Page 1

FALL 2017 2012

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

&

SPECIAL REPORTS: Sun Corridor Inc. UA College of Medicine YWCA Southern Arizona FALL 2017 • $3.99 • DISPLAY UNTIL 12/31/17

www.BizTucson.com


6 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


6 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


BizLETTER

4 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

Fall 2017

Volume 9 No. 3

Publisher & Owner

Steven E. Rosenberg Brent G. Mathis

Creative Director Photo: Steven Meckler

Dr. Robert C. Robbins is a worldclass leader in higher education, business, medicine and scientific research. In June, Dr. Robbins officially became the 22nd president of the University of Arizona, bringing a passion for education for this $2.5 billion enterprise, that also is our region’s largest employer. Journalist Jay Gonzales introduces us to this modern-day Renaissance man. For the past five years, Robbins served as president and CEO of Texas Medical Center, which is the largest medical complex in the world. While at the Texas Medical Center, Robbins’ wideranging volunteer service included: serving on the Dallas Federal Reserve board (Houston branch), serving on an independent blue ribbon committee to evaluate the Veterans Affairs health system, and the World Affairs Council of Greater Houston honored him as ‘International Citizen of the Year’ in 2016. Under his tenure, Dr. Robbins significantly enhanced the Texas Medical Center’s commitment to collaboration. Prior to his time in Houston, Dr. Robbins served as professor and chairman of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine and was the founding director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. An internationally recognized cardiac surgeon, Robbins has focused his clinical efforts on acquired cardiac diseases with a special expertise in the surgical treatment of congestive heart failure and cardiothoracic transplantation. His research work includes the investigation of stem cells for cardiac regeneration, cardiac transplant allograft vasculopathy, bioengineered blood vessels, and automated vascular anastomotic devices. This year, the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson marks a significant milestone, celebrating 50 years of innovation, research and technology. Our team has produced an indepth special report, chronicling the rich history of the college, the exciting life-changing discoveries and the vision for the future. There’s a fascinating Q&A with Dr. Charles B. Cairns, dean of the college. Cairns is a nationally recognized leader, researcher and educator in emergency medicine and critical care. Cairns provides a nice glimpse of the future. The College of Medicine –

Tucson continues a great trajectory of growth as this year there were a record number of medical school applicants. The timeline is a great snapshot of the history of the college, highlighting the world’s first artificial wrist, the first successful total artificial heart used as a bridge to transplant led by Dr. Jack Copeland, the opening of Sarver Heart Center, Dr. Andrew Weil creating the nation’s first integrative medicine program, Dr. Gordon Ewy and Dr. Karl Kern developing chest-compressiononly CPR, the beginning of a 30-year affiliation with Banner Health, the opening of the VIPER institute to work with anti-venoms and receiving a $43 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Our next special report focuses on the front lines of economic development with our region’s economic development engine – Sun Corridor Inc. The organization continues its trajectory of success with 18 successful projects and 5,964 projected new jobs. That equates to $1.5 billion projected capital investment and $12.2 billion economic and fiscal impact over five years. At press time a new high technology company from China, TuSimple, selected Tucson for development and testing of fully autonomous trucks. TuSimple’s economic impact is $60 million and 100 new jobs over the next five years. And one more special report highlights the accomplishments of the YWCA of Southern Arizona over the past 100 years and its strategies for the next century to empower women and eliminate racism. Steven E. Rosenberg Publisher & Owner BizTucson

Contributing Editors

Jay Gonzales Donna Kreutz

Contributing Copyeditors

Elena Acoba Diane Luber Dave Petruska

Contributing Technology Director

Mike Serres

Contributing Project & & Event Coordinator

Maricela Robles

Contributing Writers

Elena Acoba Lee Allen April Bourie Mary Minor Davis Jay Gonzales Chuck Graham June C. Hussey Tara Kirkpatrick Christy Krueger David Pittman Steve Rivera Monica Surfaro Spigelman Valerie Vinyard Roger Yohem Romi Carrell Wittman

Contributing Photographers

José Beltrán Eryn Caffrey Kris Hanning Amy Haskell Paul Holze Brent G. Mathis Chris Mooney David Sanders Michael Sultzbach Balfour Walker MarathonFoto Unique Photography

Member:

Arizona Builders’ Alliance DM-50 Greater Oro Valley Chamber of Commerce Marana Chamber of Commerce Sun Corridor Inc. Tucson Advertising Federation Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Tucson Metro Chamber Visit Tucson

BizTucson Phone: 520.299.1005 Subscription Information:

www.BizTucson.com subscriptions@BizTucson.com Advertising information:

Steve Rosenberg 520.299.1005 or 520.907-1012 steve@BizTucson.com BizTucson is published quarterly by Rosenberg Media, LLC. ,Tucson, AZ © 2017 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in columns or articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

Biz

POSTMASTER:

Please send address changes to: BizTucson, 4729 East Sunrise Drive, #505 Tucson, AZ 85718.


www.BizTucson.com

Summer 2017

>>>

BizTucson 5


6 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 7


8 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 9


10 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 11


BizCONTENTS

FEATURES

FALL 2017 VOLUME 9 NO. 3

COVER STORY:

46 University of Arizona President Dr. Robert C. Robbins

DEPARTMENTS

132

200

52

4 16 26 28 30 32 34 42 52 60 125 126 130 132 136 140

BizLETTER From the Publisher BizCUISINE Metro Asian Vibe Lights Up Downtown BizTOURISM Visit Tucson’s New Strategic Plan BizSPORTS El Tour de Tucson Rolls Into 35th Year Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl BizFILM ‘You’re Gonna Miss Me’ Filmed in Tucson Eclectic Film Fest BizARTS Tucson Museum of Art BizMILESTONE Powering On: Keeping the Lights On for 125 Years Davis-Monthan Air Force Base at 90 BizBENEFIT Literacy Driver: Tucson Classics Car Show BizMILLENNIALS TENWEST Festival Tech, Entrepreneurship BizPHILANTHROPY Social Venture Partners Fast Pitch Event BizEDUCATION Cradle to Career Benefits Students BizAEROSPACE Outfitting the Next Giant Leap for Mankind BizBIOSCIENCE Game-Changer: Blood Test IDs Infectious Bacteria BizSALES 146 Sales Guru Jeffrey Gitomer BizENTREPRENEUR 148 A Washing Machine: Mister Car Wash BizAWARDS 151 Tucson Hispanic Chamber Noche de Exitos Gala BizMILESTONE 196 Lasting Success of Rusing Lopez & Lizardi ABOUT THE COVER Dr. Robert C. Robbins, UA President

12 BizTucson

<<<

Spring Fall 2017 2015

Photo by Chris Mooney, Art Direction & Design by Brent G. Mathis

200 202 217 218 224 226

BizDEFENSE USS Gabrielle Giffords Sets Sail BizMILESTONE Angel Charity Celebrates Success BizFINANCIAL Ascensus Dedicates Southwest Office BizCONSTRUCTION New to Market Projects BizMILITARY YMCA Breakfast Honors Vietnam Vets BizTRIBUTE Truly Nolen

SPECIAL REPORTS 65

Sun Corridor Inc.

155

University of Arizona College of Medicine 50th Anniversary SPECIAL REPORT 2017

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

The University of Arizona College of Medicine Tucson

50

Y E A R S O F I N N O VA T I O N

www.BizTucson.com

205

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 155

YWCA Southern Arizona at 100 SPECIAL REPORT 2017

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Just Imagine W h a t We C a n Achieve

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 205


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2015

>>>

BizTucson 13


6 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 7


PHOTOS: COURTESY MIAN SUSHI AND MODERN ASIAN CUISINE

Bin An

Owner MiAn Sushi & Modern Asian Cuisine

16 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


BizCUISINE

Metro Asian Vibe

MiAn Sushi & Modern Asian Cuisine Lights Up Downtown

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By April Bourie Most restaurant owners don’t want the streets closed around their establishments for obvious reasons. However, Broadway Boulevard was closed recently in front of MiAn Sushi & Modern Asian Cuisine because of a request by Bin An, the restaurant’s owner. An asked that large “TEP” signs be hung on the Tucson Electric Power building, which caused the closure. “I keep telling people we’re located in the TEP building – but no one knows where that is – so I urged TEP to put signs up so people would know where the restaurant is located,” An said. An is a man who has the determination to get things done right the first time. He and his wife, Ginny (pronounced “Jeannie”), spent six weeks scouring factories in Beijing, Tokyo and Seoul to find the right manufacturers for most of the customized furnishings in the restaurant. “The chopsticks were designed to match the patio furniture and I wanted the silverware to feel good and be balanced when you hold them,” An said. “We wanted a metropolitan look and feel that would stand out in Tucson as something different, so we had everything custom-made – from the tables and chairs to the plates and silverware.” In addition, the wood on the bar is made from a 70-yearold Japanese whaling vessel and the granite on the bar was continued on page 18 >>> Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 17


M A N U FA C T U R E R O F R E S TA U R A N T D I N N E R WA R E

– HF Coors – Manufacturing High Quality, High Strength dinnerware, to meet the rigorous demands of the Food Service Industry, for over 90 years

“Talk with us directly about special orders”

JOIN OUR GROWING RESTAURANT FAMILY RESTAURANTS WE PROUDLY SERVE TUCSON The Yard • Prep & Pastry Commoner & Co. • North Italia Nook • Blanco Tacos and Tequila Coronet Cafe • Penca Beyond Bread The Lodge at Ventana Canyon The Hacienda at the River PHOENIX True Food Kitchen The Henry Culinary Dropout & The Yard Olive and Ivy Arrogant Butcher Matt’s Big Breakfast Scottsdale Resort Kierland Golf Club The Wildflower Bread restaurants in Arizona AND BEYOND The Hillstone restaurants nationwide (HQ Beverly Hills) The Ritz- Carlton, Dove Mountain, Coral Gables & Half-Moon Bay El Tovar at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon La Posada Hotel & Gardens Winslow, AZ

www.hfcoors.com (520 ) 903 -1010 1600 South Cherrybell Stravenue Tucson, AZ 85713 18 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

continued from page 17 carved from the ground in a Chinese quarry known to have the best quality granite. The “chandelier” above the bar looks like bands of light swirling around each other and the colors change every few minutes, matching the colors in the panels in the columns throughout the restaurant. An’s determination paid off. The effect is definitely striking and something customers and passersby stop to admire. It’s no surprise that An is a hardworking and dedicated business man. He grew up in a restaurant family as the oldest son of Kwang C. An, current owner of Mr. An’s Teppan Steak, Sushi and Seafood on Oracle Road and former owner of several other restaurants in Tucson, including Sakura on the east side. “We worked really hard in my dad’s restaurants. I started full time at the age of 11 and worked in every aspect of his restaurants, from the back end to the front end, and also in management,” said the younger An. “As I got older, I worked 70 to 90 hours a week for my dad. I was the president of all of his companies for 26 years.” Although the younger An has no formal degree in culinary arts or restaurant management, the experience in his father’s restaurants was a terrific education, teaching him all of the ins and outs of the restaurant industry. In addition to working for his father, An owned a restaurant called Sapporo in Scottsdale for five years, selling it in 2005 and returning to work for his father in Tucson. Then, in 2012, TEP approached him to open a restaurant on the bottom floor of its new headquarters, built in 2011. “I was honored that they asked me, but the timing just wasn’t right then,” said An. TEP asked again in February 2016 – and this time An accepted. “I know the industry well and I felt downtown Tucson had grown quite a bit over those four years,” he said. TEP made him an offer he couldn’t refuse – including 80 valet parking spaces and a clean slate for his restaurant. “The space didn’t even have electrical outlets in it – which was kind of strange for being located in the TEP building,” he said. Construction started in October 2016 and the restaurant opened in March 2017. In addition to his trip to Asia to find just the right furnishings during the planning and development of the restaurant, An worked diligently to find the perfect culinary team. Chef Young Min Choi, MiAn’s executive chef, was working at the high-end Japanese restaurant Nobu in Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Choi is also a good friend of An’s and the godfather to An’s daughter Misha. “I asked him to come and work for me in Tucson and he agreed,” An said. Choi was trained and worked in Japan and specializes in sushi, as well as Japanese, Korean and French cuisine. The kitchen’s head chef, Chef Lan, also trained and worked in Japan for many years and specializes in dishes from Taiwan, Japan and Korea. “We’re trying to bring a different flair and flavor to Tucson,” An said. “The menu is about trying new things and a different style, something other cities aren’t necessarily www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: COURTESY MIAN SUSHI AND MODERN ASIAN CUISINE

BizCUISINE

ready for. It’s a mixed fusion of Chinese, Japanese and Korean. That’s why it’s called ‘MiAn Sushi & MODERN Asian Cuisine.’ ” Some of the most popular dishes on the menu include “Casper the Friendly Ghost,” a striking plate of sushi that includes the red arms of pickled baby octopus emerging from the top. Another popular dish is the “Real Choi Roll,” named after the chef. The roll, which includes spicy tuna inside and salmon outside, is wrapped in a banana leaf and tin foil placed on a bed of a mixture of salt, vodka and sugar – that is lit on fire. “It cooks and smokes the roll, bringing out the flavors,” An said. Those who understand the Spanish language may think that “MiAn” means “My An” since this is the younger An’s own restaurant, a separate entity from his father’s establishments. The truth is that when An’s daughter Misha was younger, she couldn’t say her full name and called herself “Mi An.” The nickname stuck and An chose to name his restaurant after his daughter. When asked if he made the right decision to open his restaurant in downtown Tucson, An replied that he couldn’t be happier with the location. “Not only is TEP a very gracious landlord, but the clientele and other businesses downtown are so friendly. It’s great to be part of downtown Tucson’s growth,” he said. The businesses downtown work well together and often have happy hours and events at each other’s establishments, he said. This makes it easier to get to know the other restaurants and businesses in downtown Tucson and refer them to customers. “The Downtown Tucson Partnership is thrilled to have MiAn Sushi open in downtown Tucson,” said Kathleen Eriksen, Downtown Tucson Partnership CEO. “This new addition has enlivened the Broadway corridor between Scott and Sixth Avenue with its Miami-style seating, sleek modern fire pit and outdoor cool misting system. MiAn has transformed the entire corner – and just in time for the new AC Marriott to open a half a block down the street.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com

CREATE YOUR OWN COLORFUL TABLE TOP COME VISIT OUR STORE AT THE FACTORY LONG LASTING DINNERWARE 100% MADE IN TUCSON

(520) 903-1010 www.hfcoors.com 1600 South Cherrybell Stravenue Tucson, AZ 85713 Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 19


Trust The Clements Team To Protect You & Your Business The Clements Agency, LLC is a member of Trusted Choice®, offering the smart way to buy insurance. Trusted Choice® agents and brokers represent multiple insurance companies, offering you a variety of coverage choices and customized plans to meet your specialized needs. Most importantly, as Trusted Choice® agents we are not employees of an insurance company, so you have someone who works for you, not the company.

P ro p e r t y I n s u r a n c e Liability Insurance Auto Insurance Wo r k e r ’s C o m p e n s a t i o n Bonds Personal Insurance Employee Benefits

est .

2000

520.624.3456 6 2 4 5 E . B ro a d w a y, S u i t e 3 1 0 , Tu c s o n , A Z 8 5 7 1 1

Left to right: Sean, Jack & Jim Clements

480.477.5245 8 3 5 0 E . R a i n t re e D r. , S u i t e 2 3 5 , S c o t t s d a l e , A Z 8 5 2 6 0 928.774.6631 F l a6g BizTucson s t a f f I n< <s<u Spring r a n c2011 e

w w w. c l e m e n t s i n s u r a n c e . c o m

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 7


BizBRIEFS

Wendell Long After four years away from Tucson, gaming executive Wendell Long is back with a new business, ARCpoint Labs, a national testing lab. Long spent seven years as CEO of Casino del Sol, overseeing the resort facilities and Casino of the Sun. He was active in the community, including board chair of the Tucson Metro Chamber, which he recently rejoined. ARCpoint Labs provides drug testing, alcohol screening, corporate wellness services and background screening. Biz

Mary Laughbaum Mary Laughbaum was named director of admission and community outreach for The Gregory School. She is responsible for helping families apply and enroll their children to the private middle school and high school. Laughbaum previously was director of community relations for the University of Arizona, where she developed relationships with government, nonprofit and community groups. She also has held military and nonprofit leadership roles in the United States and overseas. Biz 22 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 23


BizBRIEFS

David Garcia David Garcia is now director of architecture for the Tucson office of Onyx Creative. He previously was a principal for Architectural Design Group, which merged with national Herschman Architects. Before that he was a city of Tucson architect for five years. His 25plus years of experience have included designs and construction documents for a variety of businesses, residences and government facilities. Onyx Creative offers architecture, urban design, interior design and branding services.

Biz

Kristi Tedesco Long-time journalist Kristi Tedesco has joined Focus HR as its director of marketing and sales. Tedesco, who grew up in Tucson and graduated from the University of Arizona, left KVOA-TV News 4 Tucson in August after nearly 13 years. She previously spent 10 years in TV news in Kansas and Indiana. Her responsibilities at the woman-owned human resources services provider include refining the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public message and working with new clients. Biz 24 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 25


BizTOURISM

Visit Tucson’s New Strategic Plan Focus on Economic Development By April Bourie

“Great places to live are great places to visit,” said Brent DeRaad, president and CEO of Visit Tucson. That’s why Visit Tucson’s three-year strategic plan includes a strong focus on economic development. “In the past five years, we have evolved from a company that did a terrific job of marketing and selling into a collaborative economic-development organization that not only focuses on marketing, promotion and sales, but also weighs in on roads and other infrastructure, international trade, bond elections and more.” DeRaad addressed attendees at Visit Tucson’s annual meeting in June. He highlighted the tourism organization’s recent economic development efforts that include partnering with Sun Corridor Inc. to host the Site Selectors Guild, which brought more than 50 top corporate site selectors to the region, and

participating in Sun Corridor’s “Soft Landings” program to educate Caterpillar employees and their families about what it is like to live and work in Tucson. Visit Tucson has also partnered with the Tucson Metro Chamber and the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce to discuss additional air-service opportunities and options for more rail and car transportation between Phoenix and Tucson. “These relationships are important for Visit Tucson to expand its reach into the economic development realm,” said DeRaad. “We want tourism to be top of mind when these types of decisions are being made.” Visit Tucson also hired staff to help it better understand Mexican visitors and their needs. Because many Mexicans come to Tucson for medical services, Visit Tucson hired a new medical-tourism “concierge” to help patients from

Mexico and their families find accommodations and activities to enjoy while in Tucson, and to assist with any other service needs they may have. This person also hears from these customers about how businesses and the Tucson community in general can improve to better meet these needs. Visit Tucson is the destination marketing organization for Tucson and Southern Arizona. Its mission is “to drive economic development by connecting visitors with their ideal travel and meetings experiences.” Going through the strategic planning process made it clear that Visit Tucson should continue its focus on economic development. “During the process, we found that community support for tourism was stronger than average, but that the destination rated below average when looking at product development,” DeRaad said.

Richard Bratt

photos:www.balfourwalker.com

Chairman of the Board Visit Tucson

Brent DeRaad President & CEO Visit Tucson

26 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

Graeme Hughes VP Sales Visit Tucson

www.BizTucson.com


After conducting a survey and holding meetings with community leaders, the board of directors established five goals and 26 objectives to achieve in the next three years. Visit Tucson staff then created strategies and tactics to finish the plan, which can be seen in detail on the website at www.visittucson.org. The five main goals were to:

• Promote Tucson’s designation as a

UNESCO City of Gastronomy and build Visit Tucson’s “Free Yourself” brand

• Use innovative and aggressive

marketing strategies to generate increased leisure and meetings travel

• Engage the community through the development of a tourism master plan

• Promote and grow the region’s

visitor-worthy events and establish a marquee event to attract travelers

• Enlarge Visit Tucson’s budget with a

focus on sustainable funding sources

A continued focus on economic development is obvious in the strategies and tactics of the plan, which include creating a City of Gastronomy tour, assisting attractions in their goals to expand and renovate, growing and creating new events that draw more visitors, and creating a tourism master plan that not only focuses on the tourism industry but also on infrastructure and other as-

pects of the community to make it more attractive to tourists. “The biggest contributions that we can make in the next decade are in economic development for the region,” said DeRaad. Incorporating the right technologies to draw the younger generations of travelers is another major focus of the strategic plan. “The future of destination marketing is through videos and being able to show and tell our stories in that manner,” he said. Because of the popularity of Facebook and YouTube, Visit Tucson will continue to focus on improving video views and duration of viewing on these two media, said Allison Schult, Visit Tucson VP of marketing. Visit Tucson was able to generate 3.2 million video views on Facebook last fiscal year and video views on YouTube jumped 54 percent. Other forms of video promotion will include working with the Arizona Office of Tourism to include content about Tucson as a destination on online travel shows. Videos also will be used to target meeting planners. “We used to target business travelers differently than leisure travelers,” said Graeme Hughes, Visit Tucson VP of sales. “Today’s business travelers are actually ‘bleisure’ travelers looking for a destination that offers lots of activities.” This requires meeting planners to sell potential attendees not only on the business aspect of the meeting but also the leisure opportunities of the destination.

Skift, a company that provides media, insights and marketing for meeting planners, produced three 60- to 90-second videos about this destination. “No one wants to hear what professionals are saying about their own destinations,” Hughes said. “Meeting planners are going to Skift to find out more about destinations. We earn credibility because Skift is thought of as an unbiased thirdparty provider of information.” The response to the program is impressive, he said. Meeting planners are finding out about options they never knew were available in Tucson and also discovering various ways to immerse their groups in this region’s rich and diverse local culture. The latest recognition for Tucson as a top tourism destination came just two weeks after Visit Tucson’s annual meeting. On June 15, Tucson was named No. 2 of the 10 “Best Small American Cities” (population under 1 million) – raking second to Honolulu and ahead of tourism hubs Charleston, Myrtle Beach and Asheville. The research report was produced by tourism industry think tank Resonance Consultancy, along with National Geographic. “We’re thrilled,” DeRaad said. “To see Tucson highly ranked for our museums, entertainment, neighborhoods and outdoor activities just reinforces what we’ve believed all along – Tucson is a great place to visit, live, work and play.”

Biz

Farewell Allison Allison Schult, VP of marketing for Visit Tucson, was instrumental in rebranding Tucson tourism. She was recognized for her significant impact over the past seven years with video highlights, flowers and a heartfelt ovation. Graeme Hughes, VP of sales, recalled that when she joined the organization on Aug. 26, 2010, it was still called Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau. “And for each of the 2,606 days that will conclude on June 30, she has been a tireless, passionate and outspoken advocate for this community, for this industry, for this organization and for each of you here today,” he said. “You showed us what it meant to be THE REAL SOUTHWEST. “You taught how to FREE OURSELVES. “You put us ON TOP OF THE WORLD.” “As many of you already know, back in December Allison decided to follow her passion – literally! She got married, changed her name and moved to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. She’s been working remotely for us for the last six months. “Allison, we remain in awe of your skills and talents, we are in debt for your profound contributions and we are inspired to continue what will now become your legacy with Visit Tucson.”

Allison Schult VP Marketing Visit Tucson

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 27


28 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


BizSPORTS

Ride On!

El Tour de Tucson Rolls Into 35th Year

PHOTOS: MARATHONFOTO

By Steve Rivera

Back in the early 1980s, Richard J. DeBernardis, a native of New York, traveled around the outskirts of Tucson and thought, “What a great place to have a bike-riding event.” Little did he know, at least at the time, that he would host a perimeter ride – and have it run continuously for 35 years. “I thought I’d do it one year and that would be it,” said DeBernardis, president and founder of Perimeter Bicycling and El Tour de Tucson. But people loved it and, well, still do since 2017 will be the 35th annual El Tour. This year’s theme highlights that: “Takin’ it to the Streets.” No ride beneficiary has been named yet. Former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords and her retired astronaut husband Mark Kelly were dedication recipients in 2015, and Denise Mueller (the World’s Fastest Woman on a bicycle) was last year’s big-name recipient. Through the years, riders have come from all over the world to ride on what is typically a cool-to-crisp morning that turns into a perfect afternoon. That’s long been the case for Tucson’s and Southern Arizona’s long-lasting iconic event. These days it’s a big deal and still one of the United States’ biggest rides. It clearly overshadows the El Tour rides of the 1980s when it started with just 200 riders. “It was an adventure and we were able to raise $4,500 that first year for American Diabetes Association,” Dewww.BizTucson.com

Bernardis said. “We had so much fun doing it so I said, “why not continue it?” For the next six years, the American Diabetes Association was the beneficiary of El Tour’s riders. The event went from 200 riders to 631 cyclists in year two. More than $45,000 was raised. How could DeBernardis stop? And then, well, Greg LeMond won the Tour de France in the mid-1990s and “American cycling took off.” By then, El Tour had 1,500 riders and more than $100,000 was raised for charity, the main reason for the event. El Tour has raised more than $74 million for charities through the years. More than 175,000 riders have participated since the 1983 inaugural ride. “There’s been a reason to stay every year because it’s gotten bigger with more cyclists,” DeBernardis said. “What all the money means is we are helping millions of people because the money is going to a number of causes. We feel we’re part of helping. That’s what makes me

EL TOUR DE TUCSON PRESENTED BY CASINO DEL SOL Saturday, Nov. 18 All over the city with starts of 106, 76, 54, 37 and 28 miles. There are also four fun rides of 10,4, 1 and one-quarter miles. Visit: Perimeterbicycling.com for more information

continue this because it’s not just one cause. It’s a number of causes.” Fast-forward to 2017, and El Tour – Perimeter Bicycling’s premier event – expects to raise more than $13 million for charities. Last year set the record with over $12 million that helped nearly 60 beneficiaries, including Easterseals, the ride’s primary beneficiary. Easterseals is back – and of course, so is El Tour with a main event, fun rides and strong rides in between. For the second consecutive year, the main event will be 106 miles, with shorter rides of 76, 54, 37 and 28 miles. There are four fun rides of 10, 4, 1 and one-quarter miles. “We’re expecting this year to be no different,” DeBernardis said. ‘It should be about 70 degrees and sunny.” And when the long day of riding is done for what amounts to a party in and around the community, all culminating at Tucson’s downtown – DeBernardis can relax … a bit. ”I’m always elated” when it’s done, he said. “It’s always an organizational feat. “There are times when I can’t believe it’s been 35 years – and I’m still here doing this. It’s great to see all the people being happy with it. And by the end, I think ‘We did it, we actually did it.’ It’s gotten so big and complicated through the years. Then the next day when I get up in the morning and see all the media coverage it shows that we’ve made an impact.”

Biz Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 29


BizSPORTS

1 1. South Alabama running back Xavier Johnson is tackled during the 2016 Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl at Arizona Stadium

2. Tyler Williams, an Air Force running back from Oro Valley, scores on a six-yard run in the third quarter.

CBS Sports Network Deal Brings Clout to Bowl Game By Steve Rivera To Ali Farhang and Alan Young, the Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl “is a big deal.” And, well, it matters, too. They want it to matter to Southern Arizona more and more. Not that it didn’t before because the community benefits tremendously from the money raised for local charities, including nearly $200,000 for local charities last year. But … “It’s about our town,” said Young, the bowl’s executive director. “Bowls benefit because of economic impact. We brought in about $21 million with the game (last year). It helps with branding with the city. When (the media) shows the mountains of our community and the involvement of our community it brings a lot of good. It puts us on the 30 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

map as a sports town. “The better we do on the bowl, the better we look in years to come.” The Arizona Bowl, ready for Year Three with its game slated for Dec. 29 at 3:30 p.m. at Arizona Stadium, is gaining steam after its first-yet-humble year of 21,000 in the stands. Last year, it had an impressive 33,863, and this year officials hope it’s plenty more for the game between teams from the Western Athletic and Sun Belt conferences. “There’s no reason we can’t fill that stadium,” said Farhang. “That’s important.” Who’s to think that won’t happen, given the game’s apparent rise? It’s so far so good as it enters into its third year. “It’s exceeded my expectations,” Farhang said, “because people have ex-

ceeded my expectations. The fans, the city, the county, the university … when have you heard of that, by the way?” Life is apparently good for the Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl. And, on game day could be very nice. “I have it on pretty good authority that it will be 71 degrees at 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 29,” Farhang joked. What’s not a joke is the alliance with CBS Sports Network, considered a major get for the bowl. Farhang said the agreement is “a six-figure deal for three years.” Farhang said he could have gone with another network, perhaps making it more economically beneficial, but the game “matters to them” in as much as they have a small inventory of games so they’ll concentrate on making it relwww.BizTucson.com


In our community, there are heroes living amongst us and the NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl is seeking sponsors to underwrite tickets to send these heroes and their families to the bowl game. Once a sponsor chooses a heroes group, they can choose to deliver the tickets to that group themselves or the NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl staff will deliver them on their behalf. Heroes groups include, but are not limited to: Active Military, Veterans, Teachers, and First Responders.

3

In 2016, more than 13,000 tickets and $200,000 were committed to our Heroes Tribute Program thanks to the great support and generosity of our great sponsors. Thank you for supporting Tucson’s Football Festival!

4

THE NOVA HOME LOANS ARIZONA BOWL

2

Friday, December 29 at 3:30 p.m. Arizona Stadium.

3. Air Force receiver Jalen Robinette celebrates his touchdown to open the second half.

evant. CBS allowed the bowl’s leadership to pick the date and time, which also was beneficial. “CBS turned into a natural partner because they allowed us to work with them on that,” Farhang said. The game will be shown after the annual Sun Bowl, which is on the main CBS network channel. “It meant the world,” Young said of the CBS deal. “We’ve been trying for two years to get them. We’re legitimate.” Not that they weren’t legitimate when CampusInsider.com and American Sports Network were involved. Farhang alluded to the two as being “innovative” in bringing the game to internet viewers through Facebook, Twitter and digital means. But “it was a no-brainer to have CBS because it only increases” visibility and prominence. He said he didn’t really realize it until after the deal was struck earlier this year. “It’s about profile and stature,” Farhang said about marriage. “Getting CBS involved was a huge step for us … It’s exceeded our expectations. And CBS has exceeded our expectations in www.BizTucson.com

how invested they are.” The game will be promoted by CBS in commercials and bowl officials will get six in-game commercials with a couple of public service announcements. “Things are progressing very nicely,” Farhang said. “We continue to build our foundation to increase our profile and stature. The time is now for Tucson and Southern Arizona. Tomorrow is never promised.” And although the Arizona Bowl continues to gain momentum for this year – and the future – Farhang said there is no fast track to get somewhere. Instead there’s a “motto of no limitations and no restrictions.” The soon-to-be-completed AC Marriott will be the new headquarters for the VIPs and there will be a second day of parties, building on what has been a popular must-see, must-participate-in downtown party. “We’re hoping to build on something that’s more than just a football game,” Farhang said. “It’s a community event that people feel invested in. It’s Tucson’s Mardi Gras every year. It’s a celebration by us, for us and about us.” Biz

PHOTOS: COURTESY NOVA HOME LOANS ARIZONA BOWL

4. South Alabama’s Josh Magee scores on the first play of the game.

Platinum Tribute Program ($10,000) 300 donated tickets to our local Heroes in the South End Zone; Eight $125 Stadium Club game tickets (includes food and beverage); Eight Passes to the VIP Party in the Desert Diamond Casino Tailgate Festival; Two VIP Parking Passes; FullPage ad in the official game program; Commemorative NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl Football Gold Tribute Program ($5,000) 150 donated tickets to our local Heroes in the South End Zone Silver Tribute Program ($2,500) 75 donated tickets to our local Heroes in the South End Zone ALL Heroes Tribute Program Sponsors will receive the following: Logo will appear on the videoboard as a part of the Heroes Tribute Program PreGame Ceremonies; Logo will appear on the video board in-game promoting the Heroes Tribute Program; One position in both end zones LED rotation during the game; Logo rotation on Stadium QuadVision; Logo and link on Heroes Tribute Program page of the NOVA Home Loans Arizona Bowl website; Name recognition on the Heroes Tribute Program page in the official game program In support of our great Southern Arizona Heroes, custom packages are available upon request. Please note that all of the packages above can be modified

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 31


PHOTOS: MICHAEL C. SULTZBACH

BizFILM

On the red carpet at Old Tucson – Justin Deeley, Dustin Rikert (director), Leo Howard, Eden xo Malakouti, Kix Brooks, John Schneider, William Shockly.

Kix Brooks performs at Old Tucson following the world premiere.

‘You’re Gonna Miss Me’ Filmed in Tucson By Chuck Graham

“Filmmaking is a team sport – and having the city of Tucson embrace our quest makes that effort all the better,” said William Shockley, producer and actor for “You’re Gonna Miss Me.” Shockley is talking about his newest picture, an $800,000 direct-to-video project filmed entirely in Tucson and Southern Arizona. The film was released last June exclusively through Walmart stores in the United States and Canada. The team he’s talking about includes

His old pal Dustin Rikert, the movie’s director

Country music entertainer Kix Brooks, formerly of Brooks and Dunn (still friends who perform together on occasion)

Eric Brooks (son of Kix) who is a successful screen writer (“A Country Christmas”).

“We’re storytellers,” said Kix. “We 32 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

feel like we have a pulse on what fires up an audience.” Judging from the Facebook comments by people who saw this family-friendly film, the elder Brooks is correct. “We make our movies specifically for the flyover states,” Rikert said, “PG movies full of family moments containing elements of faith, flag and country that families can enjoy watching together.” John Schneider (best known as Bo on the early 1980s TV hit “The Dukes of Hazzard” and to younger generations as Jonathan Kent on “Smallville”) plays a famous but now deceased country singer who videotaped instructions his two estranged sons (played by Justin Deeley and Leo Howard) must follow to inherit their father’s fortune. Just like in a scavenger hunt, the instructions force these cantankerous siblings to cooperate so they can survive visiting several unfriendly Southern Arizona sites. “It’s a comedy with heartfelt moments – like a dramedy,” said Rikert.

“And it’s also a road trip – so it’s a roadtrip dramedy.” “Dustin and I shot many films and music videos together in Tucson and at Old Tucson studios. This city is such a wonderful place to work,” said Shockley. “It is so dynamic – and full of great restaurants.” These four men with such diverse talents have organized themselves as Team Two Entertainment, specializing in the production of feature films and music videos. In turn, they joined company with another of Shockley’s pals – Mike DuBoise from Universal Studios – and John Kuelbs, the chairman of Group 1200 Media, to create the larger team, Vaquero Entertainment. Sounds complicated, but that’s how independent movie makers do it these days. “They call this the ‘entertainment business’ and we have a team with an eye and ear for story,” said Kuelbs. “But we also know how to execute on the www.BizTucson.com


Did You Know?

Filming Reality TV, Commercials – Not Westerns

Film production companies spent $25 million in Tucson over 3 years.

By Chuck Graham

Source: Visit Tucson’s Film Office

People still enjoy talking about all the movies made in Tucson, the movie stars they’d see kicking back in local restaurants. Mostly the movies were Westerns. Often the star was John Wayne. But just like the Old West cowboys themselves, those days of making Western movies in Tucson are gone. “People ask me that all the time,” said Dustin Rikert, the director of “You’re Gonna Miss Me.” “They want to know are Westerns ever coming back? And my sad answer is always ‘No.’ “The problem is the younger generation, the millennials, who weren’t raised on those great shows like ‘Gunsmoke’ and ‘Maverick.’ They don’t understand or appreciate Westerns the way we do.” Shelli Hall, director of the Visit Tucson film office, said at least 80 percent of the film projects these days are reality TV shows and commercials. For fiscal year 20152016 this activity brought $6,262,786 to local businesses. For 2016-2017 the total was $10.5 million.

Audience at the Old Tucson’s red-carpet premiere of “You’re Gonna to Miss Me”

Hall said the grand total of “direct spending” by film production companies for fiscal years 2013-2016 was approximately $25 million. During that time, four Westerns were made here, each with a budget of $500,000. “You’re Gonna Miss Me” spent more than $800,000 in Tucson and Southern Arizona.

business details needed for success.” DuBoise said the company “insists on being efficient, focused on delivering great screen value, on time and on budget.” True, this doesn’t sound much like the free-wheeling life John Wayne must have led. But evolution isn’t always exciting. “We developed the script for ‘You’re Gonna Miss Me’ at a company retreat on John’s property near Whitefish, Montana,” said Rikert, who lives in Glendale, Arizona. Shockley said, “Once we had the arc of the story in place, we wrote the script in about six weeks.” Rikert added, “Eric did most of the actual writing. He’s our lead writer. “We wanted one through-line in the story to be about family dysfunction that would set the tone for the film. Having that www.BizTucson.com

element was very important to John personally – but we’ve all been there in some way. Even families that love each other will be competing over some things.” Working to cinch the deal so Vaquero Entertainment would find success making “You’re Gonna Miss Me” at Old Tucson and other spots around Southern Arizona were Shelli Hall, director of Film Tucson at Visit Tucson, and Allison Schult, Visit Tucson’s VP of marketing. “Inserting Tucson into the storylines of these films and showcasing many of our region’s diverse and distinct locations is, without question, the ultimate form of product placement,” said Schult. ‘You’re Gonna Miss Me’ is an amazing opportunity to market the destination and we couldn’t pass it up.”

Biz

A pair of bilingual Mexican projects telling border stories also played significant roles. “600 Miles,” featuring Tim Roth as a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agent, won director Gabriel Ripstein the Best First Feature award at last year’s Berlin Film Festival. This year an episodic Mexican TV series “Run Coyote Run” tells the story of two childhood friends from each side of the border who meet again later in life to start a travel business helping clients slip into the United States. “Projects like these are a boon for our local actors,” said Hall. “Harley Davidson spent nearly $1 million filming a series of commercials they will use in different ways. The Travel Channel has been here several times. The Food Network had a show featuring Tucson food trucks. Some other shows are ‘Shark Tank,’ ‘American Idol’ and ‘Professional Bull Riders.’ The Discovery Channel has been here a lot, too.” “What we value is the economic impact these companies have,” Hall said. “Maybe their projects aren’t as sexy as movies, but reality TV didn’t even exist 20 years ago. For us, this is where the money is.”

Biz

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 33


BizFILM

Clockwise from top – A Suitable Girl, Lane 1974, Deliquent, Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story

Eclectic Film Fest Tucson

Features Drive-In Movies, 1914 Silent Film, Animation The third annual Film Fest Tucson will light up three screens to keep the young event’s cinema momentum growing on Oct. 19-22, returning to the downtown Scottish Rite Cathedral, 160 S. Scott Ave. “I’d say last year’s fest was successful, in that we had a great turnout and didn’t lose any money,” said Herb Stratford, founding artistic director. “We believe this fest can be built into a destination festival that has an impact on the city’s tourism. “Last year we had more than 1,000 people attend. That had a definite economic impact downtown. This year we will have a mix of 32 short films and narrative features, about like last year. 34 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

All will be Arizona premieres.” Collaboration and innovation are becoming characteristics of this deter-

This year we will have a mix of 32 short films and narrative features. All will be Arizona premieres.

– Herb Stratford Founding Artistic Director Film Fest Tucson

mined event, as Stratford keeps coming up with new ways to experience movies. Though he was still nailing down specific films for this year’s program as BizTucson went to press, he is already locked in to create a drive-in theater experience in the Cathedral’s parking lot. “We’ll have a screen set up at the edge of the parking lot, and we’ll transmit the sound so people can pick it up on their car radios.” Although Stratford didn’t know which film would screen, he did know admission would be free. Another free outdoor movie will be shown on the nearby lawn of the Children’s Museum Tucson in collaboration with the Mini continued on page 36 >>> www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FILM FEST TUCSON

By Chuck Graham


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 35


BizFILM continued from page 34 Time Machine Museum of Miniatures. For that one, he is thinking of 1957’s “The Incredible Shrinking Man.” The showcase for pioneering silent films made in the Old West this year is the 28-minute “The Girl Stage Driver.” Shot in Tucson in 1914, the film was restored by the New York Museum of Modern Art. Traditional piano accompaniment will be provided by Jeff Haskell. “We always want to have a film from Tucson’s early cinema heritage,” said Stratford. “We collaborate with the Tucson Historical Preservation Foundation to obtain the silent movies.” Continuing another tradition that began last year are documentaries that connect with Tucson Fashion Week and Tucson Modernism Week. This year’s fashion doc is “House of Z,” a recounting of the agitated life and disrupted career of enfant-terrible clothing designer Zac Posen. “We’re still looking for a Tucson Modernism Week film to book,” said Stratford. A collaboration with Yvonne Ervin of the equally new Tucson Jazz Festival brings “The Case of the Three-Sided Dream,” a bio-pic about the eclectic Rahsaan Roland Kirk. Attending the screening is Kirk’s widow, Dorthaan, who will lead a Q&A afterward. Another Film Festival Tucson collaboration in company with the Jewish Community Center is “Supergirl,” a film about a 13-year-old weightlifter. “I saw it in January at the Slamdance Film Festival that runs in conjunction with the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah,” Stratford said. Our own city’s Museum of Contemporary Art worked with the FFT to bring in “Burden,” documenting the shocking exhibitions of the extreme performance artist Chris Burden, who died in 2015. Completing the lineup of special-interest films is the latest from innovative animator Bill Plympton, the featurelength “Revengeance.” Also new from Plympton is a short film about global warming, “No Snow for Christmas.” Completing the festival are two panels for filmmakers – one about scouting film locations and another on polishing one’s own film pitch.

Biz 36 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 37


BizBRIEFS

Lee Lambert Pima Community Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chancellor Lee D. Lambert was named the Pacific Region CEO of the Year by the Association of Community College Trustees. The association focuses on issues important to community college board members. Its Pacific region encompasses 10 states, territories and provinces in the United States and Canada. Lambert has been college chancellor since 2013. He led the effort to lift accreditation sanctions against the college district.

Biz

Alex Rodriguez Alex Rodriguez is now VP of government and external affairs for Vector, which provides space launch systems. Most recently he was VP of Arizona Technology Council and led the Arizona Aerospace, Aviation and Defense CEO Network. He has more than 20 years of experience in business development, government affairs and strategic planning. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s held leadership roles in three Fortune 500 companies, including Raytheon. His background also includes foreign affairs. Biz 38 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 39


BizBRIEF

Luxury Homes Debut at Wildcat Pass

A new blend of convenient and elegant homes with relaxing resort-style living near downtown Tucson feature glorious city and mountain views. The newly constructed homes at Wildcat Pass are minutes away from the Tucson International Airport, Caterpillar, Raytheon, the University of Arizona, local arts and sporting venues, Old Tucson, San Xavier Mission, the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum and casino gaming. Talk about location! Longtime Tucson real estate broker and developer Andy Courtney of Andy Courtney Properties has developed the 31 oversized lots. The floor plans range from 2,420 to 3,229 square feet for the custom homes with starting prices in the mid-$600,000 range and the setting offers a blend of quiet rural and hip ur-

40 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

ban lifestyles. Wildcat Pass is designed to complement and embrace the surrounding natural landscape of the Tucson Mountain Park.

Andy Courtney Residents will enjoy the privacy of a gated community steps away from the JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort

& Spa and Starr Pass Golf Club with 27 holes of Arnold Palmer Signature championship golf. Those purchasing a home or lot receive the initiation fee for a country club or spa membership. The community is near world-class hiking and biking trails near the Tucson Mountains that range from 2,000 feet to 4,000 feet. The new homes complement the recent growth of business downtown and the thriving cultural, culinary and entertainment scenes that make Tucson one of the best places to live. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are particularly excited about the upcoming $20 million expansion of Starr Pass Boulevard that will greatly enhance the beautiful saguaro-studded entry to Wildcat Pass,â&#x20AC;? Courtney said.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


BizBRIEF

Another Strong Year for Vantage West Vantage West Credit Union continues to post strong financials, announcing at its 62nd annual meeting that it had $1.7 billion in total assets and a growing membership of 143,000 by year-end 2016. The credit union had a total net worth of $196 million for an 11.73 percent net worth ratio compared, with the national peer group average of 10.82 percent. With its sustained growth, Vantage West maintains its solid position as Southern Arizona’s largest credit union and the third largest in the state. Vantage West recently launched its Connect Rewards Visa Signature card, offering one of most robust reward program around. The new credit card offers five-times rewards in a category

www.BizTucson.com

of one’s choice, three-times on gas, two-times on groceries, and one-time on everything else. Vantage West also launched two new checking account options with debit rewards that can be combined with credit rewards for maximum member value. Among the other highlights announced at the meeting: • Groundbreaking on a technology center that will drive technological enhancements at Vantage West, establish a new line of business for the credit union, and enable it to offer IT services to its business-banking members and other organizations. • Customizations to the credit union’s mortgage program to benefit “heroes” (including first responders,

teachers, military and others) in the community, assigned mortgage specialists to every branch, and an updated/streamlined online mortgage portal for a friendly and easy user experience. • DocuSign implementation, which makes the loan funding process more convenient by allowing secure electronic signature, and a loan payment feature within online banking. Chairman Mitch Pisik and Gregory Good were elected as directors by acclamation for new three-year terms. Augustine Gomez was elected as a director to complete the remaining two years of a three-year term vacated in December 2016. Biz

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 41


BizARTS

Tucson Museum of Art

Investing in Itself for the 21st Century By Lee Allen The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block spent the summer investing in itself during Phase I of a three-phase program to ready the red carpet in anticipation of its upcoming Centennial. “TMA has been quintessential to Tucson as its visual arts center since 1925,” said CEO Jeremy Mikolajczak. “Our founding was a display of the fact that arts are imbedded in people and a testament to the strength and ability of what arts can do for this community.” When Mikolajczak (pronounced Mik-

o-lay-zack) arrived here in early 2016 from Miami, he brought with him some big-city aspirations. “It was time to look at re-imaging the museum, deciding where we wanted to go from here, what was next,” he said. “This institution has a fantastic history and a great future. There’s pride in what we have, but in a lot of ways, some things were underdeveloped. “We agreed we had an amazing property that was in need of some love and care – so we decided to invest in our-

selves. It was time for TMA to move forward in order to present a museum of the 21st century.” “What was next” began to take shape in June when the museum changed from exhibitions on display to a gathering place for construction crews to tear down and rebuild – the first renovation of the four-acre campus in 15 years. Phase I of TMA/100 – A Vision for the 21st Century is done, the initial part of a capital campaign that reflects the belief that a community deserves access

IMAGES: COURTESY TUCSON MUSEUM OF ART

TMA Glasser West Entry

42 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


to programs that nurture a passion for art, culture and the history of Tucson and all of Southern Arizona. With a first-phase goal of raising $1.5 million, “this is a responsible and sustainable investment,” said Mikolajczak. Upgrades began June 1, both internally and externally on the historic properties of the TMA campus at 140 N. Main Ave. By early July, exhibits closed down and the big hammers started pounding. Early September saw fewer workmen and the return of visitors to the inauguration of a new Goodman Pavilion while the main building remained closed. A ribbon-cutting and Open House community celebration is slated for Oct. 21-22 with the museum offering free admission for the weekend. The renovation includes a new Feature Exhibition Gallery, European Art Gallery, Asian Art Gallery, Folk Art Masks Gallery, and a new educational installation in the historic Edward Nye Fish House. The Goodman Pavilion

Jeremy Mikolajczak CEO Tucson Museum of Art and Stevens/Duffield House (home to Café à la C’Art ) have also been refurbished. The architect of the project was Richard “Andy” Anderson, a long-standing member of TMA’s Board of Trustees and the man who designed TMA’s iconic building that opened in 1975. Construction was by Kittle Design and Construction. Oden Construction was responsible for the restorations of the historic properties. “At the start of the new year, January 2018, we’ll launch Phase II, a planned three-year, $2 million effort focusing on what we see as a great area of need – education,” the CEO said. “What’s great about TMA is we’re not just talk-

ing children in grades K-12, but lifelong learning for everyone. Museum goers don’t necessarily flock to exhibitions anymore, but they go for events and programs and we plan to reinforce our lecture series.” Already TMA offers more than 125 lectures, programs, workshops and special artisan markets each year. Look for that schedule of activities providing a rich assortment of programs for all ages to expand along with presentations by TMALearn, the education department’s programs that already serve 35,000 kids and grown-up kids each year at the museum and off-site locations throughout the region. There is a Phase III, a larger capital campaign seeking $10 million for a campus-wide renovation that would increase gallery space and outdoor offerings. The Master Plan of 2016 was established for the configuration of a new Feature Exhibition Gallery and major continued on page 45 >>>

TMA Glasser South East View

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 43


44 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


BizARTS continued from page 43 reinstallation of TMA’s extensive permanent collection. The museum collects in many areas including Contemporary Art, Modern Art, Western Art, Asian and Latin American Art, Native American Art and Folk Art of the Americas with the collection housed in a vault on the TMA campus – a vault nearing capacity. “We knew we needed dedicated galleries for our collection because we have over 9,000 objects available with only about 2-3 percent actually on display,” Mikolajczak said. “We wanted to approach a 10-15 percent figure displaying a variety, a sense of regionalism, who we are and the culture of what’s here. Along those lines, we’re increasing our Art of the American West gallery, almost doubling its current size.” Because the museum has a large collection of Mexican folk art, there will be plenty of that to view and appreciate. “We’ll still exhibit large-format temporary exhibitions, we’ll rotate those, but at all times anyone can come in and see great Tucson gems that represent the best of Western art in our portion of the world.” Some of the most iconic exhibitions have included Maynard Dixon’s Arizona; Deborah Butterfield Sculptures; Ansel Adams, A Legacy; The Figure Examined – Masterworks from the Kasser Mochary Art Foundation; and Who Shot Rock and Roll – A Photographic History from 1955 to the Present. Not only do things get modified, reconfigured, expanded and repainted, the sum of the parts go to completing a whole, that of becoming – again – the hub of Main Avenue. “This used to be a prominent street in downtown Tucson and we want to jump start that energy again,” Mikolajczak said. “We want everyone to have the comfort zone to explore it all.” Mikolajczak calls TMA “metric-driven” because its inhouse data collection tells a story that helps in making wise plans for the future. Visitation numbers since the recession of 2008-2009 have held relatively steady, with fluctuations noted based on various shows, and year-end composites that show healthy community support of the institution. The museum welcomes in excess of 100,000 visitors annually. The numbers also show a seasonality factor as 67 percent of the art lovers who show up are winter visitors. “We need to grow our in-town support and toward that end, we offer First Thursday and Second Sunday free admission,” Mikolajczak said. “Museums are businesses, too, so the bottom line is always paramount. But you can‘t go into this being too cautious, afraid to try new ideas, because in many instances, museums that have not reinvented themselves have become dinosaurs. “We are an economic engine that makes a direct impact. The arts and culture industry in Arizona represents an annual $22 million. The cultural sector is a viable business in this region.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 45


BizLEADERSHIP

A Unifying Vision University of Arizona President Collaborates with Stakeholders

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Jay Gonzales

As a child in rural Mississippi, Robert Robbins didn’t purposely set out to be a university president like someone might set out to be a lawyer or a teacher or, as in his case, a doctor. But after spending his childhood living on a college campus, and when 46 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

happenstance kept him from his other preferred line of work – professional football player, a lifetime of education put him on a path to being named the 22nd president of the University of Arizona. Now that he’s in the seat, Robbins, a cardiac

surgeon and a long-time university and medical center administrator, sounds much like the doctor that he is in that he wants to make a difference in people’s lives. Instead of doing it one patient at a time, though, he’s trying to do it for continued on page 48 >>>

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 47


Robbins joins in a selfie with the New Student Orientation Leaders in the early days of his administration in June. Selfie photograph by Eryn Caffrey

Dr. Robert C. Robbins Professional Highlights

1993 – 2012 Stanford University School of Medicine • Director, Cardiothoracic Transplantation Laboratory • Director, Heart, Heart-Lung, and Lung Transplant Program • Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery • Chairman, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery 2012 – 2017 President and CEO, Texas Medical Center 2017 President, The University of Arizona SELECTED PUBLIC AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE: • Founding Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute • President, International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation • President, Western Thoracic Surgical Association • President, American Heart Association Western States Affiliate • President, Bay Area Society of Thoracic Surgeons • Chair, American Heart Association Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia Council • President, American Heart Association Southwest Affiliate EDUCATION • Associate of Arts, Chemistry, Jones Junior College • Bachelor of Science, Chemistry, Millsaps College • Medical Degree, Intern, Resident, University of Mississippi Medical Center • Postdoctoral Fellow, Cardiothoracic Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center Patents – 7 Research Grants – 9 Peer-reviewed Journal Articles – 322 Non-Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles – 23 Book Chapters – 25 Invited Presentations – 120 48 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

continued from page 46 the UA’s 43,000 students and 15,000 employees – and for that matter, for an entire community that is closely tied to its university. “I really believe that leadership matters, and that one person can make a difference in the life of a university,” Robbins said. “But the thing that I am most passionate about, and the things that capture my imagination, are all the components of a university. “I think that my goal, however long I last in this job – hopefully at least 10 to 15 years – is to be able to bring all the different stakeholders together around a unifying vision that will help us to make the university even greater and more impactful in the local, regional, national and global influence.” But first things first. If you think you’ve seen Robbins somewhere in the community since his hiring was announced on April 7, it’s because you probably have. He’s out and about. He’s meeting UA alumni in New York one day. He’s in Mexico the next, and Phoenix the next. He’s hobnobbed with students, posting selfies on Twitter. His Twitter feed seems to suggest he’s as likely to show up in a suit as he is to show up in shorts or jeans and a golf shirt. He dispenses with formalities and introduces himself as “Bobby.” Being in as many places as he can be during the summer was a focused strategy on Robbins’ part, an effort to absorb the complexities of the university and the community so he can get to the business at hand. “What I’ve tried to do is be as engaged as possible, as accessible as possible, and listen,” he said during his July interview with BizTucson. “I pay close attention because I can’t just plop in here with all the answers. Even if I’ve been here 10 years, I won’t have all the answers. It’s going to take a team and a tapestry of ideas that come together in aggregate to paint a beautiful picture.” Ron Shoopman, who wore several hats during the search for the successor to outgoing UA President Ann Weaver Hart, said Robbins’ energy and passion for the university were evident early in the hiring process. Shoopman is CEO of the local business group the Southern Arizona Leadership Council. He’s a member of the Arizona Board of Regents. And he was vice chair of the search committee. “He has a passion for students and for higher education and it comes through when you talk to him,” Shoopman said. “He cares deeply about people. “He is so committed. He wanted to live near the university for one reason – because any time that he was going to spend commuting to the university was time that he wasn’t working. That’s what he told me.” Robbins currently lives on campus in an apartment generally used for visiting professors. While he’s admittedly been in an information-gathering mode, Robbins is already zeroing in on a range of initiatives and actions that will begin to put his mark continued on page 50 >>>


BizLEADERSHIP

Lifelong Passion for Education By Jay Gonzales

How’s this for a lifelong commitment to education? As a child, the University of Arizona’s new president used to sit in a tree on a Mississippi junior college campus and watch classes. “We just lived on the campus and I actually watched my grandfather teach,” Dr. Robert C. “Bobby” Robbins said of his time in Ellisville, where Jones Junior College is located. “I got to see through the lens of growing up on a small campus. “I knew all the professors, integrated with the students from the time I was a little kid. I grew up playing ping pong and pickup basketball and baseball with college students. It was just a very formative part of who I am.” Who he is today is the UA’s 22nd president. A prestigious position to say the least, but if he’d had his druthers, he would have been the quarterback at the University of Mississippi, following in the footsteps of Archie Manning and preceding his famous son and Super Bowl champion, Eli. “I went to that junior college for a couple of years because I was going to go to Ole Miss to play football, but I hurt my knee,” Robbins said. “Plus, I’m not big enough to be an SEC quarterback. But every kid growing up there thought they were going to be the next Archie Manning.” When the quarterback thing didn’t work out at Ole Miss, Robbins instead turned to education and, in particular, medicine. “I looked around and thought, ‘Well, who’s the person who seems to have their own destiny and was doing great things for the community’ – and it was a local doctor,” Robbins said.

www.BizTucson.com

“One of my close friends in grade school and high school, his father was the only doctor in town. I got to see what he did and hang around with him a bit. And it just kind of stimulated me to try to study hard, achieve and go to medical school.” As it turned out, Robbins still did go to Ole Miss, but it was to earn his medical degree after getting his undergraduate degree at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. Then came his cardiothoracic training at Stanford University and postdoctoral research at Columbia University. He said his competitive nature as an athlete served him well in the operating room. “The things that I thought were the most challenging were around surgery,” he said. “I thought it was just captivating to have someone come to you, not being able to breathe or not being able to do things – and to go in, open up their chest, stop their heart, fix their heart, then have them recover. “I used to say to my patients, ‘What is it you can’t do now that you want to do? A year from now send me a picture of you doing that.’ I used to get all these pictures of people being able to run a marathon or do whatever. The ability to be able to change people’s lives so dramatically, almost instantaneously, was something that was inspiring to me.” All the while, Robbins had an eye toward teaching and administration, and he eventually acted on it at Stanford University as a professor and chairman of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford School of Medicine. “I lived on the Stanford campus,” Robbins said. “I was surrounded by philosophy professors, economics professors,

law school professors, business school professors, English professors, and it was a really tight-knit community. I thought I would stay forever. “But as I rose up through the ranks, I got more involved in administration and fund-raising and thought that the next step for me was to be a dean of a school of medicine and the president of a university.” The job that ultimately put him in position for the UA presidency was five years as CEO of the Texas Medical Center, said to be the world’s largest medical complex that includes the world’s largest children’s hospital and world’s largest cancer hospital. Now in Tucson, Robbins is taking in his new existence, making his way around the state on official business and as a resident trying to learn about his state. He golfs – allegedly about a 16 handicap. He’s already been to the Grand Canyon. He loved Tubac – “an incredible place.” He’s impressed by the activity in Tucson’s resurgent downtown and the local restaurants. “All the stuff going on downtown is very cool. The restaurants are just incredible, absolutely incredible. And the music scene is good.” In the midst of one of Tucson’s hottest summers ever, he was appreciating the weather and has already picked up on the lingo. “It’s a dry heat. I love the energy of having 300-plus days of sunshine. Once it gets below 70, I’m not happy. Come back and see me whenever it gets cold. I’ll have a coat on and I’ll be complaining that it’s below 70 and I don’t like it. “The people are incredibly friendly. It reminds me of the South and how the hospitality is infectious. It’s a tremendous, tremendous city.”

Biz

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 49


continued from page 48 on the campus. “I think I’ve got a lot of homework to do; however, when the fall semester begins we’re going to start a 15-monthlong strategic planning process,” he said. “We’ll include members of the community in this process to find out what are the big ideas over the next five, 10, 15 years that the university hopes to succeed on.” There also are some big hires on the horizon. A replacement is needed for Dr. Joe G.N. “Skip” Garcia, who earlier this year resigned his post as senior VP for UA Health Sciences, a position that oversees the medical schools. The UA Honors College also needs a new dean. “The Honors College is a big first test for me because I think it’s really important to the university,” Robbins said. “I think we need to get a new senior vice president for marketing and communications because I think we’ve got incredible stories to tell. This unified strategic plan will be a huge story about how we’ll get the pieces to be greater than the individual parts.” In the short time he’s been in Tucson, Robbins said he already has come to understand the complexity of the position of UA president in this community. There are stakeholders everywhere – students, faculty, staff, the business community, donors, alumni, the Board of Regents and elected officials from small towns to the federal government. “My belief is it’s one of the highest callings to lead a university because universities are where we touch every segment of society,” Robbins said. “All of those are stakeholders to whom I feel a great sense of responsibility.” Fletcher McCusker, chairman and CEO of Sinfonía HealthCare Corp, a company that is the poster child for commercializing UA-developed technology, has already pledged his time and energy to Robbins’ efforts to engage the business community. It might be through Tech Launch Arizona, the arm of the UA devoted to commercializing the school’s research where McCusker serves on the advisory board. “What I like is he’s an inventor. He came out of Stanford, an environment where pretty much everybody wants to have a company,” McCusker said. “He’s also a collaborator. What I saw in Houston was this huge collaboration with disparate interests.” McCusker, who has been on the front lines of most of the region’s recent economic development victories, expects Robbins to be personally and deeply involved in recruiting businesses that need assurance that the academic institutions here can support their company’s employment needs. “He’s a huge player,” McCusker said. “Because we’ve moved away from the call center environment to hightech, high-paid engineering companies, they all want a relationship with the university. They want curriculum aligned with their company’s job recruitment. They want intern programs that will migrate people to their jobs. For every inbound company we talk to, the UA is piece to that chemistry.” 50 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


I thought it was just captivating to have someone come to you, not being able to breathe or not being able to do things – and to go in, open up their chest, stop their heart, fix their heart, then have them recover. –

BizLEADERSHIP

Dr. Robert C. “Bobby” Robbins President University of Arizona

And so are the other academic institutions in the state, one of which is Pima Community College, another “stakeholder” that Robbins has reached out to in his first few months. PCC Chancellor Lee Lambert said he already believes he and Robbins are aligned as the leaders of the local institutions primarily responsible for developing local talent. Lambert also was on the search committee and, once Robbins started at the UA, the two met again to share their visions. “What really caught my eye (during the search process) was he really understands community colleges from his own personal experience and vantage point,” Lambert said. “At the end of the day, we know we’re supplying the talent base for this community and beyond. “But we have to be in alignment with one another, in alignment with the K-12 system, and in alignment with the employer community so that we understand what the respective needs, challenges, opportunities are out there. He gets all of that.” What Robbins said he also gets is that each segment of the university impacts the others in its own way. Students learn and need and want jobs. A strong and impressive university can help create jobs by attracting industry. As a standalone, the UA is the city’s largest employer. Research leads to inventions and new, spinoff businesses. The list goes on. “We’re focused on generating knowledge and transferring knowledge to students and the world at large,” Robbins said. “But we are such a big employer, we are such an integral part of this community, I can’t imagine not being absolutely committed to a strong community partnership. “It is complex and there are a lot of moving parts. But just like any big challenge, you’ve got to break it down into small pieces. And so many of the pieces are going to rely on having meaningful and deep relationships with people in the different segments.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 51


125

President & CEO UNS Energy Corp. Tucson Electric Power UniSource Energy Services

52 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

David Hutchens


BizMILESTONE

Powering On Keeping The Lights on for 125 Years By Jay Gonzales

It was 125 years ago when a locally owned electric company first fired up its generator, burning mesquite logs to bring power to homes and businesses in Tucson. Fast forward to 2017, and Tucson Electric Power, the direct descendant of the wood-burning electric company, is harnessing solar energy from more than 90 million miles away with massive solar arrays throughout the territory. Even with the vast advances in technology, the business was pretty simple for the first 120 years or so, said TEP President and CEO David Hutchens. “The only thing you had to worry about was figuring out how to get enough wire out there to serve all of the growth,” he said. “And then you had to have enough generators at the end of that wire to provide enough power.” Even so, TEP’s first 125 years brought many changes and challenges. The company was bought and sold a number of times. Most recently it was acquired in 2014 by a Fortis, a Canadian company which, as its business model, left the utility to continue to be locally managed. There also was a self-inflicted brush with bankruptcy in the early 1990s. And now, the company – like all electric utilities in the United States – is in www.BizTucson.com

the midst of the most dramatic change in the industry that is being crammed into a short period of time, about the last five years, Hutchens said. Customers and regulators are demanding utilities develop cleaner and

Our vision statement sums up everything we’re about – to improve the quality of life in our communities. David Hutchens President & CEO Tucson Electric Power –

more sustainable sources of power. There are emotional and political arguments over climate change. And customers who want to can generate their own solar power and put its excess on TEP’s grid. “This has a been a confluence of events,” Hutchens said of the last five years. “It hasn’t been just one thing.”

The lights go on

Historical records at TEP show that gas-powered electricity first lit up Tucson’s dusty streets in 1882, but the company that started it all went under in 1885 when its prices couldn’t support the business. Out of the darkness, a group of local investors formed The Electric Light and Power Company in 1892 and the lights have been on ever since. The company built the first power house on Church Avenue just north of Pennington Street and installed a brand new General Electric lighting plant. A typical residential customer had three lights and paid about $3 a month for service. Only four years after entering the electric utility business, the company bought the struggling Tucson Gas Company for $14,000, a relationship that lasted until 1979. The company managed through financial ups and downs, the Great Depression and rapid growth after World War II. As the pages of the calendar flipped toward the 1970s, things got interesting for a company that otherwise had one job – to keep the lights on. continued on page 54 >>>

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 53


continued from page 53 Going nuclear…or not

In 1969, Tucson Gas & Electric became the only company headquartered in Tucson that was traded on the New York Stock Exchange. In the early and mid-1970s, TGE was wheeling and dealing with a number of initiatives. Natural gas shortages and embargoes made coal the primary fuel for power plants in Ari-

TIMELINE

1882

The Electric Light & Power Company is formed by Tucson investors. The first electric generator is put into service in a power house on North Church Avenue.

1896

The company buys Tucson Gas Company for $14,000.

1901

The company is sold for $35,000 cash to a Denver businessman.

1911

Federal Light & Traction Company of New York City buys controlling interest in Tucson Gas, Electric Light & Power Company.

zona and New Mexico. The company also entered into an agreement in 1972 to own part of the multibillion-dollar Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station near Buckeye, Arizona. Amid escalating costs of the nuclear plant and a slowdown in growth and revenues, TGE later decided nuclear was a bad idea for its business and sold its share of Palo Verde to Southern Cal-

1927

The purchase of a 3,750-horsepower BuschSulzer oil engine makes Tucson’s central plant the largest oil-fueled, publicutility power generator in the country.

1937

Employees form a union that becomes Local 1116 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.

1948

Plans are announced to build the DeMoss-Petrie Generating Station near what is now Interstate 10 and Grant Road for $11 million.

1

2

ifornia Edison. With more financial challenges on the horizon, in 1974 the company called on 39-year-old whiz Theodore “Ted” Welp to manage its finances as a VP in 1974. He was promoted to president in 1976, and in 1978 he was named Utility Executive of the Year by Financial World magazine. “He was a brilliant guy, an absolute

1955

1979

1969

1989

The company announces plans to build the Irvington Generating Station at South Alvernon Way and East Irvington Road for $25 million. The company’s stock begins trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

1977

Regulatory approval is given to build a coal-fired generating station near Springerville, Arizona.

Tucson Gas & Electric Co. sells its natural gas distribution business to Southwest Gas Corporation. TGE’s name is changed to Tucson Electric Power Company. The company faces troubled financial times when business deals and a lower-thanexpected rate increase leads to heavy losses.

1991

Involuntary Chapter 11 bankruptcy petitions are filed against the company by its major creditors.

4

3

1. Albert Steinfeld Building 2.1906 electric streetcar takes over last mule wagon 3. 1911 South Stone Avenue TEP office 4. 1937 Local 116 of IBEW was formed 5. War effort 1940s 6. Offices 54 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


BizMILESTONE genius,” said Steve Banzhaf, a local attorney who joined the company in 1975 and served as a senior VP and general counsel under Welp. “He was very authoritarian. It was Ted’s way or the highway. But I probably have never been around a brighter guy in terms of finances and strategy.” Welp’s strong hand guided the company through a series of financial deals 1992

Stockholders approve the company’s financial restructuring, including dilution of its stock, to avoid bankruptcy.

1998

UniSource Energy is formed and becomes TEP’s new parent company.

1999

The Arizona Corporation Commission approves a settlement agreement that freezes TEP’s rates through the end of 2008.

in the late 1970s. Welp sold the gas division in 1979. “Ted didn’t like the gas business,” Banzhaf said. Two years earlier, the company had gotten regulatory approval to build a state-of-the-art, coal-fired power plant in Springerville, Arizona, that would play a huge part in the company’s near bankruptcy in the early 1990s.

2000

TEP begins to develop a new solar generation system near the Springerville plant that will eventually become one of the world’s largest gridtied photovoltaic arrays.

2011

TEP and Tech Parks Arizona partner to install the first solar power system at the Solar Zone, now the largest multi-technology solar testing, evaluation and demonstration site in the U.S. with 25 megawatts of combined capacity.

Self-inflicted wounds

A series of complicated transactions and spinoffs related to the Springerville plant and the company’s generating resources put TEP in dire financial straits by the late 1980s. The lights stayed on but the company’s finances were a mess. TEP’s creditors filed involuntary Chapter 11 bankruptcy petitions against the continued on page 56 >>>

2011

Tucson Electric Power corporate headquarters opens providing a boost to downtown’s resurgence

2014

TEP’s parent company, now known as UNS Energy, is acquired by Fortis, Canada’s largest investor-owned gas and electric utility company, for $4.5 billion.

2015

TEP ends the use of coal at its largest local power plant – the H. Wilson Sundt Generating Station, formerly known as the Irvington Generating Station – as part of a plan to diversify generating resources.

2017

TEP announces plans to buy solar energy at historically low prices from a new solar array and energy storage system being developed by NextEra Energy Resources.

continued on page 58 >>>

10 8 5

6 7

11 9

7. 1950 DeMoss Petrie plant opens 8. DeMoss Petrie Open House 9. Old TEP HQ 10. Solar Zone at UA Tech Park at Rita Road 11. Current Tucson Electric Power corporate headquarters PHOTOS: COURTESY TUCSON ELECTRIC POWER

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 55


continued from page 55 company in June 1991. Charles Bayless had been hired as CFO in late 1989 and was named CEO within a year to lead TEP through its financial workout. Bayless was fresh from leading Public Service Company of New Hampshire out of bankruptcy and his experience was needed at TEP. The first order of business, Bayless said, was to regain the support and confidence of employees, the community, regulators and business leaders to keep the company from formally going into bankruptcy. But 25 years later, Bayless said he always had confidence the bankruptcy would not actually occur. “There was a very technical reason the petition was filed,” Bayless said. “I knew everyone on the creditors’ committee. Everyone agreed we can work this out.” A positive outcome of the near-bankruptcy, Bayless said, was that it set the company on a course to address a wide range of issues – financial, cultural and in the community – to restore its financial health and regain its leadership role as a strong and stable Tucson business, where it stands today. “We had to break down the silos” within the company, Bayless said. “I knew that as a utility you had to be accepted in the community,” he said. “I think the two biggest things we did were empowering employees, and then getting them involved in the community.” A whole different game

Hutchens, the TEP president since 2014, arrived at the company in 1995 unaware of the financial troubles it had been through. Hutchens had graduated from the University of Arizona in 1988 but left town when he joined in the Navy. “I came back and that had blown over,” he said. “It seemed like we were going in the right direction.” Likewise, TEP’s current chairman of the board, Bob Elliott, had been in Tucson since he arrived to play basketball at the University of Arizona in 1973, and he said he was oblivious to the company’s financial troubles because when he flipped the light switch, the lights came on as expected. But it’s a whole new game for both Hutchens and Elliott as they steer TEP through some of the most dramatic changes in the history of the electric utility industry. “For 120 years it’s been a certain way. And in the last five years there have been a lot of changes,” Elliott said, who has been on TEP’s board since 2003. “You’ve got to be ahead of the curve. What about the changes in the next five years? It’s an ongoing challenge.” Planning for growth and increased usage in its service territory once was a matter of forecasting how many people might be moving to the Tucson area, Hutchens said. With advances in technology – including the affordability of solar power – it’s not so easy anymore. “We love to plan. We love to know where our resources are going, and to be able to tell how to get electrons from here to there,” Hutchens said. But much of the predictability went out the proverbial window as new technologies for air conditioners, appliances and other electric products reduced the amount of power being consumed by each product. Customers had more 56 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


items powered by electricity, but they weren’t using as much power, Hutchens said. Advances in solar technology have created complex issues such as how to charge customers who install solar power at their homes and expect to be able to sell their excess power back to the company using TEP’s wires and facilities. Arizona utilities and the Arizona Corporation Commission are trying to sort that one out. There’s also the complicated task of keeping up with the demand to develop clean, renewable energy, a task that is finally starting to make financial sense for the company which produced 11 percent of its total retail electric sales last year from solar energy resources that it owns and energy that it purchased. TEP owns 56 megawatts of solar capacity with its largest arrays in Fort Huachuca, Springerville and at the University of Arizona Tech Park in southeast Tucson. “If somehow science reversed itself and found there is not such a thing as climate change, we would still do what we’re doing,” Hutchens said. “The economics, the climate aspects, all of those things, point to us doing what we’re doing.” Hutchens said a utility has to do more than keep the lights on. The company continues on the philanthropic course set during the financial recovery with millions of dollars and thousands of volunteer hours streaming into the community. “Our vision statement sums up everything we’re about – to improve the quality of life in our communities,” Hutchens said. “That’s what we’ll always be about, whether it’s through providing energy service or providing community service.”

Biz

TEP By the numbers 420,000 Customers

1,500

Employees

2,696

Total generating capacity

438 MW

Solar generating capacity

2,406 MW

Retail Peak Demand – Hourly (2017)

9,755 miles

Transmission and distribution lines

$1.5 million

Charitable contributions (2016)

17,700

BizMILESTONE Culture of Community Giving By Jay Gonzales As the city’s provider of electricity for 125 years, Tucson Electric Power can literally say it has been involved in the lives of every person that has passed through the community during that time. Knowing that, the company has taken on the responsibility of doing more – a lot more – with its financial giving, in-kind donations and services, and its award-winning volunteer program. “We are completely ingrained in our community,” said David Hutchens, president and CEO of TEP, its parent UNS Energy, and sister company UniSource Energy Services. “The success of our community drives the success of our company and vice versa.” Three years ago, the company identified education, low-income community assistance and the environment as the focus areas for its philanthropy, said Wendy Erica Werden, TEP’s manager of community investment and philanthropy. It was a discussion led by Hutchens who, Werden said, wanted to send the message that “we need to do what is the right thing to do. It really, truly is a part of the culture because of Dave’s leadership because he came up through the ranks. It’s important to him.” The focus areas were developed to ensure that the community is getting the most from what TEP invests. More recently, TEP management has put even more focus on education because of the broad impact it can have on its customer base, both residential and commercial, Werden said. “Our customers have kids in school,” she said. “Having a stronger school system is going to build a better workforce which is better for businesses. That’s one of areas we felt was appropriate for all of our customers.” Even with the focus areas in corporate giving, the 1,500 employees at TEP still can get company support for efforts that are near and dear to them through the company’s organized volunteer program, the Community Action Team, which will celebrate its 25th anniversary next year. Employees can submit an idea for a sponsorship, donation or volunteer opportunity and a decision is made on whether the company will provide support. For example, TEP is supporting a leukemia walk because one of its employees is afflicted with the disease and fellow employees, including her husband, are volunteering their time. In 2016, TEP and its sister company UniSource Energy Services supported 200 nonprofits, contributing about $1.8 million and another 25,000 volunteer hours. And that’s just one year. The company points out that its charitable giving comes from shareholder funds, not from the rates its customers pay.

Biz

Volunteer hours (2016) www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 57


BizTOOLKIT

Mindset: Are You Growth-Minded or Fixed? By Katina Koller You own your mind-set – you are in full control of its influence on everything. Ask yourself if growth and success are interdependent? Is improvement possible without effort? Eve Grodnitzky, author, educator and speaker on the power of mind-set, believes that “effort is the currency of improvement.” How do you know if you are growth-minded? Here are a couple of easy exercises to explore: Inventory your “core programming”

Grodnitzky defines core programming as the “specific set of beliefs about your own and others’ skills and abilities that shape how you perceive, understand and react to … pretty much everything.” Create a list with columns comparing your beliefs, perceptions and their effects on how you react to others. Record observations of yourself. Note areas you want to change, then path constructive avenues of response. Then apply your fresh course whenever you encounter that trigger. Take a self-assessment

There is actually a “mind-set continuum,” as outlined by Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck. The majority of us operate from the moderate side of the fixed spectrum. What situations trigger your fixed mind-set? Upon reflection, how do the optics improve when you apply a growth mind-set? GROWTH

FIXED

(The world is my classroom.)

(Intelligence and skills are inherent.)

Highly adaptable

Want to “look” smart

Welcome feedback

Fear feedback

Embrace challenges

Avoid challenges

Open to other perspectives

Disdain effort

Appropriately assertive

Give up easily

Love to try new things

Resent others

Seek feedback

Invest time to develop your mantra: “Thank you for your feedback. Is there anything else?” Then approach friends, family and colleagues. Ask for objective feedback. Then ask them to select the above descriptors that apply to you and describe a recent example of when you demonstrated that mind-set. Now get to work on translating that feedback into positive action.

Biz

Katina Koller is a strategic advisor and chair at Vistage Worldwide, an international private advisory board for CEOs, executives and business owners. 58 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 59


1919

The City of Tucson opens the first municipally owned airport in the nation, an 82.6-acre property four miles south of Tucson at what is now the Tucson Rodeo Grounds.

90

1925

The Tucson City Council authorizes the purchase of more than 1,200 acres of land on what is now DavisMonthan Air Force Base for a new city airport. City leaders hoped a new airfield would attract a U.S. military aviation branch to Tucson.

1927

Aviator Charles Lindbergh flies his airplane, “The Spirit of St. Louis,” to Tucson to dedicate the city’s new airport, named Davis-Monthan Field in honor of a pair of World War I pilots from Tucson.

1940

In preparation for World War II, the U.S. War Department announces an Army Air Base is to be established at D-M Field.

1941

Davis-Monthan Army Air Field begins operations in Tucson in April. The first assigned units were the 1st Bombardment Wing, the 41st Bombardment Group and the 31st Air Group. D-M’s first commander is Brig. Gen. Frank D. Lackland.

1942

In February, the 39th Bombardment Group arrives at D-M and begins training B-17 Fortress and B-24 Liberator units and crews for heavy bomber operations.

1945

Constant airport operations cease temporarily as D-M’s mission transitions from training airmen to separation – the bureaucratic process utilized in sending soldiers home after their military service was complete. D-M is assigned the responsibility of storing excess U.S. aircraft, a mission that continues to be carried out at the base’s so-called “boneyard.” continued on page 62 >>> 60 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

SALUTE TO DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE Celebrating 90 years in Tucson. Presented by DM50. Thursday, Oct. 5, 4 to 8 p.m. Pima Air and Space Museum 6000 E. Valencia Road. Individual tickets $65 www.supportourbase.org Chuck Durham at 520-349-7302 or ChuckDurham@dm50.org

www.BizTucson.com


BizMILESTONE

Flying High Davis-Monthan Began as an Airport, Now a Force in Tucson

B-24 bomber

It was nine decades ago when “The Jazz Singer” opened, marking the end of the silent film era; when work began on the sculpture of four former U.S. presidents on Mount Rushmore; when baseball immortal Babe Ruth hit a record 60 home runs; and when pioneering aviator Charles Lindbergh flew from New York City to Paris in the first solo transatlantic flight. That same year, on Sept. 23, 1927, Tucson had its own landmark day that set in motion the series of events that have been incredibly beneficial to the Southern Arizona economy and U.S. security interests. In fact, just four months after Lindbergh’s historic journey, the pilot flew his famous airplane, “The Spirit of St. Louis,” into Tucson to dedicate a new municipal airport, Davis-Monthan Field – named after Lieutenants Samuel H. Davis and Oscar Monthan, two World War I pilots from Tucson. It was the day the seed was planted that blossomed into Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. An anniversary celebration honoring Davis-Monthan’s 90th year in Tucson and its significant contributions will be hosted by DM50 from 4 to 8 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 5, at Pima Air & Space Museum. It is the third “Salute to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base” event organized by DM50 since 2014. Funds raised by the Salute help to ensure that Davis-Monthan Air Force Base can maintain its vital flying missions. “DM50 is pleased to lead the birthday celebration for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, which is both an American asset to our national defense and a treasure to the Tucson community,” said Bob Logan, past president of DM50, a diverse group of Tucson civic and business leaders that advocates on behalf of the base, its missions

and the airmen who serve there. “Ninety years ago, when the roots of what would become Davis-Monthan were planted, no one could have foreseen the enormously positive impact it would bring.” D-M is one leg of a three-legged economic foundation – including Raytheon Missile Systems and the University of Arizona – that comprises Pima County’s largest employers. An economic impact study released by the U.S. Air Force in May concluded that D-M – combined with the nearly 20,000 military retirees living in metro Tucson, many of whom served at the base – contributed about $1.54 billion to the local economy last year. The study also reported that 10,235 personnel were assigned and employed at the base, including 5,743 active duty military, 1,804 Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard members, and 2,688 civilians. The combined payroll of those employees last year was nearly $580 million. “Davis-Monthan’s importance to Tucson cannot be overstated,” said Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild. “It is not only an important employment center and a significant driver in the economy of our region, but also a source of community pride and a center for our aerospace and defense sector.” Defense dollars flowing The U.S. military and defense contracting industries fly higher than any other in Tucson and Arizona. Nearly $5 billion in federal defense dollars flows into Tucson annually, according to a comprehensive Bloomberg Study released in 2011. That national analysis continued on page 62 >>> Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 61

PHOTO: COURTESY DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE

By David Pittman


continued from page 60

1947

The Air Force is established as a branch of the U.S. military.

1948

Davis-Monthan Air Field is renamed Davis-Monthan Air Force Base.

1953

The “jet age” begins as D-M’s runway is widened and lengthened to make way for the first jet bomber, the B-47 Stratojet. Four Lockheed T-33 training jets arrive.

1960

An Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Wing is established at D-M. Eighteen sites around Tucson are selected for construction of Titan II missile silos. The program becomes fully functional three years later. It was de-activated in 1984.

1976

The first A-10 arrives at D-M. Later that year, the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing becomes the host unit at the base.

1991

The A-10, built primarily to provide support to U.S. and Allied ground troops, sees combat during the Gulf War. The aircraft proves extremely successful, destroying more than 1,000 Iraqi tanks, 2,000 military vehicles and 1,200 artillery pieces, while only seven A-10s are shot down.

2014

A $40 million solar park, with 57,000 solar panels mounted on single-axis trackers to automatically follow the sun, begins operations at D-M. The project – designed, built and maintained by SunEdison – saves about $500,000 in electricity costs annually.

2016

The U.S. Defense Department announces that retirement of the A-10 jet will be delayed until the close of 2021. Pentagon officials had been planning to scrap the entire A-10 fleet by 2019. 62 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

continued from page 61 ranked Tucson as the seventh-highest recipient of defense dollars among all U.S. cities and No. 1 in Arizona. The state receives about $15.3 billion in federal defense dollars, eighth-most among the 50 states. “It is clear to me that the Department of Defense is the state’s largest and most important employer,” said Dennis L. Hoffman, professor of economics at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. “I don’t want to think about what Tucson would look like without defense spending.” Tucson’s first airport

According to historical records provided by D-M, Davis-Monthan Field was not Tucson’s first municipal airport. City leaders, who were quite progressive about the future of aviation, established the first municipal airport in the United States, Tucson Municipal Flying Field, in 1919 on property where the Tucson Rodeo Grounds are today at South Sixth Avenue and Irvington Road. The City Council authorized the purchase of the 1,280-acre site on property now part of D-M and transferred airport operations there in hopes the U.S. military would establish an aviation branch in Tucson. A small military presence at D-M Field began Oct. 6, 1927, when Staff Sgt. Dewey Simpson transferred military aircraft refueling and service operations from the old airport. Simpson also brought a log book signed by the field’s patrons, which includes signatures of early aviation immortals, such as Amelia Earhart and James Doolittle. That registry is currently displayed at D-M’s Base Operations. However, a military branch was not established at D-M until 13 years later when the U.S. government began preparations for entering World War II. The U.S. War Department took over DavisMonthan Field in September 1940. It opened an Army Air Base there on April 17, 1941, and the first Bombardment Wing Headquarters assumed command. The first base commander was Brig. Gen. Frank Lackland. Military aircraft filled the skies over Tucson until V-J Day (Victory over Japan) in August 1945. At the end of World War II, constant airport operations ceased and D-M’s mission transitioned from training air-

men for combat to the bureaucratic process of sending thousands of them home after their military service was complete. It was around this time that DavisMonthan, because Tucson’s dry climate and alkali soil proved ideal for aircraft preservation, took on the responsibility of aircraft storage. That mission, known as “the boneyard” is conducted by the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group at D-M to this day. Officially an Air Force base

In March 1946, the newly activated Strategic Air Command took control of the base. In 1947, the U.S. Air Force was created as a separate branch of military service and two bombardment groups at D-M achieved “Wing” status. On Jan. 13, 1948, Davis-Monthan Field was officially re-designated as DavisMonthan Air Force Base. Since the end of World War II, D-M has grown into a major military installation that resembles a small city. Throughout D-M’s history the airmen stationed there have been required to adapt to an ever-changing world that brought, among other things, a decadeslong “Cold War,” the operation of an Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Wing, vast technological advancements in aircraft and weaponry, and deployments to Southeast Asia during the Vietnam era and the Middle East during wars in Iraq, Libya and Afghanistan, as well as a Global War on Terror. Col. Scott Campbell, the current commander of Davis-Monthan and the 355th Fighter Wing, said that through all the changing missions at the base, there has been a single constant: “Tucson’s unwavering support” for the installation. “We could not do what we do without the active support of our neighbors,” said Campbell. “Our service members and their families are grateful to be a part of this unique city and its many surrounding communities. We are proud of our long history here, and we are proud of the dynamic local partnerships that continue to grow.” Mayor Rothschild said those serving at D-M are part of Tucson and often give back to the community. “We often overlook the contributions that our airmen and women make to Tucson with their volunteer work and their willingness to share their time with those in need, while doing the critical work of


BizMILESTONE training and deploying for the defense of our country,” he said. There are nine major military installations in Arizona, and eight of those, including Marine and Army operations, have flying missions because of the state’s vast, usable air space and warm, sunny weather. “There is air space over land in Arizona that I think is unmatched anywhere in the world,” said Major Gen. Ted Maxwell, commander of the Arizona Air National Guard and president of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council. “The Barry M. Goldwater Range is a national treasure to the military that stretches essentially from Kitt Peak to the California border and from the Mexican border all the way to Interstate 8, with service to 50,000 feet. “The big kicker is the weather. We plan for about five non-flying days a year. You can’t do that anywhere else.”

The 308th Bomb Group in China after training at D-M; Pictured below – Tucson and D-M in 1942.

PHOTOS: COURTESY DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE

D-M’s future

D-M continues to be held in high regard by U.S. military leaders. Last year, the Air Combat Command named the Tucson base as the winner of the annual Commander-in-Chief ’s Installation Excellence Award, an honor D-M also received in 2012. But even though D-M has a long and impressive history, support from the Pentagon and the community, a near perfect climate, and abundant air space, some Tucsonans have recently worried about D-M’s future. Those worries were brought on by efforts by Air Force officials to retire the A-10 Thunderbolt II – also known as the “Warthog” because it is not viewed among the sleekest of military jets. In fact, the Pentagon has been planning to begin mothballing the A-10 in 2018 and completely retire the aircraft by 2021. The A-10 is the backbone of the 355th Fighter Wing, the host unit and primary mission at D-M. The argument for scrapping the A-10 has been that it can no longer survive on the battlefield against modern, high-tech air defenses and that money needed to keep the aging aircraft flying would be better spent on the F-35 Lightning II, a fifth-generation fighter that features supersonic speed, advanced electronics and avionics, a wide array of high-tech weapons and stealth continued on page 64 >>> www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 63


BizMILESTONE

64 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

continued from page 63 capabilities. But what the Warthog lacks in youth and good looks it makes up for in toughness and efficiency. It is a rugged, bruiser of a jet that can fly low and for extended periods of time, allowing its pilot to target small ground targets with various bombs, missiles and a powerful seven-barrel, Gatling-type cannon that can fire 4,200 rounds per minute. “I have A-10s and I will use them because they are fantastic airplanes,” Gen. Herbert “Hawk” Carlisle, chief of the Air Force’s Air Combat Command, said in 2015 when he announced the deployment of Warthogs to Turkey to fight the Islamic State. And of the A-10 pilots trained at D-M, Carlisle said, those “guys are incredibly well-trained and they do fantastic work.” It seems there is growing support in Congress to keep the A-10 flying. U.S. Rep. Martha McSally, a Republican representing southeast Arizona, a former A-10 pilot and the first woman to fly in combat, led the charge that resulted in $126 million being included in the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act to provide new wings, electronic upgrades and safety inspections for 110 A-10s. Those improvements are needed to keep the 2018 phase-out of the aircraft from getting underway. There are 83 Warthogs in three squadrons at D-M, making the base home to the nation’s largest contingent of A10s. McSally said the A-10 is “a one-of-a-kind aircraft that is critical in any battlefield to keep our troops alive and rescue anyone trapped behind enemy lines. It is currently in the demilitarized zone protecting against North Korea aggression, destroying ISIS in the Middle East, and regularly deployed in Europe to support NATO and allies in the face of Russian aggression. It is crucial to keep the A-10 fully funded and upgraded until there is a proven, tested replacement.” House Armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry, RTexas, took a tour of D-M last year. At the end of his visit, with McSally at his side, Thornberry said there is broad support in Congress for the A-10 because it is needed for close-air support for U.S. ground troops. “I think we are going to have A-10s for a long time,” he said. The Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman, Arizona’s own John McCain, is also a Warthog fan. “There is no weapon in our arsenal that offers more effective close air support to American ground troops serving in harm’s way than the A-10,” McCain said. DM50’s Logan, who is assistant dean for external and corporate relations at the UA College of Science, believes the A-10’s retirement will come later, rather than sooner. Nonetheless, he warns that the Warthog, like all military weaponry, cannot go on forever. “As a community, we must be vigilant with our congressional delegation in pursuing and welcoming any flying mission the Air Force wants to bring to Davis-Monthan,” he said. “But D-M is among the most diverse military bases in the country and is home to many vital missions. We’ll be back celebrating the base’s 100th birthday 10 years from now and continue to do so for many, many decades to come.” Biz www.BizTucson.com


66 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 67


Blueprint Success for

10 Years Later, Momentum is on the Rise By June C. Hussey Guided by a carefully researched economic blueprint, Southern Arizona’s four-county, asset-rich region has become a hot spot for economic development in the Southwest. Ten years after launching Tucson’s Economic Blueprint, it’s the fall of 2017 and Sun Corridor Inc. President and CEO Joe Snell can make a strong argument that it’s working. In the last several months, the region struck pay dirt with 5,900 new jobs spread among 18 companies, the largest haul since the organization’s inception. Many of those jobs fall into the high-skilled, high-wage category, as targeted by the Economic Blueprint. If you ask Snell, that’s not even the most exciting part. Like a euphoric gold miner grinning ear to ear at a pan of shiny golden flecks, he is certain the best is yet to come. 68 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

“Our pipeline is bursting at the seams,” Snell beamed from his seat in Sun Corridor Inc.’s conference room, where policymakers and business leaders leave politics at the door to brainstorm about ways to attract new business. Every step forward is progress. “In March, we hosted 45 site selectors here for the first time ever,” Snell said, pointing out that he’s keeping the pedal to the metal with media trips and road shows. “We have a great story to tell and we need to keep telling it. We can keep the momentum going as long as we keep pushing and earning it,” he said. Bringing the region together

Things weren’t always so rosy. Snell said Southern Arizona’s recent economic windfall is a return on a 10-year investment, the result of a carefully orchestrated and doggedly implemented strategy.

Before being tapped to lead TREO (Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities, later rebranded as Sun Corridor Inc.), Snell ran a similar organization in Denver, where he worked with 52 cities and eight counties to successfully develop significant regional economic projects like the Denver Broncos’ new football stadium and Denver International Airport. Those experiences taught him that big things are possible when communities work together. By no coincidence, Denver today is among the fastest growing cities in the United States, a magnet for millennials and the businesses that employ them. Tucson may never aspire to be an NFL city like Denver or Phoenix, but leaders like Snell have looked to such cities for valuable lessons on how to “get in the game.”

www.BizTucson.com


BizECONOMY

When he first arrived from the Mile High City sporting his big-city goggles in 2005, Snell said his first order of business was to develop a plan to bring together Tucson’s historically fractured community. Polarities, infighting and territorialism would only derail future economic prosperity. So Snell set out to forge good relationships with policy makers and industry leaders throughout the region, asking each one to take ownership in the new effort. A comprehensive industry-targeting study by Harvard University expert Michael Porter led to a strategic plan that would guide Tucson in driving its own destiny. Tucson’s Economic Blueprint was unveiled in 2007, just as an economic recession the size of the Grand Canyon was looming. Southern Arizona weathered that deep and prolonged recession while www.BizTucson.com

Snell and his board at Sun Corridor Inc. fine-tuned the strategy and stayed the course, marketing and selling Tucson and its surrounding environs as a regional magnet for four targeted industries – aerospace and defense, transportation and logistics, alternative energy and natural resources (including mining technology) and biosciences and healthcare. To help support the attraction and expansion of the industries, Sun Corridor Inc. rallied troops and resources around four essential pillars for success – talent acquisition, infrastructure, healthcare and business environment. Snell credits Southern Arizona business and community leaders for coming together and laying the essential groundwork that allows the region to compete today at an elite level.

The power of momentum

The region is on a roll and momentum is building, said Dr. Eric Walk, senior VP for medical and scientific affairs and chief medical officer at Roche Tissue Diagnostics, known locally as Ventana Medical Systems, Inc. Roche Tissue Diagnostics is a global leader and innovator of tissue-based cancer diagnostic solutions, providing more than 250 cancer tests with related instruments to more than 90 countries to improve outcomes for the 14 million people diagnosed with cancer annually. It’s also one of the largest biotech companies in the state, with about 1,300 employees at its Oro Valley headquarters. Contributing to Roche Tissue Diagnostics’ growth, Walk said, are the close proximity to the University of Arizona, a receptive business environment in Oro Valley and Arizona and the momentum continued on page 70 >>> Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 69


continued from page 69 of Southern Arizona’s emerging bioscience and biotech community. The homegrown company’s success is a strong testament to the region’s ability to support the growing biosciences/diagnostics industry. With Roche Tissue Diagnostics’ strong presence and Dr. Eric Walk mentorship role, the number of Senior VP biotech companies is growing. Medical and Scientific Affairs “Companies like Accelerate Chief Medical Officer Diagnostics, HTG Molecular Diagnostics, SalutarisMD and Roche Tissue Diagnostics Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals, together with Roche Tissue Diagnostics and organizations with keeping up the recent economic like TGen (Translational Genomics Redevelopment momentum and making search Institute), have created a critical sure the UA is contributing. mass that I think is key for the Southern “I’m impressed with Tucson and how Arizona biotech community to grow its partnership with the university can even further,” Walk said. continue to do great things,” Robbins said. “We’ve been blessed to have RayIt takes talent theon here. We’re now blessed to have Ask Snell the five most important facCaterpillar here. tors in growing a robust economy and “I’ll be looking for the next one, the he’ll respond, “Talent, talent, talent, talnext one and the next one, and how can ent, talent” – and others will agree. we, as a university, help to partner with “It’s critically important,” said David all the stakeholders and government Hutchens, president and CEO at UNS and the captains of industry to be able Energy Corp., Tucson Electric Power to make Tucson an attractive place for and UniSource Energy Services. Hutchthat next company.” ens also is chairman of the board of Sun Corridor Inc. “Prospective employStrong border partners ers always focus on the quality of our One proponent with a strong voice local workforce, and we’re fortunate to for international trade is Guillermo have a diverse and talented population.” Valencia, chairman of the Greater No“We passionately feel that continuing gales and Santa Cruz County Port Auto grow a more robust, vibrant and inthority. He accepted Snell’s invitation to terconnected talent pool will benefit all join Sun Corridor Inc.’s board because organizations in the region,” Walk said. he believed it was mutually beneficial. “Having a vibrant talent pool not only “I’ve learned that Nogales has to helps us acquire top talent, it also helps partner with like-minded people to pronurture a really dynamic ecosystem of mote our area. We cannot do it alone,” job opportunities, career pathways and Valencia said. “When we get together personal growth.” with other groups and pull the rope Walk added that he’s optimistic about in the same direction, we can get a lot the future of biosciences in Southern more accomplished. Arizona. “Sun Corridor Inc. pools the best re“We have a top-tier, BIO5 Institute at sources of the entire region so we, as a the UA. The UA has expressed a strong group, can market all of our assets tointerest in working with companies in gether to attract business. Whether it’s a transitional medicine sense,” he said. to Tucson or Nogales, it’s a plus for our “We already have a small group of enarea,” said Valencia. thusiastic biotech companies. In addiMajor employers including Target, tion, we are very fortunate to have the HomeGoods and FritoLay have moved Desert Angels, an investor group that distribution centers into the area from has invested more than $41 million Casa Grande to Tucson to Nogales since 2000.” where more than 150 transportation The University of Arizona’s new and logistics providers help them move president, Dr. Robert C. Robbins, who goods up and down the corridor and was hired in April, already is on board throughout the U.S. 70 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

“There are a lot of good things happening up and down the Arizona-Mexico trade corridor. There has been $1.8 billion invested in infrastructure on the Mexican side, from Mexico City to Nogales. We’re putting in another $130 million from our port of entry to our interstate. We’re preparing for future growth. We believe there’s a lot of room for growth and, by default, a lot of benefit to Southern Arizona and Mexico.” Valencia describes the Mariposa Port of Entry as “the big engine in Southern Arizona.” It processes 600,000 commercial vehicles and 21 million visitors annually. The port is the direct route between Mexico and the U.S. for nearly all Mexican agricultural products going east, as well as mining exports and imports, auto parts, clothing to be assembled and consumer products heading to Mexico. A total of $30 billion in imports flow into the U.S. and $11 billion in exports into Mexico pass through the port every year, by Valencia’s counts. No other U.S./Mexico border crossing has the capacity to move products like Nogales does – making it a tremendous asset to Southern Arizona, Valencia said. “We’ve worked with every agency on efficiencies,” said Valencia. “We’ve developed expertise, logistics and polished the whole process to make our port efficient, competitive and beneficial to the entire region.” Going for more wins

With advocates like Walk, Robbins and Valencia and more than 70 member organizations backing up Sun Corridor Inc., the region is on a winning streak. If that streak continues, as experts project, Southern Arizona can continue on a track to being one of the most dynamic business centers in North America. “We have reached a core critical mass that poises us to transform Southern Arizona into a real powerhouse of innovation and discovery,” Walk said. “We have all the necessary ingredients.” Robbins added, “We’ve got to work together, because there are going to be disagreements, there are going to be challenges and the only way to solve those is to have meaningful deep relationships, great communication and a shared vision for not only the university, but the entire region and the community.”

Biz

www.BizTucson.com

Photo:BalfourWalker.com

BizECONOMY


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2016

>>>

BizTucson 71


BizTALENT

Train, Retain, Recruit, Reload Talent Acquisition & Retention Drive Economic Growth By Roger Yohem Train and retain. Recruit and reload. Workforce development is the key to success in the incredibly competitive world of economic growth. With Sun Corridor Inc.’s focus on growing economic sectors such as aerospace, biosciences, healthcare, transportation and logistics, and renewable and mining technologies, businesses are challenged to train, retain, recruit and reload talent. Southern Arizona, like all regions across the nation that target these desirable industries, faces fierce competition to fill these needs. “If young people don’t understand the opportunities in Tucson, they get caught up in the hype to move somewhere else for their dream job or career,” said Ian Roark, VP of workforce development at Pima Community College. “The lack of middle-skill workers is a national crisis, not just here.” It’s a labor crisis that is 20 years in the 72 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

making. Waves of baby boomers were projected to start retiring in the late2000s, Roark said. The Great Recession crashed that forecast, rocked their world, and erased billions of dollars in retirement savings. That forced too many boomers to work a decade longer than predicted. As they now exit, the economy is growing despite a shortage of trained talent to replace them. “That is our greatest challenge and opportunity,” said Roark. At Pima Community College, students and businesses are “customers.” To meet the needs of students, PCC is pushing career awareness with a focus on the middle-skills gap. The curriculum is geared to create a pathway to “stay-here” job success. To help businesses, program quality and educational capacity (instructors, facilities, equipment) have been re-aligned.

That supports Sun Corridor Inc.’s Economic Blueprint, said David Welsh, COO. “The better-paying, middleskill jobs run the gamut from turning a wrench to assemblers to machinists to clinical technicians.” Similarly, the University of Arizona is working to create a culture of collaboration to prepare students for success. A well-planned “engagement experience” can help students graduate with specific academic and career experience. “Our programs go beyond minimum academics. We want students to do something in the workforce – an internship, research, study abroad – to know what it’s like to work,” said Melissa Vito, UA senior VP for student affairs, enrollment and strategic initiatives. “That’s huge; it quantifies their involvement. Engagement experiences help students distinguish themselves in the workforce.” www.BizTucson.com


u

Melissa Vito Senior VP Student Affairs, Enrollment & Strategic Initiatives University of Arizona

u

u

Sethuraman Panchanathan

Ian Roark

Executive VP & Chief Research & Innovation Officer Arizona State University

The UA embraces an “entrepreneurial spirit” with employers. Different companies require different talent, “so we look at how we can tailor professional development to their specific needs,” Vito said. “If we can help their workers complete degrees or get certified, the businesses see the added value.” Many regions are chasing the same sectors as Southern Arizona. Many colleges across the country are collaborating with businesses to train employees. As a result, many similar workforce programs are being developed. “Differentiation – it’s a challenge. Many things are the same,” Vito said. “Some differentiation occurs because each university has specific advantages based on its academic programs that are well known.” Two key advantages at the UA are its strong science programs and the Eller College of Management. Those are www.BizTucson.com

VP Workforce Development Pima Community College

examples of “signature academic areas that automatically give us differentiation,” Vito said. Going forward, more visionary thinking is needed along with the ability to be even more responsive to the needs of a changing economy. “Instead of preparing students for one particular job in their field, we must prepare them with the skills most in demand in the 21st century – creativity, analytical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork and flexibility,” said Sethuraman Panchanathan, executive VP and chief research and innovation officer at Arizona State University. “Many jobs that exist today didn’t exist 10 to 15 years ago. For example, there were no self-driving car engineers or voice-application developers or university chief innovation officers, for that matter,” he said.

Rapid innovations are changing the landscape of the modern workforce. At ASU, the objective is to produce “master learners,” individuals capable of learning anything when equipped with the skills to adapt to changing economic circumstances. People who are lifelong learners will have better career choices, making for happier and more productive workers and citizens. For companies, investing in lifelong learners promotes problemsolving and innovation in their organizations and their products. “Around 70 percent of our graduates begin their careers in Arizona, contributing to the region’s economy. We’re proud of this, but we can do more,” said Panchanathan. “We must continue to foster learners who are adaptable, continually curious and creative.”

Biz Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 73


BizMINING

‘Density’ in Defense and Mining

Southern Arizona Closing in on ‘Hub’ Status for Targeted Sectors By Romi Carrell Wittman and Jay Gonzales Silicon Valley didn’t pop up overnight to become the technology hub of the United States, where innovators like Apple, Google, Facebook and Yahoo make their home. It was a long process to build up that concentration of worldclass technology companies in Northern California. In Tucson, there’s a sense of a similar growing “density” in the target sectors that Sun Corridor Inc. (known then as Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities or TREO) identified 10 years ago in an effort to broaden the region’s economic base. Two of those sectors – aerospace and defense and mining technology – have raised the region’s profile in the last few years through headline-grabbing economic development victories to the point that some high-tech industries are starting to view Tucson as hubs for those sectors. 74 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017 2016

“People don’t realize that Tucson is the mining hub in the West,” said Helio Samora, CEO of Hexagon Mining, considered a global force in mining technology. Hexagon announced in March that it is expanding its North American office which already was located in Tucson. It is in the process of relocating the office to downtown. “The region has supported mining and mining technology companies for a very long time,” said Ryan Hawes, VP of business development for Guardvant, another Tucson-based company that combines high-tech software solutions with mining to improve safety as well as efficiency. “There is a great base of local talent that has large ties to the mining industry.” Since the middle of last year, Raytheon Missile Systems expanded the region’s aerospace and defense industry profile by deciding to add nearly 2,000

jobs to its operation on Tucson’s south side. And Caterpillar boosted the mining technology sector by moving its Surface Mining & Technology Division here. It is building a new facility downtown. That type of movement in a given sector creates what Greg White, VP of finance and CFO at Raytheon, calls “density of engineering and innovative thought. That means good ideas bouncing off a lot of smart people in close proximity tend to get perfected more quickly. I think between Raytheon, the University of Arizona and other aerospace businesses in the area, we have great density of technical talent in our local area.” While Caterpillar and Hexagon have led the region’s recent charge in mining technology, Raytheon has been Tucson’s flag-bearer in the defense industry for decades. But newcomers like Vector, www.BizTucson.com


C AT E R P I L L A R

u Rio Nuevo unveiled the design for Caterpillar’s Tucson Mining Center, a three-story, 150,000-squarefoot building that will be constructed northeast of Sentinel Peak and west of Interstate 10

HEXAGON MINING

a rocket-building company, and World View, with its high-altitude balloon technology, arrived and relationships are building that strengthen Southern Arizona’s profile in the aerospace and defense sector. “Raytheon is fueled by innovation,” said White, who also is vice chair at Sun Corridor Inc. “The greater the level of local talent the greater our ability to help each other to succeed. We had contracts with World View to do research together within months of them starting up. Once they were here and once we ran into each other and talked to each other, we began doing business with each other.” Ben Cordani, lead human resources manager at Caterpillar, said the selection of Tucson just made good sense. “We wanted to be in mining country, www.BizTucson.com

and Tucson is in the heart of it, with such a rich mining heritage,” he said. Long term, Caterpillar’s success and that of other high-tech companies will depend on continued access to highquality talent to fill the company’s many high-tech jobs. “We’re establishing a strong linkage to educational resources such as the University of Arizona,” Cordani said. Hexagon considered moving to Denver some years ago and Denver pulled out all the stops to encourage the move. “We wanted to stay,” Samora said, “but it had to make sense for the business.” Samora admits that, at first, Denver was winning the race. Then Sun Corridor Inc. stepped up and worked closely with the company to meet its needs. “We needed a more modern building and access to subject-matter experts

in mining,” he said. “The university is known for engineering and it also has a very good computer science degree. We’re a technical company so having that talent here is very good for us.” Samora said that, in the end, Tucson’s diversity, talent and community were the deciding factors. “Everything made sense in the end,” he said. Now he calls the region a “hub,” a term that Sun Corridor Inc., as the local economic development leader, would like to see used on multiple sectors. “I don’t know where Tucson ranks,” White said of the region’s profile as a potential location for aerospace and defense companies, “but I will tell you just having Raytheon with roughly 12,000 people in one location puts it pretty high up there.”

Biz Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 75


SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

David Hutchens CHAIR

{

President & CEO UNS Energy Corporation, Tucson Electric Power and UniSource Energy Services

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Our business and community leaders must continue working collaboratively to promote our region. Everyone needs to help tell our story. In addition to our attractive climate and quality of life, Southern Arizona offers a diverse, talented workforce and strong educational opportunities in a location well suited to regional and international trade. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

We need to keep building more awareness among site selectors who help businesses in the expansion and relocation process. Tucson checks all the key boxes for many businesses, particularly hightech and manufacturing employers in search of an educated and accessible workforce. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Collaboration has been the key to our community’s economic development success. Private- and public-sector leaders have worked together with educators and nonprofit groups on numerous projects that have contributed to our economic growth. It wasn’t always this way. But after Tucson missed out on some significant opportunities, a group of key stakeholders committed to working together to put us in a position to attract Caterpillar, the Raytheon Missile Systems’ expansion and other projects that have contributed to our recent success.

It’s critically important. Prospective employers always focus on the quality of our local workforce, and we’re fortunate to have a diverse and talented population. The University of Arizona consistently produces well-qualified job candidates, and our community boasts many excellent primary and secondary education options. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

The energy industry is transforming at a pace that will make it almost unrecognizable just a decade from now. We’re adding storage, intelligence and versatility to our grid to transition to new, cleaner energy resources and provide our customers with more control over how they use energy. This, in turn, will lead to pricing options that reflect these new realities and promote the efficient use of our community’s energy resources.

76 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 77


SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Greg White

{

VICE CHAIR VP of Finance & CFO Raytheon Missile Systems

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

We need to keep doing what we are doing. The coalition of government, business leaders and economic development groups has been working together to ensure that companies wanting to relocate to Southern Arizona feel they will succeed. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

It is a combination of governance, a tax-friendly environment and education. Will the families of workers have access to a quality education and resources? Is there a vibrant economic community and talent readily available? And infrastructure – are roads and expansion projects being effectively managed to enable future growth? What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

In my opinion, it is clearly because of the local economic development organizations, government (state, county, and local) and industry working as a team. In the projects I have worked on, the first question has been, “How can I help?”

It is absolutely critical to growth and why investment in our education system is key. It is also important to fully understand what an asset we have in the University of Arizona. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Aerospace and defense looks to be growing at a good clip of 3 to 5 percent, but local companies have a chance to grow at significantly more than that given the particular products they supply. Raytheon Missile Systems’ recent expansion is testament to that growth.

78 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

Photo: BalfourWalker.com

The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 79


SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Robert D. Ramirez

{

SECRETARY/TREASURER President & CEO Vantage West Credit Union

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

There has to be a genuine desire to help our communities grow so that we all flourish. For instance, Vantage West reinvests part of our profits in the community through social responsibility, scholarship and financial literacy initiatives that help uplift people’s lives. Our business success has translated to our ability to provide people with gainful employment, so they are given the means to be productive members of the community. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

There are two key issues that currently impede economic development: one has to do with our roads and the other with our educational system. When prospective employers come to town, the two things that interest them the most have to do with our roads and educational programs for their young families. The best way we can sustain our growth momentum is by focusing on fixing our roads and enhancing our educational system. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

One of the most critical factors for any business is open and honest communication. What I have witnessed this past year is open coomunication between our county, city and business leaders. There is ongoing collaboration in Tucson, and the results speak for themselves.

In order to attract high-wage/high-tech industries to Tucson, we need to have the talent. At Vantage West, we have an ongoing internship program with the University of Arizona Eller College of Management, and the program has been so successful that we have hired several students upon their graduation. These types of programs are a win/win for both the students and prospective employers. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Similar to other industries, the financial industry is facing massive consolidation as well as massive disruption from other players coming into our marketplace. Banking is evolving at a very rapid pace, and our focus is on leveraging technology more than ever to meet the needs of our membership.

80 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 81


SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

Dennis R. Minano

{

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR Managing Director, Convergence Mitigation Management Retired VP Public Policy, Chief Environmental Officer General Motors

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

We need to execute on our commitments to our region. We recognize there is a mutuality between the success of our community and the growth in our industry. New building simply does not occur unless we demonstrate we can and will execute on our commitments. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

We need stronger tools to help us draw industries. Incentives are one such tool. Granted, they are not a key deciding factor why companies choose to locate in one community over another, but they are an important consideration. We all need to communicate that we can be trusted. Knowing that we fulfill our commitments lessens the risk for companies considering us. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

It’s difficult to zero in on just one factor. The risk in doing so is we oversimplify what is a sensitive balance of many factors. If I were to pick just one, it would be our ability to work collectively and collaboratively. Success comes through unity of action. Collectively, we understand our assets and have diligently worked together to apply them toward significantly advancing our region’s competitiveness.

Companies and site selectors continually rate talent and skills as the number one reason a community is even considered. Without talent, there is no chance of a company even giving our region a glance. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Economists are already looking to the next downturn. No one is more attuned to economic cycles than those of us who live with them. They are a reality and we are highly confident we can weather future economic cycles because of our foresight and planning. In recent years, we have expanded our core industries, thereby diversifying our local economy. Now our challenge is to think tactically and strategically.

82 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as key economic drivers?


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 83


SUN CORRIDOR INC. LEADERSHIP

{

Joe Snell PRESIDENT & CEO Sun Corridor Inc.

}

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Keep our foot on the gas. We must continue to be aggressive in selling the successes and assets of Southern Arizona. Our team will be in other markets more often this year than we have been in the past. We must continue to be aggressive in removing obstacles and creating a competitive environment. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

Improved air service, improved educational outcomes and repair our roads. We continually hear from site selectors that the lack of key non-stop connections is a potential barrier. A strong educational system leads to advances in talent development. Good roads and infrastructure are key ingredients to remaining competitive. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Sun Corridor Inc.’s decision to expand its reach two years ago. By adding three counties and strengthening relationships in Southern Arizona, Sun Corridor Inc. has the ability to showcase additional assets, which include a greater workforce, cross-border commerce and an expanded regional approach. This culminated in the Site Selectors Guild locating its annual conference in Tucson, an acknowledgement of our economic development acumen.

Talent is critical and the No. 1 reason companies choose to expand or relocate to a new market. It is imperative a community works to diversify its talent pool with an eye toward what existing industry needs. We came to the realization our economy was weighted too heavily toward the growth industry. We have made strides to develop stronger programs for our targeted industries in Southern Arizona. But to remain competitive, we need to train for the skills the companies in our region need. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Southern Arizona continues to grow and with it comes more opportunities. Raytheon Missile Systems announced 1,900 new jobs. Caterpillar moved a division here. Accelerate Diagnostics just received FDA approvals. With these and many other positive announcements, Southern Arizona will achieve more success. Our best times are ahead of us.

84 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: JOSE BELTRAN

The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 85


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Sharon Bronson Chair Pima County Board of Supervisors

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

We need to continue achieving the goals of the Pima County Economic Development Plan, which includes supporting existing major employers, investing in regional transportation infrastructure, building on our economic relationship with Mexico, promoting tourism and increasing foreign investment. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

We need to come together as a state and a region and create the school-to-work pipelines necessary to supply manufacturers, builders, tech and biotech companies with the skilled workforce they need. These are high-wage jobs and there is a gap between available jobs and the skilled workers needed to fill them. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Believe it or not, it was the recession. It knocked the growth train off the tracks and forced the entire region, including the private and public sectors, to come together and start building a new economy not so tightly tied to growth and homebuilding. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Workforce is everything. If growing employers can’t find the employees they need here, but can elsewhere, they’ll leave. Many of the skilled workers in our region are older and approaching retirement age and there aren’t enough young workers entering those professions, like electricians or machinists, to replace them. We need to solve that challenge now. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

If we’re successful in implementing Pima County’s Economic Development Plan, we have a chance to have a bigger, better economy than we ever did when we were riding the growth train and taking 3- to 4-percent annual economic growth for granted. u

Year Established – 1864

u

Population (2016 U.S. Census Bureau estimate) – 1,016,206 u Annual Budget 2017-2018 – $1.27 billion u FTE Employees 2017-2018 – 6,894 Did you know?

Pima County is one of the oldest continuously inhabited areas of the United States. Native Americans have lived in this region from prehistoric times to the present. 86 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: JOSE BELTRAN

About Pima County


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 87


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Michael Crow President Arizona State University

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

The way that we will accelerate momentum is to ensure there is a deep level of cooperation and dynamic energy between metropolitan Tucson and Phoenix with a projected plan for the Sun Corridor that positions the region and Arizona as a can-do, cansolve, can-happen place that is great for business, families and education. We need strong alliances between major financial, educational, entrepreneurial and investment institutions with the major cities positioned as development sites. The ultimate manifestation of the Sun Corridor would come through a greatly enhanced I-10 connection between Tucson and Phoenix. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

Two priority areas – the first and most significant being educational attainment and workforce development. Tucson must continue to build a highly adaptive workforce at scale from the diverse communities that make up the region. The second is the speed of business and engagement. We need to accelerate the way in which business decisions are made, partnerships are developed, and customizable educational programs are deployed. The rate of change in our economy is moving too fast to not accelerate on all of these fronts. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

The outlook is fantastic. We know that we have to step up to enhance all outcomes by working in partnership with the K-12 sector to graduate 90 to 100 percent of students with world-class high school degrees and move to 60 percent of the population having some type of postsecondary certificate or degree to have a highly adaptive workforce for the future economy. And we have to take whatever steps necessary to make this happen, including revamping our systems. It’s either innovate or fail. About ASU u u u u u u u

Year established – 1885 Number of students – 71,946 in 2016 Number of employees – 16,800 Economic impact of $3.6 billion in Arizona in FY 2016 47,650 jobs created by ASU spending and investment 75 startup companies launched since 2003 More than 200,000 ASU grads work in Arizona with aggregate earnings of $11.4 billion, contributing $820 million in taxes

Did you know?

ASU was ranked first in the nation for innovation by U.S. News & World Report in 2016 and 2017.

88 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 89


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Lee Lambert Chancellor & CEO Pima Community College

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Community leaders must recognize that human capital is now the number one driver for economic development. The University of Arizona’s wonderful MAP AZ Dashboard illustrates that educational attainment can be tied to nearly every leading economic indicator. Arizona must continue to support and reinforce workforce training and education because better educated workers will not only help existing businesses be more productive, innovative and adaptable, but will attract more new businesses to the state. Only about 39 percent of Pima County residents over 25 years old have an associate’s degree or higher, according to the UA MAP Dashboard. That’s why Pima Community College has committed to align itself with the statewide Achieve 60 AZ Initiative, which sets the goal of ensuring that 60 percent of Arizonans have a college certificate or degree by 2030. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Availability of skilled human talent has become the number one global currency in 21st century economies. By investing in that talent, PCC produces graduates who are productive citizens, creative and collaborative workers, and who have the skills and knowledge necessary to compete in an increasingly knowledge-based global society. One way we are doing this is by working to ensure that our training and curriculum is consistent with national and industrywide standards. One strategy PCC has employed is to join with Central Arizona College and Maricopa Community Colleges in offering a joint uniform advanced-manufacturing curriculum, with the help of private companies, including Boeing and Raytheon. In working with companies whose reach spans the North American continent, we are ensuring that our graduates can meet the needs of industry anywhere and everywhere. About PCC u

Year established – 1966 – Ballot initiative approved to form a junior college district. First classes held in 1969. u Number of employees – 1,376 FTE in FY 2016-17 u Enrollment – Approximately 43,000 in FY 2015-16 u Annual revenues – $194.3 million in FY 2013-14 u Total payroll – $122.1 million in FY 2013-14 u

PCC is one of the 25 most affordable two-year colleges in the nation, according to the U.S. Department of Education u PCC is approved to offer online classes in 28 states

Did you know?

More than 10,000 students earned diplomas or certificates from PCC in the past three years.

90 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 91


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Lisa Lovallo Market Vice President, Southern Arizona Cox Communications

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

The excellent cooperation and alignment between our local governments and the business community needs to remain strong. To keep Southern Arizona’s momentum going, we need to continue to work together to solve problems that impact job growth and economic prosperity across our region. If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

I would like the University of Arizona to accelerate its economic development efforts in Southern Arizona. The UA is the heart of Tucson, and our success as a community is inextricably linked to its goals and outcomes. This is a big responsibility for our university and a great opportunity for it as well. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Consumers and businesses will be bombarded with advancements in technology over the next decade. The “internet of things” has arrived and homes and offices will never be the same. In Tucson, companies like Cox are building modern networks that will be able to provide unlimited capacity and possibility. About Cox Communications

Year established – 1962 u Year established in Arizona –1995 u Number of employees – Approximately 18,000 nationwide u Cox is the third largest private for-profit employer in Arizona u According to a recent study, Cox Communications has contributed more than $1 billion to the Arizona economy u Cox also is committed to supporting the communities in which we live and do business. Cox employees performed more than 3,500 hours of hands-on volunteer service in Southern Arizona last year. Cox and its employees also support hundreds of worthy organizations each year through Cox Charities. In 2016, Cox Charities awarded more than $104,000 in grants to 22 local nonprofits in Southern Arizona. Did you know?

Cox Enterprises was founded in Dayton, Ohio, in 1898 by former schoolteacher and news reporter James M. Cox. Today Cox is still family-owned and family-run. Three generations of Cox family members are involved in the business today.

92 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

u


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 93


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Fletcher McCusker CEO Sinfonia HealthCare Corporation

If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

Better collaboration. Our recent successes were due to multijurisdictional collaborations. However, it could be better. Pima County, the City of Tucson and the University of Arizona need to be joined at the hip regarding the creation of an innovation economy. Where? What incentives can we offer? Is the focus downtown, The Bridges, Tech Park Arizona or the Sonoran Corridor? How do we attract and retain millennials? Organizations like Southern Arizona Leadership Council, Sun Corridor Inc., Startup Tucson, Tech Launch Arizona and the multiple Chambers of Commerce need a coordinated effort toward primary employment, reducing our job shortage, creating incentives for relocating companies and telling our story. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Success breeds success. Caterpillar has been a huge catalyst. We have also recently relocated Hexagon Mining downtown and we are seeing a number of mining companies now interested in Tucson. Combine that with Raytheon Missile Systems, HomeGoods, World View, Comcast, Vector Space, ADP and others, Tucson is on the radar. Our low cost of living combined with our outdoor reputation has fared well against competitive cities. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

We don’t do nearly enough to attract talent to Tucson. The region’s employers should come together with a traveling job fair, especially in the winter back East. Nurses, engineers, teachers and law enforcement have severe shortages. Our academic institutions can and should partner with employers and offer students an employment track and a degree track. Economists estimate we need to fill 125,000 bachelor-level jobs by 2020. About Sinfonia and its related divisions

Year established – 2013 u Number of employees – 1,175 u Annual revenues – About $70 million u Sinfonia provides primary medical care with behavioral health treatment Did you know?

McCusker is the chairman of the board of the Rio Nuevo Multipurpose Facilities District, which was approved by Tucson voters in 1999 to invest state tax dollars in public and public/private projects to create a vibrant Tucson core. For every dollar the board invests, the community reaps $10 of construction activity with projects like the AC Hotel Tucson by Marriott, the Tucson Convention Center Arena, City Park and Caterpillar. 94 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

u


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 95


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Judy Patrick Board Director CopperPoint Mutual Insurance Companies

If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

You only get one chance to make a great first impression with site selectors. The Blueprint Update noted the competitive edge strong infrastructure provides. My magic wand would enhance roads so the city is easy to navigate and attractive. It’s about “curb appeal.” If we don’t have that, prospects may never return to discover all we have. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

We’re speaking with a united voice. When businesses and elected officials came together in support of the Blueprint, it was momentous. By aligning our efforts we’ve landed great anchor companies. Now, we need to build on that to attract their suppliers. Retention is critical, too. After attracting a new business, we need to nurture the relationship while focusing on continuous improvement and quality of life. Also, the more we can cultivate and sustain local entrepreneurs, the easier it is to retain them. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Talent entails: 1) workforce training, 2) education and 3) retaining young people. We have strong workforce programs and great educational institutions and a new University of Arizona president committed to help. We also have a new workforce development officer hired by Pima Community College to reach out to industry to better meet their needs. If we build a community that supports the workforce and boasts the features young people desire, I believe we can make significant progress in this area. About CopperPoint u

CopperPoint provides workers’ compensation insurance coverage to more than 12,000 businesses and their employees. u CopperPoint is funded entirely by employer premiums and investment dollars. u Recognized by Local First Arizona, CopperPoint is credited with injecting more than $500 million into Arizona’s economy through its buy-local practices. u In 2016, CopperPoint paid providers $111,472,939 for medical benefits of injured workers. Did you know?

CopperPoint employees volunteered 5,835 hours of their time in 2016 with more than 50 percent of employees recording volunteer hours.

96 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 97


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Judy Rich President & CEO TMC HealthCare

If you could wave a magic wand over Tucson’s economic development efforts, on what issue would you most like to see the most progress and why?

I would like to see Tucson be proud of being Tucson, to recognize that we are stronger together and that while we certainly have opportunities to become better, there are good people all over the region working hard for the good of our broader community. I would also encourage the region to recognize that when we lift up the most vulnerable among us, all of us will be more successful. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Our strong university and higher-education system has served as a driver for the growth of the high-tech sector. And, importantly, our city and county governments have made it attractive to launch innovative businesses that are outgrowths of those academic institutions. Additionally, there has been greater emphasis placed on developing programs to create a trained workforce that is ready for those high-tech jobs. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

I see exponential growth in our future. The attitude that has taken hold here is one of optimism and a renewed confidence that we lost during the recession. Success breeds success. In my industry, the next 10 years, like the previous 10 years, will be one in which we will be challenged to innovate so that we can continue to serve our community. Tucson Medical Center is fortunate to be in a community that is supportive, growing and collaborative. About TMC

Licensed at 600+ beds, TMC had 3,700 employees and a payroll of nearly $220 million last year u TMC is Southern Arizona’s largest hospital, delivers the most babies and sees the most patients in an emergency. It is the only locally governed, nonprofit community hospital in the region. u In 2016 TMC invested $58 million – nearly 12 percent of net revenues – into community benefit efforts, including charity care, investment in AHCCCS services and outreach. u TMC spent $245 million in capital improvements over the past five years. Did you know?

TMC worked with El Rio Community Health Center to open HealthOn Broadway, at 1 W. Broadway, in April 2017. HealthOn Broadway provides primary care, health education and wellness coaching to any community member. It will be staffed to accommodate up to 7,000 patient visits per year.

98 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

Photo: BalfourWalker.com

u


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 99


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Dr. Robert C. Robbins President University of Arizona

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Create an environment that encourages innovation to build successful businesses and careers right here in Southern Arizona. The university must leverage its research enterprise to contribute to the innovation ecosystem. This means continuing robust commercialization efforts with Tech Launch Arizona, but it also means continuing to grow the impact of research on the student experience at the UA, which is crucial for a talented and innovative workforce in Southern Arizona’s areas of strength and opportunity. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Incredibly important. If the state and our region are to compete on the global stage, we need to prepare students for careers that don’t yet exist. We need to teach them to be adaptive thinkers and leaders who can take on new challenges and opportunities that arise over the course of the next century. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

Tucson’s urban revitalization has begun to make our home a destination for businesses and talented entrepreneurs. The demand for an innovative workforce means as the UA’s enrollment grows from 43,625 (34,072 undergraduate) in fall 2016 towards our Arizona Board of Regents goal of 50,466 undergraduates by 2025, the quality and cost effectiveness of the student experience must remain among the world’s very best. We must collaborate with K-12 and community colleges, businesses and communities to create access and opportunity in the talent areas that will create a bright future.

u u u u u

u

u

Year established – 1885 Number of employees – 15,000 Total funds – $2.5 billion (FY 2017) Annual economic impact – $8.3 billion The National Science Foundation ranks the University of Arizona No. 1 in physical sciences research and No. 21 overall in research funding among U.S. public institutions. The first total artificial heart to win FDA approval was developed at the UA. The UA has been a part of every NASA planetary exploration mission.

Did you know?

The University of Arizona was founded in 1885, 27 years before Arizona became a state.

100 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

About the UA


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 101


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Jean Savage Vice President Caterpillar Surface Mining & Technology Division

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

We need to get out and spread the good news about what Tucson has to offer. Having just announced our expansion here a little over a year ago, we’ve seen first-hand how this community is able to compete and win around the world. Tucson has tremendous and unique strengths, strong employers, a great work-life balance culture and is developing into a cutting-edge innovation incubator. As a community, we need to acknowledge our successes, but not rest on them. Let’s continue to show prospective companies how Tucson can be part of their long-term success. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

It’s essential that Tucson grow our commitment and ability to prepare both the current and next generation of workers. It starts early in a child’s life when parents, schools and community organizations open the doors of opportunity and expose them to the potential each of them holds. It continues on through our high schools, colleges and universities. And then once someone hits the workforce, it can’t stop. We need to always ask what can be done to keep employees growing so that our workforce is globally competitive. It all requires a partnership between the community and our employers. And as we grow our presence here, we are committed to continuing our partnership with organizations like the University of Arizona, the United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona and others to ensure we provide opportunities throughout the learning cycle to everyone.

u

u u u

The Caterpillar Tractor Co. was formed in a merger in 1925 and reorganized as Caterpillar Inc. in 1986. Caterpillar is the world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines, industrial gas turbines and diesel-electric locomotives. It announced in January that it is moving its headquarters from Peoria, Illinois to Chicago. Sales and revenues – $38.5 billion in 2016 Employees – 95,400 in 2016 Its Tucson Proving Ground and Tinaja Hills Demonstration Center in Southern Arizona have a workforce of approximately 300 people. Did you know?

Caterpillar plans to employ about 600 engineers, product development and support personnel at its 150,000-squarefoot Tucson Mining Center, which is being constructed west of Interstate 10 and northeast of Sentinel Peak. It is scheduled to open in the first quarter of 2019.

102 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

About Caterpillar u


www.BizTucson.com

Fall Fall2017 2017 > > > BizTucson 103


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Anthony Smith Supervisor Pinal County Board of Supervisors

What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Workforce development is key to keeping employers interested in locating here. We want to give our future workforce the skills and education they need to be able to obtain these jobs and work in the communities in which they live. What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Pinal County’s Board of Supervisors developed and adopted a Strategic Plan in 2014 that addressed our economic development efforts. Our efforts have been successful for not only the county, but our neighboring communities. Our latest Strategic Plan further accentuates our economic development efforts and continues the cooperation between the county and our communities.

The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Arizona@Work Pinal County has been and will be a key to bringing employers and potential workers together in order to make sure we have an adequate workforce. Central Arizona College is also tailoring its classes to meet employers’ needs. With success comes higher expectations. What is the local outlook for the next 10 years in your industry?

With our recent success in bringing Attesa, Lucid Motors and Dreamport Villages to Pinal County, we expect the multiplier effect to expand in bringing like industries to the area. Transportation will be a key component in keeping commerce flowing within Pinal County. The Regional Transportation Authority is expected to answer many of the needs we have when it comes to transportation not only for commerce, but our citizens as well. About Pinal County u

Year established – 1875 Estimated population – 418,500 u County seat – Florence u Estimated annual growth rate – 2 percent u Number of employees – 2,005 (budgeted for FY 2017-2018) u

Annual revenues – $408 million (budgeted for FY 2017-2018)

Did you know?

In the latest Pinal County Citizen Satisfaction Survey, more than 80 percent of those responding said they support the strategic direction of the county.

104 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

u


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 105


SUN CORRIDOR INC. CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE

Sandra Watson President & CEO Arizona Commerce Authority

What has been the most critical factor in generating the recent momentum and successes in our region’s high-wage/high-tech industries?

Since taking office, Gov. Doug Ducey has remained focused on making Arizona the best state in the nation for doing business. This effort has included keeping taxes low, regulation light, and ensuring Arizona State government has a “customer-first” mentality toward the people and businesses it serves. As a result, Arizona’s operating environment is recognized as one of the most competitive in the United States, and we continue to win significant economic development projects. Industry leaders including Raytheon Missile Systems, Caterpillar, ADP, Comcast, Ascensus and Vector are all scaling their success and creating new highwage jobs in Southern Arizona. What do community and business leaders like yourself need to do to accelerate the economic development momentum generated over the last few years?

Continuing to demonstrate that Arizona’s unique value proposition resonates with the world’s leading companies will accelerate our already impressive economic development momentum. When industry giants like Caterpillar, Raytheon and others choose to grow in our state, it sends a signal to other businesses that Arizona is a prime location for expansion. It is critical to proudly and consistently communicate Arizona’s successes, strengths and the many advantages it offers to businesses. In addition, we must ensure that Arizona’s pro-business climate remains the best in the nation and our talent is prepared to meet the needs of growing employers. The Blueprint Update adopted in 2014 identified talent as a critical pillar in attracting new business. What is your take on the importance of talent and workforce development as a key economic driver?

Workforce skills are a key element in any corporate expansion decision. Employers must have confidence that a region or community offers a strong pipeline of available talent with the skills they need to support their growth. Arizona is nationally recognized as a top state for workforce quality and availability, which has been a key contributor to our success. About ACA Five-year goals 2013 – 2017 u

Projected jobs – 75,000. Actual – 116,000. u Projected capital investment – $6 billion. Actual – 9.5 billion. u

Projected average wages – $53,803. Actual – $52,577.

Did you know?

According to the ACA, Arizona ranks seventh lowest in the country in average workers-compensation costs, sixth lowest in property taxes, and second lowest in unemployment insurance tax.

106 BizTucson

< < < Fall Fall2017 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 107


108 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

David Adame

Bonnie Allin

David Adame

Mara G. Aspinall

Founded in 1969

Venture capital investor and adviser in health information technologies and diagnostic companies

President & CEO Chicanos Por La Causa One of the largest non-profit, community development corporations in the Southwest Located in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico More than 850 employees Four areas of impact: health and human services, housing, education and economic development 2016 impact: more than 260,000 people

President & CEO Health Catalysts

Executive Chairman GenePeeks Computational genomics company

Don Bourn

CEO Bourn Companies Headquartered in Tucson since 1990

Bonnie Allin

Privately held real estate development company specializing in corporate office, retail, and mixed-use properties

President & CEO Tucson Airport Authority

Completed more than 4 million square feet of projects across the western U.S.

Established 1948

Garry Brav

Operates Tucson International Airport (TUS) and Ryan Airfield (RYN) TUS – $3.2 billion economic impact, supporting 35,000 jobs and more than 100 tenants; all major airlines serving 18 nonstop destinations RYN – general aviation reliever airport with Federal Aviation Administration contract control tower and base to 300 aircraft and 30 tenants

Mara G. Aspinall

Don Bourn

President & CEO BFL Construction Founded 1973 Ranked among Tucson’s top 10 commercial contractors $90 Million in annual revenues 40 FTE

Garry Brav

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 109


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jacqueline Bucher

Ben Cordani

Jacqueline Bucher

VP, Head of Communications, Roche Molecular Solutions Head of Marketing and Corporate Communications, Roche Tissue Diagnostics/ Ventana Medical Systems, Inc. A world leader and innovator of tissuebased cancer diagnostic solutions Provides 250+ cancer tests with related instruments to 90+ countries to improve outcomes for the 14 million people diagnosed with cancer annually

Ben Cordani

Lead Human Resources Manager Caterpillar Surface Mining & Technology Division

Chris Denzin

Caterpillar Inc. has been making sustainable progress possible and driving positive change for 90 years as the world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines, industrial gas turbines and diesel-electric locomotives The Surface Mining & Technology Division hub is located in downtown Tucson, with a new building opening at the base of Sentinel Peak anticipated in early 2019. The Customer Learning and Demonstration Center and the Caterpillar Proving Ground are located 30 miles southwest of Tucson

Joe Coyle

Joe Coyle

Managing Director The Patrick Group Management consulting and executive search for the aerospace and healthcare fields Coyle previously held positions with Raytheon Missile Systems, Hughes Aircraft, Loral Aerospace and Ford Motor Companies

Chris Denzin

VP of Operations for Arizona CenturyLink Offers network and data systems management, big data analytics, managed security services, hosting, cloud and IT consulting services The company provides broadband, voice, video, advanced data and managed network service over a robust 265,000-route-mile U.S. fiber network and a 360,000-route-mile international transport network Proudly servicing Arizona since 1881

Tom Dickson

CEO Banner – University Medical Center Tucson Banner – University Medical Center South Banner – UMC Tucson, 2016 3,539 employees 22,006 inpatient admissions Banner – UMC South, 2016 928 employees 7,365 inpatient admissions

Tom Dickson

110 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jon Dudas

Michael Eastman

Jon Dudas

Michael Hammond

Founded in 1885, this land-grant university has more than 43,000 students and ranks among the top 25 among public universities with research activities of more than $60 million annually

Founded 1985

Senior VP and Secretary of the University University of Arizona

The UA has an annual economic impact of $8.3 billion

Michael Eastman

Vice President - Customer Service Strategy and Operations Tucson National Center of Excellence Comcast The new center houses more than 1,100 employees, providing support for residential products and services

Marc D. Fleischman

CEO Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services Leading independently owned, full-service commercial real estate company Licensed in Southern Arizona and Sonora, Mexico

Lawrence M. Hecker Managing Member Hecker PLLC

(Of counsel, Sun Corridor Inc.) 41 years practicing law in Tucson Best Lawyers in America, Corporate Law, 1993-2017

Michael Hammond

At least 15 percent of these positions are being filled by reservists, veterans and their spouses or domestic partners

Marc D. Fleischman CEO BeachFleischman

One of the largest locally owned public accounting, business advisory and consulting firms in Arizona with offices in Tucson and Phoenix Serves more than 6,000 private enterprises, nonprofit organizations and entrepreneurs in the U.S., Mexico and Canada A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top 200â&#x20AC;? largest public accounting firm in the U.S.

Lawrence M. Hecker

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 111


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Nancy Johnson

Bill Kelley

Nancy Johnson

Robert Lamb

Founded in 1970 as a neighborhood health center and currently provides medical, dental and behavioral healthcare for more than 96,000 individuals

Established 1963

11 healthcare campuses in Tucson with more than 1,100 employees

60+ employees with offices in Tucson and Phoenix

CEO El Rio Health

Bill Kelley

CFO Diamond Ventures Founded 1988

Robert Lamb

Steve Lace

Privately held company specializing in real estate development and private equity investments 2 million+ square feet of developed industrial, office and retail projects

COO GLHN Architects & Engineers Employee-owned, offering services in architecture and mechanical, electrical, civil and technology engineering

Clint Mabie

President & CEO Community Foundation for Southern Arizona Connects individuals, families and businesses to causes they care about $150+ million granted to the community by the foundation and its family of donors since 1980

20,000+ acres of developed and planned residential projects

Steve Lace

Past President Tucson New Car Dealers Association VP Royal Automotive Group & Lexus of Tucson Tucson New Car Dealers Association established 1947 Organized by dealers to offer support for economic development and transportation initiatives

Clint Mabie

112 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Xavier Manrique

Xavier Manrique

Senior VP Arizona Regional Middle Market Banking Office Wells Fargo Bank In 2016, Wells Fargo contributed more than $400,000 to Southern Arizona nonprofits, and team members volunteered 4,047 hours In August 2017, Wells Fargo Middle Market Banking expanded with the addition of three talented bankers dedicated to Southern Arizona serving customers greater than $20 million in sales Launched Diverse Segments program in June 2017 with Hispanic Business Initiative in Arizona

Edmund Marquez

Arizona State University continues to earn national recognition as a top university for graduate employability, inspiring master learners prepared with the knowledge and skills necessary to excel and achieve in today’s changing workplace ASU is in the Top 10 for graduate employability, No. 1 in the U.S. for innovation two years in a row, No. 1 fastest growing research university, No. 10 in the U.S. for total research expenditures

Ian McDowell

Vice President and Regional Director, Tucson Sundt Companies 100-percent employee-owned with revenues of approaching $1 billion

Edmund Marquez

Won more Associated General Contractors Build America awards than any other U.S. contractor

Founded agency in 1996 and now owns and operates three Allstate agencies, the largest Allstate group in Southern Arizona

Frances Merryman

Appointed by Governor Ducey to serve on the board of the Rio Nuevo Multipurpose Facilities District

Dedicated community volunteer and advocate

Agency Principal Edmund Marquez Allstate Agencies

Campaign Chairman for the United Way of Southern Arizona Received 2004 Businessman of the Year from the Tucson Hispanic Chamber Received 2016 Father of the Year award by the Father’s Day Council

Kelle Maslyn

Director of Community Engagement, Tucson Arizona State University Office of Government & Community Engagement

www.BizTucson.com

Kelle Maslyn

Ian McDowell

Vice President Wealth Strategies Group The Northern Trust Company

Past President of the Breakfast Club of Tucson and a member of Tucson’s Leading Women in Business, Women Impacting Tucson and TIEMPO Member of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council, Southern Arizona Estate Planning Council, Tucson Airport Authority, Financial Executives & Affiliates of Tucson, University of Arizona School of Dance Advisory Board, Art of the American West Patrons of the Tucson Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art and the Mountain Oyster Club

Frances Merryman

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 113


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Omar Mireles

Mark Mistler

Omar Mireles

Tom Murphy

Founded 1975

Population – 29,080

Owns and operates 38 apartment communities in Arizona, including 31 in the Tucson metro area, totaling more than 10,000 apartment homes

Median household income – $69,425

President HSL Properties

Owns and operates hotels and resorts, including the Hilton Tucson El Conquistador Resort and The Ritz Carlton, Dove Mountain

Mark Mistler

CEO Southern Arizona BBVA Compass

Tom Murphy

Farhad Moghimi

Company ranks among the top 25 largest U.S. banks, with 672 branches and 19 Southern Arizona branches Benefits Southern Arizona charitable organizations through employee volunteerism and financial contributions

Farhad Moghimi

Executive Director Pima Association of Governments/ Regional Transportation Authority Coordinates regional planning efforts to enhance mobility, sustainability, livability and economic vitality of the region Programs federal, state, regional and local funding for all regional transportation investments Manages the locally funded RTA and its 20-year, $2.1 billion regional transportation plan

Mayor Town of Sahuarita

Full-time-equivalent employees – 140

Steve Odenkirk

Executive VP Southern Arizona Regional Manager Alliance Bank of Arizona, a division of Western Alliance Bank. Member FDIC Founded in 2003, Alliance Bank of Arizona offers a full spectrum of deposit, lending, treasury management, international banking and online banking products and services, plus superior service to meet the needs of local businesses One of the country’s top-performing banking companies, Western Alliance, of which Alliance Bank is a division, ranks #4 on the Forbes 2017 “Best Banks in America” list

Tony Penn

President & CEO United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona Now in its 95th year locally, United Way fights for quality education, financial stability and healthy communities for every person in Tucson and Southern Arizona Impacting more than 100,000 lives annually, United Way is building a thriving community by uniting people, ideas and resources

Steve Odenkirk

114 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Tony Penn

Ricardo Pineda Albarran

Charles P. Potucek

Walter Richter

Randy Rogers

Ricardo Pineda Albarran Consul of Mexico Consulate of Mexico in Tucson Established in 1882 The official representation of the Mexican government in Pima and Pinal counties Promotes stronger ties between Mexico and the Sun Corridor region Fosters trade and investments across the border

Charles P. Potucek City Manager City of Sierra Vista

Population – 43,888 Home of Fort Huachuca, largest military installation in Arizona Member of the Great American Defense Communities Class of 2017

Walter Richter

Public Affairs Administrator Southwest Gas Founded 1931 in California Investor-owned utility 1.9 million residential, commercial and industrial customers in parts of Arizona, Nevada and California

Randy Rogers

CEO Tucson Association of REALTORS®

Adriana Kong Romero Senior VP Tucson Market President Bank of America

In 2016, Bank of America provided $208 million in business loans to Tucson companies, $389,419 in grants and matching gifts to local nonprofits Bank of America employees also delivered 3,144 volunteer hours to the community

Represents over 5,100 members and is the largest trade association in Southern Arizona Advocates for homeownership and property rights issues Invests in the community through membership engagement in the Tucson REALTORS® Charitable Foundation

www.BizTucson.com

Adriana Kong Romero

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 115


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jonathan Rothschild

Jennifer Ruby

Jonathan Rothschild

David Smallhouse

Incorporated 1877

Real estate, private equity and venture capital investments

Mayor City of Tucson

Population â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 520,116 236 square miles Median family income â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $46,706

Jennifer Ruby

General Manager Walton Development & Management Advisory board member of Urban Land Institute Arizona. ULI is the oldest and largest network of cross-disciplinary real estate and land use experts in the world

David Smallhouse

Keri Lazarus Silvyn

Walton Development & Management is a division of Walton Multinational, privately owned real estate investment and development group concentrating on the research, acquisition, administration, planning and development of strategically located land in major North American growth corridors

Keri Lazarus Silvyn

Partner/Owner Lazarus, Silvyn & Bangs, PC Land use law firm that helps communities and developers grow responsibly across Arizona

Managing Director Miramar Ventures

Active investor in angel and early-stage ventures, many with close ties to the University of Arizona and Desert Angels of Southern Arizona

Kevin Stockton

Market CEO Northwest Healthcare Northwest Healthcare includes Northwest Medical Center, Oro Valley Hospital, Northwest Allied Physicians, Northwest Cardiology, Northwest Urgent Care and Northwest Emergency Centers Caring for patients throughout Tucson and surrounding areas, Northwest Healthcare is dedicated to offering a variety of convenient access points such as urgent care, free-standing emergency centers, and primary and specialty care clinics. With online check-in for the emergency room and urgent care, and online scheduling for primary care appointments, Northwest Healthcare is making it easy for patients to access healthcare when and where they need it

Lawyers in the firm practicing zoning, planning and land use law in Arizona for 40 years

Kevin Stockton

116 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Guillermo Valencia

Guillermo Valencia

Chairman Greater Nogales and Santa Cruz County Port Authority Founded in December 2004, the Port Authority brings together the key stakeholders from the Ambos Nogales area to address issues that impact ports of entry Works with local, state, federal and international partners to improve Arizona’s largest port facilities, streamline the crossing process at the Nogales ports of entry and to enhance economic development in the Nogales-Santa Cruz County region Mariposa Port of Entry in Nogales processes 600,000 commercial vehicles annually which equates to $30 billion in imports into the U.S. and $11 billion in exports into Mexico

Robert E. Walkup

Honorary Consul South Korea in Arizona Sworn in July 2013 Provides efforts to protect overseas Korean nationals residing in Arizona Liaison for the promotion of trade, economic, cultural, scientific and educational relations Facilitates commercial transactions and/ or introduction of foreign capital

Robert E. Walkup

Matt Wandoloski

Matt Wandoloski

VP of Corporate Strategy and Analytics Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona Founded 1939 1.5 million customers Offices in Tucson, Phoenix, Chandler and Flagstaff 1,500 employees statewide

Joshua Weiss

Executive Vice President Shared Services, Finance Hexagon Mining Headquartered in Tucson, Arizona, with offices worldwide, Hexagon Mining is shaping smart change by helping to connect all parts of a mine with technologies that make sense of data in real time

Joshua Weiss

Develops products and programs that connect surveying, design, fleet management, production optimization, and collision avoidance for mining companies and operations worldwide

Steven G. Zylstra

President & CEO Arizona Technology Council Established 2002 Arizona’s premier trade association for science & technology companies Events, resources & educational forums to grow Arizona’s technology industry

Steven G. Zylstra

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 117


Photo:BalfourWalker.com

BizTECHNOLOGY

The ribbon is cut on the new facility for TuSimple on Aug. 21. Participating, from left, Sun Corridor Inc.’s Daniela Gallagher, VP of Economic Development, and Joe Snell, President and CEO, Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild, TuSimple Chief Technology Officer and co-founder Xiaodi Hou, Sharon Bronson, chair of the Pima County Board of Supervisors, and David Hutchens, chairman of the board of Sun Corridor Inc. and president and CEO of UNS Energy Corporation, Tucson Electric Power and UniSource Energy Services

TuSimple to Invest $15 Million in Tucson Facility Driverless Trucks Headed to Interstate 10 By Jay Gonzales By the end of this year, motorists making the drive on Interstate 10 between Tucson and Phoenix might see empty driver’s seats on large trucks making the same drive if a company that is new to Tucson meets its stated goal. TuSimple, a China-based company that is developing a driverless truck, dedicated its new research and development facility at 2551 N. Dragoon St. on Aug. 21, surrounded by local business, political, education and economic development leaders who heralded the company’s arrival as another win in the region’s efforts to attract high-tech and high-wage jobs. “By the end of this year, we want to achieve our first milestone of having five trucks driving from Tucson to Phoenix in the first pilot operation of fully loaded trucks carrying goods from one place to another without human intervention,” said Xiaodi Hou, TuSimple’s chief technology officer and co-founder. “By the end of next year, we plan to have a fleet of 25 trucks driving in any 118 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

weather conditions, back and forth between Tucson and Phoenix every day.” TuSimple, which maintains its Beijing location and a facility in San Diego, has leased 6,865 square feet of warehouse and office space in Tucson, where it will engineer and test its autonomous trucking technology. The company projects to invest $15 million in capital expenditures, bringing its economic impact to $81.7 million over five years, according to a statement from Sun Corridor Inc. In addition to the 100 primarily engineering jobs to be hired by TuSimple over the next five years, the company’s move to Tucson is an even bigger win because of the added value of bringing in foreign investment, said David Hutchens, president and CEO of UNS Energy Corp., Tucson Electric Power & Unisource Energy Services, and chairman of the board of Sun Corridor Inc. “It’s bringing in that foreign investment and shipping out technology,” Hutchens said at the dedication. “That is the exact inflow and outflow of dol-

lars that you want – investing in our community with those outside dollars and selling those products outside. That is the perfect economic development model.” “This was a very competitive process and the winning city had to demonstrate that we have, first, a very capable, high-tech workforce that could meet the needs of this 21st-century company,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO of Sun Corridor Inc. “The second thing that we had was the right regulatory environment. Third, we had the infrastructure needed to support this R&D facility.” TuSimple is one of Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Research Center corporate internship partners, and attracts graduates from top universities around the world, according to the announcement released by Sun Corridor Inc. Those interested in employment opportunities with TuSimple can apply and learn more about the company at its website, www.tusimple.ai. Biz www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 119


SUN CORRIDOR INC. BUSINESS ATTRACTION & EXPANSION FY 2016-2017 AAA of Arizona AAA is adding 97 employees at its Tucson facility. Capital expenditure is $1.6 million, resulting in a $50 million economic impact to the region. Arcadia Custom Arcadia Custom is a high-end window and door manufacturer located on Tucson’s southeast side. The company recently purchased its facility and plans to add 150 jobs. Capital expenditure is $6.2 million, resulting in an $80.4 million economic impact. Ascensus Ascensus, the nation’s largest independent retirement and college savings services provider, opened a new office location in Tucson earlier this year. The company is adding 192 employees at its Tucson facility and capital investment is nearly $8 million. Ascensus’ expansion will have a projected economic impact of more than $200 million for Tucson and its surrounding communities. Bayview Asset Management, LLC Bayview Asset Management, a nationwide investment and mortgage finance company, is expanding its operations in Tucson. Bayview plans to hire an additional 375 people in key financial roles. Capital investment is $300,000, resulting in an estimated economic impact of $552 million for Tucson and its surrounding communities. Bombardier Aerospace Bombardier is adding 27 employees at its Tucson airport facility due to a steady growth in work orders. Capital expenditure is $3.5 million, resulting in a $17.4 million economic impact to the region. Creative Machines Creative Machines is a group of visionary artists, engineers and fabricators doing world-class work and whose abilities span exhibition design, ball machine sculptures, and monumental public art. Creative Machines is adding 20 employees at its Tucson facility. Capital expenditure is $2.1 million, resulting in a $35 million economic impact to the region. Ernst & Young Ernst & Young is a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services. The company has opened a national executive support center in Tucson. The new center will create 125 jobs in the area with a focus on executive administrative support, creative graphics and digital services. Capital investment is $1 million, resulting in a projected economic impact of more than $125 million to the region. Global Equity Finance Global Equity Finance has a unique business model of banking and brokering loans that allows the company 120 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

to focus on finding the best loan and the best rates for its clients. The company is expected to hire 82 new employees, resulting in a $96 million economic impact to the region. HD Petroleum HD Petroleum has developed a smallscale waste oil micro-refinery, providing a profitable and sustainable solution for the processing of waste oil. The company is adding 20 new jobs to its Tucson facility. Capital investment is $8 million, with a projected economic impact of more than $27 million for Tucson and its surrounding communities. Hexagon Mining Hexagon Mining, an information technology provider of planning, operations and safety solutions for the mining industry, is relocating and expanding its Tucson-based North American headquarters to downtown. Hexagon Mining employs 140 people in Tucson and plans to add 119 jobs over the next five years. Capital investment is more than $2 million, resulting in an economic impact of $224 million for Tucson and its surrounding communities.

The most successful year for Sun Corridor Inc. in more than a decade • 18 successful projects • 5,964 projected new jobs (direct) • 4,798 new jobs in targeted industries • $1.5 billion projected capital investment • $12.2 billion economic and fiscal impact Hexcel Hexcel is an aerospace company that manufactures products for commercial aircraft structures and interiors, defense aircraft, helicopters and various industrial applications. Hexcel will invest in new facilities, machinery and equipment, while adding 146 positions in engineering, production and management. Capital investment over the next four years at its growing Casa Grande facility is projected to be $85 million. Innovation Manufacturing Solutions Innovative Manufacturing Solutions is a high-volume precision manufacturer located in Tucson. Its customers include aerospace, defense and military all the way to semiconductor laser corporations. The company is adding 65 new jobs to its facility. Capital investment is $1 million, resulting in an economic impact of $80 million for Tucson and the surrounding communities.

Lucid Motors Lucid Motors has selected Casa Grande/ Pinal County as the site for its new electric car manufacturing facility, with 2,213 new jobs and a $700 million capital investment. This is Arizona’s first auto manufacturing operation and Mexico will play a major role in its supply chain. The project represents a $1.7 billion economic impact to Arizona. Mainstreet Mainstreet offers a unique design concept in healthcare for the growing senior population. The company is expected to hire 63 new employees, resulting in a $41 million economic impact to the region. Monsanto Monsanto is a sustainable agriculture company, which delivers agricultural products that support farmers around the world. Monsanto intends to grow corn for research at its new facility near Marana. The company will create 60 new jobs at its facility. Capital investment is more than $91 million, resulting in an economic impact of nearly $290 million to the region. Northwest Medical Center Northwest Medical Center is a community healthcare provider serving the greater Tucson area and its residents with routine and emergency medical care, diagnostic and preventive screenings, surgical care and care for chronic conditions. Northwest Medical Center plans to open a new, free-standing emergency department which will enable the hospital to expand emergency services to Marana, creating 25 new high-paying jobs, and enhancing the quality of health care for the residents of Pima County. Capital investment is more than $8 million, resulting in an economic impact of nearly $20 million for the region. Raytheon Missile Systems Raytheon Missile Systems, Southern Arizona’s largest private employer, has selected Tucson/Pima County as the site for significant expansion. The expansion represents the addition of nearly 2,000 new high-skilled, high-wage jobs and will result in several billion dollars being added to the regional economy over the next few years. Vector Vector, a micro-satellite space launch company, is locating its manufacturing facility in the Pima County Aerospace Research Campus and adding 200 highwage jobs in Southern Arizona. The company’s expansion is expected to have an estimated $272 million economic impact on the local economy over five years.

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 121


SUN CORRIDOR INC. INVESTORS & STAFF

Sun Corridor Inc. Investors CopperPoint Mutual Insurance Company

Adecco Allstaff Services

Cox Communications

Alliance Bank of Arizona Arizona Commerce Authority

Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services

Arizona State University

Diamond Ventures

Bank of America

DLR Group

Banner University Medical Center, Tucson and South Campuses

DPR Construction

BBVA Compass Bank

GEICO

BeachFleischman

GLHN Architects & Engineers

El Rio Health

BFL Construction

Hecker PLLC

Bill’s Home Service

Hexagon Mining

Port of Tucson Randstad Staffing Raytheon Missile Systems

Sundt Companies

Tucson Airport Authority

Bourn Companies

Lloyd Construction

Business Development Finance Corp.

Long Companies

Northwest Healthcare

Chicanos Por La Causa

Nova Home Loans

City of Sierra Vista City of Tucson

Pima Association of Governments/Regional Transportation Authority

The Clements Agency

Pima Community College

Comcast

Pima County

Concord General Contracting

Pinal County

8

9

10

Tucson Association of REALTORS®/MLS

UNS Energy Corporation, Tucson Electric Power & UniSource Energy Services

CenturyLink

7

Trico Electric Cooperative

Lazarus, Silvyn and Bangs

The Northern Trust Company

6

Town of Sahuarita

Bluespan Wireless

CBRE

5

TMC HealthCare

The University of Arizona

Caterpillar

4

Southwest Gas

HSL Properties

Miramar Ventures

3

Sinfonia HealthCare

Tucson New Car Dealers Association

Blue Cross® Blue Shield® of Arizona

2

SAHBA

Hilton El Conquistador

BizTucson

1

Vantage West Credit Union Roche Tissue Diagnostics/ Ventana Medical Systems, Inc. Venture West Walton Development & Management (USA)

1. Joe Snell, President & CEO 2. David Welsh, COO 3. Laura Shaw, CMO

Wells Fargo Bank

4. Cathy Casper, CFO

Westland Resources

5. Susan Dumon VP, Economic Development 6. Daniela Gallagher VP, Economic Development 7. Michael Guymon Director of Marketing 8. Courtney Pulitzer Executive Assistant to the President & CEO 9. Skye Mendonca Corporate Administrative Assistant 10. Steve Eggen Special Project Advisor

122 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2016 2017

>>>

BizTucson 123


124 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

BizBENEFIT

From left –

Jim Murphy, Tucson Classics Car Show Chair and Cliff Bowman, President, Rotary Club of Tucson.

Rotary Engine Powers Fundraiser Classics Car Show Fuels Literacy Group By David Petruska Year after year the Tucson Classics Car Show has gained momentum as a fun fundraiser, officially topping the $1 million mark last year with a record payout of $209,308 for its 10th edition. This year’s model is again presented by the Rotary Club of Tucson Foundation on Oct. 21 at The Gregory School, 3231 N. Craycroft Road. The volunteer-led event, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., features more than 400 classic cars. Once again reading and literacy advocate Make Way for Books is the major grant recipient. Make Way for Books provides successful programming to ensure that children are ready to read and succeed when they start kindergarten. As the major sponsor of its Cover-toCover program, Rotary Club of Tucson provides funding that allows the group to meet families in community locations like food banks, social services offices and mobile home communities. Make Way for Books transforms these locations into early literacy classrooms withwww.BizTucson.com

out walls where children and parents learn together. Four other charities benefit from this year’s show: • Pima County Joint Technical Education District, which provides cuttingedge technology, relevant hands-on experiences and a rigorous cur-

11TH ANNUAL TUCSON CLASSICS CAR SHOW Sponsored by WeBuyHouses.com Saturday, Oct. 21, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Gregory School, 3231 N. Craycroft Road Tickets are $5, which includes an entry into the raffle No cost for children under 18 with a paid adult.

riculum to help high school students move on to careers and college. • GAP Ministries, which provides rehabilitative programs to those recovering from drug abuse and homelessness through a culinary training program designed to educate, empower and rehabilitate at-risk, vulnerable youth and adults. • Caregiver Institute of Tucson, which addresses the increasing need for professional certified caregivers in our community to attend to the rapidly growing numbers of seniors and disabled individuals in our community. • YWCA Women’s Impact Fund, which helps reduce the number of working women who still live in poverty and increases access to capital for entrepreneurs.

Purchase tickets from a Rotary Club member or online at www.rotarytccs.com

Biz Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 125


BizMILLENNIALS

Inspiring Tucson’s Future TENWEST Festival Opens Doors for Young Entrepreneurs

Tucson has long been a crossroads for commerce in the Southwest – and the folks who host the annual TENWEST Festival of Innovation want to see that continue and expand. The third iteration of the TENWEST Festival, running from Oct. 14 to 22 in and near downtown, offers a weeklong celebration where entrepreneurship, technology, communities and the arts cross paths. Publicity fliers invite all to “Come together with culture-makers, technologists, professionals and community builders alike for a celebration of what inspires Tucson.” Event organizers are promoting the TENWEST Festival as an opportunity to discover what the “next Tucson” will look like. The rapid-fire, non-stop, week-long program deals with 126 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

what the Small Business Association calls “second-stage companies” – $100,000 or more in annual sales – toward the goal of moving them up to a $1 million or more a year. Originally created by Startup Tucson in 2015 as part of its mission to drive economic development in Southern Arizona, the first festival attracted more than 3,000 attendees at 18 events with 90 sessions. “We’re hoping to double those attendance figures this year,” said Justin Williams, the current CEO of Startup Tucson, the umbrella organization coordinating the festival. Planners hope to have 50 to 100 seats filled in every session. While the long-term goal is to share Tucson’s diverse attributes and attract and retain an industry talent pool in Southern Arizona, the dynamic weeklong festival brings together a www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS COURTESY TENWEST

By Lee Allen


TENWEST is designed to create and catalyze Tucson’s innovation culture – because innovation drives economic growth.

Justin Williams CEO Startup Tucson

range of people and interests to share perspectives and create innovative solutions. “TENWEST is designed to create and catalyze Tucson’s innovation culture – because innovation drives economic growth,” Williams said. “This event helps fulfill the mission to transform Tucson’s economy through innovation and entrepreneurship. It is designed to help create a regional identify for innovation.” Greg Teesdale, one of the event founders and a passionate champion of TENWEST, said, “I personally like to think in terms of 5-10-15 years in the future, not just about Year 3, because this is going to end up being a really big event for Tucson. “The whole concept began with a blank sheet of paper and half a dozen people in a room – no name, no event length, no time limit. All we had was an idea that needed to be developed,” he said. “I told the crowd at the first event in 2015 that they ought to take a picture of each other because a decade from now people were going to be asking, ‘Were you at the first TENWEST event?’ and you’ll want to have a picture to prove you really were there.” While much of the focus deals with starting a business, the nitty-gritty, nuts-and-bolts of the event are open for the public to take a look and sense the potential of Tucson’s young entrepreneurial spirit. In Year 1 the objective was to survive, getting people to discover the event with attention localized and specifically focused on Tucson. Subjects were stand-alone with technology in one place, arts in another and entrepreneurship topics in another. Year 2 brought more consolidation and included more outreach. Ultimately plans call for the event to have more of an international flavor, building a base in the Southwest with a lot of reach into Mexico, and continuing to get broader as the years go by. continued on page 128 >>> www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 127


BizMILLENNIALS continued from page 127 Already comparisons have linked TENWEST to South by Southwest startup gathering in Austin, Texas. Liz Pocock, COO of Startup Tucson, said, “Cities that have built great startup communities like Boulder, Seattle, San Francisco and Austin all have one thing in common – a supportive culture that startups love to be a part of. We believe Tucson’s first step in achieving this caliber of startup community has begun with TENWEST Festival.” A changing and uncertain political climate dealt a financial blow to the planning effort. The U.S. Small Business Administration recently discontinued funding for its Scale Up America Initiative, leading to $300,000 in lost funding for Startup Tucson this year. “We’re looking to restore that funding locally to supplement that through a combination of revenue-generating programs as well as grants and philanthropy,” Williams said. With Startup Tucson as the backup base of support, Cox Communications and the Arizona Commerce Authority have stepped forward as premier sponsors of the various panels, seminars, performances, workshops and mixers that will help expose new business community members to skills they will need to acquire. Tucson’s inventors and engineers who may lack broad basic business skills can use the TENWEST Festival as an avenue to obtain that knowledge and make beneficial business contacts. TENWEST promoters are literally trying to offer something

128 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

for everyone with a broad and extensive program of presentations. Although the myriad schedules of such a lengthy and complex staging are always fluid, there is some core structure about what happens when. “Among the key highlights will be the opening weekend, our community weekend, with partner events like Second Saturday and Tucson Meet Yourself,” Williams said. “Monday will include a social impact summit in partnership with the McGuire Entrepreneurship Program at the University of Arizona. “Tuesday will feature Tucson’s longest-running entrepreneurship and investor conference. Tuesday night includes a startup business pitch competition, Getting Started in Arizona, hosted by Cox. “Wednesday through Saturday focuses on cross-path programming, involving entrepreneurs, technologists, artists, musicians and community leaders – 25 talks over those four days “On Saturday we’re doing a Tucson Music Showcase in partnership with the United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona and Local First, to complement Film Fest Tucson that runs from Thursday through Sunday.” Williams added that throughout the Festival there will be art pieces at various galleries and music at several locations. More information is at www.tenwest.com.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 129


BizPHILANTHROPY

Jared Perkins CEO Children’s Clinics

Kerri Lopez-Howell Director of Special Projects YWCA Tucson

Fast Pitch Audience

Fast Pitch Catches Fire

3rd Annual Social Venture Partners Event Each pitch lasts only three minutes. But the persuasive perTwo examples: The Connie Hillman Family Foundation was formances by seven nonprofits slated to appear on the Leo particularly moved by the story conveyed by Helping Hands Rich Theater stage for the 3rd annual Fast Pitch event on Nov. for Single Moms and supported the program with a $75,000 9 will go far beyond storytelling. matching grant. Dr. Tom Grogan of Ventana Medical SysTrue to its growing reputation as an energetic incubator tems and his wife, Cande, also attended the 2016 Fast Pitch of worthy nonprofits, Social Venture Partners Tucson says its showcase and decided to support all of the finalists because Fast Pitch showcase is a way for the community to come toof the due-diligence vetting process already handled by SVP gether to maximize its strengths while supporting nonprofits Tucson. that closely match local needs. Even those not part of the Fast Pitch finals walk away with Part of an international network of like-minded philanthrosignificant value. Our Family Services Chief Development pists organized in 40 cities across the world, SVP Tucson has Officer Emily Brott never made it to the 2016 stage, but her pushed the local philanthropy envelope via its ambitious conexperience gave her the tools to rethink her organization’s decept of engaged, hands-on philanthropy since its founding in velopment strategies. “It’s transformed the way we talk about 2006. It introduced the Fast Pitch program in 2015, modeled our organization,” she said. after venture-capital pitching competitions. Previous Fast Pitch events featured renowned and compelFast Pitch merges proven business tactics with community ling thought leadership, and this year’s much-anticipated keyneeds, giving forward-thinking nonprofits the platform to acnote speaker is Vu Le, a Seattle nonprofit executive director celerate their impact, said SVP Tucson Executive Director whose writings and social media are must-follows in the nonCiara Garcia. Last year, the Fast Pitch profit and philanthropy sectors. “All of program alone invested more than us need to take advantage of humor to $300,000 in local nonprofits, more than refresh our thinking,” Garcia said, “and double what the program funded in its Vu Le’s message will certainly bring a SOCIAL VENTURE PARTNERS inaugural year. “We’re leveraging the FAST PITCH TUCSON reality check that helps us walk away financial investment to drive change with an expanded vision of what’s posPresented by Tucson Medical Center in ways that elevate the entire sector,” sible.” Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017 Garcia said. Passionate storytelling, it seems, is a Leo Rich Theater, Tucson Convention Center Beyond giving nonprofits the tools key to leveraging collective action and they need to take their model to the Event doors open at 5 p.m. with reception connections. By any measure, Fast Pitch next level, Fast Pitch educates the comis breaking through limitations and and exhibits from 15 Fast Pitch semifinalists. munity on impactful initiatives and sparking community change. Biz Tickets are $60 and $30 (student price). facilitates collaboration. Ninety-eight percent of attendees last year indicated To learn more about SVP Tucson’s programs, Purchase online at www.svptucson.org that Fast Pitch introduced them to noneducational opportunities and partnerships, or through SVP Tucson at (520) 209-2879. profits previously not on their radar. visit www.svptucson.org. 130 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: DAVID SANDERS

By Monica Surfaro Spigelman


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 131


BizEDUCATION

From Left PHOTO: PAUL HOLZE

Amanda Kucich

Senior Director Cradle to Career Partnership

132 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

Vicki Balentine

Co-Chair Cradle to Career Partnership Education Consultant

Jon Kasle Co-Chair Cradle to Career Partnership VP Communications & External Affairs, Raytheon Missile Systems

www.BizTucson.com


Cradle to Career Benefits Students

Educated Workforce Leads to Economic Sustainability By April Bourie It’s common – almost automatic – for cities and counties in Arizona to rank economic development among their top priorities. Those charged with developing the economies of their municipalities work to help new and existing companies in their area to survive and thrive and to bring new businesses to the area. However, achieving these goals is difficult without a sizable trained workforce, supported by a healthy education system. George Hammond, director of the Eller Center Economic and Business Research Center at the University of Arizona, said at a recent event that this is a big issue for Tucson because the city’s working-age college graduation rates are below the national average. “One of the things that reams of academic research have shown us is that states and local areas with high levels of highly educated individuals tend to grow faster than in regions with lower levels,” Hammond said at a recent “Breakfast with the Economists,” hosted by the Eller College. Realizing that these issues need to be addressed in Pima County, the United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona began to look for ways to improve the situation in 2014. “We have no shortage of wonderful education initiatives and programs working to change the situation, but we have lacked the community infrastructure to get results at scale,” said Amanda Kucich, senior director of Cradle to Career Partnership, which was created in March 2015. “We needed something transformational, something that could coordinate efforts for maximum impact.” Looking at how other communities address their education issues, United Way representatives discovered the www.BizTucson.com

“Strive Together National Network,” operating in 73 communities. This national network takes a systemic approach and involves the entire community to affect positive change. Local United Way representatives felt it could be successful in Southern Arizona and invited 16 community members to rigorously evaluate the framework to determine how it would work in Pima The Cradle to Career Partnership created a baseline report across seven indicators in 2016, and a Community Impact progress report was announced in June 2017. There is some good news to celebrate:

20.6 percent of the 3- and 4-year old children in Pima County are enrolled in quality pre-K programs, up 4.2 percent.

Third-grade reading levels have increased to 41 percent. The minority achievement gap in this indicator has also decreased 5 percent between AfricanAmerican and white students and 3 percent between NativeAmerican and white students.

Graduation rates rose to 74.3 percent, up 3.4 percent from the previous year.

C2C will continue to use its change networks to improve these and other statistics in education throughout the county. Consisting of volunteers across community industries, these change networks depend on their participants for success. “We are always looking for more presence from the business community,” said Vicki Balentine, C2C co-chair. For more information on getting involved, see www.c2cpima.org.

County. Over the next six months, the group developed the structure of the partnership, created goals and determined how success would be measured. Cradle to Career was created. Its first step was to bring together more than 150 education, business and nonprofit community leaders to determine how to achieve the partnership’s mission of supporting the preparation of Pima County students for success in school and life with an end goal of ensuring the economic vitality of the community. It was decided that the best way to achieve the mission was to determine a baseline performance metric and then report progress each year. Using both public data and information that had been collected in local school districts, the baseline report was created in 2016. It focused on seven community-wide indicators for students’ success: •

Kindergarten readiness

Early-grade literacy

Middle school math achievement

High school graduation rates

• The number of “opportunity youth,” those youth who are not in school or work, who reconnect to education and/or career pathways • Post-secondary education successes and career attainment •

The number of young adults entering a career

The minority achievement gap is also determined among all the indicators. Since then, the partnership has worked to improve the education system in the county by gathering data to discover and share what they call the continued on page 134 >>> Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 133


BizEDUCATION continued from page 133 “bright spots” of education. “At every school, there are great teachers doing great things and allowing kids to grow at a faster rate than other schools,” said Steve Holmes, Sunnyside Unified School District superintendent. “We start by focusing on those ‘bright spots’ to determine how these practices can be replicated across districts to improve learning. This collaboration between districts around the data is unique to this partnership and is very helpful.” Vicki Balentine, former Amphitheater Public Schools superintendent and C2C co-chair, agreed. “As we identify those practices that make a difference, we can share them across districts to improve educational results and, ultimately, the economics of the county,” she said. “We need to accelerate the improvement of student outcomes to increase and sustain the readiness of a local workforce,” said Jon Kasle, VP of Communications and External Affairs at

134 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

Raytheon Missile Systems and the business co-chair of C2C. Raytheon was an original investor in C2C and is continuing that investment for 2018. “We are seeing positive results on several outcomes. I am recommending to other businesses that this is the most effective and efficient model for investing in the reputation of Pima County over the long term. “In addition to other larger businesses announcing moves to, or expansions within, the Tucson area, Raytheon Missile Systems is adding 2,000 new employees to its operations here over five years. “The positive developments we are seeing for our local economy indicate that the word is very much out on Pima County as a superior area for locating and growing a business,” he said. “C2C’s collective impact approach makes possible the first evidence-based initiative solely focused on improving student outcomes in Pima County. Our data analysts extract, present and share

data for the purposes of stimulating new collaborations between school systems and other organizations already totally committed to improving specific measures. We bring together Pima’s leaders in education on a regular basis, and in a structured way that has established networks and clear accountability for moving from strategy to action” Kasle said. In the future, C2C hopes to have what it calls “change networks” for all seven indicators. The networks will consist of volunteers from local businesses, nonprofits and education institutions charged with finding and sharing the bright spots throughout school districts in Pima County. However, because of limited resources, C2C currently has only two change networks fully running with both paid staff and volunteers. The first is called First Focus on Kids and is working to improve kindergarten readiness. According to C2C, a highquality childcare and preschool setting has teachers and caregivers who have expertise with children ages 5 and

www.BizTucson.com


We start by focusing on those ‘bright spots’ to determine how these practices can be replicated across districts to improve learning. –

Steve Holmes, Superintendent, Sunnyside Unified School District

younger, learning environments that nurture emotional, social and academic development, and prepare children for kindergarten. First Focus on Kids currently is concentrating on two projects. The first collects data to identify barriers early childhood education students face to determine strategies to overcome those barriers. The second project collects data at Maldonado Elementary School in the Tucson Unified School District, which has predominantly Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students. This study will determine if a “community connector” placed at the school can better engage and encourage parents to take advantage of available services that promote kindergarten readiness.

www.BizTucson.com

The second network is called Youth on the Rise, which focuses on re-engaging opportunity youth. To this end, the network worked with the Pima Prevention Partnership to create the Youth Reengagement Center. There, opportunity youth are paired with a coach who connects them to education, career and support services to help them reconnect with education and/or obtain work. A smaller change network consists of local superintendents who are focused on improving high school graduation rates. “Ninth-grade attendance is a key factor in graduation rates, and Flowing Wells also has higher ninth-grade attendance than most other high schools in the area,” said Holmes, pointing out

that Flowing Wells High School has one of the highest graduation rates in the city. “Our next step is to determine what is influencing this at the school and figure out how to share this across districts.” C2C has applied for a grant to create a change network focusing on postsecondary education success, and it will find out in late 2017 or early 2018 if it will be awarded funding. “I really believe that the C2C partnership sends a signal that we are all in this together and want to operate with one voice,” said Holmes. “There is power in voice when everyone comes at the issues from one vantage point.”

Biz

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 135


From left

Ron Sable

PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

Chairman of the Board Paragon Space Development Corporation

Grant Anderson

President & CEO, Co-Founder Paragon Space Development Corporation

Paragon’s water processor will be on the International Space Station by 2019

Paragon’s XRadTM radiators will fly as part of Sierra Nevada’s Cargo Vehicle in 2019

IMAGE COURTESY OF SIERRA NEVADA CORPORATION

136 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017


BizAEROSPACE

Outfitting the Next Giant Leap for Mankind

Honeywell Aerospace Picks Paragon Space Development Corporation

PHOTOS & BACKGROUND IMAGE COURTESY PARAGON SPACE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

By June C. Hussey When NASA Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to set foot on the Moon in 1969, fellow earthlings looked on in awe. Nearly a half century later, aerospace experts like Tucsonan Ron Sable are predicting with confidence that the very same kids who witnessed that giant leap for mankind on their parents’ nifty new color consoles will quite likely witness the first Mars walk, too. Sable, 74, has been poised on the leading edge of aerospace technology ever since his earlier days in the Air Force, Department of Defense, Ronald Reagan’s White House and McDonnell Douglas. Today he serves as chairman of the board of Tucson-based Paragon Space Development Corporation. Sable said he would be thrilled to see, in his own lifetime, two people return safely from a 500-day round-trip mission into deep space. Regardless of when such a manned space mission is ultimately accomplished, Sable and the 40-member team at Paragon will have played a big part. Founded in 1993 by five principal partners, including current President and CEO Grant Anderson and former Biospherians Taber MacCallum and Jane Poynter (who now lead Paragonincubated WorldView Enterprises), Paragon describes itself as a world leader in the design and manufacture of thermal control and life-support systems for extreme environments. After spinning off WorldView Enterprises in 2014, Paragon’s board elected Sable as chairman to steer the future development of Paragon’s patented life- support and thermal systems. www.BizTucson.com

Whether on Earth, in deep space or 20,000 leagues under the sea, water and oxygen are vital to human survival, Sable said. Building innovative systems that deliver and regenerate these

Paragon’s Patented Technologies • Paragon manufactured and delivered more than 400 precision tube assemblies for the Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 (successfully launched and landed on Dec. 5, 2014) and the upcoming Exploration Mission 1 (planned for 2019). Paragon also manufactured and delivered the FLO1 instrumentation package for both of these vehicles. • Paragon’s patented Ionomer-membrane Water Processor is in manufacture and will be delivered to the International Space Station in early 2019. It will increase water recovery on ISS to greater than 98 percent. • Paragon’s patented Humidity Control Subsystem has been manufactured, qualified, and delivered to Boeing and is being integrated into the CST-100 Commercial Crew transport spacecraft, scheduled to launch in early 2019. • Paragon’s patented Extruded Radiator (xRAD) technology was just selected by the Sierra Nevada Corporation to provide flight hardware for its Dream Chaser spacecraft. In 2016 NASA selected the Dream Chaser to transport pressurized and unpressurized cargo to and from the International Space Station with return and disposal services. First flight is expected in 2019.

vital elements has catapulted Paragon into the scientific stratosphere. With headquarters in Tucson and offices in Houston and Denver, Paragon’s client list includes NASA, the Department of Defense, Lockheed Martin, Boeing and extraordinary private citizens like Alan Eustace. Eustace, a Google executive, quietly hired Paragon to orchestrate his threeyear quest to clinch the world record for the highest space dive. In 2014, donning a Paragon-designed spacesuit with elaborate life-support systems, Eustace ascended and then descended over 25.5 miles from the upper stratosphere at speeds up to 822 miles per hour – breaking the sound barrier – before pulling his chute and landing within his target zone near Roswell, New Mexico. A support crew by his side within 15 seconds confirmed his good health. Eustace’s descent from 135,890 feet not only beat the previous record of 128,100 feet set in 2012 by Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner, it also left him a lot less banged up, thanks to Paragon’s hightech wizardry. Pushing the envelope of space exploration isn’t just about setting records – it’s also about yielding innovative technologies that improve how we live. Most modern communication devices wouldn’t exist without satellites, and without GPS to guide our every move, many of us would feel lost. Space exploration led to both. Working on Eustace’s space dive afforded Paragon the opportunity to design, patent and implement a new drogue chute deployment system that continued on page 138 >>> Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 137


BizAEROSPACE continued from page 137 prevents entanglement between a pilot and his or her parachute while ejecting at high altitudes, where there is insufficient wind pressure to deploy the chute. This technology can be easily adapted to increase safety during ejection events aboard emerging high-altitude piloted aircraft, balloons and spacecraft. Paragon’s principal role in Eustace’s high-profile space dive also helped launch the company once and for all into rarified air. By April 2017, Paragon had entered into a teaming agreement with Honeywell Aerospace to design, build, test and apply environmental control and life-support systems for future human NASA programs. “For a Fortune 500 company to reach down to a small company and say ‘We want to work with you,’ is really something incredible,” said Sable. “We’d been working on it for about four years. This is a testament to the reputation Paragon has earned as a cutting-edge leader in life support. That’s the whole

138 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

thing – you have to have water and oxygen for these deep space habitats.” “A renewed interest in developing a deep space habitat needed for reaching the Moon and Mars, continued experimentation aboard the International Space Station, and a desire to push the limits of unmanned flights make this a remarkable time in space exploration,” said Marty Sheber, VP of Honeywell Aerospace’s space division, in a press release issued by Honeywell announcing the two companies’ agreement. “Unmanned achievements are now giving way to long-distance and long-duration human missions. The technology developed by Honeywell and Paragon will give humans the opportunity to explore space for longer periods than before.” Paragon’s Anderson said, “This agreement allows the Honeywell and Paragon team to provide fully integrated solutions to NASA – combining our strengths of experience and innovation in technology with an agile and customer-focused responsiveness.

Potential prime contractors and NASA will have access to a system-focused integration team with a catalog of proven and emerging technology to bring longduration exploration of the Moon and Mars to practical implementation. “Ever since the teaming agreement was announced, we’ve been fielding multiple inquiries from all levels of NASA and their contractors for alternatives to current systems and technologies.” According to Paragon’s Chief Engineer, Barry Finger, NASA is expected to begin cis-Lunar human exploration missions in approximately 10 years and if the current timelines hold, human exploration missions to Mars could commence by early to mid-2030. When that day comes, Tucsonans can feel rightfully proud that neighbors like Sable and Anderson played a big part in outfitting this next giant leap for mankind.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


BizBRIEF

Tohono O’odham Groups Benefit From Golf Event The Tohono O’odham Gaming Enterprise presented checks to four organizations that serve the Tohono O’odham Nation as part of a highly successful annual fundraising event. More than $128,000 was presented as part of the funds raised at the 14th Annual Desert Diamond Casinos Golf Classic. The Desert Diamond Casinos Golf Classic over the past 14 years has become one of the top golfing fundraisers in Southern Arizona. This year’s tournament, which featured a bikers and motorcycles theme, was held at the Omni Tucson National Golf Course in March. More than 260 individuals participated, with support of many volunteers from Desert Diamond Casinos & Entertainment and the beneficia-

www.BizTucson.com

ries. The tournament’s major sponsors included Delta Diversified, the Hunt Penta Joint Venture, BelAire Mechanical and Pepsi. This year’s recipients are: • Tohono O’odham Department of Health & Human Services Division of Prevention Kom Ckud Ki: Domestic Violence, which offers programs and services to prevent domestic violence and help individuals live free of abuse. • Tohono O’odham Veteran’s Affairs, which provides programs and services to support all Tohono O’odham veterans of the U.S. military. • Tohono O’odham Community Action and Tohono O’odham Ki:Ki Asso-

ciation, which are collaborating on a joint project. TOCA is dedicated to creating a healthy, culturally vital and sustainable community on the Tohono O’odham Nation, while Ki:Ki has provided housing services to the members of the Nation for more than 50 years.

Desert Diamond Casinos & Entertainment, with three Southern Arizona locations in Tucson, Sahuarita and Why plus one in the Glendale area west of Phoenix, is owned and operated by the Tohono O’odham Gaming Enterprise, an enterprise of the Tohono O’odham Nation. The award ceremony was held in the Fine Arts Building of Baboquivari High School, located in Topawa.

Biz

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 139


President & CEO Accelerate Diagnostics

140 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Larry Mehren


BizBIOSCIENCE

Game-Changer Blood Test IDs Infectious Bacteria in Hours, not Days By Monica Surfaro Spigelman We know bacteria. Our lives are intertwined with millions of these good and bad microorganisms that live in, on and around us. When the harmful ones take over, infection strikes. Lately, methods that battle bloodstream infections with a barrage of antibiotics have proven hopelessly inadequate. Instead, a deadly rise of altered microbes impervious to antibiotics is sending science on a frantic search for approaches that steward the use of existing antimicrobials, to prevent development of further resistance to them. Enter Tucson-based Accelerate Diagnostics, a game-changer in microbiology and medical diagnostics. President and CEO Larry Mehren moved his company to Tucson in 2012 from Colorado, setting up shop in first-class 15,000-square-foot labs and office spaces built out by Pima County in the Dr. Herbert K. Abrams Public Health Center at 3950 S. Country Club Road. Four years after this move, the problem-solving hustle of Accelerate’s 200 microbiologists, engineers, computer scientists and other cross-functional professionals culminated in revolutionary high-tech diagnostics – the Accelerate Pheno™ system and Accelerate PhenoTest™ BC kit. This first direct-fromblood culture sample and completely automatic system identifies pathogens and assesses appropriate antimicrobial susceptibility – producing results up to 40 hours faster than conventional methods. By quickly applying antibiotics in targeted ways, said Mehren, the tool is helping medical professionals to cut antibiotic overuse and save lives. “Others have taken swings at it and didn’t change the science at all,” he said. www.BizTucson.com

“We’re influencing antimicrobial therapy in a way that has never been done before. We can adjust therapy in very rapid fashion and practice precision medicine in a way that is quite curative and impactful – not just to one patient, but to society as a whole.” Impatient futurist

The launch of Accelerate’s Pheno™ platform represents a new paradigm for a colossal problem, and has thrust a young company into the spotlight of medical diagnostics. Starting an entrepreneurial diagnostics company in microbiology required strength of technique coupled with something Mehren calls “out-of-this-world genius and social science.” It’s a process the hard-driving CEO has optimized over his multi-faceted career that’s included everything from book publishing to investment banking and global business leadership at Ventana Medical Systems and Roche Tissue Diagnostics. “It’s all about being open to possibilities. And if failure rears its ugly head as it does for us all, it’s also about figuring out ways to turn that into opportunity,” Mehren said. “Usually the challenge with entrepreneurism is when the entrepreneur feels fear for the first time. It’s that moment that often defines the company – because almost every entrepreneur I find begins with hubris and then finds fear. That’s when they become smart enough to realize how little they know.” That moment came for Mehren in 2016, when Accelerate had entered clinical trials and began its data analysis. It was when those social science skills of team-building and transparency came

into play. “When we came up against data challenges, instead of just engaging the brains of three people to solve a problem, I had 200 people to express my fears to. And this company stepped to the fore with its collective intelligence and collective will. The collective faith of this group was brought to bear on the challenge. And that’s when problems were solved.” After one of the largest clinical trials ever in clinical microbiology, the Accelerate Pheno™ system performance was validated. In February 2017, the FDA approved the Accelerate Pheno™ system and Accelerate PhenoTest™ BC kit to market in North America and Europe. To date, there are signed agreements for 191 instruments. Around the world – from Tucson Medical Center in Tucson to the Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene in Tübingen, Germany – the Accelerate Pheno™ suite is rapidly identifying infectious bacteria in samples in a few hours in a test process that traditionally takes two to three days. “When we talk about sepsis, time is life,” said John Allen, director of TMC Laboratory Services. “TMC has worked closely with Accelerate since the company was recruited to Tucson – from providing specimens to helping run testing prototypes. “We’re very excited by the promise of this test to help us find more targeted therapy as quickly as possible to improve patient outcomes and potentially save lives.” Medicine’s most wanted

It only took a century to crack this dilemma. How did we get here? continued on page 142 >>> Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 141


BizBIOSCIENCE continued from page 141 Louis Pasteur’s germ research and Alexander Fleming’s discovery of penicillin were the first wave of the revolution. Prior to this work, even minor injuries could lead to infections that could result in death. The first antibiotics were wonder drugs of modern medicine. When they became widely available, they saved lives. Within a 10-year period around the 1950s, the medicine advanced further – introducing new antibiotics, like streptomycin, tetracycline, erythromycin and, later, ciprofloxacin. But science didn’t anticipate the cunning quality of bacteria, Mehren said. “Remember that before invention of penicillin, the expectation was that you would die of infection. We forget that pre-antibiotic era was marked by the fact that if you got an earache you could die. Then along came sulfur and penicillin, and people started getting used to the idea that you could survive these infections. Expectations started to change.” Bacteria then learned how to adapt and resist, Mehren said, forcing physicians to prescribe broad-spectrum cocktails of antibiotic therapies that began to decrease the longterm efficacy of the drugs. “We failed to understand that the biome we were affecting started to evolve itself. When those bacteria began to change, what is now called antimicrobial resistance was bred.” Bitter pills of history

Mehren said we’re passing through a golden age of antibiotic discovery, and on our way to a post-antibiotic era, when antibiotic resistance could raise a grim specter. “That’s what the world is facing today – when bacteria continue to be virulent even in the face of antibiotics. That’s what everyone’s afraid of – a post-antibiotic era where antimicrobials fail to work and we go back to a time when you get an earache and you could die because it got into your bloodstream.” In the face of this doomsday picture, Mehren’s belief in Accelerate’s exquisitely robust tool is farsighted and optimistic. “There’s a way to stop that – and that is by giving antibiotics only to people who need them in the quickest time frame possible.” To deal with a post-antibiotic era, science now agrees that wanton use of broad-spectrum antibiotics contributed to the rise of superbugs. New strategies, like the holy grail of reliable rapid diagnostics that identify both the microbial cause of an infection and its drug resistance profile within hours, is the way to battle resistant incarnations of bacteria. Accelerate’s inroads to solving pieces of the infection-control puzzle are now trailblazing the biosciences. Mehren has ramped up commercial activity for Accelerate’s testing system. Mehren’s mix of hubris and respect for fear continue to inform his business approach, upending medical diagnostics at Accelerate’s headquarters, where whiteboards detail complex team goals and messages that urge, “See it. Own it. Solve it. Do it.” Each word is an omen of how Mehren plans to push Accelerate forward – and open the floodgates to more microbiological ingenuity and impact.

Biz 142 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


BizBRIEFS Katrina Noble

Katrina Noble celebrated her 20th year with Bolchalk FReY Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations with a recent promotion to senior director of media and marketing strategy. She develops and implements strategic and integrated marketing campaigns for the Tucson company’s clients. She has worked in advertising since she graduated from the University of Arizona in 1990. Bolchalk FReY has provided marketing, public relations and advertising services since 1964. Biz

Jeff Sales

Jeff Sales is the new executive director for the Arizona Technology Council’s Southern Regional Offices in Tucson. His experience includes working with other trade organizations as well as general management, organizational behavior, coaching, strategic planning, operations, marketing, business development and consulting. He has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Cincinnati and an MBA from Harvard Business School. He will play an instrumental role in expanding the council’s efforts and growing its membership.

Biz

Julie Bonner

Julie Bonner has joined West Press as its creative marketing director. She oversees the printing company’s graphic design and cross-media marketing services. Bonner has held various graphic design and marketing positions in Philadelphia and Tucson, including art director of Clear Channel Outdoor. She also owns Julie Originals in which she sells her own art works. West Press is a 26-year-old employee-owned company. Its services include printing, web design and mailing. Biz www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 143


BizTOOLKIT

Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses By Laura Liewen The end of the year is a busy time. Planning for the upcoming holidays often takes precedence so it’s easy to overlook important business decisions that should be made before the start of the New Year. One frequently neglected task is strategic tax planning. By October or November businesses should have a good grasp of their financial situation for the year. Analyzing your business’s finances at this time affords a small window of opportunity to make decisions that can affect the bottom line for the entire year. If there is expected profit for the year, deferring income and accelerating expenses can be a tool, depending on your basis of accounting. If your business needs new equipment, consider

144 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

purchasing it before year-end. You may want to give bonuses or make other discretionary payments. On the flip side, if your business is expecting a loss, you may want to accelerate income and defer expenses. Don’t wait until year-end when it will be too late to make adjustments. Since most businesses are taxed directly at the owner level, year-end tax planning can have an even bigger effect. An owner may have income or loss from other sources that can offset the business income or loss. Look at the overall picture and make decisions that are best for both the business and the owner. Also stay abreast of the constantly changing tax laws and their impact. Discuss this with your tax advisor.

Year-end tax planning is not a onesize-fits-all methodology. Every situation is unique and many factors come into play. Meeting with your CPA to come up with a customized plan could save you tax dollars that can instead be used to reinvest in your business. It can also save you the surprise of a big tax bill in the spring. Strategic tax planning can be a powerful tool for the sustainability of your business and personal financial future. Don’t forget to use it. Laura Liewen is a certified public accountant and senior tax manager at R&A CPAs in Tucson.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


BizBRIEF Senior leadership from Pima Federal Credit Union presents a check to Tucson Values Teachers for their annual supply drive program. From left: Angi Griffin, Senior VP/Chief Human Resources Officer, Pima Federal Credit Union; Katie Rogerson, COO, Tucson Values Teachers; Bruce Baca, Senior VP/Chief Retail Officer, Pima Federal Credit Union; Chris Gutierrez, Principal, Holaway Elementary and TVT board member.

Senior leadership from Pima Federal Credit Union recently presented a $55,000 check to Katie Rogerson, COO of Tucson Values Teachers, for Tucson Supplies Teachers, TVT’s annual supply drive for local educators. The funds raised came from Pima Federal Credit Union’s Fifth Annual Golf Classic, held on May 4 at the Golf Club at Dove Mountain. The partnership between TVT and Pima Federal has resulted in more than $317,000 raised since 2012 through the Golf Classic. All funds raised through the golf tournament go directly to teachers to purchase items for their classrooms. TVT is a business and education partnership focused on helping schools

www.BizTucson.com

and districts attract, retain and support the very best teachers for every K-12 classroom in Southern Arizona. The organization recognizes the critical role teachers play in student achievement and the vital influence they have on Tucson’s future. TVT does this work by raising public awareness of the value of the teaching profession while providing programs that benefit teachers economically and professionally. Hundreds of local teachers will benefit thanks to Pima Federal Credit Union’s commitment to education and educators. Tucson Supplies Teachers has delivered more than $880,000 worth of school supplies since its inception in

2009. It is the largest school supply drive in the region, occurring every July and August. TVT is currently raising funds in the community to help match Pima Federal’s investment. So far, another $13,000 has been raised toward that goal. TVT also works with other community partners to raise funds for Tucson Supplies Teachers. Southern Arizona teachers can sign up for a chance to win a $50 gift card for school supplies by visiting www.TucsonValuesTeachers. org. Community members interested in making a donation toward the supply drive can visit the website for information on how to contribute.

Biz

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 145

PHOTO COURTESY TUCSON VALUES TEACHERS

Pima Federal Event Raises $55,000 for Teachers


BizSALES

Closing the Sale

Definitive Answers You Won’t Like By Jeffrey Gitomer

“A – B – C. Always Be Closing.” You may know that line from the infamous sales movie “Glengarry Glen Ross” with Alex Baldwin. It’s a throwback sales training line from the 1960s that manifested itself all the way to the ’80s. The problem with that line is that some people are still using it. Whenever I do a seminar, everyone wants to know the fastest way to close the sale, the easiest way to close the sale and the best way to close the sale. REALITY: There is no fast way, there is no easy way and there is no best way. However, there is a better way than thinking of it as closing the sale. And once you understand what that way is, it will change your approach to the sale, for the better, forever. It’s not the “close,” it’s the open. From the moment you engage prospective customers, they are beginning to make a judgment. First they judge you, then they judge what they’re buying and finally they judge what company they’re buying it from. As I’ve said for years, the first sale that’s made is the salesperson (that would be you). The secret of selling is four words – perceived value, perceived difference. Two of the four words are the same – perceived. If your prospective customer perceives no difference between you and the competition, and perceives no value (better stated a greater value) in what you’re offering, then all that’s left is price – and you will most likely lose the sale. Or if you win the sale, it will be at the expense of your profit. There are two intangibles that, when combined, create a better chance of you completing the sale. They are “comfort” and “fit.” How comfortable were you with the prospective customer? How comfortable was the prospective customer with you? And was there a perceived fit? Did what you were selling fit with what the customer needed or wanted to buy? So I’m going back to my original statement: It’s not the close, it’s the open. Let me give you a pop quiz that will determine whether or not you are even ready to open. How is your attitude? How strong is your belief system? Do you have a GREAT attitude? Do you have an impenetrable belief in your company, your products or services – and yourself ? Do you also believe that the customer is better off having purchased from you? How well have you researched both the company and the person that you’re meeting? Preparation for the sale is broken down into three parts – personal preparation, sales preparation and preparation IN TERMS OF THE PROSPECT. Do you know what their reasons for buying are? Do you 146 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


know what their motive(s) for buying might be? If you know their reasons and their motives, by definition, you will also know their urgency. NOTE WELL: Your reasons for selling pale in comparison to their reasons for buying. When you first spoke on the phone with the prospect, was it a friendly encounter? Were you familiar with them? Were they familiar with you? Did you develop any rapport prior to arriving? Do you have anything in common? Prior to your face-to-face appointment or your telephone appointment to complete the sale, and in addition to your preparation, you must have a goal for the customer to like you, believe you, have confidence in you and trust you. If those goals are not achieved within the framework of the sales presentation, then the completion of the sale will never become a reality. SELF-TEST: Rather than me teaching you a closing question, here are some tough questions that you must ask yourself before, during and after every presentation that you make. These questions, if answered positively in the mind of the prospective customer, will preclude you from ever having to “ask a closing question.” In paraphrasing my opening statement: If it doesn’t start right, it won’t end right.

• • • • • • • • • •

How ready were you? How friendly were you? How engaging were you? How valuable were you? How compelling were you? How believable were you? How credible were you? How self-confident were you? How relatable were you? How trustworthy were you perceived to be?

Closing the sale is not an action. It’s a culmination and a sum total of the elements that make a favorable decision possible. As I’ve written in “The Sales Bible,” the close of a sale is a delicate balance between your words and deeds, and the prospect’s thoughts and perceptions. And a sale is always made. Either you sell the prospect on yes, or they sell you on no. You give me a prepared, friendly, engaging, valuable, compelling, believable, self-confident, relatable, trustworthy salesperson – and I’ll give you a sale. Don’t close the sale – rather, complete the sales process and begin the relationship. It’s not the responsibility of the salesperson to close the sale. It is the responsibility of the salesperson to earn the sale.

Biz

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of 12 best-selling books, including “The Sales Bible” and “The Little Red Book of Selling” and “The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude.” His real-world ideas and content are also available as online courses at www.GitomerLearningAcademy.com. For information about training and seminars visit www.Gitomer.com or www.GitomerCertifiedAdvisors.com, or email Jeffrey personally at salesman@gitomer.com. © 2017 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from GitGo, LLC, Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. (704) 333-1112

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 147


John Lai

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

CEO Mister Car Wash

148 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017


BizENTREPRENEUR

A Washing Machine

Mister Car Wash is soaking the competition By Valerie Vinyard John Lai envisions Mister Car Wash becoming the Starbucks of car washes. “We see unlimited potential,” said Lai, the CEO who sees the Tucsonbased company growing to 1,000 locations nationwide. “It’s all about growth right now.” And it’s well on its way. As the largest car wash company in the United States, Mister Car Wash employs more than 8,000 people at 236 locations scattered throughout the country, including 14 full-service and express sites in Tucson, plus one in Sierra Vista. A former Royal Car Wash at 4600 E. Broadway opened as a full-service Mister Car Wash in May. Mister Car Wash entered the Tucson market in 2000 when its Boston-based ownership group was struggling. Tucson-based Blue Coral Systems agreed

to take over if the headquarters was moved to Tucson. More than 700 employees are in Tucson, including 120 at the corporate office. One sunny afternoon in April, the employees of Mister Car Wash on East Speedway were hard at work cleaning some of the estimated 105,000 cars that are washed each month at Tucson area locations. Joe Lamarilla pulled up his white Honda Accord to one of the open lanes, where a friendly employee found out what type of service he wanted. After getting a receipt, Lamarilla left his car and made his way to the dog-friendly indoor/outdoor waiting area. For the next 15 minutes, his vehicle was in Mister Car Wash’s capable hands. First, two people thoroughly vacu-

umed the inside floors and seats. After that, an employee drove the vehicle to an automated car wash. As it came off the line, teams of two each took a side, using towels to soak up any leftover droplets that the blower missed. An employee then drove the car to the finishing crew, where two more workers finished hand-drying the outside and started tackling the inside. A thorough dusting of the dashboard and other surfaces ensued, and the inside of the windows – including the moon roof – were polished. Ten fresh towels are used for every full-serve wash, four for every express. When the service was done, an employee called out the make and model of the vehicle. After dropping a couple of bucks in the tip container, Lamarilla continued on page 150 >>>

Grand Opening of Mister Car Wash at Swan and Broadway. It is their 15th Tucson store and one of their flagship locations.

PHOTOS: COURTESY MISTER CAR WASH

Mayor Rothschild and John Lai

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 149


BizENTREPRENEUR continued from page 149 walked over and handed his receipt to an employee, who encouraged him to check over his car to make sure it was finished to his liking. It was and Lamarilla was happy. “My car looks good,” said the 39-yearold engineer. “I’ve never had such a nice experience at a car wash.” Lai likes hearing reports like that since customer service stands out in Mister Car Wash’s “people-first culture.” Ron Stewart, who never imagined a career in car washing, loves his job as the GM of the Speedway location. He stayed on after Capin Car Wash was acquired by Mister Car Wash in early 2012. “We’re in the customer service business,” he said. “We just happen to be washing cars.” Lai said there’s actually a lot behind “washing cars.” “The science behind cleaning is intense,” he said. “There’s a technique to box and fill and frame the window.

150 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

There’s even a method for how to hold the towel and how to fold the towel. I call it a choreographed dance.” To learn the science, the company offers a college for its employees – Mister Car Wash University. Lai said the training videos and other opportunities “allow us to improve and be more consistent.” Michael Osuna, GM of the Miracle Mile location, has taken advantage of the in-depth training. “There’s a lot of opportunity,” said Osuna, 27. “They give you the tools to succeed. They’ve opened my eyes to be more of a businessman.” Mister Car Wash customers also have something not available at many car washes – an unlimited option. More than 400,000 people nationwide pay a monthly fee for unlimited washes, including 15,000 in Tucson. Prices in Tucson range from the $19.99 Express exterior wash to the $49.99 Full Serve Platinum. Some people might see car washes as

a wasteful extravagance in the desert, but the service uses less water than some might think. Plus, Mister Car Wash recycles about 14 to 15 gallons per vehicle using three underground tanks that filter the water. As Mister Car Wash grows at a clip of over 25 percent year over year, Lai said the Tucson headquarters is “bursting at the seams.” To create more corporate space, Mister Car Wash bought the recently vacated DeWitt Designs location, a 25,000-square-foot building at 415 N. Sixth Ave. Renovations should be done by December, Lai said. The company also will keep the original corporate office at 222 E. Fifth St. “There’s a car culture to America,” Lai said. “The car, to many Americans, is more than just transportation. People have this connection to their vehicle and, as a result, people want to care for it. “Plus, it makes you feel good.”

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


BizHONORS

Hispanic Business Leaders of the Year By Lee Allen

The Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce – the largest Latino business organization in Arizona – announced recipients of two of its highest honors. Laura Oldaker, CEO of By Your Side Senior Care and the Academy for Caregiving Excellence, is Business Woman of the Year. Marcel Dabdoub, co-CEO of the family-owned Dabdoub Holdings, is Business Man of the Year. The awards, presented since 1998, go to the top Latino executives of businesses of any size located in Southern Arizona. The winners exemplify “the strength and importance of Hispanic entrepreneurship, organizational management and community leadership.” Lea Márquez-Peterson, president and CEO of the chamber, said, “It’s our honor to promote the personal and economic accomplishments of Hispanic entrepreneurs and to highlight businesses that value the importance of the fast-growing Hispanic market and trade relations with Mexico. “Honoring these business leaders and

www.BizTucson.com

celebrating their accomplishments is important because these leaders are role models for our member businesses and for our youth. “Several years ago we added award categories to recognize binational leaders and companies that work to strengthen the ties between Arizona and Mexico.” The Hensley Beverage Company is Arizona Corporation of the Year. Suspiros Pastelerías is Mexican Corporation of the Year. In 1955 Hensley began delivering

NOCHE DE EXITOS GALA & BI-NATIONAL BUSINESS AWARDS Saturday, Oct. 21 Casino Del Sol Resort 6 p.m. reception 7 p.m. dinner 9:30 p.m. after-party with live music $150 per person, $1,500 for table of 10 Sponsorship opportunities available: laura@tucsonhispanicchamber.org (520) 620-0005

cold beer to thirsty Phoenicians. It is now one of the largest family-owned beverage distributors in the nation. A Hensley foundation, financed by the corporation and its employees, contributes funds to education, healthcare, housing, human rights and social welfare programs. Suspiros Pastelerías, a gourmet Mexican bakery based in Hermosillo, Sonora with 260+ shops throughout Mexico, exemplifies leadership in serving the Hispanic market and promoting U.S.Mexico trade. It opened the first site in the United States in Tucson earlier this year. Pima Community College Chancellor Lee Lambert receives the La Estrella Award, given to an individual or organization based on exceptional service to the Hispanic community in Southern Arizona and Northern Mexico. Born in South Korea, he received a law degree from Seattle University and has served as chancellor of Pima Community College since July 2013. Biz

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 151


Marcel Dabdoub 2017 Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Business Man of the Year

PHOTO: UNIQUE PHOTOGRAPHY

BizHONORS

By Lee Allen Entrepreneurial genes run deep in the Dabdoub clan on both sides of the Arizona-Sonora border, as evidenced by Marcel Dabdoub, Hispanic Business Man of the Year. Dabdoub belongs to a family who left Palestinian territory and settled in Nogales, Sonora, to become merchants. A few generations later, family members got involved in developing properties in Nogales, Arizona, as well. He was educated at Salpointe Catholic High School and Boston University. After working as a financial analyst, he returned to school at the University of Arizona, where he obtained a master’s in business administration and a law degree. He worked as an attorney for several years with a focus on real estate and 152 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

commercial transactions before transitioning to business full time in 2008. His real estate projects span a wide range of industrial, commercial and residential developments on both sides of the border as well as more than a dozen downtown redevelopment endeavors that include several historic renovations. In partnership with Peach Properties, Dabdoub is restoring and developing the Chicago Store, the Arizona Hotel, Brings Chapel on South Scott Avenue and 123 South Stone Avenue. He is a member of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council and his community commitments include board positions at the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona, St. Mary’s Hospital and Downtown Tucson Partnership, as well as serving as board president for

an orphanage in Nogales, Sonora, and as founding director of a 501(c)(3) supporting organization that benefits the orphanage. Dabdoub said he was suspicious when folks from the Tucson Hispanic Chamber walked into a conference room “meeting” that had been set up for him with “congratulations” balloons. He was surprised and humbled. “This is not something to be taken lightly,” he said. “I am honored. I am grateful to the chamber and its board of directors for this incredible award.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: UNIQUE PHOTOGRAPHY

BizHONORS

Laura Oldaker 2017 Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Business Woman of the Year By Lee Allen

Laura Oldaker learned early “how to earn the things I want.” After she was named Verizon’s 2013 Latino Business Series’ Entrepreneur of the Year, she told HipLatina.com that when she was 9 and wanted a Barbie doll, her mom helped her set up a raspado on their front porch. “I made enough to buy my own Barbie,” she said. Working at a senior care center in 1995 to help pay for college, Oldaker saw how much she could improve others’ lives – and never forgot it. After a foray into marketing and public relations, she and her husband, Justin, founded By Your Side Senior Care in 2009 to provide in-home care for Tucson-area elderly. They now employ a team of three dozen people. Oldaker started the Academy for www.BizTucson.com

Caregiving Excellence in 2015 to train caregivers. The bilingual mover and shaker is one of the first Arizona graduates of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business effort, receiving a Certificate of Entrepreneurship in 2014, the same year she won the Hispanic Business Salute Award from Telemundo Arizona and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Oldaker has lived up to her advice to young would-be entrepreneurs to “give back to your community” once they’ve achieved their career goals. She is vice chair of the Tucson Hispanic Chamber’s board, a member of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council, is involved with the Alzheimer’s Association and the Santa Catalina

Parish Pastoral Council, where she volunteers in the soup kitchen to help the less fortunate. The Arizona Center for Civic Leadership named her a Flinn-Brown Fellow in 2016. After learning that she was the Hispanic Chamber’s Business Woman of the Year, Oldaker said, “I’m overwhelmed with gratitude to be included with this group of fantastic business leaders and also indebted to our team that is dedicated to positively impacting the lives of older adults in our community. Without them I wouldn’t have the opportunity to share and mentor other Hispanic women about how they can start and run a successful business.”

Biz Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 153


BizBRIEFS

Steve Neely Casino Del Sol promoted Chief Marketing Officer Steve Neely to COO. Neely will manage all operational aspects for Casino del Sol and Casino of the Sun. Neely has worked eight years for Casino Del Sol, driving its strategic marketing efforts. He has more than 20 years of executive experience. Neely has worked at gaming properties throughout the nation, including in Chicago Illinois; Las Vegas, Nevada; Temecula, California and Albuquerque, New Mexico. Biz

Jan Lesher Jan Lesher, deputy county administrator for Pima County, will serve as chair of the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona in FY 2018. The Tucson native has a long history of public service and community involvement. She served as Chief of Staff for former Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano, then Chief of Staff for Operations at the Department of Homeland Security under Secretary Napolitano. Other incoming officers are Vice Chair Claudia Jasso-Stevens, Secretary Fred Chaffee and Treasurer Anne Roediger. Biz 154 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


SPECIAL REPORT 2017

THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

The University of Arizona College of Medicine Tucson

50

Y E A R S O F I N N O VA T I O N

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 155


156 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 157


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 159


Picking Up

UA College of Medicine – Tucson Takes the Fast Lane in Research, Education

By Christy Krueger There’s a lot for Tucson to hang its hat on when one of the top public research universities in the country sits smack in the middle of the city along with a world-class medical school that’s breaking barriers with cutting-edge initiatives. The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, just north of the main campus and adjacent to Banner – University Medical Center Tucson,

is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year with a laundry list of accomplishments that are saving lives and contributing to the advancement of medicine worldwide and to the economy here at home. Leading the march into the next 50 years is Dr. Charles B. Cairns, a nationally recognized leader in emergency medicine and critical care who initially was hired as vice dean of the College

1964

50 Years in the Making

Dr. Merlin K. DuVal becomes first dean of the College of Medicine.

1967 First class of 32 students begins classes.

of Medicine – Tucson in 2014 and was named permanent dean in April 2016. Cairns was lured away from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine. In his move to the UA, Cairns was part of a package deal with his equally renowned wife, Dr. Monica Kraft, now the Department of Medicine chair.

1971 University Hospital, now Banner - University Medical Center Tucson opens. Arizona Respiratory Sciences Center, now University of Arizona Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center, established.

1974 World’s first artificial wrist designed by orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Robert Volz.

TIMELINE

160 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017


Speed at 50

BizMEDICINE

Enthusiastic about becoming part of one of the country’s top research schools, Cairns and his capable staff took no time in generating a huge win for the college. The UA was one of four universities selected in 2016 by the National Institutes of Health for its All of Us Research Program, formally known as the Precision Medicine Initiative. The NIH selected four partnership groups,

1976 Arizona Cancer Center, now University of Arizona Cancer Center, established.

www.BizTucson.com

UA Health Sciences and Banner Health being one of them, to conduct studies with the goal of advancing genomic research. The award, led by Dr. Lolu Ojo, totals $43.3 million over five years and is the largest NIH peer-reviewed grant in Arizona history. It signals that the university is considered one of the nation’s top research facilities in the field of genomics, suggesting a high level of prestige and the opportunity to be in-

1980 Arizona Center on Aging, now University of Arizona Center on Aging, established.

1983 Native American Research and Training Center established.

strumental in the future of medicine in the United States. Cairns credits the 2015 affiliation agreement with Banner Health and the physical growth of the hospital and UA Health Sciences for many of the positive changes that have taken place at the college since he arrived, as well as those still to come. “All the changes have enhanced academics and the missions of the college,” continued on page 162 >>>

1985 First successful total artificial heart used as a bridge to transplant led by cardiothoracic surgeon Dr. Jack Copeland. Arizona Arthritis Center, now University of Arizona Arthritis Center, established.

1986 University Heart Center opens. Renamed UA Sarver Heart Center in 1998 in recognition of generous support from the Robert Sarver family. continued on page 162 >>> BizTucson 161


University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson Deans from legislative approval of the college to present

1964-1971 1973-1974

1971-1973 Dr. Jack M. Layton Dr. Merlin K. DuVal (interim)

continued from page 161 Cairns said. “They provide students with new opportunities for clinical experiences and to be at the forefront of technology. They allow the faculty to be engaged in the highest quality research and clinical care. And it allows for better interaction with the community, to serve the needs of the people in Tucson and around the nation.” Growth and changes go beyond the Tucson campus. The Banner affiliation opens opportunities for students and faculty at any of Banner’s Phoenixarea hospitals and facilities where, incidentally, the UA operates the recently fully accredited College of Medicine – Phoenix. To top off all the excitement around the College of Medicine – Tucson, the Arizona Board of Regents couldn’t have hired a more appropriate and qualified leader than Dr. Robert C. Robbins as the UA’s new president. Robbins happens to be a cardiac surgeon whose previous job was leading the world’s largest medical complex, the Texas Medical

1990

1992

Arizona Emergency Medicine Research Center opens.

Steele Memorial Children’s Research Center, now University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center, opens.

<<<

Fall 2017

Dr. Neil A. Vanselow

1977-1987

Dr. Louis J. Kettel

I think we can do things together (with Banner Health) not only to catch up to but actually lead in the discovery of new drugs, new devices, new digital platforms, new diagnostics, new ways of delivering healthcare that will be higher-quality, lower-cost, with a more patientcentered focus to service.

continued from page 161

162 BizTucson

1974-1977

Dr. Robert C. Robbins President University of Arizona

1993 Dr. Andrew Weil starts the nation’s first integrative medicine program based at a medical college. It is now the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine.

1988

Dr. Vincent A. Fulginiti (interim)

1988-2001

Dr. James E. Dalen

Center in Houston. He comes with a long, highly visible background in medicine, research and large-institution leadership, including time as a professor and chairman of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford School of Medicine. “The partnership with Banner is in its nascent stages,” Robbins said. “I thought one of the reasons the Regents chose me was my background, and that I could hopefully have a positive influence on the evolution of this partnership, which I think could be tremendous between the University of Arizona and Banner Health. “I think we can do things together to not only to catch up to but actually lead in the discovery of new drugs, new devices, new digital platforms, new diagnostics, new ways of delivering healthcare that will be higher-quality, lower-cost, with a more patient-centered focus to service.” Sarah Hiteman, retired deputy dean of finance and administration, who was

1996 Arizona Telemedicine Program established. Valley Fever Center for Excellence, now the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, established.

2000 UA Liver Research Institute, now UA Thomas D. Boyer Liver Institute, established.

www.BizTucson.com


BizMEDICINE

Dr. Raymond L. Woosley

2001-2002 Dr. William S. Dalton

2002-2004

2004-2008

Dr. Kenneth J. Ryan Dr. Keith A. Joiner (interim)

at the college for 22 years, sees Robbins as an important part of the medical school’s future. “We now have a UA president who understands the Colleges of Medicine. It’ll be a benefit to all health sciences in Tucson and Phoenix.” Hiteman has lasting memories of the continuous struggles with having enough funding, a dilemma that has changed over the years as the UA consistently has landed high in the rankings as a top public research university. “One of the biggest challenges the College of Medicine faced through time was state budget cuts,” Hiteman said. “Historically, UA decided the College of Medicine would have deeper cuts because they thought the college had additional resources to tap into to reach budget, like access to hospital resources and from doing well in research. It was considered a cash cow.” Hiteman explained that researchers basically had to generate their own income, some of which was used to pay

2008-2009 2009-2014 Dr. Steve Goldschmid

their salaries. “It’s hard to work with $12 million in deficits. A lot of tenured faculty left to go to other institutions where they were paid 100 percent by the state and didn’t have to generate part of their own salary.” Today, Hiteman said, the keys to success of any medical school includes research, funding and retaining faculty. “We need to take care of people to keep talent.” She points to the UA Cancer Center as being a “huge research engine; it’s very important.” Philanthropy also is integral to the school’s funding. Much of it comes from patients who had positive experiences with the hospital and specific centers connected with the school, such as the UA Cancer Center, the UA Sarver Heart Center, the UA Steele Children’s Research Center, the UA Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center and the UA Center on Aging, among others. The centers include College of Medicine – Tucson graduates, who contribute to the Tucson community’s

2003

2005

After 16 years of research, Dr. Gordon Ewy and Dr. Karl Kern, of the UA Sarver Heart Center, advocate chest-compression-only CPR.

Arizona Simulation Technology and Education Center (ASTEC) established.

2006 VIPER Institute (Venom Immunochemistry, Pharmacology and Emergency Response) established.

2014-2015

2015-present

Dr. Joe G.N. “Skip” Dr. Charles B. Cairns Garcia (interim)

economic stability while strengthening and growing the services the centers provide. Of course, the whole purpose of a medical college is education. Its admissions office received more than 7,200 applications for 120 spots for the class of 2021, a 50-percent increase since 2014. It’s a strong indication that the university’s medical school is benefiting from an increased level of visibility and reputation as a top research institution. “I think that when people look at a UA graduate, they know they’ve had excellent clinical training,” said Dr. Kevin Moynahan, the deputy dean for education who also oversees admissions. “They’re going to see an excellent physician, a well-rounded physician, one who has core competencies, including professional behavior and empathy. I think that’s what people see. We see that when our students are accepted for admission.”

Biz

2007

2015

UA College of Medicine – Phoenix welcomes first class of medical students.

Beginning of a 30-year landmark affiliation with Banner Health.

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 163

IMAGES: COURTESY THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE – TUCSON

2001


Dean University of Arizona College of Medicine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tucson

164 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Dr. Charles B. Cairns


Q&A

BizMEDICINE

with

Dr. Charles B. Cairns Dean, University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson By Christy Krueger Dr. Charles B. Cairns came to the University of Arizona in 2014 as vice dean of the College of Medicine – Tucson and assistant vice president of health sciences. After a national search in 2015, he took over the position he holds today as dean of the college. Prior to his move to Tucson, Cairns spent his professional career in North Carolina, Colorado and California. He is a nationally recognized leader, researcher and educator in emergency medicine and critical care, serving in university leadership roles. His research interests include the host response to acute infections, asthma, trauma and cardiac resuscitation. Positions he has held include professor and chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of North Carolina; associate chief of emergency medicine at Duke University and director of emergency research at the Duke Clinical Research Institute; and director of the Colorado Emergency Medicine Research Center at the University of Colorado. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, Cairns held faculty and research positions at Denver Affiliated Residency in Emergency Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, University of North Carolina and Duke University. Cairns has received numerous awards, including Arizona Business Leader, 2017; Outstanding Contribution in Research Award of the American College of Emergency Physicians in 2000, and the 2014 John Marx Leadership Award, the highest award of the Society for American Emergency Medicine. He has published more than 200 articles, appearing in such prestigious journals as New England Journal of Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Circulation, Journal of Trauma and Science Translational Medicine. While attending Dartmouth College, Cairns was recognized as a National Merit Scholar and a Daniel Webster Scholar. In 1980, he was an NCAA Division I national finalist in cross-country. He still enjoys staying fit today and has a treadmill desk set up in his office at the College of Medicine – Tucson. www.BizTucson.com

Q. What is the

University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson’s niche nationally?

and in 10 years. We look for people who have led multidisciplinary teams and inherently link clinical needs and research. I’m not sure if any other medical schools have such a strategic and comprehensive approach.

We truly are one of the A. nation’s leaders in preQ. cision medicine, as evidenced by the large NIH All of Us grant and the groundbreaking research performed here. We’re also internationally known as one of the centers of excellence for pulmonary, asthma and allergy research and internationally known in cardiac resuscitation.

Q. Talk about blending clinical initiatives with research and education.

We strive to fully inA. tegrate clinical and research excellence. As an

example, we recently developed 10 strategic initiatives in research. These are built on the foundation of what are important initiatives for health care in Arizona, where the strengths in science at the UA are, and what are the health needs in Tucson and in Arizona now

Can you give examples of how the college has adapted to changes in health care in general? We’ve been an examA. ple to the country in the transformation of health-

care. The hospital and the college have been partnered since their founding in 1971. As a result, the UA Health Network was a successful healthcare delivery organization with a vibrant academic portfolio and stable finances until 2013. Then market forces, healthcare finance changes and technology upgrades led to a compromised position, same as many other academic medical centers. Banner Health has recruited high-quality providers and developed unique healthcare delivery systems, and in 2015 we started our partnership,

continued on page 166 >>> Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 165


BizMEDICINE continued from page 165 designed to adapt to the changing landscape.

Q. What changes did you bring with you?

A.

To successfully navigate new partnerships and address our missions in this healthcare market, we incorporated a number of changes – to structures, education, training, research and governance. Some important components are a new curriculum for medical students to expose them to clinical medicine and engage them in communities earlier in their training. We have incorporated research processes to take advantage of opportunities available by working across Banner’s 28 hospitals. We received the NIH All of Us Research grant because we made this change. We’ve increased the number of opportunities for faculty to be directly engaged in the direction and governance of the college. And we incorporated new promotion tracks to recognize scholarly excellence in healthcare delivery and innovation.

166 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

Q. Does having innovation attract faculty?

Having innovation has been critiA. cal in attracting the best faculty and students from all over the world to Tucson. These innovation programs are recognized globally as a forefront of medicine, and they provide a foundation for our research, educational and training efforts.

Q. Are most medical

schools associated with a hospital like here and are all your faculty members involved with research?

Q. What are your thoughts

on new University of Arizona President Robert Robbins and his support of moving the college into the future?

I look forward to working with A. President Robbins on the evolution of the College of Medicine – Tucson, as well as academic medicine and healthcare delivery. That will enhance all of our endeavors and benefit the people we serve in Arizona and beyond.

Q. What is the College of Medicine celebrating in its 50th year?

Our record year of excellence Most major medical schools A. and impact. We’ve had a record A. closely associate with a hospital number of medical school applicants, to form academic medical centers. All of our faculty are engaged in academic activities. Most UA College of Medicine – Tucson professors are involved with research, but some focus mainly on education and training.

up 50 percent during my time here, a record number of promotions, up 30 percent, record number of faculty and the remarkable record of innovation and research with grants, funding, publications, patents, licensing and startups up by more than 25 percent.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


continued on page 80 >>> www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 167


continued on page 82 >>> 168 BizTucson

<<<

Summer 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 169


BizECONOMY

Major Economic Driver in Arizona & Beyond UA College of Medicine – Tucson’s Annual Budget is $365 Million By Jay Gonzales

When the word “university” is in the name of an organization, it’s a nobrainer that learning is first and foremost in its mission. That remains so at the University of Arizona and its College of Medicine – Tucson. Yet over the years, the ball game has shifted to the point that in a college town like Tucson, the university is a major economic driver measured by billions of dollars. Some of it is obvious, such as the fact that the UA as a whole is Tucson’s largest employer with a total annual budget of $2.5 billion. Within that is an economy – at the College of Medicine – Tucson, for instance – that stretches throughout the community, the nation and even the world as the college competes for the best of the best in faculty and students, and where world-class researchers develop and put their technologies on the market for the betterment of mankind. All with the blessing of a research-focused institution like the UA. Gone are the days when a faculty member could just hole up in an office or a lab stacked with papers and documentation and surrounded by test tubes and microscopes, emerging long enough to teach classes and churn out the next generation of physicians. “The best teachers are the ones who are going to be really inspirational and drive people to go forward and be outstanding – the cutting-edge research170 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

ers,” said Anne Cress, deputy dean for research and faculty affairs at the College of Medicine – Tucson. “They’re at the cutting edge of how to make healthcare better, how to make discoveries that impact people, rather than just make discoveries that you put in a textbook.

One of the most important reasons for a college of medicine to function in our state is to serve the needs of the population of Arizona.

– Dr. Francisco Moreno Deputy Dean for Diversity and Inclusion College of Medicine – Tucson University of Arizona

“Twenty years ago, you could do things in isolation. Not anymore,” Cress said. “Science has moved way beyond that. You’ve got to get in there and really make it real.” By “real,” Cress means that research no longer is done for the sake of doing

research. It has an end. Sometimes it results in a company being formed or a patent filed for a new medical device. Other times it leads to a next level of research, it lures a prominent faculty member to the college or, in its simplest form, it can draw in research dollars – sometimes millions – that lead to more opportunities to change the world. “It does seem rather mind-boggling,” Cress said. Not just teaching and learning

With an annual budget of $365 million, the College of Medicine – Tucson is no slouch as an economic driver on its own. As Cress mentioned, companies are spun off, often getting into the market through the UA’s technology incubator, Tech Launch Arizona. Or something big happens – like UA Health Sciences receiving a $43 million grant over five years from the National Institutes of Health to study precision medicine. Or the school turns out doctors who find their calling in helping a small, rural community, practicing medicine where no one else will and making an impact not in dollars but in service. This is the norm – the expectation – when faculty members and students make their way to the UA colleges of medicine in Tucson and Phoenix. With a new UA president who also is a cardiac surgeon, Dr. Robert C. Robbins, continued on page 172 >>> www.BizTucson.com


Anne Cress

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Deputy Dean for Research & Faculty Affairs College of Medicine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tucson University of Arizona

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 171


BizECONOMY

continued from page 170 there’s a sense that an even brighter light is shining on the fortunes of the college. “Being a land-grant, state university, we have a responsibility to be able to not only give our students the best education that we possibly can, but also to discover new knowledge and to translate that knowledge into commercialize-able products,” Robbins said. “If we discover the new knowledge and it just lies dormant in some article, that would be important. But if it never gets translated into something that could help make the world a better place and improve the status of humanity, then what a missed opportunity that is.” Reaching out to make an impact

Dr. Francisco Moreno

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Deputy Dean for Diversity & Inclusion College of Medicine – Tucson University of Arizona

172 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

Even as millions of dollars pass through the college, one of its primary economic impacts is on the smaller communities around Arizona that might not have the financial resources to attract doctors who have gone through the rigors of medical school and might see it as a path to financial well-being. “One of the most important reasons for a college of medicine to function in our state is to serve the needs of the population of Arizona,” said Dr. Francisco Moreno, deputy dean for diversity and inclusion at the college. Moreno pointed out that Arizona has an abundance of rural communities with high minority populations, and the UA sees diversity in its students as a way to impact those communities with doctors who understand the culture. “The health needs of these populations are very unique,” Moreno said. “When we train individuals from those backgrounds, they’re more likely to go back and serve those populations. We’re training individuals to be asking the next questions, to be conducting the new research projects that serve the needs of the state.” That effort starts early at the college – for example with the Med-Start program that brings high school students who might be interested in a health career to the campus during the summer for exposure to the campus, its academics, the labs, the classes and the work. Students apply for the program and those who are accepted receive a scholarship while getting a close-up look at a future in a medical field. continued on page 174 >>>


Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 173


BizECONOMY

continued from page 172 “It’s hard to measure a program like that, but anecdotally, it’s been wildly successful,” said Linda Don, former assistant dean for outreach and multicultural affairs, which administers the program. “Whenever I go to a hospital or a clinic, I literally run into someone who will say they went to Med-Start and they will say what they’ve been doing with their lives. A lot of them are working in health-related jobs, whether they’re a physician or a nurse or working in a county health department.” Buildings for the future

Deputy Dean for Finance & Business Affairs College of Medicine – Tucson University of Arizona

174 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

David Elmer

While there’s plenty going on inside the College of Medicine – Tucson, outside major construction is signaling a commitment to technology, learning and an environment for the future of healthcare. Banner Health, the UA’s partner that runs the teaching hospital now known as Banner – University Medical Center Tucson, has a brand-new building going up next to the old hospital originally known as University Hospital. Two other UA buildings – the Bioscience Research Laboratories and the Health Sciences Innovation Building – are in line with the direction the college is taking in its teaching and research, giving students more hands-on training and lab opportunities earlier in their time at the college, said David Elmer, deputy dean for finance and business affairs. All of those projects had their own economic impacts – providing construction jobs. And while adding new facilities and new technology for new ways of teaching and learning is not a competition like one might find across campus in collegiate athletics, there’s a mindset that it contributes to attracting the best students and faculty who see an opportunity for turning out better-trained doctors and conducting higher levels of research. “While there’s a building going up, it’s really the strategic positioning of our education that’s hopefully attracting the students,” Elmer said. “It’s going to be beautiful. It’s always nice to work in an environment like that. The technology will be advanced. But it will give us an opportunity to change the way we teach.” Biz www.BizTucson.com


Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 175


BizEDUCATION

A Passion for Patients The Right Reason to Become a Doctor By Jay Gonzales

If there’s a Medical School 101 for getting into the University of Arizona, the first lesson is knowing the right reason to be a doctor. “If you’re going into medicine for any other reason than you want to serve patients and help them better their lives, you’re not going to be successful in medicine,” said Dr. Kevin Moynahan, the deputy dean for education who oversees the UA College of Medicine – Tucson’s admissions and medical education programs. As the college turns 50, the admissions and education process is constantly evolving to keep aligned with the rapidly changing medical profession and the way students learn. Yet, even as teaching and students and the practice of medicine continue to change, Moynahan said, the way to be a good doctor does not. A prospective medical student has to have a strong desire to serve patients. No questions asked. “If that’s not your motivation, if you’re going into medicine because of money or because there’s prestige, if serving patients isn’t there in front of you, driving you forward through the good and the bad, you’re not going to be happy because things are changing so rapidly,” Moynahan said. The UA works on developing the service mindset from the outset – starting in the admissions process – and underscores it the day medical students set foot on campus and they see patients on their first day of school. 176 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

Getting in

The students who are admitted are the ones who demonstrate, in a detailed and thorough admissions process, that they have specific traits the school is looking for – “empathy, excellent com-

We’re trying to create an environment where students understand the commitment that it takes to be a physician and the trust that our society has placed in them.

– Dr. Kevin Moynahan Deputy Dean for Education UA College of Medicine – Tucson University of Arizona

munication skills, resilience, appreciation of diverse populations and then the absolute commitment to the profession,” Moynahan said. Applicants for medical school – last year there were 7,200 applications for 120 spots – get a first look, like at other schools of medicine, based on their undergraduate grade-point average and the Medical College Admissions Test

or MCAT, Moynahan said. But once an applicant gets the needed score to be considered for the college, other personal attributes and overall fit are considered along with grades. In the UA process, the applicant is put through nine to 10 mini-interviews intended to draw out the aforementioned qualities the school desires. It’s hard to fake it in the process, Moynahan said. “They want to get into medical school so they might be trying to think about what they’re supposed to be answering and maybe not what they’re thinking,” he said. “They’re probably not going be able to do 10 of those because it’s rapid fire. We’re hoping that we’re picking up students where we see these traits that we value. “We’re trying to create an environment where students understand the commitment that it takes to be a physician and the trust that our society has placed in them,” he said. “And then we fill that with the medical knowledge and the traits that they need to be a successful physician – all the while maintaining their ideals in terms of wanting to help people.” To serve the underserved

At the UA, there’s emphasis on understanding and gaining experience with the diverse populations that need to be served in a city and state with a high population of ethnic minorities, partly because of its proximity to the continued on page 179 >>> www.BizTucson.com


Dr. Kevin Moynahan

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Deputy Dean for Education College of Medicine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tucson University of Arizona

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 177


178 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


BizEDUCATION Gonzales said that in urban areas nationwide, there are about 290 doctors per 100,000 residents. In the urban areas of Arizona, it’s about 250 per 100,000. In the rural areas of Arizona, it’s about half that. Another program geared toward the college’s mantra of serving people is the student-run volunteer program, Commitment to Underserved People, or CUP. The CUP program puts students in both clinical and non-clinical programs where they get first-hand experience with the needs of underserved communities.

PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

continued from page 176 Mexican border, and where there is a significant underserved population both inside and outside the urban centers of Phoenix and Tucson. At the same time students are learning how to practice medicine, they have opportunities to experience what their future work will entail by participating in the college’s community engagement programs. The Rural Health Professions Program, under Dr. Carlos Gonzales, matches medical school students with physicians working in rural communities throughout Arizona. Students apply for the program and 22 get into the program each year, taking at least two rotations, one in the summer after their first year of school and a second during the third year. The purpose is two-fold, Gonzales said. One is to get future doctors to consider the idea of providing their services in underserved and rural areas by attracting potential students from those areas. “We try to recruit kids from the rural communities because it’s been proven time and time again that (doctors) who go into rural communities come from rural communities,” Gonzales said. “Also, you can often get students interested in rural medicine if you give them exposure to rural medicine early on in their education.” The second purpose is that students in the program tend to get more hands-on experience when they’re working with a rural doctor as opposed to a setting at a hospital in an urban area. “They get the same clinical experience, but sometimes it’s a little better because often, when you’re in the big hospital here, you’re going to be on a team of seven to 10 people seeing one patient,” Gonzales said. “If you go to rural Arizona, there are no teams. It’s you and the doc.” The need for doctors in the smaller communities is constant and growing. www.BizTucson.com

Dr. Carlos Gonzales

Assistant Dean, Curricular Affairs College of Medicine - Tucson University of Arizona

Gonzales said the programs are recruiting tools for the college. Students are attracted to the College of Medicine – Tucson to have an opportunity to participate in them. He said he usually gets 30 to 35 applications for the 22 slots in the Rural Health Professions Program. “Our program has been somewhat successful,” Gonzales says modestly. “We know that since the year 2000, we have placed between 40 and 50 physicians in rural Arizona. It has worked.”

The community programs also help fulfill what Moynahan said is one of the primary goals of the college – to get doctors into communities throughout Arizona. “We’re a state school and we’re committed to educating our state’s population. That’s a big thing that we are obligated to do and feel passionate about,” he said. Learning communities

In the fiercely competitive world of medical schools, the college takes a lessthan-traditional approach to the education it provides with what are called “learning communities.” In a learning community, new students are assigned to one of 21 “clinical mentors” in the college, and they make their way through their four years of medical school with the same mentor and group of five to six peers. They get one-on-one training with the mentor. They learn their clinical skills from the mentor sideby-side with other students in their community. They start seeing patients with the mentor on the first day of school. “It’s a movement that’s really growing nationwide. We were one of the first to have such a program,” Moynahan said. The approach also leans toward less class time and more practical experience. He said that the traditional, 50-minute classroom lecture is becoming somewhat obsolete in favor of hands-on work, mentoring and relationship-building because “medical school is a tough place,” he said. It’s an approach that is intended to make sure the student arrives, thrives and leaves with the same motivation to be a doctor. “We’re trying to preserve the empathy and the passion for medicine by using educational modalities like learning communities and close mentorship so that students feel connected for the four years that they’re here,” Moynahan said “While they’re certainly a different person when they come out, hopefully they have the same values they came in with.” Biz Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 179


BizINNOVATION

School of

180 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


Innovation Multimillion Dollar Grants Fuel Research By Christy Krueger A five-year $43 million grant is a significant award for a university, especially when it benefits a medical school like the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson that already is focused on innovation, research and technology. They’re still celebrating at the college over the 2016 National Institutes of Health grant and the opportunities it presents. Although the grant, led by Dr. Lolu Ojo, was awarded a year ago, the work just got underway in July. First called the Precision Medicine Initiative and then renamed the All of Us Research Program, the award is the largest peer-reviewed NIH grant in the history of the state of Arizona, said Dr. Charles B. Cairns, dean of the College of Medicine – Tucson. “This initial award of $43 million enables us to be at the forefront of the genomics revolution. We were one of only four awarded,” said Cairns, obviously proud of the excellent company the college is keeping. The partner groups are the New York Presbyterian Hospital system,

www.BizTucson.com

which includes both Columbia University and Cornell University; the University of Pittsburgh; and a consortium made up of the University of Chicago, University of Illinois and Northwestern University. “UA’s goal is to enroll 150,000 people across the Western region to better understand their individual differences and how it applies to health and disease. The goal nationally is to enroll 1 million people. We’re interested in having everyone participate in this landmark study,” he said. Cairns invited members of the public to learn more about the program at https:// allofusaz.uahs.arizona.edu. He emphasized that innovative programs like this and others at the school are critical to attracting faculty and students from all over the world. “These programs are recognized globally as the forefront of medicine and provide a foundation for research efforts.” Precision medicine is among several areas that faculty at the medical school recognizes as its top cutting-edge research programs, said Anne Cress, who holds a continued on page 182 >>>

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 181


BizINNOVATION

182 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

gist, to start a heart center,” said Cress. “He realized how important it is to have a heart center devoted to cardiac health.” The UA Center on Aging has brought the field of immunology into its programs, hoping to gain a better understanding of aging and its connection to the immune system and T-cells. Moreover, researchers connected with UA Sarver Heart Center, Cress said, also would like to study the relationship between cancer and immunology and the ability to block tumors using the immune system. “Another one of the innovative areas,” she said, “is the pain group, which recently received a program grant. It’s important to study pain because of the opiate problem, and lots of people require pain management. They’ve come up with new compounds that are not addictive.” This group consists of medical pharmacologists, chemists and anesthesiologists. While the public may not hear much about the Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center, formerly the Arizona Respiratory Center, it’s one of the largest and oldest centers connected with the school. “It was established in 1971 and it’s one of the top and biggest legacies of the college,” Cairns said. “The natural history of asthma was defined here. Many fundamental discoveries

came from here.” The Center is led by Dr. Fernando Martinez and Dr. Monica Kraft, both world experts in research and clinical care of asthma and airway diseases. Cress added, “There are 32 new faculty members at the College of Medicine – Tucson this year and a good part of them are studying asthma.” Although innovative findings at all the centers of excellence play a critical role in the future of medicine, a system must be available for moving these inventions into the marketplace where they can help patients. There was a time when this process was not very efficient, but that has changed. Cress praised former UA President Ann Weaver Hart for hiring David Allen to lead Tech Launch Arizona, the arm of the UA that works toward taking research and technology developed at the UA into the marketplace. “David Allen jump-started this. He was a good hire. Before, we lost researchers and inventors because many went to join collaborators in other places. He’s brought a lot of knowledge and processes,” said Cress. That includes figuring out what’s marketable, knowing what to do and knowledge of patent disclosures. “It’s good to have (Tech Launch Arizona) on your side,” said Cress.

Biz www.BizTucson.com

IMAGES: COURTESY THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE – TUCSON

continued from page 181 doctorate from the UA and is the deputy dean for research and faculty affairs. She also is a professor of cellular and molecular medicine. “We’re very interested in genomic instability and the disease process – how DNA damage is repaired and if it’s repaired properly or not,” she said. “A study we have here is on centrosomes – organelles that direct chromosomes. If there’s a defect, that’s an early event that leads to gene instability, cancer, immune system alterations and arthritis. A group here identifies defective targets for cancer and drug combinations that are very specific for those targets.” Other cutting-edge innovations at the college include research efforts in the fields of cardiovascular, cancer, aging, asthma and pain. “The cardiovascular team is interested in how fundamental properties of the heart muscle work. Researchers are looking at heart progenitors – stem cells used to repair the heart,” said Cress, herself a researcher at the UA Cancer Center. There’s been much interest in this area of work ever since the days of Dr. Jack Copeland and his development of the artificial heart back in the 1980s, which eventually led to the opening of what is now the UA Sarver Heart Center. “One of the former deans of the College of Medicine – Tucson, Jim Dalen, asked Gordon Ewy, a cardiolo-


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 183


BizPHILANTHROPY

Philanthropy Critical to the Mission Decreases in state funding for Arizona’s universities have presented real challenges to those in higher education leadership positions. Despite a stellar reputation in research and learning, the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson has not been immune to budget cuts as the school’s leaders strive to support the best faculty, lead a superior level of research and give the best possible education to Arizona’s future medical professionals. Fortunately, the school has a loyal philanthropic following to help fill the gaps. Donors range from appreciative patients to those interested in advancing medical research to well-known local philanthropists who are giving back to the community they love. “The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson was the first public medical school founded primarily on private funding, so philanthropy was always a critical component of our evolution and, no doubt, to our future,” said Dr. Charles B. Cairns, dean of the medical school. 184 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

“We’ve had remarkable success in obtaining federal grant funding. We rely upon philanthropy to attract the best faculty and promote new areas of discovery. In addition, we’ve done this despite dramatic reductions in state support. In the last 10 years, state support dropped 35 percent to the college.” As vice dean for innovation and development at the college and co-director of the UA Sarver Heart Center, Carol Gregorio has a hands-on approach to fundraising. Although she’s not a development officer, the center often connects her to potential donors who are interested in the university’s cutting-edge research programs, often in cardiac research. “Frequently, paired with a development officer, I have the opportunity to speak with potential donors to inform them about the exciting research that is occurring at the university with the ultimate goal of providing the best care for our patients now and into the future,” Gregorio said. With her credentials as director of the Molecular Cardiovascular Research

Program and head of the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, she’s more than qualified to explain research studies being conducted at the school and provide tours of the facilities to get donors interested in contributing financial resources to the work going on at the college. A researcher herself, Gregorio is well aware of the importance of private funding. “The impact of community donations is immense. For example, donations provide essential state-of-the-art equipment, fellowships for trainees, and endowments essential for the future of the medical school,” she said. “They help us to recruit and retain top clinical and biomedical researchers, allow us to accomplish things not possible otherwise, be more creative in finding solutions, and contribute to raising the bar of excellence.” Cairns considers the benefits of philanthropy from an educational standpoint. continued on page 186 >>> www.BizTucson.com

IMAGE: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Christy Krueger


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 185


The impact of community donations is immense. For example, donations provide essential state-of-the-art equipment, fellowships for trainees, and endowments essential for the future of the medical school. –

Carol Gregorio, Vice Dean for Innovation and Development, UA College of Medicine – Tucson

continued from page 184 “Tuition increases can’t cover our shortfalls and we hope to further reduce the impact of tuition challenges on our students,” he said. “The only way this can happen is through philanthropy and private scholarship support.” While donations come from around the country, most originate locally, and sometimes the trend repeats through generations of a family. “A huge part of our fund-raising stems from our grateful patients who have had excellent healthcare here and who want to make a difference in making research happen faster in the areas of interest they are passionate about,” Gregorio said. “Frequently, families get involved with parents initially support-

186 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

ing our work, and then their children and extended families and friends start giving.” Although many potential donors know they want to make a difference, they are not always sure where they want to their funds to go, she said. As such, “I frequently write up proposals and take them on tours so they can meet, for example, our medical students and/or investigators who are involved in active research projects,” Gregorio said. “In other words, I provide them with options and help them discover funding opportunities that interest them the most.” Gregorio is personally familiar with several of the longtime contributors to the college, especially to the UA Sarver

Heart Center. “Long term relationships are important. Endowments are forever.” She emphasized the importance of philanthropy to the college. “Philanthropic funds are critical to our mission to raise the bar of excellence – to provide outstanding education for our trainees, care for our patients, and innovative and impactful research ultimately leading to prevention and treatment of disease,” she said. “Simply, it is essential and makes a difference. It allows us to be more creative in finding solutions to important biomedical challenges, and in training the next generation of physicians.”

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


BizPHILANTHROPY

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 187


BizPHILANTHROPY

188 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 189


BizMEDICINE

Department Leadership at the University of Arizona College of Medicine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tucson Basic Science Departments and Department Chairs

Cellular & Molecular Medicine Carol Gregorio, Ph.D.

Chemistry and Biochemistry Roger L. Miesfeld, Ph.D.

Immunobiology Janko Nikolich-Zugich, M.D., Ph.D.

Pharmacology Todd Vanderah, Ph.D.

Physiology Nicholas A Delamere, Ph.D.

Clinical Departments and Department Chairs

Anesthesiology Wayne K. Jacobsen, M.D.

Emergency Medicine Samuel M. Keim, M.D.

Family & Community Medicine Myra Muramoto, M.D.

Medical Imaging Diego Martin, M.D., Ph.D.

Medicine Monica Kraft, M.D.

Neurology David M. Labiner, M.D.

Obstetrics & Gynecology Kathryn L. Reed, M.D.

Ophthalmology and Vision Science Joseph M. Miller, M.D.

Orthopaedic Surgery John T. Ruth, M.D.

Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Steven J. Wang, M.D.

Pathology Achyut K. Bhattacharyya, M.D.

Pediatrics Fayez K. Ghishan, M.D.

Psychiatry Ole J. Thienhaus, M.D.

Radiation Oncology Baldassarre Stea, M.D.

Surgery Taylor S. Riall, M.D., Ph.D.

Source: The University of Arizona College of Medicine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tucson

190 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 191


192 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 193


194 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


BizBRIEF

Odenkirk New Executive VP for Alliance Bank Steven Odenkirk is the new executive VP, southern region manager for Alliance Bank of Arizona, a division of Western Alliance Bank. Odenkirk leads Alliance Bank’s regional presence, which includes two banking locations and 36 employees. His appointment follows the March retirement of Duane Froeschle, who held multiple senior executive positions within Alliance Bank of Arizona and Western Alliance Bancorporation. “I’m thrilled to be joining such a well-respected team and organization,” Odenkirk said. “Alliance Bank is known for being entrepreneurial in spirit and invested in Arizona’s growth and success. I truly look forward to being part of the bank and its substantial role in Southern Arizona’s business community.” Odenkirk most recently served as the principal of Peritus Commercial Finance, a consulting practice where he brokered more than $175 million in loans. He served in roles ranging from chief credit officer to debtor consultant. Before that he was the chief credit officer of Canyon Community Bank N. A., producer-commercial mortgage banker at CBRE Capital Markets and manager of Tucson-area commercial real estate for Wells Fargo. “Steve has a strong track record of success and a wellrounded background in banking, real estate and mortgage brokerage. He is an excellent addition to our Southern Arizona team and we look forward to his contributions to both Alliance Bank of Arizona and the Tucson business community,” said Don Garner, CEO for Alliance Bank of Arizona. Odenkirk holds an MBA in Management from Arizona State University and is a graduate of Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois. He also holds a National “C” level soccer coaching license from the U.S. Soccer Federation.

Biz www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 195


From left

Oscar Lizardi, Tim Reckart, Mick Rusing and Pat Lopez 196 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

25


BizMILESTONE

Lasting Success of Rusing Lopez & Lizardi Local, Regional and National Clients By Christy Krueger The joining together of Rusing Lopez & Lizardi’s law partners may be attributed to a mere one degree of separation – a connectedness that’s kept the close-knit team together 25 years. Their friendships show in the relaxed way they banter with one another and the success they’ve found as a growing business. Common ground for three of the senior partners is Stanford University, where Mick Rusing and Pat Lopez attended law school. Tim Reckart was working on his master’s degree in nuclear engineering at the University of California when Lopez, whom he’d known since childhood and from playing sports together at Salpointe Catholic High School, persuaded him to go for his law degree. “Pat visited me in Berkeley and said, ‘You can never be a lawyer if you’re a businessman, but you can be a businessman and a lawyer,’’’ Reckart said. In 1983 Reckart finished Stanford with a law degree and an MBA. After growing up in Nogales, Arizona, Oscar Lizardi left to attend Arizona State University as an undergraduate before making it back to Wildcat Country for law school at University of Arizona. The serious matchmaking began several years after each of the partnersto-be had worked for various organizations, mostly in Arizona. Lopez was a law professor at UA, where he also earned his undergraduate degree. He thought he’d always be a professor, but www.BizTucson.com

after some time he decided to make a change. “In 1992 Pat called me and said he was leaving UA,” Rusing said. “I was leaving Snell & Wilmer. We had lunch at Mountain Oyster Club” and formulated a plan to be partners in law. Lizardi remembers being five years out of law school, working at DeConcini & McDonald, when he considered a move. “It was July 2000. A friend introduced me to Pat and Mick. They made an offer to come over. I was made partner in 2004, and in 2010 my name was added to the door.” Though Reckart already had a connection with the firm through Lopez, the relationship became tighter when Reckart was working for one of RL&L’s clients. That eventually led to an invitation to join the firm, where he is one of the four senior partners. Now Rusing jokes, “He was nicer as a client.” The diverse areas of law practiced by the firm include real estate acquisition and development, financing, commercial governance, mergers, nonprofits, intellectual property, licensing and patent law. The firm team of 18 includes attorneys, litigators and legal staff with more than 200 years of combined experience practicing law. Their offices are at 6363 N. Swan Road. Rusing is the lead litigation attorney. “We do civil litigation, business litigation, products liability, probate and lender liability – such as suits against banks. I’d get bored specializing in one

area,” he said. “We have a stable base of local clients and also a lot of work for regional and national companies. For litigation we get hired a lot by large national entities.” Some of the more interesting cases the firm has handled over the years involved Arizona groups. “We represented all the residents in Santa Cruz County,” Lizardi said. They sued their utility company, Citizens Utilities, for numerous outages in the early 2000s. More recently was the highly publicized casino case in Glendale, Rusing said. “We represented the Tohono O’odham in many lawsuits that were just resolved.” After being in business for a quarter of a century and gaining a winning reputation, the firm attracts a sizable number of cases. “As we get older,” Rusing said, “we are more seasoned and the tentacles keep getting longer.” They also make a point to be a visible part of the community by supporting a number of local causes. “We encourage our lawyers to be involved in community activities and bar activities. Most of the major charities have had members of our firm,” Rusing said. These include YMCA, Boys & Girls Clubs of Tucson, San Miguel High School and Tucson Conquistadores, among many others. A favorite among the group is everything UA. “We support the law school,” Lizardi said, “and Coach Rich Rod’s football camp. Our name is on the basketball floor and on the football field. continued on page 198 >>> Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 197


BizMILESTONE continued from page 197 We’re season ticket holders for basketball and football.” “I’m the biggest UA fan,” Reckart said. “When we play ASU, I give Oscar grief.” Lizardi bounced back, “I’m a big UA supporter. It’s important to our firm.” Lopez and Lizardi both were named Hispanic Businessman of the Year by the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Rusing and Lopez were selected as Father of the Year by Father’s Day Council Tucson. These honors say something about their high level of community participation. Reckart enjoys volunteering as a board member for organizations such as The Loft Cinema and BioSA, a bioscience industry group. And a number of RL&L attorneys are on the Best Lawyers in America list. In order to grow their practice, the partners have an ongoing eye toward recruiting new attorneys and facilitating in-house education. “We have a clerking program with UA in the summer and sometimes during the year,” Lizardi said. “But we recruit everywhere.” Each of the partners finds his work to be very rewarding. For Reckart, “I love being involved in the business of my clients, helping them. I also like to give good business advice, help them work through their difficult issues.” “I’d say we work for a lot of good people,” Lopez said. “Nothing is more satisfying than helping them achieve their goals and solve problems. Things are complex; we boil it down to something achievable and see the creative solution.” “I love solving problems and fixing things for clients. And the people I work with – I love working here,” Lizardi said. “The most satisfying to me,” said Rusing, “is litigation, winning hard cases, especially when I really care about it.” The firm had a 25th anniversary party in April at Playground Bar & Lounge downtown – with friends, families and clients enjoying an open bar and cigars. It gave the partners a chance to celebrate all they’ve achieved, but also to look toward the future. “To be around 25 years, I believe we have our best days ahead,” Lizardi said. “We have great people.”

Biz

198 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 199


BizDEFENSE

WOMEN WHO LEAD Former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and her husband, Navy combat veteran and retired NASA astronaut Capt. Mark Kelly joined the United States Navy for a ceremony to commission the Navy’s newest Littoral Combat Ship, the USS Gabrielle Giffords.

USS Gabrielle Giffords Sets Sail Navy Ship Commissioned in Name of Former Congresswoman

Former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was thankful for others as she stood on a Texas pier where the U.S. Navy’s newest combat ship was commissioned in her name. Giffords, the courageous representative from Arizona, stood before a crowd of nearly 2,500 guests at Pier 21 in the Texas Gulf Coast city of Galveston and expressed what an “incredible honor” it was for her to participate in the commissioning ceremony for the USS Gabrielle Giffords. “I thought of you in my darkest days, the sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines of the United States of America,” said Giffords, with her husband, Mark Kelly – a retired astronaut, engineer and U.S. Navy captain – by her side. “We ask so much of you. Despite danger, you always say, ‘Yes.’ You make me proud. You make America proud.” The honor bestowed on Giffords at the June 10 commissioning ceremony is 200 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

lofty, incredibly exclusive and steeped in tradition. The USS Gabrielle Giffords is the first Navy warship named after a living woman since “Lady Washington” (named for Martha Washington) was commissioned in 1776, and only the 13th named for a living person since 1850. In announcing five years ago that the warship would be named for Giffords, then-Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus said it was appropriate because Giffords “has become synonymous with courage, has inspired the nation with remarkable resiliency and shown the possibilities of the human spirit.” Giffords was shot in the head on Jan. 8, 2011, at a “Congress on Your Corner” event at a Tucson grocery store. Remarkably, she survived, though she suffers from a language disorder and is partially paralyzed from the attack. Six people died and 13 others, including Giffords, were injured in the shooting

rampage. The killer, Jared Loughner, was sentenced to life in prison. Giffords served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 2007 to Jan. 25, 2012. The Southern Arizona congressional district she represented includes two major military installations – DavisMonthan Air Force Base in Tucson and Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista – which is the reason Giffords worked hard to land a position on the House Armed Services Committee. High-ranking military officials and major Democratic Party political figures – including former secretary of state and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and former Vice President Joe Biden – attended the ship’s commissioning ceremony. The USS Gabrielle Giffords, which cost $475 million, is the 10th in a series of high-speed warships built to navigate shallow coastal areas, known as “littowww.BizTucson.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF GABRIELLE GIFFORDS

By David Pittman


ral” waters. The ship – which weighs 3,200 tons and is 421 feet long – uses two gas-turbine and two diesel engines to power four steerable waterjets capable of propelling it to speeds of more than 40 knots, or 46 miles an hour. Littoral combat ships, which are armed with various missiles and machine guns, are expected to be an important part of the Navy fleet for more than three decades. An extremely versatile ship, it is designed to operate in near-shore environments that other warships cannot get into to eliminate threats from mines, submarines and fast surface crafts. It is effective in battling deep-water menaces as well. The ship is outfitted with modular payloads that can be changed out quickly to perform a variety of missions. Most other Navy surface combatant ships have a crew of 300 or more sailors, but littoral combat ships like the USS Gabrielle Giffords are more automated and have much smaller crews. The USS Gabrielle Gifford’s crew numbered just 73 at the ship’s commissioning. Navy Adm. William Moran, vice chief of naval operations, delivered the ceremony’s principal address before officially commissioning the ship into service. “As we man the rails today, blood gets pumped, the ship comes alive and the heart begins to beat,” Moran said. “It’s the blood that is infused by the spirit, the attitude and the courage of its namesake. We are so proud to be part of Gabrielle Gifford’s legacy to the United States.” Following the commissioning, Jill Biden, the ship’s sponsor and wife of the former vice president, gave the timehonored Navy tradition of ordering the crew to “man our ship and bring her to life!” The crowd sounded its approval as the crew ran aboard the ship to their assigned stations to complete the ritual of bringing the ship into active service. “I will never forget this day or the crew of the USS Gabrielle Giffords,” said Giffords, who wished her namesake vessel and those aboard it “fair winds and following seas.” The home port of the USS Gabrielle Giffords is in San Diego.

continued from page 196

Biz www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 201


BizMILESTONE

Angel Charity Celebrates Success $25 Million in Donations Has Helped 1 Million Children Since 1983 By Tara Kirkpatrick

Pima County children may have no greater guardian than this group of women. Over the past 34 years, Angel Charity for Children has donated more than $25 million to benefit more than 1 million children throughout Southern Arizona. There is no executive director or any full-time staff – only 150 devoted volunteers who pride themselves on being good stewards of their donors’ dollars. “You want to give every child in Pima County what you would want for your own children,” said Olivia Sethi, the organization’s 2017 general chairman. Added Chairman-Elect Carla Keegan, “We have an obligation to them. Every child deserves a roof over their heads, food on the table and a good education.” It’s why this venerable CPA has served as a member of Angel Charity for 23 years and will lead the group in 2018. Louise Thomas founded Angel Charity in 1983. Thomas, who had lost her 9-year-old son, Michael, to cancer, started the group “to turn a family’s tragedy into hope for a better life for the children of our community,” she said. “It was a way for my son’s life to not have been in vain.” In its first year, Angel Charity retired the mortgage of the Ronald McDonald House and funded the remodel of its building. The group, which counts attorneys, accountants, business owners, retired 202 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

Wings Over Tucson A Look at Angel Capital Projects Through the Years 1983, 2005

Ronald McDonald House Retired mortgage and added manager’s quarters, kitchen renovation. Funded a 12-room Isolation Wing as part of a new 24,000-square-foot facility.

1984

Arizona Children’s Association Renovated and remodeled once condemned buildings to create “Angel House.”

1985

executives and at-home moms among its members, is closing in on four decades of funding 501(c)(3) – nonprofit – agencies with the main purpose of aiding children. “As I drive past all of the buildings with the Angel Charity sign, I see children who were abused now being safe, children with disabilities now having opportunities, children able to play and learn and take the next step toward achieving their dreams,” Peg Harmon, CEO of St. Elizabeth of Hungary Clinic, said in a 2011 impact report by students in the University Arizona Eller College of Management. This year – its 35th – Angel Charity partnered with five nonprofit organizations to donate $747,010 to pay off the mortgage of the Diaper Bank of Southern Arizona, fund the Angel Charity Arts-in-Medicine Program run by Beads of Courage for young patients, buy a new van for Ben’s Bells, enable the Erik Hite Foundation to provide youth camp scholarships and help Junior Achievement of Arizona launch a virtual financial planning program for Tucson students. Beneficiaries are the winners of a rigorous annual selection process that is as scrupulously thorough as it is ultimately rewarding. “People have a misperception that we are a group of fluffernutters and we are not,” said Keegan, who has personally secluded herself continued on page 204 >>>

Las Familias Purchased the agency’s headquarters building.

1986

The Blake Foundation Funded facility’s renovation and expansion.

1987

Child & Family Resources Purchased the agency’s new headquarters.

1988

Open Inn Retired mortgage. Funded the remodeling of four shelters.

1989

Casa De Los Niños Funded a new, furnished 40-bed nursery named “Angel Nursery.”

1990

The Steele Memorial Children’s Research Center Funded the fourth floor, 32,000-squarefoot “Angel Charity for Children – Wings for Genetic Research.”

1991

El Rio Santa Cruz Neighborhood Health Center Funded the “Angel Children’s Clinic” on the first floor of a new building.

1992

Big Brothers / Big Sisters Funded the purchase and remodeling of the new “Big Brothers/Big Sisters Angel Charity Youth Center.”

continued on page 198 >>> www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: AMY HASKELL

WOMEN WHO LEAD

2017 Angel Charity Executive Committee (from left to right) – Michelle Brown, Paige Cogdall, Wendy Marquez, Cathie Batbie-Loucks, Adaline Klemmedson, Becky Rebenstorf, Shannon Chapman, Louise Thomas, Olivia Sethi, Cheryl Cox, Carla Keegan, Donna Crawford, Sharon Norman and Allison Duffy Skeif. Not pictured – Amber Adil, Deanna Miles, Margaret Larsen, Emily Lazarus and Nancy Rodolph. Fall 2017 > > > BizTucson 203


BizMILESTONE

continued from page 196

continued from page 202 for days to analyze applicants’ financial statements. “This is one of the hardestworking groups of women, ever.” Added Sethi, “We feel responsible for the money we ask people to donate.” Angel Charity is changing with the times. The organization recently completed a yearlong strategic planning process and is focusing more on social media for publicity, Sethi said. The group upgraded its computers and now offers its application online. “We are making our charity selection process a bit more user-friendly for the applicants, taking into consideration their feedback without sacrificing the things we think are important,” Sethi said. Coincidentally, applications for funding have increased. Angel Charity received 40 applications for 2017, up from 27 in 2016. “This is a process that is fair to everyone,” said Shannon Chapman, vice chair. “We have had an amazing turnout with the applications over the past few years. It’s out there that Angel Charity gives money away every year.” If applicants aren’t selected, the group wants them to persist. Imago Dei Middle School, for example, was awarded $600,000 in 2016 to keep its school building after previous attempts to win Angel Charity funding were unsuccessful. “We only fund the greatest need,” Keegan said. “They were going to lose their building. You can’t argue with that. “We’re not a handout, we’re a hand up. We are taking some of these agencies to the next level.” The Diaper Bank of Southern Arizona, for example, will receive $600,000 this year to retire its mortgage. Over the years, the nation’s first diaper bank has become a national model for 220 other banks across the country, Keegan said. Angel Charity is poised to reach more milestones. “I so appreciate the value of each year’s leadership teams who have rotated through the years,” said Thomas, adding that she’s proud “that the community continues to support Angel Charity.” Added Keegan, “After 35 years ... are we done? Have we done enough? No!”

Biz 204 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

1993, 2004

2007

1994

2008

1995

2009

1996

2010

1997

2011

1998

Children’s Museum Tucson Funded new 1,800-square-foot STEM “Investigation Station” exhibit.

Tucson Urban League Funded the construction, renovation and expansion of the youth center. Project YES Funded a new building and recreation area named ”Project YES Angel Family Center.” Pio Decimo Center Funded renovation and expansion of “Pio Decimo Angel Children’s Center.” Tucson Centers for Women and Children Funded acquisition and construction of “Angel Children’s Center.” Tucson Youth Development Funded acquisition and renovation of “TYD Angel Youth Resource Center.” St. Elizabeth of Hungary Clinic Funded construction of “Angel Children’s Urgent Care Wing” to adjoin clinic.

1999

TMM Family Services Funded building of four new group homes and assessment center. The Child Language Center Wings on Words Preschool Funded construction of new “Angel Wing” at preschool. St. Elizabeth’s Health Center Funded renovation to support four new dental operating areas. YMCA/Northwest of Southern Arizona Funded completion of 5,300-square-foot “Angel Youth Center.” Boys and Girls Clubs of Tucson Funded renovation of Roy Drachman Clubhouse at Northwest Y.

Therapeutic Riding of Tucson Funded expansion of “TROT Tots” Therapy Clinic.

Intermountain Centers for Human Development Funded purchase, renovation and furnishing of “Angel House” group home.

2012

2000

2014

San Xavier Mission School Funded construction of new wing. YMCA Triangle Y Ranch Camp Funded new cabin area to accommodate 450 youth.

2001

The Steele Memorial Children’s Research Center Comprehensive Program for Children’s Diabetes Funded renovation of 3,300-square-foot laboratory into clinical, training and research facility.

2003

Arts For All/Third Street Kids Retired mortgage, allowing for building expansion and renovation.

Our Family Services Funded construction of new 20-bed shelter. Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona Funded construction of “Angel’s Place for Girls.” Aviva Children’s Services Funded construction of 11,000-square-foot Outdoor Visit Center.

2015

Make Way For Books Retired mortgage on 10,000-squarefoot building named “The Angel Early Literacy Resource Center.” Boy Scouts Catalina Council Funded construction of 75 new cabins, new kitchen and expanded dining hall at Camp Lawton.

2006

Tu Nidito Children & Family Services Funded addition of building space, new parking lot, outdoor lighting and playground relocation.

www.BizTucson.com


SPECIAL REPORT 2017

THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Just Imagine W h a t We C a n Achieve

www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 205


1

2

3

Just Imagine What We Can Achieve YWCA Southern Arizona makes real change happen by making this a place where everyone has the opportunity to thrive . It does so by:

u Building on a 100-year history of action and impact u Envisioning the next century of change-making u Raising $1.5 million for the Women’s Impact Fund

4

and Stand Together Arizona Training and Advocacy Center

u Growing the local economy

5

u Providing the tools to be successful and live the American dream

u Creating the future for all with hope, energy,

6

intellect and action.

1. John-Peter Wilhite, Director of Donor Relations 2. Kelly Fryer, CEO of YWCA Southern Arizona 3. Liz Rabago, COO 4. Marisela Felix, Director of Marketing & Community Relations 5. Chef John Wirtis 6. Michelle Pitot, Chief of Staff 7. Alba Jaramillo, Director of Women Out of Poverty Initiative and Latina Leadership Institute 8. From left – Kerri Lopez-Howell, Director of Special Projects; Marisol FloresAguirre, Director of Microbusiness Advancement Center 9. From left – Jillian Thomas, Digital Media Manager; Liane Hernandez, Community Outreach & Education Director; Mari Herreras, Director of Organizing & Advocacy

8

206 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

7

9

www.BizTucson.com


PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

YWCA Positively Impacts Lives

BizCOMMUNITY

Just Imagine Its Second Century

‘We Are Determined’

By Valerie Vinyard

YWCA has been leading the fight for social and economic justice in Southern Arizona for 100 years.

Las Promotoras is designed to empower Spanish-speaking immigrant women in Pima County. The name translates into “the promoters” and refers to women who help create healthier communities. Launched last October, this pioneering program demonstrates how YWCA Southern Arizona, now celebrating its first century of impact, is already planning for the next 100 years of change-making. Las Promotoras is the brainchild of Alba Jaramillo, director of YWCA’s Latina Leadership Institute. “The goal is to give these women the tools to become advocates for themselves and other women to help them get out of violence,” she said. Imelda Esquer, 47, volunteers with the program. While searching online for help to escape her domestic abusive situation, she found YWCA. The organization referred her for counseling and social services and helped her enroll in Pima Community College classes. “They helped me. I feel like I have to give back,” said Esquer, who has been a YWCA volunteer over the past year. “I feel like I have to do something to improve the life of women out there. YWCA is the right place to help humans.” Moving out of poverty

Jaramillo, trained as an attorney, oversees the many programs of the institute, which focuses on economic justice and works to get women out of poverty. Its services are free. www.BizTucson.com

Las Promotoras offers weeklong trainings in January on stalking awareness, April on sexual assault and October on domestic violence. Jaramillo and her team have accomplished much, including helping persuade Pima County to recognize January as Stalking Awareness Month. Mi Carrera (“my career’) is another institute program, focused on career development for Spanish-speaking women, no matter their education level. Participants learn leadership skills, public speaking, financial management and computer skills. Ultimately, the training prepares the women to go to school, get jobs or start a business. Mi Vida (“my life”) is an empowerment program that helps women who have experienced trauma. Participants work on building self-esteem, setting goals and learning to use art as a form of creative expression. Women also can vie for a scholarship for a two-month Spanish-language business training program co-sponsored by YWCA’s Women’s Business Center and the University of Arizona’s Eller College of Management. YWorks is a four-day employability skills building and empowerment seminar to help women identify and build their strengths and self-confidence to enter and succeed in the workforce. Participants analyze their strengths, deficits, and needs while identifying the obstacles and what resources are available to overcome them.

Achieving success

These programs work. Jaramillo said, “Ninety-five percent of women who go through the Latina Leadership Initiative programs either find a job, start a business, return to college or enroll in a GED program.” Many women who complete the various programs remain involved so they can help future participants. “The women are learning, but it doesn’t stop there. Women become volunteers when they feel they are at a point where they can mentor women. They support each other in their leadership growth. Kelly Fryer, CEO of YWCA Southern Arizona, is proud of what her organization of 24 staffers and a host of volunteers has accomplished – yet realizes there’s much more to do. Last year, she asked the board and staff to think about what YWCA’s second century should look like. Just imagine. “We looked back at everything that has been accomplished because of what our founders did 100 years ago,” Fryer said. “We asked ourselves this question: ‘One hundred years from now, when people look back at us, what will they be thankful for?’ “We want them to say that because of what we are doing today in the state of Arizona, everybody thrives. Everybody.” Overcoming disadvantages

Fryer described YWCA as an oasis where women overcome the disadvantages they

Our mission is eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, dignity and freedom for all. Today, we are as committed as ever to making Southern Arizona a place where everyone has the opportunity to thrive.

YWCA Benefactor Frances McClelland Frances McClelland Community Center 525 N. Bonita Ave. Tucson, AZ 85745 (520) 884-7810 www.ywcatucson.org info@ywcatucson.org South Campus 243 W. 33rd St. Tucson, AZ 85713 (520) 884-7810, ext. 7201

continued on page 208 >>> Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 207


Championing Social Justice Since 1917 In 1917, Arizona had been a state for five years. Tucson, a place of commerce and trade for hundreds of years, had doubled in size once the railroad came to town. Streets were paved, sanitary sewers installed and an electrified streetcar replaced the mule-driven version. But the benefit of economic growth was distributed unequally. Social divisions became more entrenched. Statewide laws mandated school segregation and prohibited mixed marriages. Yet the women who started YWCA, including Tucson’s most influential women, had a vision – everyone should have the opportunity to thrive. It’s hard to overstate how radical that vision was or how difficult it would be to achieve. They wanted to create a safe space and support network for working women. In 1917, 150 members of the Tucson Business and Professional Women’s Club raised enough money to establish a YWCA over the old State Theater. Then they commissioned the first woman registered as an architect in Arizona to design a new building (now “the Historic Y”) on Fifth Street. One hundred years is a long time to foster change – and YWCA has had a significant impact. Yet eliminating racism and empowering women is still a struggle. Fortunately, YWCA has a bold vision for the next century. The goal is simple – create a community where everybody thrives. Everybody. This fight isn’t over yet.

YWCA History in Tucson 1917 YWCA of Tucson opens its doors above the old theater

at 49 E. Congress St.

1930 Groundbreaking for YWCA’s first building (now “The Historic Y” at 738 N. Fifth Ave). It includes clubrooms, offices, a swimming pool and residence rooms. 1956 The Matthews Gymnasium and the balcony bedrooms are added. YWCA purchases property at 330 E. Third Street for a cooperative home for older women. 1969 The Howsare Wing, named for Elizabeth Howsare, YWCA executive director for 27 years, adds office space and meeting rooms. Property at 301 E. Fourth Street is purchased for the Mary Kelley Child Care Center. 1974 YWCA opens the ABC Child Care Center, starts a Latch Key program and establishes a halfway house for female ex-offenders. 1979 Pearl’s Kitchen, a low-cost food program for senior citizens and the disabled, opens. 1981 A shelter for domestic violence victims and their children opens. 1982 A building housing the Laura Banks Child Care Center is acquired and the first Women on the Move Awards Banquet is held. 1988 YWCA starts Elderhostel program, which now nets more than $100,000 per year. 208 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

continued from page 207 face – in education, work, poverty or personal matters. The organization has set two goals for the next century. “First, we are doubling down on our efforts to give women and other underserved communities the tools they need to succeed in the private sector,” said Fryer. She notes that the Women’s Impact Fund will enable YWCA to launch a microlending program and invest in social enterprise that drives economic development, especially for women and minorities. “Second, through our new Stand Together Arizona Training and Advocacy Center, we are stepping up our efforts to advocate for women and underserved communities in our state.” These programs require funding – which comes from members, grants, foundations, corporate partners and government contracts. YWCA’s fundraising efforts already have yielded hundreds of thousands of dollars for programs, education and advocacy. Its biggest push is its Second Century Fundraising Campaign to raise $1 million for the Women’s Impact Fund and $500,000 for STAT. The Connie Hillman Family Foundation is matching donations to the Women’s Impact Fund, providing $1 for every $2 raised up to $250,000. Fryer said the funding for STAT will go to education and advocacy to challenge and change what YWCA sees as the extreme agenda that is hurting Arizona’s economy, environment and people. Creating opportunity

A portion of the money raised for the Women’s Impact Fund will help build and

develop the Kitchen Business Incubator, Southern Arizona’s only kitchen facility where women and minorities will learn the skills needed to become restaurateurs. The incubator is a challenging and comprehensive three-year training program. Budding restaurateurs take business courses in operations, finance and marketing. At graduation, they will have the knowledge and training to open a food truck or their own restaurant. The Kitchen Business Incubator will be an addition to the five-building South Campus at 243 W. 33rd St., which was formerly the House of Neighborly Service. Construction should be completed later this year. YWCA programs significantly impact the Tucson business community, Fryer said, and in turn, the nonprofit benefits from support of the business community, particularly women-owned small businesses. For example, Tucson’s best women chefs and restaurant owners, women entertainers and woman-owned Buffalo Exchange come together every October to support YWCA’s “POP!” Event, which raises funds for YWCA’s Women’s Center for Economic Opportunity. Fryer noted that several Tucson businesses hold drives for Your Sister’s Closet, a 28-year-old volunteerrun service that provides workplace-ready clothing, shoes and accessories for women in need who are seeking employment. Your Sister’s Closet helps outfit about 1,000 women a year. A shopping coach helps the woman fill a bag with five outfits, including clothes, shoes, accessories and grooming supplies. Women also can get an hour-long appointment with a volunteer stylist.

www.BizTucson.com


BizCOMMUNITY Local businesses also hold drives for Project Period, which allows YWCA to supply feminine hygiene products to about 1,500 individualsa year at its Bonita Avenue headquarters, as well as give products to 14 other organizations to distribute. The program keeps people from missing work or school because they can’t afford supplies to manage their monthly menstrual cycle. E. Liane Hernandez has served as YWCA’s community outreach and education director since January. She affectionately calls YWCA “the oldest startup in town” and seeks out issues of bias to highlight and educate people in the community. The former chef provides “on-theground training” on topics such as inclusion and activities combating racism. “We have to be aware, take note and make changes,” she said. “The future of the United States is browner and more female. We’re constantly widening perspectives and illuminating blind spots.” Opening businesses

Some participants take advantage of classes and support services to explore, learn and gain confidence until they are ready to strike out on their own and start a business. That’s where Marisol Flores-Aguirre, executive director of the Microbusiness Advancement Center, comes in. MAC focuses on entrepreneur development and helps women start and grow their businesses through services offered in English and Spanish. The $1 million Women’s Impact Fund will enable MAC to launch a small business lending program, which will give women and minority entrepreneurs access to microloans of $500 to

www.BizTucson.com

$50,000. The fund will also enable MAC to launch new programs and businesses that can drive economic development in some of this community’s poorest neighborhoods. MAC also offers entrepreneurs all-important access to industry experts. “We’ve taken a very hands-on approach,” Flores-Aguirre said. “We put them in front of folks they didn’t know how to access.” Last year, MAC’s Women’s Business Center helped clients secure $63,000 in small loans to help them launch a business and become their own boss. This year, the amount jumped to $500,000. The only prerequisite for using the WBC, which YWCA acquired in 2015, is that participants attend an hour-long orientation to learn about the process. “I’m proud of the approach YWCA is taking on economic development,” Flores-Aguirre said. “We’re working to build a local economy that works for everyone.” Fryer agreed. “YWCA is a critical part of the economic infrastructure of our community,” she said. Fryer dreams of the day where these programs aren’t needed for women to succeed. “I so wish that our programs weren’t necessary,” she said. “I mean, YWCA has been doing this kind of work for 100 years. And, to be sure, women have made a lot of progress. But there is still so far to go before women achieve true equity.” Biz

4TH ANNUAL POP! EVENT Food, Fun, Fashion Sunday, Oct. 1, 5-8 p.m. Frances McClelland Community Center 525 N. Bonita Ave. $75 VIP $45 General admission $25 Students www.ywcatucson.org

1989 Your Sister’s Closet, a free clothing shop for low-income women seeking employment, opens. The first Women’s Leadership Conference and the Leadership Academy are presented. 1995 YWCA receives a grant for the Lesbian Cancer Project. 2000 Bright Futures, a leadership development and scholarship program for high school girls, is launched. YWCA and the city of Tucson receive top honors from the National League of Cities for Undoing Racism. 2001 Property for a new YWCA building is purchased and a capital fundraising campaign begins. 2004 YWCA in Tucson becomes the first YWCA in the United States to elect men to board membership. 2006 TechGYRLS is created and expands to schools, the Pima County Juvenile Court Detention Center and the Tohono O’odham Nation. YWCA begins construction on Bonita Avenue to be completed the following year. 2010 The Emerald Foundation awards YWCA $1 million to pay the remaining mortgage on what is now known as the France McClelland Community Center. 2010 YWCA of Tucson is the only institution in Arizona and the only YWCA in the United States to receive a Kellogg Foundation Healing Racism grant ($200,000). 2011 YWCA’s Lider de Mi Vida leadership development program for women who are recent immigrants from Mexico is named by the Center for the Future of Arizona as one of five transformative programs in the state. 2012 Janet Marcotte retires after 25 years as YWCA of Tucson executive director. 2014 The Women’s Center for Economic Opportunity, a café and catering program, and Galleria Art & Gifts are launched. 2015 YWCA of Tucson becomes YWCA Southern Arizona and acquires two nonprofit organizations – the Microbusiness Advancement Center and the House of Neighborly Service, which becomes YWCA’s South Tucson campus. 2016 YWCA’s two campuses welcome 50,000 visitors a year for classes, public forums, art and theater, conferences, community events and meetings. The board articulates a vision for the second century – Everybody Thrives. 2017 YWCA Southern Arizona celebrates its 100th anniversary. It joins with YWCA Maricopa County to start a statewide Stand Together Arizona Training and Advocacy Center. A $1.5 million fundraising campaign begins to launch YWCA into its second century of change-making. Source: YWCA Southern Arizona

Biz Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 209


BizCOMMUNITY

Women’s Leadership Conference Fuels Curiosity Every year YWCA Southern Arizona co-sponsors the largest women’s conference in Southern Arizona with the Women’s Business Center of Southern Arizona. This year’s theme is “Taking the Lead” and features three inspiring millennial-generation leaders and an array of 14 new workshops. The Nov. 10 event is designed to fuel your curiosity. The keynote speakers are Ashley Callingbull, the first Native woman to be crowned Mrs. Universe 2015; Brit Gilmore, president of The Giving Keys, and Ariana Stein, co-founder of Lil’ Libros. Workshop topics range from what it really takes to run for elected office, how to build a business that’s good for the planet or escape the wrong career to how to be a good ally, recharge when you don’t have time and overcome doubt and negative selftalk. Sponsorship opportunities or other details are available from Marisol Flores-Aguirre at YWCA, (520) 884-7810 or mflores-aguirre@ywcatucson.org.

29TH ANNUAL WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Presented by YWCA Southern Arizona and Women’s Business Center of Southern Arizona Friday, Nov. 10, 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort and Spa 3800 W. Starr Pass Blvd. $99 – Young Leader (age 30 and under) $145 – Early Bird (until Sept. 30) $165 – General Registration $65 – Individual Lunch-Only Ticket $650 – Table of 10 Lunch Only Register online at ywcatucson.org

Action Centers Tackle Biggest Issues Facing Women By Valerie Vinyard It’s almost overwhelming to realize how many programs and initiatives YWCA Southern Arizona implements. The nonprofit organizes its operations into three action centers. “These three action centers, together, tackle the biggest issues women and minorities in our community face at every level,” said Kelly Fryer, CEO of YWCA Southern Arizona. Women’s Center for Economic Opportunity With the WCEO, YWCA is leveling the playing field for women in business and at work. It supports women seeking to advance professionally, hoping to acquire job training, learning financial literacy and achieving educational goals for economic advancement. Led by Alba Jaramillo, the WCEO’s bilingual workforce-education and leadership-development programs help thousands of women every year gain tools and confidence to advance in their professional lives and step into leadership roles in our community. Last year the center provided 11,066 hours of service to 2,519 women. Graduates of YWorks and the Latina Leadership Institute earned $2 million in new wages. More than half of the women YWCA serves live at or below the poverty line. Many are survivors of domestic violence or face other challenges. These programs help get them on a path to a better life. Microbusiness Advancement Center MAC works to bring economic renewal to our community by investing strategically in place-based economic development and incubating small businesses. Led by Marisol Flores-Aguirre, MAC’s partnership with YWCA enables the Women’s Business Center to leverage the strengths of both organizations to increase cost efficiency and expand the outreach to microbusiness startups. The program focuses on the underserved. The numbers are impressive – last year about 1,000 entrepreneurs were served, $3.8 million in gross sales revenue was generated by WBC clients, 7,612 service hours assisted 1,379 people and 500-plus hours of business coaching were provided. Stand Together Arizona Training and Advocacy Center STAT works to implement a public-policy agenda that will lead to equity, opportunity and justice. STAT challenges “the extreme agenda that hurts Arizona women, families and minorities, and is devastating our economy and environment” and advances a legislative strategy that could make life better for Arizona residents. The STAT team is led by Liane Hernandez, community outreach and education director; Mari Herreras, director of organizing and advocacy, and Jillian Thomas, digital media manager. The goals of STAT are:

u Advance a bold, coalition-led legislative strategy that makes life better for all Arizonans.

u Deliver anti-racism and inclusion training programs to private and

public organizations.

u Create a more informed voter base through online and onsite

educational programs.

u Recruit and train better leaders for civic leadership. u Support local, grassroots movements. Learn more at www.ywcatucson.org.

210 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 211


212 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: CHRIS MOONEY

BizLEADERSHIP

Rosey Koberlein CEO Long Companies

Nurturing Budding Businesswomen By Valerie Vinyard It’s one thing to have a fantastic idea for opening a business. Then reality sets in. First, you need a business plan. Then you need a building, supplies, materials and staff, not to mention mentoring from fellow entrepreneurs. And don’t forget about money. Lots of money. YWCA’s Social Enterprise Task Force is a much needed team of experts who identify, vet and recommend social enterprise business opportunities to YWCA. These social enterprise businesses provide job training, help launch other small businesses, drive economic development and generate revenue for YWCA programs. The task force is also helping YWCA become more entrepreneurial. The task force, whose members include two attorneys, a CPA, financial planner and a business owner, has an all-important purpose – to vet business opportunities and help shepherd them. “It’s taking some very, very smart women who are vetting business ideas that also support the mission of YWCA,” said Rosey Koberlein, a

www.BizTucson.com

YWCA board and task force member. Koberlein described one opportunity that fell into the task force’s hands about two years ago – the chance to open the Kitchen Business Incubator at the YWCA’s South Campus in South Tucson. When the incubator opens later this year, women and minority entrepreneurs hoping to enter the food business will have access to cooking, prep and storage space in a commercially licensed kitchen; business classes; technical training; business counseling, and co-working space. “We’re helping them put together a very sound business,” Koberlein said. “YWCA is doing economic development on a grass-roots level.” Koberlein is CEO of Long Companies, which employs 90 at the main East River Road complex and has 950 real estate agents. Her first experience with YWCA started in the East, when she rented one of the organization’s residence rooms while attending college in Scranton, Pennsylvania. “YWCA has always had

a soft spot in my heart,” she said. “It’s a great use of my time.” Armed with a degree from Kent State University, Koberlein eventually moved to California and accepted a job with Long Realty. She steadily moved up the ranks. She already had fallen in love with Tucson during her travels after earning a master’s degree in public administration from University of California, Berkeley. When Koberlein met YWCA CEO Kelly Fryer about four years ago at the Women at the Top breakfast group, Fryer had an easy task reeling her in. “She hooked me,” said Koberlein, saying Fryer inspires her. “Kelly has this vision where the current YWCA could create a sustainable income flow.” While that’s not a reality yet, Koberlein has served as a YWCA board member for three years and on the task force about two. She calls her service an incredibly rewarding experience – but it sometimes can be difficult to accomplish YWCA’s self-described mission “to empower continued on page 214 >>> Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 213


BizCOMMUNITY YWCA Southern Arizona Makes Real Change Happen YWCA Southern Arizona programs produce impressive results. Just in the past 12 months: u 1,500 women gained tools to find employment, injecting $2 million in new wages into the local economy. u 1,000 entrepreneurs got help starting and growing businesses, generating $3.8 million in local sales revenue. u 7,612 training hours served 1,379 people and 500-plus hours of business coaching were provided. u 500 young professional women learned leadership skills to advance in their careers. u 200 community events, public forums and arts programs were held. u 40,000 people marched across Arizona for human rights and continue to be mobilized for action with YWCA support and training. Source: YWCA Southern Arizona

214 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

continued from page 213 women and eliminate racism.” “It feels like we’re pushing that mission uphill,” she said. “You would think in 2017, it would be like pushing it down an expressway. That’s why the task force even becomes more important.” Koberlein said there have been bright spots, too. When YWCA moved in to create the Kitchen Business Incubator in South Tucson, she noted how the main building, the former House of Neighborly Service Center, had been defaced with graffiti. Once YWCA started cleaning it up, she said the community took ownership and the vandalism ceased. The kitchen incubator is not the only thing happening at the South Campus. This is where the Women’s Business Center is located. It’s also the site of the only coworking space south of Broadway, a meeting space for community groups and an experiment site for new programs that will support cultural and food entrepreneurs in South Tucson. “It’s the most rewarding thing I’ve done in a really long time,” Koberlein said. “In terms of value for your dollar, the community receives a tremendous rate of return from YWCA.” Biz

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 215


216 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: KRIS HANNING

BizEXPANSION

From left – Mayor Jonathan Rothschild; Bob Guillocheau, President & CEO Ascensus; Bruce Wright, Associate VP, Tech Parks Arizona; Shannon Kelly, President Retirement Services, Ascensus

Ascensus Arrives in Tucson By Mary Minor Davis Ascensus, the nation’s largest independent retirement and college savings service provider, celebrated its new Tucson location at an August ribbon cutting at Tech Parks Arizona. Shannon Kelly, president of the company’s retirement services, said the move was prompted by a desire to serve the demand seen in the West. “It’s a big decision to make the decision where we should grow,” she said. “We had to answer three important questions: Can we find the right talent? Is the location right for us? And will it be attractive enough to recruit and retain employees? The answer for Tucson was yes, yes and yes. One of the best decisions I’ve ever made, and I make a lot of decisions.” “This is indeed a growing sector and we’re glad you’re here to help service the needs of our community,” Mayor Jonathan Rothschild said in welcoming Ascensus at the ribbon cutting. “On behalf of Tucson and its residents, I’m www.BizTucson.com

pleased to welcome Ascensus to our community as part of our growing financial services sector,” Bob Guillocheau, Ascensus president and CEO, added that the resources and partnerships with all of the entities involved with the site location, construction and recruitment were important factors. “Everyone has welcomed us, from Mayor Rothschild in Tucson to Bruce Wright at the Tech Park, the Arizona Department of Commerce, Sun Corridor Inc. We see ourselves as partners in our communities and you all have made locating here a wonderful experience.” Guillocheau praised Wright, associate VP for Tech Parks Arizona, for helping the new facility get built “on budget and on time.” The facility at 9040 S. Rita Road was built to support nearly 200 staff. Ascensus plans to hire 100 employees by late 2017, with the first 60 associates already on board, many from the University of Arizona.

With the Tucson expansion, the company now has offices in 15 states. Ascensus was named to the 2017 Inc. 5000 List of Fastest-Growing Private Companies in United States for the third year in a row, based on 65 percent revenue growth from 2013 to 2016, according to a news release on the company’s website. In addition, Ascensus expanded its national footprint and capabilities through several acquisitions in 2016 including the acquisitions of Retirement Educators, National Retirement Services and Matthews Benefit Group. The company release also noted “the firm has continued to actively acquire values-based organizations in the retirement plan market, including Kravitz, Retirement Plan Administrative Service and Benefits of Missouri.” The company currently serves more than 7 million people with college, health savings and retirement planning.

Biz Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 217


BizCONSTRUCTION

N E W

T O

M A R K E T

Project: Roadhouse Cinemas Addition Location: 4811 East Grant Road Owner: Larsen Baker / Roadhouse Cinemas Contractor: Barker Contracting, Inc. Architect: ADG/Onyx Creative Broker: Larsen Baker Completion Date: Fall 2017 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: $1.5 million Project Description: The expansion of the existing dine-in theater consists of an additional 10,000 square feet, including three new theaters with stadium-style seating, an events room and a new bakery.

Project: The Hampton Inn & Suites Marana Location: 6300 W. Marana Center Blvd. Owner: HSL Marana Hotel Opportunity Management Contractor: HSL Construction Services Architect: Seaver Franks Architects Broker: None Completion Date: Summer 2018 Financed By: Bank of Tucson Construction Cost: $13.4 million Project Description: The 101-room hotel, which includes 30 suites, features a pool, daily complimentary breakfast and high-speed wireless internet service.

Project: Location: Owner:

The Hampton Inn & Suites at Rita Ranch Tech Park 9905 Rita Ranch Road HSL Properties and Diamond Ventures Contractor: HSL Construction Services Architect: Seaver Franks Architects Broker: None Completion Date: Fall 2018 Financed By: TBD Construction Cost: $13.3 million Project Description: Amenities of the 104-room hotel include an outdoor pool, complimentary breakfast and high-speed internet. Twenty-two of the guest rooms will be suites.

218 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 219


BizCONSTRUCTION

N E W

T O

M A R K E T

Project: Mission Garden Location: 929 W. Mission Lane Owner: Friends of Tucson’s Birthplace Contractor: Lloyd Construction Company Architect: BWS Architects Broker: N/A Completion Date: January 2017 Financed By: Rio Nuevo Construction Cost: $879,000 Project Description: New construction of an educational/administrative building and a kitchen building complement Mission Garden’s educational tourism objectives.

Project: Costa Vida Fresh Mexican Grill Location: 6307 E. Broadway Owner: Oasis Foods Contractor: Lloyd Construction Company Architect: Lloyd Construction Company Broker: N/A Completion Date: June 20179 Financed By: N/A Construction Cost: N/A Project Description: The second Tucson location for this Mexican restaurant.

Project: Location:

West End Station Apartments 855 W. Congress St. Owner: Gorman & Company Contractor: Tofel Construction Architect: Gorman & Company Broker: N/A Completion Date: October 2018 Financed By: Arizona Department of Housing, Chase Bank and Enterprise Community Partners Construction Cost: Estimated $11.6 million Project Description: Creation of 70 new, affordable family apartments in the Mercado district of downtown Tucson. Named because of its proximity to the westernmost stop on the Tucson Modern Streetcar line.

220 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 221


BizCONSTRUCTION

N E W

T O

M A R K E T

Project: Marist Mid-rise Location: 111 S. Church St. Owner: Foundation for Senior Living Contractor: Tofel Construction Architect: Poster Frost Mirto Broker: N/A Completion Date: October 2018 Financed By: Wells Fargo, Rio Nuevo and Pima County Construction Cost: Estimated $12.8 million Project Description: This new, affordable senior housing apartment complex will feature 75 units, an on-site parking garage, exercise room and common area rooftop deck.

Project: Marist College Location: 235 S. Church St. Owner: Foundation for Senior Living Contractor: Tofel Construction Architect: Poster Frost Mirto Broker: N/A Completion Date: October 2018 Financed By: Wells Fargo, Rio Nuevo and Pima County Construction Cost: Estimated $2.7 million Project Description: Listed in the top 10 nationally for historic buildings in need of rehab, the former womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college will be repurposed into eight new, affordable senior housing apartments.

Project:

McCormick Residential Location: 201 S. Stone Ave. Owner: Holualoa Companies and Scotia Western States Housing Contractor: AF Sterling Architect: Eglin + Bresler Architects Broker: Peach Properties, Ron Schwabe Completion Date: May 2017 Financed By: Alliance Bank of Arizona Construction Cost: $4.9 million Project Description: McCormick Residential is a townhome-style gated community composed of 25 luxury rental units with individual garages, balconies, low-e windows and ample storage.

222 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 223


BizMILITARY

YMCA Breakfast Honors Vietnam Veterans By Lee Allen

When Johnny comes marching home again, he doesn’t always get a hurrah – and the Tucson YMCA is trying to change that with a Military Breakfast Honoring Vietnam Veterans. The official blog of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is pretty explicit in noting that, “On March 29, 1973, the last American combat troops left Vietnam and returned home. Unlike troops of more recent wars, the vast majority of those brave service members did not receive a warm welcome. ... Vietnam veterans bore the horrors of battle only to come home to shoulder the burden of an unpopular war that was no fault of their own. ... They did their duty because their country asked them to.” There is now a National Vietnam War Veterans Day (March 29), the entire month of May is designated as Military Appreciation Month, and this year Vietnam vets from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard who fought during those 19 years of engagement will be feted during the breakfast at the Tucson Convention Center on Nov. 10 – one day shy of the national Veterans Day that honors all vets, living and deceased. “Our plan is to present a full military ball every other year with some type of event, like this year’s breakfast, to advocate and support military families in the in-between years,” said Mike Reuwsaat, executive director at the YMCA Holsclaw Family Child Care Center. Advance publicity reads: “We understand that military families are under enormous strain. The Y is proud to give thanks to all who serve.” “We expect up to 600 to attend this 224 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

family event that speaks to the Y’s longtime support of the military,” Reuwsaat said. “It’s our way of saying thank you to the men and women who served during the longest U.S. armed conflict that saw 107 Tucsonans make the ultimate sacrifice.” As a reminder that freedom is not free, Arizona recorded 619 war casualties in Vietnam, part of the more than 58,000 named on the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C. Over 9 million military personnel served on active duty during the Vietnam era. A number are still listed as Missing in Action. Mark Irvin of Mark Irvin Commercial Real Estate Services, involved in commercial real estate in Tucson since 1983, and retired U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Donald Shepperd, former direc-

2017 YMCA COMMUNITY MILITARY BREAKFAST Tucson Convention Center Friday, Nov. 10 Registration begins at 7 a.m. Program is from 7:30 to 9 a.m. Individual Tickets are $75 Partially tax-deductible table sponsorships range from $1,250 to $5,000 Sponsors of a table of eight receive four guest seats with the other four seats donated to Vietnam veterans and their family members. www.tucsonymca.org/events (520) 623-5511

tor of the Air National Guard and a military aviation analyst for CNN, are honorary event co-chairs. Allstate Insurance agent Edmund Marquez Jr. will be master of ceremonies. Shepperd, known locally for his Tactical Fighter Squadron leadership, is a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy and is also a Vietnam vet who logged more than 5,000 flight hours, including tours of duty as a fighter pilot at Bien Hoa and Phu Cat air bases. He is a prolific author. Included among his several titles is one called “Mayday – The Vietnam Chronicles.” “This will be an event to remember for veterans from all wars – from those who fought to families that waited and worried because they had combat of their own,” said Shepperd. “I always say that no matter how strong the wind, how deep the ocean, or how dark the night, they’re there for us, defending the nation, and they’re awesome.” “We’ve lined up a tribute program and some phenomenal entertainment with morning musical talent presenting medleys of 1970s music,” Reuwsaat said, noting that net proceeds will go to scholarships for YMCA programs for military families. “Event proceeds will help support the Lohse YMCA, YMCA Holsclaw Family Child Care Center, and Jacobs City Community Center programs and their increased outreach to military families.” For those who are unable to attend, but would like to still be a part of the event, a Patriot Contribution gift of any amount is appreciated as a show of support and appreciation.

Biz www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2017

>>>

BizTucson 225


BizTRIBUTE

Truly Nolen Truly Inspirational By April Bourie

It may seem odd, but many people think of cars rather than pests when the name Truly Nolen is mentioned. Some also don’t realize that Truly Nolen was an actual person who founded the company headquartered in Tucson in 1955. Today, the company includes Truly Nolen of America and Truly Nolen International with offices in 63 countries. The savvy and witty businessman passed away on April 18 at age 89. Nolen was raised in south Florida, and it was here that he fell in love with the water and the air. Nolen got a degree in entomology at the University of Florida. At the age of 21, he contracted polio. He was on an iron lung for a year – and he read to pass the time. This led to his lifelong love of reading. The doctors said he would never walk again, but he beat the odds. The disease affected him for the rest of his life, but many people didn’t know he had polio because he hid it well. “I often say Truly was the most tenacious person I have known in my entire life,” said Bob Hartley, a close friend of Nolen’s for more than 47 years and Truly Nolen VP of safety and insurance. “He would never say it couldn’t be done. He was always very positive, always moving forward and very inspirational.” In 1955, Nolen read that Arizona had more termites than any place in the nation. He decided to check it out for himself and chose Tucson because he was going to miss the Yellow Pages deadline in Phoenix, said Michelle Nolen Senner, Nolen’s daughter and Truly Nolen di226 BizTucson

<<<

Fall 2017

rector of public relations. Advertising on antique cars came about as part of a “lucky accident,” she said. Soon after he moved to Tucson, his old car broke down. He had painted the company name and phone number on the car, which sat at the repair shop

Truly Nolen for a few days until Nolen could get the money to pay for the repairs. He noticed the phone calls picked up that week. It happened again a couple of weeks later when his wife’s car broke down. He decided to purchase some antique cars that he moved around to promote his business. “Purchasing antique cars made people think the company was older than

it really was, and moving them around made the company seem larger because people thought he had more cars than he did,” Senner said. The mouse car came about in 1961 as the VW Beetle was growing in popularity in the United States. An employee in Albuquerque, New Mexico, came up with the idea. “If you had an idea and a plan, he’d give you the space to try it out. He was very generous in that regard,” she said. Nolen also had a great sense of humor and loved to play pranks and make small bets. “He usually had some insider information before he would make a $5 bet with you,” Hartley said. “If he didn’t win, he wasn’t happy!” Though he moved back to Florida in the 1990s, he remained very involved in the business to the very end. He also made time to play. In 2014 at age 86 he told BizTucson, “I fly, I have a sailboat and I scuba dive.” He attributed Truly Nolen’s phenomenal success to welltrained employees – many who have been with the company for 20 years or more. Nolen was a supporter of community issues and of human rights, offering equal pay to men and women from the beginning. The company has offered benefits for same-sex partners for decades because he felt it was the decent thing to do. “He was very generous,” Hartley said. “His family can be very proud of what he accomplished in his productive life. He was an inspirational leader and built a fantastic company.” Biz www.BizTucson.com


6 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


6 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com

Biztucsonfall2017  

Southern Arizona's Business Magazine