are becoming more and more integrated with community-based systems,” Dale said. In their case, that means working with local EMS providers from Northwest Fire, Golder Ranch Fire District, Rural Metro and other local emergency services agencies. “It’s a real collaborative effort to go beyond the walls of the hospital.” He said as part of a national trend, some EMS providers actually partner with their local hospital and “go out to a discharged patient’s home and do a healthcare check. That provides continuity.” Oro Valley Hospital piloted such a program in Fall 2014. Some of this reaching outside the hospital takes novel forms. For instance, Northwest Healthcare runs what these administrators refer to as “black-and-blue clinics” during high school football season. That seasonal weekend readiness deals with injuries from Friday night high school football games – and to address an emerging national trend – concussion management. “And we’re expanding to the adult community,” Stockton said. Northwest Healthcare’s Sports Medicine program will care for adult athletes, too. He said there’s a new attitude about that group. “They’re not sick – they’re injured,” he said of weekend warriors, runners, triathletes and other adult athletes. The modern medical answer to an injured amateur and older athletes is no longer to just to tell them “to stop doing that.” Northwest’s Occupational Medicine services also may bring people from outside into the network. Occupational medicine services – treatment of on-the-job injuries, preemployment drug tests and physicals – are offered at three of its urgent care centers. Those services are offered at the Continental Reserve Urgent Care on Silverbell Road, Rancho Urgent Care in Rancho Vistoso and Northwest Urgent Care near Green Valley. As with other healthcare services, “we’re making occupational medicine much more accessible,” Dale said. “It’s part of the same urgent care centers we already have. It’s one-stop convenience.” And the growth spurt is far from over, most notably with the freestanding Vail emergency center, set to open in late 2015. “We will continue to expand. We own 57 acres up in Marana near Tangerine Road and Interstate 10. We’ll be looking to build on that and in other parts of Southern Arizona,” Dale said. Stockton added, “We’ll be opening a QuickMed walk-in clinic in the first quarter of 2015 on Valencia Road for the southwest markets. We’re looking at ways to provide more access to care. “We’re trying to get the care to the places people live and work – so that they seek out care before they get into the emergency rooms,” Stockton said. Biz www.BizTucson.com


BizHEALTHCARE 13

Northwest Urgent Care now includes six urgent care centers staffed with on-site physicians and registered nurses. Appointments are not necessary and patients are seen on a walk-in basis. The growing network spans the metro area from the northwest to the foothills to Green Valley. 1. Northwest Medical Center 6200 N. La Cholla Blvd.

5. Rancho Vistoso Urgent Care 13101 N. Oracle Road

9. Lazos de Familia 344 W. Ajo Way

1a. The Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center at Northwest 1920 W. Rudasill Road

6. La Paloma Urgent Care & Physician Offices 4001 E. Sunrise Drive

10. Healthy Beginnings 333 W. Fort Lowell Road, Suite 120

2. Northwest Urgent Care at Orange Grove 3870 W. River Road 3. Continental Reserve Urgent Care 8333 N. Silverbell Road 4. Oro Valley Hospital 1551 E. Tangerine Road Oro Valley www.BizTucson.com

7. Northwest Urgent Care at Duval Mine Road 1295 W. Duval Mine Road 8. Northwest Urgent Care at Speedway 1370 N. Silverbell Road

11. Northwest Emergency Center at Vail Houghton and Old Vail Roads opening in late 2015 12. QuickMed Walk-In Clinic 3000 W. Valencia Road future expansion 13. Marana â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 57 acres near Tangerine Road and Interstate 10 Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 141 future expansion


Focus on Excellence at Every Level Rigorous National Certifications Set Standards

In today’s environment, navigating the healthcare system is hard work. Patients have a choice of where they receive care – but how do they choose? Northwest Medical Center and Oro Valley Hospital strive to make the choice simple by staying focused on delivering high-quality care every step of the way. Combined, the hospitals are home to 12 national accreditations, sometimes referred to as “Centers of Excellence.” A steadily increasing number of the hospitals’ specialty areas have been certified for meeting high national standards – and their ongoing performance is continually monitored to make sure that level of performance is maintained. The certifications, which are offered in many medical specialties, do not come easily, say Registered Nurses Kay Stubbs and Julie Hunt, the chief nursing officers at Northwest Medical Center and Oro Valley Hospital respectively. If these certifications could be compared to a standardized quality system in another line of work, it would probably be the rigorous ISO – International Organization for Standardization – certifications for engineering and precision manufacturing. They involve the kind of scrutiny and standardized qualification of systems by outside auditors that give staffers from the operating room to the executive offices headaches and sleepless nights. Delivering quality care is all about details, process, training, best practices and ongoing patient communication before, during and after the hospital stay. Stubbs and Hunt agree that national certifications and other evolving practices and standards at their hospitals “absolutely make a difference” to patients and the care they receive. One way the hospitals are focusing on the patient experience is through education. For instance, patients scheduled for a knee or hip replacement are encouraged to take 142 BizTucson

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a class at the hospital a week or more before coming in for the actual surgery. And patients love the classes. Patient education handbooks were piloted at Northwest Medical Center with bariatric surgery, and now extend to robotic, cardiac, and joint and spine surgeries. Each patient receives a handbook that prepares them in every possible way. Stroke and chest pain patients also receive educational handbooks to guide them through managing their conditions and recovery processes. Oro Valley Hospital provides patient education handbooks to their stroke, total joint and chest pain patients as well. “Patients like that because then they know what to expect before, during and after and they’re better prepared when they go home,” Stubbs said. And, it helps improve outcomes. “It’s empowering patients to maximize their recovery in collaboration with their medical team,” she added. The upgrading of specialized care at both hospitals is a continuing process. “Every area that has a center-of-excellence capability is something that we want to look at – because it does make sure your processes are evidence-based, current and exceptional,” Stubbs said. Oro Valley has upgraded its Emergency Department with a designation as a Level IV Trauma Center from the Arizona Department of Health Services. Hunt said the Oro Valley Hospital ER is also accredited for pediatrics through the Arizona Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. This means the staff and physicians have received specialized training and are equipped to handle pediatric patients, which she said is relatively unique for a small hospital. Another crucial area that improves both the patient experience and outcomes is communication – and that has changed dramatically. continued on page 144 >>>

PHOTO: TOM SPITZ

By Dan Sorenson

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BizHEALTHCARE

Julie Hunt

Chief Nursing Officer Oro Valley Hospital

Kay Stubbs

Chief Nursing Officer Northwest Medical Center

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BizHEALTHCARE continued from page 142 “It’s really evolved,” Stubbs said. “We encourage family members to participate. We have the patient’s care plan on a white board in the room. Both Northwest and Oro Valley hospitals have communication boards in every room – and that’s really to communicate with the family. Your wife can’t be with you the entire time you’re in the hospital, usually. She comes in and we have your care plan for the day on the board. So she knows what’s planned for you and who your nurse is. We know when the next pain medication is due. We know if you have been given any new medications. It’s all on the white board today, so your family is aware. And we know how to contact them.” “Even the handoff at shift change is at bedside – so the patient can listen to the report that the nurses are giving to each other,” Hunt said. “The outcomes are better for patients when they know what we’re going to do, what side effects of drugs to look out for,” Stubbs said. “If you’re part of the care team, if you know about possible complications, you’re going to speak up.” She said this communication is part of the commitment to providing quality care – an approach where “each patient is ensured to receive the same level of care – so there are certain steps along the way that have to be measured and met as the patient advances to being discharged. It’s a really strong program.” And there is follow-up after discharge, Hunt said. There is “discharge planning to make sure that patients get to the right setting, either at home with outpatient therapy if that’s appropriate, or to a rehab center if they meet criteria, or to some sort of assisted support if necessary.” Hunt said, “We do discharge phone calls on all of our inpatients – so someone in the hospital contacts them after they go home to make sure they understood their discharge instructions. At either facility, two to four days after discharge, they get a phone call to see if they have any questions about discharge instructions. That’s how we try to ensure their recovery continues after they leave the hospital.”

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National Accreditations Northwest Medical Center

• Bariatric Surgery Accreditation from the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program.

• Breast Imaging Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiology.

• Chest Pain Center Accreditation recognized by the Society of Cardiovas-

cular Patient Care. The protocol-driven approach to heart care allows the medical team to reduce time to treatment during the critical first stages of a heart attack.

Heart Failure Accreditation by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. The hospital’s protocol-driven and systematic approach to patient management allows physicians to reduce time to treatment, and to risk-stratify patients to decrease their length of stay. One of Northwest’s unique answers to meet the needs of these patients is through its Heart Failure Clinic, which helps patients manage their condition, improve quality of life and slow the progression of the disease.

• Primary Stroke Center Gold Seal Designation by The Joint Commission

as a Primary Stroke Center. Accredited stroke centers have demonstrated expertise in the early assessment, rapid diagnosis and treatment of stroke emergencies. The “brain attack” team collaborates with local emergency medical services to provide patients with quick access to advanced diagnostic and treatment technology.

• Spine Surgery Gold Seal Disease-Specific Care certification by The Joint Commission.

• Total Knee and Total Hip Replacement Gold Seal Disease-Specific Care certification by The Joint Commission.

Oro Valley Hospital

• Southern Arizona Emergency Medical Services, Level IV Trauma Center • Chest Pain Center Accreditation recognized by the Society of Cardiovas-

cular Patient Care. The protocol-driven approach to heart care allows the medical team to reduce time to treatment during the critical first stages of a heart attack.

• Primary Stroke Center Gold Seal Designation by The Joint Commission as

a Primary Stroke Center. The “brain attack” team collaborates with local emergency medical services to provide patients with quick access to advanced diagnostic and treatment technology.

• Top

Performer on Key Quality Measures (Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Pneumonia and Surgical Care), 2011 and 2013,The Joint Commission

• Niche Certified ER means the hospital is more “user-friendly” for senior

patients. The mattresses are thicker, oversized amplified pillow speakers make it easier to hear the TV, larger clocks make it easier to see what time it is.

• Total Knee and Total Hip Replacement Gold Seal Disease-Specific Care certification by The Joint Commission

• Pediatric-Prepared Emergency Care by the Arizona Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics

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Dr. Robert Poston

Cardiothoracic Surgery

Dr. Megan Nelson General Surgery

Dr. Sanjay Ramakumar

PHOTO: TOM SPITZ

Urology

NMC Leads in RoboticBy Mary Minor Davis

When it comes to surgery, bigger is not always better. In fact, large incisions and long hospital stays are just two of the downsides of traditional, open surgeries – and most patients would agree they would prefer neither. Today patients have new options. Innovation has evolved and many surgeons have adopted the philosophy “less is more” by utilizing robotic-assisted surgery techniques – with potential patient benefits such as less blood loss, less pain and less time in the hospital. These benefits are apparent to many of the surgeons at Northwest Medical Center. They are committed to robotic technology and it shows. The hospital has attracted some pretty heavy hitters to its surgical ranks, allowing it to offer a comprehensive robotic-assisted surgery program. With two dedicated robotic operating rooms, NMC has 23 surgeons on staff performing robotic-assisted surgery for general surgery – including gall bladder 146 BizTucson

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and colorectal procedures, as well as gynecologic oncology, gynecology and, most recently, cardiac. NMC is also the first hospital in Tucson – and the second in the state – to upgrade its robotic surgery platform to an ergonomic system that allows for multi-quadrant surgeries where the instruments must be able to reach from the pelvis to the chest. The result is less time under anesthesia for patients compared to the previous robotic surgery platform. The newer system also provides greater magnification of the surgical area and better access to some of the hardest areas to reach in the body. Robotic-assisted surgery utilizes computerized technology that is operated by surgeons. It is the next evolution in minimally invasive surgery, said Dr. Sanjay Ramakumar, a urologist and independent member of the medical staff at NMC. This advancement allows surgeons to make smaller incisions and precisely

access areas within the body that previously have been difficult to reach or would cause greater trauma to internal organs during surgery. For the patient, using robotics tools typically reduces pain, the risk of bleeding and other complications, and time spent in the hospital. “This results in better patient outcomes,” he said. Ramakumar brought robotic-assisted surgeries to Tucson in 2005 when he performed the first procedure. “To date I have performed more than 630 prostatectomies,” Ramakumar said. “Well-done surgery gives you good results” no matter what tools you use, he said. “When you have a good surgeon who is adept at using the technology of the robotic-assisted instruments, you have the best of both worlds,” he said. “The more technically complicated the surgery, the better the robotic-assisted surgery option is for the procedure.” Dr. Robert Poston specializes in the use of robotics technology for cardiowww.BizTucson.com


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-Assisted Surgery Two Dedicated Operating Rooms vascular surgery. “Since 2006, I’ve performed more than 800 cardiac procedures using robotics,” Poston said. “I’ve seen patients recover as much as two times more quickly than those who choose the more traditional procedure where the sternum is cracked open,” Poston said. Dr. Megan Nelson was in the final two years of her residency in Michigan when she was introduced to roboticassisted surgery. Although she knew the robot was a mainstream option for urological and gynecological procedures, she had never considered the robot for general surgery. At NMC, she was mentored by Ramakumar and now uses the tool for certain types of gallbladder removal, colorectal surgery and for inguinal, abdominal or hiatal hernias. “I was excited by how much more I could see with the robot,” she said. “That was an a-ha moment for me. It’s such beautiful technology that you are able to do exactly what you want to www.BizTucson.com

do without compromising any of your techniques.” Poston said he’s seeing more patients who want to know about the robotics

The more technically complicated the surgery, the better the robotic-assisted surgery option is for the procedure.

– Dr. Sanjay Ramakumar, Urologist

option – because they are more educated about the types of procedures that can be done, and they know they may recover more quickly and with less risk.

“We’ve gone away from the Marcus Welby days where patients will just listen to their doctor and do what is recommended,” Poston said. “Patients know what they want – and they want the least amount of trauma and less time in recovery. They want to get back to doing the activities they love. Smaller incisions are what they want.” Brenda Franks, a retired school bus driver, lived with gallbladder issues for nearly five years before making the surgery decision. Franks said the robotic-assisted procedure was one option presented to her, but she wanted to research it to find out more. After briefly looking into the procedure online, she met with Nelson who was so “kind, compassionate and caring,” she said. “Dr. Nelson took the time to educate me on the procedure and the expected outcome, using language I could understand,” Franks said. continued on page 148 >>> Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 147


BizHEALTHCARE continued from page 147 After hearing the difference between the traditional open procedure and the more simplified robotic-assisted approach, she chose to go with the less invasive procedure. “She went through the belly button – an incision of a half-inch or so,” Franks said. “I found it remarkable. I don’t have any complaints.” Franks spent one night in the hospital and she said her recovery was “cut and dried.” “I would encourage anybody to use this procedure,” she said. “If the surgeon has the skill and you live in an area that has the technology, why wouldn’t you take advantage of that?” Nelson said that while the learning curve to operate the robot can be “challenging,” once surgeons are comfortable with the equipment, the surgery time is comparable to many traditional and laparoscopic procedures. Ramakumar agrees. “Once you have the experience with the machine, operating times are the same. “Balance comes from speed and precision,” he said. Ramakumar said 90 percent of his patients go home the next day, com-

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pared to traditional open-surgery procedures where patients are hospitalized for two or three days or longer. “Onethird of the hospital time is reduced – those are huge numbers,” he said. Some in the medical profession criticize the cost of robotic-assisted surgery. “What is often not included in those cost reports is time and money saved in extended hospital stays,” Ramakumar said. “Longer return-to-work time, the cost of complications that come from higher risks of blood loss, longer healing time for open surgeries – none of these considerations are included in most cost analyses.” NMC has two of the nine robotics systems in use in Pima County. Ramakumar said it’s not enough to just offer robotic-assisted procedures. Hospitals must have a program in place that incorporates three important elements – hospital commitment, surgeon commitment and a dedicated operating-room team that is familiar with the robotics system and can support the surgeon. NMC has all of these elements – and that is attractive to surgeons such as Poston and Nelson.

“I was very impressed with how the OR team has embraced robotics,” Poston said. “NMC is being innovative and that is seen in the depth and the breadth of the program. I’ve been at some of the top hospitals in the country and I can tell you the team here is the best I’ve ever had.” Poston said hospitals that look at making critical quality improvements and that are bringing innovative techniques forward are “what make good hospitals these days. It’s a good transition into the future of healthcare. NMC has an infrastructure for innovation.” Currently, there are 2,153 robotic systems throughout the United States. There were 422,000 robotic-assisted procedures performed in the country in 2013 – up 15 percent from 2012. “For this generation of surgeons, robotics is going to be the new technology that becomes the norm – just as generations before have transitioned from traditional procedures to the more minimally invasive procedures such as laparoscopy,” Nelson said.

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Advanced Care for Moms and Babies By Mary Minor Davis Northwest Medical Center’s Women’s Center has developed a long-standing reputation of offering a comforting environment for moms, dads and their newborns. Yet in the last year, the center has gone even further – completing voluntary certification from the Arizona Perinatal Trust. This certifies the special care nursery as a Level IIE, which means the center can offer perinatal care for mothers and babies born as early as 28 weeks. What’s more, the hospital invested in a number of technological advances and expanded its special care nursery for premature infants. In addition to more space, The Women’s Center added five continuing-care beds, with 15 dedicated to premature newborns needing medical attention, two well-baby beds for stabilization of newborns, and one isolation bed for babies with infectious illness upon delivery. Stateof-the-art monitoring equipment and portable nursing stations round out the technology upgrades. Overhead cyclic lighting may help develop a premature infant’s circadian rhythm, sleep schedule and neurologic function. Lights change color depending on time of day from shades of amber at sunrise to blues and purples at dusk. The lights were the first of their kind in Southern Arizona, according to hospital officials. “We provide an environment of neurodevelopmentally appropriate, family-centered care,” said Dr. Alan Bedrick, neonatologist and medical director of the special care nursery at The Women’s Center. He is also a professor of pediatrics and chief of the division of neonatology and developmental biology in the pediatrics department at University of Arizona Medical Center. “We’ve learned that babies do very, very well in a less chaotic environment. No more machines that beep and send off sig-

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nals or that ring out in the night,” he said. “We cluster care – trying to get labs, monitor blood pressure, etc. when the baby is already awake. The adjusted lighting helps keep babies relaxed, and we even adjust to day/night lighting as the baby gets closer to going home,” Bedrick said. In this kind of environment, studies have shown that babies are taken off respirators and other machines earlier, go home earlier and “just have better outcomes,” Bedrick said. The freestanding women’s center on the hospital campus also has a new addition to help mothers through issues that can arise before delivery. Dr. Christopher Sullivan is the medical director of The Women’s Center as well as a maternal fetal medicine physician. Sullivan serves as a case consultant for mothers in distress or facing high risks with pregnancy. He said that high-risk pregnancies are on the rise because some women are waiting longer to have babies. This can lead to hypertension, type 1 and gestational diabetes and genetic issues. Older moms have a higher risk of delivering children with Down syndrome or other genetic issues. Another challenge is obesity. “There are a lot of moms coming into pregnancy with weight issues. This creates its own set of complications for mother and baby.” Sullivan has been on staff at The Women’s Center for two years. He said that NMC has “always been perceived as being a nice birthing center – but with the changes the hospital has implemented, they now offer families so much more. I’d like to say that if you have any type of obstetric complication, with the exception of a few rarities, we can take care of you.” Bedrick agreed. “We are one big multidisciplinary team that offers seamless care before, during and after delivery.”

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Breast Health Saving Lives with Early Detection

Breast cancer is a diagnosis no woman wants. Knowing this, Northwest Women’s Imaging recently invested in the latest technology for breast cancer screening – tomosynthesis – otherwise known as 3D mammography. “Early detection of cancer can dramatically improve a woman’s chance at surviving breast cancer – and 3D mammography improves the rate of early detection. We believe this can potentially save lives,” said Dr. Gary Wood, radiologist and medical director of NWI. The new technology produces a three-dimensional view of the breast providing greater visibility for the radiologist to see tissue detail in a way not possible before. 3D mammograms offer exceptionally sharp breast images reducing the need to call women back for a “second look” by up to 15 percent, according to recent studies. 3D mammography also finds cancers earlier than traditional 2D mammography alone – with a 27 percent increase in cancer detection and 41 percent increase in invasive cancer detection. The radiation dosage of NWI’s 3D equipment is about the same as 2D mammography. Wood said breast tomosynthesis can benefit all screening and diagnostic mammography patients. The 3D technology is especially valuable for women receiving a baseline screening, those who have dense breast tissue and/or women with a personal history of breast cancer.

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Patient Engagement Improves Joint & Spine Outcomes By Mary Minor Davis Knees, hips and backs. For many people if their back isn’t bothering them, their knee or hip joint is. Physical pain is often accompanied by the hesitation and anxiety related to having surgery, the recovery process and more. Northwest Medical Center and Oro Valley Hospital strive to alleviate these fears through one basic principle – patient education. From the moment the patient decides to move forward with surgery at either hospital, the educational process begins. “It’s no secret that patients who are actively involved in their care have better outcomes. So we took this principle and applied it one step further. We came together as a team – surgeons, nurses and staff – to develop comprehensive patient protocols that would measure outcomes for our joint and spine patients,” said Mary Sotelo, a registered nurse and the total joint and spine coordinator at Northwest Medical Center. All joint or spine patients receive comprehensive education to prepare them for surgery and, more importantly, recovery. This includes attending a class that outlines what to expect before, during and after surgery. Each patient receives a handbook and is encouraged to use it as a journal and reference guide through the process. Additionally, every patient undergoes a thorough pre-procedural screening appointment, which ensures they are medically ready for surgery. “Being able to connect with patients one-on-one before their surgery is huge,” Sotelo said “Patients walking 152 BizTucson

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out of class are astonished.” Registered nurse and medical/surgical manager Jennifer Miller is one of

Partial Knee Resurfacing When Oro Valley Hospital announced the introduction of the robotic-assisted partial knee resurfacing system in the fall of 2012, there were two surgeons trained in its use and only a dozen or so procedures had been performed. Just two years later, five surgeons are now using the surgeon-controlled technology, and more than 100 patients have undergone the partial knee resurfacing procedure. Partial knee replacement surgery is an option in lieu of a full knee replacement if conditions are caught early. Surgeons go into a single compartment of the knee and remove early stages of osteoarthritis before it damages the entire knee. The minimally invasive procedure with the robot allows for the greatest precision to save as much of the natural knee as possible. Orthopedic surgeon and Oro Valley Hospital’s Section of Orthopedics chair, Dr. Kevin Bowers was one of the first to use the technology. “The robot provides an element of control and an increased level of accuracy estimated at two to three times that of the traditional procedure. Getting the precise alignment can be the key to the longevity of the procedure. The robot’s biggest advantage is this level of accuracy.” Biz

three responsible for Oro Valley Hospital’s Total Joint Program. She said, “From the patient’s perspective, they understand not only the surgical aspect of what’s going to happen, but learn the importance of exercise and breathing, for example, which helps them recover more quickly. Our goal is to empower them to be an active partner in their care, helping them to get home faster.” This focus on patient engagement sends a powerful message to patients, challenging them to take responsibility for their health. Data – including length of stay, infection rate and discharge rate – is tracked by the hospitals and indicates how they perform against national standards. The results are astounding. Total knee and hip replacement patients at NMC and OVH stay an average of two days in the hospital – compared to the national average of three days. NMC has an 81 percent discharge rate of two days for total knee patients, compared to the national average of 25 percent. For total hip replacement patients, it’s even higher – 98 percent – compared to the national average of 22 percent. These are 2012 statistics, the most recent available. Sotelo and team attribute these impressive statistics to patient empowerment. “Patients want to get better and get back to their active lifestyle. We give them the tools to get them there,” Sotelo said. When it comes to spine and neck surgery, the buzz word is minimally invasive surgery – or MIS. “MIS is a muscle-sparing procedure. continued on page 154 >>> www.BizTucson.com


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BizHEALTHCARE continued from page 152 That means surgeons don’t cut into the muscle but rather separate the muscle vertically to access the spine,” said Mandy Gessler, a registered nurse with NMC, who serves as the center’s spine navigator. Longer incisions that cut through the muscle used to be the norm in traditional spine surgery. The MIS approach uses smaller incisions to help reduce damage to surrounding tissue, lower risk of infection, reduce bleeding and pain and help patients heal faster. Spine surgery patients follow the same protocol as joint patients – class, handbooks and pre-procedural screening. Patients are also encouraged to call Sotelo with questions before or after

surgery, and she provides her email and direct phone number in the handbooks and during class. Teamwork is also attributed to the program’s success. That team includes Sotelo, along with the surgeons, dedicated operating room teams, physical and occupational therapists, hospitalists and the patient’s primary care physician. Sotelo said Northwest’s spine team is “collaboration at its best for the benefit of the patient.” The team, including surgeons, meets monthly to review outcomes and best practices. The goal is to continually evolve the program to give patients the best possible experience. “It’s about giving our patients a one-

of-a-kind experience that gives them their lives back. We decide as a team on how to treat each case. We bring that experience of care so that patients can maximize their recovery,” Sotelo said. As of December 2014 Northwest Medical Center is the only hospital in Arizona that has national certification for hip, knee and spine surgeries from The Joint Commission. It is also a designated Blue Distinction Center for hip, knee and spine surgery. Oro Valley Hospital received national certification from The Joint Commission for its total knee and total hip replacement programs in 2013. Oro Valley Hospital does not offer spine surgery.

Patients want to get better and get back to their active lifestyle. We give them the tools to get them there.

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– Mary Sotelo Total Joint and Spine Coordinator Northwest Medical Center

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Intensive Wound Care Saves Lives

First in Tucson to Offer Laparoscopic Weight-Loss Surgery

By Mary Minor Davis For most people who are injured or recovering from surgery, wounds heal without incident. Yet for 2 percent of the nation’s population, non-healing wounds can be life-threatening.

By Mary Minor Davis Obesity affects between 28 to 32 percent of the population, according to recent data published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If the trend continues, 46 percent of Americans will be obese by 2018. Annual healthcare costs for the obese average $1,429 more per patient than people of normal body weight, according to the CDC. Dr. Patrick Chiasson and Dr. Stephen Burpee are working to address this epidemic as independent members of the medical staff practicing bariatric surgery at Northwest Medical Center. Across the country over the past 10 years, bariatric surgery has surged. While the initial goal was to reduce obesity, Burpee said weight-loss surgery also alleviates many of the subsequent underlying diseases that occur as a result of obesity – especially diabetes. It may also reduce the risk of stroke, coronary disease, cardiovascular disease, even death. NMC was the first to bring laparoscopic weight-loss surgery to Tucson. The surgeons said, “We have performed more than 2,000 surgeries since 2003.” In 2009, NMC was the first program in Tucson to be certified by a national program that sets industry standards for surgical weight loss. Today NMC’s surgical weight loss program is accredited by the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation Quality Improvement Program. Burpee credits the NMC bariatric program with having a strong team approach – beginning with patient education, including classes, to walk patients through their options, all the way through post-operative care. Bariatric surgery has evolved dramatically since the 1960s, Burpee said. 156 BizTucson

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Surgeons removed part of the stomach to treat ulcers, which were a severe condition before medication was developed to alleviate their severity. It was soon learned that patients lost weight as a result of the procedure. Since then, the introduction of minimally invasive laparoscopic procedures “changed the paradigm of bariatrics completely” because it typically led to safer surgeries and faster recovery with reduced risk of complications, Burpee said. Only 1 percent of the people who qualify for bariatric surgery actually end up getting it, he said. There simply are not enough resources in the industry to accommodate the need. “The biggest detractor is the cost. It’s a great treatment on an individual basis. It’s not practical on a population basis. Doing surgery on all of the people who need it is not economically viable.” Burpee said about 70 percent of patients keep off the weight and see reduced health risks. Lifestyle changes, behavior, diet and exercise all play into long-term success. Yet studies also show that it’s not just about “calories in/calories out” anymore. “We used to think weight loss occurred because the stomach was made smaller – but now we are learning that there are a lot of other chemical systems in place that support weight loss. The surgery affects hormonal systems that control body weight and metabolism. Much of our metabolism is out of our control no matter how much exercise or calorie restrictions we put in place.” Burpee encourages people to learn whether weight loss surgery is right for them. The center offers free seminars that outline the various procedures and potential outcomes. “The better educated people are, the better the results.”

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In fact, chronic wound care has become a significant healthcare cost – with an estimated $50 billion spent on treatment, according to a study published in 2012. By 2009, Northwest Medical Center had already recognized this growing challenge in patient care and opened the Wound Care Center, setting quality benchmarks comparable to some 600 successful wound centers in the United States. The center specializes in the treatment of a variety of wounds – including diabetic, arterial and pressure ulcers; chronic venous stasis disease (which can lead to blood clots); soft tissue infection; osteomyelitis (bone infection); skin tears or lacerations; radiation burns from cancer treatment; and non-healing surgical or other traumatic wounds. Nationally, the average healing time is about 15 weeks with a 66 percent success rate where the wound is entirely healed. The Wound Care Center at Northwest beats that consistently – with 90 percent of patients becoming wound free within 45-50 days. Dr. Scott M. Bolhack is medical director of the center. He said proper wound care is essential to prevent amputation and save lives. Diabetic patients are at especially high risk of amputation. “The statistics around even having a single toe removed are really horrifying,” Bolhack said. National studies show that any type of amputation can significantly shorten the patient’s lifespan. Vikki Hensley, a registered nurse and certified wound care specialist, is clinical director of the Wound Care Center. She said the team’s mission is to “determine what’s causing the wounds, then apply the best treatment protocols to enhance the healing.”

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Getting Back in the Game Sports, exercise, fitness – once you’re hooked, there’s no stopping you. Unless, of course, you get hurt. Whether a minor injury or something more serious, it’s important to ensure your injury heals properly so you can get back to the activity you love. That’s why Northwest Healthcare recently launched a Sports Medicine program caring for athletes and physically active people of all ages. The program brings together a multidisciplinary team – including orthopedics, orthopedic surgery, neuromusculoskeletal medicine, osteopathic manipulative medicine, sports medicine, physical therapy and family medicine. By incorporating a broad range of specialties, this program individualizes treatments for the patient, helping patients recover from sports-related injuries as quickly and safely as possible. Though many athletes may see their primary care physician when an injury occurs, a physician trained in sports medicine has additional nonsurgical training in fracture management, concussion management, sprains and strains, joint injections and other sports-related treatments. The sports medicine team has partnered with local high schools to help them better manage athletes with concussions. During football preseason, student athletes receive a baseline test using a specialized computer program, which provides physicians with reference points should a concussion be suspected throughout the season. Dr. Troy Taduran, a sports medicine physician with Northwest’s Sports Medicine program, said concussion management is extremely important because of the potentially devastating consequences. If not managed correct158 BizTucson

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The Challenges of Aging

ly, concussion can lead to major problems – including Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a permanent and degenerative condition occurring from multiple impacts to the head, and Second Impact Syndrome, which is brain swelling that occurs from impact to the head of someone who has not fully recovered from concussion. “It is vital athletes receive appropriate and expedited concussion management. Sometimes symptoms of concussion are obvious, while other times they are less apparent. The sooner we can diagnose and begin treatment, the sooner they can recover and get back in the game,” said Taduran. Taduran, along with Dr. William Prickett, orthopedic surgeon and medical director of the program, and Dr. Christopher Houdek, orthopedic surgeon, attended high school football games to provide instant attention and treatment should an athlete need it for concussion or other sports-related injury. Beacause Tucson is a mecca for runners, triathletes, cyclists, tennis players, golfers and a host of other sports, the program is expanding in 2015 to serve athletes and sports enthusiasts of all ages. Taduran said his goal is to treat active adults and return them to their desired activity as safely and quickly as possible. “We promote active lifestyles and do everything we can to facilitate that,” he added. Northwest is set to open its new Sports Medicine clinic in the second quarter of 2015, which will include onsite imaging services, physical therapy, performance testing and nutritional services for sports medicine patients.

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The aging process presents challenges that can be overwhelming. Sometimes these challenges cause symptoms that affect an individual’s ability to carry out basic life activities and roles. When this happens, many don’t know how to cope. The 17-bed Senior Behavioral Health Unit at Oro Valley Hospital offers a specialized program for patients ages 55 and older to deal with and manage these symptoms. It is a voluntary program for those who decide they need help. Whether it’s coping with stress, grief or addictive behaviors, the behavioral health team, led by Medical Director and Psychiatrist Dr. Vicki Berkus, works with patients to help empower them to be healthy and maintain balance as they age – and return them to their life and family. Mental health resources for the elderly are few and far between in Pima County. This specialized program for seniors is an important resource for the community. “The elderly are more susceptible to every aspect of mental illness. They don’t have the defense systems, whether physiological or medical, to handle the effects of a mental illness that younger people have,” Berkus said. Berkus challenges the referring person – whether a parent, spouse or doctor – to ask “what about this person has changed that requires an acute care setting?” It can be a change in cognition, behavior, memory or even eating habits, she said, with no other discernable medical reason. Patients are admitted to the unit by a doctor or through the emergency room. The average length of stay is two weeks with follow-up outpatient therapy once the patient has left the hospital. The goal is to provide the tools to help them cope with the challenges of aging.

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BizHEALTHCARE

Improving Occupational Health Outcomes By Mary Minor Davis

Treating Sleep Disorders

Managing occupational health issues is a complex business. That’s why more companies are seeking third-party sources to help manage regulatory compliance and costs.

By Mary Minor Davis There is nothing more rewarding than a good night’s sleep – waking with a clear mind and an energetic body to start the day. Unfortunately, nearly 40 million Americans suffer from some sort of sleep disorder that robs them of that well-rested feeling. The Sleep Center at Oro Valley Hospital helps patients overcome the obstacles to achieving a good night’s rest. Dr. Elias Kakish said that finding solutions to sleep deprivation isn’t just about feeling rested – it’s also about preventing other health risks that arise from loss of sleep. Sleep disorders can affect anyone, though they are more often seen in people with increasing obesity or who are aging. Once referred to the sleep center, Kakish said, patients are scheduled for a sleep study designed to assess abnormalities in their sleep patterns – ranging from brainwave activity to loss of oxygen, irregular cardiac rhythms and even seizures. The most common sleep disorder is obstructive sleep apnea. This condition results when the flow of air pauses or decreases during breathing while asleep because the airway is floppy, has been narrowed or blocked. A pause in breathing is called an apnea episode. A decrease in airflow during breathing is 160 BizTucson

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called a hypopnea episode. An episode occurs if breathing is affected for at least 10 seconds. If a patient has more than five episodes per hour, they are diagnosed with sleep apnea. Five to 15 episodes is considered mild and more than 30 is considered severe. “Even mild sleep apnea is significant enough to require treatment,” Kakish said. Sleep apnea has been linked to increased risk of stroke, heart attack, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, depression and memory loss. The center also studies insomnia, narcolepsy and restless leg syndrome. More than half of those who suffer from a sleep disorder go undiagnosed, Kakish said. That’s why the hospital works to educate the public about the importance of treating sleep issues and what to look for to determine if you should have a study done. “Among the symptoms that can indicate a sleep disorder are snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, loss of energy, irritability, mood or behavior changes, morning headaches, inability to concentrate and workplace mishaps or accidents,” he said. “It’s important to discuss these issues with your physician. Sleep deprivation can be a life-threatening condition. You should take care of your sleep.”

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The demand for this expertise led Northwest Healthcare to launch its Occupational Medicine program just over a year ago. Led by Troy Overholt, a registered nurse, this program focuses on injury management for on-the-job injuries. It also provides routine drug screening, lab testing, blood pressure checks and health fairs. “The key is that employers want to partner with skilled personnel in the area of occupational medicine because workers compensation premiums can come with a pretty significant cost, depending on the employer’s history,” Overholt said. “Employers have a financial interest in keeping employees healthy.” Private-sector employers spend an average of $30.11 per hour worked on employee compensation. Just over 8 percent of that is for legally required benefits, such as workers compensation, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics. The No. 1 work injury complaint is back pain. Overholt said his team can work with Northwest’s joint and spine programs to help identify the cause and treat or eliminate the problem. “One injury can cost an employer thousands of dollars,” Overholt said. “We can help bring closure to some of these recurring injuries, resulting in better outcomes for all.”

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BizDEVELOPMENT

From left: Rendering of Tucson Premium Outlets coming to Marana, Phoenix-based developer Michael Treadwell at the groundbreaking event

Premium Outlets Coming to Marana By Mary Minor Davis Phoenix-based developer Michael Treadwell said he was surprised at his first meeting with Town of Marana officials to discuss a piece of property at Interstate 10 and Twin Peaks Road. A partner with Vintage Partners, Treadwell had contacted Town Manager Gilbert Davidson to get some information about the site. “I just thought it was going to be an information-gathering meeting,” he told attendees at the site’s groundbreaking event in November. “When we walked in, the conference room was packed with anyone and everyone who could answer our questions. We’d never had that kind of welcome.” That cooperation, along with the team commitment of Simon Property Group, a global leader in retail ownership, management and development, culminated in the announcement of Tucson Premium Outlets coming to Marana. The groundbreaking event was held in November, with the shops expected to be ready for business by the 2015 holiday season. www.BizTucson.com

The multimillion dollar project will bring a mix of more than 90 retailers to the region, according to Danielle De Vita, senior VP of development for Simon Premium Outlets, a Simon Property Group subsidiary. The center will consist of 366,000 square feet of leasable space, including apparel, shoes, fashion accessories, home furnishings and specialty items, as well as dining options. De Vita said the design will take advantage of the open environment the Southern Arizona desert offers. “We just feel the whole project works in this environment,” she said at the groundbreaking. “The cultural influence is warm, calm, relaxed and friendly. The center is going to be the best of the best.” De Vita said she was overwhelmed by Marana’s commitment to doing whatever was necessary to “get it done.” “There are so many positives to this site in terms of the access, demographics and visibility – but it was really the town staff and its willingness to work

with us that made this the right location.” Davidson said the town made the commitment to be a partner with businesses several years ago when officials approved the town’s strategic plan. “No matter the challenge or obstacle, we will rally to figure out a solution and a path forward (for businesses), because that’s what we do,” he said. Marana Mayor Ed Honea said he was thrilled when Simon approached Marana, because he has seen the quality of their properties and the amenities offered. “The first time I visited a Simon mall I was like a kid in Disneyland,” he said. “I don’t usually like to shop, but I could have stayed there all day.��� Mark Silvestri, COO for Simon Premium Outlets, said in a statement that he expects the center will make a “significant economic impact with the creation of 300 to 500 constructions jobs and more than 800 full-time and parttime retail jobs upon opening.”

Biz Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 163


BizMILESTONE

Superlative Success UA Tech Park Celebrates 20 Years By Larry Copenhaver my,” Wright said. So it seems the only folly expressed 20 years ago came from critics. The metamorphosis of going from a barren and remote hunk of land owned by the late billionaire Howard Hughes and later giants IBM and Microsoft to what exists today amazes Manuel T. Pacheco. He was the UA president who went out on a limb to work with IBM, Microsoft and other hardball players to get the park set up near Interstate 10 and South Rita Road. Though blatantly optimistic 20 years ago, he is quick to admit that he never figured the project would be this successful. “The Tech Park has accomplished more in the past 20 years than I ever thought it would,” Pacheco said. He patterned the concept after another park, a research park in North Carolina, and grabbed onto the idea to do something just as good or better for UA, Tucson and Arizona. It started with a regional economic development mission, but that morphed

into a center for testing, evaluation and demonstration of new technologies. Along with a tweak in mission in 2013, the Office of University Research Parks was renamed Tech Parks Arizona. Looking back, Pacheco said he and his colleagues are proud of the success, yet even more satisfied that the site brings opportunity to scientists, commercial enterprise and students from high school to doctoral candidates. Meanwhile, officials continue to aggressively recruit in six key areas – advanced energy, agriculture, arid lands and water technology, biosciences, defense and security, intelligent transportation systems and mining technology, Wright said. Cutting across those are some larger themes – including imaging, big data, sustainability and advanced manufacturing Pacheco is delighted that the 1,410acre park is doing so much for the community. “I thought it would be important for the University of Arizona to have something like that, but financially it was

PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

Some pooh-poohed the whole concept and one area newspaper called the project “Pacheco’s Folly,” but after two decades of development, the University of Arizona’s Tech Park is not only a success, it is internationally respected and continues to grow as a jobs creator and education facility without peer. On Oct. 2, Tech Parks Arizona hosted a gala honoring those who saw the potential of the facility 20 years ago and fought to make the place a Tucson treasure. In the past 10 years nearly 100 companies have emerged from concept to become reality. “We have played an important role in advancing technology and commercialization,” said Bruce Wright, one of the movers and shakers who helped shepherd the UA Tech Park through its infant years, and continues to work to make sure the site is on the high road. Wright now serves as UA associate VP of Tech Parks Arizona. “The tech parks have been a major regional employment center and contributed significantly to the local econo-

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Tech Parks Arizona celebrated the 20th anniversary of University of Arizona Tech Park with fireworks and accolades.


a very difficult time,” he said. “There was some very creative thinking going on. IBM, who owned the site, needed to do something and the University of Arizona wanted to buy it. But we actually wanted it given to us. Of course that was impossible. So we were able to put together a deal. In essence IBM was able to give us a lease-back contract. That took quite a while, but it came to be. Our thought was it could become an economic boost for Tucson.” Of course it was much more than that. Also, Microsoft, which used the site briefly, presented some issues. “They decided to pull out after a year, not because of lack of success, but because the times changed,” Pacheco said. “That put us into a bind, but the space was subleased and it became success. “We owe a great deal of the success to former UA VP Joel Valdez, businessman Donald Pitt, the support of the Arizona Board of Regents and others. IBM turned out to be a great partner and made it possible to pull off. There was a lot of creative thinking done during that time period. Bruce Wright was able to keep all the parties together and was instrumental in the negotiation that ultimately allowed the university to be successful. “Bruce Wright is a low-keyed individual who likes to work behind the scenes, and he is tremendously effective. He held the pieces together, along with the help of Donald Pitt, who was president of the Board of Regents at that time. He was what I would call a genius to be able to think strategically. Joel Valdez was the key to finding creative ways of financing. Although there were millions of dollars involved in the deal, university funds paid only about $700,000 – all of that for legal fees. So that was a big, big accomplishment for us,” Pacheco said. Today, the university estimates the site and its facility top $500 million in value. “I fully expected this park was going to be highly successful, but I never dreamed it would be such a powerful research facility,” Pacheco said. “I never had any idea this would be as good as it is. It’s beyond any expectations that I had. And I see no reason for that success not to continue.”

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BizTECHNOLOGY

Here Comes the Sun King

Solar Zone Powers Forward to Phase Two By Larry Copenhaver Gilad Almogy, CEO and founder of Cogenra Solar, told a power, which is nearly twice the daily electrical consumption story about how he asked his daughter to turn out the lights of the Tech Park or enough to power the homes of more than behind her and quit killing polar bears. She asked why that 4,600 TEP residential customers. Besides Cogenra, WGES would be – after all, electricity is made from the sun. and TEP, organizations in the Solar Zone include Arzon “She was right – just a few years ahead,” Almogy told a Solar, Duke Energy, E.ON Climate and Renewables, IBM, crowd gathered at the Solar Zone at the University of AriREhnu, Solon, and Vail Academy and High School. zona’s Tech Park on Oct. 29. The folks came to witness a forWith Cogenra up and operating, the Solar Zone already mal dedication of Cogenra Solar’s energy array using T14 has moved into Phase Two, said Bruce Wright, UA associate ground-mounted, dense-cell interconnect technology known VP of Tech Parks Arizona. Much of Phase Two will focus on as DCI. The 1 megawatt (1 million watts) array, owned by Coenergy storage, micro grids and distributed solar systems, ingenra’s partner, Washington Gas Energy Systems, was quietly tegrated and embedded solar materials, and solar applications gathering energy in the abundant sunshine as attendees also and deployment in mining, agriculture, defense and security celebrated the completion of the Solar systems. Zone’s Phase One development and the UA students and faculty already are beginning of Phase Two. doing research on the impact of weather, The Solar Zone is one of the largest heat, dust and all those potential enemies multitechnology solar testing and demof solar energy harvesting, Wright said at onstration sites in the world. It was estabthe gathering. lished in a partnership between the UA “The Solar Zone has begun to creep and Tucson Electric Power. It’s located out of the fence line here to other parts between South Kolb and Rita roads, just of the park,” he said. “We even have a north of Interstate 10. great project at Vail Academy and High Almogy said his daughter represents a School – located on the Tech Park site – generation that he expects to dramatically where students are using wind and solar change its collective attitude toward enpower to generate electricity to meet the ergy consumption. He said he also looks demands of the school, all the while weavforward to a time when people choose ing lessons learned about solar into the renewable energy resources because they science curriculum. IBM also has a solar are the least expensive, not just that they array outside its space, and Tech Park is – Bruce Wright are renewable. using Cogenra technology on the top of Associate VP, Tech Parks Arizona The cost concept was an integral comits main administrative building to generponent of the DCI technology that focuses sunlight via paraate electricity and hot water. bolic mirror to produce DC power that can be converted to “We see us taking the next leap forward in staying at the AC and used by consumers and industry to meet their elecforefront of new and renewable advanced energy technology.” trical needs to run everything from lights and motors and to One area of intense scrutiny focuses on energy storage “so charge electric cars. when you don’t have the sun or you have clouds, or you need Almogy predicted this is just the beginning. “In the years to to use energy in other ways, you can store it for those times,” come, there will be many, many more of these projects.” Wright said. Phase One of the Solar Zone occupies 165 acres and acEmbedded solar is an exciting technology, and is taking its commodates 10 companies and organizations bent on testplace in construction materials, even finding its way into the ing and demonstrating a variety of solar technologies and sides of buildings, potentially into the roofs of cars – applicasystems. Collectively these projects generate 23 megawatts of tions where solar becomes an integral part of the system it is

We are reaching out around the world, and we say to companies – ‘If you really want to be at a place where solar technology is being developed, come to Tucson, Arizona.’

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powering, he said. “We’ve had a lot of conversations, particularly with Mexico, in places they don’t have electricity linked to the grid, to develop micro grids and deliver power to rural areas,” Wright said. “There are a whole series of areas that we see we can venture into to expand and stay at the leading edge – then use that technology to improve the lives of people not only in Arizona, but of the world. “The second part is the economic development. We see the opportunity to use this facility, the university’s expertise and our partnership with TEP to attract companies from around the world who want to test, evaluate and demonstrate their technologies – even take it through first-generation manufacturing. These are primarily small or midsized companies that are very innovative and really are on the leading edge of renewable applications.” In November, Wright and other local experts traveled to Israel to meet with Israeli companies that have technologies they would like to bring to the market place. UA officials worked with Almogy in partnership with an Israeli company that has technology in solar storage. “We are reaching out around the world, and we say to companies – ‘If you really want to be at a place where solar technology is being developed, come to Tucson, Arizona,’ ” Wright said. Another focus of Phase Two is public education about renewable solar energy and the opportunities for using it. Phase Two calls for “some really fun programs that are very impactful,” Wright said. “We have a program called ‘Raising the Sun,’ which is a solar go-cart program for high school kids. The park recently hosted 15 schools with about 110 students learning about solar energy – how you engineer a solar go-cart, how you power it, even sessions about how you would market that technology to investors and the public. It’s a very exciting program. These kids will build go-carts from the ground up and race them next April.” The idea is to provide solar energy activities at the park to connect with young people, and it is related to STEM – which stands for science, technology, engineering and math education, Wright said. “In a partnership with IBM, Raytheon (Missile Systems), Girl Scouts and a lot of other people, we are going to have the STEM Adventure here,” Wright said. “We expect 1,000 or so middle school students coming to the Tech Park to learn about science and engineering. “There are a lot of dimensions in Phase Two, including opening up 29 acres of space for more solar demonstration projects. We have two companies that have shown interest in bringing solar energy, particularly related to storage, to demonstrate their technology here at the park. We are working through that as well.” Also planned is a solar plaza and information center to offer visitors a place to learn about solar energy. This will be an ideal location to demonstrate everything that’s happening under the sun in Tucson, Wright said. The Solar Zone has received international recognition for its solar and renewable energy expertise. The International Economic Development Council awarded the Solar Zone the Excellence in Economic Development Gold Award for Sustainable & Green Development. The Solar Electric Power Association recognized TEP as the 2012 Investor Owned Utility of the Year for the company’s leadership and continued investment in solar energy. Biz www.BizTucson.com

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BizTECHNOLOGY

Thompson-Wimmer

Cleveland Electric Laboratories

UAS and Fiber Optics Firms Choose UA Tech Park By Larry Copenhaver Thompson-Wimmer and Cleveland Electric Laboratories are the newest tenants to set up shop at the University of Arizona’s Tech Park. Thompson-Wimmer, based in Sierra Vista, provides services and consulting to a variety of federal government clients – including the U.S. Department of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security – as well as private industry. The company is working as a staging agent for successful integration of unmanned aircraft systems into the National Airspace System. Ohio-based Cleveland Electric Laboratories is using the Solar Zone, a site occupied by 10 pioneering solar energy developers, as a large-scale testing and demonstration site for its FiberStrike Direct Burial Perimeter Security System. FiberStrike is a new family of fiber-optic-based sensing solutions developed by Cleveland Electric Laboratories’ Advanced Technology Group. FiberStrike extends the capabilities of fiber optic sensing and includes a variety of sensors and sensing systems for security and industrial applications. The Solar Zone is 165 acres of Sonoran Desert laden with photovoltaic solar panels at the UA Tech Park just north of Interstate 10 between Kolb and Rita roads. It will eventually power about 3,700 homes in the Tucson area. The Solar Zone is the largest multitechnology solar evaluation site in the United States. 168 BizTucson

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“There are some very innovative people from industry and the University of Arizona itself,” said Graham Hauptman, Thompson-Wimmer VP. “We realize there is a huge opportunity to be had here from what the Tech Park and the surrounding climate brings. We thought from a business perspective, we could leverage that. And it has worked out very well so far. We’ve already made some great contacts and met some great people. “We have employees all over the world. We have a big footprint, but we are agile enough to take an opportunity very quickly.” When the company saw its chance to move into the Tech Park where science and technology are at the cutting edge, they acted. “We see the opportunity of unmanned aircraft systems, commercially

We realize there is a huge opportunity to be had here from what the Tech Park and the surrounding climate brings. – Graham

Hauptman, VP Thompson-Wimmer

in the United States,” Hauptman said. For example, the company is using UAS with energy companies such as electric or gas or petroleum operations to both survey land and keep an eye on infrastructure. “We can gather enough data that they need to make business-type decisions,” Hauptman said. “That affects their bottom line in a positive way. We also are using it in precision agriculture, not only here in the United States but globally. In the next 35 years, the world’s population is expected to be up around 9 billion people, and the world’s crop production, yield if you will, is going to have to keep up with that. “We can use unmanned aircraft systems to find real-time data in fields and with crops that the farmer, in the past, might only have seen in the early season – but now he can see it once every week or once every day. The data will allow the owner or operator of the agricultural areas to make key decisions about what is prudent action for the best crop – whether it’s watering, fertilizing or even not watering to maximizing yields.” Cleveland Electric is headed by Jack Allan Lieske, son of the founder who started the company in 1920. “We have always been involved in industrial temperature control – thermocouples,” Lieske said. “Thermocouples are mainly the measuring apparatus used in most furnaces. We’ve done everything www.BizTucson.com


from building furnaces to doing all the service and instrumentation for heating units.” Cleveland Electric, based in Twinsburg, Ohio, acquired a company in Phoenix 10 years ago. While searching for a place to exercise experiments and implement fiber optics applications, the company learned about the UA Tech Park. When the company came to Tucson, “we got nothing but help. They gave us 2.5 acres for a test site and some nice office space,” he said. “In Tucson, we are introducing our fiber optic sensing business. “ Fiber optics, which are used in communications, became essential with the high-speed transfer of data using laser light, Lieske said. “We found we can harness laser going down the fiber as it responds to pressure, stress and temperature changes,” he said. “You can use it as a measuring stick – a very sophisticated, highly accurate and thousandths of degrees more responsive than thermocouples.” What the company plans at the Tech Park is to bury completely undetectable fiber around the Solar Zone, he said. “It has no interference with electrical or lightning strikes. It’s completely passive – which makes it very significant for placement because you don’t have to worry about other elements around it. So we were going to bury fiber around that fence at the solar park.” The key objective was for security, including border security, he said. “We knew that we could put this in the ground and when people would step within 3 or 4 feet, that movement would be detected. “The issue with fiber optics – you have to work out all the extraneous types of indications because it’s so sensitive. So there has had to be a huge effort to develop the interrogator, which is the black box that measures the light going down and returning. You would need some pretty sophisticated software.” According to UA officials, the successful recruitment of these new tenants is largely because of Tech Parks Arizona’s new business development attraction program – Global Advantage – which aligns closely with UA research strengths. Biz www.BizTucson.com

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BizSPORTS Wade Dunagan

Greens Revolution City Hopes Private Operator Turns Around Golf Courses By Steve Rivera The changes have been noticeable and appreciated by Mike Smith, a regular golfer at a number of Tucson-area golf courses – including Tucson City Golf ’s five. “It happened immediately, cleaning up some areas and getting some of the little things done,” said Smith, who plays about 75 rounds a year in Tucson. “I’ve told people that there is a big improvement. Go out and play.” Art Kingman has – and he’s been happy with all the city courses. “The experience has been an awesome one,” he said. “The courses have never been this nice and manicured – and the customer service is better. If there was one thing I would complain about it is the sand traps. They all need to be redone, to add more sand in them. Other than that, the courses look and play awesome.” Since OB Sports Golf Management became the overseers of Tucson’s city golf courses, conditions are improving. The wet summer, which has helped with greener fairways and lush greens, made them more visually appealing. The facilities are better – but it’s yet unknown how the changing of the guard will affect Tucson golfers. 170 BizTucson

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In February, OB Sports Golf Management took over operations of Dell Urich, El Rio, Fred Enke, Randolph North and Silverbell courses. The contract is for 4½ years with two automatic renewals for five years each if everything goes well, said Wade Dunagan, director of operations for Tucson City Golf. “We want to give the people of Tucson something to be proud of,” Dunagan said. Customer service and good conditions are at the top of the list. OB made it a priority to do just that after being picked from more than 20 companies vying for the contract. OB Sports is paid $240,000 a year by the city to manage the courses. It also spends city money to maintain and improve the courses. “I’d like to give reasons for golfers to get excited about the city golf courses again,” Dunagan said. “We want them to come back and play, to enjoy things and to be excited about our golf courses. We have arguably five wonderful golf courses for players of all levels. There is no reason why we can’t give people courses to be very proud of.” Dunagan, a former University of Arizona golfer, has more than 30 years of Tucson golf knowledge and was an executive www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Director of Operations Tucson City Golf


We have arguably five wonderful golf courses for players of all levels. There is no reason why we can’t give people courses to be very proud of. –

Wade Dunagan, Director of Operations, Tucson City Golf director of the World Golf Classic–Accenture Match Play Championship. He’s well versed in what Tucsonans want and need for a better golf experience. So far kitchens have been renovated at all properties except Silverbell, and floors have been resealed, walls painted and air conditioning upgraded at the El Rio clubhouse. Fairways are being mowed more frequently, bunkers are better prepared, and fairway grass is now cut more often and closer to the ground. Landscaping upgrades have begun, the fall overseeding finished and fairways extended. OB Sports is now handling the concessions. In the past, the food and beverage areas were leased to a different company. “I had a player stop me and say, ‘I can’t wait to see what you guys do next,’ ” Dunagan said. He added that the city has been “a terrific partner” in the approval of many decisions. “Our list continues to grow,” Dunagan said. “There’s a long list of things we’d like to do. We will pick and choose our battles where we can make the biggest impact.” It’s all about improving playing conditions “It may be an overused term, but we are trying to pick up the basics. Golf is one of those sports that if you pay attention to the basics, you are probably going to do very well.” Golfers have paid attention. Matt Kelaher said he was thankful to see bag boys show up and take his bag to the appropriate tee area. “That’s new and kind of cool,” he said. Dunagan said to expect more soon. “When we first came on board, I think people were just a little disappointed,” Dunagan said. “We have a number of players who have been playing here (at Randolph) 20, 30, 40 years – and while memory is somewhat selective, they remember better days for the golf courses. “We’re just trying to come in and make them better and return them to the glory they once had.” In winning the bid to oversee the courses, OB Sports projected nearly 190,000 rounds in the first year, up about 6 percent from last year. Projections are that rounds could increase to more than 200,000 in three to four years. Cart fees could rise from $25.90 to $26.96 in three years. Dunagan said the courses “had a difficult summer.” Rounds and revenues were down – yet the comments about the courses were very positive. “I feel we’re in position to have a good season,” he said. And the future? “Well, that’s up to them, isn’t it?” said Smith. “They do the best with what they’ve got, but turning it over is good – so far it is.” Biz www.BizTucson.com

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BizMILESTONE

A School That Works San Miguel Celebrates 10 Years By Gabrielle Fimbres

A decade ago, something extraordinary happened on Tucson’s southside. A school rose from a spot where people once dumped their trash. It was unlike any other school in Tucson – a Catholic college preparatory school for students who might otherwise have little hope for a future rich in education and prosperity. From that spot, in a neighborhood struggling with violence, poverty, teen pregnancy and crippling dropout rates, rose San Miguel High School. A decade later, the school is graduating students who have mastered a rigorous curriculum, spent four years in the workforce and are prepared for college and life. Virtually all of San Miguel’s graduates go on to college – from Pima Community College to Georgetown University and everything in between. “We are changing lives,” said Jim Click, who has supported the vision of San Miguel since the beginning. Click and his wife, Vicki, and their family have donated more than $3 million and provided interest-free loans to make construction of the $10.3 million school a reality. San Miguel celebrates its 10th anniversary with a bash on April 11. Making the party even more joyous is a recent donation of $1.25 million from the Jeannie & Cole Davis Family Foundation. This leaves a little more than $100,000 left to raise to eliminate the mortgage – which will allow the school to burn its mortgage at the celebration. “What San Miguel is doing for kids and families on the southside, it is going to do forever,” Jim Click said. Stroll through the halls of the school, 172 BizTucson

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near Valencia Road and South 12th Avenue, and the student engagement is obvious – classrooms are rich with debate and discovery. Students can take part in athletics, drama and clubs, creating a well-rounded high school experience. Students and faculty set the tone for achievement in professional dress – young men in shirts and ties, young women in slacks and crisp blouses. These students work one day a week throughout their high school years in one of more than 100 businesses in Tucson – from hospitals to high-tech manufacturers. Money earned on the job helps cover their tuition. While many students are Catholic, it is not required to attend. The vision for San Miguel came from Sister Rosa Maria Ruiz, who was superintendant for Catholic schools in the Diocese of Tucson. She is now president of Lourdes Catholic School in Nogales, Ariz. On a visit to the San Xavier district Ruiz realized the extent of the need.

San Miguel by the Numbers Enrollment – 360 Average family income – $32,000 Class of 2014 graduates – 56 Class of 2014 college acceptance rate – 100 percent Class of 2014 annual merit scholarships and institutional grants – $2.5 million Total alumni – 347

“Only 30 percent of the kids in the area graduated high school,” she recalled. “That really bothered me. I learned about the drugs and the gangs and the pregnancies.” She told the late Bishop Manuel Moreno, “We are losing our kids. We need a Catholic high school on the southside.” “It was sort of an impossible dream,” she said. Not long after, Ruiz heard of the Cristo Rey school model in Chicago. Now a thriving association of 28 high schools that utilize an innovative work-study program to provide Catholic education to more than 9,000 students nationwide, the Cristo Rey Network was just getting started. “This was the answer to our prayers,” Ruiz said. But there were doubters. “People said it was impossible,” Ruiz recalled. “There were not enough jobs in Tucson to support the concept.” Enter the next answer to her prayers – Jim Click. Ruiz took the idea to the car dealer and philanthropist. “He was so excited he literally jumped out of his seat and said, ‘This is what we need.’ He took us to see his friends in different businesses,” Ruiz said. A study showed that the Cristo Rey model could be supported in Tucson. The Lasallian Brothers of the Christian Schools joined in to bring affordable Catholic education to the neighborhood. Ruiz is proud of what was accomplished. “Students have something to look forcontinued on page 174 >>> www.BizTucson.com


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1. Bishop Gerald F. Kicanas of the Diocese of Tucson has been an advocate and supporter of San Miguel. 2. The origins of San Miguel 3. Back row from left â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jim Click, Philanthropist & President, Jim Click Automotive Group; John Omernik, Principal, San Miguel High School; Brother Jonathan Cord, Corporate Internship Program Office Manager, San Miguel; Leslie Shultz-Crist, President & CEO, San Miguel. Front row: San Miguel students Mireya Iglesias Ayala and Jason Avitia

PHOTO: CARTER ALLEN

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BizMILESTONE

San Miguel kids are seeing there is a different way. We can go to college, we can be doctors, we can be lawyers, we can be entrepreneurs. It’s a business model that works. – Jim Click Philanthropist & President Jim Click Automotive Group

continued from page 172

ward to in their lives. They have dreams. It has changed the southside.” Jim Click said San Miguel is the best investment his family has made in Tucson. “Vicki and I decided this was important to our family,” he said. “We had done a lot for the community but we wanted to do something for the kids and the families of the southside.” Eight San Miguel students currently work at the Jim Click Automotive Group. “San Miguel kids are seeing there is a different way. We can go to college, we can be doctors, we can be lawyers, we can be entrepreneurs,” he said. “It’s a business model that works.” Leslie Shultz-Crist, president and CEO of San Miguel, said the Clicks and other donors “have provided an opportunity for these kids to achieve their dreams in a very tangible way. I get teary-eyed thinking about the impact.” The school is helping to build Tucson’s workforce, and is shedding light on the neighborhood’s young people. “These kids are changing the perception of kids on the southside,” said Nicola Hartmann, director of advancement at San Miguel. “Employers are so impressed with them.” The original employers – the Arizona Daily Star, Carondelet Health Network, El Rio Community Health Center and University of Arizona Business Affairs – are now joined by about 100 more. The school continues to build the base of business partners. All incoming freshmen and transfer students receive intensive job training during the summer. “It’s a huge commitment,” Shultz-Crist said. “Students have to want it. They have to be willing to work hard.” About 40 percent of the $11,500 annual tuition is paid for by businesses. The remainder is paid through tax credits, family contributions and donations. About 82 percent of students arrive below grade level. They get a double dose of math, science and reading, and take part in tutoring and mentoring. Not all make it. “We start with 125 and we hope to graduate 100,” Shultz-Crist said. 174 BizTucson

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“But it’s not just about graduating from San Miguel – it’s about graduating from college and changing the trajectory of your life.” She said families and neighbors are supportive. “We have a community of hard-working families who want something different for their kids.” Many students come from difficult situations. “Our job is to honor and respect who they are, and understand that sometimes they are going home to no electricity,” Shultz-Crist said. “Mom got laid off and dad’s in prison. But they still have to be here at 7:15 every morning. They can’t use it as a crutch.” Senior Frydha Cordova, 17, hopes to earn a scholarship to St. Mary’s University of Minnesota, where she has taken part in summer programs. “I didn’t know much about college because my parents didn’t go, and San Miguel has given me the knowledge and the work experience,” said Cordova, who has worked at Snell & Wilmer law offices and Regier Carr & Monroe CPAs. “My self-confidence has grown,” Cordova said. “I have been taught to shake hands, to look a person in the eye. And I am getting real-world experience.” Brother Nick Gonzalez was founding principal of San Miguel. He called the experience “transformative.” “The spirit of San Miguel is you cannot settle,” Gonzalez said. “You have to keep innovating, to improve opportunities for students.” Karina Loyola, 19, graduated in 2013 and is a student at Georgetown University, majoring in biology. “San Miguel provided me with a never-ending sense of family – starting from the moment that I was dropped off at the side gate early in the morning, to the moment when I left the gym after practice late in the evening.” That sense of family inspires students to succeed, Loyola said. “Students all share the same journey – working to achieve a brighter future.”

Biz

SAN MIGUEL HIGH SCHOOL’S 10TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION & BURN THE MORTGAGE PARTY – A THROWBACK TO HIGH SCHOOL Saturday, April 11, 6 p.m. San Miguel High School, 6601 S. San Fernando Ave. Event co-chairs are Celestino and Kim Fernández, Humberto and Czarina López and Dr. Michael and Cindy Parseghian. Honorary co-chairs are Jim and Vicki Click. $175 per person Sponsorship packages available (520) 294-6403 or www.sanmiguelcristorey.org www.BizTucson.com

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PHOTO: LARRY COPENHAVER

BizECONOMY

Dignitaries including Mayor Jonathan Rothschild take part in the VXI Global Solutions ribbon cutting.

VXI Global Solutions Expands to Tucson Up to 500 Jobs, Increased Tax Revenues By Larry Copenhaver Jobs and taxes. Those two essential elements are the payoff from VXI Global Solutions moving to Tucson. The international giant plans to generate up to 500 new positions at its state-of-the-art call center just a few blocks north of the runways of Tucson International Airport. “In April, VXI decided Tucson would be the perfect place to open a new line of business for one of our clients – DirecTV,” said Leo Gunnells, a VXI human resources official, at the center’s opening ceremony. “We’ve got about 200 employees and we are getting ready to open it up to hire 100 more.” The goal calls for up to 500 at the Tucson center, said Michele Oliver, senior HR manager. That will allow the center to run 24/7 taking customer service calls for DirecTV. The Tucson office is being positioned to handle sales and service 176 BizTucson

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for both DirecTV general packages and the company’s bundle packages to accommodate phone and Internet service. “We have 35 service centers in our community. And at those centers, we employ 15,000 people,” said Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild before joining VXI officials in snipping a red ribbon in the company’s reception area. “I think one of the main reasons these centers are so successful here is because we have a workforce ready to work. And it’s a friendly workforce. We are happy Tucson has so many good people. I am gratified for that.” One asset of these centers is that they offer flexible schedules, benefits and work that is not particularly physically demanding, the mayor said. “We have a lot of students seeking jobs and retirees who want to return to the workforce. So I www.BizTucson.com


Tucson is doing very well and we have hired a couple hundred folks. The initial feedback is that this market is worth expanding, worth growing.

– Toby Parrish VP of Operations, VXI Global Solutions

Tucson has so many good people. I am gratified for that.” One asset of call centers is that they offer flexible schedules, benefits and work that is not particularly physically demanding, the mayor said. “We have a lot of students seeking jobs and retirees who want to return to the workforce. So I expect a lot of success – and I expect a lot of growth here.” And with any job development come wages and the accompanying taxes that they generate. This center could generate a $13 million annual payroll – and most of that will be plowed back into the community by the wage earners as they purchase goods and services. The wages get spent “and that will create a couple million dollars in taxes – income tax, sales tax, property tax,” Rothschild said. “That’s all money we can use to strengthen our community, our police, our fire, our parks. That’s what it’s all about.” Tucson City Council member Richard Fimbres, whose Ward 5 includes the call center, said at the ribbon cutting, “We have a lot of great things going on here. Several companies in the area are expanding. The city lives off of sales tax and we need to generate that if we want programs for our children.” Joe Snell, CEO and president of Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities, a public-private organization that promotes Tucson-area economic development, said the Old Pueblo is a place that responds to the needs of businesses and was successful in getting VXI to move here because the city offers a “good corporate fit.” Toby Parrish, VP of operations at VXI, said, “We expect big things from this market. One thing about opening a center in a market is you never know in advance what you are going to get. But we have a lot of experience with our clients and we know what they are looking for. Tucson is doing very well and we have hired a couple hundred folks. The initial feedback is that this market is worth expanding, worth growing.” VXI employs 15,000 people around the world including locations in Asia and Latin America.

Biz www.BizTucson.com

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PHOTO: COURTESY UP WITH PEOPLE

BizEVENT

Coming Home

Up with People Returns to Tucson for 50th Anniversary By Romi Carrell Wittman Every spring they would converge on the campus of my high school in northwest Tucson, the extraordinarily upbeat and talented young people that made up the cast of Up with People, a global youth performance and cultural exchange group. The dozens of performers, ranging in age from 18 through their mid-20s, were friendly and colorful and, as an added bonus, they would put on a show for the entire school before they headed out to spread joy and breezy music to people around the world. Up with People has a long history in Tucson and, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the organization, it’s staging a celebration here in the Old Pueblo. The group will perform its new show, “The Journey,” March 6 and 7 at 7:30 p.m. at the Fox Tucson Theatre. 178 BizTucson

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For 25 years, Tucson served as the group’s world headquarters, and it’s still the home of musical founder J. Blanton Belk. Given this history, kicking off the latest tour in Tucson makes a lot of sense. Dale Penny, Up with People’s president and CEO, said, “We’re proud and honored to come home to Tucson to launch this monumental event and celebration.” The group was born in 1965 during a time of upheaval and civil unrest in the United States. “Students were demonstrating about the things they were against,” Belk said. “I thought we could use their energy if we could find out what they would demonstrate for.” He set about gathering student body presidents from around the country to discuss issues of concern. Eventually this culminated in a musical performance, one that received a standing www.BizTucson.com


We’re proud and honored to come home to Tucson to launch this monumental event and celebration.

– Dale Penny President & CEO, Up with People

ovation from a wide-ranging group of senators, congressmen and other dignitaries. From there, Up with People developed into the global musical phenomenon we know today. A little known fact is that the organization shaped the now-famous Super Bowl halftime spectacle. Back in the early days, Super Bowl halftime entertainment consisted of college marching bands – basically the type of entertainment you’d expect at a college football game. That changed in 1976, when Up with People staged a bicentennial-themed performance. It was so popular that Up with People was invited back to perform at three more halftime shows over the years and the concept of halftime entertainment was forever changed. Over the past 50 years, Up with People has toured some 40 countries including, most recently, Israel and Cuba. After visiting Tucson in the spring, performances will be held in Brussels, Belgium, Mexico City, Munich and Orlando, Fla. The tour will wrap up in Denver, the current home of the organization. While in Tucson, Up with People plans to give more than 1,000 hours of community service to local charitable organizations. Cast and crew will live with local host families. Going forward, the organization will maintain an office in downtown Tucson that will serve as the base for Mexico and Latin America coordination. Business are encouraged to get involved with the upcoming show, either by purchasing a ticket sponsorship package, partnering on the local community service projects or by sponsoring a local student to participate in a future cast.

Biz

UP WITH PEOPLE’S “THE JOURNEY” March 6 & 7, 7:30 p.m. Fox Tucson Theatre, 17 W. Congress St. For ticket information, go to www.upwithpeople.org/world-tour. For ticket blocks and sponsorship package information, contact Chelsey Panchot at (720)215-3206, or cpanchot@upwithpeople.org/Tucson. www.BizTucson.com

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PHOTO: STEPH E PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO: STEPH E PHOTOGRAPHY

BizINSPIRATION

1. Kelsey Luria 2. Kelsey received a visit from the Wildcats football team soon after she started treatment at University of Arizona Medical Center Diamond Children’s. (Photo: Adam Gonzales, Arizona Athletics) 3. Clockwise from left – Max, Michael, Maya and Kelsey Luria

#BPositive Campaign to Kick Cancer By Gabrielle Fimbres War is being waged on the sixth floor of University of Arizona Medical Center Diamond Children’s – Kelsey Luria’s war against leukemia. Acute myelogenous leukemia to be exact, a less common and tough-totreat form of blood and bone marrow cancer that Kelsey, a 17-year-old senior at Catalina Foothills High School, was diagnosed with in November. AML better watch out. “Once I kick this cancer’s ass I’m going to focus on raising serious awareness,” Kelsey said from the hospital room. On Kelsey’s team are her parents, Michael Luria, executive director of Children’s Museum Tucson, Maya Luria, community relations coordinator for Community Partnership of Southern Arizona, 14-year-old brother, Max, family, friends, the UA football team and a medical team she calls “awesome.” And it’s clear her medical team thinks Kelsey is pretty awesome herself. “Her mental health, the support of her family, her jovial nature, her interaction with her peers and her drive to fight AML will be a great asset to her treatment and cure,” said Dr. Neha Bhasin, pediatric oncologist at Diamond Children’s. She pointed to Kelsey’s #BPositive campaign, named after her blood type. A family friend had 500 purple silicone bracelets made with the message #B+TeamKelsey Kick Cancer’s Ass. Bracelets are worn by family, friends and members of the UA football team, 180 BizTucson

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who visited Kelsey in the hospital. “With her BPositive attitude and her support system, Kelsey has the strength to see the cup half full and that is inspiring to us as physicians,” Bhasin said. “Patients like her make me think children and teens are much stronger than we give them credit for. This is one of the reasons cure rates in children with leukemia are higher than adults.” The fight won’t be easy. The prognosis with AML is not as good as the prognosis with the more common ALL – or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Treatment generally consists of four grueling rounds of chemotherapy over four months. For nearly all of that time, patients must be hospitalized. Bhasin is encouraged by Kelsey’s “excellent” response to the first round of chemotherapy. “I hope with the way her AML is responding so far, she will be a survivor.” Kelsey is a native Tucsonan, and has been a student in Catalina Foothills School District since first grade. She had a fantastic spring and summer traveling to Poland and Israel with Jewish teens as part of the March of the Living and visiting family in Australia. The start of her senior year was devoted to college applications, working as a student athletic trainer at Catalina Foothills and having fun. This fall, Kelsey started experiencing headaches – some dull and constant, others severe. In October, she saw a neurologist, who thought she had chronic migraine syndrome. She started steroid treatments, which

did not help, and was scheduled to undergo inpatient treatment when she was found to be severely anemic. Within a couple of days, on Nov. 5, the family was given the devastating diagnosis. “You lose control as parents,” Michael Luria said. “We were in a daze, walking around with a glazed look and trying to accept the new reality.” But the family jumped into action. Michael and Maya take turns spending nights at the hospital, working remotely. There are good days and days when side effects of the chemo are debilitating. Between Nov. 4 and mid-December, Kelsey was home only three days. The rest were spent at Diamond Children’s. While she was home, family friend Stephanie Epperson took gorgeous photos of the family, Kelsey beaming and poised. She is determined to beat AML, and hopes to enroll at UA in the fall. She’s interested in journalism and athletic training. Kelsey’s goal is to raise awareness. “Research money isn’t going to AML – and there are no drug trials in Arizona. I feel totally gypped.” For now the family stays close in Kelsey’s cozy hospital room, drinking tea, chatting and cheering each other on, making it through the peaks and valleys of the disease. “It’s a constant roller coaster of emotions,” said Maya Luria. But one this family is navigating together.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Summer 2010

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

BizSTARTUP

Justin Williams

CEO & Founder Startup Tucson

Forward Boost $1.44 Million Grant to Aid Startups With High- Growth Potential By Eric Swedlund Startup Tucson will use a five-year $1.44 million federal grant to coach high-potential, local businesses through early challenges as part of an effort to boost job growth across Tucson. The ScaleUp America grant, administered through the U.S. Small Business Administration, will support Startup Tucson’s Thryve Next, a model for entrepreneurial cultivation and education. “Our primary priority is to drive job growth over the next five years across Tucson, working with those companies that have the highest potential to grow and add jobs and be able to export their products and services around the world – then import those revenues back to Tucson,” said Justin Williams, CEO and founder of Startup Tucson. Thryve will focus its accelerator pro182 BizTucson

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gram on high-potential, growth-oriented companies with annual revenues between $150,000 and $500,000. “The kind of companies we’re looking at have been in business for a couple of years and they haven’t grown to the scale that the founders expected. There’s some sort of barrier that’s preventing them from making the next step,” Williams said. One of seven successful applicants nationwide out of more than 60 proposals, Thryve is unique among the grantees in two significant aspects – applying specific selection criteria to the businesses it assists and applying business tools that prove successful in the startup realm to existing businesses. “Unlike many other programs that have been funded by the SBA, this is

a selection-based program,” Williams said. “Typically with programs they’ve supported in the past, resources go to the first company that walks in the door. It’s important for businesses to recognize that this is a competitive process and we’re looking for entrepreneurs who want to grow their businesses. “In our case, we were bringing forward the current models of launching and growing new startup companies and applying that to established businesses. I don’t think any other programs were drawing on tools for startups in their proposals.” Thryve will use the grant funding to support two to four cohorts of roughly 10 companies each year. The money doesn’t go directly to companies, but instead to support programs like educawww.BizTucson.com


tion, networking and trouble-shooting. “Each team that comes in will effectively be joining a CEO network as part of this,” Williams said. “They will be getting curriculum and mentoring from some of the top people in Tucson – not the kind of adviser they currently have access to. We’ll walk them through a 12week program starting to triage what it is that’s breaking down in their process.” Williams expects each company to have a different challenge or mix of challenges – whether it’s in finding the right customers or being able to market effectively. “The staff we’ve brought together for this program has a huge amount of success and experience. Being able to work with these sorts of advisors will be a huge step up,” he said. “We help prepare them to present to investors if that’s their next step. We’ll work with partners and help them present to a bank if they need funding through more traditional means. They’ll be able to participate in pitch and showcase events. Once they’re admitted into our program, there’s an ongoing relationship, with support in as many ways

www.BizTucson.com

It’s important for businesses to recognize that this is a competitive process and we’re looking for entrepreneurs who want to grow their businesses.

– Justin Williams CEO & Founder, Startup Tucson

as we can provide.” Thryve will kick off the program in February, following applications and the selection process in December and January. There will be new application windows for each additional cohort, and prior applications will be revisited as well. “Our interest is in having as wide a visibility as possible for the program,” he said. “Our model is to incorporate the tools that we’ve been developing for

startups over the last three years and integrate that with another model called economic gardening. “It’s kind of counterintuitive because these businesses have been around for a while – but if they’ve hit a wall, they’re in a similar boat,” he said. “They’re looking around wondering why they need help and in the end, the sort of things we teach startups can help. We anticipate being able to offer continuing services to the companies that come to this program, so the relationship doesn’t end with the cohort. Our approach to this is as comprehensive as it can be.” Though tech companies are a natural fit for Thryve, the program is not exclusive to that sector, Williams said. Any type of company that has highgrowth potential would be a good fit. He cited the national success of Buffalo Exchange as an excellent example of a Tucson startup business that used a more traditional retail model. Small businesses interested in Thryve Next can email Thryve@startuptucson. com or visit www.startuptucson.com/ thryve.

Biz

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PHOTOS: COURTESY WHOLE FOODS MARKET

BizCOMMERCIAL

Makeover Magic Market in Casas Adobes Plaza Stays True to Original Feel By Gabrielle Fimbres After more than 18 months of construction, Whole Foods Market is hopping in Casas Adobes Plaza, bringing new life to this celebrated center that features longtime merchants and striking Spanish Colonial architecture. The anchor seems to fit right in with the plaza, which was created by a protégé of renowned Tucson architect Josias Joesler. Casas Adobes Plaza was built in 1953 at the southwest corner of Oracle and Ina roads, with winding red brick staircases and breezeways. Melding history with the latest in convenience is the new Whole Foods Market, which opened in August. The store was dismantled down to the ground in January 2013, and rebuilt from a 16,000-square-foot structure to a more than 30,000-square-foot store with a second story to accommodate office space. 184 BizTucson

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“It’s great to be back,” said Scott Holmes, who manages the store. He said response has been overwhelmingly positive. “Customers are glad we are back and the other stores tell us they have seen an increase in business. It’s been a win-win for everyone.” He said customers are most enamored with the selection of prepared foods, the produce selection and meat counter. “The response has been great,” Holmes said. “Our meat counter has been a huge hit and the produce is so colorful and fresh. Everything is new and bigger and better.” The store includes a dine-in restaurant, with room for 45 seats indoors and 30 seats on an outside patio. Diners can enjoy the bar’s 24 craft beers on draft, with at least 12 dedicated to local brews. “We’ve nearly doubled our store size and hired more than www.BizTucson.com


100 new team members from the community to bring healthy food and living to nearby residents from Tucson, Marana and Oro Valley,” Holmes said. Local subcontractors that took part in the construction project included RG & Sons Plumbing, Addisigns, McNary Co., Arizona Cleaning, Universal Wallboard, CMR Construction and Wiese Painting Contractors. Holmes said Whole Foods is committed to providing locally produced products whenever possible, including humanely raised meats. “We make sure local products are integrated into the store, and are not just an afterthought,” Holmes said. Shop owners in Casas Adobes Plaza are pleased with the new addition. “We have noticed an uptick in walk-in traffic and in sales,” said John Kopplin, who owns Maya Palace with his wife, Susy Kopplin. “It has definitely been a positive.” Jeff Kaiserman, founder of Frost a Gelato Shoppe, said the new Whole Foods “is a great addition to the center. They did a nice remodel, outside and in. We have seen a lot of new business, and it’s like the Casas Adobes of old.” Ted Greve, owner of Loop Jean Company with his wife Tamara Greve, said the “Whole Foods people are very professional and handled the reopening very well.” The new anchor is like frosting on the cake at the center, Ted Greve said. “Business has been up every year since we opened in Casas Adobes in 2008,” he said. “Casas Adobes is the best property in the greater Tucson area by a long ways. It’s unique in terms of charm, architecture and feel. We absolutely believe in this property and it’s a pleasure to be here.”

Biz

Keeping It Local Whole Foods Market incorporates locally grown, raised and produced items. Among the local brands found at Whole Foods are: • Adobe Rose Inn • Adventure Coffee Roasting • Alejandro’s Tortilla Chips • Arbuckle Coffee • Arizona Cactus Ranch • Birds Nest Granola • Briggs & Eggers Orchard • Dog Gon Good Biscuits • Dream With Colors • English Fruit Farm • Forever Yong Farm • Grandma Koyotes BBQ • Green Valley Pecan Company • Isabella’s Ice Cream

• JC’s Midnite Salsa • JoBob’s BBQ • Margy’s Kitchen Jam • Popcorn Country • Ramona Farms • San Xavier Cooperative Farm • Small Planet Bakery • Tortilleria Arevalo • Tucson Tamale Company • Tucson Urban Firewood • Vivapura • Wholesum Harvest • Willcox Greenhouse Company Cooperative Farm

Whole Foods Market was founded in 1980 in Austin, Texas. In fiscal year 2013, the company had sales of $12.9 billion and currently has more than 80,000 employees and 370 stores in the United States, Canada www.BizTucson.com and the United Kingdom.

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BizAWARDS

2014 Copper Cactus Award Winners Ben Korn Named Small Business Leader of the Year By David B. Pittman The Tucson Metro Chamber hosted the 17th annual Copper Cacand printing company. Korn is president of Greater Tucson Leadership, a member of the Centurions for Carondelet Health Network, tus Awards, presented by Wells Fargo, honoring... organizations. Ben chairman of the Emerging Leaders Council and former president of Korn, owner of Safeguard Tucson, was named small business leader of the year. Tucson Young Professionals. The event was held Oct. 31 at Casino Del Sol Resort & Con“I am fortunate to have the ability to contribute to this community ference Center, hosted by KMXZ-FM’s Bobby Rich and in a meaningful way,” Korn said. KGUN-TV’s April Madison. Other nominees were Mike Hammond, president and Awards categories included Innovation Through Techmanaging shareholder of Cushman & Wakefield/PICOR; nology, Best Places to Work and Business Growth. For the Jeffrey Hamstra, owner of Hamstra Heating & Cooling; and first time, outstanding charitable nonprofit businesses were David Lovitt, president of D.M. Lovitt Insurance Agency. also honored. About 450 small businesses were nominated. Wells Fargo established the Copper Cactus Awards in The winners were selected from four finalists in each cat1998 and turned the lead role over to the chamber in 2012. egory. Wells Fargo continues as presenting sponsor. Intuit and Casino Del Sol are co-sponsors. “We are proud to showcase the companies judged ‘best of Ben Korn Judges were Michael Burdette of Wells Fargo; Pam Crim, the best’ by their peers,” said Michael Varney, the chamber’s Cox Business; Mark Dean, Intuit; Sharon Foltz, Tucson president and CEO. Electric Power; Helaine Levy, Diamond Family Philanthropies; Molly Korn, 37, a graduate of Sabino High School and Northern Arizona University, began working at Safeguard Tucson in 2005 and Gilbert, Tech Parks Arizona; Dave Iaconis, BeachFleischman; Tad has consistently grown the business since purchasing it from his parJewell, Lovitt & Touche; Dick Luebke, Pima Medical Institute; and ents in January 2013. Safeguard Tucson is a promotional product Jeremy Woan, CyraCom International.

PHOTOS: ALI MEGAN

BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ARIZONA BEST PLACE TO WORK

Kent Vincent, M.D.

Children’s Orthopedic Specialists is the only medical practice dedicated to providing pediatric and adolescent orthopedic care in Southern Arizona. It provides the entire spectrum of pediatric and adolescent musculoskeletal care – including newborns, sports medicine, fractures, scoliosis, spine issues and upper and lower extremity concerns. The practice uses a conservative, non-operative approach when possible and provides surgical treatment when needed. Susie Vincent, practice manager for the organization, said it is a great place to work “because it provides livable wages and great benefit packages, which includes 3½ to 7½ weeks of paid time off for holidays and vacations for all employees.”

26 to 50 employees HJ3 Composite Technologies

HJ3 is a leading manufacturer, designer and installer of composites used to strengthen infrastructure worldwide. Clients of the business save 60 to 90 percent of the costs of alternative repairs and replacement, while extending the life of their structures. HJ3 is a clean technology company and helps eliminate 95 percent of the environmental impact associated with tearing down and rebuilding infrastructure. HJ3’s team thrives on personal and professional growth, fostered by an internal membership program, quarterly community outreach and monthly town hall meetings.

Brad Smith

51 to 75 employees Airtronics

Mitch Pisik

Since it was established in 1975, Airtronics has provided topquality aircraft repair, manufacturing and design services. The company provides, among other things, operational test support for fixed-wing aircraft and missile systems and design/build manufacturing to reduce repair costs and improve readiness. A government contractor, Airtronics has worked closely with the U.S. Air Force and the Department of Defense to develop repair capability on items historically considered non-repairable. In so doing, more than $13 million of assets have been established as repairable. Airtronics is an international business that works with such countries as Saudi Arabia, Italy, Greece, Australia and New Zealand.

76 to 250 employees TM International

There is nothing temporary about TM International, a Tucson company that is the world’s largest manufacturer of temporary tattoos. TMI, which has been in business for more than 25 years, also produces a wide variety of craft and children’s activity products – such as stickers, paint sheets, books, scratchn-win cards and pocket calendars. “We have such a strong team. Being recognized as the employer of choice in Southern Arizona is not only a great reflection on all the employees of TM International but also to our clients and customers,” said Mitch Pisik, president and CEO of the company.

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Winners of the 2014 Tucson Metro Chamber Copper Cactus Awards

3 to 25 employees Children’s Orthopedic Specialists

Jim Butler


BizAWARDS

Winners of the 2014 Tucson Metro Chamber Copper Cactus Awards

Gary Oschmann

Scott Neal

3 to 25 employees Oschmann Employee Screening Services

Oschmann Employee Screening Services is a national leader in developing, managing and servicing drug and alcohol testing programs, employee background checks and motor carrier safety services programs. The company is accredited by the Drug and Alcohol Testing Industry Association. Earlier this year the Transportation Security Administration, a federal agency within the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, selected Oschmann as the exclusive Universal Enrollment Center in Southern Arizona. Gary Oschmann, owner of the firm, called winning the award a “validation of all the hard work my staff has put in and the sacrifice of my family.”

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26 to 50 employees Mastek-InnerStep

Craig Mast and Kathy Mast founded Mastek-InnerStep, which provides electronic manufacturing services on a contract basis, in 1999. The company has the ability to convert product concepts into reality. A member of the Arizona Technology Council and the Tucson Supplier Partnership, MastekInnerStep uses a 20,000-squarefoot facility to provide manufacturing support in cable and harness assembly, printed circuit board assembly and full product building and testing. The company can provide support to all phases of a product’s life cycle, including R&D prototyping, production ramp-up and legacy product support.

Winter 2015

Tim Grimes

51 to 75 employees Andersen, Randall and Richards

With roots dating to 1998, Andersen, Randall and Richards specializes in helping its clients successfully manage and recover their outstanding accounts receivable. Starting as a modest, home-based business, the company now operates from a 13,000-square-foot Tucson corporate office and maintains branches throughout the nation. It serves more than 8,000 clients of all sizes in the United States and around the world. “Winning this award means we are growing – and without growth you die,” said John Wieland, the company’s CFO. “Our employees are our biggest asset. Without them we couldn’t do what we do.”

Ryan George

76 to 250 employees Simpleview

Simpleview helps destination marketing organizations succeed on every front – from convention sales to tourism marketing and day-to-day operations. The company offers integrated products and services – including the industry’s most advanced customer relationship management and content management system platforms, powerful forecasting and reporting tools, dynamic websites, sites for mobile web, search engine optimization and interactive marketing. With more than 20 years of experience, a list of more than 350 clients and more than 150 employees, Simpleview is a leader in delivering powerful tools and marketing techniques to those in the tourism industry.

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: ALI MEGAN

COX BUSINESS GROWTH


PHOTOS: ALI MEGAN

NEXTRIO INNOVATION THROUGH TECHNOLOGY

Eric Smith

Aztera is an engineering company focused on developing technology for established firms and startups alike. It specializes in building automated test and measurement platforms, developing prototypes and supporting manufacturing across a wide array of markets, with a particular focus on energy efficiency and life sciences. Aztera is “closely tied with the University of Arizona – especially the College of Engineering and AzRISE, a renewable energy center,” said Manny Teran, the company’s founder and CEO. “We take pride in our work with Intel, Biosphere 2 and a variety of companies in Tucson and Phoenix, large and small.”

www.BizTucson.com

26 to 50 employees

Associates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Formed more than 40 years ago, Associates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery provides diagnostic, surgical and post-surgical care in Tucson and Sierra Vista. The AOMS team of doctors are well trained in a broad scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures – including office-based anesthesia, dental implants, corrective jaw surgery and facial trauma. “With an untiring commitment to quality care, we have built our team to include the most qualified oral and maxillofacial surgeons and support staff,” according to the AOMS website. “In addition, we strive for that excellence through advancing education, participating in our community and being active in our profession.”

Scott N. Sheftel M.D., FAAD

51 to 75 employees HealthySkin Dermatology

Henry Johnstone, PE

HealthySkin Dermatology provides services in Tucson, Oro Valley, Sahuarita, Willcox and Globe. Its medical staff is expert in all aspects of skin care, medical and cosmetic, and specializes in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of skin cancer. HealthySkin Dermatology physicians are board certified and stay current in the latest treatment modalities for diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Winning the award “is all about the performance of our entire organization,” said Scott Sheftel, managing partner of the organization. “This is what 70 people accomplished together.”

76 to 250 employees GLHN Architects & Engineers Established in 1963, GLHN

Architects & Engineers is an employee-owned firm in Tucson offering integrated, multidiscipline services in architecture and mechanical, electrical, civil and technology engineering. GLHN has a staff of more than 80 people. It also employs LEED-accredited professionals in all disciplines and has a resume of LEED-certified projects to its credit. “This award is recognition of the great work our people are doing,” said Henry Johnstone, president of GHLN. “We have a motto: ‘Our success comes from making others succeed.’ This is feedback from the community that we are achieving our goal.”

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Winners of the 2014 Tucson Metro Chamber Copper Cactus Awards

3 to 25 employees Aztera

Clifford W. Cornelius, D.D.S.


BizAWARDS

Winners of the 2014 Tucson Metro Chamber Copper Cactus Awards

Liz Baker

Bonnie Kampa

$50,000–$499,999 total revenue

Southern Arizona Research, Science and Engineering Foundation SARSEF empowers Southern Arizona’s K-12 students to participate in science, technology, engineering and math through inquiry-based learning and research. The organization serves more than 75,000 students annually across seven Southern Arizona counties, offering free, year-round educational outreach, with particular focus on low-income students. “We’ve been an all-volunteer organization for 55 years and now, in our 60th year, we have just 2.5 employees,” said Liz Baker, director of SARSEF. “We are very hopeful that the attention we receive because of this award means that we will continue to grow and be able to help more students.”

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$500,000–$1,999,999 total revenue

Tucson Botanical Gardens Located on a historic property, the Tucson Botanical Gardens is celebrating its 40th anniversary. During that time it has become a Tucson institution, providing educational resources to children and adults, and offering a tranquil environment to Tucsonans and visitors alike. Voted the best secret garden by Readers Digest, the gardens are supported by income generated through admissions, memberships, gift shop sales, special events, classes and rentals. It also benefits from contributions from individuals, corporations and foundations, and grants from the City of Tucson and Pima County. Volunteers assist the staff with almost every aspect of operations.

Winter 2015

$2,000,000–$4,999,999 total revenue

Interfaith Community Services A volunteer-based non-profit, Interfaith Community Services provides food, job assistance and emergency financial assistance to Pima County residents in need and assists seniors and disabled adults with Mobile Meals, transportation, home repairs and health and safety needs. Affiliated with 75 faith communities, ICS helps nearly 37,000 people a year achieve stable, healthy and independent lives. “We would not have received this honor without the hard work and dedication of our staff, our board of directors and the 700 volunteers who have supported our efforts,” said ICS CEO Bonnie Kampa.

PHOTOS: ALI MEGAN

TUCSON ELECTRIC POWER CHARITABLE NONPROFIT BUSINESS

Thomas Litwicki, M. Ed.

$5,000,000–$9,999,999 total revenue

Old Pueblo Community Services Since 1996, Old Pueblo Community Services has provided assistance to more than 17,000 people who struggle with addiction, homelessness and mental health concerns – by providing housing options, behavioral health counseling, employment coaching and peer support. On any given day, the organization houses 300 underserved people – including homeless veterans, people released from incarceration and those experiencing long-term homelessness. “Receiving this award means more people will become aware of the important work we are doing and join us,” said Tom Litwicki, CEO of OPCS. “This will spur greater community involvement and help us do even more.”

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

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BizHONORS

2014 Tucson Man of the Year

Bob Elliott By Jay Gonzales

As a high school teenager blessed with the talent to play major college basketball, Bob Elliott left his home near Detroit in search of the perfect place to grow, play basketball and get an education. He hadn’t been in Tucson long visiting the University of Arizona when a chance encounter with a local let him know he might be standing somewhere that would be special to him. “On my recruiting trip, I remember being at El Con Mall,” Elliott recalled. “I was in a store looking at pants, and this lady next to me started giving me her opinion, but in a nice way. That does not happen in Detroit.” More than 40 years later, Elliott considers himself one of the locals, embedded in the Tucson community as a recognizable face, not only for his basketball exploits at UA from 1973 to 1977, but as a businessman and community leader so dedicated to making Tucson a better place that he was named the 2014 Greater Tucson Leadership Man of the Year. When Elliott graduated from the UA with a degree in accounting, he and his wife, Beverely, who married after his sophomore year, decided to make their home in Tucson. Elliott spent six years traveling to play professional basketball, including a stint in Italy, but Tucson was always home for the couple. Once they decided to stay, they were all in, and raised a family of four kids here. “Tucson is a special community,” Elliott said. “The combination of the people, the weather, the mountains – it’s a beautiful place to live.” Elliott also recognized that his profile as a UA basketball player in a basketball town like Tucson would benefit him. During summers at the UA, he interned at local accounting firms. In 1983, when his basketball career was over, he established Elliott Accounting, which he operates today. “Because it’s the University of Arizona, because of University of Arizona basketball, because it’s a basketball town, people here knew a lot more about me other than the fact that I wore No. 55,” Elliott said. He understood that connections mattered, and if he were to succeed, he needed to connect with business and community leaders who could advise him and lead him down the path he ultimately took. His list of influences during his four decades in Tucson is a who’s who of the community – starting with John P. Schaefer, who was UA president when Elliott arrived on campus. www.BizTucson.com

It was Schaefer and then athletic director Dave Strack who made the bold hire of Fred Snowden to be the Wildcats’ basketball coach. Snowden, who had been a high school and college coach in the Detroit area, including at the University of Michigan, became the first African American to be hired as head coach at a major college basketball program. And players from Michigan followed, including Elliott. “If those three don’t do what they did, we are not here having this discussion,” Elliott said during an interview with BizTucson. Elliott still considers attorney Peter Economidis and Canyon Ranch founder Mel Zuckerman two of the advisers he affectionately refers to as his “Fab Five,” a group that helped him develop as a businessman and community leader. He said there was always a helping hand reaching out to him as he was establishing himself, and he considers it his responsibility to be the same for others – hence the bevy of boards and charitable efforts and giving that earned him the Man of the Year award. He will be honored Feb. 7 at the 62nd Annual Man and Woman of the Year and Founders Award Gala at Loews Ventana Canyon. His current involvement includes serving as board chair for UNS Energy Corporation-Fortis and AAA of Arizona. He has served on numerous local and national boards. “He has touched more lives in Tucson than most folks could ever imagine,” said Daisy Jenkins of Daisy Jenkins & Associates, who nominated Elliott. David Hutchens, president and CEO of Tucson Electric Power, said Elliott brings “wisdom, a keen business sense and an appreciation that Southern Arizona’s success depends on the willingness of corporate leaders to commit their time and energy to address our community’s most pressing needs. He brings a joyful, generous spirit and infectious positive attitude that make even the most daunting challenges seem manageable.” Mike Tully, president and CEO of AAA Arizona, said Elliott “embodies the caliber of leader and citizen who continuously gives back to the community. He loves Tucson and his leadership impact has been felt across the community.” Elliott said he and his wife believe in giving back to the community where they have prospered. “That’s why we are who we are, why we do what we do and how we do it. That’s why we’re Tucsonans.” Biz Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 193


PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

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BizHONORS

2014 Tucson Woman of the Year

Helaine Levy By Gabrielle Fimbres

Virtually every day, Helaine Levy hears from Tucsonans about the impact of her family’s philanthropy. A sick child could not be successfully treated until he was correctly diagnosed at the University of Arizona Medical Center Diamond Children’s. Her daughter’s friend is undergoing treatment for leukemia from the caring team at Diamond Children’s. The UA Steele Children’s Research Center makes another medical breakthrough. Programs at the Tucson Jewish Community Center support wellness. As executive director of Diamond Family Philanthropies, Levy is devoted to empowering the city that she grew up in. For her efforts, Levy is the Greater Tucson Leadership 2014 Woman of the Year. She will be honored Feb. 7 at the 62nd Annual Man and Woman of the Year and Founders Award Gala at Loews Ventana Canyon. “It was easy growing up in Tucson,” Levy said. “You had the support system of people that you knew who knew you. My parents always modeled philanthropy, and they feel very strongly about giving back to the community that enabled them to be successful.” She was just 6 when her parents, Donald and Joan Diamond, relocated the family from New York. The Diamonds met as UA students in 1947, and moved to Long Island, where Donald was a commodities dealer. Joan yearned to raise daughters Jennifer, Deanne and Helaine in Tucson, where she and her husband had many friends and where the weather would help Deanne, who had asthma. She died from the disease at age 13. Levy attended Robison Elementary, Mansfeld Junior High and Tucson High schools, and “grew up” at the Tucson J. “I am still friends with many childhood friends. I really love that.” She graduated from Boston University’s School of Public Communications, but her heart was in Tucson. Here, Levy has helped lead Old Tucson, which is owned in part by her family, and became executive director of Diamond Family Philanthropies in 1998. She has served as director of community relations for Diamond Ventures since 2000. Levy raised her three children here. Nathan is an MBA student at Boston University. Carly recently graduated from the UA Eller College of Management and is starting work with the Phoenix Suns. Gabby is a senior at The Gregory School and is making her college decision. “On any given day on my desk I have work to do for Diamond Ventures, Diamond Family Philanthropies, Old Tucson, my own volunteer work, college applications – any mom is like that,” Levy said. www.BizTucson.com

She is proud of the accomplishments of her family’s philanthropy, which took a significant leap forward with a $15 million gift to Diamond Children’s, helping to make the pediatric medical center a reality in 2010. The family had long been supporters of the UA and Steele Children’s Research Center, and the impetus for the gift came in part following a conversation Levy had with longtime family friend Mel Zuckerman, founder of Canyon Ranch. Zuckerman told her he was “having a difference of the meeting of the minds” with his longtime friend, Donald Diamond, a real estate developer. Zuckerman was leaving his legacy through charitable giving in his lifetime, while Diamond planned on making a legacy gift – like Diamond Children’s – after his death. “Mel told me that he saw a lot of merit in making a difference now, during my parents’ lifetime, and that really resonated with me,” Levy said. She wanted her parents to experience the joy of seeing their legacy gifts come to fruition – which happens daily through Diamond Children’s. Among her accomplishments, Levy helped create Social Venture Partners and the Nonprofit Loan Fund of Tucson and Southern Arizona, which is designed to strengthen the financial capacity of nonprofits. Through her professional relationship with Steve Alley, who was then CEO of Community Foundation for Southern Arizona, Social Venture Partners was created. The organization encourages philanthropists to pool resources – financial and time – to make an impact in the community. “Steve and I like to say we put the social in Social Venture Partners,” said Levy. The two have been married more than four years. Levy was nominated Woman of the Year by Jim Moore, president and CEO of the University of Arizona Foundation. “As someone who embodies the highest level of integrity, Helaine elevates any organization or project with which she is associated,” Moore said. Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, director of Steele Children’s Research Center, physician-in-chief at Diamond Children’s, head of the UA Department of Pediatrics and the Horace W. Steele Endowed Chair in Pediatric Research, said Levy’s work “is unparalleled.” She hopes to see Tucson move from a fragmented community to one where government, business and the social sector work collectively. “In the healthiest communities, there is a seat for everybody at the table. That’s my goal.” Biz Winter 2015 > > > BizTucson 195


PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

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BizHONORS

2014 Tucson Founders Award Honoree

Jim Murphy By Valerie Vinyard

Jim Murphy’s life is a biography waiting to be written. Family man. Marine. Foreman. Distributor. Elected official. Government administrator. Founder of nonprofits. A new chapter would include his latest accolade – the 2014 Tucson Founders Award to be presented by Greater Tucson Leadership on Feb. 7 at the 62nd Annual Man and Woman of the Year and Founders Award Gala at Loews Ventana Canyon. Established in 1985 by the Tucson Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, now Tucson Metro Chamber, the award goes to someone who has “demonstrated significant long-term community involvement and accomplishments and who has helped shape the community in a quality, positive manner.” “Jim has done extraordinary things in our community for a number of years,” said Suzanne McFarlin, executive director for GTL, which became a partner program of the chamber in 2012 and now presents the Man and Woman of the Year and Founders Awards. “We recognize him as a founder who has made a number of contributions in a selfless way. This award is really a lifetime achievement award.” While chatting at a northwest Starbucks, Murphy talked about the marriage of his daughter Tamah a few days earlier. “Family is the most important thing,” said Murphy, who was born in Pennsylvania and moved with his family to Tucson when he was 8 years old. “My wife and I feel we have set a tone for our kids and our grandkids. Part of what we’re here for is to help others.” Murphy’s biography would detail a range of occupations, including serving eight years in the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Reserve, “cable splicer helper” with Mountain Bell Telephone Company, second-shift shipping foreman at Krueger Manufacturing and – most importantly – husband of 46 years to Connie, dad to daughters Michele and Tamah, and grandfather to three. It was politics where Murphy began making his mark on this community. The former junior class president at Salpointe Catholic High School – and member of the Salpointe Sports Hall of Fame – won a spot on the Tucson City Council as a Democrat from 1965 to 1968. He resigned to become a member of the Pima County Board of Supervisors from 1968 to 1975. In 1975, he resigned again after being appointed Pima www.BizTucson.com

County’s assistant county manager. For 22 years, he served in government administration, the last 10 as director of Pima County’s healthcare system. Murphy then devoted 15 years to the Pima Council on Aging, the last six-and-a-half as CEO. He retired from PCOA in January 2013. Addressing the needs of older residents hasn’t been Murphy’s sole nonprofit focus. He’s helped establish several organizations in Tucson – including Reading Seed, Compass Health Care (now Pasadera Behavioral Health Network) and Tu Nidito Children and Family Services. His current affiliations include serving as president of the board of directors for Administration of Resources & Choices, Casitas On East Broadway, ITN GreaterTucson and NBA Estes Gardens Apartments, and president of the Tucson Housing Foundation board of trustees. He also serves on the Arizona Public Media Community Advisory Board and is chair of the City of Tucson Mayor’s Senior Task Force. “I’m very busy, but I’m not getting paid, which I don’t mind,” Murphy said. “I like to be active, to give back, to make a difference. I know those sound like clichés, but why are we here?” Charlotte Harris nominated Murphy for the Founders Award. Harris was a Woman of the Year recipient in 1984. She met Murphy when her husband, Michael J. Harris, served as his city council campaign chair. She also has served on the American Cancer Society and Tu Nidito boards with him and they both belong to the Rotary Club of Tucson. “I’ve known Jim for over 40 years,” said Harris, who also graduated from Salpointe. “He has always done the job thoroughly, passionately and with not a lot of fanfare. He is a very special person. He has so much depth in this community.” Murphy noted some things most people don’t know about him: He used to be an owner of Yogi’s, a lounge on East Speedway. Later he owned My Brother’s Place, a folk music club on Copper Street where Peter, Suzy and Linda Ronstadt performed as the New Union Ramblers. He even tried his hand at distributing for about five years when he and a friend provided mini-chimis to stores in Tucson, Phoenix and Albuquerque. “There’s a purpose for us being here, and that’s how I express it,” Murphy said. “We all contribute in our own ways.”

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BizGOVERNMENT

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey

Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild

Tucson Metro Chamber’s

State of Government 2015 Two Tucson Metro Chamber events will connect Southern Arizonans to government leaders at the state and local levels. The State of the State address on Jan. 13 gives Southern Arizonans a chance to meet new governor Doug Ducey, while the State of the City event on March 6 lets Tucsonans hear from Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild. The State of the State address takes place at the Hilton Tucson El Conquistador Golf & Tennis Resort. The State of the City address is at the JW Mar-

riott Starr Pass Resort & Spa. Ducey isn’t wasting any time in unveiling his plans to bolster Arizona and address its multitude of challenges. After being sworn into office on Jan. 5, Ducey, the state’s 23rd governor, will swing down to Tucson to address his plans for Southern Arizona and the state. Ducey, who won the November election with 53 percent of the vote, was previously Arizona’s state treasurer. Before serving in public office, Ducey was the CEO of ice cream franchise Cold Stone Creamery.

Rothschild, who has been Tucson’s mayor since 2011, will discuss the goals, planned policies and objectives for Tucson in the coming year. A Tucson native, Rothschild is a graduate of Canyon del Oro High School, Kenyon College and the University of New Mexico Law School. Before becoming mayor, he had a distinguished career as an attorney, serving as managing partner of the Tucson law firm of Mesch, Clark & Rothschild. He has been involved in numerous Tucson organizations.

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STATE OF THE STATE

STATE OF THE CITY

Tuesday, January 13 Hilton Tucson El Conquistador Golf & Tennis Resort 10000 N. Oracle Road

Friday, March 6 JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa 3645 W. Starr Pass Blvd.

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 10 a.m. – Business Expo 11:30 a.m. – Registration Noon – Luncheon and address $85 Tucson Metro Chamber members $115 Nonmembers

10 a.m. – Business Expo 11:30 a.m. – Registration Noon – Luncheon and address $85 Tucson Metro Chamber members $115 Nonmembers

Gov. Doug Ducey

Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild

Contact Jason Cook at (520) 792-2250, Ext. 158, or jcook@tucsonchamber.org. More information at www.tucsonchamber.org.

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BizCHOW Renee & Steve Kreager

PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

Owners Renee’s Organic Oven

Food for the Soul By Edie Jarolim

It’s not always easy to follow your convictions, as Renee Kreager has discovered, but doing so can be smart business – and lead to personal growth. Kreager, who co-owns Renee’s Organic Oven with her husband, Steve, is the driving force behind the intimate northeast-side pizzeria. She initially found it challenging to meet her own high standards for food – including providing locally grown produce, meats and more whenever possible. “When we opened our restaurant in January 2005, the organic and chemical-free ingredients we wanted to use were expensive and difficult to find,” Kreager said. But perseverance paid off, and Tucson and the rest of the country have caught up with the Kreagers, who are celebrating the restaurant’s 10th anniversary. “The organic market just keeps 200 BizTucson

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progressing to being more affordable and available,” she said. “Now WalMart is offering organic food at lower prices.” Her decision in 2007 to provide gluten-free products was similarly hard fought – and forward thinking. During the first two years she spent working the front of the house of her restaurant, getting feedback from her customers, the two requests she heard most often were for whole grain and glutenfree pizza. “Because we’re small, we couldn’t do both, so we chose the one for which there was the greater need,” Kreager said. She got dough from a gluten-free baker and put a sign out. The response was immediate – and enthusiastic. “A woman who ran a celiac kids’ group came in and educated me about what it would take to make the restaurant safe

for her daughter,” Kreager said. Many of the breads the restaurant now uses are gluten-free, and so are several desserts. Kreager has reached out to other members of the community for help in building her selection of gluten-free products – another lesson learned along the way. “We discovered the best way to go is to buy gluten-free products from other places we trust. It’s more expensive but it’s a guarantee of safety for those whose health is at issue,” she said. She recently started sourcing all her glutenfree pizza dough from the local Gourmet Girls. As of the end of 2014, Renee’s Organic Oven had served about 12,000 gluten-free pizzas. Also on the menu are appetizers, salads, sandwiches, pasta and more. Some www.BizTucson.com


dishes are gluten free, others are not. Kreager strives to pack each with nutrition and taste. Opening a restaurant that had pizza as its centerpiece was a natural for both Renee and Steve, who grew up outside of Detroit and worked in pizzerias there. But Renee’s commitment to healthful and socially responsible food was spurred by an experience unavailable to Steve – pregnancy. In 2002, when she was carrying their son, Jeffrey, Kreager became obsessed with reading every ingredient of every item she consumed. “My family thought I was nuts when they came to visit,” she recalled, but she wasn’t deterred. Just as Kreager initially felt a little overwhelmed with having the responsibility of creating a new life, she was a bit daunted at first by the responsibility of taking care of her customers. She quickly adjusted her perspective, however. Instead of getting bogged down with trying to be perfect, she realized, “I could celebrate everything I learned about food and make it fun and delicious for other people.” Although pregnancy spurred her interest in healthy food, Kreager’s caretaking tendencies date back to her years of working as a server – and to her love for her great-aunt, Betty. “When I was growing up, my great-aunt was one of the closest people to me. Whenever I waited on someone, I used to think, ‘How would I want someone to treat Betty?’ ” That’s still her philosophy, one she trains her staff to follow. “Everyone has special needs, whether for certain foods or for kind treatment – and it’s crucial to meet them whenever possible,” she contends. It was Kreager’s growing confidence in the quality of her food and in herself as a restaurateur that convinced her in 2011 to make perhaps the toughest business decision of her career – to change the restaurant’s name midstream. The original name, Eclectic Pizza, was a tribute to Mark Smith, a key investor in the restaurant and one of the owners of the Eclectic Café, where Kreager had waited tables. “Mark was very supportive of our plans to open our own place, and when we found a space in the same complex as Eclectic, we took the safe route with the name,” Kreager said. But Steve and Renee realized that affiliating themselves with a 30-year-old business – even one they admired greatly – didn’t convey their distinctive, innovative approach. “It was confusing and didn’t reflect who we were – or the products I was putting my heart and soul into,” Kreager said. They were also losing business to the cafe, which people thought was the same as the pizzeria. As usual, Kreager surveyed her patrons before doing anything. “I started asking customers what they would think if I changed the name, for about six months. The feedback I got was overwhelmingly positive,” she said. Sure enough, under its new name, Renee’s Organic Oven saw a 40 percent increase in sales in the first year. Looking back, Kreager sees that her biggest achievement is finding balance, learning to trust her own voice while always taking others into account. “Mixing grit with kindness,” as she puts it, has turned out to be a recipe for success.

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BizTRIBUTE

A Rock-Solid Banker By Teresa Neil Nowak

Forty-four years of banking bring a depth of wisdom not easily replaced. Tucson lost a deep source of knowledge Oct. 18, 2014, when Fred Dawson Jr. died. Dawson made a lasting impact on our community – reflected in a legacy of bankers he mentored, businesses and professionals he counseled, and family and friends he loved. He shared his time and expertise. He served with a sense of duty and a tireless work ethic. His profound perspective helped banks mitigate risk and recover potential loss. Raised in downtown Tucson, Dawson learned the meaning of hard work as a summer farm laborer. He enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam War, earning the Purple Heart when he sustained a near-fatal sniper shot. He lived with the bullet lodged in his neck as a reminder of his survival. Dawson graduated from the University of Arizona with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and joined Southern Arizona Bank in 1969 as a management trainee. He became proficient in all facets of banking. Perhaps his crowning achievement 202 BizTucson

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was his contribution to the resurrection of the failed Union Bank, which was recapitalized by Jim Click and Robert Tuttle. Arizona Bank became a top-rated $900 million bank. Under Dawson’s leadership as executive VP and credit administrator, the bank achieved the highest ratings for safety, soundness and community reinvestment from its regulators, and flourished as the state’s largest independently owned bank. Click frequently said that “his continuing investment required Fred protecting the quality of the bank’s assets.” Dawson also helped navigate its sale to Compass Bank for a substantial return on investment for shareholders. Dawson served as regional credit administrator for Compass Bank before joining the senior management team at the new Commerce Bank of Arizona. He served the last decade of his career there, helping it grow into a $265 million bank with a five-star rating from Bauer Financial. He shared his expertise with frequent presentations to the Arizona Small Business Association and mentored students at the UA Eller College of Management, opening doors of opportunity

for the next generation of leaders. Dawson developed lasting relationships with his clients. He volunteered to spend the last year of his career working on troubled assets to recover losses to the bank in the wake of the recession. As his best friend, John P. Lewis, remarked at Dawson’s memorial, bankers are constantly questioned on their decisions and must be resolute in their instincts. Dawson demonstrated this capacity confidently, never wavering on his judgment, and in turn brought confidence to those around him. He is survived by the love of his life, his wife of 43 years, Chari Dawson, sons Rick and Steve, grandson Jayden, mother Ruby G. Dawson and other family members. Donations in memory of Fred Dawson Jr. are welcomed at the Arizona chapter of the ALS Association, 360 E. Coronado Road, Phoenix, AZ 85004. Teresa Neil Nowak is a VP and business banking relationship manager at Bank of the West. Dawson and her late father, John C. Neil, started their banking careers on the same day and worked together their entire careers. Dawson became her mentor after her father died

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