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SPRING FALL 2012 2017

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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Jennifer Barton University of Arizona BIO5 Institute

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SPECIAL REPORT: Town of Marana Father of the Year Honorees SPRING 2017 • $3.99 • DISPLAY UNTIL 06/30/17

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skillfully juggle parenting, business and community service. The honorees are Alan Levin, Edward P. Maxwell, Luis Felipe Seldner, Robert Smith, Michael V. Varney and Gregory J. White. Proceeds from the 23rd annual Father of the Year Awards Gala support the UA Steele Children’s Research Center, led by globally-acclaimed physician, researcher and scientist Dr. Fayez Ghishan, also Physician-in-Chief at Diamond Children’s Medical Center. This spring, BizTucson celebrates its 8th anniversary as the region’s business magazine. We offer special thanks to our advertisers, who invest their marketing dollars to reach the region’s top executives – and to you, our loyal readers. We also extend a special thank you to our stellar team for contributing outstanding reporting, writing, editing, design and photography. The exceptional creative direction and high journalistic standards begin with a terrific dedicated trio committed to excellence in every detail. We thank our Creative Director Brent G. Mathis for his outstanding graphic design, photography and sense of style – and Contributing Editors Donna Kreutz and Jay Gonzales, for their commitment to the highest level of journalistic quality in writing and to editing, and to Contributing Project & Event Coordinator Maricela Robles for her dedication and great contributions to the team. Most important is my heartfelt thanks to my very supportive family – and especially to my wonderful wife Rebecca.

Biz Steven E. Rosenberg Publisher & Owner BizTucson

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Volume 9 No. 1

Publisher & Owner

Steven E. Rosenberg Brent G. Mathis

Creative Director Photo: Steven Meckler

The University of Arizona is home to world-class scientists. In this issue you’ll meet two extraordinary women who lead in the world of medical research and discovery. Featured on our cover is Jennifer Barton, an ovarian cancer research pioneer and professor in the disciplines of biomedical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, optical sciences, agriculture and biosystems engineering. She’s a co-leader of the Cancer Imaging Program at the UA Cancer Center and interim director of UA’s BIO5 Institute, a collaborative research institute dedicated to solving complex biology-based problems affecting humanity. One year ago, Roberta Diaz Brinton was recruited to lead the newly created UA Center for Innovation in Brain Science. She recently received a $10.4 million research grant, focused on women with Alzheimer’s disease. Statistics show that at age 65, women are almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s than men. Brinton has earned a host of awards – Woman of the Year by Los Angeles Magazine in 2014 for her research into Alzheimer’s disease; the Presidential Citizens Medal by President Barack Obama in 2010; Science Educator of the Year in 2006 by the Society for Neuroscience; and listed by U.S. News & World Report as one of the “Ten Best Minds” in 2005. Science writer Eric Swedlund introduces us to both of these dedicated women. Our Women Who Lead series extends beyond science to also encompass leadership roles in philanthropy, nonprofits, community services and small business. You’ll meet these remarkable women – Ginny Clements, Kate Jensen, Wanda Moore and sisters Jill Woodward and Robin Woodward. This edition also features a special report on the Town of Marana, celebrating 40 years since its incorporation. This town is business friendly and growing fast. Informative articles highlight the impact of strategic planning and cover education, top employers, development, home building, tourism, retail and the potential for continued growth. Writers David Pittman and Christy Krueger take us behind the scenes. Every spring we celebrate the Father of the Year honorees selected by the Father’s Day Council Tucson. These dads

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Contributing Editors

Jay Gonzales Donna Kreutz

Contributing Copyeditors

Elena Acoba Diane Luber Dave Petruska

Contributing Technology Director

Mike Serres

Contributing Project & & Event Coordinator

Maricela Robles

Contributing Writers

Lee Allen Rhonda Bodfield April Bourie Larry Copenhaver Mary Minor Davis Jay Gonzales Chuck Graham Renée Schafer Horton Christy Krueger David Petruska David Pittman Steve Rivera Monica Surfaro Spigelman Eric Swedlund Valerie Vinyard Melissa Vito Romi Carrell Wittman

Contributing Photographers

Jacquelynn Buck Feastography Amy Haskell Joe Jackson Jr. Brent G. Mathis Chris Mooney

Member:

Arizona Builders’ Alliance DM-50 Greater Oro Valley Chamber of Commerce Marana Chamber of Commerce Sun Corridor Inc. Tucson Advertising Federation Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Tucson Metro Chamber Visit Tucson

BizTucson Phone: 520.299.1005 Subscription Information:

www.BizTucson.com subscriptions@BizTucson.com Advertising information:

Steve Rosenberg 520.299.1005 or 520.907-1012 steve@BizTucson.com BizTucson is published quarterly by Rosenberg Media, LLC. ,Tucson, AZ © 2017 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in columns or articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

POSTMASTER:

Please send address changes to: BizTucson, 4729 East Sunrise Drive, #505 Tucson, AZ 85718. www.BizTucson.com


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36 WOMEN WHO LEAD

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BizLETTER From the Publisher BizCUISINE Local Eatery Prepped For Success BizDEFENSE Raytheon Reaches Missile Milestone BizSPORTS Shootout at Old Tucson BizAWARDS Lori Carroll Wins International Honor

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WOMEN WHO LEAD BizRESEARCH Jennifer Barton BizRESEARCH Roberta Diaz Brinton BizNONPROFIT Kate Jensen BizHONORS Wanda F. Moore BizMANUFACTURING Robin Woodward Jill Woodward BizPHILANTHROPY Ginny Clements

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BizART Madaras Gallery BizHONORS Tucson Values Teachers Spirit of Education Awards Cox Communications, Thomas R. Brown Foundation BizCOMMUNITY TMC Donates $500,000 to Tucson’s Jan. 8 Memorial

SPECIAL REPORTS

65 Marana AZ: Celebrating 40 Years 70 Open for Business in Marana 82 Quality of Life a Community Effort 86 Business Has a Friend in Marana 88 Tourists, Locals Explore the Town 92 Homebuilders Staying Active, Momentum Continues

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139 SHRM of Greater Tucson 142 HR Pros Support Any Who Need It 147 Innovation in the Workplace Awards 150 Board of Directors

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BizTRIBUTE Joan Diamond – A Legacy of Giving BizREALESTATE 26th CCIM Forecast – Legend Award BizCOMMUNITY Major Donation to Libraries BizCONSTRUCTION Banner-University Medical Center Tops Out New To Market: Projects in the Region BizMILESTONE Hughes Federal Credit Union – 65th Anniversary BizSALES Sales Guru Jeffrey Gitomer BizHONORS Good Scout Awards Don Baker, Bill Nelson, Garry Brav BizAWARDS Southern Arizona Home Builders Association Annual Awards BizMILESTONE 153 YWCA of Southern Arizona at 100 BizAWARD 154 University of Arizona Executive of the Year BizPUBLISHING 156 Author Shares Loves with Young Readers BizAWARDS 161 Father of the Year Honorees: (Selected by Father’s Day Council Tucson) Alan Levin, Maj. Gen. Edward P. Maxwell, Luis Felipe Seldner, Robert Smith, Michael V. Varney, Gregory “Greg” J. White BizMILITARY 174 162nd Wing Parents Do Double Duty BizAWARDS 180 Greenest Workplace Awards BizNONPROFIT 182 Linkages Experience & Building Bridges Awards BizVOLUNTEERS 184 Arizona Builders Alliance Volunteer Day BizTRIBUTE 186 Movie Man Bob Shelton Rides Into Final Sunset ABOUT THE COVER Women Who Lead Jennifer Barton, Ovarian Cancer Research Pioneer At The University of Arizona Bio 5 Institute. Photo & Creative Design by Brent G. Mathis


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PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

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BizCUISINE

Prepped for Success Local Eatery Drawing Crowds

FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY: FEASTOGRAPHY

By Valerie Vinyard

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On a recent Sunday, Prep & Pastry was overflowing with patrons. The wait wasn’t quite the 1 hour and 45 minutes that often greets weekend brunch visitors, but it was still a hefty chunk of time before a diner could savor the restaurant’s duck confit hash or other well-crafted modern comfort food. Frequent customer Sally Nezbit said the wait is worth it. “Prep’s got it all – atmosphere, delicious food and great service,” said the 32-year-old engineer. “Plus, the bloody marys and different types of mimosas are to die for.” By the end of a typical Saturday or Sunday brunch, about 550 diners will have indulged at each one of the two Prep & Pastry locations in Tucson. The restaurant also is open weekdays for breakfast and lunch. Hours are 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. First-time patron Dianne Metcalf was visiting town during the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show.

The Los Angeles resident found out about the restaurant through friends, although many articles espousing Prep’s positives readily are available online. Owner Nathan Ares is a familiar face at his restaurants. After logging countless hours since his first restaurant’s December 2013 opening, the 33-year-old, recently married restaurateur finally started taking a day off each week to spend with his wife. He still logs plenty of hours at his now three eateries. That’s the best way he can interact with customers and make sure his standards for service and food remain high. Having worked in a number of Tucson restaurants, including North and The Abbey, Ares took a page from successful restaurateur Sam Fox’s playbook when it comes to the diner experience. “We focus on every aspect,” said Ares, who has two partners, Brian Pracko and Brian Morris. “We stress that fact from the mocontinued on page 20 >>> Spring 2017 > > > BizTucson 19


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We focus on every aspect. We stress that fact from the moment you walk in to the moment you’re out the door. Nathan Ares Owner Prep & Pastry

continued from page 19 ment you walk in to the moment you’re out the door.” The first Prep opened at 3073 N. Campbell Ave. in the space that was previously Amelia Grey’s Café and Catering. With its high pitched ceilings and exposed beams, the 2,600-square-foot location has the feel of a French farmhouse and can seat 90 inside and out. Last July, a slightly larger Prep opened at Grant and Wilmot in a new 6,000-square-foot building that it shares with fast-casual restaurant Sauce Pizza and Wine. Think San Francisco chic with an open ceiling and industrial track lights. That location can seat 120. And now, Prep & Pastry’s gift cards can be purchased at Costco. In summer 2015, the partners also opened dinner and weekend brunch spot Commoner & Co., which is in the space that was formerly The Abbey on East Sunrise Drive. Ares said the neighborhood welcomed Commoner “with open arms.” With all of their restaurants, Ares said it’s important to create the atmosphere that people want, as well as making sure high service standards are maintained. And of course, it’s about the food. GM Vinh Nguyen calls Prep’s menu “brunch food on crack.” “We do it so differently,” he said. “Nate is very in tune to everything. He knows all the latest trends. He can almost predict them.” www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: FEASTOGRAPHY

M A N U FA C T U R E R O F R E S TA U R A N T D I N N E R WA R E


BizCUISINE Take the Monte Cristo. The brioche French toast is made daily at the restaurants sometime after midnight. The produce and ingredients are fresh and local. Ares and Executive Chef Izzy Gonzalez, who started as a line cook for Prep, like to take classic dishes and put their own twist on them. “I like to call it Mad Hattering,” Ares said with a laugh. “We take a classic dish and tweak it and make it our own.” One dish to benefit from such a technique is Prep & Pastry’s unique take on the Cubano sandwich ($11). Instead of pulled pork, cooks use duck confit and ham and include house-made pickles with stone-ground mustard. Another standout is The Beni, which is a delicious combination of pork belly, asparagus, soft poached eggs and herbed cheese hollandaise on house-made cheddar biscuits ($10). Even the alcohol choices aren’t run of the mill. The eight or nine mimosa flavors include the French 75, which comes with a splash of gin. And Nguyen said their bloody marys are spectacular. Sometimes the creativity goes even further. Take the restaurant’s dossant ($4), a hybrid between a croissant and a donut. Various flavors such as red velvet, chocolate churro and vanilla berry are put in the rotation, but their signature flavor is maple bacon. Ares discovered his pastry chef, Hannah Houlden, when she walked into Prep one day. “She is a fireball,” he said. “When I saw her style and some of her work, I would not let her go. My main goal is to make her a big deal.” Everything except for the white and wheat bread and baguette is baked in-house, with the end goal being to bake everything on site. “I always tell everyone a lot of places have good service and a lot of places have good food,” Nguyun said. “The vision of the owners is the culmination of great hospitality and amazing food.” Perhaps because it’s still early in the year, Nguyen has noticed customers trying to make healthier choices. “People are very aware of what they’re eating,” he said. “We play that balance between good for you and just good.” So, what’s in the future? “Moving forward, I will focus on the breakfast end. I love waking up early and ending my day early,” Ares said. The keys to his success make sense. “I went out and found the best of the best,” said Ares, including choosing general managers who “know how to make the angriest customer happy. We take the time to do the work. We really knock it out of the park in keeping that standard day in and day out. “I enjoy life right now, knowing you have people that have started with you from the beginning you can trust. You surround yourself with people that are better than you.”

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BizBRIEF

Casino Del Sol Receives Tribal Spirit of Giving Award By Elena Acoba

Casino Del Sol’s practice of giving its employees paid time off for cultural activities earned it a Tribal Spirit of Giving award presented in February by Raving’s Indian Gaming National Marketing Conference. The resort and casino operated by the Pascua Yaqui Tribe received first place in the employee category, one of three – the others are community and customer – that recognizes efforts of generosity by American Indian gaming companies. Casino Del Sol closes its casino and pays more than 1,500 employees for

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From left: Steve Neely, Chief Marketing Officer, Casino Del Sol; Ciro Rivera, Director of Community Relations for Casino Del Sol

four days off around Easter, an important tribal cultural activity in which many employees participate. It also pays employees for time off during other cultural ceremonies, such as honors for a loved one who has died. This is in addition to traditional paid time off provided by other companies. The closure costs the casino about 2 percent of its overall revenue. The Employee Tribal Cultural Program has paid salaries for more than 750,000 hours off over its 23-year history. “The loss of revenue that the casino is

willing to incur to ensure all employees are able to participate is exceptional,” according to a judge’s notes. “Having rested, happy, valued and involved employees translates to great service on the casino floor.” “This award reflects the commitment to community and culture that is so important to Casino Del Sol and the Pascua Yaqui Tribe,” said Kimberly Van Amburg, CEO of Casino Del Sol. “To be recognized for something that we hold so dear to our hearts is a source of great pride for our organization.”

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BizBRIEFS

Remy Arteaga Entrepreneur Remy Arteaga is the new director of the top-ranked McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Arizona Eller College of Management. Arteaga spent more than 20 years launching and managing successful startups, accelerators and corporate innovation initiatives before becoming involved in entrepreneurship education. He was the executive director of a nonprofit that created and managed Stanford University’s Latino entrepreneurship accelerator and research programs. Biz

R&A CPAs Now Member of DKF International R&A CPAs is Arizona’s first member of DKF International, a global association of independent accounting, tax and business advisory companies. R&A, founded in 1942, was accepted into the association in December as the 52nd member office in the United States. It anticipates that its expertise in cross-border trade will contribute to the worldwide reach of DFK International members. “This affiliation will add value to the services we provide our current clients and allow us the opportunity to work with more clients around the world,” said R&A shareholder Rodolfo Paredes, who oversees the company’s international division. His knowledge of international tax matters helped R&A increase its services to clients wanting to expand into a global market. “An international affiliation was the next step.” DFK International is a consortium of independent firms with more than 400 member offices in 92 countries. Biz 24 BizTucson

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BizBRIEFS

Kurtis Dawson Kurtis Dawson is the new president/ CEO at the YMCA of Southern Arizona. Dawson joins the YMCA team after 15 years at the YMCA of Grays Harbor in Hoquiam, Wash. As the CEO/executive director there since 2008, Dawson helped that YMCA association grow and prosper, surpassing budgetary and fundraising goals. He graduated from Evergreen State College in Washington with a degree in business management.

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Adam Goldstein Adam Goldstein, a senior VP-financial adviser in RBC Wealth Managementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tucson office, has been named to the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Portfolio Focus-Senior Portfolio Manager Group, an exclusive group of financial advisers that is recognized for its success in building fee-based discretionary portfolio management practices. The group is the highest level of recognition that the firm bestows upon its fee-based discretionary financial advisers Biz www.BizTucson.com

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BizMANUFACTURING

Raytheon Produces

th 20,000 By David Pittman

Raytheon Missile Systems employees and military officials came together in January to celebrate a major milestone with the completion of the 20,000th Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM). Also at the Jan. 31 luncheon at the company’s headquarters, it was revealed that Raytheon and the U.S. Air Force are developing a new signal processor for the AMRAAM to help ensure its continued production well into the 2020s. “AMRAAM is and always has been

the best missile of its kind,” said Taylor W. Lawrence, president of Raytheon Missile Systems. “With the Air Force, we have evolved it beyond expectation, and we will continue to innovate to stay far ahead of the threats our armed services face.” AMRAAM’s ability to track targets in electronic warfare environments has resulted in it becoming the world’s leading air-to-air missile. AMRAAM is not only used by the U.S. military, but is also procured by 36 U.S- allied nations. AMRAAM is utilized by the F-35, F-16,

F-15, F/A-18, F-22, Typhoon, Gripen, Tornado and Harrier aircraft. With more than 4,200 test firings, no other air-to-air missile has been as thoroughly tested or improved as AMRAAM. Col. Brian A. Henson, senior material leader of the Air Dominance Division at Florida’s Eglin Air Force Base, was one of five speakers to address the approximately 300 people who attended the luncheon. Henson said prior to his first Air Force flight assignment in 1994, the leader of his squadron informed new pilots that the AMRAAM missile

Raytheon Economic Impact: $2.1 Billion Raytheon Missile Systems contributes $2.1 billion annually to the Arizona economy, according to a study released in late January by the Seidman Research Institute at Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business. Researchers studied Raytheon’s payroll, taxes and supplier partnerships in making its findings. The company is the world’s largest missile maker and Arizona’s largest private government contractor. “With a local workforce of nearly 11,000, we are Southern Arizona’s biggest private employer and one of the leading employers in the state,” said Taylor W. Lawrence, Raytheon Missile Systems president. “Raytheon does business with more than 500 Arizona suppliers.”

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was a “game changer” that provided the U.S. and its allies with “air superiority.” “I stand here today with the same company, many of the same people, with the same focus, and you are still delivering the game-changer in air superiority,” Henson said. Mike Jarrett, VP of air warfare systems for Raytheon, spoke about the history of the missile. He said after winning the AMRAAM contract, Hughes Missile Co. (later absorbed by Raytheon) began full-scale development of the missile in the early 1980s. Jarrett said despite schedule delays and cost overruns in de-

velopment, AMRAAM’s overwhelming success in tests silenced its critics. “With lots of hard work and literally hundreds and hundreds of smart engineers and dedicated factory workers, AMRAAM delivered its first production missile in 1988,” he said, adding the missile was not only smaller, faster and lighter than its predecessors, but also more powerful and precise. “Thirty years removed from that first production delivery, it is truly amazing to see how far this program has come,” Jarrett said. “What the machine gun did for land warfare, AMRAAM has done for

aerial combat. Producing 20,000 of anything in our industry is a significant accomplishment. It is a historic milestone for this storied franchise.” “I want to thank all of you for your hard work, which has kept our customers ahead of our adversaries,” Lawrence told those at the event. “Today, U.S. and international pilots have 10 air-to-air combat victories (utilizing AMRAAM), proving the technology you created comes through in dangerous circumstances, ultimately saving many lives.”

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Raytheon’s yearly Arizona payroll is about $1 billion, but the company’s impact is about more than dollars. Raytheon employees participate in numerous programs and events throughout the state aimed at inspiring the next generation of engineers and scientists including: MathMovesU Day at the University of Arizona, MathNight tutoring at Arizona high schools, and the Raytheon Leaders in Education Award honoring outstanding Southern Arizona teachers. In November, the company announced plans to expand its Southern Arizona operations by adding infrastructure and 2,000 new jobs over the next five years. “With its high-tech jobs and competitive wages, Raytheon is absolutely critical to Southern Arizona’s economy,” said Dennis Hoffman, center director of the Seidman Research Institute.

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PHOTOS: COURTESY RAYTHEON MISSILE SYSTEMS

‘Game-Changer’


BizSPORTS

Off-Road Motorsport Racing Roars Into Old Tucson By Steve Rivera Brian Gale has held races on the streets of downtown Los Angeles, the Olympic Stadium in Barcelona and in the jungles of Brazil. Then he headed to the dirt roads at Old Tucson. With that, The Shootout @ Old Tucson was born. Imagine the possibilities. Gale, president and CEO of Speedleague, had that imagination and thought “outside the box” to bring Speedleague to Southern Arizona to be held at the venerable movie location. “We’re not crazy, we’re just looking for ideas that get people talking and captures their attention,” he said. 30 BizTucson

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Speedleague is an international racing league founded by Gale, Global Rallycross creator and ESPN X Games sport organizer. This will be high-level, off-road action motorsport racing and what Gale hopes will be the start of something big. The races will be held May 6-7, the first of a three-year agreement. “I thought the town had a lot of promise as a market for what we do,” Gale said. “The challenge was finding the right location to build a venue. We don’t like to race at traditional race tracks and are always trying to think out-

side the box, especially when it comes to the setting. It took several scouting trips, with (Tucson businessman) Vince (Marold) driving me around. But, eventually we went out to Old Tucson and came to an agreement with Diamond Ventures, the operators of the facility.” In the eyes of Mary Minor Davis, Old Tucson’s director of marketing and communications, it’s a great fit and one where the venue often “overcomes the odds in the desert.” “All this is pretty cool,” she said. “Old Tucson has a history of evolution and rethinking itself.” www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: COURTESY THE SHOOTOUT @ OLD TUCSON

We don’t like to race at traditional race tracks and are always trying to think outside the box.

– Brian Gale President & CEO Speedleague

Horses have given way to fast autos, “but we’re going to stay true to our core and promoting our Western character. The West has always been about conquering the elements and this race fits that character.” “The most notable impact will be in media exposure to the region, followed by our spending on producing the event and then some tourism, which should increase over the years,” said Gale. “We think all the elements are in place for strong attendance. My team has a lot of faith in Old Tucson to market locally. It was one of the deciding factors for us when we agreed to the event.” The Shootout will feature some of the world’s best drivers in Baja style offroad racing trucks and UTVs competing on a challenging purpose-built dirt track, featuring large jumps and a section that runs through the Old Tucson’s Main Street. Competitors will battle head-to-head in a series of exciting elimination heats throughout the weekend to advance to the final race on Sunday afternoon. This Tucson event will be Speedleague’s first of what it hopes are many throughout the nation. “The Shootout @ Old Tucson is a watershed moment for the league,” Gale said. “While we’ve produced and sanctioned events for ESPN in a whitelabel capacity, this is our first event using the Speedleague name with the public. “Besides the Shootout, which we view continued on page 32 >>> www.BizTucson.com

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BizSPORTS continued from page 31 as a unique, single, stand-alone event, we’ve also recently announced exciting plans for a new electric-powered rallycross racing series called E/RACING, the first of its type in motorsports.” Drivers will come from throughout the area, including Mexico. Participation is by invitation only and will focus on star athletes, including action sports heroes and world-class drivers. One of the more unlikely participants in the race will be Tucsonan George Hammel, who broke his back nearly 20 years ago, was a paraplegic, but recovered to return to racing by 2009. “I can’t wait. The Shootout is gonna be awesome! It’s like having the Super Bowl of off-road racing in our backyard,” he said. “As an industry, motorsports is losing its audience, so I’m always looking at ways to capture a unique experience,” Gale said. “Racing around this old-west site is way cooler and more interesting to fans and drivers than racing around the same old track, where everyone expects it to be.” In addition to the old-west atmosphere, fans of all ages will enjoy a Saturday night concert, an open-pit area where fans can rub elbows with the stars and various driver-autograph sessions over the event weekend. “Most important is to make sure that everybody who buys a ticket or sponsors the event feels like they got a great value,” Gale said. “If we get those elements right, then we’ll be in a strong position to keep growing the event.”

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SHOOTOUT AT OLD TUCSON OFF ROAD GRAND PRIX Saturday & Sunday, May 6 & 7 Old Tucson 201 S. Kinney Road Tickets: $25-$72 at www.tixr.com/speedleague Group discounts for 50 or more: Sandra Lopez at slopez@oldtucson.com or Joe Camarillo at jcamarillo@oldtucson.com www.speedleague.org

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BizAWARDS

COURTESY LORI CARROLL & ASSOCIATES

Lori Carroll & Associates Win International, National Design Awards Lori Carroll and her team at Lori Carroll & Associates have received special honors nationally and internationally in recent weeks. The Tucson interior designer was recognized globally for the International Design of the Year Award along with several National Kitchen & Bath Association accolades. She won the International Design of the Year at the 2017 Designer Kitchen and Bath Awards in Essex, England, with a powder room called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Modern Flair.â&#x20AC;? The major theme behind the design idea was color and light. In this space, color had everything to do with setting the tone. Adding the proper amount of light greatly enhanced the perception of those colors. The rich tones that were created in the specialty paint finish and a glass bead wall covering became the backdrop for layers of light. Each one of these elements contributed to making this bathroom project truly unique. Brad Wachs of Mike Wachs Con34 BizTucson

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struction Company, Marc Soloway of Soloway Designs Inc. Architecture + Interiors and William Lesch of Lesch Photography were Lori Carroll & Associates partners on this project.

Construction and Jon Mancuso of JM Photography helped bring this project to life.

Platinum Best in American Living Award

Following a Kitchen of the Year award in 2016, Carroll continued that winning streak in 2017 with Best Bath at the 2017 National Kitchen & Bath Design Competition held during the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show in Orlando. The winning design included contemporary materials with a neutral color scheme, the bathtub as a focal point, metallic-glazed tiles with a bronze liner and floating shelves for storage. In addition, the design team was named the winner in the Large Bath category and finished first and third in the Powder Room category. Carroll earned a Bachelor of Science in interior design from the University of Arizona and established her firm in 2000.

Lori Carroll & Associates also won the Platinum Best in American Living Award for One-of-a-Kind Custom or Spec Home (2,500-3,500 square feet) at the 2017 National Association of Homebuilders Show in Orlando, Fla. The award was presented at the International Builders Show in Orlando. This home is the perfect example of a vacation hideaway. The clients were looking to escape the extreme winters on the Atlantic Coast and Lori Carroll & Associates came up with a contemporary retreat that embraces the casual, sundrenched Southwestern lifestyle. Ron Robinette of Robinette Architects, Tom Mancuso of MK Alliance

2017 National Kitchen & Bath Design Competition

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BizRESEARCH

Taking on Ovarian Cancer with Teamwork By Eric Swedlund As a renowned biomedical engineer and research administrator, Jennifer Barton knows that scientific breakthroughs come from bringing the right team together. In her own laboratory and as interim director of the University of Arizona’s BIO5 Institute, Barton exemplifies the principle that the best outcomes come from aligning the strengths of many. Barton’s approach earned her team a fouryear, $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health that will allow her to build on her work over the last decade developing a life-saving approach to early detection of ovarian cancer. “Effective screening for early detection is a compelling problem and a fantastic technical challenge because there’s no perfect solution today,” Barton said. “This is a new way of thinking about accessing the ovary in a minimally invasive way.” The work is especially challenging because although ovarian cancer is not a very common cancer, it is the fifth-leading cancer killer among women, largely because most cases aren’t detected until the disease is widespread. Early detection, when the cancer is still confined to the ovary, occurs in just 15 percent of cases, but dramatically improves the prognosis.

The overall five-year survival rate for ovarian cancer patients is only 46 percent, but the survival rate jumps to more than 90 percent in those early detection cases. “We have a dual-faceted problem,” Barton said. “We haven’t had the technology or the scientific understanding of how ovarian cancer develops.” With the new grant, Barton and her research collaborators, Khanh Kieu, assistant professor of optical sciences, and Dr. Kenneth Hatch, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, will move forward in developing and improving the device, a millimeter-scale endoscope called a salpingoscope. Used under local anesthesia in an office setting, the salpingoscope would enable high-sensitivity, high-resolution imaging of the fallopian tube, ovaries and uterine wall. Concurrent to advancing the basic biology research on ovarian cancer development and improving the device’s imaging capabilities is a search for an outside commercial partner to provide engineering and manufacturing, Barton said. “Universities are great at building prototypes, but we don’t do manufacturing,” Barton said. “We have a patent and are actively seeking a licensee.” continued on page 38 >>>

About Jennifer Barton Jennifer Barton completed her bachelor’s and master’s in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and University of California Irvine, respectively. She worked for McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) on the International Space Station program before returning to UT Austin to obtain a doctorate in biomedical engineering in 1998. That same year she came to the University of Arizona. She is a professor in four specialties – biomedical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, optical sciences and agriculture and biosystems engineering. Each of her funded projects has included co-investigators from other departments, universities and/or industry. She recently was named co-leader of the Cancer Imaging Program at the UA Cancer Center. She also serves as the interim director of the BIO5 Institute. She is a fellow of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, and of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. 36 BizTucson

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Jennifer Barton is researching ovarian tumors to develop the first effective screening method for the disease. (Photo courtesy of the National Cancer Institute)

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WOMEN WHO LEAD

Jennifer Barton Co-Leader Cancer Center Imaging Program University of Arizona Cancer Center

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Interim Director UA BIO5 Institute

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I have in my lab engineering students, physiology students, optical science students and medical residents and they all feel 100-percent confident. We try very hard to create that culture here.

– Jennifer Barton, Interim Director, University of Arizona BIO5 Institute continued from page 36 If it becomes the first acceptable Scientists have an incomplete picture between the health science campus and screening method for ovarian cancer, of just how aggressive ovarian cancer the main campus. Everybody on camthe salpingoscope would be a breakcan be, and as other research into gepus can feel like they own this building. through for those at high risk of denetics and biomarkers related to cancer “I have in my lab engineering stuveloping ovarian cancer. Currently, improves, the detection itself can bedents, physiology students, optical sciwomen over 35 who are in the highcome easier. ence students and medical residents risk pool, as determined by their family The current consensus, Barton said, and they all feel 100-percent confident. medical history, have a single effective is that ovarian cancer starts in the falWe try very hard to create that culture prevention measure: the removal of lopian tubes as pre-cancerous lesions. here.” their ovaries and fallopian tubes. Eventually, the salpingoscope could be Started in 2001, the BIO5 Institute About 50 percent of women in the incorporated into an annual screening has brought together top researchers high-risk pool develop ovarian cancer, protocol and Barton’s goal is to incorin agriculture, engineering, medicine, and ovary removal surgery has its own porate biopsy capabilities into the depharmacy and basic science under health risks and consequences. Early vice itself. a collaborative umbrella, encouragtests that don’t detect the onset of ovarBarton’s research is exemplary of ing creative solutions with small seed ian cancer can render the surgery unhow BIO5 was designed to facilitate grants. Strategically aligning areas of necessary. cross-disciplinary collaborations and specific strengths across campus has “We know now this would be really combine different areas of expertise in directly led to biomedical engineering great for women who are at high risk innovative ways. breakthroughs like Barton’s. of developing ovarian cancer,” Barton “I’ve had people here at BIO5 help “These are areas we’re great at on said. “If we show we’re successful, we me meet collaborators and that’s been campus and what BIO5 can do is facan expand that out to those with an crucial,” Barton said. “One of the best cilitate those ties,” she said. “We work elevated risk.” things is having this building right in with our strengths here at the UA and

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BizRESEARCH PHOTO: COURTESY MEREDITH MITSTIFER

Ovarian Cancer Survivor Shares Her Story With Medical Students The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that about 20,000 U.S. women are diagnosed each year with ovarian cancer and 14,000 die from the disease. Tucsonan Meredith Mitstifer is one of the lucky ones. And University of Arizona medical students have heard her story:

her 14th year with no evidence of the disease. She serves on the board of the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition. She also has participated in Survivors Teaching Students: Saving Women’s Lives, an Ovarian Cancer National Alliance program in conjunction with the UA in which ovarian cancer survivors share their stories with medical students.

At 30, while visiting a fertility specialist, she “I’ve lost many friends to this awful disease, had an ultrasound test that revealed a large and have many other friends who are dying Meredith & Ryan Mitstifer mass in her left ovary. A few weeks later, from it,” she said. “Many of them desperately preparing for surgery, she learned she was want to see advances in diagnosis and treatpregnant. She had the diseased ovary removed and biopsied, ment and, ultimately, a cure, so their own children won’t have confirming early stage ovarian cancer. She went on to give to go through what they have. An effective screening process birth to a boy, Ryan, who is now a healthy teenager. would be a great start.” Mitstifer is a clinical psychologist for the Federal Bureau of – By Jill Goetz, UA College of Engineering Prisons and has her own private practice. She is approaching

help connect them in new ways. That’s where the exciting developments are happening. BIO5 and Tech Launch Arizona have enabled me to do this in a way that doesn’t happen at other universities.” Barton’s interest in science was sparked during America’s Bicentennial

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celebrations, watching on television as laser beams bounced off the Washington Monument. “I was fascinated,” Barton said. “And when I discovered that lasers could be used for medical purposes, that’s when I knew what I wanted to do with my life.” Rather than medicine, Barton settled

on engineering for her path, first with electrical engineering, then shifting to biomedical engineering as it emerged as its own field. And that childhood fascination came full circle when Barton began her dissertation research, working on using lasers to treat people.

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BizRESEARCH

Expert in Alzheimer’s Focuses on Women Funded by $10.3 Million Grant By Eric Swedlund A leading expert on Alzheimer’s disease in women, Roberta Diaz Brinton started her career at the University of Arizona, yet never expected she’d return. A heralded neuroscientist with nearly 20 years on the University of Southern California faculty, Brinton had earned a host of awards – Woman of the Year by Los Angeles magazine in 2014 for her research into Alzheimer’s disease; the Presidential Citizens Medal by President Barack Obama in 2010; Science Educator of the Year in 2006 by the Society for Neuroscience; and listed by U.S. News & World Report as one of the “Ten Best Minds” in 2005. But a new opportunity as inaugural director of the UA Center for Innovation in Brain Science brought Brinton back to Tucson, where she’ll lead creative translational research efforts to finally solve the challenges posed by Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases. Brinton returned to the UA in May and by October had secured a $10.3 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health. Brinton’s research had already been continuously funded by the NIH for 20 years. “In the 21st century, there’s not a single cure for a single neurodegenerative disease,” Brinton said. “Our center’s mission is to bring the innovative brain 40 BizTucson

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science of the future to those who need a cure today. Part of that is approaching the problem differently. I use the phrase ‘all brains on deck.’ It’s clearly a complex biology challenge and it’s going to take many brains thinking collaboratively to solve it.” Alzheimer’s disease strikes women more frequently than men. Of the more than 5 million Americans of all ages with Alzheimer’s disease in 2016, more than 3 million were women. By age 65, women have a one-in-six chance of developing Alzheimer’s, compared to a one-in-11 chance for men. Brinton’s research centers on understanding how the aging female brain can account for those differences. “I devote a very large part of my research program to understanding what is occurring in the female brain as the brain ages and what is creating this vulnerability, this greater lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease,” she said. Both men and women with neurodegenerative diseases – like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis – tend to be treated the same. Many of the symptoms are the same, but the biology is different. Brinton describes it with an analogy that speaks to her years in Los Angeles. Neurodegenerative diseases are described as progressive, meaning they start at a point long before diagnosis,

around 20 years in the case of Alzheimer’s. “The pathology freeway is the same, but the on-ramp is different,” she said. “How one begins that process is exactly where the interventions need to target.” With the average age of Alzheimer’s diagnosis in women being in the mid70s, Brinton focused her research on biological transformations in the brain that occur during perimenopause, a neuroendocrine transition unique to women. “It’s an aging transition that can be uneventful for some and very eventful for others,” she said. “In women with severe symptoms, the complaints are neurological – like hot flashes, insomnia and depression. Endocrine transitions can be these tipping points, where these vulnerabilities emerge.” Brinton’s research interest stems directly from formative experiences in her past. When she started college at the UA, she had a job in the pediatric clinic and was inspired by the doctors and nurses around her. Taking classes at night, she finished her undergraduate degree in two years and went on to earn a doctorate at the UA in neuropharmacology and psychobiology. As a post-doctorate in neuroendocrinology at Rockefeller University, she was asked by a physician to observe a clinical trial of Alzheimer’s patients. continued on page 42 >>> www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO:CHRIS MOONEY

WOMEN WHO LEAD

Roberta Diaz Brinton Inaugural Director of Center for Innovation in Brain Science University of Arizona

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BizRESEARCH

For the Center for Innovation in Brain Science, instead of going from bench to bedside, we’re going from bedside to bench. We start with the human condition and work our way to the discovery environment.

– Roberta Diaz Brinton Inaugural Director of Center for Innovation in Brain Science University of Arizona

continued from page 40 She spent a lot of time with a particular patient who changed the direction of Brinton’s career. “She could not remember me for 30 seconds and I’ve remembered her for 30 years,” she said. Brinton’s new grant at the UA builds on a paper she published two years ago about detecting potential Alzheimer’srelated changes that occur during menopause. Brinton found that on an integrated set of biomarkers that target the metabolic system, she and her research team could detect women who were already experiencing mild cognitive deficits. The changes were subtle, still in normal range, but on the edge of normal. “The goal is to detect women who are at greater risk before they cross over and work to bring them back to normal,” Brinton said. In returning to the UA, Brinton praised the university’s “boldness to think and to act and to take on the challenges of the 21st century.” “I see that across everyone I encounter here,” she said. “The University of Arizona has unique advantages in the ability to reach across diverse disciplines, within the science sphere, within the business sphere, within the behavioral and social science sphere. It’s big enough to have the intellectual critical mass and small enough to be a family, where connections can be made in real time with real people. That is an edge that many larger metropolises don’t have. “We have the capacity to create innovative teams that include scientists and business people to go from the inception of an idea to the distribution of the outcome. We can really start with the end in mind,” she said. “For the Center for Innovation in Brain Science, instead of going from bench to bedside, we’re going from bedside to bench. We start with the human condition and work our way to the discovery environment.”

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BizNONPROFIT

Sharing a Passion for Children & Families By April Bourie It’s funny how the smallest things can change life so quickly. Kate Maguire Jensen, the new president and CEO at Tucson’s Ronald McDonald House, was working at Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital when she went into the physicians lounge to get a cookie. There she heard about the job posting from a cardiologist whose wife volunteers at the welcoming house for families of children receiving medical care in Tucson. “Once I learned more about the position, I realized it was my dream job,” Jensen said. It was a perfect fit for her professional experience and personal passions. “The mission of the house calls to me,” she said. “No one can keep kids from getting sick – that’s why it is so very important to support the families during these difficult times.” The house is a place where families can share a home-cooked meal, catch up on laundry or spend time together in a warm and friendly place away from the hospital. Though Jensen wasn’t looking for a new job, she realized that her career path had prepared her for precisely this position. She grew up in Tucson, went to college, worked in public relations and marketing in San Francisco, then returned after marrying another Tucson native. She worked in advertising and public relations before moving to an in-house marketing position with the HMO Intergroup of Arizona. She loved the healthcare industry and went from there to marketing at Steele Children’s Research Center at the University of Arizona. “That was my second-favorite job – after my current position,” she said. “It allowed me to make life better for families, and I was able to spearhead many of my own 44 BizTucson

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programs.” Ever upbeat and energetic, while working and raising four children, she completed a master’s degree in public health at the UA. After 11 years at Steele, Jensen moved up to assistant VP of marketing for the entire university. That’s when she had the opportunity to participate in a yearlong leadership academy, which helped shape her ideas on leadership and motivation. “This exposed me to many styles of leadership and made me create my own leadership mantra,” she said. “Mine is: I use my optimism and enthusiasm to inspire and connect people so they use their talents well for the greater good.” Jensen also discovered the writings of Daniel Pink, author of “Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us.” His premise is that employees are motivated by three things – autonomy, mastery and purpose. “I have absolutely seen how powerful and joyful it is for people to have purpose in their work,” Jensen said. After the UA, she became director of business development at St. Mary’s – which led her to that fateful cookie break and ultimately to Ronald McDonald Charities of Southern Arizona. It may be surprising to some that Ronald McDonald Houses do not screen families based on economic need. The only requirements are that the family must live more than 30 miles from the house – and the child must be receiving care at a medical clinic or hospital in Tucson. The child can be up to 22 years old. “Even middle-class families can be pushed into bankruptcy by a major illness,” Jensen said. “But it’s not just the economic impact that the house is focused on. During this difficult time, guests need the compassion and sym-

pathy that our amazing staff provides. It is so nice to work with people who share a passion for children and families. We all have a common goal – and it is incredible to see how the staff pulls together.” The nonprofit operates with eight full-time and nine part-time staff, plus some 80 regular volunteers. Art Lindberg, a retired physician who is over 90 years old, volunteers at the front desk. “He tells me it’s his antidepressant,” Jensen said. The centrally located 24,000-squarefoot house serves nearly 600 families each year. They stay anywhere from one night for a checkup or outpatient procedure, to six or nine months for organ and bone marrow transplants. The nonprofit benefits from generous ongoing community support. Nationwide, the Alpha Delta Pi sorority has chosen the Ronald McDonald Houses as their charity of choice, and each year the local chapter raises from $20,000 to $25,000 for the Tucson house through special events. Of course, local McDonald’s restaurants are major supporters of their namesake charity. Local employees volunteer in the house kitchen once a week and McDonald’s managers hold meetings at the house. A portion of daily sales from each restaurant is allocated to the house, and the restaurant owners donate on top of that. They also sponsor fundraising events and offer special donation programs in their restaurants. So the next time you eat at McDonald’s, think about how you are a part of the Ronald McDonald House success – and how the small purchase of a cookie (or any menu item) could make a big difference in the life of the family of a sick child.

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

WOMEN WHO LEAD

Kate Jensen President & CEO, Ronald McDonald House Charities Southern Arizona Spring 2017

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BizHONORS

Champion for Creating Change for Women & Girls By Elena Acoba In projects modest and grand, Wanda F. Moore has personally touched innumerable individuals in her drive to better lives. Moore, whose work focuses on women and girls, is the 2017 Luncheon Honoree of the Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona. Her praises will be sung at the 24th annual WFSA event on April 26. “The Women’s Foundation proudly selected Wanda because she is a champion for creating change for women and girls in our community,” said Dawne Bell, WFSA’s CEO. “We’re thrilled to recognize not only Wanda’s professional achievements, but her leadership in the health community, her volunteerism with the foundation and other nonprofits, as well as her mentorship and guidance for so many women and girls.” Moore said her mother laid the groundwork for her service to others. “My mom really influenced my work,” said the Georgia native. “If the family next door needed food, she was going to split our food to give it to them. She got such joy out of giving to others. I was going to follow her example.” Moore’s first opportunity came in the 1980s in Los Angeles where she lived with her husband, Jim, and three children. She created the Rainbow Club, a church program for poor girls in the Watts neighborhood. They learned to cook, clean and babysit, did homework, studied the Bible and took field trips “so they would always see a different view from where they live,” said Moore. “I was really happy because I saw the results that they were going to do better.” Moore also attended colleges and law school while working at General Dynamics, where Jim also worked. The family moved to Tucson in 1993 in the relocation of employees with Hughes Missile Systems, which bought 46 BizTucson

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out General Dynamics a year earlier. The division became Raytheon Missile Systems. Jim continued his engineering career while Wanda networked by volunteering for the Tucson Chamber of Commerce and the Mount Calvary Missionary Baptist Church. She found jobs, first as a City of Tucson contract administrator, then, from 1997 to 2003, as the director of supply chain management for Carondelet Health Network. There Moore mentored employees to earn their GEDs, study for the purchasing manager certification and find jobs that advanced their careers. “I just believed everybody had the right to equal education,” she said. “Those that didn’t have the high school education, I wanted to help them.”

WOMEN’S FOUNDATION OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA 24TH ANNUAL LUNCHEON Wednesday, April 26 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tucson Convention Center 260 S. Church Ave. $70 for individuals $700 for table of 10 (520) 622-8886 www.womengiving.org/ annual-luncheon

Moore was elected to the WSFA board in 2001. “I was thrilled,” she said. “I felt like the women’s organization was right down my alley.” The WSFA runs and supports programs that help women and girls improve their social, political and economic lives. Since its formation in 1991, the

group’s grant program has awarded more than $3.4 million to hundreds of organizations. At the luncheon it will announce grant awards of more than $700,000 to efforts addressing issues of health, career development, refugee settlement, domestic violence, access to legal services and more. WFSA’s Unidas program is dear to Moore’s heart. The program gives high school girls experience in leadership, social justice and community service by allowing them to work together to research needs and decide what organizations to award $10,000. “These girls would arrive shy,” Moore said, “but when they left they had so much courage and confidence.” She also is active with WFSA’s WIN Arizona which stands for Women’s Issues Network. It monitors state legislation and provides lobbying suggestions on specific bills. “That allows our voices to be heard on the political issues that impact the quality of life for women and girls,” she said. After retiring in 2003, Moore became a full-time volunteer, accepting two state-appointed positions, and working with the Tucson Urban League, Sahuaro Girl Scout Council, American Heart Association, American Red Cross and Habitat for Humanity. She continued to be actively involved with a variety other community organizations. Moore’s current work centers around the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center. She serves on the advisory board, teaches CPR, talks about women health issues and raises funds for the Women of Color Research Endowment to support research on health disparities of people of color. “My greatest passion right now,” she said “is working with women and girls in under-served populations. I go out and encourage them to do preventative health things.” Biz www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: JOE JACKSON JR / J3 PHOTOGRAPHY

WOMEN WHO LEAD

Wanda F. Moore 2017 Honoree Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Foundation of Southern Arizona Spring 2017

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BizCUSTOM

Making First Impressions Count By Larry Copenhaver

Butler Custom Doors, a Tucson company owned and operated by sisters Jill and Robin Woodard, strives to furnish the most attractive and functional entryways possible to discriminating home and business owners. Foremost considerations in the effort include doors and entrances that are both durable and aesthetically comforting. The company’s broad spectrum of customers, including custom home builders, architects, remodelers and interior designers as well as do-it-yourselfers, encourages the one-on-one attention that has catapulted Butler Custom Doors into an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau. “We have a wide folio of products,” Jill said. “The front door to a home is especially important. It is the statement to the home, the personality to the home. It’s what people see when they come to your house. We feel front doors are an important investment, not only adding value to the home but the character, too. “It’s good when visitors say to themselves, ‘What a beautiful entry – what’s the rest of the house look like?’ Robin and I both take pride in really helping people make the right design choices.” That work begins in the showroom at 9290 E. Old Vail Road, where rows and rows of examples of entry treatments are on display. Then, one of the owners will work in the field with clients’ contractors and door installers. They want to make sure the products being selected are architecturally or “design-wise” right for that unique setting, as well as 48 BizTucson

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make sure the new door fits properly in the opening. Butler is not a manufacturer of entry products, and its lowest grade of door might be something found at a big box store, Jill said. Customers looking for higher grades of products are those who seek out Butler products that can be customized. “We used to be only high end, but now the company does all ranges of doors,” Jill said. “The market has changed so much.” Butler even does doors from materials such as plastic laminate “to the most expensive door you could imagine.” Recently, the pair completed a major project that carried a nearly $250,000 price tag for the interior and exterior doors and other treatments of a home. “Almost all of our doors are made of solid wood,” Jill said. Some of the more common wood species chosen for today’s fashion door include knotty alder, poplar and cedar. Often, iron and glass or aluminum and glass find their way into the materials list. Other issues include insulation ratings and the durability of the material relative to solar exposure, Robin said. “Some 95 percent of sales go through the review of an architect. Roughly 5 percent of the clients are folks off the street. Prior to 2006, 90 percent of business was new construction, but with Tucson homes being available for renovation, that has slid to about 80 percent.” There are four employees at Butler Custom Doors. Two are the owners

who take the lead on product selections. The other two ensure quality control so entries are compatible to the quality of workmanship found in some of Southern Arizona’s stunning homes – homes that often cost millions of dollars or businesses obsessed with making a favorable first impression. “We do all of our pre-hanging here. We bring in the product and create our own jambs and frames, customizing for each particular opening in the home,” Jill said. Butler most often depends on local custom manufacturers for the actual doors. “They manufacture the products, then we custom hang them,” Jill said. “And we have our own custom stainer so we can stain all of our wood products.” Butler built its offices and showroom on Tucson’s far eastside 20 years ago, completing the structure in April 1996. Jill has worked for the company, formerly owned by the sisters’ parents, Dean and Margie Woodard, for 22 years; and Robin, for 17 years. The founder of the company was Tucson businessman Mark Butler, a nationally recognized door and home builder. The company has been in the Tucson area for about 30 years. In January 2015, Robin and Jill purchased the company. They said if anything, being female entrepreneurs is an advantage. Clients are happy to be working with women, Jill said. “The gender gap is gone. It’s really disappeared over the past 20 years.”

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

WOMEN WHO LEAD

From left

Robin Woodward & Jill Woodward Co-Owners Butler Custom Doors Spring 2017

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WOMEN WHO LEAD

Ginny L. Clements PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Community Leader & Philanthropist

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BizPHILANTHROPY

Clements, Donors Make Academic Center a Reality

PHOTOS: COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA’S NEW ACADEMIC CENTER

By Steve Rivera The idea came to Ginny L. Clements as she was shown around the University of Arizona’s new Academic Center. At the time, what Senior Associate Athletic Director Erika Barnes wanted was perhaps a donation for a room in what is a 15,000-square-foot building. Clements, a Tucson community leader and philanthropist, saw a need and, well, made the commitment – and one much larger than expected, donating $3 million to the project. “Bill (her late husband) started the Golden Eagle Awards and it was about academics and athletics. To honor him and to continue his legacy of academics and all that it represents, I just decided it was something I felt comfortable with and would like to do,” said Clements, whose family has helped UA overall and with UA’s academics specifically over the last 40 years. “And because I felt a good feeling when I visited the center on that first tour, I decided this was the right thing to do,” she said. Clements donated the lead gift for what is now called the Ginny L. Clements Academic Center. “When much is given to, much should be given to others. I have been very blessed,” she said. One morning while visiting the building that cost $7.25 million, she greeted student-athletes randomly. Some knew her, others didn’t. “What you’re doing is building aca-

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demia into these young people who we get so excited about when they play their sports,” Clements said. “They get the applause and jubilation and all that. That’s important, too. But this will carry them on for the rest of their lives.” It’s a major reason she said, “I’m pretty proud of this.” As she and UA should be. Clearly, UA officials appreciate what she has done in the past and present. “We were overwhelmed by Ginny’s generosity,” said Barnes, who has been appointed UA’s interim athletic direc-

What you’re doing is building academia into these young people who we get so excited about when they play their sports.

– Ginny L. Clements Community Leader & Philanthropist

tor with the departure of Greg Byrne. “Not only did Ginny want to support our academic efforts, but she chose to contribute at a level that allowed us

to cover the total project cost through private funds. We are so appreciative as it will benefit all current and future student-athletes.” Clement’s donation, along with a $2.5-million gift from Andrew and Kirsten Braccia, a $1 million commitment from Dr. David Lapan and family, $500,000 from Steve and Margot Kerr’s previously announced $1 million donation, and a $500,000 anonymous donation funded the center. Overall the project took about 14 months from the start of design to occupancy of the building, which is a pretty aggressive track, said Brian Fitzpatrick, construction executive for Mortenson Construction. Ninety percent of the work – which topped out at about 70 workers – came from Pima County with 98 percent coming from Arizona businesses. “Overall just a fantastic example of collaboration by all those involved to deliver a facility that furthers the mission of C.A.T.S. and the university to support the success of student-athletes in the classroom and beyond,” Fitzpatrick said. The practical-but-nice two-story building sits just across Fred Enke Drive from McKale Center and on the north end of Kindall Field/Frank Sancet Stadium where the UA football team practices. The building brings studentcontinued on page 52 >>>

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BizPHILANTHROPY continued from page 51 athletes together to assist in academics in a more one-onone approach with more privacy than in the past. “We’re so grateful to be here,” said Marisol Quiroz, associate director of student development. “We’re able to accommodate so many. We were able to multipurpose the best we could with the space we had (in the old area).” But it clearly outgrew the area. The new building houses life skills, sports psychology and personal-development services as well as the C.A.T.S. Academics staff, which is made up of 14 full-time staff members, including six academic counselors, five learning specialists and administrative staff. In addition, the full-time academic staff is supplemented by six part-time assistant learning specialists and approximately 60 student tutors/mentors. The facility isn’t your mom or dad’s study table. Less than 20 years ago and as recently as last year, study tables were in coach’s offices or in the bowels of McKale where so many student-athletes had to spend time in cramped quarters where privacy was nonexistent, with small rooms, few necessities and lots of day-to-day traffic. “We’ve come a long way,” Barnes said, laughing. “What an opportunity they have. It’s just so wonderful for their educational experience.” Barnes had to deal with the cramped quarters in as much as she was a former standout UA softball player. Clearly, the space and comfort was needed in that UA was outgrowing the space it had in McKale. “Prior to the new facility, our academic, life skills and sport psychologist were all located in different parts of McKale,” said John Mosbach, associate athletics director for C.A.T.S. Academics. Now, being housed under one roof allows the student a “one-stop shop” experience that is efficient for the students and staff. “We’re excited, encouraged,” Mosbach said. “I don’t know if there are enough adjectives to explain how the staff and student-athletes feel. One that is definitely felt is appreciative.” C.A.T.S. Academics facilitates close to 1,000 hours of academic appointments weekly for more than 500 studentathletes on campus. “I definitely see a difference with the students. There is higher volume of traffic in this center compared to McKale and one of the main reasons is because of the extra space and diverse learning environments,” Mosbach said. “Another area that has gotten great reviews from students is the upgraded technology. Many of our computers were getting fairly old in the previous space and with the building came an entirely new allotment of computers. Also, it’s just a cool, fresh space with amazing natural light and great views.” Student-athletes are spending more time in the facility, Mosbach said, because of its comfort and it’s the place to connect with other student-athletes. There are a total of 41 rooms, which includes staff offices and student spaces. Just as important is the equipment where 70 new computers are in use. “Our department’s number one goal and principle,” Mosbach said, “is to graduate student-athletes and this facility is certainly going to help with that goal.”

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BizART

Perfect Place

Madaras Feels at Home in New Gallery on Swan By David Petruska Popular Tucson artist Diana Madaras has found the perfect place for her namesake Madaras Gallery on Swan Road. After 12 years in the Skyline Gallery on the corner of Skyline Drive and Campbell Avenue, and after operating a smaller place for much longer at 1535 E. Broadway, the new gallery at 3035 N. Swan Road is a perfect fit to consolidate all of Madaras’ retail operations. “We love the new gallery,” Madaras said of the former Rochelle Rubin Design Resource building. “It shows the art and Southwest gifts so beautifully and is a wonderful central location.” Madaras is a colorist who paints

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in both watercolor and acrylic and is known for her desert landscapes and expressionistic portraits. The new gallery is just the right setting for her work and the work of about a dozen guest artists. The space features a combination of a large entry with high ceilings, a fireplace, dramatic niches, small intimate rooms and a designer bathroom. It has parking for more than 100 cars since it shares parking lots with other businesses in the complex, so there’s plenty of room for special events like the fashion show held there last month. The next big event is the Annual AllArtist Show on March 24 from 5 to 7 p.m., featuring small paintings and min-

iatures of 10 Madaras Gallery artists including new works by Madaras. It has been a hectic 12 months for Madaras and her husband, Miro Tymosiak. The move to the Swan Road location was influenced by a rent increase and the Broadway widening project. The new gallery opened last October, but it had its grand opening celebration on Feb. 12. “When our rent at Gallery Row increased, Miro and I began considering other options,” she said. “After much searching, we identified the Rochelle Rubin building as a perfect fit for us.” Madaras had known Rubin for more than 35 years and decided to call and

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PHOTOS: COURTESY MADARAS GALLERY

ask if she’d consider selling the building. “She stunned me when she said that just last night she’d decided to sell. We quickly made a deal and three months later, we had a new home.” Madaras held off having the grand opening until both galleries had merged into the Swan Road location. After a 10-year wait, the City of Tucson finally purchased the Broadway gallery as part of the Broadway widening project. The Skyline Gallery location closed in September and the Broadway gallery closed on Jan. 1. “I never thought I’d move two galleries in one year,” she said. “Now, we have one retail location and are very happy about that.” The gallery had its first show in late October, but sadly, during the show, Madaras found out that Rubin had died. “Rochelle built the building 20 years ago and it was her pride and joy, so we dedicated the building to her at the grand opening.”

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BizTOOLKIT

A New Level of Workforce Readiness By Melissa Vito

I recently joined a team of key administrators from the University of Arizona to meet Phoenix business leaders. We were eager to learn about the needs of businesses looking to relocate to our state – and how we could serve those needs. One of the Phoenix reps sat forward and revealed that corporations today cared less about things like business costs and supply chains. Today, their biggest concerns were the quality of the talent pipeline and an educated workforce. I’m proud to say that the UA anticipated these needs several years ago and developed solutions to address them. We’ve put talent at the core of our efforts and we are now seeing those efforts come to life for students and employers alike. 100% Engagement Initiative

Simply put, our goal is to make UA graduates the most competitive in the career and graduate-school markets. Our 100% Engagement commitment ensures that every student learns and applies skills imperative for career success – such as communication, problem-solving, critical thinking and project management – before they graduate, thereby creating success on the job from Day One. This is a new level of workforce readiness. Students can conduct research with faculty, complete an internship, launch a business, study abroad, or pursue any idea that meets the criteria of the program. Each engaged learning activity has the rigor of an upper-division class and meets specific outcomes that employers tell us they want. Upon completion, these students graduate with a notation on their academic transcript that certifies these personal and professional skills. No other top-25 public research institution is willing to make this commitment to its students. Since launching in 2015, nearly 5,200 students have graduated with these notations. This semester alone nearly 3,700 more are set to join their ranks. But how do we know 100% Engagement is working? According to one national survey, just 23 percent of employers report that recent college graduates are well prepared to apply knowledge and skills in the real world. At the UA, 92 percent of employers rate our grads with the skills needed to succeed on the job – a 70-percent difference. On top of that, continued on page 58 >>> 56 BizTucson

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BizTOOLKIT continued from page 56 89 percent of employers rate UA grads as exceeding the quality of their peers. It’s no exaggeration when we say that we’ve found a better way to fill the talent pipeline for Tucson and Arizona. UA Online and Continuing Professional Development

We also make it easy for businesses to turn their talents into a competitive advantage. With UA Online, we’ve collaborated with employers to deliver our world-class education to their employees in a customized, flexible way that matches the needs of “Workplace Wildcats.” We deliver the same UA on-campus professors, classes and degrees through a customer-focused system – which makes implementing and supporting employee education goals simple and straightforward. After just one year, the results speak for themselves. UA Online ranked in the top tier of U.S. News & World Report’s Best Online Bachelor’s Programs. Whether an employee wants to finish or start a full, four-year undergraduate degree, earn an advanced or graduate degree, obtain company/industry certifications, or simply participate in noncredit enrichment classes, the UA Online Corporate Initiative provides employers a comprehensive workforceeducation solution. We’ve partnered with GEICO to provide business degrees to their full-time employees. We worked directly with Caterpillar to create a custom master’s degree for their leaders. The Salt River Project and, most recently, Cox Communications also have established partnerships with the UA to help thousands of employees complete degrees, develop new skills and attain their long-term business objectives. Next quarter, you’ll hear from Kimberly Espy, senior VP for research, who will share additional initiatives designed to make the UA an energetic and fundamental partner in the economic growth of Tucson. Melissa Vito, a Tucson native and lifelong Wildcat, is University of Arizona senior VP for student affairs and enrollment engagement, as well as senior vice provost for academic initiatives and student success. Biz 58 BizTucson

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

BizHONORS Last year, Cox employees volunteered over 14,000 hours and contributed more than $100,000 through employee giving and Cox Charities grants in Southern Arizona.

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Tucson Values Teachers Spirit of Education Award Honoree

Cox Honored with ‘Spirit of Education’ Award Presented by Tucson Values Teachers By Valerie Vinyard When subscribers to Cox cable flip on the television, education probably isn’t at the top of their minds. Yet the roots of Cox Communications are in the classroom – which makes it fitting that the company is one of this year’s Spirit of Education recipients through Tucson Values Teachers. On April 6, Cox will receive the annual award during the “Stand Up for Teachers” event at the Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa. The company traces its history back to 1898, founded by Gov. James M. Cox, who served three terms as governor of Ohio. He got his start as a teacher. “As a result, Cox education is more than just a commitment – it is a way of life for our employees and our business,” said Lisa Lovallo, Southern Arizona market VP of Cox Communications. Lovallo said Cox Communications was one of the founding members of Tucson Values Teachers and has had a representative serving on its board since its inception. Today, Cox is the third-largest cable provider in the nation. In addition to providing telecommunications products, the company offers advanced digital video programming services, local and long-distance telephone services, high-speed internet and commercial and data services through Cox Business. Cox provides cable TV service and internet access to schools and libraries and has invested more than $100 million through cash and in-kind resources to improve education since 1989. In Southern Arizona, Cox invests $2 million annually to support the programs and initiatives that are most important to the company, including education. Katie Rogerson, COO for TVT, said the organization looks for businesses that go above and beyond to support education – and Cox fits the bill. She said that Cox was chosen because of its commitment to helping people get connected and bridging the digital divide. She said the company helps ensure that all students have access to the technology that helps students excel. “We know that the future is driven by technology, and at Cox, we believe that it is vitally important that kids have the opportunity to be connected and have access to the latest digital advances,” Lovallo said. “We work hard every day, with our local school partners, to enable access to the best technology products and services that we offer.” Cox supports education in many ways including:

Connect2Compete program: Cox launched Connect2Compete nationally in Tucson in partnership with the Sunnyside School District. The program provides high-

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speed internet access to low-income families. Families with K-12 children who participate in the National Free/Reduced School Lunch program are eligible. Last year, Cox expanded the program to include ConnectHome for children who receive public housing support, and this year, the company plans to launch new partnerships.

Technology centers: Over 12 technology centers in Southern Arizona are available for students to access the internet, work on computers and receive training and homework support. These tech centers are particularly important for students who have no internet access at home. Locations include Boys & Girls Clubs, Big Brothers Big Sisters and Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona.

ArizonaOn: Cox formed a partnership with Gov. Doug Ducey and community organizations to establish ArizonaOn, which helps low-income families, supports education and raises awareness of access to internet solutions.

Overall support: Cox is a longtime supporter of local school districts, including Sunnyside School Foundation, TUSD’s Education Enrichment Foundation and the Vail School District. Cox also partners with the University of Arizona’s AZ Assurance program to help students who want to go to college have the opportunity to achieve their dreams.

Cox also encourages its employees to get involved. Last year, Cox employees volunteered over 14,000 hours and contributed more than $100,000 through employee giving and Cox Charities grants in Southern Arizona. Cox can’t do it alone, Lovallo said. Cox is grateful for the help from its many partnerships, including the Boys & Girls Club, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Pima County Public Library and the Children’s Museum Tucson. Lovallo said receiving the TVT award validates Cox’s commitment to education that is so firmly embedded in its values. “Our employees are proud of the recognition of the contributions that we are making every day. At our heart, we believe in delivering life’s most important connections – and education is truly one of the most important connections in a community.” In the future, Cox plans to expand its community partnerships that support local education programs and the needs of the residents. “We will continue to celebrate and champion that entrepreneurial spirit and commitment to education that Gov. Cox first set forward and now embodies in our employees and their values,” Lovallo said. Biz Spring 2017

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

BizHONORS

Trustees of the Thomas R. Brown Foundations Back row from left

Sarah Smallhouse, Gerald Swanson, John Carter, Michael Hard, Mary Bernal Front row seated from left

Jack Jewett, Shaun A. Kirkpatrick.

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Tucson Values Teachers Spirit of Education Award Honoree

Economics Essentials For Everyone

Brown Foundations to Receive Spirit of Education Award By Valerie Vinyard Economics can be a tough – and some might even say, boring – subject to absorb for students. But it’s an essential one. And that’s where the Thomas R. Brown Foundations come in. The foundations’ mission is to advance the use of economic principles in public and private decision-making through strategic partnerships and educational programs. The Brown Foundations were formed by the Brown family in the late 1990s. They are part of the legacy of Thomas Brown and Burr-Brown Research Corporation, which was the multibillion dollar semiconductor firm Brown co-founded in Tucson in 1956, took public in 1983, and sold to Texas Instruments in 2000. Because of Brown’s impact and importance to Southern Arizonans, the foundation will be one of the recipients of the Spirit of Education Award. The award is given by Tucson Values Teachers and the Tucson business community to honor commitment and investment in education for Southern Arizona. The Stand Up for Teachers awards event will take place April 6 at the Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa. The foundations were formed to help educators in Southern Arizona through funding and support. They invest in programs that will create the conditions for success, such as in education and workforce development. Sarah Smallhouse, CEO of the foundations, said they are dedicated to doing something of value for mankind, starting in Southern Arizona. “We believe there is nothing more important for individuals, or for society at large, than education,” she said. “Education is the key to unlocking opportunity, expanding productivity, enriching life and building healthy communities. We honor teachers in their noble role as educators, and we are certainly honored to receive this award.” Smallhouse has a full complement of degrees herself: a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Washington, an MBA from the University of Arizona, and an MPA from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. “Teachers are the heart and soul of the education system,” Smallhouse said. “They interface with each new class of students. We think it is a wise investment to support ongoing education, professional development and industry exposure for our classroom teachers.” Katie Rogerson, COO of Tucson Values Teachers, said the foundations have helped Southern Arizonans in a variety of ways. www.BizTucson.com

“The Brown Family Foundation has been a huge contributor to our Teachers in Industry program,” said Rogerson, citing the foundations’ tuition expenses were paid for people earning a master’s from UA. “We wanted to thank and recognize them.” Smallhouse believes the Teachers in Industry program is a fitting example of how the foundations fulfill their mission. Because the Arizona curriculum requires teaching economics from kindergarten through high school, the foundations’ goal is to equip teachers to increase student exposure to fundamental principles of economics in a neutral way. It’s also to help students develop an appreciation of how economic analysis applies to everyday choices and other issues. “The foundations invest in programs that will create the conditions for similar success stories to emerge today,” Smallhouse said. “That means a strong focus on education and workforce development. The Teachers in Industry program fits perfectly with these aims.” Economics plays into this, too. When the teachers participate in summer programs, they also receive compensation. Being that teaching jobs across the board tend not to be highpaying, every little bit helps. “We like the fact their income can be increased through summer employment,” Smallhouse said. The foundations do that through K-12 workshops and seminars where teachers are provided with classroom-ready materials. A rotating schedule of workshops covers practical teaching skills and economics in interdisciplinary topics such as history and civics. The foundations have offered these workshops for 12 years, and they have expanded to serve all of Southern Arizona, from Yuma to Safford. Some of the foundations’ ongoing programs include an Economics Book Club for Teachers and luncheons that feature speakers. Other events have ranged from last year’s Macro Fun N’ Games, a six-part series called The Mathematics of Economics and a workshop called the Best of the Federal Reserve. “The Brown family believes that investing in teachers is the best way to systemically improve not only their professional experience, but also the quality of instruction students receive,” Smallhouse said. For more information on the foundations and their programs, go to www.brownfoundations.org/

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BizCOMMUNITY

Tucson Medical Center Donates $500,000 to Tucson’s Jan. 8th Memorial

IMAGE: COURTESY TUCSON’S JANUARY 8TH MEMORIAL

By Elena Acoba Tucson Medical Center has donated $500,000 toward the fundraising effort to construct Tucson’s Jan. 8th Memorial at the Pima County Courthouse. The memorial gardens and gathering spaces will honor the victims killed and injured when a gunman opened fire at a 2011 public event by then-U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. She was among 13 people who were wounded. Six people were killed that day. “This memorial will serve as a symbol of the better selves we were when we came together – often with people we didn’t know – to mourn, to work toward more civil discourse and to embrace the hope and promise of the future,” said Judy Rich, TMC president and CEO. “It is our honor, on behalf of our staff and all of the people we serve, to be in a position to help support the creation of this important space to commemorate this shared community experience 64 BizTucson

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that touched ‒ and changed ‒ so many lives.” TMC’s donation helped initiate the fundraising effort by Tucson’s January 8th Foundation for the construction phase of the memorial project. The majority of the design-selection process and initial design phases have been paid through private funds. Another $5 million is needed to complete construction of the memorial and gardens. “TMC has had a longstanding commitment to building community and caring for the health of the people who live here,” said Dot Kret, president of Tucson’s January 8th Foundation. “We are very pleased to join them in establishing this common place that will be a meaningful space of remembrance for those who were touched by the immediacy of the event, as well as those who will come after us.”

On Jan. 8, 2011, Rich was flying to Washington D.C. when she learned of the shooting, she recalled in an article in the foundation’s winter 2016 newsletter. She got in touch with TMC staff and “began planning to offer grief counseling sessions throughout the community,” she said. In the ensuing years, TMC has sponsored running and wellness events in honor of Giffords’ aide Gabriel Zimmerman ‒ who died in the shooting ‒ as part of Beyond, an annual series of events that commemorate Jan. 8. TMC’s donation will be recognized along the memorial gardens walk, an oval-shaped path that leads visitors past gardens, a memorial wall and water feature. Other naming opportunities include gardens, trees, pavers, lanterns and donor plaques. Biz For more information, contact the foundation, 393-8317, www.tucsonsmemorial.org. www.BizTucson.com


SPECIAL REPORT 2017

THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

TOWN OF

MARANA BUSINESS FRIENDLY & GROWING FAST

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL PHOTO: SEAN PARKER PHOTOGRAPHY

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Ed Stolmaker President & CEO Marana Chamber of Commerce

Ryan Mahoney Development Services Director Town of Marana

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BizCOMMUNITY

Open for Business in Marana

Resorts, Retail and Infrastructure Boost Onetime Farming Community

PHOTOS: COURTESY TOWN OF MARANA

By David Pittman

It’s easy for anyone passing through Marana without getting off at any of the town’s six freeway exits to view the community as a wide-open, rural stretch of desert and cotton fields on the way to Tucson. While Marana is extremely spread out and has enormous swaths of open, undeveloped land, those drive-by views are deceiving. According to a July 2016 population estimate by the Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity, Marana has the second-highest population of any incorporated area in Pima County at just over 43,000, and is the fastest growing community in Southern Arizona. Greg Wexler is a real estate developer, property manager, consultant and entrepreneur with widespread business interests in Marana, Oro Valley and northern Pima County. He is among a growing group who believe Marana is destined for decades of strong economic growth. “Marana has an airport, an interstate highway running through it and huge amounts of developable land,” Wexler said. Curt Woody, director of Marana’s Economic Development & Tourism Department, is also confident the town will be the primary growth area in the Tucson region for many years. “Marana’s location, near Tucson and on the way to Phoenix, is ideal,” he said. “Nineteen miles of I-10, a major artery of the Sun Corridor, bisects the town. Marana contains 122 square miles

of land and has thousands of acres to develop.” Marana has been No. 1 in Pima County in issuing single-family residential housing permits three of the last four years. “People who haven’t explored Marana lately would be surprised at what a significant town it is becoming,” said David Mehl, president and owner of Cottonwood Properties and the masterplanner of Dove Mountain, the high-end, 6,200acre residential community located in the foothills of the Tortolita Mountains and within the Marana town limits. “Marana’s mayor (Ed Honea), the Town Council and the town manager (Gilbert Davidson) have put in place progressive, pro-business policies,” Mehl said. “It is a very encouraging community toward business that is seeking positive quality growth. Our experience in working with the town has been extremely positive.” Cottonwood Properties and HSL Properties, one of the region’s other prominent developers, purchased The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain resort for $45.5 million last June. The only Forbes five-star hotel in Arizona continues to be managed under contract by The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Co. “We had a record year in 2016 at The RitzCarlton and our advanced bookings indicate this year will be even better,” Mehl said. The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain and the continued on page 73 >>> Spring 2017

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

BizCOMMUNITY

Gilbert Davidson Town Manager Town of Marana

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Marana Regional Airport have been discovered by the rich and famous in the worlds of technology, politics, finance and banking who are regularly flying their private jets into the airport and using the hotel for meetings and conferences. “I think most of the major corporate business leaders of innovative high-tech companies have been guests at our hotel,” Mehl said. “These executives are flying private jets into Marana to visit our resort because they are seeking an exclusive location with great amenities that also offers privacy. The economy is improving and our reputation is growing. The Ritz-Carlton is also doing a great job of managing the hotel. We are very pleased.” HSL Properties already owns a 272unit luxury apartment complex in Marana at 4688 W. Tangerine Road, and will soon build a second. “We are hoping to break ground in May or early June on a 304-unit luxury complex in Continental Ranch, adjacent to Quarry Pines Golf Course,” said HSL President Omar Mireles, adding, Marana “is a great place to do business” and is destined for substantial growth. “The rules of engagement are very clear in Marana and they have a very professional staff,” he said. “You know exactly what to expect. Marana has a lot of room to expand and we see it as a growth area. It is the gateway to Tucson from Phoenix and the north. Demographic reports, as far as Arizona is concerned, indicate a nexus of growth is Casa Grande. Eventually that area will probably all be connected as one large metro.” Davidson, Marana’s town manager, said development of Dove Mountain and The Ritz-Carlton has been “transformative” for Marana and described Mehl as “an incredible visionary.” Cottonwood Properties started development of Dove Mountain in 1996. The Ritz-Carlton resort opened 13 years later. “The addition of one of the finest resorts in the entire country into Marana has been a blessing,” Davidson said. “Prior to The Ritz-Carlton, we owned a nice little airport. But today it has taken on a life of its own because of www.BizTucson.com

The Ritz-Carlton and the jet traffic flying into Marana that previously didn’t exist. Some of the wealthiest business leaders in the world are using our airport to get to The Ritz-Carlton. “When Hillary Clinton addressed leaders from Goldman Sachs before she announced her candidacy for president, that speech was not given in New York or Los Angeles, but here in Marana at The Ritz-Carlton,” he said. Davidson regards the Marana Regional Airport as an economic development tool for the town to take advantage of. “There are people flying into our airport who have never been to the Sonoran Desert before and their first experience is here in the Tortolita Mountain area with its beautiful vistas and desert topography,” he said. “It’s very exciting. Growth is creating new opportunities that nobody could have possibly envisioned. If you had said 20 years ago that this activity was going to be happening in Marana, most people would have probably chuckled.” The town’s retail portfolio got a major boost when Tucson Premium Outlets opened in the fourth quarter of 2015 on the south side of Twin Peaks Road between I-10 and Linda Vista Boulevard. The 366,000-square-foot, open-air mall is owned by Simon Property Group, a global leader in retail real estate and an S&P 100 company. The mall features about 100 well-known brands, including Adidas, Banana Republic, Bebe, Brooks Brothers, Calvin Klein, Disney, Forever 21, Nike and Tommy Hilfiger. The Premium Outlets was the first project built at Marana Center, a 170acre, planned regional destination designed for shopping, dining, entertainment, hotels, auto dealerships, medical services and other commercial purposes. David Scholl, a partner of Vintage Partners, a Phoenix company that develops properties throughout Arizona, worked directly with the Town of Marana in developing the outlet mall. He said Marana’s reputation for being business friendly is well-deserved. “I’ve been developing projects for 30 years and one of the top experiences continued on page 74 >>> Spring 2017

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BizCOMMUNITY

TOP 10 EMPLOYERS IN MARANA Sargent Aerospace FLSmidth Krebs MHC Healthcare TRICO Electric Coca Cola Comcast Lasertel Ridgetop Engineering International Towers, Inc.

continued from page 73 I’ve ever had in working with a municipality was in Marana building the Premium Outlets mall,” Scholl said. “Marana officials and their staffs were talented, dedicated and entrepreneurial. They also displayed a great sense of urgency in working with us to ensure tight deadlines we were facing were met.” The mall opened Oct. 1, 2015, on schedule and in time for that year’s Christmas season. “A lot of cities don’t care about construction deadlines, but the Town of Marana was committed to working with us to deliver results,” Scholl said. “That is not to say they roll over and let you do whatever you want. They have a lofty vision of what they want their city to look like and they require those standards to be adhered to.” Scholl said the town provided a permanent inspection team that met with builders and developers on a regular basis to iron out potential difficulties and help shepherd the project to completion. “They were hardworking, accessible and creative problem-solvers,” he said. 74 BizTucson

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Scholl believes the attitude will help Marana continue to grow toward a bright future. “The Town of Marana has done great planning and has a great vision for the community,” he said. “It is located on the I-10 corridor and has an excellent offering of homes, beautiful mountain views and the quality of life people are looking for. It’s an attractive place to call home.” Davidson said it is now customary for town staff to embrace business and assist new projects in getting up and running as much as possible. “We understood this was going to be a revenue-producing development that was going to bring significant sales tax revenue for our community, which could be used for public safety, roads or parks,” he said. “So the sooner we could get them open, the better it was for all of us. When you get people thinking about how to speed things up without sacrificing regulatory standards, it’s amazing how much time you can shave off a project.” The Arizona Pavilions, a well-established large shopping area on Cortaro Road just west of I-10, also continues

to thrive in Marana’s business environment. New stores opening at Arizona Pavilions include T.J. Maxx, Ross, Petco, HomeGoods and Dollar Tree. Two eateries, Taco Bell and Dunkin’ Donuts, were added at the Pavilions last year. Although Arizona Pavilions has a couple of pads still available, the shopping center is nearly built out and fully occupied. To support the growth, Marana has committed itself to improving its infrastructure, including a new Marana Police Department headquarters located at the Marana Municipal Complex. Construction is expected to begin in May and be completed in 2018. The new police facility – which will include holding facilities, an indoor shooting range, and high-tech officer training facilities – is expected to cost $21 million with $18 million raised through a four-year, half-cent sales tax approved by Marana voters. Mayor Honea said Marana residents overwhelmingly approved the sales tax increase because “they love our police department and the job being done by Police Chief Terry Rozema.” Rozema continued on page 76 >>> www.BizTucson.com

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The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain


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BizCOMMUNITY MARANA EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES

Marana Events & Festivals

2017 Schedule Marana Founders’ Day March 25, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., parade at 10 a.m., Ora Mae Harn Park Star Spangled Spectacular July 4, 5-9 p.m., Crossroads at Silverbell District Park Marana Cotton Festival October 21, 4-9 p.m., Marana Heritage River Park Marana Holiday Festival & Christmas Tree Lighting December 2, 3-8 p.m., Municipal Complex Roundabout Christmas on the Farm Post Farm, check wwww.maranachristmasonthefarm.com for dates Egg Nog Jog 5K New Year’s Day 2018, 8:30-11 a.m. Other Outdoor Activities Guided Hikes Wild Burro Trail and Tortolita Mountains. Second Saturday of the month, hikes and start times vary Major Shopping Districts Tucson Premium Outlets at Marana Center 6401 W. Marana Center Blvd. Arizona Pavilions 5755 W. Pavilions Drive Live Music/Movies in the Park Visit www.maranaevents.com for listings and locations Southern Arizona Arts and Cultural Alliance Free music series at Premium Outlets, every Saturday evening. Visit www.saaca.org for entertainment schedule Parks and Recreation Many activities and venues are available in Marana, including ball fields, basketball, volleyball, tennis, swimming, cycling and trails. Visit www.maranaaz.gov/recreation

For details on all events and activities, visit www.maranaaz.gov

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continued from page 74 was hired by Marana after nearly 24 years with the Tucson Police Department. “We did our due diligence before the sales tax increase went to the Town Council,” Honea said. “We went to the Chamber of Commerce and they fully supported the effort. We went to every HOA and talked to people. We went to Simon Malls, Home Depot, Lowes, Costco and all the big taxpayers and they told us one reason they do business here is because they feel safe. They said, ‘Build it.’ ” Davidson said the town is constantly looking to the future and preparing for it by creating the infrastructure needed for growth. He said Marana recently spent a great deal of time and money on wet utilities, such as water, sewer and sewage treatment. “You are not going to get any growth if you don’t have the water resources and we have a long-term strategic view on managing our water resources,” he said. The town acquired a wastewater treatment facility from Pima County following a long and contentious legal dispute that finally led to a settlement agreement. Marana wanted the treatment plant because by controlling effluent, or treated wastewater, and recharging it into the aquifer, the town can earn credits from the state that allow it to pump more groundwater and secure water needed for future development. Getting into the wastewater business has required significant investment from the town. In addition to buying the Pima County plant and all its conveyances at a cost of $21 million, Marana decided to upgrade the old plant and build a new one next door for $22 million for a total cost of $43 million. “There will be some elements that we will keep from the old plant, but for the most part it is going to be a whole different type of design,” Davidson said. “We are upgrading our wastewater facilities and expanding its capacity.” While Davidson acknowledges the price is high, he said it is worth every penny because water costs will rise significantly in the future and Marana is now in a much better position to control its growth destiny. Two major road projects are underway in Marana: an overpass on Ina Road over I-10 and extensive improvements to a 10-mile stretch of Tangerine Road from I-10 to La Cañada Drive. The overpass at Ina Road will also clear the Union Pacific Railroad tracks, which carry between 40 to 60 trains daily. Construction, continued on page 78 >>> www.BizTucson.com


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BizCOMMUNITY continued from page 76 which began last year, will cost $148 million and is being funded by the Regional Transportation Authority. In addition, the Town of Marana is providing $25 million for work that will widen Ina Road and reconstruct Ina Road bridges over the Santa Cruz River west of I-10. Honea said Marana will assist Ina Road businesses in any way it can to mitigate problems associated with the two-year closing of the interchange. The town has developed a “Project Ina” app to keep up with traffic alerts and news about affected business. The first phase of the Tangerine Road project, a five-mile segment from Dove Mountain Boulevard/Twin Peaks Road to La Cañada Drive, is well underway and is expected to be completed in 2018. Marana, Pima County and Oro Valley each share a portion of the Tangerine Road Corridor and are working together on the project with the Town of Marana as the lead agency. Concontinued on page 80 >>>

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Residents Tell Their Stories As Marana celebrates its 40-year anniversary throughout 2017, town leaders are offering residents and business owners a chance to share what is special to them about Marana through its “40 Years of Stories and 40 Years of Faces” online campaign. Following are a few edited samples. More can be found at www.maranaaz.gov/40-years. “This past summer, I went to New York City to compete in the National High School Musical Theatre Awards. I go to Marana High School. I was given the pleasure and opportunity to work with several Broadway professionals. This is something I’m very proud of because I went representing my town and my school. My town is part of who I am and where I come from.” − Sarah Chico, age 17 “I love our small-town feel, our gorgeous desert sunsets, and the many diverse families you see sharing in laughter at community parks that surround our neighborhoods. Marana is a unique town filled with compassionate people and an ever-growing population. My wish for Marana is for us to continue growing and nurturing our strong sense of community. Our children are our future, and in Marana we value our next generation of compassionate and innovative thinkers.” − Amber Jones, age 34 “I was born at Tucson Medical Center and raised in Marana. The amazing education I received at Twin Peaks Elementary School, Marana Middle School and Marana High School helped me to win a scholarship to Northern Arizona University. I am currently a double-science major. My hometown has helped me be successful in an academic environment, and I will always be grateful. I love my hometown!” − Rachel Linker, age 21


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BizCOMMUNITY continued from page 78 struction will widen the roadway to four lanes with landscaped medians, and will install turning lanes, eliminate dips in the road, and provide facilities for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Ed Stolmaker, president and CEO of the Marana Chamber of Commerce, said widening Tangerine Road “will improve a major arterial corridor that is already viewed as a promising area for future growth.” While the economic outlook for Marana appears rosy, the town does face some unique economic development challenges. Incorporated in 1977 by local farming interests to protect their water rights, the new town had no Main Street, no downtown and no central core, and instead consisted of pockets of population centers, farms, ranches, desert and a few small, isolated neighborhoods. A long-term goal of Marana planners is to develop the town into a single community, rather than distinct, spread-out pockets of development currently referred to as “activity centers.”

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“The economic development plan we are going to be rolling out very soon is going to address how we make this a great place to invest and attract the people and businesses that will provide the infill to complete that mosaic,” Davidson said. Marana has developed a plan for a future downtown to be located in north Marana in the area where the town’s municipal complex and health center are located west of I-10 near Marana Road. However, much greater population density is needed before the Downtown Activity Center can flourish. “Downtown Marana as currently envisioned is a large activity center, identified as part of the council-approved single central business district,” says the town’s “Economic Roadmap,” unveiled in 2010 and updated in October 2015. “This area can include a variety of development areas tied together with unifying design features and a multimodal transportation network that might include a trolley or other form of transit and pedestrian system.”

Other activity identified in the Roadmap include The Dove Mountain Activity Center, Tangerine Road I-10 Activity Center, Tangerine Corridor Activity Center, Airport Activity Center, Twin Peaks Activity Center and South Marana Activity Center, which takes in the mix of retail and commercial business along Ina, Thornydale and Orange Grove roads. Another activity center includes Pinal Airpark. “While currently out of the town’s corporate limits, this center’s proximity to I-10, Pinal Airpark and planned rail system improvements provides tremendous opportunities for intermodal transportation, logistics and freight activities,” the Roadmap said. “The future potential of this activity center may hinge upon the town’s decision to annex and its success in annexing all or part of the area. Even if this area does not become part of the Town of Marana, the regional impacts of successful development in this activity center could be very positive for Marana.”

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BizCOMMUNITY

Quality of Life a Community Effort Government & Residents Work Together

Linda Hampton Director Community Food Bank in Marana

Terry Rozema Police Chief Town of Marana

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The number of well-attended gatherings the Town of Marana organizes for its 43,000 citizens is testament to the sense of community that’s prevalent in this growing area north of Tucson. But it’s not just fun and games that inspire the homey cohesiveness here. It’s an all-in attitude that trickles down from the town’s leaders to the staff, and even organizations outside the government, that truly makes a difference in the quality of life. One of those public figures who is creating positive changes is Marana’s chief of police, Terry Rozema. Since arriving six years ago, he has transformed the culture of his police force and the department’s relationship with the public. Rozema has a different approach to policing than many law enforcement agents. He trains his officers to use all contacts with the public for strengthening community ties, rather than emphasizing an appearance of confrontation and authority. “When I first got here, there was a big push to write a lot of tickets. I’ve never been big on traffic enforcement through tickets, but I want to make a lot of stops because it changes behavior and instills goodwill toward the community.” Rozema said the difference is in how the officers conduct themselves, and if they have to write a ticket, he urges them to be compassionate. As a result of these changes in approach, in his first year as chief, Rozema saw the number of traf-

fic stops increase from 5,000 to 13,000 while the number of tickets written dropped from 14,000 to fewer than 1,000. Collisions decreased because traffic stops, not tickets, change drivers’ behaviors, according to Rozema’s philosophy. This relationship building also helped when Rozema needed money for a new police station. To fund the $21-million facility, the town needed to implement a half-cent sales-tax increase that will revert back once the money is raised. The Town Council voted overwhelmingly to approve the tax increase to raise $18 million of the needed funding, and groundbreaking for the new police station at the Municipal Complex campus will take place this summer. The Community Food Bank in Marana is a longtime leader in supporting the area’s citizens by distributing government-provided meals to qualifying families. Those in need of emergency food service who can show proof of county residency can pick up food one time a month, said the Food Bank’s director, Linda Hampton. “We also get private and retail food donations,” she said. “We can be more flexible with this, so they can come two times per month.” The requirement is that continued on page 84 >>>

BY THE NUMBERS Marana Cares Mobile Served 3,000 meals

October 2015 to December 2016 Kids eat free, parents pay $1

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PHOTOS: AMY HASKELL

By Christy Krueger


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Marana Unified School District Enrollment 2016-2017: 12,300 students 11 elementary schools 2 middle schools 2 high schools 1 alternative high school 1 ACE (Another Chance at Education) school – 8th grade and below

Doug Wilson Superintendent Marana Unified School District

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continued from page 82 they earn no more than 180 percent of the federal poverty level. With Marana’s recent uptick in business growth and higher-paying jobs, Hampton is noticing a decrease in need. Those numbers dropped from 3,000 per month two years ago to 2,700 now. “Our client base is declining and I hope it’s because they’re going back to work,” Hampton said. Her dream to expand services to help strengthen the community is becoming a reality, thanks to the donation of two portable offices. “We’re building a resource center so we can address the root causes of poverty,” she said. This will include assistance from Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse, the Diaper Bank and child nutritional education in the schools. Financial, budgeting and tax preparation help also will be offered. “Our community is very supportive of the Food Bank, including businesses, the Town of Marana and Chamber of Commerce. We want to make sure needs are met and we are building health for Marana,” Hampton said. When families are looking for a new community to settle into, one of the biggest priorities is often the quality of education. Having a solid educational system is important for a town like Marana that’s trying to grow. Marana Unified School District Superintendent Doug Wilson is serious about engaging students, parents and the community as a whole, as exemplified in his adaptation of a 21stcentury model of learning. Gladden Farms Elementary opened in August 2016 and already has 500 students enrolled in the 750-capacity school. It may become the standard of future Marana schools in both design and classroom curriculum. “We wanted the facility to be for the kids – one that can teach kids to be prepared for the future,” Wilson said. Quail Run and Gladden Farms are currently the only elementary schools in the state to initiate computer science programs. The reason this is important, Wilson said, is because by 2020 the need

for computer sciences jobs will be very high. “This will help them find well-paying jobs.” In the next two years he will add similar classes at the middle school and high school levels. Marana students also are being prepared for careers in such fields as automotive, biosciences, dentistry, aviation and others through the district’s Career and Technology Education and Joint Technical Education District. Wilson believes after-school programs are a great way to involve students in learning opportunities. “We have a full array of activities. We have an award-winning fine arts program, we have almost every sport,” he said. Approximately 750 students out of 1,100 enrolled in Marana’s middle schools are involved in afterschool activities. “We work hard to get the kids engaged.” While offering progressive schools for current and future residents is a priority for the school district, there are other ways in which the district works to be part of the community. School representatives occasionally meet with Town of Marana leaders to open communication between the two entities. “We both felt like partnerships would be advantageous,” Wilson said. “For the town to be vibrant, they need a relationship with the school district, and it’s important for us to share what we’re doing.” Another priority for Wilson is helping students maintain proper nutrition throughout the year. So he created Marana Cares Mobile, an old school bus repurposed as a food truck that feeds students in low-income areas during school vacations of one week or longer. A doctor is on board once a week to see kids with medical needs. Currently in his ninth year as superintendent, Wilson continues to outdo himself by regularly introducing innovative ways of teaching. But there’s one thing he feels must always be emphasized in educating kids. “It’s important to teach the love of learning,” he said. That will stay with them forever.

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

BY THE NUMBERS


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The Marana Town Council, from left, Patti Comerford, Jon Post, Carol McGorray, Herb Kai, Mayor Ed Honea, Roxanne Ziegler, and Dave Bowen.

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

BizGOVERNMENT


Business Has a Friend in Marana By David Pittman Greg Wexler, a real estate developer/consultant with wideMarana Mayor Ed Honea has history with the town he spread business interests in Marana, said the town is “progrescalls home and thus a personal interest in its evolution as a sive” and easy for business to work with. business-friendly community. “Mayor Ed Honea is a guy who is instrumental in seeing He is the third of five generations of Honeas who have lived in Marana. He worked for the postal service before retiring 10 things get done. Gilbert Davidson is absolutely great and the years ago. entire Town Council is united and works well together, which He has served on the Town Council for 30 years, 13 years is a formula for success,” Wexler said. “The mayor wants to as mayor. He was re-elected last year. see Marana evolve from a small farming community into a “My grandparents came here when my dad was a young very big place.” boy,” he said. “My grandfather Honea was a cotton farmer. In Curt Woody, director of Marana’s Economic Development fact, the original town hall was part of five acres of that farm.” & Tourism Department, said he considers the Town of MaraHonea’s late wife was the presina to be the most business-friendly dent and CEO of the Marana government entity in Pima County and responsibility for that starts Chamber of Commerce. He said four of Marana’s seven Town Counwith the town’s leadership. cil members belong to the chamber, “The Marana mayor and giving them a business-friendly perTown Council have a philosophy spective. of growth, but they want it to be “Most of the time our votes are smart growth that includes proper unanimous,” he said. “I think that’s planning and zoning,” Woody said. because the staff does extraordi“Just below that is the leadership nary due diligence on anything we at the staff level,” he said. “Gilbert do. We are kept in the loop, either Davidson drives a requirement of meeting individually with our town innovation and a culture of excelmanager, Gilbert Davidson, or other lence here. He does not want to opstaff members to get up to speed on erate this town like any other muexactly what is going on. Occasionnicipal entity, and he doesn’t want ally we’ll have a vote of 5-2 or 6-1, burdensome bureaucracy and red but our decisions are unanimous tape. He is always encouraging inpretty much.” novation out of the departments. Honea said self-interest has a If you are not innovating here, you great deal to do with Marana’s proare probably in the wrong place.” business attitude. Davidson said Marana has built “Marana doesn’t have a property a solid reputation for being busitax, so we are heavily reliant on sales ness-friendly, but that is something – Greg Wexler tax,” he said. “It is in our best interthe town should not take for grantReal Estate Developer & Consultant est to accommodate retail growth, ed or become complacent with. but we have also been very accommodating of job creation as “It is something you earn one business or one homeowner well. It’s a mutual benefit. Whether it’s the Town Council, the at a time,” he said. “You can do a good job, but if you mess up town manager and his staff, or the Chamber of Commerce, with just one person, that person will come away with a negawe are all really working hard to attract business to Marana.” tive view. We have to work incredibly hard for every customer. Members of the Marana Town Council are Honea, So you never completely own that reputation, it is always a Jon Post, Dave Bowen, Patti Comerford, Herb Kai, Carol work in progress.” Biz McGorray and Roxanne Ziegler.

Mayor Ed Honea is a guy who is instrumental in seeing things get done. Gilbert Davidson is absolutely great and the entire Town Council is united and works well together, which is a formula for success.

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Laura Cortelyou Tourism Manager Town of Marana

PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

Monique Meza Special Events Coordinator Town of Marana

Vickie Hathaway Communications Manager Town of Marana

PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

A new, 101-room Hampton Inn is expected to break ground in 2017 adjacent to the Tucson Premium Outlets.

Cynthia Nemethâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Briehn Parks & Recreation Director Town of Marana 88 BizTucson

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BizMILESTONE

Marana Turns 40

Tourists, Locals Take the Time to Explore Town When a community finds itself evolving as a result of rapid growth and purposeful management, it can take time for its new identity to catch up, especially in the eyes of outsiders. The Town of Marana’s tourism and marketing manager, Laura Cortelyou, sees the town as a jewel waiting to be discovered, and she’s working to make sure that’s exactly what happens – for locals and visitors alike. DiscoverMarana.org is the town’s biggest promotional tool. Less than two years old, the website is already winning awards. In July 2016, the Arizona Office of Tourism recognized the site by presenting the town with its Governor’s Tourism Award for Interactive Technology. Five months later the site won a Silver Adrian Award for Website Design, presented by Hospitality Sales and Marketing International. The website is a colorful guide to Marana’s numerous attractions and activities, from hiking, birding and shopping to golfing, dining and hospitality opportunities. Cortelyou’s most recent and perhaps most significant project is the launch of the Marana Gastronomy Tour in partnership with Gray Line Tours. She believes the new tour has the potential to put Marana on the agritainment and

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agritourism maps, playing on its ancient farming origins. “Marana has the oldest agricultural irrigation canal system found in North America,” Cortelyou said. “It is surrounded by mountains with lots of petroglyphs, and it all points to its long agricultural history, to the Hohokam and their predecessors. We have amazing layers of culture. Those following the cultural tourism trend may be surprised that Marana is a hotbed of archeological finds.” Curt Woody, Marana’s director of economic development and tourism, recounted archaeologists’ findings that the Santa Cruz River embankment is the longest continuously inhabited area in Arizona, possibly for as many as 5,000 years. Tour stops will include a look at local growers, such as BKW Farms, a large grain producer. “They grow heritage White Sonoran wheat, which was brought by Father Kino,” Cortelyou said. “It’s used by all the craft breweries in Tucson and also goes into Barrio Bread’s Heritage loaf.” At Marana’s Catalina Brewing Company, another stop on the tour, visitors can try beer made from a variety of locally sourced foods. “Its La Rosa is a prickly pear beer, and two beers are

made with mesquite beans, one with agave syrup. The beer is innovative and subtle,” Cortelyou said. While driving around the northern reaches of Pima County, tour guests will surely notice the expansive beauty of the region and perhaps catch a glimpse of one of its four golf courses, which include Quarry Pines near Interstate 10, and The Gallery, The Golf Club at Dove Mountain and The Highlands, each in the rapidly growing community of Dove Mountain. A popular activity for outdoors lovers is Parks and Recreation’s guided hikes in the Tortolita Mountains, including the nationally designated Wild Burro Trail. Held the second Saturday of each month, hikes vary in distance and elevation gain, offering fun and exercise for all levels of hikers. An exciting addition to Marana’s recreation scene is the news that Topgolf, a nationwide innovator in creating fun sports and entertainment venues, has chosen Marana for its first location in Southern Arizona. The Topgolf experience combines multi-tiered hitting bays with food, drinks, music and big screen TVs. Its opening is scheduled for late 2017 in the former Practice Tee site on West Costco Drive between Thornycontinued on page 90 >>>

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PHOTOS: COURTESY TOWN OF MARANA

By Christy Krueger


BizMILESTONE continued from page 89 dale Road and I-10. Tourists aren’t the only ones enjoying the area’s great natural, manmade and historical amenities. Marana residents love the sense of community in coming together to celebrate their culture and heritage. And that will be especially true in 2017 as they commemorate 40 years of incorporation. Recognizing the milestone birthday will be part of Marana’s annual events, including Founders’ Day and the Marana Cotton Festival. “Our goal is to celebrate 40 years all year long. For all events, we have added an element of celebration,” said Special Events Coordinator Monique Meza. Official recognition of the town’s 40 years will take place during the State of the Town Address and Luncheon on April 14 at The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain in partnership with Marana Chamber of Commerce. It will start with a business showcase and feature a presentation by Mayor Ed Honea about the town’s bright future. Registration is required.

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A more casual, family-friendly celebration will take place during the March 25 Marana Founders’ Day at Ora Mae Harn District Park. “We come together to celebrate our founders, agriculture, the people. It’s a get-to-know-yourneighbors event,” Meza said. During the Oct. 21 Marana Cotton Festival, locals honor their heritage

Topgolf will open its first Southern Arizona location in Marana.

with a rodeo, carnival rides, a petting zoo and plenty of food. And the Dec. 2 Marana Holiday Festival and Christmas Tree Lighting is a good time, according to Meza. “We have the largest tree in Southern Arizona and we draw a lot from all over.” For vacationers coming from a distance or locals looking for high-end resort hospitality, The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain is tough to beat. It helped introduce the world to Marana when the WGC Accenture Match Play Championship was held at its golf course, The Golf Club at Dove Mountain. Anyone who has visited the picturesque resort, tucked back into Wild Burro Canyon in the Tortolita Mountains, has been intrigued and awed by its setting and the feel of a mysterious ancient presence. Petroglyphs can be viewed just a few steps out the door of the hotel. A Native American flautist stands atop a rock ledge and plays to the setting sun as the hauntingly tranquil notes echo off the looming cliffs. It’s all part of the experience of discovering Marana.

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BizCONSTRUCTION

From left, Humberto Lopez, Chairman, HSL Properties; Omar Mireles, President, HSL Properties; David Mehl, President and Owner, Cottonwood Properties; Carson Mehl, VP Sales and Marketing, Cottonwood Properties 92 BizTucson

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Momentum to Build Continues

Dove Mountain Sets the Pace in New Homes

More than 20 years ago, David Mehl had a vision for an upscale community in northeast Marana where The RitzCarlton, Dove Mountain resort now sits, surrounded by single- and multi-family homes and commercial development to support it. Mehl’s company, Cottonwood Properties, now owns the resort in partnership with HSL Properties, and the momentum generated by his vision continues today throughout the town. According to Marana Development

Services Director Ryan Mahoney, in 2013 and 2015, Marana issued more single-family home permits than Tucson, Oro Valley and Sahuarita combined. “Marana’s homebuilding economy has been consistently strong out of the recession the last few years,” he said, while just last year the rest of the region started to catch up. But the Town of Marana still issued nearly 600 single-family permits in 2016 and expects 700 for this year. Whether it’s considered a challenge or an advantage, Marana’s population is

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Christy Krueger

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BizCONSTRUCTION

DR HORTON

MATTAMY HOMES continued from page 93 separated by three distinct areas: north, including Gladden Farms; south, reaching down to Orange Grove Road; and in the northeast, the Tangerine corridor and Dove Mountain, which is leading the area in number of new homes built. Gladden Farms started out with a bang, but came to a near halt during the recession. KB Home, the original lead builder, returned four years ago

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PEPPER VINER and in 2016 was joined by Lennar, Meritage Homes and Richmond American Homes. With this much activity in Phase I of Gladden Farms, Mahoney said it won’t be long until more amenities are added. The community has a park with a splash pad, sports fields, wedding venues and hiking trails, but not many shopping opportunities. “They want a grocery store for north Marana,” Ma-

honey said. “We’re monitoring it. Fry’s owns a piece of land there and people really want it. Development activity is getting close to that option.” What almost all new neighborhoods have in common, he said, is outdoor amenities, with a focus on recreation, parks and trails. “Every new developer that comes on board is trying to have continued on page 96 >>>

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PHOTOS: COURTESY COTTONWOOD PROPERTIES

continued from page 94 a trail system, and some connect to the Tortolitas. We’re working on linking trails in neighborhoods to the trails we’re building. That’s the grand vision.” Cynthia Nemeth-Briehn, who directs Marana Parks and Recreation, also believes parks play an important role in residents’ lives. “People seek parks and recreation services to get healthy and stay fit. From a social perspective, parks are a tangible reflection of the quality

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of life in a community,” she said. In addition to single-family home development, there has been more multi-family housing activity in the past few years, Mahoney said. Encantada at Dove Mountain, by HSL Properties, and Legacy Apartments at Dove Mountain both sit on or near Tangerine Road. HSL Properties plans to break ground this summer on its next luxury apartment community near In-

terstate 10 north of Cortaro Road. Mahoney has a good feel for what is attracting so many homebuyers to Marana. In addition to the outdoor amenities, the town provides a high level of service, such as maintaining roads and parks, he said. “Also, the schools are doing really well. Homes being built are of good quality. And there’s the interconnectedness of the street network, I-10 is accessible to Tucson.” Biz

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BizTRIBUTE

Joan Diamond

A Legacy of Giving Joan Diamond ‘Had a Very Big Heart’ By David Pittman Joan Diamond, a shining light of philanthropic influence who is credited as a dominant force behind the building of Banner-Diamond Children’s Medical Center, peacefully passed away at her home Dec. 28. She was 87. Mrs. Diamond – the wife of Donald Diamond, one of Tucson’s most successful land investors and developers – persuaded her husband to open his wallet to make one of the largest charitable donations in state history: A $15 million gift leading to the development of the first children’s hospital in Southern Arizona. “Clearly the driving force behind getting the children’s medical center built was Joan,” said Dr. Fayez Ghishan, a University of Arizona professor and physician-in-chief of Banner-Diamond Children’s Medical Center. “She was a wonderful lady who was strongly committed to helping children. It was Joan who persuaded Donald to write the check.” Ghishan said the Diamonds’ lead gift enabled university officials to approach the bond market to borrow the addiwww.BizTucson.com

tional money needed to make the hospital a reality. “When they learned we had $15 million, we got another $60 million within 24 hours,” he said. “My parents’ generosity to Tucson was initiated by my mother’s insistence that they share their successes with the community by taking on philanthropic leadership roles, both in terms of volunteering their time and financially,” said Helaine Levy, the Diamonds’ daughter who is executive director of Diamond Family Philanthropies and oversees the philanthropic activities of the Diamond Foundation and Diamond Ventures. “My father’s business success was greatly impacted by my mother taking on the primary role of managing our family, enabling him to pursue many business and political activities,” Levy said. “My mother has been described by family, friends and those who met her as elegant, kind, gracious and beautiful inside and out. I try to emulate her kindness and love for family, including extended family.” “Joan had a very big heart,” said Stuart Mellan, president and CEO of the Jewish Federation of Southern Arizona.

“She was a strong partner with Donald in making our world and community a better place.” Mellan said the Diamonds have been such “longtime champions” in support of the federation that “we named our premier philanthropic event ‘The Joan and Donald Diamond Lead Gifts Dinner.’ ” Ghishan said that after donating $15 million to create the 116-bed children’s hospital in 2007, the Diamonds hosted fundraising dinners in which they encouraged friends and business associates to give as well. The hospital opened in 2010. Joan and Donald were also instrumental in establishing Steele Children’s Research Center and have since made significant contributions to improve facilities there. “We have a lung injury lab because of the Diamonds,” Ghishan said. “They gave money to establish pediatric pulmonary testing, and for research to discover genes involved in disease states. They’ve given us $100,000 here, $250,000 there, over many years. If you continued on page 103 >>> Spring 2017

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BizTRIBUTE

Clearly the driving force behind getting the children’s medical center built was Joan. It was Joan who persuaded Donald to write the check.

Dr. Fayez Ghishan Physician-in-Chief Banner-Diamond Children’s Medical Center –

continued from page 101 added it together it would be substantial.” The Diamonds have also volunteered time and financial support for Brewster Center, the Tucson Symphony Orchestra, Angel Charities for Children, United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona, Rincon Institute and other causes. Diamond said his wife “insisted I get involved in philanthropy and give back to the community.” Donald and Joan shared a strong conviction about helping children because of the tragic death of their daughter, Deanne, who lost her life in 1971 at age 14 from complications from asthma treatment. “My wife and I always felt the philanthropic gifts we made toward children’s health gave meaning to the life of our daughter, who passed too soon,” he said. “We thought our contributions gave purpose to her life because it has resulted in so much good in the lives of so many other children and will do so for generations to come.” Donald and Joan met while attending the UA in 1947. “I was in a fraternity and Joan was in a sorority and we were thrown together because that’s how things were done back then,” Donald said. “She was the most beautiful girl on campus, which I noticed right away. We had little in common. I was from New York City. She was from Des Moines, Iowa. Because of her looks and personality she was very popular. She was charmed by my BS. I wasn’t a good student, but I was having a good time.” The couple married and spent most of the 1950s and the first half of the 60s in New York City, where Donald built a large fortune as a commodities broker on Wall Street. He loved his job and the fast pace of the Big Apple, but Joan hated the city and for years tried to persuade him to move their family west. In 1965, she got her wish and the family moved to Tucson. “Tucson is a great place, look what it’s done for us,” he said. “Joan was very happy in Tucson and she really flourished here.” Ghishan said, “because of their incredible generosity, the legacy of Joan and Donald Diamond will last forever in Tucson and Southern Arizona.”

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BizREALESTATE CCIM Forecast Winners Office Aubrey Finkelstein Vast Real Estate Solutions Vacancy rate: 2016 Forecast – 11.99 percent 2016 Actual – 11.00 percent 2017 Forecast – 9.50 percent Industrial Russell W. Hall Cushman & Wakefield I PICOR Vacancy rate: 2016 Forecast – 7.24 percent 2016 Actual – 7.80 percent 2017 Forecast – 6.90 percent Finance Mike Trueba Commerce Bank of Arizona 10-Year Treasury constant maturity rate 2016 Forecast – 2.62 percent 2016 Actual – 2.45 percent 2017 Forecast – 2.85 percent

PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

Retail Gary Heinfeld Advisors in Real Estate Vacancy rate: 2016 Forecast – 6.37 percent 2016 Actual – 6.40 percent 2017 Forecast – 6.17 percent Multi-Family Lance Parsons ABI Multifamily Vacancy rate: 2016 Forecast – 6.95 percent 2016 Actual – 6.87 percent 2017 Forecast – 5.50 percent Land Aaron Mendenhall Chapman Lindsey Building permits: 2016 Forecast – 2,949 2016 Actual – 2,928 2017 Forecast – 3,878 Tucson Legend Humberto S. Lopez

CCIM Forecasters Predict Continued Growth, Confidence in 2017 By David Pittman After eight consecutive years of extremely slow or stagnant growth, the new mood of prognosticators at the 26th annual CCIM Commercial Real Estate Forecast Competition could be described in two words: “renewed confidence.” “The positive news we have been hearing about corporate expansion and job creation in Tucson is rubbing off on several sectors of the local real estate market; especially the office, industrial and multifamily sectors; and to a smaller degree, the retail sector,” said Craig Finfrock, owner and designated broker of Commercial Real Estate Advisors and VP of the Southern Arizona CCIM chapter. The Tucson forecasting competition, one of the longest running events of its type in the nation, was held Feb. 21 in a packed ballroom of about 400 people at Tucson Marriott University Park. Recent announcements that Raytheon, Caterpillar, Comcast and several other companies are bringing thousands of new jobs to Tucson “have commercial real estate professionals more optimistic about the future than they’ve been in years,” said Finfrock, who was master of ceremonies of the proceedings. “The consensus is 2017 will usher in a year of new construction, posi-

tive absorption, lower vacancy rates across the board in all sectors, and finally a resurgence of the new housing market.” Those who made the most accurate predictions a year ago in each commercial real estate sector made year-in-review presentations and led panel discussions among those making prognostications for 2017. Winners of the CCIM (Certified Commercial Investment Member) forecasting competition were: Office

Aubrey Finkelstein of Vast Real Estate Solutions won the office category by predicting the vacancy rate of Tucson-area office property would be 11.99 percent at the close of 2016. The actual rate was 11.00 percent. Finkelstein predicts the Tucson office vacancy rate will fall to 9.50 percent by the end of 2017. Industrial

Russ Hall of Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR won the CCIM Industrial forecasting competition for the second year in a row by predicting a vacancy rate of 7.24 percent for industrial property in metro Tucson at the close of 2016. The actual rate was 7.80 percent. Hall predicts the rate will drop to 6.90 percent by the end of 2017. continued on page 106 >>>

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APPRAISAL James Bradley, CCIM AXIA Real Estate Appraisers jbradley@axiaappraisers.com DEVELOPMENT Greg Boccardo, CCIM Boccardo Realty greg@gregboccardo.com James Hardman, CCIM DESCO Southwest jhardman@descogroup.com Gary Heinfield, CCIM Advisors In Real Estate gheinfeld@ccim.net Melissa Lal, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC melissa@larsenbaker.com George Larsen, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC george@larsenbaker.com Margaret Larsen, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC mlarsen@ccim.net Jason Wong, CCIM Red Point Development jwong@redpointdevelopment. com

FINANCE Mike Trueba, CCIM Commerce Bank of AZ mtrueba@commercebankaz.com

INVESTMENTS Gary Andros, CCIM Andros Commercial Properties gandros@ccim.net

Laurie Weber, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC / LendAmerica lweber@ccim.net

Gary Best, CCIM KW Commercial best.gary.t@gmail.com

INDUSTRIAL David Blanchette, CCIM CBRE Dave.Blanchette@cbre.com David Gallaher, CCIM Tucson Industrial Realty dave@tucsonindustrialrealty.com Robert Glaser, CCIM Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR rglaser@picor.com J. Terry Lavery, CCIM Realty Executives Tucson Elite jamestlavery@laveryrealty.com Brandon Rodgers, CCIM Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR brodgers@picor.com

Swain Chapman, CCIM Chapman Lindsey Real Estate Services LLC swain@chapmanmanagementgroup.com Mick Cluck, CCIM Coldwell Banker Residential Br mick@mickcluck.com John Hamner, CCIM KW Commercial john@tucsoncommercial.com Jane Holder, CCIM Realty Executives Tucson Elite janeyholderaz@gmail.com David Houge, CCIM Realty Executives Tucson Elite david@ccimaz.com Ed Johnson, CCIM Invest-Com Real Estate ejohnson@ccim.net

James Kai, CCIM Kai Enterprises james.kai@kaienterprises.com Wayne Lindquest, CCIM Wayne Lindquist Commercial Real Estate Broker waynelindquist@yahoo.com Susan Ong, CCIM BroadStone Commercial Real Estate broadstone@aol.com James Robertson, CCIM Realty Executives Tucson Elite jr4CCIM@gmail.com

MULTIFAMILY Lance Parsons, CCIM ABI Multifamily lance.parsons@abimultifamily. com OFFICE Tari Auletta, CCIM KW Commercial tariauletta@kwcommercial.com Jannie Irvin, CCIM Mark Irvin Commercial Real Estate Services, LLC janine@markirvin.com

Paul Rosado, CCIM Commercial Real Estate Broker prosado@ccim.net

Mark Irvin, CCIM Mark Irvin Commercial Real Estate Services, LLC mark@markirvin.com

LAND Bob Benedon, CCIM Centra Realty bobbenedon@yahoo.com

RETAIL Craig Finfrock, CCIM Commercial Retail Advisors, LLC. cfinfrock@cradvisorsllc.com

James Marian, CCIM Chapman Lindsey Commerical Real Estate Services LLC jbm@chapmanlindsey.com

Debbie Heslop, CCIM Volk Company dheslop@volkco.com

Juan Teran, CCIM Realty Executives International jteran@ccim.net

Andy Seleznov, CCIM Larsen Baker, LLC andy@larsenbaker.com


BizREALESTATE continued from page 104 Finance

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Mike Trueba of Commerce Bank of Arizona won for his prediction that the 10-year Treasury note yield would close 2016 at 2.62 percent. The actual yield was 2.45 percent. Trueba forecasts the yield will increase to 2.85 percent at the end of 2017. As yields on the 10-year treasury rise, typically, so do mortgage rates. Retail

Gary Heinfeld of Advisors in Real Estate won the retail category by predicting a vacancy rate of 6.37 percent for 2016. The actual rate was 6.40 percent. Heinfeld predicts the rate will drop to 6.17 percent at the close of this year.

Meet Commercial Real Estate Legend Humberto Lopez By David Pittman

The life of Humberto S. Lopez is an inspirational, rags-to-riches tale that started in Nogales, Arizona, where Lopez was born to an immigrant mother from Mexico. Over time Lopez emerged from hardship and poverty to build a real estate empire. “At times, his family relied on welfare to survive,” said George Larsen, an owner of Larsen Baker, one of the largest commercial real estate firms in Southern Arizona. “His father died when he was 11 in 1957. His high school counselor told him, ‘Humberto, you’re not college material.’ For a while, Humberto was a field worker.” Larsen introduced Lopez as the 2017 winner of the Real Estate Legend Award presented by the Southern Arizona Chapter of CCIM in February. Past recipients include, among others, Roy Drachman, Don Diamond, Roy Long and Robert Sarver. Rather than feeling sorry “for a poor Nogales kid,” Larsen said, “we are here to celebrate the human spirit that sometimes compels a young man to rise from desperate circumstances to the pinnacle of his profession. This is Humberto Lopez’s story.” Lopez began supporting his family when his father died, then worked full time at a Nogales grocery while attending Nogales High School. He “proved his guidance counselor wrong by graduating from the University of Arizona 106 BizTucson

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in 1969 with a degree in accounting,” Larsen said. Lopez married his college sweetheart, Czarina, and went to work at Deloitte, Haskins & Sells, a Los Angeles accounting firm. While working there, he began investing in real estate on the side. “He borrowed $1,000 for his first deal. It was a single family lot in Nogales. He paid $3,500 and sold it for $7,000,” Larsen said. “He was on his way.” When Lopez was 29, still an accountant at Deloitte, he was earning more money syndicating apartment buildings than the senior executives. In 1975, he left and co-founded HSL Properties. In 1980, he relocated HSL to Tucson and began building it into a legendary company. Lopez formed more than 200 different partnerships and joint ventures, owned and operated some 25,000 apartment units, developed and revitalized more than 2,000 hotel rooms. His companies employ more than 1,000 Tucsonans. And he’s happy to share the wealth. “Bert and Czarina do not publicize all the charities they, their family and their businesses support, but their contributions are in the multiple millions of dollars,” Larsen said. While remaining chairman of HSL Properties, last year Lopez turned over the presidency of the company to his nephew, Omar Mireles.

Biz

Multi-Family

Lance Parsons of ABI Multifamily won by predicting the vacancy rate in the Tucson-area apartment market at 6.95 percent at the close of 2016. The actual rate was 6.87 percent. Parsons predicts the rate will decline to 5.50 percent by the end of this year. Land

Aaron Mendenhall of Chapman Lindsey won by predicting that 2,949 building permits for all types of residential units would be issued in Pima County in 2016. The actual number was 2,928. Mendenhall forecasts building permits will jump to 3,878 in 2017. The keynote speaker at the CCIM luncheon was John R. Oliver, director of Customer Services & Global Accounts for the Surface Mining & Technology Division of Caterpillar. Oliver spoke about the decision-making process in Caterpillar’s decision to move a division of the company to Tucson. Humberto S. Lopez, who co-founded HSL Properties in 1975, received the prestigious Real Estate Legend Award from the Southern Arizona Chapter of CCIM. HSL Properties owns and operates 37 apartment communities, most of which are in Tucson. Past legend honorees include, among others, Roy Drachman, Donald Diamond, Bill Estes, Roy Long, George H. Amos Sr. and Jr., and Robert Sarver.

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President Cox Communications

PHOTO: COURTESY VISIT TUCSON

Pat Esser

PHOTO: KENN TOMASCH

BizCOMMUNITY

Tucson Main Library

Closing the Digital Divide Cox and Library Partner to Connect Low-Income Families By Steve Rivera Even Pat Esser was taken aback when his team at Cox Communications put together a compelling video on the reasons – and importance – of providing low-cost internet services for lower-income families. Esser, president of Cox Communications, was impressed by the substantial impact of a service that seems so commonplace but is not necessarily available to everyone − particularly students just trying to compete in school. With the knowledge that many homes and families are still without internet service and the literacy to use it, Cox is providing both services in a partnership with the Public Library Association through its Connect2Compete program. According to Cox, 90 percent of medium- to high-income families have internet in their homes while 50 per108 BizTucson

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cent of lower-income families do not. “While we’ve been deploying the latest gigabit structure, I am proud to say that we have been making sure that students in our communities have an opportunity to compete in the classroom, where they can compete for a career,” said Esser, who considered it so important to get the message out that he flew to Tucson from Cox headquarters in Atlanta to personally take part in the launch. Other test cities include Topeka, Kan., and Baton Rouge, La. Esser said the launch of the partnership with the Public Library Association, a division of the American Library Association, took place in Tucson because the city has been a centerpiece for Cox with its strong education support organizations, including the libraries where everyone has free internet ac-

cess during long library hours. Cox previously installed a 30-gigabit network at Sunnyside Unified School District that Esser said “is probably the most advanced network in the country − at the top of the list. And it provides great opportunities to students in the classroom.” Now, Cox and the American Library Association have teamed up to “narrow the digital divide for low-income families.” “There is a need in a lot of communities, but Tucson has worked with us and we started here,” Esser said. According to Cox, since the program launched in Arizona in 2013, it has connected more than 10,000 families or homes in the state. No specific numbers were available for Tucson. “Arizona gets a lot of our time and attention,” Esser said, adding that Tucson www.BizTucson.com


has “always been on the leading edge” given its experience with the Sunnyside school district and the launch of Connect2Compete. Amber Mathewson, interim director at the Pima County Public Library, said she looks forward to helping with the program in as much as she feels it will have a big impact. The library can assist in many forms, including its digital literacy training program and resources to help students and families make the most of their digital connection. “It’s going to make a big difference for people who in the past have not been able to afford a digital connection,” she said. “We always invite them to come to the library because we’re always open. But it gives families the opportunity to have the same access to the internet at all times. “They are short snippets where sometimes they don’t have time to take a full class. The beauty of that is we have the staff that can help them with more, help with resumes or help find jobs.” Esser said since the launch of Connect2Compete four years ago, more than 60,000 families have participated,

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It’s going to make a big difference for people who in the past have not been able to afford a digital connection.

Amber Mathewson Interim Director Pima County Public Library –

and about 250,000 members of families have been impacted or have been given a chance to keep up to date with technology. Enrollment for families has been made easy. The fee for home internet access is $9.95 for qualified families and

requires no deposits, no contracts, no installation fees and no modem rentals. Esser, along with Felton Thomas, Jr., president of Public Library Association, and John Wolfe, Cox Southwest region general manager, and a number of local dignitaries were in attendance Feb. 24 for the newest launch of Connect2Compete at the Main Library downtown. “Tucson has the need and Tucson has a library system that has great leadership and has the understanding of how to reach the community,” Thomas said. What the program does Wolfe said, “is that it gives students a fighting chance at school.” It was a success four years ago when it was launched in the schools and now it should be again with the help of libraries providing digital literacy training “just because of the strong foundation we’ve already built.” “We’re proud of the progress we’ve made,” Esser said. “Putting internet in that child’s home is just one step in closing that digital divide.”

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BizCONSTRUCTION

Banner-University Medical Center Tops Out

Building the new Banner-University Medical Center tower is a mighty task.

By Romi Carrell Wittman

The structure is 160 feet tall and will cost $400 million. It encompasses more than 670,000 square feet.

By the Numbers

PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

Last Beam Placed on $400 Million Project On a brisk January morning, with news media, members of the public, hospital staffers and construction personnel all looking on, the last beam in the new BannerUniversity Medical Center tower was set in place. To mark the occasion, U.S. and Arizona flags were hoisted atop the 160-foot tall structure. The project is described as one of the largest in Tucson’s history, if not the largest. “We haven’t validated that, but it’s either No. 1 or No. 2,” said Brian Brown, project executive with Sundt-DPR, a joint venture of Sundt Construction and DPR Construction. It is the firm overseeing the $400 million project that encompasses 670,000 square feet. The so-called “topping off” ceremony is a pivotal moment in any construction project – but for the Banner team, it means that the highly complex work of creating a state-ofthe-art hospital with the latest equipment, patient spaces and safety features has just begun. “It’s a very important stage of the process,” said Banner CEO Tom Dickson. “Now we’re building the tower from the inside out.” Brown said that while the topping off marks an important milestone, the interior construction will be just as involved as the first phase, if not more so, given the specialized needs of the hospital. Private patient rooms, new diagnostic imaging, diagnostic cardiology, cardiac cath labs and interventional radiology are among the features to be built into the new structure. In addition, new operating rooms and patient prep/recovery space are being constructed. Though the new tower will not increase the overall number of patient 110 BizTucson

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beds, the ninth floor of the tower will include shell space to accommodate 24 new patient rooms at some point in the future. “It’s time for change,” Dickson said. “The original building was built in 1971 and, while it was state of the art back then, times have changed. The new facility will be bigger and will have more safety features. It will provide an absolute healing environment and patients will benefit from the changes tremendously.” Constructing the tower has presented some unique challenges, among them that the construction site itself is sandwiched in between the current hospital, which is still operating at full capacity, and the University of Arizona. “Our number one goal is to keep the hospital in operation and minimize impact on staff and patients,” said Brown. The hospital project, which is on target to open in spring 2019, includes a new, highly visible main entry located along the reconfigured intersection of East Elm Street and North Campbell Avenue. It will feature adjacent surface parking. This will mean that patients will have easier access to their clinical services. Dickson says the finished project will be much simpler and more patient-focused. “Our existing campus isn’t that easy to navigate. It will be a lot more organized,” he said. Given the highly collaborative relationship between designers, contractors and subcontractors, the project has been a lot of fun to work on, Brown said. Still he’s looking forward to seeing the finished product. “Being a resident of Tucson, I’m excited about getting a new replacement hospital.”

Brian Brown, project executive with Sundt-DPR, provided these other specifics:

• The tower includes more than 5,400 tons of steel. If you laid the steel pieces end-toend, they would stretch more than 35 miles – enough to go from the tower to the top of Mt. Lemmon.

• The steel was rolled in Geor-

gia, Indiana and Texas, then shipped to Eloy where it was fabricated into columns and beams.

• There

will be more than 17,000 cubic yards of concrete laid in the building – enough to pave a 3-footwide sidewalk from Tucson to Phoenix. There will be more than 860 tons of reinforcing steel in the concrete.

• The

project required two 300-ton cranes, weighing more than 700,000 pounds each.

• Workers

will install 208 miles of electrical conduit and more than 19,000 light fixtures. There also will be more than 1,700 plumbing fixtures. The average home has about seven.

• The work also requires more than 1 million pounds of ductwork and more than 40,000 square feet of masonry block.

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Tom Dickson

CEO Banner-University Medical Center

Dr. Charles B. Cairns

The Construction Team

Dean College of Medicine University of Arizona

Brian Brown, project executive with Sundt-DPR said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We currently average around 200 workers on the Banner-University Medical Center tower site. At our peak we will have approximately 350.â&#x20AC;? The self-perform work will be done by Sundt Civil, Sundt Concrete and DPR Drywall. Major trade partners are University Mechanical, Sturgeon Electric, Stark Electric, Schuff Steel, KT Fabrication, MKB Construction, Progressive Roofing and Sun Valley Masonry.

Brian Brown

Project Executive Sundt-DPR Spring 2017

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BizCONSTRUCTION

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Project: Sage Desert Assisted Living and Memory Care Location: Orange Grove Road west of La Cholla Boulevard Owner: Willis Development Contractor: W.E. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Construction Company Architect: Jeffrey Demure + Associates Architects Engineer: Presidio Engineering Broker: N/A Completion Date: December 2017 Construction Cost: N/A Project Description: A two-story, 105,000-square-foot facility that includes 87 assisted living residences and a 32-bed memory care unit, plus dining and common living areas

Project: Reid Park Zoo Animal Health Center Location: 1100 S. Randolph Way Owner: Collaborative effort by Reid Park Zoological Society and City of Tucson Contractor: Lloyd Construction Company Architect: Swaim Associates Broker: N/A Completion Date: November 2017 Financed By: Donations and Reid Park Zoological Society Construction Cost: Estimated $2.7 million Project Description: This collaborative effort with University of Arizona Veterinary School will feature cutting-edge technology and educational opportunities for the public.

Project: FAA 1st & Wetmore Location: 715 E. Wetmore Road Owner: First Avenue Associates Contractor: MW Morrissey Construction Architect: Architectural Design Group Broker: Larsen Baker Completion Date: January 2017 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: $2 million Project Description: Two buildings on a two-acre lot being leased to McAlisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deli and to Starbucks

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BizCONSTRUCTION

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M A R K E T

Project: Casa de los NiĂąos Location: 1120 N. Fifth Ave. Owner: Casa de los NiĂąos Contractor: Barker Morrissey Contracting Architect: WSM Architects Broker: N/A Completion Date: January 2018 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: N/A Project Description: New construction of an underground parking garage with two stories of office space above that will connect to the existing campus.

Project: City Park Location: 40 E. Congress St. Owner: BP City Park Investors (a Bourn Companies affiliate) Contractor: Canyon Building & Design Architect: Secrest Architecture and SBBL Architecture + Planning Broker: Bourn Advisory Services Completion Date: First quarter 2018 Financed By: Bank of Tucson Construction Cost: Estimated $18 million Project Description: Creative office space atop a food and entertainment hall that will include food vendors, retail, boutique, bowling and games

Project: Vista Plaza South Location: 493 Highway 90, Sierra Vista Owner: Larsen Baker Contractor: TBD Architect: EXA Architects Broker: Andy Seleznov and Melissa Lal Completion Date: (Estimated) Third quarter 2017 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: N/A Project Description: The now-vacant building will be extensively remodeled and re-purposed for retail users.

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BizCONSTRUCTION

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Project: Sentri Warehouse Location: 5 W. Bodega Drive, Nogales Owner: International Destiny Logistics Contractor: DCO Custom Builders Architect: C Architects Broker: N/A Completion Date: (Estimated) Fall 2017 Financed By: Bank of the West Construction Cost: Estimated $3.7 million Project Description: The 29,000-square-foot building includes a cold storage, freezer and dry storage warehouse with a two-story office component.

Project: Health Sciences Innovation Building Location: University of Arizona Health Sciences Campus Owner: University of Arizona Contractor: Kitchell Construction Architect: CO Architects/Swaim Associates Broker: N/A Completion Date: July 2018 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: $125 million Project Description: The facility will include state-of-the-art clinical labs and simulation centers for students, faculty and medical professionals, allowing for a range of instructional applications.

Project:

Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority Chapter Room Addition Location: 1435 E. Second St. Owner: Gamma Zeta Building Association Contractor: Lloyd Construction Company Architect: Lloyd Construction Company Broker: None Completion Date: August 2017 Financed By: Vantage West Construction Cost: N/A Project Description: Work includes demolition of 3,537 square feet in the center portion of the building to be replaced with 8,130 square feet on two levels.

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BizCONSTRUCTION

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Project: Pima Animal Care Center Location: 4000 N. Silverbell Road Owner: Pima County Contractor: Sundt Construction Architect: Line & Space Broker: N/A Completion Date: Summer 2018 Financed By: Pima County Construction Cost: Estimated $16 million Project Description: Construction will begin this spring on a new facility replacing most or all of Pima Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current animal care center originally built in 1968.

Project: Rauscher Reservoir Roof Rehabilitation Location: 2727 S. Harrison Road Owner: Tucson Water Contractor: BFL Construction served as the roofing supplier for this project, which was headed by Ashton Contractors and Engineers Architect: HDR Broker: N/A Completion Date: Fall 2016 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: Estimated $1 million Project Description: BFL and Behlen Metal Systems collaborated to design a new 148,000-square-foot metal S-span roof system for the reservoir.

Project: Pima Air and Space Restoration Hangar Location: Pima Air and Space Museum Owner: Arizona Aerospace Foundation Contractor: Lloyd Construction Company Architect: Acorn Associates Architecture Broker: N/A Completion Date: N/A Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: Estimated $2,000,000 Project Description: This canopy stand just over 56 feet tall and spans 200 feet with a 175-foot cantilever, allowing around-the-year airplane restoration.

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY From left â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Kellie Terhune Neely, VP Marketing; Keith Damek, VP Finance; Carla Craig, VP Operations Support; Elisa Ross, VP Sales & Service; Andrew Britton, VP Lending; Robert Swick, President & General Manager; Karen Shanor Thompson, VP Member Services; Tracey Durazo, Executive Administrator; Cyndi Samples, VP Human Resources.

PHOTO: CREATIVE COMMONS CCO

Aviation Pioneer Howard Hughes

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BizMILESTONE

Hughes Federal Credit Union A Top Local Financial Choice Going Strong Since 1952

Credit unions are the “buy local” of the financial service industry. In an age when going local is of increasing importance to a growing number of people, Hughes Federal Credit Union appears to be the institution of choice for many in the Tucson metro area. The credit union, which formed in 1952, has doubled its membership to more than 100,000 members since 2009, when people decided banking with a member-owned, locally owned and based, not-for-profit financial cooperative made more sense than trusting their hardearned money to national banks. Asset size has also nearly doubled since 2009, growing from $500 million to $1 billion, just in time for Hughes Federal Credit Union to celebrate its 65th anniversary. In 2016, Hughes had an increase of 17 percent in loan growth, more than 20 percent in member deposit growth and more than 15-percent membership growth, said President and General Manager Robert J. Swick. “Credit unions were born out of hard times to provide financial services to folks of modest means, and the situations that came out of the recession of 2009 really emphasized the value credit unions provide,” Swick said “We have a volunteer board of directors and our profit isn’t paid out to a handful of investors making money off many consumers. Our consumers are our investors and member owners and we return profit to them in lower loan rates and higher account dividends.” Hughes was originally formed to meet the financial needs of Hughes Aircraft Company (now Raytheon Missile Systems) employees and their families in ADVERTORIAL

1952, and that remained the focus until 1992. That year, Hughes Federal Credit Union merged with Arizona Transportation Credit Union, expanding its reach to more than 400 businesses throughout Arizona. In the 25 years since, Hughes has continued to grow, and currently more than 800 Arizona businesses provide membership in the credit union as a benefit to their employees, said Kellie Terhune Neely, VP of marketing. Members who join through their employer get all the usual member benefits and more with periodic presentations and services that come to the job site. In addition to expanding its reach to businesses, Hughes was approved in 2001 by the National Credit Union Administration to offer membership to the “underserved” Tucson community. This means that anyone who lives, works, worships or goes to school inside Tucson city limits is eligible for membership and can open a main-share savings account with as little as $50, said Dani Durnal, Hughes business development representative. Once a main-share savings account is opened, all other services and products at the credit union become available, including no-fee, interest-earning checking accounts with no minimum balance; debit cards; mobile banking; one-low-rate loans; and access to free financial counseling by salaried, certified financial planners. In addition, members can choose from money market accounts, term share accounts (certificates of deposit), Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), first mortgage loans and more. continued on page 123 >>> Spring 2017

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF HUGHES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

By Renée Schafer Horton


BizFINANCIAL

Awards Make a Statement

Hughes Federal Credit Union has won numerous awards over its 65-year history, most recently:

2014

BadCredit.org “Top 10 Best Finance Resources for Teens.” BadCredit.org is a website devoted to raising the overall financial awareness of its users.

2016

BauerFinancial’s 5-Star/Superior Rating. For the past 26 years, Hughes has been ranked as Superior or Excellent by BauerFinancial, including during the recession of 2007-2009. Arizona Daily Star Readers’ Choice Awards: Best Financial Planning Service, Best Bank/ Credit Union, Best Debit Card and Favorite Mortgage Lender. GoBankingRates.com Best Customer Service Award. Hughes was selected best in the nation by GoBankingRates and scored a perfect five out of five in customer service delivery channels, including live chat, 24/7 phone service and social media presence.

From left − Front row: Paula Short, Fraud Specialist Manager; April Gabriel, Operations Support Manager; Melinda Faulkner, Accounting Manager; David King, HFCU Financial Services General Manager; Tara Tocco, Internal Auditor; Judi Anderson, Mortgage Manager; Raychel Verdugo, Pantano Branch Manager. Second row: Kathie Lorenz, Sales Manager; Sylvia Mendez, Speedway Branch Manager; Daniele Loomis, Indirect Lending Manager; Mary Burruel, Branch Operations Manager; Andrea Lopez, Wetmore Branch Manager; Linda Grigsby, Voyager Resort Branch Manager. Third row: Kerry Graham, Website Digital Manager.

First place, Dora Maxwell Social/Community Responsibility Award. The award is sponsored by the Mountain West Credit Union Association and the Credit Union National Association to recognize the breadth and depth of a credit union’s social responsibility that strengthen their community.

2017

Datatrac Great Rate Awards. Datatrac compared 234 banking locations in metro Tucson and found that Hughes offered 22 consumer banking products that outperformed the market average by up to 324 percent for deposits and loans. Better Business Bureau Torch Award Finalist, Good Neighbor Category, honoring ethical business in Southern Arizona. Credit Union National Association (CUNA) Marketing Diamond Award, which recognizes outstanding marketing achievements in the credit union industry nationwide. Hughes has received multiple awards throughout the years and consecutively from 2010-2017.

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From left − Liz Felix, Digital Marketing Specialist; Daniel Gutierrez, Graphic Designer; Kellie Terhune Neely, VP Marketing; Kerry Graham, Website Digital Manager; Elsa Jacklitch, Lead Business Development Representative; Matt Smith, Marketing Representative; Dani Durnal, Business Development Representative.


PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

continued from page 121 If people live outside of Tucson and don’t work for a Hughes member employer, they can still join Hughes by paying a $10 membership fee to the Friends of the Pima County Library or Friends of Oro Valley Library. Once they have joined the Friends, they qualify to open a main-share savings account at Hughes and to access all other products. “We’ve tried to make it really easy for people to become members of a locallyowned, member-owned credit union,” Terhune Neely said. “It fits with our philosophy of being in business to make a positive difference in members’ lives and give back to the community.” As Hughes has expanded its membership, it has adapted to the needs of younger members by adding technology such as Apple, Android and Samsung Pay, as well as mobile phone apps to help locate no-charge ATMs or CO-OP Shared Branching locations. “We offer all the conveniences of national banks, including helping members access money when they are not near a Hughes branch,” said Elsa Jacklitch, lead business development representative. “But we still offer the personal touch that our long-standing member base desires.” John Sansbury, chairman of the Hughes Federal Credit Union board of directors, said he has used both banks and credit unions, and knows intimately why credit unions are a great bet for most people. “It is really simple,” Sansbury said. “Credit unions are interested in people, not profit. We give people from all walks of life the opportunity to better themselves by having financial goals and it makes the whole community stronger.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com

From left − Elsa Jacklitch, lead business development representative, and Dani Durnal, business development representative, promote Hughes Federal Credit Union benefits to more than 800 businesses and community partners in Southern Arizona. Durnal also presents financial education classes to youth and adults.

Hughes Takes Services to the Job Site More than 800 Businesses Make Membership a Benefit By Renée Schafer Horton At a time when businesses use all manner of enticements to draw the best and brightest employees, more than 800 businesses in Arizona believe that offering free membership in Hughes Federal Credit Union is one of the best “win-win” benefits they can offer. “It has definitely been great for us,” said Jane Overbey, outreach coordinator for Tucson’s Beyond Bread Bakery and Café. “We have 240 employees and they are a diverse group. Employees get stressed about managing their money, which makes it hard to focus on the job. “Hughes comes right to us and takes care of everything on site, from signing people up for savings and checking accounts, to enrolling in direct deposit, and answering questions about loans. Also, we’re a local business and they are local. It has been a great match.” Joining Hughes through an employer gives members access to all the services provided by the credit union. The ability to engage in some services on site adds a level of convenience. Robin Sodari, who works in the human resources department at Roche Tissue Diagnostics, known locally as Ventana Medical Systems, Inc., said that presentations by Hughes representatives have been key to employees’ financial well-being. “Our partnership with Hughes Federal Credit Union goes well beyond providing the free benefit of credit union membership and affordable financial services to our employees,” Sodari said. “We were excited

to recently have Hughes participate in our Health and Wellness Fair with top-notch financial wellness seminars and excellent speakers. We look forward to having them out again and spreading the word to more of our employees.” Perry Shazier II, human resources manager at Miraval Arizona resort and spa, agreed about the benefits of being a Hughes business partner. “With monthly onsite visits by Hughes representatives, our employees can make more informed decisions that can improve their financial lives,” Shazier said. Kellie Terhune Neely, VP of marketing at Hughes, said monthly visits fit directly with the credit union’s philosophy of being “about people, not profit.” “Statistics show that more than 60 percent of all employees suffer from stress due to worries about debt, retirement, paying for a child’s education, medical expenses or even covering basic living expenses,” Terhune Neely said. “These visits to businesses help employees right on the site, so they don’t have to worry about finding time they don’t have to come to us. This helps them become more productive and, thus, more valuable employees because we are helping them improve their financial condition so they don’t have those financial issues. It is part of what makes working at a credit union valuable. When you help employees at a business, that spreads out to the entire community.”

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BizFINANCIAL

‘Like a Bank’ But More Hughes Adds Local Touch to Services By Renée Schafer Horton When setting the bar for its level of service, Hughes Federal Credit Union has about 100,000 things in mind – its membership. “I hate to say we are just like a bank, because we really are much more, but sometimes that is the easiest way to explain it,” said Dani Durnal, business development representative at Hughes. “We can present free financial seminars – from basic budgeting to home ownership to retirement planning – right at your business location, which is not something normally offered by banks.” Hughes offers every service to its 100,000-plus membership that national banks offer, but because it is a not-forprofit cooperative, it can offer its members higher dividends on savings, lower rates on loans and lower – or no – fees. For instance, members open a mainshare savings account with a deposit of $50 or more, and can then have a free, interest-bearing checking account with no minimum balance requirements or per-check fees. Hughes also offers direct deposit of payroll, free credit-score analysis and credit-score enhancement, rollover IRAs and more. Recently, the credit union added Health Savings Accounts, an important benefit as more employers offer high-deductible insurance plans requiring an HSA. “We help members understand all their financial options and we really focus on empowering people to save,” Durnal said. One of those ways is in Hughes’ auto-loan business where it has had a $2 billion portfolio since 2000, said President and General Manager Robert J. Swick. Members get one low rate on auto loans instead of having the rate adjusted due to their credit rating. “If you meet our basic qualifications for a loan, you get the same rate as everyone else, no matter if you have a credit score of 581 or one of 850,” Durnal said. An auto loan is often a person’s first step into the world of loans and pay124 BizTucson

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ing that loan builds credit that can later help the person qualify for larger loans such as a mortgage. Hughes puts extra effort into making the auto loan process easy and making auto loans available to non-Hughes members as well, said Kellie Terhune Neely, Hughes’ VP of marketing.

Hughes Federal Credit Union By the Numbers With more than 100,000 members and $1 billion in assets, Hughes Federal Credit Union is a significant economic driver in the region. The credit union was formed in 1952 and now serves members throughout Arizona. $846 million in current loans outstanding $901 million member savings on deposit $1 billion in assets $2 billion in auto loans granted since 2000 $3.9 billion in loans granted since inception 107,380 member-owners 7 branch locations 218 employees 5,000+ shared branching locations at participating credit unions nationally 30,000+ no-surcharge ATMs nationally through the CO-OP Network Savings are federally insured up to $250,000 by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). IRAs are insured separately, up to an additional $250,000. A+ rating by Better Business Bureau. Accredited since 1974. 5 Star ‘Superior’ BauerFinancial Rating

“We participate in the Credit Union Advantage program,” she said. “This program allows community members who are not Hughes Federal Credit Union members to get a car loan through Hughes at dozens of participating car dealers throughout Arizona. Potential car buyers join Hughes through the dealership − right at the dealership − to get the auto loan.” Although much of its loan business is in auto, Hughes also offers mortgages, both conventional and first-time FHA loans that only require a 3.5-percent down payment. Datatrac, the nation’s largest tracking website, recently certified Hughes as having mortgage rates that outperform the Tucson metro market, Terhune Neely said. As a truly local business, Hughes develops partnerships with community groups to allow non-Tucson residents who do not work at a Hughes-member business to join the credit union. One of its hallmark efforts is the Primavera Foundation “Her Family” program. This financial-security effort is directed at single mothers and their daughters to help them learn how to save smartly with the goal of a home purchase. Hughes provides required financial literacy seminars and helps the mothers and daughters open savings accounts at the credit union. Primavera provides mothers an initial $50 to open their savings accounts and $25 for the daughters to start theirs. Primavera then provides mothers with a bonus of $125 and daughters with a bonus of $65 when they reach predetermined savings goals. “The mothers are saving for a future home and the daughters are saving for something that might go in that home, like a comforter for their bed or a dresser for their room,” Durnal said. “The goal is buying a home and becoming financially independent, but what also happens is that savings becomes a family activity and a lesson those daughters never forget. It is just one reason we all like to work at Hughes.” Biz www.BizTucson.com


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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

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BizBRAND

Miller and Hughes Put on the Press

UA Basketball Coach Plays Point for Credit Union Arizona basketball coach Sean Miller didn’t want to pick a favorite Hughes Federal Credit Union commercial – even if he was the star of the show. It’s like picking your favorite child or athletic moment or championship. It’s just not possible. It could have been the one where two students were playing with his bobble head and he stepped in to embarrass them a little. Or, when he chose “the basketball design” on his debit card, or when he pushed the buzzer on a terrible dancer before former head coach Lute Olson showed him how to do the robot dance courtesy of former UA standout Steve Kerr. “They all blend together at this point,” Miller said. There are 16 of them and all have an alternate ending. They’ve won awards for being cutesy and clever. Even Miller can pull it off. For seven seasons, Miller, a man with a dry sense of humor who can offer a quip here and there, has come on the commercial scene for Hughes Federal Credit Union to be its point (guard) man, delivering the message of going local and manwww.BizTucson.com

aging money with the kids’ savings and financial education programs. “Hughes Federal Credit Union is very proud of our partnership with coach Sean Miller,” said Kellie Terhune Neely, Hughes’ VP of marketing. “Partnering was an easy decision. The values that have successfully guided him as a coach have also guided Hughes Federal Credit Union for the past 65 years – commitment to excellence, teamwork and giving back to the community. These are values we have in common. On the court coach Miller has gained considerable acclaim, and off the court he is a respected member of our community.” Miller is a spokesman on behalf of the credit union in television commercials and other media (print and radio ads) and Terhune calls it a “great fit for Arizona Athletics, coach Miller and Hughes Federal Credit Union.” Miller said he joined in part because Hughes is a partner of Arizona IMG Sports Marketing – the radio, digital and marketing arm of Arizona Athletics. “They are tremendous people and a great organization,” Miller said. “From my perspective I’m really happy to be a partner.” He says that’s the case even if he’s performing out of the box or out of his comfort zone. Miller, who arrived in Tucson and at the UA in 2009, is known for being a basketball-focused individual who has little time to run a

full-court press on anything other than hoops. But, he has found time to talk all things Hughes. “When you’re in a job you always like more things than others, but I really enjoy them as an organization,” he said. “They’ve been great to our athletic department and our basketball program.” This year alone, Hughes has received numerous awards after years of being one of the top banking institutions in Southern Arizona. “The association with coach Sean Miller, Arizona Athletics and the sponsorship of the University of Arizona Visa® Debit Card have brought additional name recognition and visibility to our locally owned, member-owned financial institution,” said Terhune Neely. The marriage between Miller and Hughes started early into Miller’s arrival in Tucson. Shortly after being hired, Wildcat fans had a chance to sign a huge banner to Miller with local radio stations conducting live remotes at Hughes. Later that year, Hughes Federal Credit Union representatives approached UA to secure the coach as a spokesman. “We knew that coach Miller was an incredible addition as head men’s basketball coach,” Terhune Neely said. “We also remembered the legacy that Hall of Fame coach Lute Olson built at Arizona Basketball and knew we wanted to get in early.”

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF HUGHES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

By Steve Rivera


BizSPORTS

Connecting Kids Cats to the

Hughes Teams with Several UA Sports

IMAGES: COURTESY OF HUGHES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

By Steve Rivera Jessica Cosgrove spent a recent Saturday night with two of her children at a University of Arizona gymnastics meet because it’s good entertainment for the youngsters, and because, as members of the Arizona KidCats Club, they get a chance to get up close to the athletes. “It’s great because they do so many fun things for the kids,” said Cosgrove. “They are good athletes, but to see them as people, it’s very fun for them.” The KidCats Club, sponsored by Hughes Federal Credit Union, is just one of the ways the organization connects the community with UA athletics through sponsorships, marketing and education programs. KidCats, which has about 3,500 members, connects kids to college through activities related to Wildcat athletics and also by providing financial education and savings programs for members. “It’s such a positive experience for the kids,” said Cosgrove, whose children, Claire and Liam, are KidCats

members. “I definitely feel they inspire, showing they, too, were 6 years old at one point. Everyone sort of takes the same path.” “It’s really fun for me,” said 9-yearold Sarah Valenzuela who served as an honorary captain at a recent UA gymnastics meet. “If you want to have fun you can. And you get to meet new friends.” Along with KidCats, Hughes sponsors a number of youth programs, including: Classroom Cats − A program for K-8 classrooms to connect through educational materials, posters, exclusive contests and opportunities. Pen Pal Program – Through this K-8 program, a UA student-athlete corresponds with a classroom during the course of one school semester. S’cool Cats – This program pairs UA teams with local elementary and middle schools for an entire school year. Through the year, student-athletes and

coaches make contact with the schools following a standard curriculum. “It’s great for (the kids) to have an awareness that this is available,” said Courtney Weber, a teacher and a fouryear member of Classroom Cats. Aside from its youth programs and the men’s basketball sponsorship featuring head coach Sean Miller as the spokesman, Hughes is a title sponsor for women’s athletics, supporting basketball, cross country, golf, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track, volleyball and sand volleyball. Hughes also is a Strike Out Sponsor for UA baseball and a prominent Wildcat Club member. “Both their organization and ours are part of a proud tradition of excellence and a strong commitment to community,” Terhune Neely said. “We value the relationship that raises awareness and support for the University of Arizona, Arizona Athletics, studentathletes, alumni and fans.”

Biz


BizCOMMUNITY

Hughes Really Helps Focus on Education, Financial Literacy By Renée Schafer Horton Hughes Helps may be the most accurate marketing name ever created to describe what a particular company does for a community. Just ask University of Arizona senior Katrina Verduzco. Or the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona CEO Debbie S. Rich. Or maybe Jane Peterson, president of the Friends of the Oro Valley Library. Verduzco, Rich and Peterson are representative of people and organizations aided by the physical, intellectual and financial generosity of Hughes Federal Credit Union and its employees to the community, making Tucson a more compassionate city. “We really do live and breathe the credit union motto of ‘people helping people,’ ” said Matthew Smith, a Hughes marketing representative who works closely with the Hughes Helps initiative. “Volunteering in or donating to the community gives all of us a sense of family and togetherness.” Every year the credit union helps a number of Tucson organizations through community outreach. Since 2015, Hughes has provided cash donations to more than 100 local organizations through corporate sponsorships and employee donations, and employees have donated thousands of volunteer hours, Smith said. Verduzco, 22, is an Earn to Learn scholar, a revolutionary “savings to scholarship” program that empowers low- to moderate-income Arizona students to successfully complete college. Hughes is a participating financial institution and corporate sponsor for Earn to Learn and Verduzco met with employees when she needed to start saving for the $500 required to be part of the program. “People don’t save because they don’t want to – they don’t save because they don’t know how,” Verduzco said. “The

people at Hughes helped me learn. I started saving with Earn to Learn and saw how setting aside $50 each month leads to $500 in 10 months. I thought maybe I could do more, so I asked Hughes about setting up a second account for non-educational expenses. “After that, because they knew one of my goals was to buy a car, they helped me build my credit with the secured credit card and a year later, walked me through every step to get an auto loan. The people there look out for you and because of that, I’m actually getting my whole family to transfer over to Hughes so they can learn how to save and build credit.”

Hughes Helps By the Numbers In 2016 2,231 Hours volunteered by staff $80,000 Contributed to local organizations with $36,550 towards education 26,670 Students reached

The credit union has a special commitment to education and youth and directs much of its outreach there, including such efforts as the Arizona KidCats Club, a partnership with University of Arizona Athletics funded by Hughes to connect elementary and middle school students with college, and Arizona Financial Faceoff, a financial-case competition for middle school and high school students in which winners share $4,000 in prize money Hughes donates. Additionally, Hughes Federal Credit Union in 2016 donated approximately

$9,000 worth of computer equipment to the Pima County Joint Technical Education District Information Technology Program, sponsored Sporting Chance Active Afternoons so students can play basketball for free, provided financial literacy training to 75 Girl Scouts attending schools in underserved neighborhoods as part of the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona’s “Value of a Dollar” program, helped raise $15,000 for TMC for Children. It is in its 12th year of offering scholarships to local high school students. Due to all this good work and more, Hughes Federal Credit Union recently won first place in the 2016 Dora Maxell Social Responsibility Community Awards and has advanced to the national competition. The award recognizes a credit union that promotes social responsibility within the community, especially for external activities that strengthen the community. The recognition is well-deserved, said Peterson, the Oro Valley Friends president. Her group and the Pima County Friends of the Library are beneficiaries of Hughes’ generosity because the credit union offers free membership to the credit union to anyone who buys an annual $10 membership in either Friends’ group. “I can’t say enough good about Hughes,” Peterson said. “They are so committed to the Friends’ mission. Our group has to buy whatever the library’s budget can’t afford, and that can be a lot. We’ve bought equipment for a makerspace, recently built a parking lot expansion and provided scholarships to high school students – all with great help from the money we raise with the Hughes partnership. They have such a community mentality and I don’t know what we’d do without them.”

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BizSALES

Hard is Easy, When You Discover Easy is Hard By Jeffrey Gitomer

Make a sale − that’s the easy part. Now comes the hard part: Doing everything else. That’s why it’s imperative that salespeople look at the sale as one small part of the selling process. The easy one. “Thanks for the order, Bill. I’ve given the details to our installation team, your deadlines to manufacturing and shipping, your training requirements to service and all of your financial information to accounting.” Making the sale is not just the money and the victory. It’s also the foundation for a relationship − as long as the rest of the process flows as you have sold it. Too often salespeople “sell and run,” leaving the details of delivery, installation, coordination and exceeding expectations to someone else. Big mistake. If you’re in sales, and you’re looking to make a successful career of it, you have a responsibility that extends way beyond a signed piece of paper. Here are the “beyond the sale” elements than make a relationship probable: Deliver

After a sale there is an expectation for delivery. Salespeople tend to delegate this process as much as possible, because they want to make the next sale. Quickly. Perform as expected. Both as a person and a product, the customer wants top quality, regardless of the price they paid. They also expect a quality person to be there to see things through.

Keep promises

Customers remember promises that salespeople make, most times better than the salespeople who make them. If the promises are kept everyone wins. If the promises are not kept, the salesperson loses.

Provide value

This is a critical area as you seek to build a long-term relationship. Value is not what you add. Value is what you do to help customers understand how they use and produce, and how they profit from purchase. Caution: What you believe is “valuable” may be perceived by the customer as “part of the sale.” Serve personally

Customers are counting on you to know your stuff as it relates to their purchase. They expect you to anticipate needs, coordinate details and handle every aspect of the “after the sale” process.

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Fix it yourself

When you get a call for service, DO NOT PASS IT ON. Handle it yourself. Customers don’t want or expect a runaround, they just want it handled, and expect it from you.

Communicate weekly from the time you complete the deal

I have stressed value messages since I began mine. Until the initial process is delivered, and everyone has been trained or is comfortably using your products and services, communication should be frequent, and communication to customer requests, immediate. After that, you build value towards the NEXT sale by staying in touch with (in front of) every customer every week. WOW! them

It may be something as simple as fast service or personal phone calls. But however your customer defines WOW!, you better be executing it. After the sale, salespeople know how to celebrate but seem to forget the prime fact that the customer didn’t just buy your product or service, they bought YOU. In fact, they bought you FIRST. And they feel let down, even abandoned, when the person they have faith in abandons the process after the deal has been consummated. The best thing a salesperson can do to avoid any awkwardness on their part, or disappointment on the customers part, is to set expectations and details for delivery BEFORE the sale is completed − or, if you’re chicken to make full disclosure (as many are), immediately after the contract is signed. If you do everything I have outlined, I can assure you two customer responses. They will buy more, and they will buy again. When this occurs, it’s not just a reason to celebrate, it’s a report card that you are doing what the customer expects you to do, not just what your company dictates as policy or procedure. And it creates the basis for relationship. NOW, you can ask for a referral and get one. NOW, you can call them on the phone and they’ll return your call. NOW, you have earned the next order. Many managers make the fatal mistake of training salespeople to ask for referrals as soon as they make a sale. That’s not a big mistake, that’s a HUGE mistake. Maybe even a fatal mistake. You haven’t even delivered. Why would anyone in their right mind want to help you before you have helped them? Making the sale is a gateway to a relationship. All you have to do is everything else. Biz Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of twelve best-selling books including The Sales Bible and The Little Red Book of Selling and The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude. His real-world ideas and content are also available as online courses at www.GitomerLearningAcademy.com. For information about training and seminars visit www.Gitomer.com or www.GitomerCertifiedAdvisors.com, or email Jeffrey personally at salesman@gitomer.com. © 2017 All Rights Reserved - Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer, Inc • 704/333-1112

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BizHONORS 2017 Good Scout Award

The Catalina Council, Boy Scouts of America, has been around for pretty close to 100 years now, serving the southeastern portion of Arizona with a mission of preparing young people to make ethical choices over their lifetimes. To accomplish that goal, the values of the Scout oath and law are instilled in an effort to build tomorrow’s leaders today – duty to God and country, other people and self. And under the mantra of Being Prepared is the scout slogan – “do a good turn daily.” It takes efforts by today’s leaders to build the character of those who will lead tomorrow; and for their adult efforts, three will be recognized at the 18th annual Good Scout Awards luncheon in April. Last year’s fundraising luncheon event brought in close to $50,000 for the Catalina Council of Boy Scouts, which serves 7,000 scouts in the Southern Arizona area. Awardees are the late Donald Lee Baker, former co-owner of Larsen Baker; Bill Nelson, president emeritus, GLHN Architects & Engineers; and Garry Brav, president of BFL Construction Company.

Donald Lee Baker By Lee Allen As co-founder of Larsen Baker, the largest retail-commercial property owner in Tucson, Don Baker left his mark on Tucson. Baker, 59, and his wife died in a private plane crash in January of 2016. George Larsen, Baker’s business partner for more than two decades, will speak on his former partner’s behalf as the two used to speak for each other in developing numerous commercial properties. In fact, they never formalized their working relationship. “There was no document, just a handshake and a promise to work together,” Larsen said. That displayed trust factor was reflective of the 12 points of Boy Scout Law that include trustworthiness and loyalty – “Being morally straight, living a life with honesty, and being a person of strong character.” www.BizTucson.com

“Don was a larger-than-life character who lived, breathed and inhaled real estate, his one love,” Larsen said. “He was fun to work with. Extremely kind and highly energetic – he’d be at work at 5 a.m. sending emails. And his dedication, like that of a Boy Scout, was lifelong – from working at a pizza place as a teen until he entered the real estate field right out of college. “He worked hard and always tried to do things right. He valued his 30 employees and wanted them to thrive, to the point that he wrote them into his will. And he cared deeply about the community and how he contributed to making it better. Our company takes tired old buildings and repurposes them, like remodeling a warehouse into a school. That was his passion because he wanted to improve the community while having some fun doing it.”

Biz

Baker, who died in a 2016 plane crash, will receive a special tribute commemorating his life and legacy while Nelson will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement award and Brav will be presented with a Good Scout award.

2017 GOOD SCOUTS AWARDS LUNCHEON PRESENTED BY CATALINA COUNCIL BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA Thursday, April 27 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Tucson – Reid Park 445 S. Alvernon Way Call (520) 750-0385 x 13 or visit https://catalinacouncil.org Spring 2017

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BizHONORS 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award

Honoring Bill Nelson By Lee Allen

This onetime Scout spent 45 years – 1970-2015 – with GLHN Architects and Engineers before earning the title of president emeritus. Nelson guided GLHN through an extraordinary period of growth and development. That kind of tenure is reflective in his Lifetime Achievement Award. He also was a longtime adjunct professor at the University of Arizona. “It’s always been one of my maxims to work hard to make everybody around you successful and I’ve tried to help as many people along the way 134 BizTucson

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as I could,” he said. “Recognize the potential in people and give them the resources, then get the heck out of the way and watch them move forward. It’s amazing.” Nelson, who worked his way through the ranks of Cub Scout, Boy Scout and Explorer – Order of the Arrow – said scouting was a big part of his life and it first taught him the wisdom of making objective decisions. “Making decisions, without bias, without prejudice, embracing the objective ways of thinking that would get

you better results. “I wouldn’t say I’ve complied with all 12 attributes of the Boy Scout Law with regularity, but when I made major decisions in life, I reflected back on that credo. “When I reflect back on the concepts I learned as a scout, they have helped me form the value system that you carry with you for your whole life. Scouting was important for me some six decades ago, and for young people today, it’s still important.”

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BizHONORS 2017 Good Scout Award

Honoring Garry Brav By Lee Allen

As founder and president of BFL Construction Company since 1977, Garry Brav expanded the firm into multimillion dollar commercial projects throughout Southern Arizona and a firm that repeatedly earns a “Top 10” commercial contractor designation. Active in the community on several fronts, he has received honors including the Urban League Man of the Year, the American Cancer Society’s Lifetime Achievement Award and the League of United Latin American Citizens Community Service Award. In his biography and exemplified in his business conduct, Brav stresses the highest standards of integrity, trust, performance and accountability, and www.BizTucson.com

points out the irony that while he never was a Scout, “My conduct is consistent with the scouting code. I’ve been in the construction business for 45 years in Tucson and have a good reputation in the community for doing what I say I’m going to do.” He got involved in his myriad community project responsibilities for a simple reason: He loves the community. “Tucson is a great place to live, and giving back is a civic responsibility that everyone should discharge because if citizens don’t participate, if they’re not a part of the decision-making process, they get what they deserve. Participating in as many areas as possible is a collective situation and one where we can

make a difference.” When he first got involved, he watched and learned from other early Tucson leaders like Katie Dusenberry and Jannie Cox and how they addressed the issues. “It was an enlightening opportunity to see how things work for the good of the community. Progress doesn’t just happen, it’s a process. “I’ve made it a personal mantra to make sure the things I do can withstand the light of day,” he said, quoting from his favorite book, “Cowboy Ethics: The Code of the West.” “Live each day with courage. Be tough, but fair. When you make a promise, keep it. Do these basics and you’ll never go wrong.”

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BizAWARDS

LEGACY AWARD

LEGACY AWARD

Southern Arizona Home Builders Association Annual Awards

More than 300 members and guests of the Southern Arizona Home Builders Association attended the Annual Awards and Installation Reception at the Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa in February. Legacy Award recipients for lifetime achievement are:

1

John Wesley Miller Founder of John Wesley Miller Companies

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Southwest Gas From left, Shari Olsen, Jose Esparza, Todd Didier, Matt Minder, Phil Connors, Walter Richter

3

David Greenberg A life director of SAHBA – Barbara Tarrish accepting the Legacy Award, on behalf of the late David Greenberg

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The other award recipients for 2016 are:

                                                  

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Production Home Builder of the Year: Pulte Group – From left, Trey Bitteker, Albert Kingsbury, David Godlewski (SAHBA), Sam Mills, Cory Garcia   Custom Home Builder of the Year:  TRS Custom Builders – Tim Staring   Remodeler of the Year: Re-Bath of Tucson – Jeff and Lisa Walling   Trade Partner of the Year: Arizona Wholesale Supply – Larry Gibbons   Associate Member Firm of the Year – Small Business:  A & E Recycled Granite – Josh and Julie Olauson   Associate Member Firm of the Year – Corporate: Title Security Agency – Bruce Jacobs   Individual Member of the Year: Joe McMahon, Pro-Copy Office Solutions   Sales Manager of the Year: Alia Jones, KB Home   Sales Professional of the Year: Mary Carranza, Maracay Homes

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LEGACY AWARD

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BizBRIEF

Mike Varney

Lori Banzhaf

Major Awards for Tucson Metro Chamber

The Tucson Metro Chamber was recognized with four major awards at the 2017 annual conference of the Western Association of Chamber Executives held in early February in Los Angeles:

President and CEO Mike Varney was selected as the CEO of the Year for the Tucson Metro Chamber’s overall program of work and its organizational achievements and contributions to the chamber of commerce industry over a career spanning 15 years in Las Vegas and Tucson.

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VP Lori Banzhaf was recognized as the Gerald Hathaway Staff Person of the Year for her achievements in business development and for creating an important workforce development program called Intern-to-Career. This program links Tucson Unified School District students with local businesses to create paid summer internships that ultimately lead to employment in five different sectors for those students – auto technology, construction, engineering, healthcare and hospitality. The Chamber’s Intern-to-Career program was also recognized for its originality and impact on improving the availability of qualified local employees to fill the growing needs for these jobs. The Chamber’s new video, called “The Good Stuff,” won first place in the communications award category. The video was produced locally by Abbott Animation, owned by University of Arizona graduate Don Abbott.

The mission of the Tucson Metro Chamber is to lead and advocate for a successful community. The Chamber is an investor-based business advocacy and economic expansion organization that represents more than 1,500 businesses, which employ more than 160,000 employees in the greater Tucson area. WACE is an association of 420 chambers of commerce in the western states of the U.S. and the western provinces of Canada. It was founded in 1924 for California chambers of commerce, then expanded in 1995 to include the other western states and western provinces of Canada.

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SPECIAL REPORT 2017

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Society for Human Resource Management – Greater Tucson


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Members come from all walks of life – business owners, entrepreneurs, independent contractors and HR professionals. – Ila

Cipriani President SHRM-GT

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BizHR Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson

SHRM-GT

400 Strong

HR Pros Support Any Who Need It By Christy Krueger The world’s largest organization dedicated to developing, serving and educating human resource professionals has a chapter in Tucson that professes to be one of the strongest in the nation. With an active membership of more than 400, Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson is able to provide the local human resources community with all levels of support – from legal updates and industry certification to workforce readiness training and professional development. Ila Cipriani, VP of human resources for Goodwill Industries of Southern Arizona, is the 2017 SHRM-GT president, following six years of serving in various other board and committee roles. Through her time with the organization, Cipriani is familiar with its members and the benefits they see in belonging.

“Members come from all walks of life – business owners, entrepreneurs, independent contractors and HR professionals,” she said. “They may be in a one-deep HR position in a company. Everyone comes to SHRM for a different reason.” Many, she added, are there for training, recertification and networking. “They come to connect with others in the community.” SHRM-GT supports 12 committees, each with a chair and member volunteers who help run them. The programs committee stays busy selecting topics and speakers for its regularly scheduled lunch and breakfast workshops that include issues such as communicating and hiring. “Sometimes,” Cipriani said, “things are going on in the field of HR that are big event-changing topics,” so they are added to the schedule. Most often, subject matter ideas come from continued on page 144 >>>

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BizHR continued from page 143 attendees who are surveyed for their requests. Three times a year SHRM-GT holds special events, such as the all-day Law Update Conference in April. “We invite law firms that specialize in employment law. They update us on the court system, what new laws there are and practical tips,” Cipriani said. For the National Speaker Event held every fall, SHRM-GT invites a highprofile presenter who speaks on broader work-related topics that are of interest to the general business community. It is open to the public. SHRM-GT’s largest event is the Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Awards in November. Requiring months of preparation, work is divided between three committees to assure it runs smoothly and is well-attended. “This recognizes innovative programs across all spectrums,” Cipriani explained. Other committees include the newly created digital presence committee, which works to create a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, and the professional certification committee. This important group puts together study sessions that prepare members for the various levels of human resources certification testing, and have been shown to improve test success rates. Cipriani is especially proud of SHRM-GT’s workforce readiness committee that is partnering with Junior Achievement to offer training to youth in the community. “We engage with high school kids as they make the decisions of what they want to do,” she said. Connecting with the younger generation is another step in SHRM-GT’s commitment to helping the local workforce reach its potential. “We’re a tremendous HR professional resource for anyone in the greater Tucson community. We’re working hard this year to put ourselves out there to help more people.”

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2017 Workshop & Events Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson

March 14

June 13

October 10

April 18

July 11

Nov. 14

Lunch workshop 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Sheraton Tucson Hotel and Suites 5151 E. Grant Road Law Update Conference 7:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Westward Look Wyndham Grand Resort and Spa 245 E. Ina Road

May 9

Lunch workshop 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Sheraton Tucson Hotel and Suites 5151 E. Grant Road

Breakfast workshop 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Sheraton Tucson Hotel and Suites 5151 E. Grant Road Breakfast workshop 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Sheraton Tucson Hotel and Suites 5151 E. Grant Road

August 8

Breakfast workshop 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Sheraton Tucson Hotel and Suites 5151 E. Grant Road

Sept. 12

Lunch workshop 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Sheraton Tucson Hotel and Suites 5151 E. Grant Road Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Awards Westward Look Wyndham Grand Resort and Spa 245 E. Ina Road

December 12

Lunch workshop 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Sheraton Tucson Hotel and Suites 5151 E. Grant Road

National Speaker Event 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Westward Look Wyndham Grand Resort and Spa 245 E. Ina Road Join SHRM of Greater Tucson Prospective members must be currently employed and/or meet the membership qualifications outlined within the SHRM of Greater Tucson bylaws. The cost for membership is $85 per calendar year for Professional and General Members, $110 for Associate Members and is payable by check or credit card.

The Application Process Once completed, your application will be routed to our Membership Committee and reviewed by the Board of Directors. After a decision has been made, you will receive notice of your membership status and dues amount along with all the pertinent new member information.

Apply Online If you are not already a member of the national Society for Human Resources Management, we encourage you to join and experience the exceptional professional development and services offered by this international organization. For more information visit www.shrm.org. We look forward to welcoming new members and advancing the HR profession in Southern Arizona.

For details, contact Garrett Kowalewski at GarrettK@StaffMattersInc.com www.BizTucson.com

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Trust The Clements Team To Protect You & Your Business The Clements Agency, LLC is a member of Trusted Choice®, offering the smart way to buy insurance. Trusted Choice® agents and brokers represent multiple insurance companies, offering you a variety of coverage choices and customized plans to meet your specialized needs. Most importantly, as Trusted Choice® agents we are not employees of an insurance company, so you have someone who works for you, not the company.

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est .

2000

520.624.3456 6 2 4 5 E . B ro a d w a y, S u i t e 3 1 0 , Tu c s o n , A Z 8 5 7 1 1

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BizHR

Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson

SHRM-GT Celebrating Innovation in the Workplace Award Winners By Christy Krueger More than 200 attendees helped celebrate outstanding achievements in the field of human resources during Society for Human Resource Managementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual awards ceremony last November at Loews Ventana Canyon Resort. Ten winners in four categories proudly carried their prizes off the stage, some as individual honorees and some representing their companies and organizations. continued on page 148 >>>

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continued from page 147

Innovation in the Workplace Award Winners COMMUNITY IMPACT

team has been working on this program for over one year. Team members help visitors to be the best they can, and the employees experience the same as the visitors. They’re learning creativeness, openness and being kind.” From left – Victoria Rubio, Pam Peterson, Catherine Moseley, Cresencio Harrison, Jane Curtis and Diana Pollack

Winners must demonstrate a commitment to volunteerism through human resource programs, make a significant impact on programs supporting workforce needs and act as role models to create positive change through human resource efforts.

Small Company Winner Tucson Federal Credit Union

Susan Stansbury accepted the award and said, “Winning is validation that when you do the right things for the right reasons, great things can happen.” Pictured from left – Erica Robles and Susan Stansbury

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“It’s really quite an honor, but it’s one I share with Lynette Jaramillo and Agnes Poore, the two co-owners. It’s their leadership and the 248 employees that propel me everyday. They empower their employees.”

Medium Company Winner Goodwill Industries of Southern Arizona

Ila Cipriani accepted the award and said, “I am honored. Goodwill provides a hand up to the community through programs we offer and it is great to be recognized for the work we do.”

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TECHNOLOGY AND PROCESS IMPROVEMENT

Large Company Winner Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital

Winning companies have implemented systems that enhance employee processes, improve employee participation in a program, realize cost savings and resulted in measurable change.

Patty Guzman accepted the award and said, “I’m extremely proud. Carondelet is a staple in Tucson. We feel so blessed to work with the community.” From left – Stacie Homan, Steve Rivera, Karen Sumerwell, Patty Guzman, Katie Loy-Gouhin and Jeanette Tellez-Hopkins, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital

Small Company Winner American Board of Radiology

Karyn Howard accepted the award and said, “I am thrilled to win the technology and process improvement award. We have a core team that examines our current processes and identifies improvements and opportunities for automation. As a result of this effort, the American Board of Radiology has seen an increase in efficiency and an improvement in customer service.”

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

Honorees in this category have a track record of strengthening community relations, adding measurable value to the company and benefiting the employees’ quality of life and work life through an environment of diversity and inclusion.

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Winner Linkages Experience

Mark Ziska accepted the award and said, “I’m really excited, more about our mission than the award – to make sure those with disabilities have the same chance to apply for a job as everyone else. I want to see it happen nationally.” (Read more about this workplace-changing company on page 180).

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Nominees in this category must demonstrate the ability to lead through challenges, adapt to change and inspire a workplace culture of accountability and engagement.

Small Company Winner Mitch Pisik, TM International

“It’s outstanding because I give a lot of presentations on leadership and you’re a leader if people follow you. HR is such an important part of leadership of a company and it’s wonderful to be a part of this.”

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Large Company Winner Catherine Moseley, Canyon Ranch

On her new-hire orientation initiative geared toward accepting diversity of employees and guests she said, “I’m thrilled. The

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Medium Company Winner Town of Oro Valley

Gary Bridget accepted on behalf of the town’s employee well-being program, which includes, among other benefits, an onsite health clinic offering free basic medical care to employees and their dependents. “This is recognition for all the hard work with the team, vendors, the community and the employees who pitch in their time and look out for each other.” From left – Gary Bridget, Jennifer Campbell and Lauren Seder, Town of Oro Valley

LEADERSHIP – INDIVIDUAL

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Medium Company Winner Natalie Ronstadt Casa de la Luz Hospice

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Large Company Winner Mister Car Wash

Devon Underwood accepted the award and said, “We’re very excited. It’s nice to hear you’re being recognized. Our organization is trying to get the word out about being innovative in our hiring.” From left – Anna Zappia and Kylie Kim, Mister Car Wash

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Board of Directors Society for Human Resource Management of Greater Tucson 1) Ila Cipriani,

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SHRM FOUNDATION

16) Coral Votroubek EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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Building a Community of Empowered Women Kelly Fryer, CEO

100TH BIRTHDAY PARTY YWCA OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA Thursday, May 4 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tucson Community Center 260 S. Church Ave. Individual tickets: $55 Table sponsorship $1,000 Call 884-7810 or email John-Peter Wilhite at jpwilhite@ywca.org Register online to buy tickets www.ywcatucson.org (then go to “events”) www.BizTucson.com

Things like attire and attitudes may have changed over the last 100 years, but the mission of the local YWCA remains the same – fighting for economic and social justice in Southern Arizona. On May 4, the Y will celebrate its legacy with a review of a century of history since its establishment in 1917, just five years after Arizona achieved statehood. That marks the appearance of “visionary women” committed to “eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all” a commitment shared with 250 YWCA associations across the nation. “That remains our mission today,” said Kelly Fryer, CEO, “building a community of empowered women – change makers – to create the change they wish to see in the world and their own lives.” Fryer noted that Southern Arizona was a very different place 100 years ago. “Postage stamps cost two cents. Pop McKale coached the fledgling Wildcats. The Arizona Women’s Suffrage manual outlined details of the newly enacted women’s right to vote. And there were fewer than 100 miles of paved roads. It was into this environment that a community of change makers was born.” Fryer did her homework before signing on as the Y’s CEO four years ago. “This organization has been right on the front lines now for 100 years. Our Y represents a history of firsts – the first licensed infant care for mothers, the first shelter for domestic violence survivors, the first integrated swimming pool in town and, for a long time, the only real option for integrated housing for young female university students. Being a part of a movement like this, that has always been first to take action for women and people of color, is appealing and exciting and I’m glad to be here now to carry on that legacy.” Today, a small staff works with a budget of about $1.7 million to welcome and assist the 50,000 women who come through the Y’s doors annually. “We could always use more revenue,” Fryer said. “We’re able to serve the numbers we do and offer the kinds of programs

we do because so many people volunteer their time to lead programs and offer services. We’re not a charity, but a community of people who work together to make Tucson and Arizona a better place.” Ever since 1917, the Y has been as a place for working women to get support from other women, Fryer said. “Back then, segregation was the norm. People of color had limited rights, and to women of a century ago, the Y’s efforts to create economic and social justice for everyone represented radical vision.” Today’s Y programs continue to focus on helping women, especially underserved women of color or recent immigrants, to get themselves and their families out of poverty, to get jobs, earn educational credentials and gain leadership skills for financial stability. “What is different today than back then is an emphasis on direct services, getting more strategic about working collaboratively to change the systems that make things difficult,” Fryer said. “It’s a systemic issue and we need to change the rules and level the playing field.” YWCA of Southern Arizona finds itself not in a holding pattern, but in a growth mode. “In the past 100 years, this organization has had peaks and valleys and we’re now in a peak mode,” Fryer said. “Our operating budget and programming has more than tripled since I’ve been here. We’ve added a campus, launched an economic development program and created a statewide training and advocacy center. So while we’re getting ready to celebrate 100 years of history, we’re also focusing on plans for our second century, creating a strategic map to get us there. It’s exciting to be working to create positive change.” That change requires revenue, and toward that end on May 4, the Y will hold a 100th birthday fundraising luncheon, which Fryer called “an incredible history of women,” an opportunity to share a vision of where the Y has been and where it’s headed.

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PHOTOS: COURTESY YWCA

By Lee Allen


Cathy Engelbert CEO Deloitte

PHOTO: COURTESY DELOITTE

BizHONOR

Cathy Engelbert Q&A with the UA Executive of the Year By Romi Carrell Wittman Cathy Engelbert, CEO of Deloitte and the first-ever female CEO of a “Big Four” accounting firm, has been named the University of Arizona Executive of the Year. “Cathy Engelbert’s career trajectory has been remarkable,” said Paulo Goes, dean of the UA Eller College of Management. “Not only did she become the first female CEO of one of the big four accounting firms, she changed Deloitte’s corporate culture to emphasize the importance of mentorship, inclusion and work-life balance.” Engelbert heads the New York national office and is responsible for 80,000 professionals. Deloitte serves more than 80 percent of the Fortune 500, according to her corporate bio. Engelbert will be honored at the 2017 UA Executive of the Year Luncheon March 31 at Loews Ventana Canyon Resort.

But 30 years later, here I am. The thing that keeps me energized is the chance to grow our people and to advise clients on their most important issues. I’m always amazed when I talk with our professionals on the breadth of our work with clients − whether it’s technologies like artificial intelligence, cloud, social, mobile and analytics, or issues like M&A, pensions, derivatives, supply chain, human capital and R&D. Our clients look to us for all of these. When I started, our work was more manual and labor-intensive. We had no computers, printers or smartphones − we didn’t even have fax machines. Today, we have augmented intelligence, sophisticated analytics platforms and we’re even piloting drone technology to assist with professional services. And the profession has become much more diverse.

You have devoted your career to Deloitte. What attracted you to the company originally? What draws you to it now? How has the industry and company changed since you first began?

You are the first woman to be named a CEO of a “Big Four” accounting firm, and The Wall Street Journal credited you with breaking the “glass ceiling.” What does this mean for women coming up in the accounting and financial world and the overall corporate world? Do you see yourself as a pioneer?

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A: When I first joined the firm, I knew I’d get a strong foundation in analytical competencies and exposure to senior executives, and that it could be a stepping-stone to lots of options. In fact, I thought I would be here two years and then out.

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A: Honestly, at first I was uncomfortable with the attention.

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by the many letters from men and women saying what it meant to them. The fact is, we can do more. In corporate America, the latest figures show only 27 companies out of 500 in the S&P Index have a female CEO at the helm. Compare that to 2009, when it was 18. So, some progress, yes, but clearly we still have more work to do to move from novelty to norm.

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You routinely meet with the CEOs of some of the biggest companies in the world, each with their own challenges. Is there one thing you can point to that keeps them all awake at night?

A: The number one question executives ask me is, “How

do I innovate and grow?” Many are worried about disruptions, technology innovation and the speed at which they need to make investments and transform their business models. The pace of change today is exponential − with social, mobile, cloud, data analytics, augmented intelligence, augmented reality, the blurring of industry lines, the digitization of everything. I call it the “Fusion Revolution,” because we’re seeing this amazing fusion of our physical, digital and biological worlds. Disruptive innovations are creating new industries and business models while destroying old ones. The next big shift is likely in data platforms. Technologies come and go, but core advances like augmented intelligence, digital and cyber seem here to stay. That’s what I hear from CEOs that keeps them up at night − not who will disrupt them, but what.

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With your long list of career accomplishments, you are frequently named one of most powerful women and influential executives. What lies ahead for you? What are your future plans and goals?

A: I am humbled by the recognition. My whole focus is to

help our clients and our people embrace a culture of courage around change in this fast-paced era. I hope we can look back and say that we helped clients navigate an era of disruption, and that our firm was ready for it, and came out stronger than before.

Biz

UA EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR LUNCHEON HONORING CATHY ENGELBERT Friday, March 31 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Loews Ventana Canyon Resort 7000 N. Resort Drive $85 per person, $850 for a table of 10 For more information: https://www.eller.arizona.edu/eoy/2017

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PHOTOS:JACQUELYNN BUCK

Jody Mackey Author

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BizPUBLISHING

Author Shares Loves with Young Readers By Valerie Vinyard Jody Mackey loves to create. Her love of writing and illustrating has translated into brilliant books for young girls. Mackey has penned four page-turners so far: “Sally Loves ... to Swim”; “Sally Loves ... Coloring, Activities and Coloring Book”; “Sally Loves ... to Dance”; and, most recently, “Sally Loves ... Horses,” which was released in May and is already in its second printing. In “Sally Loves ... Horses,” Mackey prefaces her book with “may all your dreams come true.” That could be a self-fulfilling statement for Mackey. Becoming an author and illustrator didn’t come about until she retired from the car business, where she worked for years. Mackey is married to local car magnate Don Mackey. “I never really did my art,” said Mackey, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from the University of Arizona. “It was fun to be retired for a while, but I always wanted to do something. They’re my life, they’re

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my stories. It’s a labor of love.” The lifelong athlete and animal lover’s books focus on a sport she plays or an activity that someone close to her is committed to. Mackey also takes her characters from real life. Sally is her best girlfriend. Her horses in the book have the same names as her steeds that she rides three to four times a week – Dillon, Duke and Tinkerbelle. Helenjoyce “Girlie” Abad, her assistant since 1994, also makes an appearance in “Sally Loves … to Dance.” In the book, Abad is the grandma who teaches Sally’s friend how to hula. “She made us all feel a part of her life in these books,” said Abad, who hails from Nanakuli, a town on the island of Oahu. In the hula book, Sally’s friend tells her that her grandma (Girlie) will teach her how to hula. She is the “kumu,” or teacher. In real life, the grandmother of 19 teaches hula a couple of times a week at Movement Culture Center downtown. She has been teaching hula since the mid-1990s. During the

last two years at the Tucson Festival of Books, Abad has performed half-hour hula demonstrations in honor of the book. “It looks easy, but when you start dancing, it’s harder than aerobics,” Abad said. Even though much of her publicity has stemmed from her regular appearances at the Tucson Festival of Books, Mackey’s books have caught on nationally. She estimated that she sells about 100 books each month through Amazon.com in addition to libraries, elementary schools, select bookstores and her personal website: champyouth. com. Mackey used to autograph her books in her usual cursive signature. She soon realized that many kids nowadays only learn how to print. “One little girl said, ‘That’s not how you spell my name,’ ” said Mackey, laughing, noting that now she signs her books in block letters. With Mackey’s career switch, Abad has noticed a change in Mackey’s personality, too. “She’s more relaxed now,” she said. “But it’s been keeping her busy. She just loves it. She works so hard at it. Her books are really heartfelt. All of her books encourage youth to get out there and be active.” Case in point: When Abad’s granddaughter first read Mackey’s swim book, she said it really encouraged her to learn to swim. The hula book also encouraged her to continue hula. continued on page 159 >>> Spring 2017

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BizPUBLISHING continued from page 157 “I’m always so amazed with how she comes up with these really encouraging stories,” said Abad, who said Mackey would read her books to her as she worked on them. It’s easy, Mackey said. “Sally does the things I love,” said Mackey, who’s also a former tap dancer. “It’s so easy for me to write about it – it’s my life.” Mackey said her grandfather greatly influenced her. “He was a tough guy,” she said. “He always told me, ‘Don’t let anyone tell you can’t do that.’ That wasn’t something you told little girls back then.” Mackey has carried that message throughout her books, much to readers’ approval. “They love the message,” Mackey said. “If you work hard, you can do anything you want to do. It’s a good message for girls.” Mackey’s books also educate. In the back of the book, there’s a glossary for readers who don’t know horse lingo such as “curry,” “barrel races” and “lope.” Mackey is currently working on “Sally Loves ... Skateboarding.” The topic came about while she was writing the swim book, which stems from Mackey’s love of competing in triathlons, including the Ironman. She said that when she wrote the swim book she stressed the importance of Sally wearing a helmet whenever she rides a bike. When her three grandnephews read an early draft of “Sally Loves ... Horses,” they wondered why that same focus wasn’t on using a helmet when she was riding. Mackey revised the draft to reflect the importance of wearing riding helmets. Later on, the boys had more ideas for Mackey. “The boys were so engaged,” she said. “They said, ‘Maybe Sally wants to skateboard.’ ” Thus, the next topic was born. The boys will be Sally’s best friends in her next book, which Mackey estimates will be out in May. So what will come after skateboarding? Mackey said her next book idea is up in the air, except for one stipulation: “It will have to be something I love.”

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Raising Millions for Type 1 Diabetes Research & Treatment

BizBENEFIT

Father’s Day Council Tucson Honors Dedicated Dads By Romi Carrell Wittman

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happened without the support of the Father’s Day Council Tucson.” Kids receive treatment at the Angel Wing for Children with Diabetes located at Banner-Diamond Children’s Medical Center, the Steele Center’s clinical partner. An onsite lab checks hemoglobin levels, meaning kids don’t have to trek to a lab offsite. A clinical psychiatrist is available to counsel kids on the stress of living with a chronic illness. A nurse educator, a dietician and a social worker are each available to help them manage the disease.

23RD ANNUAL FATHER OF THE YEAR AWARDS GALA PRESENTED BY FATHER’S DAY COUNCIL TUCSON

The third mission – research – centers on why certain people develop the disease and others don’t. “We know it’s tied to genetics and environmental factors,” Ghishan said. “But there’s a trigger as well.” With initial funding from the FDC, Steele Center researchers developed a preliminary model of autoimmune diseases and triggers. They took the model to the National Institutes of Health and were awarded a grant of $1.7 million over five years to study this in much greater detail with a focus on finding a cure. “The Steele Center is leading the nation in this research. We’re competing at the national level,” Ghishan said. “The Steele Center is at the forefront.” The 2017 Father’s Day Council Tucson Honorees are:

Proceeds benefit UA Steele Children’s Research Center

Loews Ventana Canyon Resort 7000 N. Resort Drive Saturday, May 20 5:30 p.m. No-host cocktails, ultimate raffle 7 p.m. Dinner and award presentions

Single ticket – $225 Table of 10 – $2,250 For sponsorship and ticket information please contact Father’s Day Council Tucson’s Treasurer Stephanie Chavez at (520) 343.2615 or Stephanie. Chavez@vantagewest.org To purchase online visit www.fdctucson.org

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Alan Levin Port of Tucson Edward P. Maxwell Southern Arizona Leadership Council (Military Honoree) Luis Felipe Seldner The Offshore Group Robert Smith Planning Design & Operations, The University of Arizona

Michael V. Varney Tucson Metro Chamber

Gregory J. White Raytheon Missile Systems

In addition, five fathers from the Arizona Air National Guard, 162nd Wing, will be honored and recognized by Maj. Gen. Maxwell.

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The Father’s Day Council Tucson wears two equally important hats – recognizing great dads and raising funds to support life-saving pediatric research. For the past 23 years, FDC Tucson has recognized local dads who balance the critical role of fatherhood with career and civic involvement. At the same time, the nonprofit has worked diligently to raise millions of dollars for type 1 diabetes treatment and research. Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, director of the University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center, said the Father’s Day Council Tucson has been a driving force in the breakthrough diabetes and autoimmune disorder research taking place on the campus. “Without the Father’s Day Council we would never have made these advances,” he said. “Through their support we are making progress.” To date the council has raised nearly $4 million. The Steele Center has three primary missions – education, treatment and research. The education component focuses on training doctors to recognize the disease and educating them on how to treat it. “The UA College of Medicine has 115 medical students who have a rotation in pediatrics, and the Department of Pediatrics has 70 pediatric resident physicians,” he said. “We teach them to recognize the disease and how to treat kids and work with parents.” FDC funding supported the Pediatric Endocrinology Fellowship Program, which provides three years of subspecialty training in pediatric endocrinology research and clinical care. “Our pediatric endocrinologists offer stateof-the-art clinical care,” Ghishan said. “Without question, this wouldn’t have

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

2017 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

Back row from left – son Mike, daughter-in-law Claudia, grandchildren Daniel and Zack, daughter Laura, daughter-in-law Jody, son Matt Front row from left – wife Jan, Alan, grandchildren Jessie, Cole, Ella, Gus, Kylie 162 BizTucson

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Alan Lee Levin Founder Port of Tucson

Plain Spoken, Self Confident, Industrious ‘Pass Those Blessings Along’ By Lee Allen Alan Lee Levin – “Butch” to those who know him well – is as plain-spoken and down-to-earth as his favorite attire, a checkered shirt, jeans and brogans. “I don’t own a tuxedo and I have only one suit and that’s for special occasions,” he said; ergo, what you see is what you get, and what you get is a small-town Midwestern farm boy, independent and self-confident since the age of 12 when that boy became a man and learned early that failure wasn’t an option. He grew up to become a very successful Tucson businessman who will be honored as a 2017 Father of the Year by the Father’s Day Council Tucson on May 19. Coming from German stock, Alan’s father and grandfather were very industrious as well as what Levin called bone-headed. “Dad farmed about 6,000 acres. One day when he and grandpa were putting away the mules, my dad’s dad had a heart attack and died in his arms. So my father’s childhood was rough with lots of early responsibilities. He’d never talk about things that bothered him, so he worked hard during the days and drank hard at night. If he’d been drinking the night before, when the help showed up in the morning, I’d assign their day’s work. I was 12 years old.” Levin admits that as the oldest of seven children, he was pressed into service early and despite all his hard work, “my dad would never, ever, compliment me to my face for a job well done.” www.BizTucson.com

Levin decided to be a different kind of parent when his three children – Matt, Mike and Laura – came along. “Unlike how my dad treated me, I compliment my kids, although they have to earn those compliments. One child ended up in a sheriff’s patrol car one night after a DUI charge. I talked to that child, reminded them that actions have consequences, and while I would be there for them, be a supportive parent, I wouldn’t be punitive. They needed to realize the impact of what they’d done and how they’d correct that action, and they did. “Today, I couldn’t do the familyowned Port of Tucson project without them. They’ve become my support group and if I died tomorrow, I know everything we’ve built would be in good hands.” What the Levin clan built is the Port of Tucson, Arizona’s only active inland port, a location for international container shipments and the Century Park Research Center for warehousing, manufacturing and distribution. It’s located on 770 acres on South Kolb Road north of Interstate 10. Over a million square feet have been developed in the Foreign Trade Zone that includes access to a two-mile rail siding. “I had a vision for this place and initially invested $8 to $9 million in startup funding. I never built this place for the money. I did it because it was something that made sense and nobody else had thought of it. Plus, with my mechanical engineering background, I like to build

things, and with my Midwest mentality, I know that if you don’t do it yourself, it’s not going to get done. Businesswise, I’ve been blessed.” If not driven by money or power, what is his motivator? “It’s a good question and I don’t have a ready answer,” he said. “I do know that part of the broad motivation involves helping other people and this business allows me to do so.” Help comes in the form of jobs at the Port of Tucson. “I like teaching young people how to do things because they don’t have an opportunity to learn job skills in school and not everybody’s going on to college.” Of those who do, the Levin family, for nearly 20 years, has provided scholarship funding – $200,000 last year alone – for deserving students at his former high school who commit to four-year studies. There are no grade requirements, just staying on until graduation. “My grandmother taught me that whenever you’ve been blessed, you pass those blessings along and that’s been a lifelong theme for my wife and me during our 50-year marriage.” Levin looks forward to future opportunities to share his value system and parenting style with his eight grandchildren that he said he “absolutely adores.”

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

2017 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

Ted Maxwell with wife Katie Pictured above â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Maxwell family members Charlie, Ali, Alee and Nick 164 BizTucson

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Maj. Gen. Edward P. “Ted” Maxwell Commander Arizona Air National Guard

Rewards, Successes, Challenges ‘The military views itself as a family’ By Valerie Vinyard Ted Maxwell understands the sacrifice that military parents make in serving their country. He entered the Air Force Academy at 18, determined to be part of something bigger than himself and looking forward to being immersed in a culture of academic and physical competitiveness and growth. Each phase, each promotion and each subsequent assignment over 33 years of military service has brought its own rewards and successes − and challenges. He lost a close friend to an aircraft accident in his first F-16 fighter unit. The pilot’s wife was six months pregnant at the time, and Maxwell was deeply touched by how the other military families rallied around the widow to support her as she carried her baby to term on base. In his own case, his son was born while Maxwell was serving as an F-16 instructor pilot at Hill Air Force Base in Utah. Four months later, he deployed for five months. In all, he was gone nearly two years of the four-year assignment. “It is so important for a military parent to have the critical support of their spouse who stays behind to make sure the children are safe, healthy and cared for, but also to know the way the whole military community will step up to support each other when someone is deployed,” said Maxwell, who serves as commander of the Arizona Air National Guard, as well as president of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council. “The military views itself as a family,” Maxwell said, “and that really epitomizes the bond in the military that is very unique.” www.BizTucson.com

He relied on that kind of global support in raising his children, Alexandra, 27, Charlie, 25, Nick, 20, and stepdaughter Alicia, 14. “When we came to Tucson, the kids always felt they had multiple parents, in a way, because we had such close friends that there were always other sets of eyes, watching, supporting and encouraging. It’s not impossible to raise kids if you don’t have that kind of support, but it’s a lot more difficult.” The same model can work in the larger community, said Maxwell, who came to his role with SALC as he transitioned from full-time military to serve in a more traditional, part-time Guard role. “When Katie and I got married seven years ago, I am not sure if she knew what to expect,” Ted said. “But without her support and mutual desire to improve our community, I would not have been able to successfully transition into my new role and continue to serve in the military.” They demonstrate their belief in being involved through his work at SALC and hers at University of Arizona, as well as their volunteer board service with the Arizona Town Hall and the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona. “What I liked about SALC was the commitment to improving the quality of life for all by promoting a vibrant economic and business environment. Everything from healthcare to infrastructure to innovation and education – these are all necessary if we are going to support the quality of life and economic health that this region deserves.” The leadership council has prioritized education, and Maxwell said there is much that business can do

locally, even as policy discussions happen at the state level about resources and achievement. “Much like raising kids, it’s all about being involved,” Maxwell said. “The reality is, we’ve got great schools in this region and there are some that could use more support and involvement from the community. Ultimately, we all have to care about the success of our children.” He’s been fortunate that his two eldest are working here, while Nick is in school at Northern Arizona University. “I would love to have an environment in which children want to grow up here and stay here to build their careers and create their own families. Ensuring we have quality education and plentiful job opportunities is part of making this community better,” Maxwell said. The greater Tucson area might do well to model the military’s sense of cohesion, he said. “We need to all be rowing in the same direction to achieve anything. If we’re all rowing in different directions, the boat isn’t going to move. From years of watching the efforts by the military and its approach, I truly believe if we embrace that ‘one-team’ mantra in this community, there’s so much more we can achieve.” Has he seen an evolution over his tenure? “We’ve had some successes and with success, we’re able to bring more people together to have conversations and work to common goals. It’s getting better and there’s a great deal to be proud of.”

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

2017 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

Front step – Adreana holding Leopoldo II, Ines, Luis Felipe IV, Julia Middle step – Leopoldo, Luis Felipe , Maite Top step – Martha Elva, Luis Felipe III, Juan Carlos Pictured separately – Elena, Juan Carlos II, Barbara and Emilia 166 BizTucson

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Luis Felipe Seldner CEO & Co-Founder The Offshore Group

Family Ties Are Strong In Business, At Home ‘Through the ups and downs, my family has always been there.’ By Jay Gonzales Out of what everyone would most certainly consider a tragedy, Luis Felipe Seldner has chosen to look at the good that came from the bad. Seldner’s mother passed away during his birth, leaving a young baby and husband to make their way in Hermosillo, Mexico, in 1947. Seldner’s father was a successful farmer, but the business forced him to make the decision to send his infant son to live with and be raised by an aunt and uncle in Nogales. “In reality, I had two fathers and a mother and I felt very fortunate because of that,” said Seldner, now a successful businessman. Seldner is one of six named Father of the Year by the Father’s Day Council Tucson. “I never got to live full time with my father,” Seldner said. “But I felt great love for him even though it was from a distance. Knowing that he was my father and that he was a successful farmer in Hermosillo made me very proud of him. “My second parents were just glad that I came into their life. They had no sons and they really pampered me. I was a very fortunate fellow to have dual parents.” Seldner, 70, has three sons of his own, who have successful careers of their own. Luis Jr. is 43, Juan Carlos is 40 and Leopoldo is 33. Today they all work side by side in businesses their dad built through the ups and downs of recessions and changing economic times. “I love the Father of the Year title,” Seldner said a day after being notified www.BizTucson.com

of the honor. “I don’t know if I deserve it or not. You have to ask my sons. But I have always been very inclined toward family. They are my fortaleza, my strength. Through the ups and downs in my life, my family has always been there.” Seldner’s primary business, The Offshore Group, is the result of a won’tgive-up attitude toward an idea he and a business partner had in the 1970s that took a couple of tries to get off the ground. The Offshore Group provides shelter services for companies, primarily manufacturers, that want to do business in Mexico. It provides shared administrative services and logistics, allowing those companies to focus on their products. Luis Jr. has been the president of The Offshore Group for four years. Juan Carlos is president of The ILS Company, the logistics arm of The Offshore Group. And Leopoldo is in banking and oversees two finance companies that were acquired by the family. “It keeps me close to them,” Luis Sr. said. “It keeps me in conversation with them. It keeps me close to how they move through life, how they’ve grown into being parents.” Seldner now has seven grandkids and another on the way, due in May. Yet it hasn’t been a total man’s world around the Seldner household for the 43 years Luis and his wife, Martha, have been parents. The couple is into their 46th year of marriage, and he has learned a lot about being a father from

his wife. “I think we’ve been a good team,” said Martha. “My dad had three girls so it was different.” Her father was “very, very soft” and probably less of the disciplinarian than Luis had to be with three boys. “I think Luis is a person who’s very committed with a lot of discipline and very strict – but at the same time, easygoing, probably because they were three good kids.” As busy as he was getting his businesses off the ground, Luis nonetheless did what he could to participate in his sons’ lives – going to their sporting events as much as possible, taking vacations and making sure to visit during times when the boys were at boarding schools, which Luis Sr. said, “gave them a good foundation.” The effort seems to have rubbed off. “They are much more involved” in their children’s lives, he said. “They don’t miss one event and are much, much more involved, the way I would have liked to have been when I look back.” Yet he appears to have done something to appeal to all three of his sons, who each began careers elsewhere and then migrated back to the family business. “I’m very fortunate,” Luis said. “I hope that I have always been looking after my children, always encouraging them.”

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2017 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

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PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

Robert Smith with his wife Nancy, daughter Kacy and grandson Connor

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Robert Smith

VP for University Planning, Design and Operations University of Arizona

Children Need Unconditional Love ‘Life is a great adventure’ By Romi Carrell Wittman Robert Smith is a pretty common name. When told he’d been named a 2017 Father of the Year by the Father’s Day Council Tucson, the University of Arizona VP was taken aback. “I had to ask if they had the right Bob Smith,” he said. Yet the honor is entirely fitting, given Smith’s devotion to his family, his community and his profession. “I think my wife, daughter and grandson are the greatest blessings in my life. They’re everything a father could hope for,” Smith said. Smith is a bit of a rare bird in these parts – a fourth-generation Tucsonan. Two of Smith’s great-grandfathers settled here at the turn of the century. Smith grew up on Tucson’s eastside, where he came to appreciate the open spaces of the American West. Smith loves Tucson and said he wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. His only greater love is for his wife, Nancy, his daughter, Kacy, and 14-year-old grandson, Connor. “We live near each other,” he said. “We’re an integral part of each other’s lives.” Professionally, Smith has been an integral part of Tucson and the UA for the past 22 years. After graduating from the UA College of Architecture in 1976, Smith went into private practice in San Diego, and later worked for the University of California at San Diego. In 1994, a UA position opened and, wanting to return home, he applied. He’s been at the UA ever since. He’s VP for University Planning, Design and Operations. www.BizTucson.com

“I love being the campus architect here,” he said. “I get to work with creative and talented people and have gotten to know a lot of the leaders in the industry. I think I have the best job in town.” Smith has led a $2-billion campus building program with no litigation, major claims or budget overruns – a feat that’s nearly unheard of. These projects have won more than 80 design and construction excellence awards. One project, the Meinel Optical Sciences Building, was the first Southern Arizona building nationally recognized by the American Institute of Architects. It received the Honor Award in 2007, one of just 11 projects around the world recognized that year. Smith has been a leader in the regional and national design community, as well as the construction community. He’s served as president of the Southern Arizona AIA and the National Association of University of Architects. In 2012, he received the Southern Arizona construction industry’s Good Scout award. “My job is pretty demanding and time consuming,” Smith said. “So I really try to find ways to contribute to the industry that are good for the university and for Tucson.” Smith pioneered new design and construction delivery methods, working with other Arizona industry leaders to help develop the state’s innovative Construction Procurement Code. The old, traditional process – designbid-build – requires completed designs

before the project goes out to bid. Once the bids come back, the lowest bidder is selected and the project commences. It’s a flawed process prone to problems, including cost overruns and delays. Smith helped to implement an entirely new process – design-build. “We hire the designer and the contractor together,” Smith said. “They work together as a team and are much more coordinated. We save time and money by ‘fast-tracking’ these projects, starting construction months before the design is completed.” The first design-build project in Arizona was the UA Student Union Memorial Center. Despite the demands – and his love – of his job, Smith is firmly devoted to his family. Smith applies the same values he uses in his professional life to fatherhood. “I believe in honesty and integrity and I try to look at the big picture at all times. Life has ups and downs. You have to take the long view,” he said. He strongly believes in giving unconditional love to one’s children. “It’s harder than ever to be a kid,” he said. “They all need the foundation that they’ll be loved no matter what. That’s a parent’s first job. And you have to let them know that you believe in them, that no matter how tough things might be on a given day, they have what it takes to be successful in life.” Smith summed up his approach to career, community and fatherhood simply: “Life is a great adventure. I live to enjoy and share the wonderful experience with friends and family.”

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PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

2017 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

Mike and Laurie Varney Pictured from top â&#x20AC;&#x201C; daughter Julie; son Jason with granddaughter Harley and grandson Cash; son Jeff with his wife Katie, grandson Lucas and granddaughters Josie and Emily; son Patrick with wife Tina and grandsons Tyler, Lance and Chase 170 BizTucson

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Michael V. Varney President & CEO Tucson Metro Chamber

Striking Balance Between Family and Work ‘If You Want Things in Life, Find a Way to Earn Them’ By Rhonda Bodfield If childhood is a series of life-defining moments stitched together with snippets of everyday existence, Mike Varney’s would include football helmets and a can of white paint. Growing up in Wisconsin, the oldest of five kids, Varney remembers one fall season when he was about 12, asking if he could have a new helmet to join the neighborhood kids in football games. The response? The fence needs painting. And so it was, armed with a wire brush to prep the surface, with paint chips flying about, that he learned a lesson – “Life owes you nothing. If you want things in life, find a way to earn them.” The white picket fence came with a cost – but he got his helmet. And when his father, an insurance executive and the sole breadwinner, told him his senior year of high school that education would shape his future – and ended it with a handshake and a “good luck” – he could read between the lines. If he wanted to go to college, he’d work for it. And he did, serving on a road crew, working in retail, tending bar and driving a school bus. That education launched him into a journey that would include 20 years in broadcast sales and marketing, six years as a small business owner and 18 years split between the chambers of commerce in Las Vegas and Tucson. He has led the Tucson Metro Chamber since 2011. While he enjoyed his earlier careers, it was chamber work that spoke to him. “From Day One, it was evident that www.BizTucson.com

nothing provided that same sense of contribution to the community. I was swept up in the fact that this organization was affecting the lives of lots of people – and there’s a good feeling to that if you do it well.” Beyond his chamber involvement in the community, Varney serves on the board of directors for Linkages, a local nonprofit organization specializing in job placements for people with disabilities, as well as serving on the board of directors for Visit Tucson and the Southern Arizona Defense Alliance, which he co-founded. His blended family includes Laurie, his wife of 30 years, two children (Patrick and Jeffrey), two stepchildren (Julie and Jason) and eight grandchildren ages 2-17. Patrick is in the cement contracting business, Jeff owns his own construction company, Julie is a social worker and Jason owns his own real estate company. “There’s always a balance you need to strike between family and work and it looks different for everyone,” he said. With the three boys active in sports or outdoor activities including camping and hunting, and Julie busy with dance and pom squad, they were on the fly, he recalled. And then there were the other youngsters in his life, as a youth hockey coach for 25 years. It didn’t come without some sacrifice. The hockey season lasted six months, with two practices a week and games throughout the weekends – many of which required flying to other communities to play against kids

of comparable skill. “I still look back and think about what a privilege it was to affect the lives of so many young people,” he said. For Varney, hockey was a microcosm of life. “You work hard, get better and succeed – but it’s also true that along the way you will fail at some point. You will need to learn to deal with adversity and failure and coming up short – and how to work through that and get back out there. And you need to know that when you work hard and play well as a team, there are rewards for that. It’s life.” It might just as well define the path to economic development – particularly that part about the importance of teamwork and the value of patience. At a recent meeting with emerging business leaders under 40, the discussion turned to community dynamics. “Everybody felt that with the economic energy here, this is a very good time to be in Tucson. That’s not reflective of where we were at when I got here six years ago. Whatever has happened, it hasn’t happened because of one person, but a lot of people making a lot of contributions.” His kids taught him, he said, that there’s value in dialogue and listening. And they are a reminder of why he does the work he does: “I am a fervent believer in free enterprise and the role it plays in creating a robust economy. If you have employment and you earn a decent salary and can take care of your family, life is better. And that’s what we all deserve.” Biz Spring 2017 > > > BizTucson 171


PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

2017 FATHER OF THE YEAR HONOREE

The White Family

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Gregory J. White

CFO and VP of Finance Raytheon Missile Systems

Setting & Meeting High Expectations ‘We’ve Given Them a Good Foundation’ By Mary Minor Davis

One of the things Gregory J. White found most rewarding about raising children was the opportunities it afforded him to get involved in his community. “Having children is a great integrator,” he said. “Because we wanted our kids to be active in their community, we were able to meet great families and get involved in different activities.” White, CFO and VP at Raytheon Missile Systems since 2012, is one of the 2017 Fathers of the Year chosen by the Father’s Day Council Tucson. White is the father of three grown children – two sons and a daughter. Because of the nature of his position at Raytheon, White shared his parenting experiences, but asked that we keep personal details – including their names – private. “Growing up, I was the youngest of six children,” he said. “My father was very good at leading the family through the crisis that is six children, born within the span of eight years. We were quite a rough-and-tumble group, but we had a lot of fun. He set high expectations for us. Both my parents treated us like the people they wanted us to become. I carried that through to my own children.” www.BizTucson.com

This did not come without challenges, he said. Time was always a factor for him, earning a living, building a career, all while still making time for the kids. He said his boys were very different, with one always active in traditional sports – football, baseball – while the other was more into karate and other non-traditional activities. His daughter presented a third dynamic, excelling in math and science. “They had very different orientations, so it was important to treat them as individuals and devote time to each one’s interest.” White said one of the best opportunities for him as a father was getting to know the younger generation. “You hear a lot of opinions that the younger generation doesn’t have the same drive or desire to succeed, the commitment to community – and I don’t believe that for a moment,” he said. “Sometimes they’re a little different in how they do things, but just seeing how they think geometrically, growing up in the technology age – when you bring that to work and you see how they apply that thinking, challenging them and watching them grow and succeed, they’re pretty spectacular.”

White recalls a time when his youngest was around 2 years old and there was a computer set up at the desk at home. “He crawls up on the desk chair, grabs the mouse and clicks through to a game he wanted and I thought, ‘Oh these guys are going to be so much better than us.’ ” Today, White is still involved with his community, but on a much different level. Serving as chair of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council board of directors and as secretary/treasurer on the Sun Corridor Inc. board of directors, he now advocates for economic development, hoping to attract and retain today’s younger workforce. “Tucson has so many assets,” he said. “Over the last two years, we’ve seen a cascade of successes, with Caterpillar coming into the region, Home Goods – it’s good for all ships rising.” White said being named Father of the Year is humbling. “You try your best to be a good father. As they say, it doesn’t come with an owner’s manual – and most of the credit really goes to my wife, Susan. But they’re good kids, confident. I think we’ve given them a good foundation.”

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Arizona Air National Guard Dads Five Play Military, Family and Community Roles By Romi Carrell Wittman Being a father can be difficult, but it’s even harder when you’re active duty military. You face long deployments away from your family and other challenges, but in the end these dads have made it work. We celebrate these five Arizona Air National Guard, 162nd Wing dads and their commitment to fatherhood. These fathers will be honored and recognized by Maj. Gen. Edward P. Maxwell at the Father of the Year Awards Gala on May 20. 1) Michael Ament, Technical Sergeant

Tech. Sgt. Michael Ament juggles many roles: Drill Status Guardsman firefighter, full-time firefighter with the Superstition Mountain Fire Department, prospective medical student and new father. A native of the Phoenix area, Ament became an emergency medical technician at 18, an Air National Guardsman at 19, and a firefighter at 21. In 2016, he became a dad to twins conceived after a long struggle with infertility. A local doctor waived his fee for the expensive procedure in order for Ament and his wife, Katie, to have a chance to have children before Ament’s deployment to the Middle East. The Ament twins, Aria and Aedan, were born 13 weeks premature and weighed just 1 pound 14 ounces and 2 pounds 6 ounces. They faced a long 72-day stay in the neonatal intensive care unit as well as cardiac surgery. Ament spent every day at the hospital until his deployment. Given the long hospitalization of his children, Ament was 174 BizTucson

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given the opportunity not to deploy; however, he and his wife both felt it was important for him to serve his country and he deployed as scheduled. Ament’s future goal is to complete medical school and serve in the Air National Guard. Chief Master Sgt. Michael Weisbrod nominated Ament for the father of the year honor. He said Ament is an unparalleled paramedic and fire captain. “Ament is not only a devoted father, but he’s also a great role model for the younger airmen.” 2) Clinton R. Awana, Senior Master Sergeant

A father to 10 children ranging in age from 2 months to 16 years, Senior Master Sgt. Clinton Awana exemplifies the ideal citizen-airman. He has devoted his 23-year career to serving his country, including a 2011 deployment to Ramstein Air Force Base in Germany, where he provided casualty reporting assistance and processed more than 150 wounded warrior recontinued on page 176 >>> www.BizTucson.com


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continued from page 174 ports in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. He serves as both a base and community leader. He oversees the 162nd Wing Top 3 Community Involvement Committee, coordinating base volunteers for many community activities like the Special Olympics of Arizona. He also gives countless hours of his personal time to seeing off every 162nd airman who deploys to faraway missions. He’s also there to welcome them home when they return safely. Awana coaches his children’s sports teams and leads a young men’s youth group to encourage character building. He also assists his wife, Christy, with the homeschooling of their children. To teach his children about entrepreneurship and hard work, he helped his four oldest boys start an online leather business and it earned $8,000 in 2016. He also encourages his children’s volunteer work in the community. As if Awana wasn’t busy enough, he’s currently pursuing an MBA degree from Columbia Southern University. With just six courses remaining, he carries a 4.0 grade-point average. 3) Donald Byrd, Master Sergeant

Master Sgt. Donald Byrd knows well the challenges facing military families. When his fiancée, Tech. Sgt. Laura Trujillo, who also is a member of the 162nd Wing, was deployed to the Middle East for six months, Byrd served as both mom and dad to their three children, ensuring the daily routine of life continued uninterrupted. He did so while remaining committed to his work as base education and training manager where he is responsible for the training of more than 900 airmen. Byrd began his career at age 18 when he enlisted in the Air Force. He served his first duty station at Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska and was later transferred to DavisMonthan Air Force Base where he worked as an aircraft hydraulics specialist. Eight years later, he joined the 162nd Wing and assumed his current role as training manager. As a father, Byrd strives to ensure that his children understand the importance of his job in the military and why it’s important to our country. Byrd approaches life optimistically and knows that having a large network of friends and family to lean on goes a long way in helping to raise children and to be a good father and role model. 4) Jason Handa, Senior Master Sergeant

As a dad deployed to Afghanistan, Senior Master Sgt. Jason Handa makes every effort to stay connected to his 11-year old daughter, Addison. Handa uses text messages, FaceTime and phone calls to bridge the 7,500 miles that separate them. Handa’s wife, Senior Master Sgt. Cally Handa, also serves full time at the 162nd Wing Arizona Air National Guard in Tucson. She said of her husband, “He inspires greatness in Addison by being so deeply aware of her needs and potential. They have quite the bond and so much fun together.” Being a joint-military family, there have been times when continued on page 178 >>> 176 BizTucson

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BizMILITARY continued from page 176 Jason had to take over on the home front due to his wife’s deployment. In 2007, Cally Handa was deployed to Iraq and, though their daughter was just two years old, she wasn’t worried about Addison. “Jason takes his job as a parent and role model very seriously,” Cally said. In addition to his deep dedication to his family and his country, Handa is committed to the community. He has served as the lead military training instructor at the Camp Navajo Summer Leadership School for high school students and takes many college and military courses each year in order to continuously improve himself. Cally said, “He truly walks the walk and sets the example for both his daughter and his airmen.” 5) Teddy Tang, Master Sergeant

The Air National Guard is something of a Tang family business. Dad Teddy Tang has served for 28 years, son Triston, 21, serves as a security forces specialist and daughter Kaylee, 20, will soon enlist. Tang was named the 2016 Senior Non-Commissioned Officer of the Quarter and serves as the accessories element supervisor where he oversees more than 100 airmen. Tang is active in the community as well, coaching youth sports. He’s volunteered with the Special Olympics of Arizona and, along with his family, participates actively in events to support cancer and diabetes research. Most recently, he began

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volunteering for the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol Explorer Program. A Tucson native, Tang and his wife, Melissa, have been married for 25 years. During that time, they’ve raised not only their two children, but several family members. He was a foster parent to his 4-year old niece and took care of his 9-year old niece after her mother passed away from cancer. He’s also served as a father figure to two nephews, Tylor and Taylor. “He taught us right from wrong, how to be strong individuals…always giving us the love and support we needed,” said Taylor. “The lessons he taught will stay throughout our lives.” Daughter Kaylee added, “My dad is the definition of the most dedicated, humble and loving man, father, uncle and husband I have ever seen or met. He is our hero and the prime example of a father.”

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BizBRIEF

ADP to Hire 250 More Employees in Tucson By Elena Acoba ADP plans to tap University of Arizona business graduates and military veterans to fill 250 new positions and expand its Tucson sales workforce. The global human resources services company made the announcement during a January ribbon-cutting ceremony to open its 49,543-square-foot sales offices at 5451 E. Williams Blvd. The new jobs will bring the number of local ADP associates to 400. Carlos Rodriguez, CEO of ADP, praised the UA for the impressive graduates of the Eller College of Management. Those alumni, as well as veterans and military spouses, are among the types of people on the company’s radar for hiring. “We need to match the diversity in the marketplace with

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diverse sales talent and expertise,” Rodriguez said. “Tucson is rich in highly educated, diverse talent.” At the ceremony, Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild said he was “delighted” that ADP was taking advantage of Tucson’s “talented workforce” for its expansion. The announcement came two months after ADP said it is opening a new facility in Tempe. Rodriguez said, “I’m quite pleased with the collaboration between the State of Arizona, the City of Tucson and ADP that has helped us create these new jobs in Tucson as well as 1,500 additional new jobs in Tempe. I’m delighted that the people of Arizona will be playing key roles in our company.”

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Hotel Congress

Maynard’s Market + Kitchen

Arizona’s Greenest Workplace Award By April Bourie Arizona Greenest Workplace Award winner this year is the Hotel Congress and its sister business Maynard’s Market + Kitchen. “It’s our obligation as a community-oriented business to ensure we are responsible with our finite resources,” said Rita Dorsey Boutwell, director of training and development at both downtown businesses. Their first sustainable initiative was implemented in 2007 when the hotel switched its urinals to EcoBlue, lowflow urinals, saving 1.5 million gallons of water. They went on to install mini-split heating and cooling systems that allow guests to regulate their own room temperature. This saved so much 180 BizTucson

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electricity that the hotel received a large credit from Tucson Electric Power. The hotel has since installed solar hot water heaters in guestrooms, and donates all of the used bars of soap to “Clean the World,” an organization that sterilizes the soap, breaks it down and creates new bars of soap that are distributed in third-world countries and disaster areas. The restaurant practices at both the hotel and at Maynard’s Market also have grown greener. They provide more than 300 pounds of food waste per week to Compost Cats at the University of Arizona, which turns it into compost and sells it to commercial

farms and individuals in the community. To-go containers and cups have been switched to 100-percent post-consumer waste, which are also compostable. Maynard’s has started using glassware up-cycled from wine bottles through Refresh Glass, and the companies partner with “One Less Straw,” an organization that encourages reducing the use of disposable straws by providing them only when requested. “Receiving this award reinforces that we are on the right path and that we are taking a step forward to help our community locally – and our environment globally,” Boutwell said.

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BizAWARDS

People’s Choice Award By April Bourie

Now in its sixth year, the Arizona Greenest Workplace Awards Program recognizes Arizona businesses that have implemented green practices in a meaningful way. A five-judge, statewide panel of sustainability professionals and advocates reviewed 16 entries in the process of selecting this year’s Arizona’s Greenest Workplace. This annual challenge also invites followers of Mrs. Green’s World to vote for the business they admire most, resulting in the People’s Choice Award. Tucsonan Gina Murphy-Darling founded Mrs. Green’s World. Learn more at www.mrsgreensworld.com www.BizTucson.com

Tucson Federal Credit Union was especially pleased to be chosen by the Mrs. Green’s World community for the People’s Choice Award. “For a financial institution to be able to gather a community following is terrific,” said Brad Elliott, the company’s marketing communications coordinator. “It says a lot about our activities and involvement in the community – and it shows that our members love us.” The credit union’s green transformation began in 2014 when the company applied for a green business certification from the City of Tucson. It purchased Energy Star computer monitors and installed energy-efficient hand dryers in the bathrooms. Lock boxes on thermostats gave the company more control over its heating and cooling. The company also implemented a water-sensor system in the landscaping so plants do not get watered if recent rains have been sufficient. Its groundskeepers have all been Smart-

scape-certified through the University of Arizona. This certification teaches landscape professionals about water conservation and how to plan, plant and care for low-water-use landscapes in the Sonoran Desert. Another step taken was to install low-flow toilets, faucets and occupancy-sensor lighting in the restrooms. The lighting system automatically turns on when a person enters the room and turns off when the person has left. That lighting has also been installed in all lesser-used areas like staircases. “We live in such a beautiful and diverse landscape, home to a wide variety of wonderful people,” said Susan Stansberry, TFCU president and CEO. “Our dedication to community giving and corporate responsibility stems from a deep sense of pride in the city we call home. We’re thrilled to accept this award for our efforts to provide sustainable facilities and services to the residents of Pima County.”

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BizNONPROFIT

Mark Ziska

Jim Click

Founder Linkages Experience

Founder Linkages

Linkages Experience Serves Employers Nationwide Easier for People with Disabilities to Apply for Jobs Online

PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

By Christy Krueger Jim Click is well-known in Tucson for his generosity to local charities. He also is highly respected for hiring people with disabilities and making employment more accessible for those with disabilities, something he’s been passionate about for more than two decades. Click’s passion for hiring individuals with disabilities led him to found the nonprofit Linkages 20 years ago. The organization educates employers on why to hire individuals with disabilities, and links them to those candidates through partner-provider agencies who serve those job seekers. Over the years, the way people link up has changed. In the last decade it’s relied heavily upon technology and having an online job board, so Linkages’ expanded mission to link veterans and highly skilled candidates can be achieved. In 2016 Linkages’ partner agencies placed almost 2,000 people in jobs. Mark Ziska served on the Linkages board of directors for 18 years. He studied the challenges of a job search for the disabled and realized that one of the biggest barriers was the lack of user-friendly online job boards. Many individuals with disabilities couldn’t use them to apply. That’s when he founded a company called Chief People Officer DBA 182 BizTucson

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Linkages Experience that creates userfriendly websites for companies across the nation to post their job openings. Ziska confronted common problems the disabled have with most online job postings and removed those obstacles. “There are unintentional job traps on websites,” he said. “We have tools for company website access or we provide access to job boards.” Some companies claim they have an 800 number that people can call if they’re having trouble using the website and they’ll be helped over the phone. “The problem is, asking if they’re disabled is against the law,” Ziska said. “We create the ability for companies not to have to ask that.” In recent conversations, Ziska and Click discussed the importance of keeping Click’s campaign to hire those with disabilities going well into the future. Click wants his efforts to continue, even after he’s gone, said Ziska. “We provide 20 percent of our gross revenue back to Linkages,” Ziska said of Linkages Experience. Cenpatico Integrated Care also funds Linkages. Some local Linkages Experience clients include the State of Arizona, Tucson Unified School District, La Frontera Center and Jim Click Automotive. Nationally, Ziska works with organiza-

tions such as Jewish community centers, YWCAs and Goodwill Industries. “The State of Arizona is the poster child for doing the right thing,” he said. “They kept their old system and we put ours in – so it was seamless for everyone.” Linkages Experience software users often benefit in ways they didn’t consider. “More people are realizing people with disabilities do have good job skills. It’s almost an untapped market,” Ziska said. Employers come to understand that by including this market, they’re reaching as many potential candidates as possible. “They say, ‘If we exclude 15 percent of the population, we have impaired ourselves in attracting candidates.’ So progressive companies looking to grow are doing all they can to hire wounded warriors and others who have disabilities.” Raytheon Missile Systems is another client Ziska says does a good job of making jobs accessible to everyone. “Raytheon embraces us. They have to fill 7 percent of jobs with disabled and 7 percent with veterans. We help them fill their federal requirements, and we help them find employees.”

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BizAWARDS

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Building Bridges Awards By Christy Krueger

1. EMPLOYMENT SPECIALIST OF THE YEAR Pamela Taggart, CODAC

Taggart goes beyond her job description in her work at CODAC in teaching individuals to advocate for themselves. She helps clients write resumes, organizes group therapy sessions to support clients in staying employed and makes www.BizTucson.com

home wellness visits. Together with Linkages partner Cenpatico Integrated Care, Taggart works to increase employment opportunities for those with mental illness and substance abuse disorders. She also works on call at Gospel Rescue Mission Woman’s Center and runs transportation for her church. Before going to work for CODAC, Taggart received help from Gospel Rescue Mission when she went through challenging times. “I’m paying it forward,” she said upon accepting the award. “Thanks for breaking down barriers.” 2. PROJECT OF THE YEAR Empowerment Through Employment, a program of DIRECT Center for Independence

Christian Padilla leads DIRECT’s peer model where mentors work with participants to identify their strengths and teach them pre-employment and job readiness skills, goal setting and soft skills. The program has been very successful in helping those with disabilities find employment. Padilla thanked his co-workers for nominating him and “to Linkages and to everyone in this room. It’s a humbling experience to see and know that your job is recognized.” 3. EMPLOYER OF THE YEAR Tucson Electric Power

Led by Marji Morris, TEP’s strategic workforce plan includes reaching out to individuals and veterans with disabilities. Morris works with TEP leadership

to find approaches for building bridges to employment for this segment of our community. The company employs a number of veterans and individuals with disabilities who are happy to be challenged in the workplace and know they are valued as team members. Morris said, “Thanks to Mr. Click. You brought this together. We have learned so much at TEP since going on this path. The last few years my heart is full every day because you’re going to change the culture.” 4. INDIVIDUAL OF THE YEAR Mellissa “Mo” Carnes-Frontroth

Carnes-Frontroth is a true example of how community support can transform an individual with paralyzing mental challenges and homelessness to become a productive resident of Tucson. Her path toward recovery began with volunteering at Our Place Clubhouse, followed by enrollment in Café 54’s employable skills program to her current employment at Johnny Gibson’s Downtown Market. “I feel really good,” she told the Building Bridges audience. “It’s amazing to go from thinking you can’t do anything in your life to having people support you.” The inspiring event went on to include a scholarship presentation by Raytheon Missile Systems, followed by Click’s closing remarks. “I feel energized and blessed. Thanks for all of you who help people get jobs and especially employers. My goal is to get the top 100 employers here next year.”

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PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

Those at Linkages like to say that employment is a bridge to independence. While generally accepted as true, it’s not so easily obtainable for many disabled residents and veterans in our community who struggle to find work. Tucson-based Linkages assists those in Pima County who often face barriers to finding meaningful employment. Each year the nonprofit organization presents its Building Bridges Awards to honor community partners who help bridge the gap on employment for wounded warriors and others with disabilities, as well as an individual with disabilities and challenges who received community support to become successfully employed. The 10th annual awards will be presented on Nov. 16, 2017. More information is at: www.linkagesarizona.org The 2016 awards were presented in November at the Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa. Attendees heard from beneficiaries of Linkages and those accepting recognition as one of the four 2016 award winners. Master of ceremonies Jim Click, a founding father and great supporter of Linkages, made the introductions. The 2016 Building Bridges winners are:


PHOTO: CHRIS MOOONEY

BizCOMMUNITY

Back row from left – Tom Dunn, Arizona Builders Alliance; Mark Riggi, Millwork By Design; Mike Johnson, Chestnut Building & Design; Tad Jewell, Lovitt & Touché; Nelson Brown, JB Steel; Rick Bright, Bright Design Associates; Toni Carroll, Southwest Gas, and Bill Jarvis, Lloyd Construction. Front row from left – Julian Ackerley, Tucson Arizona Boys Chorus; Susan Mulholland, Mulholland Art & Design; Shorty Pemberton, Lloyd Construction and Angie Ziegler, General Air Control.

Arizona Builders Alliance Volunteers Renovate Boys Chorus Facilities By Lee Allen “We are blessed,” the director of the Tucson Arizona Boys Chorus said amid the sounds of hammers pounding and saws cutting, construction activity that is part of the Arizona Builders Alliance Volunteer Day. In two phases, the latest being last December when 200 volunteers showed up ready to work, the chorus home on East Pima Street received a needed face-lift and much more. The building, originally built by previous volunteers in 1975, was sadly in need of repairs. But although its reputation is world184 BizTucson

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wide, this is still a local nonprofit group and budget dollars for a retrofit were not available. “We’ve been able to accomplish little modifications and general cleanups over the years, but no major renovations,” Director Julian Ackerley said. “What ABA volunteers accomplished involves items that would have been at the top of our needs list and at the bottom of our budget.” “The Boys Chorus is world-renowned and represents our community well,” said Tom Dunn, Southern Ari-

zona ABA Director. “We’re glad to be a part of their mission and future success. Our alliance consists of general and specialty subcontractors and industry partners that, in essence, build things; and our Volunteer Day efforts contribute to the building of our community, assisting nonprofits and helping make a difference.” Mike Johnson of Chestnut Building & Design and Mark Riggi of Millwork by Design were co-coordinators for the project. “We like to help on projects people www.BizTucson.com


PHOTOS: COUTESY ARIZONA BUILDERS ALLIANCE

ABA Volunteers work on Tucson Arizona Boys Chorus facilities.

might not be able to afford,” said Johnson, Chestnut’s project superintendent with 42 years of experience in the construction industry. Although he works his regular 9 to 5 overseeing moneymaking projects, he volunteered for this one. “It’s a way to give back to the community just like the Boys Chorus does with their music.” While many family-member volunteers cleaned, painted and took on landscape duties, tradesmen contributed their specialties in constructing a 30 foot by 30 foot ramada, pouring concrete, setting steel columns, adding roofing, with materials donated by ABA and local suppliers and the sweat equity contributed by members of local construction firms. “The new ramada will be especially

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helpful to us as a safe space to practice our fancy trick rodeo roping that’s part of our performances,” Ackerley said. “It will be a big upgrade from roping practice in the parking lot while dodging traffic.” New flooring was added and new ceilings were installed in practice rooms to improve acoustics. Flooring and ceiling lighting were upgraded in the office spaces where new cabinetry was installed. New plumbing fixtures were added to restrooms. “Typically our group does one big project a year, but this one went two years because of everything we wanted to do,” said Riggi, estimating the value of the work at $200,000. “The Boys Chorus is a well-deserving nonprofit that Tucson can brag about, turn-

ing good boys into great men, and we helped turn their old facility into something to be proud of. One of the reasons I’m a part of ABA is because of their volunteer efforts. We all walked away with a good feeling on this one.” Upwards of 60 companies contributed supplies, labor or cash over the two-year project with special recognition going to Sunstate Equipment that provided the burgers, brats and beans to keep the workers going. “Volunteer Day is a fun day,” Johnson said. “We’re serious about our real jobs, our daily routine, but in this event we can joke around, and have a good time. We’re already taking applications for a 2018 project, so we’ll get another chance to have more fun again next year.”

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BizTRIBUTE

Movie Man Bob Shelton Rides Into His Final Sunset Robert “Bob” Shelton – founder of Old Tucson Studios and the man behind Tucson and Southern Arizona’s sensational Western movie history – was a man who made an immediate impression on those he met because of his handsome face, his outgoing and warm personality and his sense of humor. Shelton passed away on Dec. 15, 2016, at the age of 95. “They don’t come any better than Bob Shelton,” said Kent McCray, producer of the 1960s-1970s TV series “High Chaparral” at a recent Celebration of Life for Shelton. The two met in 1966 when McCray was looking for a shooting location for the TV show, and they became fast friends. Actor Robert Wagner was another good friend of Shelton’s. “When I first met him, I thought he was an actor,” said Wagner. It turns out Shelton was in 16 movies shot at Old Tucson, but his real calling was to bring Westerns to film at Old Tucson – which hosted 330 films during the time Shelton owned and worked there. “He was a special man,” said Wagner. “When he wasn’t working, he played a lot of tennis. He hit a lot of great shots – both in tennis and in life.” Through the years, Shelton became friends with many famous movie and television stars, including John Wayne (who became a partner in Old Tucson), Paul Newman, Elizabeth Taylor, Lee Marvin and Michael Landon. He loved telling about how he once had five movie production companies filming at one time. John Wayne, Burt Lancaster, Clint Eastwood and Lee Marvin all were filming simultaneously. He was considered “Tucson’s Movie Man,” both in Tucson and in Hollywood. Larry Dempster, a longtime friend and rancher who provided horses and 186 BizTucson

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other ranch props for the Westerns filmed at Old Tucson, would occasionally travel to California with Shelton on his monthly trips to meet with movie producers. “Everyone knew Bob in Hollywood,” said Dempster. “They would come up and shake his hand, and say ‘Remember me? I was a gunfighter in such and such movie that was filmed at Old Tucson.’ He may not have exactly remembered them, but they all knew and admired him. I asked him one time why he was so popular with the actors and produc-

Bob Shelton ers there. He replied that they must remember his large nose.” “He was more well-known in Hollywood than people who lived and worked there every day,” said Steve “Bunker” DeFrance, an actor in “High Chapparal” and several other westerns. Dempster remembered that working with Shelton was always a pleasure. “His first question when he saw you was, ‘How are you and your family?’ It was never about the job – and that stuck with people.”

His sense of humor also made him memorable. Rich Moret, owner of Moret Advertising, first met Shelton when Shelton hired him to promote the American Airlines Tennis Games, which Shelton co-founded. They became friends, and Moret began playing tennis with Shelton and several of Shelton’s friends in 1977. Shelton played with that group until he was 90. Moret said that Shelton asked him to stand up for him at his 2016 wedding to Caroline Olson. “When I asked him what it meant to ‘stand up for him’ at his wedding, he replied, ‘That means you have to stand behind me in case I fall over.’ ” Rick Rose, owner of Film Creations, worked on many films with Shelton over the years. “His legacy goes on in our hearts,” Rose said during the Celebration of Life. Rose shared that when John Wayne returned to Old Tucson after receiving the Oscar for his portrayal of eye-patchwearing Rooster Cogburn in “True Grit,” Shelton, the entire “Rio Lobo” cast and even his horse were wearing eye patches. John Wayne was Shelton’s idol for many years before they became good friends. Wayne eventually became a partner in Old Tucson. In a tribute to Wayne after his death, Shelton said, “John Wayne is unforgettable.” It appears they are cut from the same cloth, as friends and family who attended Shelton’s Celebration of Life recognized the importance of Shelton’s legacy and what he accomplished in Western filmmaking for Tucson and Southern Arizona. “The stars shined on Tucson while Bob was here,” said Moret. “He will be missed.”

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By April Bourie


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