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SPRING FALL 2012 2018

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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SPECIAL REPORT: Southern Arizona Leadership Council Stone Canyon

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SPRING 2018 • $3.99 • DISPLAY UNTIL 06/30/18


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BizLETTER

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Spring 2018

Volume 10 No. 1

Publisher & Owner

Steven E. Rosenberg Brent G. Mathis

Creative Director Photo: Steven Meckler

Jay Gonzales said it best: “Golf is supposed to be fun. It’s a simple notion and it’s the foundation for a business model for PGA Tour Champion Phil Mickelson and his partners at Mickelson Golf Properties. It brought them to the Tucson area, where they purchased the financially troubled Stone Canyon Golf Club in Oro Valley in 2014, one of six golf properties the company now owns.” After a few years, the club is now thriving with housing developments, a new clubhouse and is on track for continued success. Mickelson definitely has a vision for the future of golf and executive living at Stone Canyon. He has a love for Tucson, winning four of his 42 PGA Tour Championships here. Mickelson told Gonzales, “I feel like we’re making golf more enjoyable because we’re making the courses we take over more playable.” In 2017, Forbes ranked Mickelson as the #12 highest-paid athlete in the world, after combining tour earnings and endorsements, and stated that Mickelson “dominated his sport” and is “one of only six athletes to top the Forbes highest-paid athletes list since 1990.” Mickelson pitches for Amgen, KPMG, Rolex, Callaway Golf, Intrepid Financial Partners, Graywawk, The Greenbrier Resort and Workday. Yet he remains ever affable and accessible to his fans. Our Stone Canyon Special Report highlights the generous philanthropy of the Stone Canyon Foundation, along with the Phil and Amy Mickelson Foundation, in serving the region’s most underprivileged youth. Since 2008 the foundation, which is made up entirely of members of The Stone Canyon Club, has donated approximately $2 million to make the community a better place, especially for children at risk. Speaking of making the community a better place to live, the Southern Arizona Leadership Council continues its momentum to set and reach focused actions and goals over the past 20 years. Comprised of more than 140 of the region’s C-level executives, it has truly become a powerhouse for getting things done. David Pittman files a special report on key accomplishments of SALC and the organization’s 2018 Policy Goals and Actions. SALC continues to address the key focus areas of governance, inno-

vation economy, healthcare, infrastructure and P-20 education. Education is SALC’s top priority, the need to address our state’s low rankings and the opportunities for improvement. SALC’s CEO Ron Shoopman, a retired brigadier general, said those who join the organization do so because of what he calls a “greater-good gene” in their makeup. “SALC is a leadership organization that views issues through a business lens,” he said. “It employs research and fact-based decision-making to develop strategic policy important to Southern Arizona and the state.” The 24th Annual Father of the Year Awards Gala on May 31 benefits type 1 diabetes research at the University of Arizona’s Steele Children’s Research Center. In this issue, you’ll meet this year’s stellar slate of honorees, selected by the Father’s Day Council Tucson: Bill Assenmacher, Rudy Dabdoub, Ryan Hansen, Richard Kauffman, MSgt. Timothy Ledford, Tony Penn and Jonathan Rothschild. These men have given great service to our community, excelled in their profession and most importantly are exceptional role-model fathers. Romi Carrell Wittman interviews the new president and CEO of the Tucson Metro Chamber, Amber Smith, who succeeds Mike Varney. Chairman of the Board Larry Lucero said, “Amber brings her exceptional business advocacy track record and will build upon Mike’s success. I was impressed with her community vision and the different perspective she brings to the Chamber.” Finally, congratulations to El Guero Canelo recently honored with a James Beard Award for their Sonoran Hot Dog. Only in Tucson. Steven E. Rosenberg Publisher & Owner BizTucson

Contributing Editors

Jay Gonzales Donna Kreutz

Contributing Copyeditors

Elena Acoba Diane Luber

Contributing Technology Director

Mike Serres

Contributing Project & & Event Coordinator

Maricela Robles

Contributing Writers

Elena Acoba Lee Allen Rhonda Bodfield April Bourie Mary Minor Davis Jay Gonzales Chuck Graham June C. Hussey Tara Kirkpatrick Contributing Photographers

Chris Cardenas Rob Cross Laura Eltze Gregory Ferreira Matt George Patric Giclas Chris Hinkle Brandy Holden Amy Haskell

William Lesch Greg Mastorakos Brent G. Mathis Chris Mooney Mamta Popat David Sanders Robin Stancliff Silhouette Photography Balfour Walker

Member:

Arizona Builders’ Alliance DM-50 Greater Oro Valley Chamber of Commerce Marana Chamber of Commerce Sun Corridor Inc. Tucson Advertising Federation Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Tucson Metro Chamber Visit Tucson

BizTucson Phone: 520.299.1005 Subscription Information:

www.BizTucson.com subscriptions@BizTucson.com Advertising information:

Steve Rosenberg 520.299.1005 or 520.907-1012 steve@BizTucson.com BizTucson is published quarterly by Rosenberg Media, LLC. ,Tucson, AZ ©2018 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in columns or articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

POSTMASTER:

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Tiffany Kjos Christy Krueger David Pittman Steve Rivera Monica Surfaro Spigelman Valerie Vinyard Romi Carrell Wittman

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Trust The Clements Team To Protect You & Your Business The Clements Agency, LLC is a member of Trusted Choice®, offering the smart way to buy insurance. Trusted Choice® agents and brokers represent multiple insurance companies, offering you a variety of coverage choices and customized plans to meet your specialized needs. Most importantly, as Trusted Choice® agents we are not employees of an insurance company, so you have someone who works for you, not the company.

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FEATURES COVER STORY:

118 Phil Mickelson’s Vision

DEPARTMENTS

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BizLETTER From the Publisher

WOMEN WHO LEAD 16 BizLEADERSHIP Amber Smith 154 BizEDUCATION Nicola Hartmann BizHONORS 156 Gail Giclas

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BizBIOSCIENCE $107 Million UA Bioscience Research Laboratory BizHONORS UA Eller College Executive of the Year BizEDUCATION University of Arizona Strategic Plan BizMILITARY Major General Edward P. Maxwell Retires BizTOURISM The Retreat: Miraval’s New Luxury Suites BizCUISINE National Award for El Guero Canelo Flour Power: Gourmet Girls

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BizLAW Farhang & Medcoff Attorneys BizEDUCATION Arizona Assurance Makes College Possible BizMEDICINE 105 Banner Health Opens Outpatient Campus BizENTREPRENEUR 108 Veterans Invention Spawns Online Business BizAWARDS 141 Carroll Wins with Powder Play 142 ASID Design Excellence Awards 144 148 152

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SPRING 2018 VOLUME 10 NO. 1

BizCONSTRUCTION New To Market: Projects in the Region BizREALESTATE 26th CCIM Forecast & Legend Award BizAWARDS MPA Common Ground

ABOUT THE COVER Phil Mickelson at Stone Canyon Photo by Rob Cross Creative Design by Brent G. Mathis

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BizHR Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Awards BizHONOR Father of the Year Honorees:

Selected by Father’s Day Council Tucson

Bill Assenmacher Rudy Dabdoub Ryan Hansen Richard Kauffman, MSgt. Timothy D. Ledford Tony Penn Jonathan Rothschild

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BizSALES Sales Guru Jeffrey Gitomer BizNONPROFIT Linkages Building Bridges Awards BizGREEN Greenest Workplace Awards BizHONORS Good Scout Awards Buck O’Rielly Fletcher McCusker Shelene Taylor

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BizVOLUNTEERS Arizona Builders Alliance Volunteer Day BizTRIBUTE Lowell Rothschild

SPECIAL REPORTS Southern Arizona Leadership Council

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SPECIAL REPORT 2018

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

20 Years of Impact & Progress PHOTO: WILLIAM LESCH

BizCONTENTS

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Stone Canyon SPECIAL REPORT 2018

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

STONE CANYON For the Love of Golf

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> BizTucson 2018 > >Homes by Stone Canyon Golf Casitas and Boulder Vista bySpring Meritage

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BizLEADERSHIP

Amber Smith

Takes the Reins of Tucson Metro Chamber

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Romi Carrell Wittman

“Better together” could be Amber Smith’s motto. After nine years spent building the Metropolitan Pima Alliance into the collaborative regional force it is today, Smith believes very strongly that the path to a prosperous community is possible only when we work together to find common ground. This philosophy will serve her well as she steps into her new role – president and CEO of the Tucson Metro Chamber. Smith is the first woman to lead the Chamber in the 120-year history of the organization, and she comes to the job at a time of community transformation. Southern Arizona faces several critical economic issues, like infrastructure demands and workforce development, issues that outgoing Chamber CEO Mike Varney incorporated into the Chamber’s mission. 16 BizTucson

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At the press conference announcing Smith’s appointment, Larry Lucero, senior director of government and external affairs at Tucson Electric Power and the 2018 chair of the Metro Chamber board, said the moment was a passing of the torch. “Amber brings her exceptional business advocacy track record and will build upon Mike’s success,” he said. “I was impressed with her community vision and the different perspective she brings to the Chamber.” Under her leadership, the Chamber will continue to strive to improve its business advocacy efforts to ensure business owners and executives have a voice in policy and legislation that could affect their businesses. Smith is ready to take on these issues and further the Chamber’s mission and continued on page 18 >>>

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WOMEN WHO LEAD

Amber Smith

President & CEO Tucson Metro Chamber www.BizTucson.com

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BizLEADERSHIP

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continued from page 16 vision. “The value I bring is that I have an outsider’s perspective – with connections and relationships throughout the community,” she said. “We don’t need simply a Chamber response to issues. We need a community response.” Smith is well-known throughout Southern Arizona for her work not only with MPA, but also her involvement with the DM50, a nonprofit, volunteer organization with the mission of educating local and national leaders about the vital role that Davis-Monthan Air Force Base plays in the local economy and in national defense. She also co-founded – and currently serves as president of – the Southern Arizona Defense Alliance, a civic group similar to the DM50, but with the specific mission of supporting all military assets located across Southern Arizona. This includes the 162nd Fighter Wing of the Air National Guard, Fort Huachuca, the Yuma Marine Corps Air Station, the Yuma Proving Grounds and the Arizona National Guard Silverbell Army Heliport in Marana. Through the DM50 and SADA, Smith has worked closely not only with local business leaders and elected officials, but also with congressional leadership. Last year, Smith met with Arizona’s congressional delegation in Washington, D.C., about the national security importance of the Southern Arizona military installations. Ted Maxwell, president of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council, has worked with Smith on several projects, including SADA. He believes Smith will bring to the job not only her extensive knowledge of the local economic landscape, but – perhaps even more critically – a sense of collaboration. “Amber brings a good understanding of business, from big to small,” he said. “She has a willingness and passion to collaborate and work with anyone in the community in order to improve the business environment and quality of life in our region.” Smith’s policy bona fides are strong. Originally from Houston, she attended the University of Arizona, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in political science and later a master of public administration degree. Her work experience includes serving in the office of Sen. John McCain in constituent services and as an intergovernmental relations associate for Racy & Associates, a firm specializing in policy and government relations. Her personal ties to the community also run deep. She lives on Tucson’s northwest side with her husband, Robert, a fire captain with the Tucson Fire Department. They share their home, which sits on several acres, with their three young sons, ages 9, 7 and 3, plus several goats, donkeys, dogs and some chickens for good measure. Her family and home – the Smith Ranch, as she calls it – provide a much-needed respite from the demands of her professional life. “I get to escape the craziness of the day and enjoy my boys, garden and animals in a peaceful part of town. We really love the exquisite natural environment Tucson offers,” she said. “Tucson genuinely offers the perfect balance for both a rural or urban lifestyle.” As with any new job, there will be a learning curve. Board chair Lucero said, “The work she’s going to have to do now is learning Chamber business. She has the policy background, but the Chamber world is new.” Smith is excited about the challenges and opportunities ahead. “While the learning curve is a vertical incline, I am continued on page 20 >>> www.BizTucson.com


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BizLEADERSHIP

continued from page 18 excited and proud to have this platform to grow our workforce development, improve our infrastructure, strengthen small businesses and create the right environment to raise a family, attract talent and retain our graduates,” she said. “The Chamber will lead in uniting the interests of the business community for the prosperity of the entire metropolitan Tucson area.”

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Amber Smith at a Glance Amber Smith is heavily involved in the community in both a professional and personal capacity. Below are just a few of her many achievements: Awards and Accolades

• • •

Inside Tucson Business named her a “Woman of Influence” in 2012. Also in 2012, the Arizona Daily Star named her one of its “40 Under 40,” an honor bestowed on community leaders under the age of 40. In 2013, she was awarded the Commercial Real Estate Women Economic Improvement Award for her work on reducing metal theft

Board and Community Involvement

• •

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President, Southern Arizona Defense Alliance – She is a founding board member of the alliance of military installation support groups and businesses working with congressional members to protect, preserve and expand missions of multiple military bases for the preservation of $5.4 billion of economic revenue in Arizona. DM50 board member – Smith co-created a new brand and cohesive messaging in order to better advocate locally for the preservation of DavisMonthan Air Force Base – “America’s Asset. Tucson’s Treasure.” Smith also provides key support to advocacy efforts, working with local, state and congressional leadership on strategies to preserve and expand missions at DMAFB. Co-chair, Joint Steering Committee for DavisMonthan – Smith manages the consultant hired to advocate for DMAFB at federal level. Past chair, Regional Wastewater Reclamation Advisory Committee. This committee advises the Pima County Board of Supervisors on necessary wastewater commercial and residential rate changes in an effort to keep the department adequately funded in providing infrastructure while protecting the interests of the rate payers. Regional Transportation Authority Citizens Accountability for Regional Transportation Committee – Smith serves on this committee, which provides the required oversight and accountability of every specific RTA project as approved by the voters in 2004 to guarantee projects stay within budget, on time and are completed. www.BizTucson.com


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BizBRIEFS

Andrew Downin Vantage West Credit Union named Andrew Downin as its new VP of marketing and communications. He received his undergraduate degree in accounting from the University of Arizona and his MBA from Pepperdine University. Most recently he was managing director of research at the Filene Research Institute, a national think tank for the credit union industry. He also held product development and marketing positions in other credit unions.

Biz

Valerie Sanchez Valerie Sanchez returned to Chicanos Por La Causa as its regional manager of Southeast Arizona and director of development. She had worked in the Tucson office from 1999 to 2002. She is a founding member of Radio Cienega Network and serves on the Hispanic Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corporation board. She earned the 2011 Cox Communications Arizona Latino Leader Award and was named a 2012 Woman of Influence by Inside Tucson Business.

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PHOTO: GREGG MASTORAKOS

BizBIOSCIENCE

New Home for Bioscience Research $107 Million Building Opens in March By Tiffany Kjos World-renowned researchers soon will work in a new world-class biosciences facility on the University of Arizona campus. The $107 million, 150,000-squarefoot Bioscience Research Laboratory is officially complete and expected to open in March. The new structure, a stunning array of brick, steel, concrete and glass, was designed to integrate seamlessly with the existing buildings around and attached to it. The facility is next to the Medical Research Building on North Cherry Avenue. It contains lab space, offices, imaging rooms and a genetics core facility. The iconic Keating building next door is home to the university’s BIO5 Institute, directed by Jennifer Barton, who holds a doctorate in biomedical engineering. The building is a joint effort between the UA Office for Research, Discovery and Innovation and UA Health Sciences. It was designed by ZGF Architects and BWS Architects. The general contractor is DPR Construction. Beauty, functionality and sustainability were all factored into the design, www.BizTucson.com

according to Jason Schroeder of DPR Construction. Schroeder is overseeing field operations with DPR for this project. “One thing that we’re really focused on is the end users, the flexibility of the space and sustainability. And that’s what governs most of this design,” Schroeder said. It also focuses on creature comforts and includes a café, conference rooms and open areas called “interaction spaces.” Don’t expect to pop in and see the building unless you have business there. It’s secured throughout. It is expected to be ready for occupancy mid-March, and a show of art by UA employees will christen the lobby. For tour information, visit www.BIO5.org. Q&A with Dr. Jennifer Barton, Director, BIO5 Institute at the UA.

Q: How many jobs will the

Bioscience Research Laboratory bring to Tucson?

A:

The new building has room for about 50 faculty and 300 graduate students, post-docs and tech-

nical support staff. Some of these personnel are investigators who are moving from other places on campus to facilitate the creation of new interdisciplinary research teams, but most are new faculty and lab members who have been recruited with the promise of this new space and ability to work in teams. We estimate that roughly 200 new jobs (including faculty, graduate student assistants, postdoctoral associates and research technicians/staff) are being created as a result of this new facility.

Q: What kinds of research will A:

be done there?

The building focuses on the UA’s strategic bioscience research themes, including biosensors and bioimaging, bioinformatics, healthy aging, precision medicine and genomics technology. It represents the integration of life science research from the most fundamental, discovery science all the way to clinical therapeutics or diagnostics ready to be applied. continued on page 28 >>> Spring 2018

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BizBIOSCIENCE

continued from page 27

Q: How is it important to the UA? To the community? A: The Bioscience Research Labs building is critical to advancing biosci-

ence research and improving health for Arizonans. Much of the building is dedicated to services that are available not just to UA investigators, but also local industry. For example, the facility will be home to a clinical-certified genetics facility that can test tumor biopsies to determine the best treatment for an individual patient. An integrated imaging facility will include both scientific and human research imaging along with support for acquiring and analyzing images, available to anyone who needs advanced imaging services. The upper floors will house researchers who are pushing the boundaries of data sciences, Alzheimer’s and respiratory disease research, and developing, for example, novel sensors systems that can help people age comfortably in their own homes.

Q: What was the thinking behind the design? What were the

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

A:

Dr. Jennifer Barton Director BIO5 Institute at the University of Arizona

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UA’s goals with the design?

It is well-known that creativity happens when researchers from different fields are housed together, sharing new ideas, learning and adapting techniques from their respective work. The purpose of this building is to bring creative people together to find solutions to our health “grand challenges.” The building was carefully designed to include bioimaging and genomics facilities, to house researchers creating new imaging systems and generating new knowledge in biomedical sciences, and to also (this is a very unique idea) include the most cutting-edge faculty in data sciences, which will take the massive amounts of data generated in these experiments and analyze it to find new patterns, diagnoses and mechanisms of disease and treatment.

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BizHONOR

UA Eller College of Business Honors Intuit Founder Scott Cook By Elena Acoba Scott Cook, who co-founded Intuit in 1983, was named The University of Arizona Executive of the Year in recognition of his executive qualities in private enterprise and public service. Cook, who also chairs the company’s

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executive committee, will be honored by the UA Eller College of Management’s National Board of Advisors on April 6. Along with his executive duties, Cook can be seen around the company working with small teams to understand and

meet the needs of Intuit’s customers. Before founding what has become an accounting and tax-preparation software giant, he managed assignments in banking, food service and technology for Bain & Company, a corporate strate-

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gy consulting firm. He earlier spent four years with Procter & Gamble, where he currently sits on the board of directors. He also serves on the advisory board for the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Brand and Product Management and is president of the Intuit Scholarship Foundation. Cook earned an MBA from Harvard University and a bachelor’s degree in economics and mathematics from the University of Southern California. Eller’s National Board of Advisors has 53 current, emeritus and ex-officio members who are company founders and high-level executives. They are alumni, supporters and friends of the Eller College of Management. Board members provide expertise, advise the college, donate money and equipment, offer internships and jobs, host site visits and class projects and underwrite scholarships and faculty research. The board and the award were established in 1983. Previous winners include Cathy Englebert, CEO of Deloitte; Frederick W. Smith, chairman, CEO and founder of FedEx; Sam Fox, CEO and founder of Fox Restaurant Concepts; Janet Napolitano, president of the University of California and former federal Homeland Security secretary, and Laurence M. Baer, president and CEO of the San Francisco Giants.

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UA EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR LUNCHEON HONORING SCOTT COOK Friday, April 6 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort and Spa 3800 W. Starr Pass Blvd. $85 per person $850 for a table of 10 For more information: www.eller.arizona.edu/eoy/2018

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BizEDUCATION

‘Inclusivity and Transparency’

We are engaging the entire campus community and larger statewide community in working together to craft a plan that will give us the strongest foundation from which to address society’s grand challenges. –

Dr. Robert C. Robbins President University of Arizona

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UA Strategic Plan

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By Dr. Robert C. Robbins, President, University of Arizona For more than 130 years, the University of Arizona has been a leader. From research achievements and excelling academic programs to economic impact and service to the community, our university ranks among the best in higher education. Shortly after I became president of the UA, I began talking about the need for a refocused institutional roadmap that will allow us to continue to lead in a changing world. January marked the beginning of our yearlong strategic plan process. I asked Elliott Cheu, associate dean of the College of Science, and Lisa Ordóñez, vice dean of the Eller College of Management, to chair this effort on behalf of the university, and am incredibly grateful for their leadership in this important undertaking. With a spirit of inclusivity and transparency, we are engaging the entire campus community and larger statewide community in working together to craft a plan that will give us the strongest foundation from which to address society’s grand challenges, prepare our next-generation workforce, and innovate to move Arizona’s economy forward. During the first day of spring classes, I was excited to visit classrooms and have the opportunity to speak with more than 1,300 students to discuss the process and gather input. On Jan. 29, we held an interactive planning event attended by 500 members of the campus and larger community. In addition to nearly 100 other focus group discussions and working sessions that have included faculty, students, staff, alumni and supporters, we are starting to define common ground and uniting goals that will be pillars of our strategic plan. The UA has incredible impact in Arizona and around the world, and our strategic plan must position us as a leader. Our goals must be ambitious enough to accelerate us among the ranks of public research universities while serving Arizona and its citizens, and most certainly give our students the educational foundation to become disruptive innovators and adaptable problem solvers. Leveraging the UA’s strengths will help us to advance forward-thinking discovery and innovation and will help position our students as leaders in navigating the challenges of global change and societal shifts resulting from the Fourth Industrial Revolution. We need to teach them teamwork, leadership,

experiential aptitude and emotional intelligence. We need to graduate learners who are proficient in their major of choice and are also able to shift their skill sets as defined by future workforce need. Whether it’s preparing our students to engineer and launch a spaceship to Mars, teach the next generation around the world, discover the cure for asthma or win the Super Bowl, we need to provide them all with the tools to dream big. With research activity that topped $622 million in total research and development expenditures for fiscal year 2017, 43,000 students and 15,000 employees, nearly 137,000 alumni in Arizona and 84 UA startups in Arizona, the societal, workforce and economic impact of our university is great, and the entire state is closely tied to its success. We are committed to partnering with our business community to meet workforce needs by aligning our degree output and research and innovation outcomes with the needs of Arizona. As the strategic plan process moves forward, our success will depend upon the ingenuity, collaboration and participation from every part of our UA community and from the larger business and industrial communities in Arizona. One of the reasons I was excited to come to the UA was its incredible potential to do for Southern Arizona what Stanford and other universities in the Bay Area have done for Silicon Valley. Catalyzing on the “place” where we live to produce innovative science, novel research, service-oriented citizens and to drive innovation and commercialization will translate into benefits for humankind. We are continuing to engage our stakeholders to gain insight and data and will soon be transitioning into Phase II of the strategic plan process where we will begin to define our primary institutional pillars and supporting initiatives. I encourage you to visit our website, strategicplan.arizona.edu, to share input and find information about opportunities to participate. We look forward to updating you on our progress in subsequent issues of BizTucson over the course of the next year. I am consistently energized and inspired by the passion of the Wildcat community throughout our state and am grateful for your continued collaboration and support.

Biz

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SPECIAL REPORT 2018

THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

PHOTO: WILLIAM LESCH

20 Years of Impact & Progress


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SAL For the Good 20 Years of Impact and Progress

IMAGE: BRENT G. MATHIS

By David Pittman

Not so long ago, it was widely perceived that Tucson’s business interests were extremely fragmented. Business leaders and the various groups that represented them were believed to be working on their own individual priorities. Unified strategic goals for the community and a united voice for major initiatives seemed elusive. But that has changed as evidenced by major victories on a number of fronts over the last few years, including the revitalization of downtown and major employers locating and expanding in Tucson. One of the most important victories since 2000 was the establishment 40 BizTucson

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of the Pima County Regional Transportation Authority, which addresses traffic and transportation needs in the region. The 20-year-old Southern Arizona Leadership Council, formed in 1997 by a small group of prominent business people, has been a critical player in the evolution toward a more collaborative business climate. SALC is a CEO-led organization of 140 influential business and civic leaders whose mission is “to improve greater Tucson and the State of Arizona by bringing together resources and leadership to create action that will enhance the economic climate

and quality of life in our communities by attracting, retaining and growing high-quality, high-wage jobs.” “Our members are people who will do things to make the community better even if it doesn’t enhance their business or enrich them in some way,” said SALC CEO Ron Shoopman. “The various business groups in the region are working together better than ever before. While we compete on some things, if we all speak with one voice on issues of importance to the business community, we are far more effective.” The membership of SALC is a who’s who of influential business and non-

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LC

BizLEADERSHIP

of the Region profit leaders who not only drive Tucson’s economy and its philanthropy, but also build, maintain, nurture and grow grass-roots support for key community initiatives. SALC members are people who own or run organizations that build and sell our homes; loan us money; sell us cars and trucks; design and engineer our streets and highways; provide medical care; insure our assets; prepare our taxes; represent our legal interests; design websites; distribute the beer we drink; and produce precise missile systems for the United States military and its allies. The membership ranks of SALC are www.BizTucson.com

made up of a diverse group who positively influence Tucson. Their collective investments in people, innovation, technology, manufacturing, wealth creation and philanthropy are indisputable and substantial. Shoopman said those who join the organization do so because of what he calls a “greater-good gene” in their makeup. “SALC is a leadership organization that views issues through a business lens,” he said. “It employs research and fact-based decision-making to develop strategic policy important to Southern Arizona and the state.” Though SALC is viewed as an effec-

tive and visionary organization today, it was not an overnight success. It took a several years of long, difficult work before its accomplishments became apparent. Tucson water war of 1999

SALC’s first major victory came in 1999 when it led the effort to defeat a voter initiative known as Proposition 200, which would have restricted the city of Tucson from delivering its allocation of Colorado River water for residential usage. “SALC understood that an adequate supply of water was essential not only continued on page 42 >>> Spring 2018

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Our members are people who will do things to make the community better even if it doesn’t enhance their business or enrich them in some way. – Ron Shoopman, CEO Southern Arizona Leadership Council

Jim Click

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Steve Lynn

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Don Diamond

for life, but also for the region’s economic growth and vitality,” Shoopman said. The conflict pitted two auto dealers against one another: Bob Beaudry and Jim Click. Beaudry worked to get the measure on the ballot and was a public spokesman for its approval. Click, an SALC member, strongly opposed the proposal. Steve Lynn, a longtime SALC member who managed the campaign to defeat the initiative, recalled a discussion he had with Click that foreshadowed the initiative’s downfall. “Jim (Click) and I were having a conversation in the parking lot and Jim said, ‘I’m going to go after that initiative and beat it,’ ” said Lynn, a former utility executive and veteran campaign operative who now serves as chief strategy officer for Strongpoint Marketing. “I told Jim, ‘If you raise the money, I’ll run the campaign.’ Jim did what he said, and beating that proposition was a real turning point because it gave this community a vast water supply into the future that might not have been there had that proposition passed.” SALC leads transformative RTA election

In 2005, after multiple attempts over a 20-year period to pass a transportation funding bill for Tucson and Pima County, SALC led a successful, game-changing election campaign in which voters established the Pima County Regional Transportation Authority. The RTA is a $2.1 billion, 20-year plan that has resulted in completion of 785 transportation projects through 2017. The RTA was overwhelmingly approved after SALC built a large coalition of support among divergent interests, a strategy the organization has continued to employ to push its initiatives past the finish line. “SALC recognized that you had to get every stakeholder at the table – environmentalists, business people, transit people, highway people, neighborhoods – everyone had a voice,” Shoopman said of the RTA victory. “It took time and hard work, but we won by a 65-35 percent margin, which was a remarkable turnaround from previous elections.” Also remarkable, some have said, was the maestro performance of Shoopman, an SALC newcomer, in orchestrating the RTA victory in his first year on the job. continued on page 44 >>>

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The roots of SALC go back to 1997, when a group of seven prominent Tucson businessmen incorporated the group.

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Discussion Leads to Action Founders Targeted Collaboration, Business Voice

Hank Amos

By David Pittman The Southern Arizona Leadership Council grew out of a desire to bring together resources and CEO-level leadership to find solutions to critical strategic issues facing the region. Dissatisfied with the lack of a strong voice of business, Hank Amos, owner of Tucson Realty and Trust, Tucson’s oldest real estate company, began a discussion with six visionary business leaders. The seven are now credited as founders of SALC. Those founding members represented a broad segment of Tucson’s economy – Amos; Si Schorr, a partner in one of Tucson’s most prominent law firms; Larry Aldrich, then-president and CEO of Tucson Newspapers; Charles Bayless, president and CEO of Tucson Electric Power; David Wright, president of Arizona Bank; David Mehl, owner of Cottonwood Properties; and Greg Shelton, a VP at Raytheon Missile Systems. Conversations led to a series of meetings ultimately attracting 30 interested business leaders to the discussions. They shared a common theme – to form a group capable of using the influence, resources and leadership of local CEOs to create a vibrant economic environment and high quality of life in Southern Arizona. The group identified an emerging category of new organizations known simply as CEO leadership groups. The founders of SALC adopted the basic structure used by these new groups adding a unique Southern Arizona spin. The formula: limit membership to the senior leader of an organization, engage issues of strategic importance, remain fiercely non-partisan and conduct business in an ethical way with integrity and honesty in every aspect of its operation. Bayless was elected as the first chair of SALC and led the development of the www.BizTucson.com

vision and mission for the organization. Similarly, business leaders in Phoenix had started their own CEO leadership group several years earlier, and those leaders saw value in a potential partnership with the new Tucson-based group. They offered assistance as SALC began operations. Greater Phoenix Leadership immediately became a close ally and today SALC works closely with GPL and the newest CEO group in the state, Flagstaff’s Northern Arizona Leadership Alliance, for the good of all the communities and for Arizona. Reflecting back, Bayless said, “I had no idea that SALC would grow and prosper as it has, but I knew the time was right for a new leadership group and I had to be part of it.” SALC’s second chair, Aldrich, added, “We had some very difficult conversations in those early days and I wondered if we could keep the group together. In the end the members recognized what was at stake and today this community is far better off because we did.” “The diversity among the seven founding members of SALC was an important factor in making the organization successful,” said current SALC President Edward P. “Ted” Maxwell. “It is amazing to me that Amos, Aldrich, Mehl and Schorr, four of the original seven founders, continue as members of SALC today. The continuity they provide has served us well over the entire 20 years of SALC’s existence.” “SALC has done many wonderful things and made a lot of progress,” Amos said, “but there is still much to be done in many areas. Two of the most critical are building needed infrastructure and improving our business climate in order to attract more jobs.”

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Si Schorr

David Mehl

Larry Aldrich

David Wright

Charles Bayless Not pictured >>> Spring 2015 BizTucson 43 Co-Founder Greg Shelton


SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL continued from page 42 “Ron Shoopman has done an extraordinary job and has given us the benefit of continuous service over a long period of time,” said Peter Likins, a retired University of Arizona president and a past SALC chairman. “Ron deserves credit for keeping this organization, which consists of a large and diverse group of people, focused and on track. SALC is now widely recognized as a mature and established element of the community.” “SALC has been an incredible organization,” said Taylor Lawrence, president of Raytheon Missile Systems. “I got here about 10 years ago and it’s been very helpful to me as I’ve gotten integrated into the community and the environment and learned about Southern Arizona.” Behind-the-scenes on downtown

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Louise Francesconi

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Fletcher McCusker

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SALC has often been invisible on efforts to better the community. A prime example of that is the genesis of the plan to revitalize downtown, create Downtown Tucson Partnership and form – and later re-form – Rio Nuevo. In the early 2000s, several prominent and influential SALC members – Click, Lynn, well-known real estate investor and developer Don Diamond and Louise Francesconi, who was then president of Raytheon Missile Systems – participated in a series of early-morning meetings aimed at breathing life into Tucson’s downtown. Much of the city core at the time was boarded-up and emptied out after work hours as government workers and lawyers headed for the suburbs. SALC launched the Downtown Tucson Action Team with the long-term goal of ensuring a successful revitalization of downtown. SALC played a role in the creation of the Downtown Tucson Partnership and invested time and energy into the early days of Rio Nuevo. “SALC was instrumental in encouraging the legislature to extend the Rio Nuevo tax increment financing out to 25 years and in making necessary changes on the Rio Nuevo Board which has done such a remarkable job in recent years,” Shoopman said. “A great deal of credit goes to Fletcher McCusker, the Rio Nuevo board chair and an SALC member who provided the outstanding leadership necessary for success. “SALC’s catalytic role in downtown revitalization in no way diminishes the great work done by many others to make downtown a great success,” Shoopman added. “Although SALC’s role was not visible, it was critical and a great example of SALC member influence helping address critical problems faced by our community.” MAP Dashboard brings visibility

SALC purposely did much of its work behind the scenes and did not seek attention for its efforts well into its second decade of existence. However, that has changed. “When I was hired back in 2005, the SALC board indicated they wanted results, not press clippings, and I was very comfortable with that,” Shoopman said. However, avoiding the limelight and lacking engagement with the general population created an image of SALC as something of a secretive society among many Tucsonans. In 2015, using the launch of the MAP Dashboard as impetus, SALC began engaging the public as never before. The organization built a new website, introduced a new logo and entered into continued on page 46 >>> www.BizTucson.com


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continued from page 44 a full-time contract with Strongpoint Marketing to assist SALC in becoming more open, visible and transparent. “Our membership recognized that to take SALC to the next level, we had to add a new dimension to what we were doing and engage the community more broadly,” said Lisa Lovallo, thenchair of SALC and Cox Communication’s highest-ranking executive in Southern Arizona. “I was often struck by the lack of community knowledge around the effort and resources SALC brings to solve big problems that impact the quality of life here.” MAP Dashboard – which stands for Making Action Possible for Southern Arizona – is a collaboration among SALC, the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona, the UA and now the Pima Association of Governments. MAP Dashboard is a website built and operated by the UA Eller Economic and Business Research Center. It gives residents of Southern Arizona unprecedented access to continually updated, comprehensive economic and lifestyle data. It is intended as a tool that can be used by government officials and the general public to make more informed, fact-based policy decisions. The formation of SADA

U.S. Sen. John McCain

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Another example of SALC’s ability to build strong and effective coalitions was its leadership in the formation of the Southern Arizona Defense Alliance, which is designed to support and protect military installations operating in the region. SADA is made up of a broad group of community and civic leaders, businesses, military-support groups, private citizens and elected officials not only from metro Tucson, but also from Fort Huachuca, Yuma and other areas of Southern Arizona. According to SALC, Southern Arizona’s six military assets provide more than 57,000 direct, indirect and induced jobs, and pump nearly $8 billion into the regional economy annually. Military installations in Southern Arizona include Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and the 162nd Fighter Wing of the Arizona National Guard in Tucson; the Arizona National Guard Silverbell Army Heliport in Marana; Fort Huachuca, the U.S. Army installation outside Sierra Vista; the Yuma Marine Corps Air Station, and the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground. “We took the organizational lead in creating SADA,” Shoopman said. “With the strong support of the Tucson Business Alliance – each committing $5,000 to initiate the project – SADA was born. It’s been sustained by the good work of our partners and many new members have joined the effort. “In forming SADA, our initial work was to counter a negative campaign against Davis-Monthan by a small group of Tucsonans who were sending messages of concern to Congress and to military decision-makers,” Shoopman said. “The net result was growing concern in Washington about the base of support for the military in Tucson and Southern Arizona.” Shoopman said SADA conducted a survey that demonstrated overwhelming support by Tucson residents for Davis-Monthan. “We took the survey results to Washington, D.C., and handcarried them to members of Congress and military leaders at the Pentagon,” Shoopman said. U.S. Sen. John McCain, a Republican from Tucson and chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said SADA is “one of the nation’s best models for supporting a region’s military” he’s ever seen. continued on page 48 >>> www.BizTucson.com


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SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

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Many reasons for SALC’s success

Building coalitions and alliances with other business organizations – as well as government officials, nonprofit charities and all of Arizona’s universities – is a key strategy for SALC to achieve its goals and widen its influence. “Early in my SALC career, business groups didn’t talk to each other very often,” Shoopman said. “That has changed and SALC has been an agent stimulating alliances and cooperative agreements.” Yet there are many other factors that have contributed to SALC’s results. Those factors were outlined in an article contained in a 17-page publication titled “Twenty Years of Action & Impact,” which was distributed to SALC members at its 2018 Annual Meeting & Retreat in December at Loews Ventana Canyon Resort. The article, written by Jim Kiser, a former editorial page editor of the Arizona Daily Star who joined SALC’s staff in 2006, cited the following reasons for the group’s success:

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What I love about SALC is it also has a strategic vision. It’s not just about what can I do for you today.

– Rick Myers Former SALC President President, Tempronics

• A decision to keep SALC nonpartisan and non-ideological • Selectivity in undertaking projects or issues. SALC only takes on issues its members believe can realistically be attained. • A focus on what is good for the community and not just isolated business interests • An emphasis on getting things done without concern about who receives credit

• Dogged persistence, as demonstrated by SALC’s multi-year effort to change the Tucson Charter to clearly give the city manager authority to supervise city operations • A board of highly successful people who understand their role and the importance of hiring strong, highly capable executives to supervise the organization and its staff

Rick Myers, a former SALC president and board chairman, said what makes SALC unique is its strategic, long-term vision. “SALC has always been about economic development, better education and building a better community,” said Myers, a former IBM executive and the current CEO of Tempronics. “So, within that, we’re always focused on the issues that need to be taken care of right now from a tactical standpoint. “But what I love about SALC is it also has a strategic vision. It’s not just about what can I do for you today, but also what do we need to be accomplishing today in order to realize long-term goals.” Biz

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MYERS

HAMMOND

WHITE

Members for the Partisan Priorities are Set Aside at SALC By David Pittman Members of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council say they take great pride in being part of the organization and universally praise its efficiency, leadership, vision, resources and success in making a difference on major issues within Tucson, Arizona and, at times, even nationally. They say they are honored to work and learn alongside the most successful business leaders in the Tucson region to make a difference – strictly to better the community and for strictly altruistic reasons. “I like talking to SALC members because it comes from them that they’re proud to be part of this organization,” said Rick Myers, CEO of Tempronics 50 BizTucson

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and a past president and board chair of SALC. “They’re proud not only because of what the group accomplishes, but how it accomplishes it. “SALC’s success is not due to any one person. Our success comes from the work we do together, the conviction we have and our ability to execute and win. SALC is made up of a group of winners.” One of those is Mike Hammond, a partner in Cushman & Wakefield|Picor, a leading Tucson commercial realty firm. Hammond said SALC’s future “is in good hands” and the organization “has broad respect in the community.” “Even those who take shots at us understand we are a force to be reckoned

with and they will need our support on certain issues,” said Hammond, also a past chair of SALC. “There’s no other organization like it in Tucson. It’s run efficiently and brings the right people to the table to discuss issues. As I get older, I don’t want to be in organizations that are irrelevant – and SALC is extremely relevant.” The current board chair, Greg White, CFO of Raytheon Missile Systems, said SALC is comprised of a diverse, “highintegrity” group of people who put improving the community ahead of their personal or partisan views. Decisions are for the overall good of the community and not for any one faction. “When you go to a board or memwww.BizTucson.com


LOVALLO

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Right Reasons bership meeting, you see people who come from all walks of life and who have all sorts of political opinions across the spectrum,” White said. “But when it comes to making a decision, they talk it through and come to a thoroughly thought-out position, sometimes sacrificing dogma to improve the community.” Lisa Lovallo, who heads Cox Communications in Southern Arizona, chaired SALC from 2014 to 2016. She called the work done by the group “very important” and described her involvement within it as “a wonderful experience” that has been personally fulfilling. “The friendships I’ve made within SALC over the years are very important www.BizTucson.com

to me personally,” Lovallo said. “I’ve received a lot of good advice and support from members.” Cristie Street, managing partner of Nextrio, said she is pleased to be an SALC member because it provides her the opportunity to work alongside Tucson’s top business leaders while also helping improve the community. “SALC has an impressive membership of citizen leaders that get things done,” she said. “It offers me the chance to roll up my sleeves, work hard and learn from the best.” Edmund Marquez, owner of The Edmund Marquez Allstate Agencies and SALC member, echoed those sentiments.

“I’ve done a lot of work for nonprofit boards for many years, but I decided to get involved in something I’m passionate about – economic development,” Marquez said. “I firmly believe SALC is the room of rooms. Beyond the great individual members and the networking opportunities, we hear from the best. “I love the fact that the people in the room are decision-makers who have skin in the game and truly care about Tucson. I’ve gained many amazing relationships and a lot of insight into what is happening throughout the state.”

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SALC Executive Staff from left

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Leadership Guides, Members Drive

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By David Pittman

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It should come as no surprise that the board of directors of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council has perennially been made up of top leaders from top companies in the Tucson region. The current board is led by executives of two of Tucson’s largest employers. Chair Greg White is VP and CFO of Raytheon Missile Systems, and Vice Chair Judy Rich is president and CEO at Tucson Medical Center. Throughout its two-decade history, SALC’s board has consistently chosen high-quality staff leaders to manage and guide the organization throughout its various stages of development. In its 20-year history, SALC has employed five executive staff leaders. The first was Barbara Huffstetler, a former executive aide to a Pima County supervisor, who provided the skills needed to keep the fledgling organization alive during a period in which its members vigorously debated the mission and direction of the group. “Barbara did a good job putting things in place and getting it launched,” said Si Schorr, an SALC founder and senior partner at the law firm Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie. Huffstetler was succeeded by retired Marine Lt. Gen. Robert Johnston, who served as right-hand man to Army Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf when he commanded the Americanled forces that crushed Iraq in the

1991 Persian Gulf War. Johnston, the first of a trio of high-ranking military men to guide SALC, presided over the group’s first major victory – the defeat of Proposition 200, a voter initiative led by car dealer Bob Beaudry that would have restricted the city of Tucson from using its allocation of Central Arizona Project water for home delivery. “Gen. Johnston brought order to things and emphasized efficiency,” said Hank Amos, president of Tucson Realty & Trust and a founding SALC member. “We liked the military precision he brought to the organization.” Rick Myers became SALC president in 2003 and served in that capacity for two years. Myers now serves on the Arizona Board of Regents and as CEO of Tempronics, an early-stage, venture-backed technology company. He took the SALC position after retiring as VP and GM of IBM Tucson. SALC experienced consistent growth and continued progress during Myers’ tenure. Like Johnston, Myers continues to be an active member of SALC. On Jan. 1, 2005, Ron Shoopman, a retired Air Force brigadier general who served as commander of the Air National Guard’s 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport, became president of SALC. Soon thereafter the organization hit its stride and has gone on a 13-year continued on page 54 >>> Spring 2018

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The effectiveness of SALC is not derived from our professional staff. It comes from the members. They drive the organization. – Edward P. “Ted” Maxwell, President Southern Arizona Leadership Council

MAP Dashboard Today The MAP Dashboard Indicators project enters its fourth year with newly designed indicators, new measures, national recognition and growing success. The MAP Dashboard project’s overarching goal is to measure the progress of this region and inspire factbased action that results in a more successful and prosperous future for our community. The MAP Dashboard team at the University of Arizona Economic and Business Research Center works daily to execute this project. They have responsibility for developing trusted data that ensures credibility for the project. The MAP Advisory Board works with the MAP team to set goals and ensure that the project has the desired impact. The Advisory Board includes the University of Arizona, Southern Arizona Leadership Council, Community Foundation for Southern Arizona and Pima Association of Governments. In 2018 the MAP includes new indicators that display trend information as well as four new indicators – housing affordability, behavioral health, physical well-being and creative occupations. MAP Dashboard received national recognition for website excellence from the Association for University Business and Economic Research and from the Association for Public Data Users. Locally, MAP won a Common Ground award from Metropolitan Pima Alliance. MAP Dashboard also was one of three finalists for the Arizona Governor’s Celebration of Innovation in Academia Award. Most important, use of MAP Dashboard is growing locally, nationally and worldwide. MAP Dashboard website traffic grew 40 percent between January 2017 and January 2018. Government officials now cite MAP data during public-policy debates, nonprofits use the data to validate community needs they are working to address and business leaders, along with economic developers, are the using the data to make the case for their products and to convince companies to relocate to our region. UA President Robert Robbins said, “The MAP Dashboard is an amazing tool for our community and I am pleased to pledge my full support to the project.” View the MAP Dashboard at www.mapazdashboard.com 54 BizTucson

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continued from page 121 run in which it has achieved substantial and seemingly inexhaustible victories. During Shoopman’s tenure, SALC built a strong reputation as an influential business organization not only in Tucson, but across the state and in Washington, D.C. “When I started at SALC, we had 56 members, a tiny budget and a little two-room office,” Shoopman said. “We now have about 140 members and more revenue and resources at our disposal than ever before.” However, Shoopman and SALC President Edward P. “Ted” Maxwell downplayed their role in SALC successes, giving credit instead to the CEO membership they represent. “The effectiveness of SALC is not derived from our professional staff. It comes from the members. They drive the organization.” Maxwell said. “It is their reputation, influence, resources and direction that has allowed SALC to accomplish the great things it has done.” Largely because of SALC’s substantial membership and financial growth, and with an eye toward future succession, the organization’s board expanded SALC’s staff and installed a new leadership triumvirate at the beginning of last year. Maxwell, an SALC VP since 2013, was promoted to SALC president, succeeding Shoopman in January 2017. While

Maxwell oversees day-to-day operations, Shoopman remains CEO, providing experience, vision, guidance and big-picture leadership. Shelley Watson, a new member of the SALC team, replaced Maxwell as VP. Watson, who grew up in Tucson, came to SALC from Capital Quest, a fundraising consulting firm where she was a partner and COO. A graduate of Arizona State University in business administration, Watson was previously executive director of the American Heart Association in Tucson. Like Johnston and Shoopman, Maxwell has had a distinguished military career covering more than 30 years of service. Maxwell, who was promoted to the rank of major general in 2015, formerly served as vice wing commander at the 162nd Wing in Tucson. In February he retired as commander of the Arizona Air National Guard, a part-time position under Gov. Doug Ducey’s authority. Maxwell received a master’s degree in business administration from UA in 2014. “After Ted’s first year as president, all indications already are that he will continue SALC’s success,” said Jim Kiser, a former editorial page director at the Arizona Daily Star and director of governance policy at SALC. “He is a quick learner, he is committed, he has an engaging way with people and he loves Tucson.”

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Key Accomplishments and Initiatives

Southern Arizona Leadership Council boasts an impressive list of accomplishments throughout its 20-year history. The following is a small sampling of initiatives and accomplishments for the organization. u

u

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Organized the Tucson Regional Town Hall, which brought together 160 local leaders for 3½ days of discussion regarding critical issues facing the Tucson region. The town hall spawned six well-attended “community conversations” on water, literacy, land use, education, and arts and culture. Outcomes produced as a result of the town hall include Literacy Connects, which resulted in five area literacy groups consolidating into a single organization; Tucson Values Teachers, which provides a strong voice for teacher recruitment and retention, and Imagine Greater Tucson, a values-based initiative that worked to bring community leaders together to create a regional infrastructure and planning vision. Brought together 45 scientists, land managers and government leaders to discuss threats from buffelgrass, a non-native plant proliferating in the Sonoran Desert that sucks up moisture faster than native plants, catches fire easily and is potentially harmful to tourism. This scientific forum led to the creation of the Southern Arizona Buffelgrass Coordination Center. Throughout its history SALC has worked to ensure a competitive and innovative economic environment in Southern Arizona, an environment that spurs the growth of high-wage jobs and a growing “innovation economy.” During the 2017 legislative session the group supported bills that created a $1 billion bond package for state universities, which is already spurring construction of research facilities on campuses. The other provides $10 million in Angel Investment Tax Credits to support hightech startup businesses. Extending its support of the Arizona Bioscience Roadmap, SALC created the Arizona Bioscience Board to address the lack of availability of risk capital in Arizona. ABB recruited CEO board members statewide resulting in a report offering eight strategies to address the shortfall. Since the writing of the report, countless new efforts have emerged, including UAVentures, a new investment fund started by SALC member Fletcher McCusker. Education is a top issue for SALC. In 2005, SALC championed the creation of the Pima County Joint Technological Education District. In 2010, SALC supported a 1-cent temporary state sales tax increase for education that was approved by voters. SALC support is always contingent upon efficient and effective strategic solutions. Last year, SALC opposed Proposition 204, Strong Start Tucson. After a thoughtful and fact-based review, SALC determined the initiative was fatally flawed. Voters agreed as Prop. 204 went down by a nearly 2-to-1 margin.

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u

Played a key role in crafting a plan to fix a state budget that was badly out of balance at the height of the Great Recession. SALC engaged with then-Gov. Jan Brewer in developing a three-pronged solution that borrowed $1 billion, cut $1 billion and raised $1 billion via a new three-year tax.

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Actively supported Gov. Brewer’s proposal to expand Medicaid funding in Arizona. SALC backed the expansion because it resulted in billions of federal dollars flowing into the state to provide healthcare to Medicaid-eligible citizens and prevent the closure of numerous rural hospitals. In late 2017, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled the voluntary assessment made by the state’s hospitals to draw down the critically needed federal funding was not a tax as claimed by members of the legislature.

u

Strongly advised Gov. Brewer to veto SB 1062, a bill labeled as discriminatory and controversial. SALC has consistently fought bills that put the state in a negative light, which impacts its economy and quality of life. Brewer vetoed the bill as did previous and subsequent governors at SALC’s urging on similar pieces of legislation.

u

Built on SALC’s strategy of inclusion and collaboration by convening more than 30 business groups to form the Southern Arizona Partners for Trade and Transportation. A significant success of BPTT was its effort advancing the scheduled construction of Highway 189 between Arizona’s Port of Entry and I-19 by more than 10 years.

u

Brought together various business groups and associations such as the Tucson Metro Chamber, Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (now Sun Corridor, Inc.), Metro Pima Alliance and other area chambers and trade associations in collaborative business coalitions such as the Tucson Business Alliance and the Tucson Regional Water Coalition. The groups involved in these collaborative efforts have distinct individual missions, yet share a vision for economic vibrancy.

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With its sister CEO leadership organizations – Greater Phoenix Leadership and the Northern Arizona Leadership Alliance – SALC created and funded Science Foundation Arizona, a public-private partnership that invested more than $100 million across Arizona, the majority of which was invested in Southern Arizona, in pursuit of growing the state’s Innovation Economy.

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Source: Southern Arizona Leadership Council

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SALC 2018 Policy Goals & Actions

Focus on Impactful Collaboration

The mission of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council is to improve greater Tucson and the state of Arizona by bringing together resources and leadership to create action that will enhance the economic climate and quality of life in our communities by attracting, retaining, and growing high quality, high-wage jobs. SALC continues the forward momentum that began 20 years ago by encouraging impactful collaboration by leadership in all sectors. These are the focus areas for 2018:

Governance Focus Area Co-Chairs: Ted Hinderaker, Si Schorr, Sarah Smallhouse

The Governance focus area engages governance issues both locally and statewide. Focus Area goals include efforts to correct structural deficiencies in governance as well as to support and prepare new leadership for elected office. The ultimate goal is efficient and effective governance for Southern Arizona and for the State of Arizona. Actions include: • Support a private-sector effort to make additional changes and improvements to the Tucson City Charter and Tucson election process. • Lead an internal evaluation of 2018 regional and state legislation, referendums and initiatives designed to improve the electoral process. • Support the development of candidates and civic leaders through partnerships with the Flinn-Brown Civic Leadership Academy, the Hispanic Chamber Candidate Academy and the Arizona Chamber Public Leadership Academy. 56 BizTucson

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• Lead an effort to raise awareness of business issues among the emerging leaders of Tucson Young Professionals and the Southern Arizona FlinnBrown Fellows who will receive an associate membership in SALC. • Support actions to improve the quality of school board members through regulatory/structural changes and board member training.

Innovation Economy Focus Area Co-Chairs: Paul August and Harry George

The Innovation Economy focus area pursues the development of high-tech, high-wage jobs for the region. It supports efforts in research, tech transfer, funding through Science Foundation Arizona and Fund of Funds and emerging technology like solar, and leads regional efforts in bioscience. Objectives: • Build Southern Arizona’s research strengths around bioscience technology.

• Nurture all sources of revenue, including venture capital, to build a critical mass of bioscience companies in Southern Arizona. • Build a talent base, through education and workforce development, that captures and retains Southern Arizona’s human resources. • Develop and maintain a business climate supportive of the biosciences and their growth in Southern Arizona. • Educate, inform, and spur to action opinion leaders and the general public on Southern Arizona’s future. • Develop the regional infrastructure to allow and support anticipated growth.

Healthcare Focus Area Co-Chairs: Nancy Johnson and Matt Wandoloski

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Innovation Economy Focus Area

Governance Focus Area

BizLEADERSHIP

Healthcare Focus Area

Infrastructure Focus Area

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continued from page 56 healthcare community as an asset for building the economy and quality of life. SALC supported efforts to design and implement a functional Health Information Exchange for the state and worked with University of Arizona’s leadership to bring Banner Health into the community. Actions include: • Support efforts that promote and enhance the economic impact of healthcare through healthcare business attraction, retention and expansion. • Support Gov. Doug Ducey’s efforts to ensure that states have the resources to sustain the positive benefits realized through the expansion of Medicaid while transitioning to a new or improved healthcare system in 2018. • Work to increase the growth and impact of digital health initiatives in Arizona through its Bioscience Leadership Council of Arizona and Startup Tucson, the University of Arizona and Mayor Rothschild’s Healthcare Sector Partnership initiative. • Support legislation and efforts to sustain or increase the stability and affordability of healthcare for individuals and employers. • Explore the prospect of bringing together appropriate parties to expand the number of primary care Graduate Medical Education opportunities in Arizona. • Support legislation and efforts to expand the availability and use of advance practice primary care physicians’ assistants, nurse practitioners and registered nurses.

P-20 Education Focus Area

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

• Support efforts to review gaps in the healthcare workforce to determine possible action to address any significant shortages.

Infrastructure Focus Area Chair: Tom McGovern

The quality of critical infrastructure directly impacts efforts within the state and the Tucson region to prosper economically and to build a high quality of life for its residents. This focus area is aimed at improving the regional infrastructure. Actions include: • Lead the Tucson Regional Water Coalition, engaging the private sector and governmental agencies to address local, state and federal water policy issues. This business group partnership is focused on regionalism and effective water management in the Tucson region. • Support the Land Use Vision Project, an outgrowth of the Tucson Regional Town Hall with the goal of developing a regional vision on land use. • Endorse and monitor the Regional Transportation Authority, Arizona Department of Transportation and Pima Association of Government Transit Initiatives. • Lead the Business Partners for Trade and Transportation to ensure the business community has a common voice and coordinated effort regarding the region’s infrastructure needs. • Lead the business community’s effort to identify and secure funding for the initial development and construction of Sonoran Corridor infrastructure connecting I-19 and I-10 south of Tucson International Airport. • Lead the business community’s efforts to identify and secure funding to complete the full buildout for SR-189. • Support the development of adequate infrastructure to facilitate increased commerce and trade with Mexico at the Mariposa Port of Entry, the Intermountain West Corridor/I-11 and the Sonoran Corridor, as well as rail needs.

Tucson Young Professionals

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BizLEADERSHIP

P-20 Education Focus Area

Co-Chairs: Rosey Koberlein, Steve Lynn and Donald Pitt SALC envisions a seamless and efficient P-20 education system that promotes outstanding achievement through high standards, a rigorous curriculum, accountability and community involvement. Only such efforts will ensure that all Southern Arizona children have the opportunity to reach their full potential. SALC’s major emphasis in K-12 education is support for Tucson Values Teachers, a program to attract, retain and support the very best teachers for Tucson’s children. SALC leads the Education Business Boardroom, a leadership idea exchange and development effort for K-12 District superintendents and SALC members. SALC endorses and monitors the Literacy for Life Coalition, UA Book Festival, P-20 Council, ABEC, RODEL AllA’s, Solutions Through Higher Education and Expect More Arizona. Actions include: • Partner with Tucson Values Teachers to attract and retain high quality teachers in every Southern Arizona classroom. • Lead the Education Business Boardroom, a leadership idea exchange and development effort for K-12 district superintendents and SALC members. • Engage Southern Arizona education leaders to better understand, and help them to address the challenges they face.

Tucson Values Teachers

From left – Katie Rogerson, COO, Tucson Values Teachers Colleen Niccum, CEO, Tucson Values Teachers www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

• Secure funding for early childhood education and full-day kindergarten for students living in poverty by 2022.

• Secure increases in K-12 per-pupil funding moving Arizona into the third quartile of all states by 2025. • Secure funding for state universities at 50 percent of the cost to educate Arizona students by 2022.

Strategic Initiatives Committee

Co-Chairs: Bruce Dusenberry and Warren Rustand The Strategic Initiatives Committee develops the legislative agenda for SALC with recommendations for action on pending legislation, initiatives and referendums for Board consideration. The committee also screens ideas and requests for SALC support on topics not covered under one of the SALC focus areas. The Strategic Initiatives Committee functions as SALC’s legislative arm as well as the main portal through which new ideas for SALC involvement will be reviewed and evaluated, whether the ideas come from inside SALC or outside. The committee has four key purposes: • Evaluate and recommend action on new initiatives of strategic value to Southern Arizona and the state for SALC board consideration. • Evaluate requests for SALC support and forward any recommendations for action to the SALC Board. • Coordinate SALC’s response to proposed legislation and ballot initiatives that do not fall under SALC focus areas. • Monitor ongoing SALC initiatives that do not fall under one of the above SALC focus areas. Source: Southern Arizona Leadership Council 2018 Policy Goals & Actions

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SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Education Tops By David Pittman Now, more than ever, education is a priority of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council, which has a long history of championing the effort. “Education is the No. 1 issue among our members and it’s the No. 1 issue in the state right now,” said Ron Shoopman, CEO of SALC. “Parents are deeply concerned about their kids’ education. There is a growing discomfort among Arizonans that we are underfunding K-12 education.” A study released in January found Arizona’s education system woefully underfunded. The Quality Counts report by Education Week ranked Arizona in 50th place among the 50 states

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and Washington, D.C., for adjusted perpupil education spending. The study ranked Arizona in 46th place based on three factors: school finance, K-12 achievement, and chances for education success. SALC President Edward P. “Ted” Maxwell said school funding in Arizona is headed for a fiscal cliff because large revenue sources created by the passage of Prop. 301 and Prop 123 – which together provide about $600 million in school funding annually – are set to expire in 2021 and 2025, respectively. SALC is working with leaders around the state to renew both sources of capital.

Both Shoopman and Maxwell said action also is needed to solve a teacher retention crisis in the state. “Right now, 46 percent of new teachers are gone in three years,” said Shoopman. “They are leaving the profession entirely or going to other states. We started this school year with about 1,300 teacher vacancies, and in the first month 500 more quit.” Despite the dire outlook, both SALC leaders believe there is a real opportunity for education reform in Arizona and they want to be a part of it. Maxwell said Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey is very much aware of the state’s K-12 challenges. He said SALC will

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BizEDUCATION

SALC Priorities

Statewide Concerns Are Opportunity for Improvement

work closely with the governor, the Arizona Legislature and other stakeholders throughout the state to forge a new path forward for Arizona education. “While many are critical of the amount of money Gov. Ducey put in his education budget, 80 percent of the new money he put in his overall budget went for education,” Maxwell said. “The governor recognizes that education is a priority and a great deal of momentum is building around it.” The group also is targeting an effort to expand opportunities for vocational training that leads to certifications and excellent career opportunities. Shoopman believes a majority of

Parents are deeply concerned about their kids’ education. There is a growing discomfort among Arizonans that we are underfunding K-12 education.

– Ron Shoopman, CEO Southern Arizona Leadership Council

Arizonans support education reform and the state’s newly adopted goal, “Achieve60AZ.” A 2030 goal calls for 60 percent of Arizona high school graduates to complete additional training or college after graduation. Today that number is 43 percent. “We (SALC) put our time and energy where there is opportunity – and right now the landscape is ripe for education reform,” said Shoopman. “There are opportunities for education reform largely because it is seen by the general public across the state as being the biggest problem facing Arizona.” Biz

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BizLEADERSHIP

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

SALC TEAM

Ronald E. Shoopman

Edward P. Maxwell

Shelley Watson

CEO

President

VP

Pamela Speder

John Pedicone

Pamela Duncan Executive Assistant

Director of Economic Development

Director of Education Policy

Katherin Rogerson

Jim Kiser

Colleen M. Niccum

COO Tucson Value Teachers

Director of Governance

CEO Tucson Value Teachers

3497 North Campbell Avenue, Suite 703 Tucson, Arizona 85719

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Stan Abrams

Larry Aldrich

David Allen

Bonnie Allin

President SPA 550

Aldrich Capital

VP UA Tech Launch Arizona

President & CEO Tucson Airport Authority

Edward Altamirano

Hank Amos

Mara Aspinall

Bill Assenmacher

VP, Area Manager Chase Bank

President & CEO Tucson Realty & Trust Co.

President & CEO Health Catalysts

CEO CAID Industries

Paul August

Bruce Beach

Amy Beiter

Mark Benz

VP Biology Icagen

Chairman of the Board & Senior Advisor BeachFleischman

President & CEO Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital

CEO Carondelet St. Joseph’s Hospital

Carmen Bermudez

Fred Boice

Chairman & CEO Mission Management & Trust Co.

President Boice Financial Company

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Kathy Bollinger

Don Bourn

Garry Brav

Zack Brooks

President, Arizona West Region Banner Health

President & CEO Bourn Companies

CEO BFL Construction Company

Associate Member Flinn Brown Fellow

Martha Brumfield

Don Budinger

Neal Cash

Rita Cheng

President & CEO Critical Path Institute

Founder & Former President Rodel Foundations

President & CEO Community Partners

President Northern Arizona University

Jack Clements

Jim Click

David Cohen

Mel Cohen

President The Clements Agency

President Jim Click Automotive

President BeachFleischman

Partner Mesch Clark Rothschild

Ann Costello

Jannie Cox

President Roche Tissue Diagnostics

CEO Meet Me Concepts

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Joe Coyle

Michael Crow

Marcel Dabdoub

Pat DeConcini

Principal & Managing Director The Patrick Group

President & Professor Arizona State University

Principal CID Holdings

Principal 4-D Properties

Chris Denzin

Don Diamond

John D’Orlando

Rob Draper

VP, Operations CenturyLink

Chairman Diamond Ventures, Inc.

President & Publisher Arizona Daily Star

President O’Rielly Chevrolet

Jon Dudas

Allison Duffy

Michael Duran

Bruce Dusenberry

Sr. VP & Secretary of the Univesrity University of Arizona

President Silverado Technologies

VP/Chief Development Officer TMC HealthCare/TMC Foundation

President Horizon Moving Systems

Ali Farhang Partner / Owner Farhang & Medcoff

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Ryan Flannagan

Harry George

CEO Nuanced Media

Managing Partner Solstice Capital

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Ryan George

Chris Gleason

Paulo Goes

David Goldstein

CEO Simpleview

CEO NextMed

Dean, Eller College of Management University of Arizona

President Diamond Ventures

George Gough

John Graham

Mike Hammond

Meredith Hay

Director, Government Affairs Monsanto Company

President & CEO Sunbelt Holdings

Chairman & CEO Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR

Professor, Physiology UA College of Medicine

Duff Hearon

Margaret Hepburn

Todd Hill

Ted Hinderaker

President Ashland Group

President & CEO Legacy Foundation of Southeast Arizona

VP, Region Manager Granite Construction Company

Partner Hinderaker, Rauh & Weisman

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Shawn R. Hollenbach

Mike Holmes

VP, Private Client Advisory Northern Trust Company

Associate Member Flinn Brown Fellow

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

David Hutchens

Raena Janes

Lynette Jaramillo

Nancy Johnson

President & CEO Tucson Electric Power & UNS Energy Corp.

Owner RJ Homes Real Estate Group

CEO Casa de la Luz Hospice

CEO El Ro Community Health Center

Tim (TJ) Johnson

I. Michael Kasser

Thomas W. Keating

Chuck Kill

CEO HTG Molecular

President Holualoa Companies

President Trailhead Ventures

CEO Bedmart (retired)

Eileen Klein

Rosey Koberlein

George Krauja

Steve Lace

President Arizona Board of Regents

CEO Long Companies

Director Fennemore Craig

Executive VP Royal Automotive Group

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John Lai

Lee Lambert

Taylor Lawrence

CEO Mister Car Wash

Chancellor Pima Community College

President Raytheon Missile Systems

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Mike Levin

John Lewis

Lisa Lovallo

Steve Lynn

Executive VP Port of Tucson/Century Park Research Center

President & CEO Commerce Bank of Arizona

Market VP for Southern Arizona Cox Communications

Chief Strategy Officer Strongpoint Marketing

Clint Mabie

Kevin Madden

Jill Malick

Dewey Manzer

President & CEO Community Foundation for Southern Arizona

CEO Madden Media

VP Business Banking Manager Wells Fargo Bank

President & CEO MicronView

Edmund Marquez

JP Martin

Ross McCallister

Nancy McClure

Agency Owner The Edmund Marquez Allstate Agencies

Associate Member Flinn Brown Fellow

Principal MC Companies

First VP CBRE

Fletcher McCusker

Michael McDonald

CEO Uaventure Capital

CEO Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Ian McDowell

Tom McGovern

David Mehl

Dennis Minano

Vice President & Regional Director, Tucson Sundt Construction

Principal Emeritus / Consultant Psomas

President Cottonwood Properties

Vice Chair Sonoran Institute

Omar Mireles

Mark Mistler

Ed Moomjian

Tom Morgan

President HSL Properties

President, Southern Arizona BBVA Compass Bank

Partner Rusing, Lopez & Lizardi

President & CEO Grayline Tours / Citizen Auto Stage Co.

Rick Myers

Dan Neff

Phong Ngo

Allan Norville

CEO Tempronics. Inc.

Chairman of the Board M3 Engineering & Technology

VP General Plasma

Owner Norville Investments / Gem & Jewelry Exchange

Steve

Odenkirk Executive VP, Southern Region Manager Alliance Bank of Arizona

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Hank Peck Partner TCI Wealth Advisors

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Tony Penn

Mitch Pisik

Donald Pitt

Jane Poynter

President & CEO United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona

President & CEO Pisik Consulting Group

Chairman of the Board Campus Research Corporation

CEO World View Experience

Jeff Prileson

Robert Ramirez

Manuel Ramos

Eric Renaud

Executive VP & CFO The Offshore Group

President & CEO Vantage West Credit Union

President & COO Asarco

President & CEO Pima Federal Credit Union

Judy Rich

Cody Ritchie

Dr. Robert C. Robbins

John-Paul Roczniak

President & CEO TMC HealthCare

President Crest Insurance Group

President University of Arizona

President & CEO University of Arizona Foundation

Bill Roe

Warren Rustand

Past Chairman Arizona Democratic Party

CEO Summit Capital Consulting

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Calline Sanchez

Michael Sarabia

Si Schorr

Jeremy Sharpe

VP, IBM Enterprise Systems Storage IBM

Principal / Designated Broker DESCO Southwest

Partner Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie

VP, Community Development Rancho Sahuarita

Keri Silvyn

Marc Simon

Neil Simon

Anita Simons

Attorney Lazarus, Silvyn & Bangs

Partner Snell & Wilmer

Partner Venture West

Associate Member Flinn Brown Fellow

Sarah Smallhouse

Jim Smith

Teri Spencer

Nan Stockholm Walden

President Thomas R. Brown Foundations

Executive VP Empire Southwest

President & CEO Ephibian

VP & Legal Counsel Farmers Investment Co.

Cristie Street Managing Partner & CEO Nextrio

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Phillip Swaim

Matthew Sweger

Principal Swaim Associates Architects

Partner Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie

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SALC Members

SOUTHERN ARIZONA LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Greg Taylor

Steve Touché

Richard Underwood

Kip Volpe

Regional VP of Community Affairs Cenpatico Integrated Care

President Lovitt & Touché

President AAA Landscape

VP/Treasurer Estes Company

Richard Walden

Dr. Eric Walk

Matthew Wandoloski

Greg White

Chairman, President & CEO Farmers Investment Co.

Chief Medical & Scientific Officer Roche Tissue Diagnostics

VP Strategy and Informatics Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

CFO, VP Finance Raytheon Missile Systems

Julie Williams

Jen Wong

Judy Wood

Bruce Wright

VP, So. AZ Division Southwest Gas Corporation

President Tucson Young Professionals

CEO Contact One Call Cente

Associate VP for University Research Parks Tech Parks Arizona

Steve

Ziehmer CEO Rincon Research Corporation

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John Zito VP of Arizona Business Unit Hudbay Minerals

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PHOTOS: TECH. SGT. GREGORY FERREIRA

BizMILITARY

From left - Maj. Gen. Michael T. McGuire with Maj. Gen. Edward P. “Ted” Maxwell, who retired as Air National Guard Commander.

Maxwell Retires as National Guard Commander By Jay Gonzales Maj. Gen. Edward P. “Ted” Maxwell has retired after serving as head of the air component of the Arizona National Guard. In a ceremony held at the Air National Guard’s 162nd Wing located at Tucson International Airport, Maxwell retired in February after 33 years of military service, 17 of those in Arizona. As the National Guard air component commander, Maxwell was responsible for the leadership and direction of more than 2,500 personnel at the Air National Guard bases in Tucson and Phoenix, according to a statement from the Arizona Air National Guard. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy. He also holds a master’s degree in business adwww.BizTucson.com

ministration from the University of Arizona. “The men and women of the 162nd Wing, the 161st Air Refueling Wing and the Joint Force Headquarters, you are the Arizona Air National Guard,” Maxwell said. “You are also part of the Total Air Force team and you are what I am going to miss most when I am retired.” While Maxwell is retiring from military service, his other, now full-time job will keep him serving the community at large as president of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council. In addition to extensive experience working with Congress and foreign dignitaries, Maxwell has managed multibillion programs for the military, in

some instances working directly with CEOs and leaders from national and international companies that contract with the Department of Defense. Named a Father’s Day Council Tucson Father of the Year in 2017, Maxwell is married with three grown children and a teenage stepdaughter. While working as a part-time National Guardsman, Maxwell joined SALC as VP in 2013. Former 162nd Wing Commander, Maj. Gen. Phil Purcell replaces Maxwell as the Air National Guard air component commander providing operationally trained, equipped and mission ready Air National Guard airmen.

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BizTOURISM

PHOTOS: COURTESY MIRAVAL ARIZONA RESORT & SPA

The Retreat

Miraval’s New Luxury Suites By Tara Kirkpatrick

With a ceremonial nod to the rugged Santa Catalina mountains and the desert sun, Miraval Arizona Resort & Spa unveiled its newest and perhaps most luxurious accommodations yet – an indulgent series of 22 private suites at the award-winning resort. Native-American Tony Redhouse, a Miraval instructor, helped officially unveil The Retreat with a soulful Zuni tribal song and an aromatic burning of sage and cedar in February. “It’s the energy of generations past. www.BizTucson.com

That’s why it feels so good here,” Redhouse told the crowd, which included Miraval staff and workout-clad guests who came to preview the decadent new digs. As Redhouse engaged the group outside, Miraval Chef de Cuisine Kyle Nottingham served served the resort’s signature Sonoran wheat bread and homemade apple cider inside one of the new suites. “The rooms are a natural progression for us at Miraval,” said Mark Stebbings,

Miraval’s new GM. “These 22 new accommodations are located on the westernmost part of the resort atop the highest vistas on property. As such, they offer some of the most beautiful views of the Santa Catalina Mountains.” Marc Ellin, global head of Miraval Group added: “Nobody in our competitive environment – here in Arizona or across the country – has anything like this.” Ranging from 600 to 3,120 square feet, The Retreat accommodations are continued on page 88 >>> Spring 2018

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BizTOURISM

These 22 new accommodations are located on the westernmost part of the resort atop the highest vistas on property. As such, they offer some of the most beautiful views of the Santa Catalina Mountains. – Mark Stebbings, GM, Miraval Arizona Resort & Spa

continued from page 87 named: Reflection (one bedroom), Unity (two bedrooms), Gratitude (three bedrooms) and Solace (studio). Each option offers private outdoor patios with indoor/outdoor shower, hot tub and fire pit. The Reflection, Unity and Gratitude suites also have gourmet kitchens with stainless-steel appliances, cozy lounging spaces and ample dining areas that can host private culinary programming. They are the perfect draw for the resort’s biggest clientele – girlfriend getaways. But they are also options for corporate retreats, family reunions, birthday celebrations or even the solo traveler. The suites, designed by interior design firm SFA, feature a plush palette of modern beiges, creams and grays with textured walls, lavish bedding and a spa bathroom with soaking tub. “We tried to capture the desert tones, but just make it super luxurious and calming,” said Heather David, Miraval’s marketing manager. “Aside from the breathtaking views and stunning décor, these serene suites feature exclusive amenities, including a special in-room spa treatment menu, a pillow menu and a communal journal and canvas where guests can share their Miraval experiences and create a beautiful piece of art for all to enjoy,” Stebbings said. The new accommodations differ from Miraval’s Villas, a community of 16 equally luxurious residences adjacent to the resort that can be reserved or privately owned. “This is a really smart step for us,” Ellin said, “the fact that we could keep something and offer the next level of luxury for our guests. The economics were really strong. We create value for the asset.” With no advertising, guests were already booking the new accommodations on the opening weekend, Ellin said. “If pre-sales are any indicator, we’re almost full and we’ve done nothing” to promote the new suites. The Retreat is just the latest step in Miraval’s progression over the past two years. The resort completed a renovation in 2016 that saw new guest rooms, a state-of-the-art fitness center and refreshed spaces throughout the property. In 2017, the Miraval Group was acquired by an affiliate of Hyatt Hotels Corporation, which now oversees the resort’s operations.

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Miraval Names Mark Stebbings as New GM

Miraval Arizona recently named Mark Stebbings as its new GM. He will oversee the flagship wellness resort in Tucson. Stebbings, an industry veteran with almost two decades of hospitality experience, last served as director of operations and GM of Travaasa Experiential Resorts, where he oversaw the brand’s two properties, Travaasa Austin and Travaasa Hana. “My goal at Miraval Arizona is to help people, both colleagues and guests, be the best they can be – by continuing to innovate and create meaningful wellness experiences,” he said. Prior to his work at Travaasa, Stebbings served as GM of Hotel Hana-Maui, where he was responsible for management, guest satisfaction, financial performance and marketing. He earned his degree in hotel catering and institutional management from Bournemouth University in Dorset, England.

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

Daniel Contreras Owner El Guero Canelo

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BizCUISINE

A Hot Dog Like No Other National Award for El Guero Canelo By Valerie Vinyard Every year, Jennifer and Angel Gallego seem to have a reason to journey from their home in Northern Colorado to Tucson, Angel’s hometown. Their most recent visit a few weeks ago was for a wedding. Whatever the reason each time, what doesn’t deviate when they hit town is to stop for a Sonoran hot dog at El Guero Canelo. “No matter what, we always stop here,” said 30-year-old Jennifer Gallego, who works in a bakery. “My taste buds just open up. It’s made with love.” Angel Gallego introduced his wife to El Guero Canelo about 10 years ago. The couple has tried to encourage restaurants in Colorado to offer their own version of the Sonoran dog, but they’ve had no luck yet. With the Sonoran hot dog winning a prestigious national award, however, that might change. El Guero Canelo recently received a James Beard Award, considered the Oscars of food awards, in the America’s Classics category. Because of that, sales are up 40 percent in the already popular restaurant, said Daniel Contreras, the 57-year-old owner and “hotdoguero” of El Guero Canelo. “This is like a wake-up call for Tucson,” said Contreras, who had never heard of James Beard before receiving the call about the award from New York in January. That call has led to even more fame for Contreras and his restaurants, which have appeared on TV shows on the Food Channel and have been written about in The New York Times. Contreras is an engaging man whose vibrant red hair matches his ebullient personality. On a recent Saturday, he walked among the tables at the location at 2480 N. Oracle Road, shaking hands with patrons and chatting with regulars. “Tucson is the Mexican food capital www.BizTucson.com

of the United States,” said Contreras, who started El Guero Canelo as a carne asada cart in 1993. The Sonoran native branched out when customers started requesting Sonoran dogs, which first appeared in Hermosillo, Sonora’s capital. The original stand is now a restaurant at 5201 S. 12th Ave., complete with picnic tables and a walk-up order window. “We are originally famous for the carne asada, but we are worldwide famous for Sonoran hot dogs,” said Contreras, who still features his original carne asada on his menus. Now, his restaurants – three in Tucson and one in Phoenix – and a bakery in Magdalena, Mexico, employ 140 people. For those who haven’t yet tried the Sonoran hot dog, you’re in for a treat. Contreras keeps his recipe traditional, a “universal Sonoran style,” if you will. First, he takes a beef, chicken and pork dog and snugly wraps a piece of bacon around it. After the meat cooks, it’s nestled in one of Contreras’ fluffy buns. Then the real fun begins. A parade of fresh ingredients – cooked beans, sautéed onions, raw onions, tomatoes and jalapeno sauce – are slathered on top. A ribbon of mustard and mayonnaise finish off the accompaniments. A mild, fat and slightly smoky Caribe yellow pepper is grilled and is placed next to each Sonoran dog. “In England they say, ‘Keep it simple,’ and that’s what I’ve been doing my whole life,” Contreras said. Many describe the magical buns as bolillo or a roll, but Contreras is quick to correct the mistake. His hot dog buns are made about 90 miles away at his small bakery in Magdalena. That is where his employees create the generously sized, super-soft buns that contain a tinge of sweetness. That bun helps offset the saltiness of the hot dog and bacon and helps create a well-rounded

flavor profile. “It’s a dinner in a bun,” said Contreras, who prices each Sonoran dog at $3.50, including tax. “I eat them every day if I can. They are the best.” The America’s Classics honor is awarded to regional establishments, often family-owned, that are cherished for their quality food, local character and lasting appeal. In addition to El Guero Canelo, other winners included Sun Wah in Chicago for its three-course Beijing Duck Feast and Galleria Umberto in Boston for its “crisp-edged squares of Sicilian pizza.” The winners will be honored at the James Beard Awards Gala at Lyric Opera of Chicago on May 7. Contreras, who started as a kid washing dishes and busing tables at a Travelodge, plans to be there to accept his award. He’ll display the trophy at the Oracle location. His third Tucson location is his smallest at 5802 E. 22nd St., while the Phoenix location is at 5131 W. McDowell Road. “I’ve been ambitious my whole life,” said Contreras, who has three kids ranging in age from 20 to 30 and three grandkids. He has been married to Blanca Contreras for 30 years. For non-hot dog lovers, El Guero Canelo’s reasonably priced menu includes caramelos, tortas, tacos and burros that range in price from a $2.75 beef or chicken taco to a $9.25 “very mucho” beef or chicken burro. Another customer, Markus Martin, has been stopping in to El Guero Canelo since he discovered it while visiting Tucson. The New York resident shrugged off the news of the restaurant’s recent award and was there for the hot dog. “I don’t care what they won,” Martin said. “I’ve been coming for six years. It’s a killer sweet bun.”

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BizCUISINE

Susan Fulton & Mary Steiger

Co-Owners Gourmet Girls Gluten Free Bakery/Bistro

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r u o l Fower P PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

Gourmet Girls Offers Delectable Food â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sans Gluten By Valerie Vinyard

Living a gluten-free life is far from easy. Luckily, businesses like Gourmet Girls Gluten Free Bakery/Bistro provide a delicious haven for people with gluten intolerance. Gluten is present in foods that contain wheat, rye or barley. That means most breads, pastas, baked goods and beer are off-limits to people who suffer from gluten intolerance. Until the early 2000s, few had heard about celiac disease, a condition in which the body rebels against gluten. People who suffer from celiac disease can experience weight loss, vomiting and abdominal bloating and pain. The disease affects more than 2 million Americans, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, or about one in 133 people. In addition, studies have shown that about 6 to 7 percent of the U.S. population has non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Gourmet Girls, 5845 N. Oracle Road, is a restaurant and bakery where people can eat or drink anything with no concerns about experiencing the effects from gluten. Susan Fulton owns Gourmet Girls with her business partner, Mary Steiger. The two met about 10 years ago in a business group and discovered a mutual love of food. continued on page 94 >>> www.BizTucson.com

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www.hfcoors.com (520 ) 903 -1010 1600 South Cherrybell Stravenue Tucson, AZ 85713 94 BizTucson

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continued from page 93 They first sold goods at farmers’ markets to much acclaim and increasing pleas to open a restaurant. They opened the brick-and-mortar location in November 2011. Steiger, who has been a pastry chef for 25 years, previously owned a bed and breakfast and had encountered guests with food allergies. Fulton had owned a framing shop before the two partnered up. Because it’s one of a kind, Gourmet Girls attracts its fair share of regulars. “We’re just surprised at the community we created,” Fulton said.

I don’t have to analyze the restaurant’s menu. The atmosphere is great. The food doesn’t taste any different than normal food. – Rick Tuckett Customer, Gourmet Girls

“Strangers will start talking to each other,” Steiger added. Gourmet Girls, which is open from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily, sells a variety of delicious baked goods made from rice, bean, potato and other flours. They’re especially proud of their bear claws, which are sweet, flaky indulgences. Its menu reads like one you might find at any café. There’s French toast, pancakes, omelets, sandwiches and salads ranging from $6.50 to $13. Coffee, sodas and teas as well as mimosas, wine, hard ciders and cocktails round out the drinks list. Because of Gourmet Girls, Rick Tuckett no longer is scared to eat at restaurants. About 10 years ago, the University of Arizona theater professor started eliminating foods from his diet to figure out why he was losing weight and feeling unwell. He finally figured out that gluten was the culprit. www.BizTucson.com


BizCUISINE Tuckett was one of Gourmet Girls’ first customers. “I don’t have to analyze the restaurant’s menu,” said Tuckett, who eats at Gourmet Girls about once a week. “The atmosphere is great. The food doesn’t taste any different than normal food.” Besides bread, gluten hides out in some toothpastes, shampoos, lipsticks and salad dressings. “We’re inundated with it,” Fulton said. Emily and Jared Peterson are part of the gluten-free community. In fact, the couple even had Gourmet Girls cater their wedding in October 2016. When she was 17, Emily started experiencing symptoms of celiac disease. “I was feeling awful for months,” said Emily, now a 27-year-old dietitian at St. Mary’s Hospital. “I was bloated, in pain, losing weight.” She found Gourmet Girls while searching online for gluten-free restaurants. “This became our place,” she said. She especially was ecstatic to be able to enjoy mozzarella sticks for the first time in eight years. “We try to think about what people haven’t been able to eat for years and what they’re missing most, and then we make it for them,” Fulton said. Jared, who doesn’t have gluten intolerance, believes there’s often a stigma attached to gluten-free foods. “There’s a belief that the quality is not the same as other restaurants,” he said. With Gourmet Girls, he said, “You could take ‘glutenfree’ out of the advertisement, and I wouldn’t know.” Steiger said there’s a reason for the “ick” factor of some gluten-free foods. She said creating delicious gluten-free foods requires a quality flour. The problem is, quality gluten-free flours cost about 10 times more than regular flour. She described the less expensive gluten-free flours as being gritty, transparent and lacking taste. That translates into some pretty unappetizing gluten-free foods. Steiger creates her own blends of gluten-free flours, which might include sorghum, millet, brown rice and tapioca. She regularly has her flours tested at the University of Nebraska to make sure they adhere to her standards. Gourmet Girls also sells loaves of bread and other gluten-free food products. “What a wonderful journey this has been for us,” Fulton said. “We’re here for a purpose,” Steiger said. “I’ve always wanted to have a bakery – and this is so much more.”

Biz Gourmet Girls Gluten Free Bakery/Bistro Where: 5845 N. Oracle Road When: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily Phone: (520) 408-9000 Information: www.gourmetgirlsglutenfree.com

CREATE YOUR OWN COLORFUL TABLE TOP COME VISIT OUR STORE AT THE FACTORY LONG LASTING DINNERWARE 100% MADE IN TUCSON

(520) 903-1010 www.hfcoors.com 1600 South Cherrybell Stravenue Tucson, AZ 85713

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From left

Ali Farhang & Tim Medcoff

Partners, Farhang & Medcoff Attorneys

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Law Firm’s Perfect Recipe Farhang and Medcoff Work to Benefit Clients, Community By Christy Krueger “Secret sauce” is what law partners Ali Farhang and Tim Medcoff believe is the reason for their firm’s success. And having a team that shares their ethics and enthusiasm is essential to sustaining this success for years into the future. Farhang & Medcoff Attorneys opened the doors in September 2008. Although the firm is nearly 10 years old, the partners feel they are just getting started. Medcoff moved around as a child, living in Michigan, Alaska and California. After attending University of California, Los Angeles as an undergraduate, he found his way to University of Arizona law school and went to work locally after graduation. Meanwhile, Farhang spent his entire childhood in Tucson, embracing his parents’ new life after moving here from Iran. His father was a long-time owner of the Maverick country bar. “He was an Iranian cowboy. He even wore a cowboy hat and boots,” Farhang recalled. The young Farhang attended University of Denver law school after his undergraduate work at the UA. The partners-to-be met through a mutual Tucson friend while Farhang worked in Denver. He eventually made his way back to Tucson and, having been drawn to Medcoff by their shared passions and visions, opened a practice with him. “We’re a full-service law firm, except family law,” said Farhang. “We both do civil litigation. Tim does product liabilwww.BizTucson.com

ity and trucking. I do regulatory work in mortgage banking and mining and general civil.” They have a close relationship with each other and with their attorneys in the firm. Both feel strongly about creating a good quality of life in the workplace, encouraging employees to follow their interests and forming a lasting legacy. “It’s important to build a tradition to endure the test of time with secret

Elizabeth Parsons

Partner Farhang & Medcoff Attorneys

sauce – which is doing genuine and passionate work,” Farhang stressed. Medcoff added, “The secret sauce is also being humble and honest with clients, solving their problems.” This extends into the community. They encourage everyone in the firm to follow their passions in charity work. The partners each serve on a number of boards in leadership roles. “We want to make a difference,” Medcoff said. Farhang’s most recent effort to make a difference in the community was been to establish the Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl. The 3-year-old post-season college football game is held at Arizona Stadium in late December. “I was inspired for two reasons,” he said. “One, people said I couldn’t do it. And two, as a born-and-bred Tucsonan, I was tired of the self-defeatist attitude.” The 2017 game was particularly successful. “It had an economic impact in the $30 million range – and for the nonprofits – we give money to local charities. You couldn’t find a hotel room that week. It’s about more than a football game. It’s portraying what’s best about us here – let the secret out.” The firm regularly receives local and global recognition, including being an AV Preeminent Peer Review Rated law firm, which Medcoff said is the highest ethical rating you can get. “MartindaleHubble evaluates law firms and attorneys internationally. They’re peercontinued on page 98 >>> Spring 2018

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BizLAW continued from page 97 reviewed, so they solicit other attorneys about law firms.” U.S. News & World Report named the firm in its 2018 Best Law Firms list, which identifies who is doing top-notch legal work. Medcoff and Farhang are also proud of the recognition they’ve received as a minority-owned-and-operated business, as well as the number of Rising Stars awards given to their lawyers by the Southwest Super Lawyers publication. One of their attorneys who already reached the Stars is partner Elizabeth Parsons. She joined the firm four years ago. She worked at a large law practice in Washington, D.C., before moving to Tucson “for a better work-life balance,” she said. Farhang said he knew within 10 minutes of meeting her that she was an excellent fit for the firm. She agreed wholeheartedly. “I’m swayed by people,” she said. “Also what swayed me was they were still becoming something and I could build it and grow.” Parsons was specifically hired to lead the transactional and corporate part of the business. It coincidentally became an all-female department until recently when a male colleague from litigation joined the group of seven women. “This is quite unusual, especially in Tucson,” Parsons said. “Most transactional attorneys are male.” Her favorite part of practicing law is helping her clients reach their goals. “In transactional, you’re helping clients reach their potential, helping them get somewhere in business.” A particular area she enjoys is start-ups. “I work with Tech Launch Arizona to help commercialize technologies.” Parsons identifies several qualities that make this law firm unique. “There’s an incredible foundation in teamwork. Everything in the structure encourages us to work together and not compete. We have fun. There’s an energetic vibe. Tim and Ali are so inspiring to me because they’re not just in this for themselves – it’s for their colleagues and it’s about Tucson – how deeply they care about the community.”

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Left to right: UA student Bianca Cortez, Ruiz Family Scholar Juan Luis Zozaya Tellez, AZA fundraiser Edith Auslander, AZA donors Ray Bernal and Mary Brown Bernal of the Thomas R. Brown Foundation

A Brighter Future

PHOTO: DAVID SANDERS/TEP

BizEDUCATION

Arizona Assurance Makes College Possible for Low-Income Students By Valerie Vinyard Like many high school students, Morgan Larson dreamed of going to college. But with the climbing costs of tuition – not to mention room, board and the price of books – the Phoenix resident’s hopes were most likely to remain an unaffordable dream. That is, until she found out about the Arizona Assurance program. The program serves as an almost all-expenses-paid opportunity for a few hundred low-income Arizona high school seniors each year who want to attend the University of Arizona. Edith Auslander has served as the AZA’s driving fundraising force through the UA Foundation. Considering the program started with “zero dollars,” the AZA has come a long way. Auslander said the program has a $13 million endowment and has received more than $30 million in spendable funds, thus sustaining an incoming yearly class of about 300 students. “We’ve got to change a lot of things in Arizona,” she said. “We’re at the bottom rung of the ladder when it comes to education in the United States.” Besides being an Arizona resident, AZA candidates must show a demonstrable need and maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average in high school. When AZA began in 2008, only a 2.0 GPA, or C average, was required to be eligible, but the program’s finite rewww.BizTucson.com

sources resulted in the program adopting a higher standard. Larson, who graduated from Shadow Mountain High School in Phoenix, had a 3.7 GPA – more than enough to qualify for the program. “It turned this dream of going to UA into something that was attainable,” said Larson, who graduated from UA with a bachelor’s degree in business administration/accounting in May 2015. She earned a master’s degree in accounting/tax in May 2016. Larson, who now works for the public accounting firm Ernst and Young in Phoenix, doesn’t like to imagine what would happen if AZA wasn’t available to her. “It’s a scary thing to think about,” said Larson, who like 70 percent of AZA students, was a first-generation college student. “I wouldn’t be a CPA. I don’t even know if I even would have finished.” It’s a similar story for two AZA students who spoke to a group of donors, AZA students and parents at a reception in February on the UA campus. Both are the first in their families to go to college, and both said the options, until AZA came along, were student loans or no college at all. “I feel like I probably wouldn’t have been able to come to college,” said Kiana Collins, a graduate of Central

High School in Phoenix who will earn her bachelor’s degree in May. “It didn’t make any sense for me to accumulate debt for myself or my family. None of my family went to college. None of my family have the funds to support it in any type of way.” While at Desert View High School in Tucson, Juan Luis Zozaya Tellez had college on his mind, but didn’t know how he could get there without piling up massive student loan debt. “I didn’t rule it out completely, but it would have been a lot more difficult for me (to pay for college) and it would have definitely involved me taking out significant amounts of student loans,” he said. “I would have been in debt and I’m not in debt.” Zozaya Tellez was the Ruiz Family Scholar for the 2017-2018 school year and will graduate from the UA in May. He made the Dean’s List several times and has been admitted to graduate school at all three of the state’s university. The program’s retention component plays a major role in getting the AZA students through college once they’ve gotten past the hurdle of getting admitted and finding a way to pay for it. It includes formal and informal meetings with faculty members, along with guidance and assistance from peer mentors, continued on page 102 >>> Spring 2018

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BizEDUCATION continued from page 101 advisers and career counselors. The AZA was established because Robert Shelton, former president of the UA, had been impressed with a similar need-based program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he had been a VP. He included helping low-income students in his inaugural promise in 2006. To qualify for AZA, the student’s family must have an income of no more than $42,400, which is two times the poverty rate. The program is funded with public and private support, including federal aid, grants, donors and the students’ part-time jobs. In the first year of the program, about 800 students who had filled out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) received a letter offering them a four-year scholarship through Arizona Assurance and about 600 accepted. The AZA’s popularity continued to grow in the next couple of years, when about 1,100 responded. Unfortunately, the economy tanked around that time, so the program needed to tighten the requirements for admission and reduce the number of scholarships. Now that the program has hit its stride, about 1,000 students are funded each year. Tuition, fees and books still are covered all four years. Campus residence is covered the first year, and meals are no longer included. “Arizona Assurance is an investment in the future of our state,” Auslander said. “What it does for the economy in Arizona is significant. These young people are going to be leaders.” Many companies and individuals who donate to the program agree. Lisa Lovallo, market VP for Cox Communications, noted that Cox was one of the early investors in AZA and continues to support it. “Nearly 10 years ago, Edie came to me with an idea – to improve access to higher education for first-generation students in our community,” Lovallo said. “When she laid out the plan to recruit, retain and graduate students who might not otherwise have this type of opportunity, Cox Communications was committed to helping make it a reality.” The four-year approach of emotional and financial support with AZA students is unique. “For me, what differentiates AZ Assurance is the first-year transitioning support and mentorship that is coupled with leadership development,” Lovallo said. “Not only are these students succeeding, they are well positioned to be leaders in their communities and chosen fields.” “The first semester I was so overwhelmed,” Larson said. “You feel so disconnected. I’m lucky that I had a whole team rallying behind me.” In the 10 years of the program, AZA has enrolled about 5,300 low-income Arizona students. All have the ability and support to succeed in college but almost all could not have afforded to attend. “People are there working to help them,” Auslander said. “They are not out there alone.” “The University of Arizona is about our future. It’s about our community,” said Sarah Brown Smallhouse, president of the Thomas R. Brown Foundation, another AZA donor. “It’s an honor to be in a position to help people who have talent, who have motivation, who have dreams about what they want to do with their lives.”

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PHOTO: MATT GEORGE

BizMEDICINE

Banner Health Opens Outpatient Campus By Christy Krueger Since settling in Tucson in 2015, Banner Health has set out to significantly expand the availability of medical care to the Tucson community. It’s in the middle of a $400 million expansion of Banner – University Medical Center Tucson to be completed next year. New Banner urgent care clinics are popping up around town. And in December, Banner opened its much needed 208,000-square-foot outpatient campus at 3838 N. Campbell Ave., immediately east of the University of Arizona Cancer Center. The three-story, $100 million building on 13 acres has been two years in the making and is intended to replace the tight quarters and aging clinics at the main hospital. Hensel Phelps Construction led the building of Banner – University Medicine North as the general contractor. The company is one of the largest general contractors in the country, working on commercial, www.BizTucson.com

educational, governmental, healthcare, hospitality and science and technology projects. It has been involved in numerous UA campus ground-up and expansion developments. Approximately 350 personnel were relocated to the north campus from Banner UMC, according to Scott Hofferber, COO of Banner University Medical Group. That includes 175 faculty members and residents occupying outpatient clinics; almost 100 clinical staff, such as medical assistants and registered nurses, and 75 support staff – schedulers, front desk and technologists. As physicians are added over the next few years, more staff will follow. “We anticipate an increase in the clinical footprint by almost 100 exam rooms,” Hofferber said. “We will recruit faculty and providers to fill it out for future growth. Two to three staff members are added for each physician.” He said one of the unique qualities

about the clinic is “it’s a one-stop shop. Patients can come in for primary care and see their cardiologist. We consider it multidisciplinary where multiple providers can come together to treat one patient.” Twenty-eight medical and surgical specialties in adult care are offered, including allergy, neurology, podiatry and rheumatology. On-site labs, medical imaging and radiation oncology services will be available starting this spring. “It’s a brand new building with the latest technology and a connection to the electronic medical records, and it’s outfitted with state-of-the-art equipment,” Hofferber said. While many of the specialty areas of care are surgical, the facility is primarily clinical. Surgeries will still be performed at the medical center. “What I really like about this building is that we have this nice, modern continued on page 106 >>> Spring 2018

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BizMEDICINE continued from page 105 architecture that takes advantage of the wonderful vistas we have of the Catalina Mountains,” said Dr. Charles B. Cairns, dean of the UA College of Medicine – Tucson. He noted that the emphasis on privacy enhances the patient experience and also makes providers feel better about the conditions for their patients. In addition, the clinic’s layout and location mean more convenience and accessibility for patients – with a 960-car parking garage, a cafe, gardens and welcoming interior spaces. Kathy Bollinger, president of Banner University Medicine, said the building means “bringing better, more efficient care to patients. It means giving faculty a home they can be really proud to work in, and it means a really wonderful investment in the city of Tucson.”

Biz

Specialties offered: Abdominal transplant Allergy Anticoagulation Cardiology Cardiovascular thoracic surgery Heart and lung transplant EMG Endocrinology Gastroenterology General surgery Hepatology Infectious disease Internal medicine Nephrology Neurology Neurosurgery OB/GYN Pacemaker clinic Plastic surgery Otolaryngology (ENT) Podiatry Pre-Anesthesia clinic Pulmonology Pulmonary function testing Rheumatology Trauma surgery Urology Vascular surgery

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BizENTREPRENEUR

Veteran’s Invention Spawns Online Family Business By Tiffany Kjos Sometimes spouses are on very different pages. The husband insists on adopting another cat. The wife wants to redecorate the living room. Or he gets out of the Navy and wants to sell an awesome invention online. Here’s how that played out for Eli Crane when he proposed making a business out of his invention to his wife, Jen: “She was like, ‘What? We’re not selling bottle openers for a living.’ ” Well, in fact, they are. And they’re pretty darned good at it. The Cranes and their upstart company, Bottle Breacher, were the only local headliner among a cast of crazysuccessful startups that brought together seven companies on one day for a dialogue about the good and the bad they’ve faced on their journey. The inaugural event – Ideas to Doors – was the brainchild of Scott Hessell, director of the University of Arizona’s Terry J. Lundgren Center for Retailing. The September event at the Fox Tucson Theatre drew roughly 200 people, including small business owners and a large contingent of UA students. The Cranes’ customizable bottle opener has spawned a growing line of similar products – from fun, holidaythemed bottle openers to T-shirts. Bottle Breacher takes up five spaces in a northside business incubator plaza, with everything from administration to manufacturing done there. Jen, who had two previous online businesses, was not convinced such a business could sustain itself. Her husband, a former Navy Seal, was convinced it could. “I feel that God gave me Bottle Breacher,” Eli said. “I believe that God will set things up like this that don’t make sense – just to magnify his power.” 108 BizTucson

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Jen’s fully invested now. “Jen in many ways was the inspiration for this corporation,” Eli said. “I’ve never met anyone who works as hard as Jen does.” Eli said that includes his fellow Seals. Eli blogs about business and has written for Entrepreneur magazine. His advice for business owners: Keep your eye on the ball. “I’m not just selling bottle openers,” he said. “At the end of the day my goal is to make the best American-made, veteran-operated business in the world.” Jen has some hard-won advice for fledgling business owners, too: Be careful with your time, including what activities you commit to, and always put kids and spouse first. Jen schedules work time around keeping up their family, which includes their two elementaryschool-age daughters. Eli, fresh out of the Navy, wanted a way to provide for his family and help veterans, especially special operatives, who might flounder after separating from the service. The couple had moved from San Diego to Tucson to be near Jen’s family. He hit upon a bottle opener fashioned from .50-caliber bullet casing, like one his brother brought back from the Philippines. Jen had experience with online sales through the two websites she founded, and maybe that’s why she knew what they were in for. Through it all, though, they never gave up. “You only have to be right once. Most successful businesses have had three, four or five other businesses,” Eli said. “I’ve gotten my butt kicked so many times. I’ve failed so many times. But one thing I don’t do is quit.” The Cranes founded Bottle Breacher in 2012. Two years later, they appeared continued on page 110 >>> www.BizTucson.com


PHOTOS: CHRIS CARDENAS

from left

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BizENTREPRENEUR continued from page 108 on TV’s “Shark Tank” and received $150,000 in funding. On the show Eli explained the Bottle Breacher name: “A breacher is an operator whose job it is to get the assaulters into whatever target we’re hitting. The breacher – that’s a qualification like a sniper. You got to breach into that beer somehow.” Kevin O’Leary, normally the toughest of the Sharks, was moved. He said, “Some people think of it as an instrument of death. I think of it as bullets for freedom. It just hit me – it became an emotional connection with the product. There’s his wife at home with two kids and never knowing every day when he goes through that door if he’s going to live.” Those couple of years between starting the company and going on national television demonstrated that the Cranes could thrive as business partners as well as life partners. “We banded together,” Eli said. “We fought like cats and dogs for two years” to get the company off the ground. To other startups Eli would say: Accept help. You’re gonna need it. “You’re nothing by yourself on the battlefield. Entrepreneurship is the same.” The couple still fights to keep the company on track, but the challenges have changed. After their “Shark Tank” appearance, the company went from selling 7,500 units a month on Etsy to selling 220,000 – and from seven employees to three dozen. Overnight. If Eli had a do-over, he’d be prepared for that response. “We got slammed pretty hard and had things on back order. We were pulling our hair out.” They scrambled to find new employees and upgrade technology. And they lost existing customers who were frustrated they couldn’t get orders filled quickly. In the end Bottle Breacher had to make significant changes to its processes. “Don’t be afraid to change things up and test them out,” Eli said. “A lot of times ‘How we’ve always done things’ is the real reason you’re in the quagmire you’re in.” One thing the Cranes didn’t anticipate was taking some heat from people who don’t like their bottle openers because they’re made of bullet casings. “A lot of media is turned off by the product – but people are still buying it,” Jen said. The two have been together since high school. Jen graduated from the University of Arizona, but Eli quit high school. “As soon as 9/11 happened he left school and joined the Navy,” Jen said. During his 13 years of service he was deployed five times – the last three as a Navy Seal to Iraq. These days he gives back by employing veterans and by making sure his products are 100 percent made and sourced here. And the Cranes’ faith is woven throughout everything they do. “It’s awesome to be able to continue to serve and be as blessed as we have been so we can continue to bless others,” he said. “We’re always going to wear our faith on our sleeve.”

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BizBRIEF

CREW Tucson Names Award Winners, Board Members By Elena Acoba CREW Tucson, the local chapter of a national networking group of women working in commercial real estate, recently honored six members with 2017 awards.

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Entrepreneurial Spirit Award – Amelie Messingham, Farhhang & Medcoff, for achieving success from recently taking a career risk Member-to-Member Business Award – Debbie Heslop, Volk Companies, for generating business with other members Career Advancement for Women Award – Barbi Reuter, PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services, for exemplifying CREW’s aim to elevate the status of women in commercial real estate Chapter Service Award – Karen Farrell, Venture West, for her work for the Tucson chapter New Member Award – Christie Lee, Commerce Bank of Arizona, for making an impact in the chapter after having joined within the last two years President’s Award – Chris Young, Young Law Firm, for supporting and assisting 2017 President Tricia Hooper, Title Security Agency, during her term

The group of more than 80 members also announced its 2018 board of directors:

• • • • •

President – Chris Young

Board members – Lani Baker, Holualoa Companies; Margret Heubner, Commercial Cleaning & Restoration; JoAnn Mountain, BBVA Compass Bank, and Teresa Vasquez, HSL Properties

President-Elect – Karen Farrell Past President – Tricia Hooper Treasurer – Susan Armstrong, BeachFleischman

Secretary – Michelle Jolly, Stewart Title & Trust of Tucson

Founded in 2002, Tucson CREW (Commercial Real Estate Women) focuses on business development, leadership development, industry research and career outreach for its members. Nationally, there are more than 10,000 members who reach every segment of the industry.

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BizBRIEFS Mike Dehen

Mike Dehen was promoted to Tucson branch sales manager for Konica Minolta Business Solutions, USA. Dehen was the company’s government and education account executive for 10 years following his position as Tucson branch manager of Hughes-Calihan Business Systems, which Konia Minolta acquired. Before that he was owner and president of DeMott Business Systems for 20 years. Dehen earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Arizona State University. Biz

Robyn Frey

Bolchalk Frey Marketing has changed its company name to Frey Creative Marketing. February marks the firm’s 54th year in business. Owner Robyn Frey joined the company in 1982 and became the firm’s president in 2011. Frey Creative Marketing provides a full range of marketing, advertising and public relations services. The firm is a proud recipient of more than 350 national, regional and local honors for creative excellence. Biz

Lee D. Lambert

Pima Community College is one of eight colleges nationwide selected by the Institute of International Education to receive an IIE Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovation in International Education. PCC received an honorable mention for its project to honor and expand economic, education and community connections to Mexico. “PCC is proud of its phenomenal relationship with Mexico, which provides important educational and cultural opportunities for our students and community,” said Chancellor Lee D. Lambert.

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SPECIAL REPORT 2018

THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

STONE CANYON PHOTOS: ROB CROSS

For the Love of Golf

www.BizTucson.com Sponsored by

2018 > > > Homes BizTucson The Golf Casitas at Stone Canyon and Boulder Vista Spring by Monterey

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BizREALESTATE

Mickelson’s Vision By Jay Gonzales

Golf is supposed to be fun. It’s a simple notion and it’s the foundation for a business model for PGA Tour champion Phil Mickelson and his partners at Mickelson Golf Properties. It brought them to the Tucson area, where they purchased the financially troubled The Stone Canyon Club in Oro Valley in 2014, one of six properties the company now owns. Within a few years, they put the club on solid financial footing, built a brand 118 BizTucson

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new clubhouse and triggered new housing developments, including one of their own. At Stone Canyon, Mickelson Golf Properties owns one of the elite courses in the nation. Golf Digest ranked Stone Canyon No. 3 on its 2017 list of the best golf courses in Arizona and in the top 100 in the country. There was only one other course in the Tucson area to make the magazine’s Top 25 in Arizona. The basic financial strategy for Mick-

elson Golf Properties is to acquire financially troubled properties at a bargain and then put its mark on them. In Mickelson’s vision, that’s to make a round of golf more fun for the average player than it often is at high-end country clubs. “In my heart, I feel like we’re making the game more enjoyable because we’re making the courses we take over more playable,” Mickelson said on a recent cool, winter day when he was at Stone www.BizTucson.com


Phil Mickelson Phil Mickelson has a love for golf. His reasons go beyond the $85 million in winnings and 42 PGA Tour championships, including five majors. Through his business, Mickelson Golf Properties, he said he is trying to bring the enjoyment of golf to the everyday player.

“I loved going out and playing with my dad and with my family. I loved competing at the highest level of college, amateur, junior golf and the PGA Tour. They forced me to work hard. But I also love playing in club events and with friends and taking buddies out. I love and appreciate every aspect of the game, and it makes me feel good when I see people love and enjoy the game as well.”

for Stone Canyon

Making Golf More Fun for the Average Player

Canyon to shoot promotional ads for the club. “My big underlying theme is making golf an enjoyable experience where you want to spend more time at the club rather than hurry up and get back home,” he said. “I want your spouse or your family to want to come out and join you here, and then you end up spending six to eight hours here rather than trying to cut it short at three or four.” While a day at the club remains the www.BizTucson.com

fundamental strategy, Mickelson Golf Properties has delved into creating opportunities for even longer stays. The company is the developer of The Golf Casitas at Stone Canyon, 28 residential properties a stone’s throw from the clubhouse. It gives buyers a less expensive option to the multi-million-dollar custom homes in the Stone Canyon development. The casitas are intended to be a place to stay for anyone thinking about mak-

ing a move to Stone Canyon. Owners can rent them for short stays through The Stone Canyon Club. The casitas are a more affordable option for an owner who is a winter visitor and doesn’t want to invest in a larger custom home. The golf experience

Nonetheless, the focus is on the golf experience for Mickelson and Steve Loy, his business partner and former coach and caddy. The two are partners in continued on page 120 >>> Spring 2018

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PHOTOS: ROB CROSS

“Because I’m so appreciative of what golf has given me, I want people to enjoy and love the game the way I do. There are so many different things about golf that I love. When I was growing up as a kid, the solitude of just playing and practicing by myself was wonderful. Being able to play with other adults when I was a kid helped me interact socially with other people and be comfortable.


BizREALESTATE Mickelson Golf Properties, whose president is Roger Nelson. Nelson also is a developer of the casitas in partnership with Mickelson and Loy. Club General Manager Mike Russell, who has worked at the golf club since it opened in 2000, saw Mickelson’s vision for the golf course coming into focus the first time the three-time Master’s champion played it in late 2014. “A lot of it started with Phil’s first round here,” Russell said. “His first time around the course, he was kind of dissecting it and looking at everything. He was really taking notes on what he could do to make the course more playable for the higher-handicapped players, but still challenging for the veteran players.” “I have this belief that the underlying reason golf hasn’t been growing is that the courses are too hard,” Mickelson said. “When I say too hard, the average player is not able to carry over a hazard and stop the ball on a green, but they can play the ball along the ground.” The proof, Mickelson said, was at an earlier acquisition, McDowell Mountain Golf Club, a public course in a residential development in northern Scottsdale. Bunkers were removed and other adjustments were made to keep the course from “gobbling up golf balls from the average guy,” he said. “Our play went up 185 percent a year. That’s when I knew we were onto something.” ‘Stone Canyon’ for a reason

Today, the golf course at Stone Canyon remains stunning. For a local who knows Tucson like the proverbial back of his hand, Stone Canyon looks like it was formed somewhere else and set at the base of the Tortolita Mountains. Each hole seems to be in its own canyon surrounded by stones with a terrain unlike any in the region. The course winds through the desert with each hole isolated from the next because of the hills covered with rock formations. Those golfers who gauge the breaks on the greens based on the theory of “breaking away from the mountain” have to figure out which mountain the ball is breaking away from because each green seems to be surrounded by hills than can affect the roll. The views are unmatched. Even the 120 BizTucson

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highest handicap players should try some of the elevated back tees where spectacular views make for breathtaking shots into the fairways or the par-3 holes. The risk of a lost ball on a tee shot is well worth the view and the opportunity to hit a memorable shot into a canyon surrounded by mountains of stones. The changes, since Mickelson put his stamp on the course, have been “subtle,” Russell said. It can be as difficult or as easy as the player desires with at least five choices and up to 10 options at the tee box. Adjustments to the course were made the summer after Mickelson’s group purchased it, starting with the removal of some of the bunkers that were making it hard for the average player to access some of the greens. Since it is a desert course, one of the challenges for a golfer who lacks a precision game is to find balls that go into the desert. Some clearing was done to make it easier for golfers to spot their balls. More recently, the greens were resurfaced and expanded to get them back to their original size. “We took out about five or six bunkers in certain areas on the course, and we did a lot of clearing of the desert in areas where people have a tendency to hit balls,” Russell said. “It was subtle, which is what you want. The golf course didn’t lose any of its characteristics. Every change was for the better.”

Looking down the fairway from the 17th green.

The Stone Canyon Clubhouse

To the rescue

The bigger change for the better came when Mickelson and his group bought the golf course and began investing in it after years of status quo for a development that had attracted a high-end resident – mostly winter residents – and million-dollar homes. When Nelson first became aware that Stone Canyon was available, he said it didn’t take a lot of convincing for the Mickelson group to take a good hard look at an acquisition. “We were looking for properties to acquire in Arizona, and Stone Canyon kind of came on the radar with a call from a longtime friend who talked me into taking a look,” Nelson said. “I had seen it when it first opened, so I knew it to be a beautiful property. I really did not have any idea what the circumstances were around the ownership. My friend continued on page 122 >>>

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View of the par-3 ninth hole from a back tee box.

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BizREALESTATE continued from page 120 just indicated that it was available. “We started talking about it. Phil and Steve had never even heard of it, so I had to get them to take a look at it. They were very excited about it because it’s such a beautiful property.” That the property was available was a mild upset in itself as Stone Canyon went through a dark financial period beginning with the real estate crash in the mid-2000s. The period was littered with bankruptcies and other financial distress that threatened the club’s existence. Much of the property in the development, including the golf club, ended up in a family trust where it was maintained until a buyer could come along and rescue it. “It was a beautiful, fantastic facility, well done. Everything was quality,” Nelson said of his first impression. “We had to figure out whether or not we could turn it around financially and make it successful.” At the time, Mickelson and Loy were focusing their business venture in Arizona where they were buying finan-

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I feel like we’re making the game more enjoyable because we’re making the courses we take over more playable.

– Phil Mickelson PGA Tour champion

cially troubled golf courses and clubs and turning them around by making them more enticing and, in some cases, more affordable for golfers. In addition to McDowell Mountain, they own two other public courses – Ocotillo Golf

Club in Chandler and Palm Valley Golf Club in Goodyear. In addition to The Stone Canyon Club, they own two other private clubs – The Rim Golf Club and The Golf Club at Chaparral Pines, both in Payson. A Sun Devil who loves Tucson

Mickelson is originally from San Diego, but he is no stranger to Arizona. He attended Arizona State University, where he launched his golf career with Loy as his coach. His first of 42 PGA Tour victories came in Tucson when he played in the Northern Telecom Open. Playing as an amateur on a sponsor’s exemption from the Tucson Conquistadores, he beat all the pros. He took home the traditional Conquistador helmet that is the tournament’s trophy, but he didn’t take home the cash prize so that he could keep his college eligibility at ASU. “I’ve always had a certain place in my heart for Tucson because it was my first tour win and the Conquistadores were the first group to ever give me a sponsor’s invite,” Mickelson said. “I always continued on page 124 >>>

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BizREALESTATE continued from page 122 have this feeling of love when I think of Tucson. I don’t feel this rivalry between ASU and the University of Arizona. In fact, I pull for the UA whenever they play. So when the opportunity came here, it was a perfect fit.” From a financial standpoint, the opportunity and the fit were far better in Arizona than in, say, Mickelson’s home state of California or other states in the West. “We’ve come close to purchasing properties in Washington and Oregon and California. We’ve gotten very close to the finish line on a number of properties, but the deal ended up not being quite right,” Mickelson said. “We feel that if one deal goes bad, we jeopardize the others, and so you have to make sure it’s the right deal for all the properties. “Arizona had the most opportunity to do what we wanted to do with so many courses closing, so many courses struggling,” he said. “There were opportunities to step in in California. The land

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was just too expensive. It’s very expensive to get started there.” ‘A fun hang’

And so it’s Arizona for now for Mickelson Golf Properties. The sparkling 25,000-square-foot clubhouse at Stone Canyon that opened

in March 2016 is an obvious sign that the turnaround for the club has been achieved. It has transformed the clubhouse into a place to be rather than a just a place to start your round. “I want the environment to be comfortable,” Mickelson said. “Our whole

mindset in structuring our clubs is to create a fun hang where you want to bring your family, your friends, or meet and congregate.” Nelson added: “This new facility has given the staff an opportunity to do some things differently, where they can do different theme nights – whether it’s around a ball game, a UA game, the Super Bowl, live music – and have a different experience. It’s making it more social and more interactive and a lot more fun than it ever was before.” And that’s the plan, the business model, the vision – fun. “Stone Canyon was a risk for us at first because it’s such an elite property,” Mickelson said. “We had to create an environment that made you want to come here. I think it’s been a success because it’s able to sustain itself. It’s not losing money, but more than that, we’ve created an environment where people want to come here.”

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BizREALESTATE

‘Stay-and-Play’

Casitas

Freestanding Homes with Intimacy and Ambiance By Jay Gonzales

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we could develop some smaller homes, sell to individuals and then have prospects come and stay and see whether or not they’d be interested in becoming members.” As part of owning property in Stone Canyon, residents must get either a golf membership or a sports membership that includes everything but golf. The casitas are one of five planned communities in the 1,400acre Stone Canyon development, which opened in 2000. There are a total of 800 lots for custom homes, more than half of which are still available. Nelson said the casitas, like the other planned communities, are an option for someone who wants a home in Stone Canyon, but doesn’t want to put millions of dollars and a long construction schedule into owning a home in the development. “It’s kind of like I always say in development, everybody likes ice cream but everybody doesn’t like the same flavor,” said Nelson, whose primary background is as a CPA, but who has been involved in home building, master-plan community development and golf course development for 25 years. “There are 800 lots planned in Stone Canyon and the vast majority of those are an acre or better in size – and that’s a lot of the same thing. This is one of the few options in Stone Canyon where you can get a smaller lot, a smaller home, lockand-leave, the ability to do nightly rentals and make some income off your property.” continued on page 128 >>>

Golf Casitas at Stone Canyon

PHOTOS: ROB CROSS

The “properties” piece of Mickelson Golf Properties has taken on additional meaning at Stone Canyon – as in residential properties. The company formed by PGA Tour champion Phil Mickelson and his business partner primarily buys and operates golf courses, but it is building a 28-home development at Stone Canyon to provide added visibility and access for the Stone Canyon Club, which they purchased in 2014. Stone Canyon is tucked against the Tortolita Mountains in Oro Valley with an elite golf course and a new, 25,000-square-foot clubhouse. Already heavily invested in Stone Canyon, Mickelson, his partner in the golf properties company, Steve Loy; and Roger Nelson, president of Mickelson Golf Properties, have made another heavy investment. The Golf Casitas at Stone Canyon sits between the golf clubhouse and the nearby health and fitness center that is part of the private club. “The decision to buy the golf course was made solely on the golf course. The decision to do the casitas came later after we developed a footprint for the clubhouse,” Nelson said. “We had nine acres left over that was situated between the clubhouse and the health and fitness center. I just thought that we needed to do something to develop that area because one of the difficulties we’ve had in attracting members is that there’s no place on the property where prospects can stay. “The whole concept is to create a stay-and-play environment where

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BizREALESTATE

continued from page 126 Until the casitas development was approved, the CC&Rs in Stone Canyon required rentals of any home for at least six months. The vast majority of homes are owned by winter visitors who spend considerable time away from their properties. When Nelson conjured the idea to build the casitas only a few months after Mickelson Golf Properties purchased Stone Canyon, he knew he was going to have to go through an approval process with the Town of Oro Valley. It wasn’t as difficult as he expected, he said. “This whole thing was part of the golf course recreational zoning, which included the health and fitness center, the vacant land and the clubhouse,” Nelson said. “We did a study for the

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town that demonstrated to them that most high-end golf courses have a higher-density product of some kind, closer to their clubhouse, for this type of use. We gave them several examples all over the country and they basically agreed. We didn’t have to rezone it. “It’s the only place in Stone Canyon where (short-term rental) is available and this location couldn’t be better,” said Nelson, who owns one of the casitas with Mickelson and Loy. “It’s walking distance from the clubhouse and the health and fitness center. They’re the most affordable option in Stone Canyon by far. They’re like little jewel boxes.” There are two floor plans, both priced in the $500,000s. The first is a 1,717-square-foot plan with two bedrooms, 2½ baths and a two-car garage.

It has two elevations. The second is a 1,942-square-foot plan with three bedrooms, three baths, a two-car garage and a choice of three elevations. “I didn’t know exactly what we wanted,” Nelson recalled of the early design process. The initial plan was to build duplexes with a total of 32 units. Once that concept was developed, Nelson went to a ready-made focus group for feedback. “We came up with some preliminary conceptual designs and floor plans and then we showed the membership here to see how they would react – and it was very interesting,” Nelson said. “The members really did not like the attached product.” continued on page 130 >>>

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PHOTOS: ROB CROSS

Stone Canyon Fitness Center


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continued from page 128 The next design plan had six larger units and 25 smaller, freestanding homes. When those designs were rolled out, a waiting list formed immediately for the six larger homes, but there was zero interest in the smaller models. Nelson and his architect literally went back to the drawing board and settled on the size and floor plans that are now for sale. Four casitas have been completed and seven are under construction. “We went back to the architect and said we’re closing in on this and it’s clear that they want units that are freestanding. It’s clear that they want a little bigger space. It’s clear they want two-car garages. It’s clear they want single level. And we went to work with that in mind. We went from 32 units down to 28 freestanding homes.” In the end, the look, the feel and the amenities don’t stray from what you might find elsewhere in Stone Canyon, even at the surrounding homes that were three and four times the price. Like most properties in Stone Canyon, the views and the setting are difficult to

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match with the Tortolita Mountains to the north, Pusch Ridge to the east and, if the lot is slightly elevated, a long-distance view into the city. The casitas are just more in line with someone who might be there for a shorter stay and doesn’t need 4,000 square feet.

“The casitas are small units that provide a kind of intimacy and ambiance,” Mickelson said. “They’re 200 yards from the clubhouse or 100 yards from the fitness area; it’s easy to walk to both. “When you’re using this as a second

home, which many people do, you don’t have to have a massive home. You can have a small casita that can be managed and taken care of so you don’t have to hire a personal assistant to manage your home and make sure everything works. And it allows you to come in and experience Stone Canyon for a few weeks multiple times a year.” Of course, there’s nothing preventing an owner from making one a year-round home with an opportunity to enjoy one of the best golf courses in the country – “Golf Digest” ranks Stone Canyon as the no. 3 golf course in Arizona – even in the summer when the golf course has plenty of tee times as winter residents flee from the heat. While Mickelson Golf Properties does sell lots at some of its other golf properties, Stone Canyon is the only one where Mickelson’s company has gone so far as to build a residential development tied to the golf property. “It’s about finding your target,” Mickelson said. “We’re trying to provide an experience and a product for them.”

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Boulder Vista at Stone Canyon A New Trend: Smaller Luxury Second Homes

PHOTOS: COURTESY MERITAGE HOMES

By Jay Gonzales There’s nothing like a little hard data – right there in black and white – to back up your instincts and convince you to jump into a project worth $30 million or so. Jeff Grobstein, division president for Meritage Homes in Tucson, sensed he was seeing a trend toward luxury homes in the $700,000 to $1 million range at the time that the real estate market showed signs of recovery from the midto-late-2000s collapse that claimed the financial lives of investors across the board. “We’re largely a data-driven company,” Grobstein said of Meritage Homes and its luxury home division, Monterey Homes, which is building a 36-home development, Boulder Vista at Stone Canyon. Meritage already was involved at Stone Canyon, having taken over development of one of the early planned communities, Stone Gate, near the entrance to the 1,400-acre development in Oro Valley. It’s one of five planned communities now in Stone Canyon. Grobstein said the home builder was well aware of the history of the oncetroubled, high-end development at the base of the Tortolita Mountains. It had been through financial struggles for nearly a decade, including a bankruptcy by its then-owner. But Meritage was seeing a turnaround. “We had been out here for almost 2½ years (at Stone Gate) and we were seeing a trend for people in what I’d call the move-up, luxury second-home market. They were asking for homes that were 132 BizTucson

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a little bit smaller than custom homes,” Grobstein said. “We quickly put some focus groups together as well as our own internal data. “We are constantly surveying our customers and hearing what they say. Plus, we subscribe to a lot of data. We’re seeing trends showing that while people will spend $700,000 to $1 million, they don’t want those big mausoleums anymore. That’s not to say they aren’t being built, but they want to be able to have a home that is built better or as good as a custom luxury home and make the process much easier than having to go through the process of the custom home.” And while the data triggered Monterey to buy the Boulder Vista property from legendary Tucson developer Don Diamond, Grobstein said there was further validation when PGA Tour champion Phil Mickelson and his company Mickelson Golf Properties bought the Stone Canyon golf course, built a luxurious clubhouse and made their own investment into a 28-home development. “We were going to do it anyhow, but we felt that was definitely a leading indicator and a positive thing for the Stone Canyon community to have Mickelson purchase and invest in the golf course,” Grobstein said. At Boulder Vista, Monterey is offering three floor plans, each single-story with two or three bedrooms, smartly named after some of the most famous golfers on the planet – Hogan, Nicklaus and Palmer. After all, Stone Canyon does hang its hat on its golf course, which Golf Digest ranks as the No. 3

course in Arizona and puts it in the top 100 in the United States. A development like Boulder Vista takes much of the guess work out of creating a custom home for someone who is putting high six figures into a home and doesn’t have a vision for what they actually want. In the custom home prowww.BizTucson.com


cess, an owner will have to rely on the vision of an architect to take their wants and needs and design the home. But it’s not that easy to convey, said Mark Barraza, sales associate at Boulder Vista and Stone Gate. “A lot of times, (buyers) don’t really know what they’re looking for, or what www.BizTucson.com

they say they’re looking for is different from what they’re actually looking for,” Barraza said. Boulder Vista provides enough options within its designs to fulfill what the customer – in the end – has in mind, Barraza said. “We try to find out what their living

situations are, what kind of homes they live in, what their lifestyle is, what their price point really is and what they’re looking for,” Barraza said. “Once you find that out, then you can direct them to the right product or the right lot.” The data, Grobstein said, showed continued on page 135 >>> Spring 2018

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BizREALESTATE continued from page 133 that customers in the market were looking for homes between 2,500 and 3,000 square feet, “which is what we did.” In the early stages of planning and design, Grobstein said, Monterey plotted out 50 homesites. But as they took a closer look at the topography and the unique makeup of the property with its rock formations and elevations, the number dropped to 36. “We felt that there was enough demand for a 36-homesite community with this type of setting where we could capitalize on the views, the rocks, the topography, and come in with what you could call a desert contemporary feel,” Grobstein said. “We worked through the data and through a pretty arduous process of design.” The common thread in the three floor plans is layouts where kitchens and dining areas open up into the great rooms. Ceilings are 12 to 16 feet high, but, thanks to modern technology and energy-efficient features, don’t strain the budget for utility bills. Each model is ENERGY STAR® certified which means the latest in energy-efficient ap-

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pliances, air conditioning, insulation and windows among its features. Sliding glass doors that open the width of the great room encourage indoor/outdoor living where the views can be equally magnificent from inside and from the patio, making entertaining almost mandatory. “Most of the new homes we design and build today don’t have a formal living room or dining room,” Grobstein said. “This is what we’ve learned. You can easily entertain here between the back yard, the side yard and the great room. It’s amazing how it flows, and makes it easy to socialize.” One of the challenges at Stone Canyon is that it is tucked away in a far corner of the Tucson metropolitan area and is not really on the way to anything. Barraza quipped that many who end up at Stone Canyon first get there by accident. But once there, residents find that everything they need is nearby because Oro Valley has developed into a bustling and well-planned community with a wide range of activities. The typical Stone Canyon buyer is of-

ten someone who is moving to Arizona for the first time, Barraza said. They might belong to a country club already, but it might be at a place where they can golf only a few months out of the year. If they happen to get to Stone Canyon during a search for a home, they can be instantly captured by the beauty of the area. “That’s what first gets them here – and the weather,” Barraza said. “Usually, when they come out here the first time, it seems like it’s far. But then they realize that five minutes away there’s a grocery store, seven minutes away there’s major shopping, 10 to 12 minutes away there’s pretty much anything you need.” And then, Grobstein said, there’s just something about being in Stone Canyon, where the rock formations that surround the various properties can dazzle on a daily basis. “I don’t think it’s just about a house,” Grobstein said. “I think when you buy in a place like Stone Canyon, you’re buying into a lifestyle, you’re buying into truly one of the most special, beautiful, unique environments around.”

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PHOTOS: AMY HASKELL

Supporting Children at Risk Stone Canyon Community Foundation Raises Funds By Jay Gonzales

In a little “oasis” of the greater Tucson valley, there’s a band of do-gooders – mostly from somewhere else – who are pitching in with their time, their caring and their money to make the community a better place primarily for children at risk. For the most part, they have little history with the area. Some may have visited in the past. Others might have relatives or friends here. But all of them made their way to the high-end development of Stone Canyon, having found the picturesque setting in their own ways. Most live here for just part of the year. They’re members of one of the most beautiful country clubs in Arizona. What they also have in common is they have a penchant for giving – and they do. Since 2008, the Stone Canyon Community Foundation – made up entirely of members of The Stone Canyon Club – has spread approximately $2 million into the community to organizations in the far reaches of the metro area from where they live, organizations such as the Sunnyside Unified School District Foundation and San Miguel High School on Tucson’s southside. Youth On Their Own, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tucson, Junior Achievement and Literacy Connects were on the list of 20 grant recipients in 2017. “This is like a little oasis in an area which, broadly, has a lot of problems,” said Dan Regis, who came to Tucson from the Pacific Northwest and who cochairs the foundation with Rod Rupp, a retired insurance company executive and winter visitor from Michigan. “These are just people with good hearts who wanted to say, ‘OK, we’re living here. We have some responsibility to help with this community.’ ” And they do help, sometimes in unique ways. 136 BizTucson

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In February, the foundation had its hand in supplying a Garmin activity tracker to every certified teacher in the Amphitheater School District in an effort to impact the district’s wellness program and support healthy living for the teachers. The Phil and Amy Mickelson Foundation also donated to the project. Mickelson and his company, Mickelson Golf Properties, own the Stone Canyon Club and the golf course. The donation was accepted by the Amphi Foundation and the activity trackers were handed out to teachers who were able to get away from the classroom to attend a festive ceremony under the sun at the golf course clubhouse. Clay Blair, a winter visitor from Kansas and a Stone Canyon member who has a family foundation and a previous relationship with Garmin, spearheaded the effort to provide the devices to the teachers. “When I talk to many of my colleagues at my old age, I ask them who are the significant people in their lives,’” Blair said at the ceremony. “And many times it was a teacher along the way.” Therein is one of the fundamental priorities of the foundation, providing support for youth and education programs, in this instance by providing support for teachers and their health. “We’re all about kids at risk and our priority is to find those organizations that are serving that distressed community,” said Regis, who has had a career in finance and currently manages his own investment firm. “If (the organizations) are serving them well, then they’re right in the center of our bowling alley and we don’t care where they are in the community.” While the foundation uses the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona continued on page 138 >>>

Club member Clay Blair emcees the Garmin presentation ceremony

Stone Canyon Community Foundation Co-Chairs, Dan Regis, left, and Rod Rupp, right www.BizTucson.com


Stone Canyon Foundation 2017 Grant Recipients Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tucson Easter Seals Blake Foundation Educational Enrichment Foundation El Grupo Youth Cycling Gabrielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Angels Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona Higher Ground, A Resource Center Imago Dei Middle School Junior Achievement Kids Animals Life and Dreams Literacy Connects Make Way for Books Our Family Services Painted Sky Elementary School Southern Arizona Association for the Visually Impaired San Miguel High School Sunnyside Unified School District Foundation TMM Family Services United Way Cradle to Career

PHOTO: ROB CROSS

Youth On Their Own

Amphitheater School District teachers join community members and Stone Canyon Foundation members to celebrate receiving their Garmin devices.

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BizPHILANTHROPY continued from page 136 as an advisor and to manage and dispense its funds, the foundation has its own grants committee that accepts and reviews applications, then recommends the awards to CFSA, which distributes the funds. Sometimes it’s a two-way process, Rupp said, with CFSA directing organizations to the Stone Canyon Foundation to submit applications. “We have a very structured allocations committee.” Regis said. “From the beginning the notion was kids and I think that kid focus became more narrow to children at risk for whom we could make a difference.” The foundation got its start in 2008 when a handful of Stone Canyon residents – “There were four couples that got together,” Rupp said – and decided to try to do some good. Neither Regis nor Rupp were among those at the start, but they both quickly became involved when they became part of the Stone Canyon community. “This is our fourth winter here and we actually got involved in terms of contributing prior to that because we were property owners,” said Rupp, who

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has been on the foundation’s board of directors for three of the four years he and his wife, Suzanne, have actually had a home in Stone Canyon. “Because of my connection with our friends who were here before us and in talking with them about what does the foundation do, what are they about, where’s the money go, it piqued our interest because it really fit with some of the things that my wife and I like to be involved in.” But there is a challenge for the foundation in that it’s so out of the way from the center of the community, that it has admittedly been “under the radar” as a generous source of funds for organizations that need it. It’s a challenge the foundation is trying to address. “I think we all agree that we don’t do a good enough job of educating our community about the foundation. We need to do a better job because there are still quite a few people – even within Stone Canyon – that don’t know us,” Regis said. “We fly under the radar quite a bit.” To get the Stone Canyon community involved, the foundation annually holds two fundraisers that are the primary

sources of funding. There’s a spring golf event in which members get to play with members of the University of Arizona’s two golf teams – an event which also benefits the teams – and a fall gala. The golf course and the clubhouse are made available to the foundation at no cost for the events. The new clubhouse, built by Mickelson Golf Properties and finished in March 2016, has enhanced the events. “We have this beautiful facility and we have an organization in the club that not only was willing to be a part of this fundraiser, but they wanted to be part of it,” Rupp said. “We definitely raised the bar when the club was done.” The grant application process runs through January of each year with grants awarded in the spring. “We want to be well-known in the community that has needs, and we want to be well-known in our own community so that we can continue to raise funds to do the things that we have in mind,” Regis said. “We want to try and change the trajectory of the lives of children who are at risk, try to get them to some kind of a playing field that gives them an equal bite at the apple.” Biz

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BizAWARDS

Carroll Wins With Powder Play Two National Awards for Bathroom Design

COURTESY LORI CARROLL & ASSOCIATES

By Valerie Vinyard Lori Carroll transforms bathrooms, or powder rooms, into livable art. Think floating bathtubs, suspended mirrors and custom sinks with an array of materials and a variety of textures. Carroll, who owns the Tucson interior design firm Lori Carroll and Associates, transforms living spaces as easily as someone else might change an outfit. And the powder room, probably a home’s most essential room, is Carroll’s favorite subject. That might be because she’s so good at it. Carroll recently earned two national awards in the design world for her powder rooms. A custom master suite in Marana, called “Beautiful Necessities,” recently garnered Room of the Year from the National Association of Home Builders in Washington, D.C. Carroll used glass, tile and wood in the 347-square-foot space, which included a floating tub, back-to-back sinks and expansive windows with soaring www.BizTucson.com

desert views. Judges described the room as “innovative, fun, different and funky.” “It’s a finite amount of space,” said Carroll of powder rooms. “You can reach out and address all of the finishes and make an impact.” Carroll’s “Stone Sanctuary” recently earned first place in the National Kitchen and Bath Association’s Powder Room category. For this renovation, Carroll transformed a tiny 36-square-foot space that was covered with mirrors into “a warm, luxurious retreat inspired by nature.” Carroll, who hails from Iowa but moved to Tucson in 1981 to study interior design at the University of Arizona, likes to show how even a small space can be molded into an inviting oasis. “You can still get creative with how you address it,” she said. “I dissect it and come up with something new and interesting. I try to create something personal.”

These new awards will be added to the more than 30 others her design firm has accumulated over the years. Of course, Carroll doesn’t solely focus on powder rooms. She has years of experience working on residential and commercial projects, and she has a corps of satisfied clients. Patty Smallsreed is one of those clients. She commissioned Carroll in 2010 to work with her and her husband on a 6,800-square-foot custom home in Dove Mountain. With that project, as with many others, Carroll worked with architect Marc Soloway of Soloway Designs. “We hired Lori at the very beginning of designing our home,” Smallsreed said. “It was one of the best decisions we made. She did so much more than interior design. She almost acted in some ways as an architect. She has so many wonderful traits and assets, and her level of detail was phenomenal. That is something we don’t see in other designers.”

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ASID Design Excellence Awards

COMMERCIAL SPACE OVER 8,000 SQ. FT.

COMMERCIAL SPACE UNDER 8,000 SQ. FT.

SINGULAR COMMERCIAL SPACE

COMMERCIAL PRODUCT DESIGN INDUSTRY PARTNER PRODUCT DESIGN

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The Arizona South Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers recognizes excellence in the field of interior design each year. These are the five category winners. COMMERCIAL SPACE OVER 8,000 SQ. FT. FIRST PLACE DESIGNER: Mar Designs, Andrea Rodriguez PROJECT: La Quinta Inns & Suites Renovation PHOTOGRAPHER: Robin Stancliff The existing building for the new La Quinta hotel was more than 40 years old prior to the multimillion dollar renovation. The lobby got extensive renovations by removing a second story near the reception area. The client asked for a modern update for their guests to provide a revitalizing feeling as they entered it. The planning for the lobby has an inviting and airy space with decorative pillar focal points. The reception area has two main desks instead of a single solid barrier. The 3D panels used in different areas create visual interest. The color palette of the bar and restaurant finishes complement the taste of Southern Arizona and provide a warm hospitality. COMMERCIAL SPACE UNDER 8,000 SQ. FT. FIRST PLACE DESIGNER: Liz Ryan Design Jennifer Thompson and Liz Ryan PROJECT: Mattamy Homes New Office Space PHOTOGRAPHER: Robin Stancliff The design goal for this national builder’s office was to reflect the company’s work – organized, updated and engaging. The lobby needed to be colorful and energetic. Bright pops of cobalt, carried over from the builder’s logo, draw the eye around the room and the entire space. A focal wall features unique porcelain tile, organic white pebbles and texturedrock wallpaper in metallic tones. The builder’s work is brightly displayed with photography printed on metal. For main work areas, a collaborative environment with multiple touchdown spaces and semiprivate cubicles was important. The cubicles, while traditional in thought, each feature a sit-to-stand desk, ergonomic chairs, wire management and a white-noise system that controls distracting external sound. For collaboration sessions, there are large work stations and a casual break room. Colorful art and accessories, as well as accent walls in shades of blue are seen throughout to further enhance this cohesive space. www.BizTucson.com


SINGULAR COMMERCIAL SPACE FIRST PLACE DESIGNER: Interiors in Design Brandy Holden, Eva Murzaite PROJECT: Sol Y Luna Student Living – Lobby PHOTOGRAPHER: Brandy Holden The designers set out to create a lively and exciting lobby for high-energy student living. With a cold blank palette of concrete and glass, they had room to play with bold colors – greens, blues and silver. They warmed the space by integrating natural elements of live edge wood, an area rug that resembles water and coffee tables resembling over-sized river rocks. For a young and hip demographic, the lobby had to be fun and interesting to create a great first impression as well as a comfortable lounge space. For that youthful curb appeal, the design team incorporated fun shapes through accent furniture and a rocking chair made of seat belts. High-durability fabrics and finishes were utilized to ensure that the interior withstands the test of use and time. COMMERCIAL PRODUCT DESIGN FIRST PLACE DESIGNER: Mar Designs, Andrea Rodriguez PROJECT: La Quinta Inns & Suites – Custom Bar PHOTOGRAPHER: Robin Stancliff The hotel lobby, restaurant and breakfast area had old arches with brick and very low ceilings. The client asked for modern updates for their guests to unwind during the day or at happy hour. The bar has all the necessary amenities for serving a cold beer on tap, washing glasses and plenty of storage. The 3D panels behind the bar create a visual focal point without distraction or busyness. The bar is curved, and metal lines create interest. The color palette of finishes and materials well describe the taste of Southern Arizona and its warm hospitality. INDUSTRY PARTNER PRODUCT DESIGN FIRST PLACE DESIGNER: Moca23, Tanja Eltze PROJECT: Oro Valley Residence PHOTOGRAPHER: Lara Eltze The objective was to create high-quality pieces of fine art that the homeowners would like and are specifically created for them. It also needed to solve the homeowner’s problem to find art that would fit into certain niches. The design was inspired by the homeowners themselves – the interior design, the architecture and the flow of the house. With the help of technique samples, sketches and proposals provided by the designer, the homeowners were able to commission pieces for three locations. All three works of art contain the color black to add drama and elegance to the interior which was already present outside with a black-bottom pool. While all three pieces fit the overall modern and organic feel of the home, they are decidedly very different in technique – to create interest and a curated feel in the house – and also to respond to the different locations and their challenges. Biz www.BizTucson.com

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N E W

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M A R K E T

Project: El Corredor Planned Area Development Location: 9630 N. Oracle Road Owner: Boulder Oro Valley Contractor: Lloyd Construction Company Architect: SBBL Architecture & Planning Broker: N/A Completion Date: November 2017 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: Estimated $1.2 million Project Description: New construction of attractive retail shell space built to accommodate multiple tenants including anchor restaurant with outside patio space.

Project: Vector Manufacturing Facility Location: Raytheon Boulevard and Aerospace Parkway Owner: Vector Contractor: Barker Contracting (Developer Holladay Properties) Architect: Swaim Associates Architects Broker: N/A Completion Date: 2019 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: Estimated $11 million Project Description: The ground-up 92,500-square-foot factory includes two soft-production facilities, a 30,750-square-foot, two-story office space and a dedicated area for special projects such as research and development.

Project: Pima Air & Space Museum Restoration Hangar Canopy Location: 6000 E. Valencia Road Owner: Arizona Aerospace Foundation Contractor: Lloyd Construction Architect: Acorn Associates Architecture Broker: N/A Completion Date: September 2017 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: Estimated $2.5 million Project Description: This steel canopy was added to the existing hangar to allow for aircraft restoration work to be completed outside.

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Project: Hotel McCoy Location: 720 W. Silverlake Road Owner: Openstay Management, Bryan Coggins Contractor: Building Excellence Architect: RAH Architectss Broker: N/A Completion Date: April 2018 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: $2.2 million Project Description: This property was restored from a mid-century modern motel and rebranded into a boutique hotel offering affordable rooms, local art presentation and local beer/wine tasting while remaining true to its roots.

Project: Starbucks Redpoint Location: 2807 N. Campbell Ave. Owner: North Campbell Contractor: MW Morrissey Construction Architect: Herschman Architects Broker: N/A Completion Date: May 1, 2018 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: $760,000 Project Description: Starbucks Coffee shop will move into the new ground-up shell building at Campbell Avenue and Glenn Street.

Project: Location: Owner:

Oro Valley OneAZ Credit Union 11167 N. Oracle Road OneAZ Credit Union Contractor: DBSI Architect: DBSI Broker: N/A Completion Date: Summer 2018 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: $2.5 million Project Description: The full-service facility will offer members access to banking, lending and investment solutions, with local decisionmakers on-site.

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2018 CCIM Forecasters

CCIM Forecast Winners

Industrial Russell W. Hall Cushman & Wakefield I PICOR Vacancy rate: 2017 Forecast – 6.90 percent 2017 Actual – 6.80 percent 2018 Forecast – 5.90 percent Finance Justin Martinez National Bank of Arizona 10-Year Treasury constant maturity rate: 2017 Forecast – 2.75 percent 2017 Actual – 2.40 percent 2018 Forecast – 2.95 percent Retail Gary Heinfeld Advisors in Real Estate Vacancy rate: 2017 Forecast – 6.17 percent 2017 Actual – 6.00 percent 2018 Forecast – 5.77 percent Multi-Family Jason Hisey The Hisey Group Vacancy rate: 2017 Forecast – 6.50 percent 2017 Actual – 6.307 percent 2018 Forecast – NA Land Aaron Mendenhall Chapman Lindsey Building permits: 2017 Forecast – 3,878 2017 Actual – 4,151 2018 Forecast – NA

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By David Pittman The good times are back for Tucson and the city’s commercial real estate market. That was the consensus among real estate professionals at the 27th annual CCIM Commercial Real Estate Forecast held Feb. 13 at the Tucson Convention Center. “Economic indicators overall are positive and increased demand in every real estate sector in Tucson is causing vacancy rates to drop, rental rates to climb and investment interest to grow,” said Gary Andros, VP of the Southern Arizona CCIM chapter and master of ceremonies of the forecast event. “Investors are looking to secondary markets and Tucson has much to offer – a high quality of life, a great climate and it is very affordable here compared to other communities across the nation,” Andros said. The CCIM forecast is one of the longest running events of its type in the nation. The approximately 350 people who attended heard from the commercial real estate experts who made the most accurate predictions a year ago in various commercial real estate sectors – industrial, office, retail, multi-family, land and finance. Winners of forecast awards also led a panel discussion in their area of expertise. CCIM is an educational designation that stands for Certified Commercial Investment Member. Office

For the second consecutive year, Aubrey Finkelstein of Vast Real Estate Solutions took home the forecast award in the office category. Finkelstein predicted a 9.5 percent vacancy rate for office properties in metro Tucson at the close of 2017.

Tucson Legend Si Schorr

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Let the Good Times Roll

Spring 2018

The actual rate was 9.4 percent. She expects the rate will fall to 8.9 percent by year-end 2018. Industrial

Russ Hall, a shareholder and principal at Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, has won the forecasting award in the industrial category for three consecutive years. He won his latest award by predicting a 6.9 percent vacancy rate for Tucson industrial properties at the close of 2017. The actual rate at that time was 6.8 percent. Hall expects the rate to drop to 5.9 percent by the end of this year. Finance

Justin Martinez of National Bank of Arizona won the forecast award for predicting the yield on the 10year Treasury note would be 2.75 percent at the end of 2017. The actual rate was 2.40 percent. Martinez expects the note to yield 2.95 percent at year end. Retail

Gary Heinfeld of Advisors in Real Estate won the 2017 forecasting award in the retail category, predicting the vacancy rate for retail properties would be 6.17 percent. The actual rate was 6 percent. Heinfeld predicts the retail vacancy rate will drop to 5.77 percent. Multi-family

Jason Hisey of The Hisey Group, which specializes in the development of affordable housing for nonprofit, charitable organizations, won the multi-family forecast award by predicting the vacancy rate in Tucson’s apartment market would be 6.5 percent at the close of 2017. The actual rate was 6.3 continued on page 150 >>> www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

Office Aubrey Finkelstein Vast Real Estate Solutions Vacancy rate: 2017 Forecast – 9.50 percent 2017 Actual – 9.40 percent 2018 Forecast – 8.90 percent


DEMAND TOTAL EXPERTISE APPRAISAL James Bradley, CCIM AXIA Real Estate Appraisers jbradley@axiaappraisers.com

FINANCE Mike Trueba, CCIM Commerce Bank of AZ mtrueba@commercebankaz.com

INVESTMENTS Gary Andros, CCIM Andros Properties gandros@ccim.net

Susan Ong, CCIM BroadStone Commercial Real Estate broadstone@aol.com

OFFICE Tari Auletta, CCIM KW Commercial tariauletta@kwcommercial.com

DEVELOPMENT Greg Boccardo, CCIM Boccardo Realty greg@gregboccardo.com

Laurie Weber, CCIM LendAmerica lweber@ccim.net

Swain Chapman, CCIM Chapman Lindsey Real Estate Services LLC

James Robertson, CCIM Realty Executives Tucson Elite jr4CCIM@gmail.com

Isaac Figueroa Cushman & Wakefield/PICOR ifigueroa@picor.com

Paul Rosado, CCIM Commercial Real Estate Broker prosado@ccim.net

Jannie Irvin, CCIM Mark Irvin Commercial Real Estate Services, LLC janine@markirvin.com

INDUSTRIAL David Blanchette, CCIM NAI Horizon

swain@chapmanmanagementgroup.com

James Hardman, CCIM DESCO Southwest jhardman@descogroup.com

David.Blanchette@naihorizon.com

Mick Cluck, CCIM Coldwell Banker Residential Br mick@mickcluck.com

Gary Heinfield, CCIM Advisors In Real Estate gheinfeld@ccim.net

David Gallaher, CCIM Tucson Industrial Realty dave@tucsonindustrialrealty.com

John Hamner, CCIM KW Commercial john@tucsoncommercial.com

Ryan Heinfield, CCIM Advisors In Real Estate rwheinfeld@gmail.com.

Robert Glaser, CCIM Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR rglaser@picor.com

Jane Holder, CCIM Realty Executives Tucson Elite janeyholderaz@gmail.com

Melissa Lal, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC melissa@larsenbaker.com

J. Terry Lavery, CCIM Realty Executives Tucson Elite jamestlavery@laveryrealty.com

Ed Johnson, CCIM Invest-Com Real Estate ejohnson@ccim.net

George Larsen, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC george@larsenbaker.com

Brandon Rodgers, CCIM Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR brodgers@picor.com

James Kai, CCIM Kai Enterprises james.kai@kaienterprises.com

Margaret Larsen, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC mlarsen@ccim.net Jason Wong, CCIM Red Point Development jwong@redpointdevelopment.com

Wayne Lindquest, CCIM Wayne Lindquist Commercial Real Estate Broker waynelindquist@yahoo.com

LAND Bob Benedon, CCIM Russ Lyon Sotheby’s Realty bobbenedon@yahoo.com James Marian, CCIM Chapman Lindsey Commerical Real Estate Services LLC jbm@chapmanlindsey.com Juan Teran, CCIM Realty Executives International jteran@ccim.net MULTIFAMILY Lance Parsons, CCIM ABI Multifamily

lance.parsons@abimultifamily.com

Mark Irvin, CCIM Mark Irvin Commercial Real Estate Services, LLC mark@markirvin.com RETAIL Craig Finfrock, CCIM Commercial Retail Advisors, LLC. cfinfrock@cradvisorsllc.com Debbie Heslop, CCIM Volk Company dheslop@volkco.com Andy Seleznov, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC andy@larsenbaker.com

INSIST UPON A COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL Discover why less than 1% of the world’s commercial real estate professionals hold the coveted Certified Commercial Investment Member designation.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS, MARKET ANALYSIS, USER DECISION ANALYSIS AND INVESTMENT ANALYSIS CHAPTERS.CCIM.COM/SOUTHERNARIZONA


BizREALESTATE

continued from page 148 percent. Hisey did not make a prediction for the coming year. However, Art Wadlund, senior managing director at Berkadia, and a past winner in this category, said he expects the rate to be 6.2 percent at the close of this year. Land

Aaron Mendenhall of Chapman Lindsay Commercial Real Estate was victorious in the residential land-use category, predicting 3,878 residential building permits would be issued in Pima County last year. There were actually 4,151 permits issued. Members of the land panel predicted between 3,257 and 4,500 residential building permits would be issued in Pima County in 2018. Biz

Si Schorr: A Real Estate Legend By David Pittman

A lot has changed since Si Schorr and his bride, Eleanor, moved from New York City to Tucson in 1957. “When Ellie and I arrived in town in 1957, there was a cotton farm as far south as Speedway and Silverbell,” he recalled. Yes, Tucson has changed – and Schorr had a hand in changing it. So much so that he was inducted as a “Real Estate Legend” by the Southern Arizona CCIM Chapter at its annual market forecast on Feb. 13. As a young lawyer, Schorr was advised by Roy Drachman and Evo DeConcini to get involved in molding Tucson’s future. He followed their advice. He served on the City Planning and Zoning Commission, then as assistant city manager and Tucson’s special counsel on urban renewal, which brought the Tucson Convention Center. He was a founding board member of Pima Community College and helped buy land for its west campus for $2.50 per acre. He was the first chair of the Regional Transportation Authority. Schorr was the go-to lawyer among Tucson commercial real estate developers. He worked alongside other legends, such as Bill Estes, Peter Herder, Joe Kivel, Humberto Lopez and Drachman. Schorr’s fingerprints are on many Tucson landmarks – including Williams Centre, Continental Ranch, the Tucson Jewish Community Center and Main Gate Square.

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Through it all, Schorr is still active in the community and practicing law as a senior partner at Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie. www.BizTucson.com

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BizAWARDS

Common Ground Awards

Recognize Collaboration in Development By Tiffany Kjos

Anyone aware of the history of development in Pima County knows municipalities here haven’t always gotten along. That’s what makes the Common Ground Awards celebration so interesting: It highlights the agencies and people who’ve formed often unique alliances here to get things done. In its 13th year, the Common Ground Awards Ceremony is hosted by the nonprofit Metropolitan Pima Alliance, which brings together developers, neighbors and local governments to plan new projects such as housing and infrastructure. Some 550 tickets were sold for the Dec. 1 event at the JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort. Public and private organizations as well as nonprofits were represented. “Since our projects are so diverse, we have a really large group that ranges

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from elected officials to government staff members to business owners to project managers, as well as a significant number of folks in the nonprofit community,” said Amber Smith, CEO at MPA who was recently named to head the Tucson Metro Chamber. The overarching theme of the awards is working together. “We are absolutely collaborating now more than ever,” Smith said. “It’s absolutely the key to us being able to move forward.” Founding MPA board member Terry Klipp concurred. “The awards are given to projects that have outstanding, above-the-norm collaboration to bring them to fruition. Developments, programs are all a process, and getting to the finish line with a successful process, a successful program, takes a lot of give and take. I think the people that receive the awards are proud of the fact that

they accomplish that.” The award selection process includes personal interviews, presentations and a scoring process. The 10 award winners, culled from more than 50 nominees and 20 finalists, are “probably the best example of how collaboration works in our community to build a better future,” said Brian Barker, owner of Barker Contracting who received a 2016 Award of Merit for Exemplary Collaboration with World View. When MPA was founded 20 years ago, two strong, vocal factions – progrowth and anti-growth (or anti-sprawl) – had ongoing clashes. Going back even further to the early 1970s, when Klipp founded his business, Terramar Properties, if a developer put up a sign about a construction project on the eastside, for example, someone would spray paint “No sprawl” on it, he said.

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The company is a real estate broker, their allotment of water from there. development manager and investor, and Turns out the collaborators have a Klipp is an eyewitness to decades of history: They all came up through the building here. ranks of the City of Tucson water department. “Today it’s ‘Do this, but do it respon“It made working on this agreement sibly or don’t do it at all.’ I think responsible growth is the only way a commuso much easier. To be honest with you, nity can grow well and prosper,” he said. I was working with my friends,” said One of the top projects had nearly Oro Valley Water Utility Director Peter three dozen collaborators. The projAbraham. ect, the Airmen Memorial Bridge, links “A collaborative effort like this, a lot North Sabino Canyon Road with North of times you get one bad egg or a perKolb Road. It was paid for by the voterson that doesn’t mesh well, and that can approved Regional Transportation Aumake it really difficult.” thority. Sharing the work were Joseph Olsen Klipp happens to of Metro Water and live nearby and has John Kmiec of the Maseen the bridge’s imrana water department. pact on commuters. Also involved was Oro “It’s really changed Valley Water Director the traffic pattern and Philip Saletta, who prethe terrible congestion ceded Abraham. at Grant and Tanque “There was a time Verde,” he said. in water service where Greg Coleman, it was kind of competiwhose family owns tive,” Abraham said. Mayfield Florist at the “While we do still take intersection of Tanque care of our own, that’s Verde and Sabino almost like a friendly Canyon, said the projbanter now. The tone – Amber Smith ect was years in the has changed. The tone Former CEO making. is Southern Arizona – Metropolitan Pima Alliance “We felt like we were because at this stage of embraced by the city the game securing waon the decisions. They did do a good ter resources, none of us make it if we job of keeping us abreast of what was don’t all make it.” happening,” he said. Work on the project will start with the Another award winner was the Northdesign process in 2019. The system is west Recharge, Recovery and Delivery expected to be complete by 2025. System intergovernmental agreement. “The cost sharing is tremendous. Metro Water District and the towns of We’re able to get what we need at a Marana and Oro Valley agreed to share third of the cost,” Abraham said. “It’s a in the cost of building a system that will big deal for the region. It’s going to help allow them to store Central Arizona preserve our aquifer even further. It’s a Project water in a new facility and draw good deal all around.”

We are absolutely collaborating now more than ever. It’s absolutely the key to us being able to move forward.

Biz

Arizona Pure Water Brew Challenge

Mission Garden

Common Ground Award Winners Arizona Pure Water Brew Challenge Caridad Community Kitchen Expansion Global Advantage Greyhound Terminal Relocation Mission Garden Northwest Recharge, Recovery and Delivery System Project Prosperity Sabino Canyon Road: Tanque Verde Road to Kolb Road/Airmen Memorial Bridge The Trinity Mixed-Use Project Tucson UNESCO City of Gastronomy

Finalists: A Brighter TUS (Tucson International Airport Terminal Expansion) Atlas Copco Remanufacturing Facility Barrio Hollywood Community Outreach and Design City Park Mixed-Use Development Proposition 101– Invest in Tucson 2017 Ruthrauff Basin Management Plan Sister Jose Women’s Center Sunset Road and Bridge Townsend School Redevelopment Tucson Marketplace at the Bridges

MPA, Barker Contracting and National Bank recognized these nonprofits for exceptional work: The Homeless Coalition Tucson Arts Brigade Tucson Change Movement Tucson Homeless Work Program

Spring 2018

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BizEDUCATION

Giving Youth a Chance Youth On Their Own Guides Homeless & Needy Kids Toward Graduation

Talk about grit. Like most communities, Tucson has a population of youth who have little or none of the basics to sustain them. They don’t have homes. They don’t have financial or parental support. And those things often mean they don’t have opportunities for education. They’re on their own in the shadows. That’s where Youth On Their Own can help. YOTO is a dropout prevention program that supported more than 1,600 unaccompanied youth last year, making it possible for them to graduate from high school or envision it as a real possibility. Students tend to find out about YOTO’s services through other students or teachers who serve as volunteer liaisons in the schools. “Teachers often notice patterns in these types of students,” said Nicola Hartmann, YOTO’s CEO. “They tend to be tired and hungry and often wear the same clothes day after day.” Once students have been identified as needing YOTO’s services, program coordinators meet with them to offer assistance. “These program coordinators are often the only champions the students have,” Hartmann said. “Sometimes these coordinators are the only ones cheering for the students when they graduate or succeed in school.” Hartmann came to YOTO after several years of working at for-profit businesses and in the nonprofit arena on boards and as a consultant. “I missed having my own cause to get passionate about,” she said. She has been the CEO since June 2016 and feels it is her dream job. “I’ve learned that being a leader is a continuous process,” Hartmann said. “It’s important to be supportive to both 154 BizTucson

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our program managers and our students. I’ve also learned that admitting I’m vulnerable and don’t have all the answers makes it easier to work through problems together to find a solution.” YOTO’s support for the students includes a $140 monthly stipend if the student maintains grades at or above a C average. Students also are eligible for free food and hygiene supplies through YOTO’s Mini Mall located on the organization’s site at East Pima Street and North Alvernon Way. Transportation, school supplies, rental assistance, financial assistance for medical bills and, most importantly, emotional support and guidance also are provided to the students as needed. YOTO’s primary financial support – about 97 percent – comes from community and business donations. “We receive every size donation from $5 to thousands of dollars, and some of our supporters send us a certain amount each month,” Hartmann said. Under Hartmann’s leadership, YOTO constantly seeks new opportunities to expand their services. “These students are unaccompanied due to no fault of their own,” said Daniella Zaza, program director at YOTO. The main reasons they are “couch hopping” – staying with relatives or in foster care – is because their parents have died, are abusive to them, are incarcerated, abuse alcohol or drugs in the home or are too poor to care for their children or the students have serious unresolvable conflicts with their parents. Although many of YOTO’s services are available online and through the program coordinators in the schools, students’ success is sometimes made more challenging because it is difficult for them to get to the YOTO Mini Mall

for food and hygiene items. That is why the organization came up with the idea for a Mobile Mini Mall. Zaza recently competed in the Social Venture Partners Fast Pitch Competition, where she won two awards for YOTO totaling $10,000 for the creation of a Mobile Mini Mall that would go into the outlying areas of Tucson to deliver supplies to needy students. YOTO will lease a vehicle to pilot the program in Sahuarita, Vail and Marana for a few weeks in March and April. If it is deemed successful, YOTO will attempt to find additional sponsors to make the Mobile Mini Mall a permanent offering. Zaza pointed out that there’s more to helping the student than the money and other assistance that YOTO provides. “We need to lead them through this process by helping them become independent and self-sufficient. This happens when they learn how to access the services available to them like jobsearch assistance, scholarships and trade programs. This helps make the students successful in the future.” While each dollar donated is vital, not all donations are financial. For example, several dentists in town provide dental services to students at no cost. Will Taylor of Martin-Taylor Dentistry recently provided two front teeth to a student who didn’t have those teeth. “Every time I saw him after that, he was smiling,” Hartmann said. “He never smiled before that. These types of donations really make a difference in the students’ self-confidence.” “We have many volunteers in the program, and their time is so valuable to us,” Zaza added. “We’re always looking for more volunteers to do almost any type of work.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By April Bourie


WOMEN WHO LEAD

Nicola Hartmann CEO Youth On Their Own www.BizTucson.com

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BizHONORS

Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona Celebrates 25 Years of Inspiring Women and Girls By June C. Hussey

Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona is the only philanthropic foundation in Southern Arizona dedicated exclusively to empowering women and girls. At its core is the belief that when women thrive, the whole community prospers. That’s why, for more than a quartercentury, WFSA volunteers have been hard at work making an impact on their community through nonpartisan research, advocacy and grantmaking. At its first fundraising luncheon 25 years ago, WFSA founders announced its first $20,000 grant. Last year, WFSA grants topped $700,000. Its April 18th luncheon alone is expected to raise another $250,000 with an anticipated sellout crowd of 1,200 men and women. CEO Dawn Bell is quick to point out that as far as WFSA has come, it still has a long way to go. Of foundation giving in the United States, less than 8 percent goes to women and girls. The need is especially great in Arizona, where poverty rates have steadily risen since 2000 and 79 percent of single-parent families with incomes below the poverty level are headed by women. Helping such women break the poverty cycle is a top priority for WFSA. Through its funding committee, WFSA awards grants to local charities like Emerge Center Against Abuse, Pri156 BizTucson

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mavera Foundation and Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona. Less well-known beneficiaries include Earn to Learn, which works with low-income students who are the first in their families to go to college. Earn to Learn rewards students who can save $500 of their own money with a $4,000 match in scholarship funds. The eight-to-one match helps participants graduate with one third of the debt of their peers. “If you think about setting up women for economic empowerment, given the student loan crisis, you can see how Earn to Learn is having a very real impact on lives, even after just four years,” Bell said.

WOMEN’S FOUNDATION OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA 25TH ANNUAL LUNCHEON Wednesday, April 18, 2018 Networking reception – 10:30 a.m. Lunch and program –12:00 p.m. Honoring Philanthropist Gail Giclas Tucson Convention Center Arena 260 S. Church Ave Sponsored by Tucson Electric Power Tickets: $75 each or $700 for a table of 10 www.womengiving.org

“Our broad push with grantmaking is finding and funding organizations that are measurably increasing income and assets for women and girls – and education is a key component of that.” WFSA also funds Unidas, an afterschool program that mentors high school teens in the art of philanthropy, and Tucson Public Voices, a fellowship program that aims to amplify women’s voices by encouraging professionals to write opinion articles in their areas of expertise. Bell’s been impressed by Tucson’s generosity in the three years she’s been here. “When people hear how effective our nonprofit partners are and what an impact they are having in turning around people’s lives, they can’t help but want to give. Tucson is a very generous community and WFSA celebrates all levels of philanthropy.” Honoring Philanthropist Gail Giclas

When WFSA hosts its 25th annual luncheon on April 18, participants can expect a delicious meal, an entertaining show and a surprise announcement. They will also enjoy hearing from WFSA’s 2018 Luncheon Honoree, Gail Giclas. “Gail was instrumental in guiding our board to ‘think bigger’ in establishing our endowment, which is now continued on page 158 >>> www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: PATRIC GICLAS

WOMEN WHO LEAD

Gail Giclas 2018 Honoree Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Foundation of Southern Arizona Spring 2018

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BizHONORS continued from page 156 10 years old and $4 million strong,” Bell said. Every year, Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona honors a leader in the community who, over the course of her lifetime, has made a significant impact for women and girls. Her career is an inspiration to others, she gives back through volunteering and philanthropic work and, most of all, she has made a difference through her work with the WFSA. This year, WFSA’s Board of Trustees unanimously chose to honor Gail Giclas. A Tucson financial adviser for 35 years, Giclas worked with Boettcher & Co., Shearson Lehman Brothers, Smith Barney and Bank of America Merrill Lynch before joining Raymond James & Associates in 2017. Despite often working 60-hour weeks, Giclas has always made time to serve the community in many capacities, including as a trustee and advisory council member for WFSA. Giclas became involved in WFSA not long after she moved to Tucson from Kansas City in 1983 to begin her career in financial services. Although she didn’t have a job lined up at the time, she did have the financial and emotional support of her parents, which she cites as a significant factor in giving her the confidence to reach for her dreams. “I was raised in a middle-class Midwest family and I was always told, ‘You can do and be anything you want to be.’ When I realized as a young adult that not everyone has that option, I decided it was time to give back,” Giclas said. Give back she did. In addition to her work with WFSA, Gail and her daughter Emma co-founded a motherdaughter giving circle called Charity Chicks. Gail also served as event chair for Arizona Theatre Company’s annual gala. When asked how a full-time working mother of two still has the desire to give so much of her time to the community, she said, “Tucson opened its arms to me when I moved here and I think everyone has a responsibility to give back. You don’t have to be a Rockefeller to be a philanthropist. It’s what we do collectively that makes a difference.” ‘ Humble in accepting WFSA’s honor, Giclas said, “I’m a little overwhelmed and I truly mean it – this is not about me. It’s about the Women’s Foundation and what it’s done over time. I feel that when you have over a thousand people at a luncheon, it is not about who is up on stage – it’s about the group who’s in the audience. “When I was introduced to the Women’s Foundation, it was in the living room of someone’s home. To look out and see our guests in an arena is a pretty powerful journey. We are on a good path. I love the grassroots nature of the foundation and it’s wonderful to see it thriving.”

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BizHR

Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Awards By Christy Krueger Award winners and audience members packed into the Westward Look Wyndham Grand Resort & Spa ballroom in November to celebrate the Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson’s 2017 awards. Individual and organizational honorees in four categories were recognized for their accomplishments.

COMMUNITY IMPACT

LEADERSHIP – INDIVIDUAL

Winners must demonstrate a commitment to volunteerism through human resource programs, make a significant impact on programs supporting workforce needs and act as role models to create positive change through human resource efforts.

Small Company Winner Staff Matters

Garrett Kowalewski and Gloria Rich accepted the award. Kowalewski’s response to the recognition: “We’re excited and surprised to accept this amazing award. We weren’t expecting to win. It’s validation for us to get involved in the community and supporting companies. We have a big team doing hard work.”

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Medium Company Winner BeachFleischman

Kristine Fitzpatrick said she was honored to accept the award for the firm. “I’m so excited. Our firm is a strong believer that everything we do is part of our life, and being able to partner is great. We believe strongly in collaboration.”

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Large Company Winner Tucson Electric Power

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“I’m honored. Anytime you’re recognized for leadership, it’s a good thing. I look forward to doing good things with Golder Ranch.”

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Small Company Winner University of Arizona Office for Diversity and Inclusive Excellence

Jesus Trevino accepted the award, saying, “I’m elated. We’ve been in operation for about one year and we’ve had so much success at UA. We have a small staff, but we’re workhorses. We’re passionate.”

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Medium/Large Company Winner Tucson Unified School District

Janet Rico Uhrig accepted the award. “TUSD HR department is proud of the work the district does to increase diversity and provide services to our community,” she said.

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Large Company Winner Janet Rico Uhrig, Tucson Unified School District

“I’m so thankful for the opportunity to serve TUSD as executive director of human resources.”

TECHNOLOGY AND PROCESS IMPROVEMENT

Winning companies have implemented a system that enhances employee processes, improves employee participation in a program, realizes cost savings and has resulted in measurable change.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

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Medium Company Winner Randy Karrer, Golder Ranch Fire District

“Thanks to SHRM. Thanks to Golder Ranch and Mountain Vista HR. I’m humbled, and it’s all about the people. To be a good leader, you have to think about the people before you.”

Accepting for the company, Wendy Erica Werden said, “Thank you to the HR team for making this happen. I’m so surprised; there were other great organizations nominated. We couldn’t do what we do in the community without our HR team who hires these people. We have an incredible HR department.” Honorees in this category have a track record of strengthening community relations, adding measurable value to the company and benefiting the employees’ quality of life and work life through an environment of diversity and inclusion.

Small Company Winner Cheryl Horvath, Mountain Vista Fire District (now Golder Ranch Fire District)

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Small Company Winner – Two honorees Ben’s Bells Project

Jennifer Simmerman spoke for the organization: “We’re very pleased to win. It’s recognition of our prudent use of limited resources and for being more efficient in HR practices. We’ve come a long way.”

Vector

Denise Morrison represented the company: “We are thrilled to receive recognition for our innovative technology. Each and every day at Vector, top talent comes together committed to advancing access to space through reliable cost-effective means. As a growing business, it means a lot to be recognized in the Tucson community this way.” (not pictured) continued on page 163 >>>

PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

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Individuals in this category must demonstrate the ability to lead through challenges, adapt to change and inspire a workplace culture of accountability and engagement.


Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Award Winners

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BizHR Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Award Winners continued from page 160

TECHNOLOGY AND PROCESS IMPROVEMENT (continued) 11

Medium Company Winner Trico Electric Cooperative

Accepting the award, Hal Elzwerg said, “It was totally unexpected. One of our HR personnel nominated us. We put a team together in February (2017) to implement the technology we had available.”

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Large Company Winner University of Arizona Facilities Management

Jenna Elmer accepted, saying, “We have 615 employees in facilities, and we have improved processes in keeping the campus clean. It’d also like to thank Life and Work Connections who partner with us.”

Special 2017 Award 13 12

SHRM-GT Volunteer of the Year Gladys Walker

“I’ve been on the board and didn’t know about this. I’m excited and humbled for the many opportunities to work with talented and caring professionals.”

SHRM-GT 2018 Workshops & Events SHRM-GT holds HR-related educational presentations each month throughout the year. Events scheduled to date are listed below. Any additional information will be available on the SHRM-GT website as it is confirmed. Go to shrmgt.org to register. Breakfast workshops (7:30 to 9:30 a.m.) and lunch workshops (11 a.m. to 1 p.m.) will be held at Sheraton Tucson Hotel & Suites, 5151 E. Grant Road. Special events will be held at Westward Look Wyndham Grand Resort & Spa, 245 E. Ina Road.

April 3 Employment Law Update 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.

May 8 Lunch workshop, Stop Writing Annual Evaluations and Get Better Results

June 12 Breakfast workshop, Handling Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

July 10 Breakfast workshop, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Laws and Practical Tips for Avoiding Complaints Filed

Aug. 14 Breakfast workshop, Workplace Violence: How to Prepare, Recognize and Respond

Sept. 11 National Speaker, 2 to 5 p.m.

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PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

Oct. 9 Lunch workshop, TBD

Nov. 1 Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Awards, 2 to 5 p.m.

Dec. 11 Lunch workshop, TBD Spring 2018

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Father of the Year Gala

BizBENEFIT

Nearing a Goal for Diabetes Research By Romi Carrell Wittman pening. “They checked her blood sugar and it was off the charts. The reading was 999, which is as high as the glucometer will go, but it was much higher

24TH ANNUAL FATHER OF THE YEAR AWARDS GALA PRESENTED BY FATHER’S DAY COUNCIL TUCSON

Proceeds benefit UA Steele Children’s Research Center Loews Ventana Canyon Resort 7000 N. Resort Drive Thursday, May 31 5:30 p.m. Cocktails and Ultimate Raffle 7:00 p.m. Dinner and Awards Sponsorship and ticketing information: Stephanie Chavez, (520) 343-2615 or Stephanie.Chavez@vantagewest.org Tickets: www.fdctucson.org than that. She was close to a coma,” Shaw said. Olivia remained in intensive care for six days.

The young parents were bewildered and wondered if they’d done something wrong. They also worried how they would find good care for her once they returned home to Tucson. They’d recently relocated from Albuquerque and didn’t know anyone, let alone any pediatric doctors who could help them manage their daughter’s disease. At the time, there was one pediatric endocrinologist in town and he was booked out several months in advance. Over time, the treatment options and number of doctors able to treat kids like Olivia grew. Shaw said this is because of the vision and leadership of Dr. Fayez Ghishan, director of the Steele Children’s Research Center. “We’ve seen what the community has done in terms of building this world-class medical resource here,” Shaw said. “It’s all because of Dr. Ghishan. We’re fundraising for Dr. Ghishan.” One hundred percent of the funds raised go to Steele Children’s Research Center. While adjusting to Olivia’s disease took some time, Shaw said, he was astounded by the Tucson community and how it pitched in to help fund vital research in type 1 diabetes. “I’ve had the privilege of meeting so many people here. The community has become our family and we take care of each other.” Over the past 23 years, the council has raised nearly $4 million for type 1 diabetes research.

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Lee Shaw, the chair of the Father’s Day Council Tucson is really looking forward to the awards gala May 31. He is very hopeful that the council will meet its fundraising goal of $250,000. That will complete the $2.5 million funding for FDC Tucson Endowed Chair for Type 1 Diabetes Research at the University of Arizona’s Steele Children’s Research Center. That’s something the council has been working toward for the past several years. Yet there’s a more personal reason Shaw is looking forward to the event: His daughter Olivia has been a diabetes patient at Steele. Nearly 20 years ago, Shaw, his wife Laura and their then 22-month-old daughter Olivia were visiting Texas to enjoy a Christmas gathering with family when the couple noticed something wasn’t right with Olivia. She cried more than usual, was bloated in appearance and couldn’t eat. In addition, she was wetting the bed, something that was unusual for her. Shaw’s brother-in-law saw the child and grew very concerned. His boss had two kids with type 1 diabetes and he had some knowledge of the symptoms of the disease. “You’ve got to get her to the ER,” he said. Olivia was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit in Dallas, where doctors tried to determine what was hap-

About the Father’s Day Council Tucson Founded in 1994, the Father’s Day Council Tucson Held each May, the Father of the Year gala honors annually honors “individuals whose achievements and several fathers who have exemplified the best in both values enhance the meaning and status of Father’s their professional and parental lives. The 2018 Father Day.” of the Year Honorees are: • Bill Assenmacher, CEO, CAID • Rudy Dabdoub, Partner, North Face Investments • Ryan Hansen, President, Bon Voyage Travel • Rick Kauffman, CFO, Holualoa Companies www.BizTucson.com

• Timothy D. Ledford, Master Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, Military Honoree • Tony Penn, President & CEO, United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona • Jonathan Rothschild, Mayor, City of Tucson Spring 2018

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PHOTO: SILHOUETTE PHOTOGRAPHY

2018 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

From left â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Robbie (grandson), Liana (daughter-in-law), Rob (son), William (grandson), Molly (wife), Bill, Meghan (daughter), Madison (granddaughter), Mason (grandson), Makena (granddaughter) 166 BizTucson

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BizHONOR

Bill Assenmacher CEO CAID

Bill Assenmacher Fostering a Family Business By Rhonda Bodfield

Bill Assenmacher’s parents weren’t college educated or particularly affluent, yet they were determined to stamp his future with a wealth of experiences. Raised in a small town in Michigan, the eldest boy of four children, Assenmacher was active in church, giving out turkeys at the holidays to those less fortunate and volunteering to teach catechism after school to disadvantaged youngsters. Included among eight jobs he had through high school was managing a paper route and hawking newspapers on Sunday mornings. He pumped gas for one uncle and did landscaping for another. Assenmacher was the kind of kid who would check out 20 books from the library and read every one within a week. He served as class president and played sports. He built sets for school plays and marveled during field trips to the Detroit automakers. Some of those experiences pointed to a future calling – supported by aptitude tests showing a particular affinity for complicated mechanical work. His library explorations turned to an interest in engineering which led him to enroll in the University of Arizona’s aerospace engineering program. Through a cooperative education program in which students split their time between going to school and working in the field, Assenmacher traveled to New York, Germany and Miami in a management-training program for the airlines and worked on the railroads. He hired on with Bob Caid’s manufacturing firm while completing his UA studies. www.BizTucson.com

Then, a crossroads: Procter & Gamble in Long Beach, California, extended an offer. Caid, who had no heir apparent, told Assenmacher that if he stayed, Caid would sell the business to him. California beckoned, but Assenmacher already had a taste of big companies. “I saw that you could be a name and a number and not an individual,” he said, “and that you could get lost in the shuffle as one in 10,000. Here, I could control my destiny and help mold the company.” Two months before he graduated, he bought Caid’s business, once known as CAID Industries and now simply CAID. He’s had no regrets in the ensuing 45 years. In that time, the company grew from $1 million in annual revenues with 30 employees to one that makes more than $50 million and employs 300. “It wasn’t fate so much as taking advantage of the opportunities that came before me,” Assenmacher said. “My career evolved because of all of the exposure I had and because I was able to get my hands dirty and get involved in a number of things at a number of levels.” It was something he felt strongly about passing along to his own children — Robert, who now runs CAID’s dayto-day operations, and Meghan, as well as to his five grandchildren, the eldest of whom studies astrophysics and has an upcoming internship at NASA. Rob worked at CAID’s art department and in the machine shop during high school. He’d tag along on delivery trips to manufacturing plants across the

state and around the world. While Bill had a focus on growing the firm around the mining industry, Rob has built opportunities around complex manufacturing for defense and military applications. “It’s a different time and business overall is different, so I’ve taken a lot of pleasure in seeing the firm evolving,” Bill said. The company encourages staff to get involved with local charities. One manager is drawn to the Red Cross, so the firm has regular blood drives. One is drawn to Habitat for Humanity, so the firm helps build houses. “I think being brought up Catholic, you wonder why you’re here and you wonder if you’re on the right path,” Assenmacher said. “I’ve had a good life and a wonderful career, and it’s important to me to do my part to contribute to society.” He is proud to support the work being done at Steele Children’s Research Center, particularly since his wife of 40 years, Molly, was stricken with a serious form of cancer. “Had it not been for medical research that had been done 15 years ago, she wouldn’t be alive today. “My wife has been blessed to see four more grandchildren born after her cancer,” he said. “We benefitted because people before us put money and energy into research that would help extend lives through medical advancements, so I not only want to give back, but I want to inspire others as well. By helping make a difference in some young person’s life, it feels like we are completing that circle.”

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

2018 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

Top row left to right: wife Lupita & Rudy. Bottom row left to right: Zara, Mia, Adrian, Arielle & Aminah.

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BizHONOR

Rudy Dabdoub Owner/Managing Member, North Face Investments & Cima Enterprises Partner, 5 North Fifth Hotels

Rudy Dabdoub The Importance of ‘Being There’ By Jim Marten

It may sound simple, but the genuine secret to fatherhood, according to Rudy Dabdoub, is spending time with your children on a daily basis. Although Dabdoub is often sought after for business and investment advice – having opened several hotels throughout Southern Arizona and Mexico – his first recommendation is to set priorities and build a foundation for family. “It’s easy to get carried away with our jobs,” said Dabdoub, a 2018 Father’s Day Council Father of the Year honoree. Sitting next to his wife, Lupita, in the lobby of his latest venture, the AC Hotel by Marriott in downtown Tucson, Dabdoub added, “If we have children, we must remember that our first and foremost responsibility in life is being a good parent.” Born in Nogales, Sonora, he was educated on both sides of the border, acquiring a unique understanding and appreciation of Arizona and Mexican culture. He graduated from Northern Arizona University and joined his father’s business – which established the first maquiladora, or foreign factory, in Nogales, Sonora. Dabdoub was close with his father, and says he tries to emulate him. “He taught me how to lead by example, to show my children the importance of a strong work ethic and making good decisions,” Dabdoub said. “Most importantly, he taught me how a father should be there for his children from day to day – not just for the rewww.BizTucson.com

citals and games, but really be there to provide attention, advice and love.” After working with his father for several years, Dabdoub struck out on his own – building gas stations in Nogales, Arizona. In the early 2000s, a hotel next to one of his gas stations happened to lose its franchise, and Dabdoub decided to purchase it. The new endeavor was challenging, but it soon thrived. Dabdoub sold the gas stations and jumped into the hospitality industry with both feet. “It was an exciting new direction that has been rewarding, but I have never wavered in my commitment to spending time with my children.” Dabdoub and Lupita were gradeschool sweethearts, and although life led them on different paths, destiny would bring them back together. They met again later in life, both were single parents and their similar life experiences sparked conversations that rekindled their childhood romance. From the start, Dabdoub focused on the well-being of the kids. “On one of our first dates, we went hiking together with his three children and my two children,” said Lupita. Making the children a priority made a significant difference for all. “He was perfect,” Lupita said. “He saw how each child was different and had the patience to provide the support they need. I am so thankful that he put them first.” That hiking outing also served as a precursor for the active life the family would lead. “It’s also important to help children

learn how to balance their lives,” Dabdoub said. “My father had a serious heart attack at 39 and I was so afraid of losing him – so we incorporate fitness into our family time, from hiking to competitive cycling. Fitness is a family matter.” The five children, now ranging in age from 18 to 23, are making their parents proud, attending college, graduating with honors, earning degrees in communications and mechanical engineering. This summer, daughters Mia and Zara will begin a six-month, humanitarian mission in Costa Rica and Guatemala. Lupita explained that she and Dabdoub are also proud that all five children think of each other as family. “The kids are so close that their college friends were surprised to find out they are step-siblings, and Rudy has been a big part of bringing them together.” The family is so close that the children became ordained ministers to marry Dabdoub and Lupita. “We are a family and we recognized that in the ceremony.” Dabdoub said. “Lupita and I exchanged rings, we presented a necklace to our four daughters, and presented a bracelet to our son – representing how we have become one family.” What would Dabdoub offer if asked for advice on parenting instead of hotels? “The secret sauce? If you spend as much time as possible with them, the rest will fall into place – you learn from them and they learn from you, and it all starts with being there.”

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From left â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Brock, Jack, Anna and Ryan

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BizHONOR

Ryan Hansen

President Bon Voyage Travel

Ryan Hansen Staying a ‘Little Nervous’ Key for Parenting Success By Jim Marten

For Bon Voyage Travel President Ryan Hansen, something great is going to happen every single day with his sons, Jack and Brock. But it takes being present to capture those treasured moments. As coordinator of basketball operations for the University of Arizona Wildcat basketball team under Lute Olson, Hansen’s had an enviable career. He worked in several UA assistant athletic director positions, was UA director of development and donor services, and has been a basketball commentator on the Arizona IMG radio network for more than 20 years. For the UA graduate who has lived in Tucson since he was eight months old, it was everything. “I was living the dream,” Hansen said amid Wildcat memorabilia and family pictures. “It was so incredible working with student athletes – they walk onto the court every day filled with dreams and hope. There wasn’t another place I wanted to be or another job I would have rather had.” Living the dream became a different pursuit when Hansen started a family. “The exhilaration of traveling and working with the team was amazing – but I was doing it alone,” he said. Bon Voyage Travel provided the new opportunities Hansen was seeking. “I always wanted a shot at making my own mark. Most importantly, I can now travel with my family and spend the quality time with them.” In January Hansen was selected as a 2018 Father of the Year by the Father’s Day Council Tucson. When asked what inspired him to inwww.BizTucson.com

vest time with his family, Hansen said it was the experiences working with the Cats. “Working with Lute and the team, I came to appreciate what is truly most important in life.” Hansen explained the team would have dinner together before each game, home or away. “I recognized that we always remembered those dinners, not the games or the plays, but the time we spent together. I can’t tell you whether those dinners helped us win any games, but they sure brought us closer. I knew then that the time my family spent together would be what I remember and value most.” Hansen credited his experiences in sports for a life perspective that he passes onto Jack and Brock. “As a parent there is nothing more rewarding than seeing your children succeed – and nothing more heartbreaking than seeing them fail.” Hansen said. “With the Cats, I not only learned how to win, but how to fail. What matters most is what you do after you fail. Things are never as bad as you think and another chance is right around the corner.” Some perspectives came directly from Coach Olson himself. “Lute showed us how to get the best from the players without pushing too hard and how to be competitive with respect and dignity,” said Hansen. “Encouraging and motivating my kids in the right ways helps them grow intellectually, emotionally and personally.” Hansen said observing positive personal development is another of the many parenting rewards. “There’s

something magical about seeing them become their own person. Watching them take their first steps into something new is like watching the first steps on the moon – remarkable.” Although his previous and current professions have made an indelible impact, Hansen’s father has been his strongest influence as a parent. “If I’m half the father he was, I’m a success,” he said. “My father has always been a patient and thoughtful leader. Parenting isn’t easy and children don’t come with manuals – but my dad is as close to a parenting manual as you can get.” Hansen’s father is a retired minister, and faith is an important part of the Hansen household. “Our faith provides a great perspective on the principles we live by and why we live by them – not just because Dad said so.” Like his father, Hansen has taken an active role, volunteering as a worship leader at Desert Foothills Baptist Church. Hansen also credits faith for motivating him to give back, providing an example for his boys. He has volunteered and raised funds for local nonprofits and charities, such as the ALS Association Arizona Chapter, Easter Seals Blake Foundation and Special Olympics. New fathers are apt to be a little nervous – what’s the advice from this 2018 Father of the Year? “Stay a little nervous,” Hansen said, smiling. “That means you care, you’re involved and you’ll be thoughtful about helping your kids grow.”

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Richard Kauffman CFO Holualoa Companies

Richard Kauffman Tools for His Daughters to Succeed By Rhonda Bodfield

He didn’t know it at the time, but at 15 years old, unloading an 18-wheeler in back of his maternal grandfather’s grocery store in Philadelphia, Richard Kauffman was learning important life lessons. Work hard. Develop competency. Treat people right. Kauffman, a principal and CFO at the real estate investment firm Holualoa Companies, grew up the oldest of three, steeped in the rules of what made small businesses successful. His father, a pharmacist, owned three neighborhood pharmacies before the dominance of today’s drug store giants. His paternal grandfather was a fruit and gift retailer with his own business. “Each of them were mentors to me,” Kauffman said. “By watching them, I learned to work hard, set a goal, have a good moral compass and give back. If your neighbors helped you succeed, then you should return the favor. It’s what you do as part of a community. And if you do all of these things, success will follow.” Kauffman’s roots may have been in neighborhood retail, but his path took him around the globe. In college, he found he had a knack for business and began his career as a CPA with KPMG in Philadelphia. Four years later, he was hired by Campbell Soup, spending 80 percent of the next four years traveling throughout the United States, Europe, South America and the Caribbean. On one of the trips coming home, he met Sandy Capin of the venerable www.BizTucson.com

Capin family that ran mercantile operations in Nogales, Arizona, for generations. When the two married in 1989, and subsequently moved to Nogales in 1990, his friends were puzzled. What was he thinking, leaving the thriving metropolis of Philadelphia to live in a city of 25,000? Kauffman’s travels had brought him to many small farming communities, so it was less of a change than it seemed. “Having spent time in so many places, I found there was something good everywhere. You just have to decide what you want.” What he wanted was a place with better weather, a connection with family and a good place to raise children. In Nogales he became the controller of the Capin Mercantile Corporation until it was sold, and later joined Holualoa in 2000. Even after 18 years, he still learns something new every day. He thrives on the intellectual challenge of the work because of the breadth and depth of the company, which spans from Hawaii to Europe and has a focus on venture capital as well as real estate. Tucson is home now, a place to hike and be active with the family Labrador retrievers. “It’s small enough that you can be involved in things, but have a larger impact than if you were one person in a large city,” he said. After growing up in the humidity of the East Coast, he has an unwavering appreciation of sweeping desert vistas and towering mountains.

Kauffman said he is not only proud to be honored by the Father’s Day Council Tucson as an outstanding father in the community, but finds that its cause resonates as someone whose family has a history of diabetes. Kauffman passed down to his daughters what he learned as a child. Brittany, 26, has a master’s degree in marriage and family therapy from Arizona State University and counsels children in the Phoenix area. Taylor, 21, is studying psychology and film studies and production at the University of Denver. “As a parent, the best thing you can do is to teach your kids values and a moral compass they can apply as they go through life,” Kauffman said. “You can’t be there to help with every decision that will confront them, but you can help them develop the tools they need to make the right decisions.” The couple encouraged both girls to become engaged in the community. Taylor, who was active in Girl Scouts, also raised money for her family’s foundation, which secures medical equipment for a clinic in Santa Cruz County. Brittany volunteered in the pediatric unit of a hospital, helping sick children find some sense of normalcy and distraction through doing artwork. It was rewarding to see their growth, he said. “I’ve been fortunate. I feel that these lessons worked for me and it’s what I’ve tried to pass down for them.”

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2018 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

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Timothy D. Ledford Master Sergeant U.S. Air Force

Timothy D. Ledford Well-Traveled ‘Hover Dad’ By Romi Carrell Wittman

Master Sgt. Timothy Ledford thought he was having a family photo taken, though he didn’t quite understand why Denise, his wife, had scheduled it for a day when Davis-Monthan Air Force Base was conducting military exercises. When he was told he’d been named one of the Father’s Day Council’s 2018 Fathers of the Year, his first reaction was, “Is this real?” Then he broke into a huge smile. “This is awesome,” he said. “I’m so thankful.” Timothy and Denise, along with their two daughters, Brianna, 11, and Audrey, 8, have been stationed at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base for almost two years. They moved to Tucson from Ramstein Air Base in Germany and Ledford admitted it was an adjustment. “We landed in June wearing scarves and warm clothes,” he laughed. “But we got used to it.” He added that it helped that Tucson was a friendly and welcoming community. “Coming from Oklahoma, you know Southern hospitality. It’s true in the West as well.” For Ledford, the Father of the Year award carries special meaning. When Ledford was growing up in Lawton, Oklahoma, his father was not involved in his life. Therefore, he’s vowed to be there for his children. “I want to give my babies what I didn’t have,” he said. He joked that he’s the ultimate “hover dad,” always looking out for his girls. “We live across the street from the park and the girls like to play there. I’m always watching them, making sure they’re OK, seeing who they’re talking to.” www.BizTucson.com

Additionally, the Ledfords have a son, Cory, 21, who will be following in his father’s footsteps. “I’m very proud of my son’s decision to join the Air Force,” the senior Ledford said. Cory lives in Fort Worth, Texas, and has enrolled in the delayed entry program for the Air Force. There isn’t a single moment of fatherhood that stands out as the best. All of the moments are special and unique to him. “I love to see them learn, to see them love each other and to love God,” he said. Ledford and his wife have a long tradition of taking family photos. It’s a practice that has two purposes: to remember the family as it grows and evolves, and to ensure his children have pictures to remember their dad, should something happen to him while he’s deployed. Ledford has served in the Air Force for 20 years and Denise has been at his side the entire time. High school sweethearts, they’ve traveled all over the world as Ledford has made his way in the Air Force. As a result, Denise, who holds a master’s degree in family and child studies, has often had to put her career on hold. Ledford said that, in the next phase of their life, he’s going to take a backseat to ensure Denise pursues her career. “Wherever she wants to live and whatever she wants to pursue,” he said, “I will follow her.” Ledford is the first sergeant for the 12th Air Force, Air Forces Southern. He is well-regarded by his peers on base and is involved in the surrounding community as well. As a first sergeant, he

along with the First Sergeant Council and their airmen visit Camp Conklin, a homeless camp for veterans, at least once a month. Their team organizes food and hygiene drives and helps distribute items to the residents of the camp. On base, he’s organized boot drives, where airmen donate old boots they no longer use. They are given to the men and women living in the camp. “We wear our uniforms when we visit our teammates at the camp. It’s important for them to know that they’re still part of the team, that they’re still part of our military family,” Ledford said. Ledford also delivers food and other necessities to Santa Rita Park, another area with a large homeless population. “We want them to know they’re not forgotten,” he said. “I feel that if we can improve the lives of people overseas, we should also take care of our people here at home in the states.” The commitment to helping and serving others extends to the entire Ledford family. Ledford and Denise also are active at Covenant Generations Church, where they both serve as volunteers in the children’s ministry. Ledford is preparing for an upcoming military training event in Panama. He will serve as the first sergeant for a military team focused on building schools and roads and improving medical facilities. “He’s very humble, said Chief Master Sgt. Shanece Johnson, command chief master sergeant of the 355th Fighter Wing. “He doesn’t brag about his service to his country, the community or his family.”

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Donny’s Family

Linda & Tony Penn

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Tony Penn

President & CEO United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona

Tony Penn ‘We Matured as a Family Together’ By Romi Carrell Wittman

For what might have been the first time in his life, Tony Penn was speechless. As president and CEO of the United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona, Penn is rarely caught tongue-tied. At any given moment, he has an elevator speech about United Way’s achievements ready to go. But this day was a bit different. Penn was attending a run-of-the-mill United Way board meeting in late January when told he’d been named one of the 2018 Fathers of the Year by the Father’s Day Council Tucson. Penn was so surprised and overwhelmed by the announcement that he found he was at a complete loss for words. “I was completely speechless. My board vice chair said it was one of the few times that’s ever happened,” Penn laughed. Eventually he regained his composure and realized that the entire board, as well as several of Penn’s staff members, were in on the surprise. Penn said, “It was a wonderful, endearing moment.” Penn and his wife, Linda, have called Tucson home since 2010, when he took the helm of United Way, which works with some 80-plus charitable organizawww.BizTucson.com

tions to assist more than 100,000 people in the areas of education, fiscal responsibility and healthcare. Prior to taking the job in Tucson, Penn served for eight years as a senior executive for the YMCA in San Antonio. He also worked as a field engineer and later as a regional manager at Teradyne, a high-tech designer and manufacturer of automatic test equipment. He’s an Air Force veteran. Though San Antonio, the city where Penn’s two sons and 10 grandchildren live, isn’t terribly far away, it’s not near enough. Penn said he wishes his family was geographically closer. “Hopefully that will change in the future,” he said, while acknowledging that he’s fortunate because “unlike some of my friends, I don’t have to chase my grandkids around the country. Penn’s family is so close-knit that they take a couple of vacations together each year. Past trips have included a summer stay in Galveston, Texas, where they enjoyed a rented beach house for a month. Future plans include a Walt Disney World Resort excursion. “There will be 16 Penns going, with kids ranging in age from 6 to 19,” he said. Both from large families, Penn and his wife started their own family when

they were young, an experience for which he is grateful. “It gave me an opportunity as a young man to have a lot of fun with my kids. And we matured as a family together,” he said. It’s no secret that parenthood isn’t always easy. In fact, sometimes it’s downright hard, Penn said. Still, in his view, it’s one of the best experiences a man can have. “It’s the greatest privilege and toughest responsibility that any man could ask for, but at the same time it’s the most rewarding,” he said. Penn is proud of the types of fathers his two sons have become, and he really loves being a grandfather because it’s given him the chance to experience fatherhood a second time. “I get to enjoy my grandkids and spoil them,” he said. “The best part is the parents let us.” Penn is passionate about not only his family, but also his work and the opportunity it gives him to help other men be successful dads. “We want to create a better chance for fathers who are socioeconomically challenged as well as those who need a second chance,” Penn said. “We’re giving them the opportunity and tools to raise their kids and families successfully.”

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Top row, left to right - Tanya Miller holding Zev, Molly Rothschild, Jenny Rothschild Middle row - Jonathan holding Tyrone, Karen holding Ezra Bottom row - Isaac Rothschild, Nathan Rothschild.  178 BizTucson

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Jonathan Rothschild Mayor City of Tucson

Jonathan Rothschild Family Came First Before Running for Office By Romi Carrell Wittman Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild’s fatherly pride is evident when he talks about his children Isaac, Nathan and Molly. It probably doesn’t hurt that all three have followed in the family’s career footsteps. Isaac and Nathan are attorneys at Mesch Clark Rothschild, the law firm founded in 1957 by their grandfather, Lowell Rothschild. Daughter, Molly, is currently attending the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona. “We’re three for three,” Rothschild joked. “My wife says we’re zero for three.” Karen, Rothschild’s wife, is a physical therapist. They’ve been married 38 years. Rothschild learned he was named a 2018 Father of the Year by the Father’s Day Council Tucson when his sons summoned him to their law office in late January under the guise of an important meeting. “They told me something had to be discussed,” Rothschild said. However, when he walked into the conference room and saw his wife as well as his daughter-in-law in attendance, he knew something was up. “I was very surprised,” he said of the moment they told him. “I was surprised and very appreciative.” Rothschild has served as mayor of Tucson since 2011. Prior to that, he www.BizTucson.com

worked at MCR for more than 30 years, specializing in business law and estate planning. Rothschild’s roots in Tucson run very, very deep. He’s one of the rarest of desert dwellers – he’s a native Tucsonan. He attended Canyon Del Oro High School back when it served grades 7 through 12. He was among the first students to attend all six grades at the school. He later attended Kenyon College in Ohio, then the University of New Mexico Law School. After earning his law degree, he returned to Tucson and served as a law clerk for District Court Judge Alfredo C. Marquez. Later, he went into private practice at MCR. Rothschild enjoys being a father and, more recently, a grandfather to each of his sons’ young boys, Ezra and Zev. “When you have a child, it changes everything,” he said. “If you’re doing it right, it brings mom and dad closer together because you’re making these decisions together.” He especially enjoyed raising his children in Tucson. “One of the great things about raising a family here is there are a lot of great communities and things for young people to do.” When asked, Rothschild doesn’t have a single favorite memory of raising his kids. He said his favorite experiences were when his kids surprised him with

their maturity and grounded approach to problems. “It’s great when they show maturity and an emotional intelligence greater than your own,” he said. Rothschild always prioritized his family because he knew that his time with them was precious. While he had kicked around the idea of running for office, he tabled those plans until his youngest child was out of high school. “It was important to me to be involved with them from a young age until they didn’t want that anymore,” he said with a smile. “Spending time with them is the most important thing. You don’t get that much time before they grow up.” Rothschild’s family wasn’t entirely on board when he decided to run for mayor. His mother had concerns about the ugly nature of politics and worried for his safety. His father, knowing Jonathan was a very skilled and accomplished attorney, didn’t want him to give up his law career. But Rothschild’s desire to serve and better the community ultimately won out. He is currently in his second term as mayor. Having grown up when Tucson was still a modest city of 300,000 residents, Rothschild loves that Tucson and its economy have grown enough that his children are able to live and work here. “One of the great joys of life is having your family near you,” he said.

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BizSALES

If You Would Do It Later – Why Wouldn’t You Do It Now? By Jeffrey Gitomer

I met a guy on the plane who was an area director for a major shoe store chain. “Suppose I went into your store and the shoe I wanted was out of stock in my size – what would happen?” I queried. “Well, that shoe store has the capability of finding those shoes in our other stores – and then asks (tells) the customer to go to the other store to pick them up.” “Can’t you just ship them to my home?” I wondered. “No,” he said matter of factly. “We’re not set up to do it that way.” I turned the tables and asked the guy which he would rather have? “Delivered,” he said without a second of hesitation. “I’d rather have them delivered.” “What about your customer? Do you think they’d want them delivered, too?” I challenged. “Yes, I suppose they would,” he said with that what’s-thisguy-going-to-say-next look. “Who’s your biggest competitor?” I asked. “WalMart,” he said. “Suppose WalMart came out with a new service that would locate out of stock shoes for shoppers at other WalMarts and deliver them to the customer’s home the same day they were ordered – no hassle, complete return privileges at any WalMart store – think you might have to offer the same thing to be competitive?” “You bet we would!” was his knee jerk reply. If you would do it after your competition does it to “meet” them, why wouldn’t you do it before they do it and “beat” them? If you would do it reactively, why wouldn’t you do it proactively? • Why not beat them to the punch? • Why not make them react to you? • Why not have them be perceived as the follower? • Why not be the leader in service? • Why not set the standard and let others try to catch you? 180 BizTucson

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I’m stumped. There isn’t one company or person reading this column right now that doesn’t have an opportunity to out-maneuver and out-serve the competitor you hate the most – yet you sit there and wait for something to happen. Wait for your arch rival to take the lead. Why? You only have an opportunity to capture leadership once – after that, you play no. 2 – ask Avis. They’ve been “trying harder” for 25 years. Enterprise Rent-A-Car is a different story. They took the bold position to deliver the rental car to the customer. Their competition HATES it and their customers love it. They niched the replacement car market, delivered it to the door of the customer, and are now no. 1 in rental cars. Call Hertz and ask them who’s no. 1. Enterprise never wanted to be no. 2 and using a proactive approach, beat Hertz at their own game just by delivering the car and mastering one segment of the market – and beat them so bad, that now Enterprise is entering the airport market – and Avis is still “trying” to do it the same old way. Pity. Most of these changes (innovations) are obvious. You see something new and say to yourself, “Why didn’t I think of that?” Three big reasons we fail to see the obvious: 1. Too caught up in the day-to-day “got to make more sales” trap of mediocrity. Failure to see the big picture. 2. Too caught up in making money instead of becoming “best” at what you do. The greed factor blocking the leadership and creativity factors. 3. Too wasteful of your personal time (news, dumb TV, ball games, bars) to focus and plan for true success. Upside-down success priorities. Proactive opportunity knocks: What new service or product offering could you make that would establish you as a leader in the field? Proactive challenge: What would you hate for your competition to beat you at? Proactive leadership: What new service could you offer that your competition would HATE you for? Leaders don’t respond to trends – they set them. Are you in the field or do you lead the field? Your innovative, proactive actions will determine your fate. And your field position. Be first. If you would do it reactively, why wouldn’t you do it proactively? is a haunting question. Don’t let it haunt you. Biz

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of 12 best-selling books, including “The Sales Bible” and “The Little Red Book of Selling” and “The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude.” His real-world ideas and content are also available as online courses at www.GitomerLearningAcademy. com. For information about training and seminars visit www.Gitomer. com or www.GitomerCertifiedAdvisors.com, or email Jeffrey personally at salesman@gitomer.com. © 2018 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from GitGo, LLC, Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. (704) 333-1112

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BizBRIEFS Jeanne Johns

Commerce Bank of Arizona promoted Jeanne Johns to relationship manager, serving as a liaison between lending and operational staff. Johns has worked at the bank for five years, including as executive assistant to the president. She has nearly a decade of banking experience. Johns is on the Father’s Day Council Tucson board of directors and chairs the liaisons and honorees committee. She also serves on the Tucson Metro Chamber Ambassador Committee.

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Kristine P. Hoey

Jamie A. Villaseñor

Regier Carr & Monroe named two tax managers for its Tucson office. Kristine P. Hoey joined the CPA firm in November as a specialist in small business services. She has more than 18 years of accounting experience, including owning her own firm for nearly 13 years. Jamie A. Villaseñor was promoted after having joined RCM Tucson in 2016. With more than six years of public accounting experience, she will focus on business and real estate taxation.

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BizNONPROFIT

From left – Hailey Thoman, Executive Director; Jim Click Jr., Founder and Board President; Grayson Stogsdill, Employee of the Year; Michelle Stogsdill, spouse of Grayson; Susan Hurt, Employment Specialist of the Year; Donna Gallagher, Employer of the Year

Linkages Award Winners Disability Doesn’t Stop Winner

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

By Tiffany Kjos Fewer than 18 percent of people who have disabilities in the United States have jobs – while 65 percent of the general population is employed. Presenters and award winners at the 10th annual Linkages Building Bridges Awards want everyone to keep those statistics in mind as they honor employees with disabilities each year. “Harvard Business Review says it’s not just nice to hire people with disabilities, but it’s a good business decision,” said Amanda Kraus, director of the Disability Resource Center at the University of Arizona. Kraus was the keynote speaker at the Linkages awards luncheon where Grayson Stogsdill was honored as the 2017 Linkages Employee of the Year. The event was held in mid-November at the Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa. Linkages is a Tucson nonprofit agency that helps corporations become more disabled-friendly and helps the disabled www.BizTucson.com

get jobs. Linkages founder Jim Click Jr., known for his philanthropy and his automotive empire, was the emcee. “Probably the highest award someone with a disability can achieve is to be honored by their company, by their peers, to be employee of the year,” he said before introducing Stogsdill at the luncheon.

Other Award Winners Linkages Employer of the Year: Southern Arizona Family Services helps seniors and people with disabilities stay out of institutions by providing in-home care. The nonprofit works closely with its employees, offering classes in sign language, Spanish and English, and providing specialized training. Employment Specialist of the Year: Susan M. Hurt works at the Beacon Group, which connects employers with disabled job seekers. Hurt works mostly with people who have behavioral-health challenges.

Stogsdill was just two years old when he was diagnosed with Type I diabetes, which claimed his eyesight by the time he was 21. He was unemployed for years. That ended after he went to a DREAM Job Fair, where he met Marji Morris from Tucson Electric Power, the 2016 Linkages Employer of the Year. “I spent four years looking for a job. I’ve been from job fair to job fair to job fair, not having any luck or callbacks,” Stogsdill said. “I’ll tell you, being a person with blindness and not quitting, and pushing every day – that’s what you have to do. You can’t stop. You can’t quit.” He owns a three-bedroom home with his wife and three children, pays his bills on time and is a happy and motivated employee. “It’s a great journey,” he said. “I guess from here the only way to go is to the top – and that’s where I’m headed.”

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BizBRIEFS

Different Name, Same Builder By Elena Acoba Longtime builder Tofel Construction has changed its name to Tofel Dent Construction to reflect a management move from the founding brothers to a second generation of leaders. Steve Tofel and his brother, Rich, will remain as consultants. Jim Tofel – Rich’s son and Steve’s nephew – was named managing member of development Jan. 1. David Dent, who joined the company in 2000 as assistant director of development, is now managing member for operations. Dent earlier worked as a materials researcher after earning a bachelor’s degree in materials science and engineering from the University of Arizona. The younger Tofel has been with his relatives’ company since 2002 when he became VP of development. Previously, he worked for computer software and

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information technology companies. He has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the UA. “With our founders stepping back into a more consulting role, we all felt this was the proper time to make this change,” Jim Tofel said. “It more accurately reflects where the management of the company has been transitioning for the past couple of years and where those responsibilities will rest moving forward.”

Jim Tofel

David Dent

While the leadership has changed, the company plans to continue to grow as a general contracting company specializing in multifamily housing, hotel and commercial construction projects. Founded in 1984 and headquartered in Tucson, it is an $85 million company with 67 employees in Arizona, California, New Mexico and Nevada. One of its current projects is converting the Marist College in downtown Tucson into senior housing and a community center. “Our vision and commitment to delivering the exceptional work we’re known for will not ever change,” said Dent, “but our clients are now seeing an expansion of our services and our capabilities that is tremendously exciting for all of us.”

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Arizona Bowl Scores $30 Million Impact for Tucson Economy By Elena Acoba The Tucson-area economy won big from the third annual NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl, garnering a $30 million impact by staging the post-season collegiate football game. Teachers also scored from the Dec. 29 game that pit New Mexico State University against Utah State University. Bowl officials donated $50,000 of the proceeds in grants to educators with the Tucson Unified School District and Amphitheater Public Schools. “We see the many needs that teachers have and want the success of our game to translate into support and success for teachers,” said Alan Young, executive director of the Arizona Bowl. He and Ali Farhang, chairman of the bowl game, presented the donations on Feb. 7. An estimated 28,500 fans traveled to Tucson to attend the game, which New Mexico won 26-20 in a battle that went into overtime. An estimated 88 percent of those out-of-towners were believed to be supporters of NMSU, which played in its first bowl game in 57 years.

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Visitors stayed in 87 percent of metropolitan Tucson’s hotel rooms on game night. That’s an occupancy rate 46 percent higher than the year before. The game also generated $1.7 million in regional hotel revenue between Christmas and New Year’s Day – 68 percent more revenue than in 2016. “Their spending over three days translated into the aforementioned economic impact,” said Nikki Balich-Cammarata, executive director of the Arizona Sports and Entertainment Commission. “This does not include the indirect spending or ripple effects that always follow.” Hosting a bowl game adds prestige to a city, said Brent DeRaad, president and CEO of Visit Tucson. “In just three years, the NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl has become a point of pride for Tucson.” Young said that the greater benefit is what such events do for the economy. “In many ways,” he said, “economic impact is the bottom line for bowl games.”

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PHOTOS: MAMTA POPAT

Green Workplaces Win Annual Awards Food Co-op, School District Take Honors By April Bourie The Food Conspiracy Co-op was named Arizona’s Greenest Workplace for 2017. “Our collective daily activities make us a unique business,” said Kelly Watters, education and outreach manager at the Co-op. The Co-op is owned by its customers, who are concerned about healthy eating and living as well as a healthy environment. Because of this, the company has phased out plastic bags and has begun using only recyclable materials in their food service packaging. In addition, the Food Conspiracy Co-op was one of the first organizations to work with Compost Cats, a University of Arizona 186 BizTucson

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organization that turns food waste into compost and sells it to both commercial farms and individuals in the community. In addition to these daily practices, the Co-op also contributes several thousand dollars each year to the Food Conspiracy’s Cooperative Community Fund. Co-op members and shoppers also can donate to the fund, with the interest earned each year donated to local nonprofits chosen by Co-op members. Any local nonprofit organization with a mission similar to the Co-op’s is eligible to apply for funding. Past winners include Desert Harvesters, Tucson Vil-

lage Farm, Living Streets Alliance and No More Deaths. “One of the things we aspire to do is not only measure the green aspects but also the social aspects of what we do,” Watters said. Winning proved to the Co-op that they were succeeding in both areas, but the award was a bit of a surprise. “We’ve been around so long that sometimes people forget who we are,” said Watters. “We’re excited to be recognized for the longevity of our green and social practices. It helps us to articulate what we do and makes people aware of our daily activities.” Biz www.BizTucson.com


BizAWARDS

People’s Choice Award PHOTO: DAVID SANDERS/TEP

By April Bourie

Founded by Gina Murphy-Darling, Mrs. Green’s World started as a local radio program and has now gone national via podcast. In addition, MurphyDarling has created a community of people who care about the environment via her website, www. mrsgreensworld.com, which provides tips and action plans for both individuals and companies to participate in the green movement. Now in its eighth year, the Arizona Greenest Workplace Awards Program recognizes Arizona businesses that have implemented green practices in a meaningful way. This year, a five-judge panel of sustainability professionals and advocates from Tucson and Phoenix reviewed 13 entries in the process of determining Arizona’s Greenest Workplace. Nominations are judged for their sustainable practices and for their community engagement that supports the use of sustainable practices. The annual challenge also invites Mrs. Green followers to vote for the business they admire most, awarding them the People’s Choice Award. “We need to celebrate businesses that are doing sustainable and healthy things for the planet and bring them to the public’s attention,” said Murphy-Darling. “That’s the main reason for this competition.”

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The People’s Choice Award winner was Sunnyside Unified School District, which piloted a new program at three schools called the “Battle of the Buildings.” Elvira Elementary School, Challenger Middle School and Star Academic High School competed against each other to achieve the highest percentage decrease in electricity usage over a 90-day period. The program included a curriculum component for the students, and clubs were formed that allowed students to determine ways to conserve electricity and water. Star Academic High School was the winner of the competition this year with a 4.63 percent decrease in electric usage over the previous year. “The program was so successful that we want to incorporate it at all of our schools next year,” said Cindy Bova, project manager for energy and efficiency at the school district. “Tucson Electric Power and Tucson Water are terrific partners in assisting with curriculum for this type of program, so we will be looking to them to create the appropriate STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) curriculum when we roll it out at all of our schools next year.” An additional benefit is that the program encourages Sunnyside’s students and their families to conserve electricity and water for a sustainable future. “It’s a terrific way to change actions as kids learn about these issues, take them home and influence their families to be more conservative,” said Bova. The money saved on utilities has helped the district to invest in the installation of water- and energy-saving devices throughout their buildings. The district just upgraded all lighting to LED inside and outside their buildings and upgraded all bathrooms with water-efficient toilets. Occupancy sensors have been installed in all the classrooms, so lights are turned off and temperatures are higher in rooms that aren’t being used. Mini split air conditioning systems have been installed in all classrooms in the portable buildings, and in 2014 chiller plants and older rooftop air conditioning units were upgraded with bond money. The air conditioning upgrades have nearly paid for themselves already. The district is planning to convert to solar in the near future, made easier because of these electric savings tactics they have already put into place. All of the dollars that will now be saved on utilities will go toward classroom expenses, making the savings even more important because they will support student learning. When asked about the impact of winning the People’s Choice Award, Bova responded, “It is important to the district that we were chosen by the general population for the People’s Choice Award. It shows that the community appreciates that we are being fiscally responsible with their tax dollars.” Biz Spring 2018 > > > BizTucson 187


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BizHONORS 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award

One of Tucson’s most anticipated annual events takes place April 26 – the 19th annual construction industry’s Good Scout Awards Luncheon in which exemplary members of the community are celebrated. “These honorees live by the ideals of the Scout Oath and Scout Law in both their professional and personal lives,” said Susan Hicks, development director of the Catalina Council, Boy Scouts of America.

PHOTO: CHRIS HINKLE

Some of those precepts include the scout commitment “to help others at all times” and the scout aim to “do a good turn daily.”

Honoring Richard Brady O’Rielly

A trio of Tucsonans is being recognized for living their lives with those adages in mind. Auto entrepreneur Richard Brady ”Buck” O’Rielly, health industry pioneer Fletcher McCusker and multi-faceted businesswoman Shelene Taylor have given of themselves to make lasting contributions to this community.

By Lee Allen Richard Brady O’Rielly got the nickname “Buck” from his dad and it stuck. O’Rielly is an eighth-generation Tucsonan, a proud Tucson High School Badger who was involved in politics, sports and serious studying that ultimately lead to a University of Arizona degree in business and public administration. Following military service as a combat pilot in Korea, the Air Force major joined his father at O’Rielly Chevrolet Motor Company, where he eventually assumed company leadership. His Lifetime Achievement Award points to long-term, wide-ranging civic involvement that includes the Tucson Airport Authority, United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona and Southern Arizona Leadership Council – a trail of community service that previously led to being selected as Tucson Metro Chamber’s Man of the Year. www.BizTucson.com

“I was both a Cub Scout and a Boy Scout and earned a few merit badges,” he remembered, citing some of the basic scouting precepts he took with him into his business life. “My parents taught me things like personal conduct, trustworthiness and the need to be prepared. Mostly I learned about organization and how to go about accomplishing tasks by following procedure.” Citing both his close family relationships (he’s been married for nearly 57 years) and his former involvement in bringing Central Arizona Project water to Tucson as two issues he’s most proud of, O’Rielly has been a lifelong coach in helping people grow. “Don’t just hang around and tell people what to do – show them why and how to do it,” he said. “Be a coach. A leader. Showing them how to achieve more is beneficial to everyone.” Biz

2018 GOOD SCOUT AWARDS LUNCHEON Thursday, April 26, 2018 Networking & check-in – 11:00 a.m. Lunch & program – 12:00 noon Tucson Convention Center Copper Ballroom 260 S. Church Ave. For information, contact Susan Hicks, (520) 750-0385 susan.hicks@scouting.org, www.catalinacouncil.org

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BizHONORS 2018 Good Scout Award

Honoring Fletcher McCusker By Lee Allen Fletcher McCusker is acknowledged as Downtown Tucson’s biggest fan, a crusader who has taken calculated risks to help revitalize Tucson’s urban environment. “If Plan A doesn’t work, stay calm,” he said. “The alphabet has 25 more letters. If you stay in the batter’s box and keep swinging, you’ll eventually hit one out of the park.” He’s hit a lot of homeruns for the city he grew up in. “There’s a strong connectivity here that makes me engage,” he said. “Downtown modernization is at a point now where it’s stable, cred190 BizTucson

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ible, respected and flourishing. “I was literally shocked to receive the Good Scout Award, indicating that I was both good and a scout, because I was neither at an earlier age. I did get involved in YMCA camp and learned a lot of scouting basics there. I love what scouts represent and how that resonates with young people.” As founder of Providence Service Corporation and Sinfonía Healthcare, he’s a business guru. But when it comes to translating real business-world concepts of life, McCusker said, “I’m

probably the worst corporate person in the history of the world to give advice because little fazes me. Others may feel comfortable learning by their mistakes. I try to not give myself opportunities to fail. “One thing I’ve clearly learned is to surround yourself with good people – lifetime relationships in family and corporate life. Surround yourself with smart people who are loyal to you and care about you and who can appreciate how to have fun in a stress-filled life.”

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BizHONORS 2018 Distinguished Citizen Award

Honoring Shelene Taylor By Lee Allen Shelene Taylor is busier than one person should have the capacity to be as owner-operator of eight Rubs Massage Studio locations and two Spa Solai sites – yet she’s found time to volunteer for 15 years for the Angel Charity for Children, including serving as the 2015 chair and now the 2017 Guardian Advisory Council Chair. “I’m lucky,” said the hometown Tucsonan. “I was born happy, and my natural optimism ended up turning me into an accidental entrepreneur. Three decades later, I still love business with a passion.” www.BizTucson.com

That passion translates to what she learned early on as a Girl Scout. “The serve-others-first concept came early to me when I was taught to be respectful of others and to act with integrity,” she said. Her Distinguished Citizen Award comes after years of service to Angel Charity. Under her leadership, the group’s 2017 efforts raised a quarter of a million dollars to help open Camp Lawton Boy Scout Camp on Mount Lemmon, a place where scouts and youngsters from other nonprofit agencies can have a chance to commune

with nature. As you might expect from a business leader who delegates responsibilities, she said, “It was a team effort – just as it is every year when we raise at least $700,000 for charities that can help change the trajectory of a child’s life. “When kids get a hand up, it can change their entire life’s direction and ultimately provide a positive impact to the whole community. What we do to help find and fund solutions to children’s needs – serving over 1 million children in Pima County — touches my heart.”

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

BizVOLUNTEERS

Front row: Tom Dunn, VP of Southern Arizona ABA; Steve Sweet, Sunstate Equipment Company; Tom Kittle, Kittle Design and Construction; Betty Stauffer, Executive Director, Literacy Connects, and Susan Mulholland, Mulholland Art & Design Commercial Interiors. Back row: Colleen Edwards, Arc Point Labs and Susan Petrus, Kittle Design and Construction.

Building a Better Place for Nonprofits

ABA Volunteer Day Helps Those Who Need It PHOTO: CHRIS MOOONEY

By Lee Allen For close to a quarter century, a group of eager beavers has been helping make Tucson a better place for local nonprofits by donating labor and materials for the Arizona Builders Alliance Volunteer Day. They’ll do it again later this year – the 23rd time that hundreds have gathered in service to others. “It started as a small venture and just generated its own steam,” said Tom Dunn, ABA’s VP for Southern Arizona. “In the early days, it was a definite leap of faith involving a handful of folks. At last year’s project (Literacy Connects) 192 BizTucson

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and the year before (Tucson Boys Chorus), we had between 100 and 150 volunteers who showed up to lend a hand. Volunteer Day has galvanized our construction community. It’s the highlight of our year.” Another yet-to-be-named nonprofit will have those volunteers descending on its facility to assist with a wide range of fix-up tasks. Depending on the available skills of contractors and specialty sub-contractors, there is no limit to what can be undertaken – everything from building

structural support, heating and cooling, roofing and flooring, plumbing and painting to general grounds maintenance. Whatever needs exist, the possibilities of supplying those solutions is considered. “We were able to fund general cleanups and minor modifications over the years, but no major fix-up efforts,” said Julian Ackerley, director of the Tucson Boys Chorus. “What ABA volunteers accomplished for us involved a number of items that were at the top of our needs list, but at the bottom of our www.BizTucson.com


available budget. We were blessed by their efforts.” Applications from nonprofits are received early in the year, then screened for requirements (like adequate parking for upwards of 75 construction trucks with supplies or providing a barbeque for the volunteer workers at the end of the project). Dunn then takes the coordinators to tour the three or four finalists to make a decision as to which organization gets chosen. This year, Marleena Lauver of Sun Mechanical Contracting will lead the efforts along with Tom Kittle of Kittle Design, last year’s chairman. “We’re contractors. We build things. And when it comes to vertical construction, this is our way of giving back to the community – by helping others,” Dunn said. No dollar amount is committed, just a commitment to make things better. “We normally start with a small scope, but when our member companies and industry partners learn of the yearly project, they begin to find new ways to add additional efforts, and items to the original endeavor. We like to underpromise and over-deliver,” he said.

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We’re contractors. We build things. And when it comes to vertical construction, this is our way of giving back to the community – by helping others.

– Tom Dunn Southern Arizona VP Arizona Builders Alliance

ABA committee members will look over a job to determine what can be done to improve conditions because they don’t know the extent of the prob-

lem until they crack open the walls and ceilings. Once they take a look, the scope of the project tends to get larger. “My membership sometimes can’t say no,” said Dunn, whose job it is to keep desires in check. Those who show up to re-roof or repaint or connect plumbing and wiring harnesses, do so on their own volition. “Some of the larger companies may send a couple of dozen of their employees, some of whom may be between contract jobs,” Dunn said. “Other individuals show up on their own time because they want to be a part of the effort. “People in the construction industry are good folks. They show that in the quality of their work and their willingness to share their skills to help others. They all believe that Tucson is a great place to live and they want to help make their community an even better place.” Last year’s beneficiary still has glowing words for those who helped. “Literacy Connects will never be able to fully express our gratitude for what ABA did for us,” said Betty Stauffer, executive director Literacy Connects.

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BizTRIBUTE

Remembering Lowell Rothschild By Romi Carrell Wittman Some years ago, local attorney Doug Clark was on an airplane with fellow lawyer Lowell Rothschild. The airplane wound up getting stuck on the runway for more than three hours. No take off and no return to the gate, just passengers killing time inside the plane while the airline sorted it out. For most people, this would be a nightmare scenario, but Rothschild saw it as an opportunity. “Lowell talked to everyone on that plane,” Clark said. “By the time we left, he knew a little something about every person on that plane. He was a curious person, genuinely interested in people. He wasn’t trying to drum up business for the firm. He really wanted to hear what people had to say.” Rothschild, an honorary native son of Tucson by way of Chicago, died last December at the age of 90. He left behind a long and treasured legacy, which includes son and Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild, daughter Jennifer Rothschild and several grandchildren and great grandchildren. His wife, Anne, passed away in 2016. “He was a tremendous guy,” said Clark, one of the partners at Mesch Clark Rothschild, which Rothschild co-founded in 1957. “I’ll miss him. Everyone will miss him.” Rothschild was born in Chicago, but moved to Tucson with his mother when he was 15. A single mother who relied on the help of her sisters to raise young Lowell, she opened a used furniture store on South Sixth Avenue. Rothschild attended Tucson High School for a time, but eventually returned to Chicago, where he graduated from high school. After leaving high school, he enlisted in the Navy and steeled himself for deployment to fight in World War II. When Harry Truman effectively ended the war by dropping two atomic bombs on Japan, Rothschild uneventfully finished his enlistment, then returned to Tucson where he enrolled at the University of Arizona. At that time, there was a program that allowed GIs to finish their undergraduate degrees in just two years, so after two years of undergrad work and two years at UA’s law school, Rothschild went to work for the Arizona State Legislature. He eventually returned to Tucson and, in 1957, he co-founded Mesch Clark Rothschild. “He had incredible integrity,” Clark said. “I worked with him for 51 years, every work day, and I never saw him do anything that wasn’t honest. He had a gruff manner, but he was a champion for everyone. He treated 194 BizTucson

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everyone the same and fairly.” Melvin Cohen, an attorney at the firm, still remembers when he first met Rothschild. “I was opposite him in a legal matter,” Cohen said. “It was like facing a lion. If you were going to go up against him in a legal matter, you’d better be ready.” Rothschild married Anne Silverman in 1954 and devoted himself to his family and his career, earning a reputation as a talented bankruptcy attorney who also took the time to mentor and raise up junior colleagues. “He was raised by his mother and her seven sisters,” Cohen said. “I think that experience gave him a lot of different perspectives. I think it gave him a great ability to nurture and see the value of nurturing.” At home, Rothschild was devoted to his wife and children. “He wanted the best for us,” Jonathan said of his father’s devotion to family. “He emphasized doing well in school and taught us the importance of being involved in the community. And he was totally devoted to my mom, which is something you don’t really notice when you’re a child.” Rothschild’s two grandsons, Isaac and Nathan, went to work at MCR after earning their law degrees. “He really treasured working with them in those last eight years,” Jonathan said. Both grandsons had a standing Tuesday night dinner date with their grandparents and continued it after their grandmother passed away in 2016. There was one hobby he loved – bowling. In fact, Lowell Rothschild is a member of the United States Bowling Congress Hall of Fame. “He wasn’t very good at it,” Jonathan said of his father’s bowling skills. “But he was passionate about it.” Rothschild served as president of the Tucson Bowling Association from 1962 to 1964 and served as president of the American Bowling Congress in 1977 and 1978. He was elected to the USBC Hall of Fame in 2009. Rothschild’s community involvement stretched far and wide and, in 2017, he was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the UA. He also served on many boards, including the UA Foundation, Pima County Legal Aid, Handmaker senior services and the Jewish Federation of Southern Arizona. “I would not be where I am without him,” said Clark. “He was so accomplished in all facets of life, not just law. He was the most unique and influential man I ever met.”

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Lowell Rothschild

Lowell Rothschild: 2018 Father of the Year Honoree The Father’s Day Council Tucson is posthumously honoring Lowell Rothschild as one of the 2018 Fathers of the Year. Father to two children, Jonathan and Jennifer, as well as grandfather and great-grandfather to many, Lowell Rothschild made an overwhelmingly positive and lasting impact not only on the lives of his children, but to the countless other individuals he mentored over the years. Last December, several members of the council traveled to the Mesch Clark Rothschild law firm to make a surprise announcement: Both Mayor Jonathan Rothschild and Lowell Rothschild, were to be honored as Fathers of the Year. Standing in the conference room of the law firm, surrounded by family and friends, Lowell immediately asked about the Father’s Day Council Tucson Endowed Chair for Type 1 Diabetes Research at the University of Arizona’s Steele Children’s Research Center. Specifically, he wanted to learn more about the FDC’s fundraising goals for this year’s event. As Lowell put it, “endowments hold a special place in my heart.” That evening, MCR held a special 60th anniversary celebration, which turned into something of a block party. Lowell passed away not long after at the age of 90. www.BizTucson.com


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