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ANNUAL REPORT 2013


DEAN’S OFFICE

ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

Sue C. Maes, Dean of Continuing Education 785-532-5644 scmaes@k-state.edu Distance Education, Evening College, Intersession, credit courses, distance degree programs, courses for educators, 2+2 programs with community colleges 785-532-5575 or 1-800-622-2578 Fax: 785-532-3779 informationdce@k-state.edu


MILITARY

UFM

STUDENT AND FACULTY SERVICES

K-State at Fort Riley Office 
 785-532-5575 (general questions)
or 785-784-5930
 Community Learning Center 
 785-539-8763
 http://tryufm.org info@tryufm.org Course materials and testing 785-532-5575 or 1-800-622-2578 dce.k-state.edu/students/services

CONFERENCES AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS

785-532-5569 or 1-800-432-8222 registration@k-state.edu Fax: 785-532-2422 conferences.k-state.edu

MAILING ADDRESS

Division of Continuing Education Kansas State University 1615 Anderson Ave. Manhattan, KS 66502 dce.k-state.edu

THE DCE ANNUAL REPORT IS PUBLISHED BY:

The Division of Continuing Education’s Marketing and Communication Services Office Managing Editor: Rosanna Vail Art Director: Mary Hager Contributing Writers: Matt Blomberg Ashley Nietfeld Anna Shippy

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DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION


Table of Contents

Student Statistics 05 Credit 08 College of Agriculture College of Architecture, Planning and Design College of Arts and Sciences College of Business Administration College of Education College of Engineering College of Human Ecology College of Veterinary Medicine K-State Salina K-State Olathe Credit Program Highlights

Services 22 Student and Faculty Services Marketing and Communication Services Conferences and Noncredit Programs

People 32 Dean Profile: Carol Shanklin Faculty Spotlight: Linda Yarrow DCE Alumni Fellow: Brig. Gen. Mark Stammer

Special Features 35 K-State Sesquicentennial UFM Highlights Military Student Highlights Scholarship Recipients Grant Funding Awards and Presentations

dce.k-state.edu

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PARTNERING ON ALL FRONTS

DCE DEAN’S MESSAGE

A good place to start FY13’s annual report is to focus on its emerging theme— Partnerships.

Partnership with the Kansas State University academic faculty is first and foremost. Through this partnership, the Division of Continuing Education (DCE) launched five new online academic programs in nutrition and health, family and community services, adult learning, functional special education and mathematics education. These additions capitalize on K-State faculty strengths and respond to requests received by students unable to attend K-State’s oncampus programs. Partnerships with corporate entities have taken on a significant priority for us. One of our most recent partnership programs is with Caterpillar Inc. K-State’s Manhattan and Salina campuses joined efforts with Highland Community College and Manhattan Area Technical College to help Caterpillar employees achieve their bachelor’s and master’s degrees. This is a true area partnership and a win for all. Kansas community college partnerships continue to be a strategic effort. Along with the Salina campus, we signed 2+2 technology management agreements with all 19 Kansas community colleges. The division received a record 1,140 applications for bachelor’s degree completion programs last fiscal year. International partnerships with India and Ecuador have expanded significantly. The division hosted engineering summer institutes in a partnership with

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DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

India’s Gujarat Technological University and the K-State College of Engineering. In partnership with the College of Education and the Office of International Programs, the division hosted the fifth cohort of Go Teacher— Ecuadorian teachers preparing to teach English in their own country. This program is under the sponsorship of Ecuador’s Ministry of Education and SENESCYT, Ecuador’s governing body of higher education. Partnerships with our alumni are promising. As part of K-State’s 2025 strategic plan, the division has pledged to raise $1 million in scholarships to assist distance learners. Allan Sicat, a former U.S. Army officer who earned his online master’s degree in engineering management, is helping lead the way by pledging $1,500 for an annual scholarship for the next five years. We are just in the infancy of our campaign to reach out for financial contributions to our many graduates. A partnership commitment with our distance students means DCE must think worldwide—beyond our residential campus and its occupants—when a weather disaster strikes. This report features how DCE’s Student and Faculty Services office responded to a student affected by Hurricane Sandy by reaching out with emotional counseling and academic assistance to help this student and others like him maintain a 4.0 GPA through the most challenging situation. We also launched a virtual open house, creating a campus visit for current and prospective distance students. Take our

Sue C. Maes, dean of continuing education

virtual campus tour at distance.k-state.edu/openhouse. A very appropriate K-State Distance social media post states, “K-State means a SECOND CHANCE. I played around my freshman and sophomore years at my first college. Now with a husband and almost two-year-old daughter and living in Germany, I am so blessed to be able to fulfill my personal goal…Thanks K-State!” I wish to thank all of those throughout the annual report for lending your support and confidence in the Division of Continuing Education to promote your programs and serve your students. You are true Partners.


A YEAR IN NUMBERS

FY 13 20

THE DIVISION: A YEAR IN NUMBERS Statistical Data from Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Summer 2013

6,462

56.5%

4,975

43.5%

{

11, 437

≤24

25-34

DCE students by age

35-44

45-54

Age

Evening College

Intersession

Distance Education

Total

≤24

2,218

1,310

3,638

7,166

25-34

298

229

2,088

2,615

35-44

43

46

858

947

45-54

17

17

479

513

≥55

6

7

183

196

2,582

1,609

7,246

11,437*

TOTALS ≥55

* 5,045 study completely by distance dce.k-state.edu

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A YEAR IN NUMBERS

ethnicity

DCE students by ethnicity American Indian Asian

797

Black/African-American

660

Hawaii/Pac. Islander

22

Hispanic

673

Multi-Racial

309

Not Specified

240

White/Caucasian Total

6

53

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

8,683 11,437


A YEAR IN NUMBERS

credit hours

9,103

DCE student credit hours (by program)

student numbers

DISTANCE EDUCATION 29,105 UG 18,808 G

INTERSESSION

2,276

4,750 UG 517 G

58 EVENING COLLEGE

DCE students by location

9,321 UG 72 G

UFM 2,289 UG 4G

TOTALS: 45,465 UG 19,401 G

Evening College

Intersession

Distance Education

Total

2,509

1,445

5,149

9,103

United States

0

107

2,169

2,276

International

0

4

54

58

2,509

1,556

7,372

11,437

Location

Kansas

TOTALS

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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

STUDYING A NEW FIELD Master’s Degree Helps Professionals Advance in Agricultural Education and Communication Communication is key in nearly every profession. Thanks to the online master’s program in agricultural education and communication, professionals can utilize Student Credit Hours strategic communications planning to make data-driven, theorybased decisions on how best to communicate about agriculture. Share of DCE SCH

4,832 UG 2,198 G

Shannon Washburn, professor of communication 10.8% and agricultural education at K-State, says agricultural DCE returned communications occur within and on behalf of the to the College of Agriculture agricultural and in salaries, DRAs and environmental sciences, helping stakeholder transfers in FY13. group members make informed decisions for technically advanced situations. Washburn serves as K-State’s

$1.5 million

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DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

representative to AG*IDEA, the consortium of institutions that contribute courses for the master’s program. “While the details making it possible for universities to collaborate in offering degree programs are complex, the result for endusers is simple and logical,” Washburn said. “By joining forces, institutions can take advantage of their existing resources to create more opportunities for students.” Students in AG*IDEA programs pay a common tuition for courses regardless of their home institution. AG*IDEA allows faculty at member institutions to contribute a few courses within their specific areas of expertise. Washburn says skilled professionals are more effective educators and communicators, making a ripple effect on student career aspirations and interest in agricultural careers. “Career opportunities for agricultural communication-focused students can range from corporate and member organization communications, legislative affairs and governmental agencies, to doing broadcast, web-based or news media communications,” Washburn said. “For those more focused on education, careers include positions in high schools, community colleges and extension education programs.”

By developing a passion for the agricultural industry in young people, the entire industry benefits both globally and locally.” Shannon Washburn Professor of Communication and Agricultural Education


BUILDING AN EXPERIENCE Architectural Inspiration and Academics in the Italian Studies Program

Each spring, the College of Architecture, Planning and Design’s Italian Studies Program sends a group of fourth-year students on the experience of a lifetime: to the Italian hill town of Orvieto for a semester immersed in the culture and architecture of the region. Students collaborate on design studio projects, attend seminars and return to their programs with new perspectives on architecture.

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING AND DESIGN

Nadav Bittan, Senior in Architecture “The Italian Studies Program was an opportunity to realize the origins of architecture in person—to understand its scale, authenticity and significance to a degree impossible through a book or case study. I looked forward to the holistic integration into a foreign town, one whose local size and structure allowed a group to quickly assimilate into ‘locals.’ Particularly memorable were the city of Venice and its dizzying character, the cultivated landscape of the Val d’Orcia in Tuscany, the Piazza Del Campo of Siena and the Great Synagogue of Florence as a brief personal departure from the Catholic heritage of the region. I learned many academic lessons during my time abroad, most involving the way I perceive the built environment and how to organize these thoughts in a coherent and useful way. The relationships we developed with K-State faculty and local professors were far beyond the typical teacher/student formality and became one of the most enriching elements of the experience.”

Nadav Bittan (right) explores the Orvieto area.

Gretchen Gravenstein, Senior in Landscape Architecture “Throughout my education, I had been learning about Roman and Italian architecture, but I had never seen these ancient structures or traveled outside the US. Many small towns in Tuscany and other parts of Italy are planned to be dense, so little development occurs on the fringes of the town. This was inspirational because so many cities have problems with sprawl and are trying to achieve a dense urban environment, but many Italian towns already contain the density modern towns are trying to develop.

Share of DCE SCH

I interacted with students from all departments within the college. I learned not only about Italian architecture and design in general, but also about research and drawing. I’ve already applied what I’ve learned in Italy during my summer internship.

2.0% DCE returned

$180,000

to the College of Architecture, Planning and Design in salaries, DRAs and transfers in FY13.

Student Credit Hours

789 UG 505 G

The most memorable experience was seeing landscapes and cities unlike any I have seen before. Studying in Italy was the greatest time of my life, and every day I wish I could go back.”

Gretchen Gravenstein visits Italian hill towns near Assisi.

dce.k-state.edu

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

STRIKING A CHORD Honoring 25 Years of the Music Symposium

century milestone was especially meaningful as her last year serving as symposium director. “I took a job as the director of teaching and learning at K-State, moving out of music education,” she said.

The sound of music from the K-State campus isn’t necessarily the marching band. Each summer, teachers throughout Kansas attend the K-State Music Symposium for new ideas and technologies in the field of music education—and for a little musical R&R. “Sometimes it’s draining to be a teacher, putting in many hours to meet the needs of students,” said Jana Fallin, professor and former director of the symposium. “Few teachers get thank yous for all they do in the classroom or refreshed for the year ahead.” Special concerts, luncheons and interactive learning sessions set the tone for the symposium, which commemorated its 25th anniversary. For Fallin, this quarterShown above: Jana Fallin (left) and Laurie Curtis, assistant professor of curriculum and instruction, assist with a symposium event.

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DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

To honor her many years of dedication to the field, the symposium featured sessions on Fallin’s favorite music education topics—folk music and children’s literature in music. “My absolute favorite was the session on how music interacts with the brain,” she said. “My goal has always been to bring in cuttingedge speakers and also sessions that encourage teachers to network and learn from each other.”

Share of DCE SCH

Fallin says offering the event through K-State has been the best part of the symposium. “K-State does a wonderful job in training teachers,” she said. “They’re great musicians, they’re skilled in teaching and they understand kids. They truly are wonderful people.”

39.2%

DCE returned

$2.9 million

to the College of Arts and Sciences in salaries, DRAs and transfers in FY13.

Student Credit Hours

23,058 UG 2,341 G


TEACHING WITHOUT BORDERS Instructor Brings Global Marketing Insight to the Classroom

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

For College of Business Administration Professor Swinder Janda, examples of marketing fill our lives. “Marketing is all around us,” says Janda. “That is the beauty of what I teach. You can walk around and observe marketing and create value from it without reading from a book.” This concept fuels the experience of Janda’s College of Business Administration students who travel with him to countries such as Spain, France and most recently Germany, getting first-hand cultural and business knowledge that shapes their marketing education.

Student Credit Hours

4,491 UG 615 G

“I have been really fortunate to be able to teach and travel abroad,” says Janda. “Those opportunities have given me a lot of good insight into how organizations work around the world.” Janda’s classroom is one increasingly without borders, so his engagement with distance education students at K-State comes as no surprise. “I like online students who have the initiative but don’t have a lot of time to take classes. In today’s world, all of us professors need to create opportunities for everyone, even those who are busy.” Janda knows that distance students are not in the same situation as their on-campus colleagues and has tailored his online classes to reflect this. “Many online students are working, and time is very precious for them. I realize that when you watch an online lecture, no matter how many jokes you tell, it gets old, and so I try to make it engaging by sharing my experiences and observations in other countries. That’s what interests students.”

Share of DCE SCH

7.9%

DCE returned

$800,000

to the College of Business Administration in salaries, DRAs and transfers in FY13.

Ultimately Janda is interested in creating an environment where learning can happen and in piquing his students’ curiosity. “I am not here to give them all the information but to make them think and reflect on recent marketing trends that they can apply within the context of their work.”

dce.k-state.edu

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

OVERCOMING THE STORM Educator Stays the Course through Hurricane Sandy’s Aftermath

Student Credit Hours

1,386 UG 8,596 G

Tim H. Cox, academic advising master’s student, helps other students achieve their educational goals at his job at Brookdale Community College in Old Bridge, N.J.—located in a county hard hit by Hurricane Sandy in fall 2012.

Share of DCE SCH

Cox was traveling out of state during the storm, 15.4% waiting a week for a flight home. He returned to floods, downed DCE returned trees, damaged property and long lines for food to the College of Education in and gasoline. Most salaries, DRAs and transfers of the town went without power for two in FY13. weeks, making it difficult if not impossible to continue his course work under such extreme conditions.

$1.8 million

12

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

“Honestly, K-State reaching out to students after Hurricane Sandy made me feel like I was officially part of the K-State family,” Cox said. “From emotional counseling to academic assistance, it was great to see that resources were available to all students. My professors were very understanding of the challenges we were facing.” With his passion for higher education, Cox has served college students for five years, helping those at Brookdale through the storm’s aftermath. He says with patience, determination and support from family, K-State and Brookdale, he also could remain focused on his studies that semester. “Even though I am hundreds of miles away, knowing that I am cared about makes a big difference,” he said. Now, one year later, Cox is proud to report much of the Jersey Shore and surrounding communities have recovered and established a new sense of community. His own point of pride: maintaining a 4.0 GPA through the most challenging of situations. Cox plans to pursue a doctoral degree in education after completing his master’s degree next year.

Tim H. Cox returns to his campus in Old Bridge, N. J. to continue advising students at Brookdale Community College after Hurricane Sandy.


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING When Allan Sicat ‘03, former U.S. Army officer, earned his degree, he had no idea what impact he’d make on his alma mater a decade later.

HELPING THOSE WHO SERVE

To transition from military to civilian life and prepare for the corporate world, Sicat completed a master’s degree in engineering management through distance education. Because of his professional accomplishments and distinguished career service in the years following graduation, he was selected as the Division of Continuing Education’s first Alumni Fellow in 2011. The honor of serving in this new role for the division, coupled with his affinity for the university, gave Sicat a strong desire to give back to K-State. So he did something else that had never been done before—he started a scholarship fund specifically for distance students involved in the military.

Engineering Graduate Develops Scholarship for Military Students

He contacted the division and established the Allan D. Sicat Scholarship, providing $1,500 to a degreeseeking active-duty or veteran student. Beginning in fall 2013, Sicat has committed to an annual scholarship for the next five years. “This is an excellent example of how distance education students, through their good experiences, develop a strong allegiance to the university even though they have never been on campus,” said David Stewart, associate dean of continuing education. “As a result, other students will be helped as they pursue their educational goals.”

Share of DCE SCH

Sicat’s philanthropy is providing opportunities for distance students who often do not qualify for traditional university scholarships due to required credit hours per term—helping more students join the ranks of distinguished K-State alumni.

3.3% DCE returned

$750,000

to the College of Engineering in salaries, DRAs and transfers in FY13.

Student Credit Hours

632 UG 1,533 G

How you can help Find out more about developing or contributing to a distance education scholarship fund by contacting Tracy Robinson at 785-532-7568 or tracyr@found.ksu.edu. dce.k-state.edu

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COLLEGE OF HUMAN ECOLOGY

FINDING A SOLUTION Doctoral student researches conflict resolution in financial planning

Many times where there’s money, there are also disagreements. Sarah Asebedo, Edina, Minn., a doctoral student in personal financial planning, wanted to examine the role of conflict resolution techniques in the financial planning field.

Asebedo’s doctoral program is the first of its kind in the nation to be offered primarily online. She says K-State faculty provide ongoing support and guidance throughout the research and publication process for doctoral students. “Conducting research while at a distance from Kansas State University is seamless with the technology made available through the university and the wealth of knowledge available through online academic journals,” Asebedo said.

As a financial planner with Accredited Investors, Inc. for nearly a decade, Asebedo advises clients through career changes and retirement transitions. Although she cannot directly confront money disagreements, she can utilize conflict resolution techniques as a third party to help couples see eye to eye and move forward. “Financial planning draws on elements of various disciplines including psychology, economics, sociology and counseling,” Asebedo said. “These disciplines need to be more fully integrated into practical application, financial planning research and theory development to optimize financial planning recommendations and consumer decision making.”

14

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

Share of DCE SCH

20.8%

DCE returned

$2.8 million

to the College of Human Ecology in salaries, DRAs and transfers in FY13.

Student Credit Hours

10,236 UG 3,283 G


FORMING AN ALLIANCE PRAIREE Consortium Courses Help Improve Health of American Indians, Rural Midwest

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE

When the Mayo Clinic wanted to create an inter-institutional partnership for online graduate courses that prepared individuals to conduct research to improve health in rural and American Indian communities, they looked no further than the Kansas State University Institute for Academic Alliances. The institute had the experience and the connections to turn the Mayo Clinic’s vision into the Partnership for Rural and American Indian Research Engagement and Education (PRAIREE) Consortium. The PRAIREE Consortium is made up of K-State, the Mayo Clinic Graduate School, the University of Kansas School of Medicine, the University of Nebraska Medical Center and the University of South Dakota. Students at each school pay tuition and fees to their home institution, but they can enroll in eligible courses through the other consortium institutions. “It makes it really convenient for the students,” said Dawn Anderson, program manager with the Institute for Academic Alliances. “It’s an opportunity to give our students access to other classes, particularly those concerning the health of Native Americans and the rural communities.”

Student Credit Hours

41 UG 330 G Share of DCE SCH

0.6% DCE returned

$200,000 to the College of Veterinary Medicine in salaries, DRAs and transfers in FY13.

In addition to managing the consortium, K-State offers DMP 895 One Health, a course through the College of Veterinary Medicine that explores diseases that can be transmitted between humans and animals and their impact on human, animal and ecosystem health.

dce.k-state.edu

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K-STATE SALINA

TEAMING TOGETHER

Teri VanWey Teri has worked at Kansas State University Salina for 16 years. She coordinates the Certified Inspector Training program as well as noncredit programs. Additionally, she manages the department accounts payables and receivables.

K-State Salina Continuing Education Forges Ahead

Kansas State University Salina’s continuing education department is charged with supporting online education programs offered through the Salina campus. They also host the campus and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) testing center; coordinate the Concurrent Enrollment Partnership with Salina area high schools; manage professional conferences, noncredit programs and events; host summer camps; and aid in community workforce development.

Danielle Brown The department welcomed a new director, Danielle N. Brown, in April 2013. Brown has worked on the Salina campus for the past five years and previously served in the Academic and Career Advising Center.

Julie Wilson Julie is the test center supervisor and administrative specialist for the department. She has worked at Kansas State University Salina for 11 years and most recently served as registration specialist for the department.

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DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

We look forward to our future as we support the K-State Salina campus vision of connecting education with industry, challenging what higher education can be, and taking pride in our land grant mission.” Danielle Brown, director

2013 Achievements:

Increased the number of summer camp registrations by 62 percent

Coordinated 117 online courses

Enrolled 181 pre-college students in the Concurrent Credit Partnership

Trained 2,253 KDOT employees and contractors with 102 courses

Served 67 students currently in the online Technology Management program

Kirsten Zoller Kirsten joined the department’s team in 2013 serving as the events coordinator. Kirsten’s professional experience lies in event management.

Jacqueline Wood Jacqueline has worked at Kansas State University Salina for seven years. She serves as the technology management online program advisor and assists in recruiting activities in western Kansas.


K-STATE OLATHE

CONTINUING SUCCESS New Partnerships and Opportunities at K-State Olathe

Kansas State University Olathe continued to grow and expand academic offerings and professional development programs last year, welcoming over 19,000 people through its doors. Participants included leaders and members of K-State, the greater Kansas City and Johnson County community, industry employees, K-20 students and teachers and graduate students. Examples of programs included:

Industry

K-State U.S. Department of Homeland Security NBAF Biotechnology Development Module Workshop

Grundfos Pumps hosted SAP Fundamentals Training classes for associates from Texas, Indiana, Illinois, Ontario (Canada), Mexico, Denmark and Olathe, Kan.

Kansas City Area Development Council (Bioscience) Corridor Conversations

Partners

K-State Department of Hospitality Management and Dietetics/USDA Serving Up Science Conference

The Kansas Farm Management Association National Farm Business Management Conference

K-State College of Business Administration Professional Education Lecture Series, Executive Education and Sales Management Workshops

Meeting Professionals International, Kansas City Chapter Catering and Restaurant Showcase, a collaboration between Kansas City Meeting Professionals International and the Olathe Convention and Visitors Bureau

K-State Thin Surface Conference K-State Department of Education Kansas Educational Leadership Institute (KELI) First K-State Olathe Open House Graduate classes in food sciences, horticulture, biological and agricultural engineering, adult education and leadership, veterinary biomedical sciences, and agribusiness with an emphasis in animal health

Ceva Bio and Animal Health-Managers Meeting and Ceva Animal Health Leadership and Development Planning

The Johnson County K-State Research and Extension Master Gardener Program meets monthly in the Forum Hall at Kansas State University Olathe.

Perceptive Software, a technology company in content and data management software for businesses, educational institutions and medical organizations

Agriculture, JCERT Authority, USDA, Olathe Chamber of Commerce, Johnson County government, Kansas Board of Regents, etc.

Urban Extension National Conference Reception, hosted by the Wyandotte County Research and Extension, for extension professionals in urban/ suburban communities in building strategic collaborative partnerships State and local government agencies meetings including City of Olathe, City of Desoto, Kansas Department of Commerce, Kansas Department of

K-12 During FY13, 4,766 students, teachers and community members attended events at K-State Olathe or their schools in animal health and food safety fields. More than 60 K-12 teachers attended graduate-credit summer professional development opportunities. Other K-12 events included the Life Sciences, Physics and Veterinary Medicine lecture series, Summer Experience in Public Health (SEPH) camp, Willie and the Beanstalk plant growing competition and the first Aviation Fixation Camp in collaboration with K-State Salina.

Sensory & Consumer Research Center In food related programs, the SCRC conducted 23 studies and collected more than $300,000 in total revenue. Participants in research projects exceeded 2,000. Project partners included global and local food/beverage companies, pet food manufacturing companies, consulting companies, and K-State grantfunded research. dce.k-state.edu

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ACCELERATING TO GRADUATION Evening College and Intersession Highlights

FY13 Intersession Enrollments: August 2012

431 students (record for August session) 36 classes offered

January 2013 1,082 students 49 classes offered

May 2013

530 students 44 classes offered

FY13 Evening College Enrollments: Fall 2012

1,383 students

Spring 2013 1,732 students

Summer 2013 157 students

18

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

Accelerated Course Options Intersession and Evening College, as accelerated courses offered in a shorter, convenient timeframe, can help on-campus students move toward their degrees while allowing them to fit in a part-time job, study abroad or participate in an internship opportunity that can benefit them after graduation. The division began marketing these two options together, providing students and advisors with at-a-glance information about upcoming accelerated course options.

“

I can take courses that count toward my graduation requirements, that are of great interest to me, and be able to lighten up my load during the actual semester with courses that cannot be moved around as easily.� Wilson Meeks III, Intersession student (shown right)

CREDIT PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS


CREDIT PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

New Programs Launched in FY13 BACHELOR’S DEGREE Nutrition and Health The nutrition and health bachelor’s degree emphasizes health promotion and human nutrition. Through this degree program, students study the science behind human health and nutrition and learn how to provide practical guidance to the public about the influence of dietary patterns on health.

MASTER’S DEGREES Family and Community Services The family and community services master’s degree allows students to better understand families and the management and delivery of services to them in a community context. Students develop a research-based perspective to understand individual, family, interpersonal and community dynamics while gaining essential skills in leadership, management and the implementation of family and community service programs.

Curriculum and Instruction with an area of study in Mathematics Education The curriculum and instruction master’s degree now offers an area of study in mathematics education. Through this area of study, students develop a deeper foundation for understanding the teaching and learning of K–12 mathematics and how to implement the Common Core State Standards.

CERTIFICATES/ ENDORSEMENTS Adult Learning Graduate Certificate The adult learning graduate certificate emphasizes how adult learning principles and instructional methods can be used to strengthen the skills of trainers and educators who provide educational opportunities for adult learners. This program assists working professionals who want to expand their skills in the areas of adult curriculum design, learning theories, teaching methods and program evaluation.

Bachelor’s Degree Completion Program The division received a record number of 1,140 applications for bachelor’s degree completion programs in FY13. These applications resulted in record enrollments in the programs for fall 2012 (526 enrollments) and spring 2013 (560 enrollments). Online bachelor’s degree completion programs include: • animal sciences and industry • dietetics • early childhood education

Functional Special Education Endorsement The functional special education program prepares licensed teachers for the functional special education endorsement PRAXIS exam in Kansas. Through this program, teachers develop an understanding of curriculum content, assessment, interventions and teaching methods for students with functional special education needs, including students with autism.

• family studies and human services • food science and industry • general business • interdisciplinary social science • nutrition and health • technology management

English as a Second Language Endorsement–online This English as a second language (ESL) program prepares students to receive their ESL endorsement from the State of Kansas, as well as other states who offer endorsement options. Through this program, made available online starting in FY13, students gain the necessary skills and knowledge to teach culturally and linguistically diverse students in the classroom through an experiential learning model that emphasizes strategies that can be used immediately in the classroom.

Traci Bolin, bachelor’s student

dce.k-state.edu

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CREDIT PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

SIGNING STATEWIDE 2+2s in Technology Management Signed with Kansas Community Colleges

Kansas State University Salina completed 2+2 agreements with all 19 community colleges in Kansas and three technical colleges, allowing students from these institutions to seamlessly earn a K-State bachelor’s degree in technology management. Under the agreements, students can complete their associate degree through their local community college or technical college and then complete an entirely distance-based bachelor’s degree in technology management through K-State Salina. “The agreements make it easier for students to reach their goals,” said Verna Fitzsimmons, CEO and dean of K-State Salina. “They are able to earn a bachelor’s degree without a commute and without worrying about whether course credits will transfer into their degree program.” The technology management degree captures a large market, allowing students in many technical degrees to have an opportunity to use their twoyear degree toward a four-year degree without starting over.

20

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

“One of the great things about these programs is that students earn a bachelor’s degree from a highly respected university,” said Don Von Bergen, head of K-State Salina’s department of arts, sciences and business, which oversees the technology management program. “In the case of the technology management degree, students can complete the K-State course work entirely online, which means they can stay at their current place of employment and their families aren’t disrupted.” The technology management program is the third bachelor’s degree completion program to sign 2+2 agreements with all community colleges in Kansas, following general business and interdisciplinary social science degrees.

2+2


CREDIT PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

2+2s in Place by College/Degree General Business

ISS

Tech Mgmt

Total

1

2

3

8

3

2

8

20

Butler County Community College

2

1

5

8

Cloud County Community College

1

1

3

5

Coffeyville Community College

1

1

4

6

2

3

6

13

2

1

2

5

1

2

2

6

1

1

3

5

1

2

1

6

1

2

1

4

1

5

2

11

1

2

1

4

1

2

2

6

1

1

1

4

1

1

4

6

Manhattan Area Technical College

2

2

North Central Kansas Technical College

1

1

1

3

11

11

School

Animal Science

Dietetics

ECE

FSHS

1

1

1

1

Food Science

2+2s IN KANSAS Allen Community College Barton Community College

1

2

Colby Community College

2

2

Cowley College Dodge City Community College

1

Fort Scott Community College Garden City Community College

2

Highland Community College Hutchinson Community College

3

Independence Community College Johnson County Community College

1

Kansas City KS Community College

1

Labette Community College

Neosho County Community College

1

1

Northwest Kansas Technical College Pratt Community College

3

2

1

4

10

Seward County Community College

2

1

1

2

6

2+2s OUTSIDE KANSAS Austin Community College

1

1

Central Texas College

1

1

Illinois Central College

1

1

Ivy Bridge College

1

Metropolitan Community College

1

1

Redlands Community College TOTALS 28 Schools

1

1

2

7

10 1

1 1

2

2

17

3

31

33

77

166 dce.k-state.edu

21


STUDENT AND STUDENT FACULTY AND SERVICES FACULTY SERVICES

PUTTING STUDENTS FIRST Jason Maseberg-Tomlinson, Student and Faculty Services Director

A Year of Progress Our goal last year was to be a “front porch” to students, providing an open line of communication to the university. We achieved this goal and started working with other offices on campus to help them understand how to better assist distance students. We partnered with numerous campus offices so distance students may experience K-State and feel as connected to campus as residential students.

Student Services Statistics: •

140 calls received per week

• 2,433 exams proctored at in-house testing facility • 3,620 students on average per semester took exams in up to 435 proctor locations around the world • 3,000 prospective student interactions

Communication with distance students enhances our relationship with students near and far, from those just starting to think about K-State to those leaving with a degree. Not only have we improved our use of Facebook and Twitter, we also added a chat service and a LinkedIn account. The chat service allows visitors of our website to text chat with students and staff in our office between 8 a.m. and 5

• 364 students in distance programs honored through Virtual Commencement

22

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

p.m. We noticed an increase in contacts overall, specifically with international students who want to talk to us in real time. LinkedIn allows us to connect with students while also connecting them to others in similar academic fields or careers. Our vision is to use LinkedIn to create student connections between alumni and current students, opening a dialogue to help current students plan their future career moves. We also migrated our quarterly newsletter, The Leading Edge, into a weekly blog to keep students current about the division, campus and Manhattan community. On the logistics side, we have utilized Qualtrics, a web-based survey system, to log each contact received via the phone or through our instant message system. Each question and topic is noted for future analysis. If multiple students ask the same question, we now have the data that allows us to better train our call staff, update our website, and further enhance email and social media communications with the timely and critical information students need.

Forward Vision As we continue forward, we renew our focus on bringing the K-State spirit to distance students, virtually involving students around the world in everything from K-State’s 150th celebration to football Fridays. This means listening to student questions and responding not only in real time, but also through our communication tools. Distance students must utilize technology to access critical course materials. As the technology underlying class delivery advances and changes, our students must learn and adapt, becoming educated via course content and course delivery systems, and even new email platforms. The Student and Faculty Services office plans to continue serving as an advocate for all K-State students, easing the changes and helping students adapt as we grow. We strongly believe that our distance students are second to none, and we are proud to work with them every day.


STUDENT AND FACULTY SERVICES

Spotlight:

Virtual Open House The division launched a virtual open house to help bring the campus to online learners. The website creates the experience of a campus visit for current and prospective distance education students who are unable to travel to campus. It features videos of online instructors and advisors as well as online program information. The site also gives current distance education students a chance to explore campus up close using interactive features like Google Street View and featuring a campus photo tour. The division’s live chat feature lets students communicate directly with distance student services staff to answer questions. “The division is always looking for ways to enhance or increase the connection that distance students have with K-State so they always feel like part of the campus,” said Lynda Spire, assistant dean of continuing education. “We want to give them the same sense of place, support services and K-State experience that on-campus students have.” The virtual open house is accessible online at distance.k-state.edu/ openhouse.

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23


STUDENT AND FACULTY SERVICES

Distance Student Utilizes LinkedIn to Share Online Learning Advice “Every instructor has their own style of delivering courses online. Some are very computer savvy and some are not. Realize that you’ll have to use other resources to find answers to questions that will take the place of an actual conversation, unless the instructor is available by phone. Not all instructors work well with online delivery as they do in the classroom. Be prepared to go it on your own sometimes, as some instructors travel and may be without an internet connection to answer emails or message board questions last minute. Preparation and planning ahead are key. If you have a hard time learning by reading only, realize that some instructors don’t post lectures. K-State is an excellent university with wonderful instructors and advisors. But understand ‘distance learning’ means that you’ll have to rely on yourself a little more for your own success than you would if you took courses on campus. I have to admit I miss having classmates and instructors to converse with face-to-face. But if you can discipline yourself to complete the courseload and don’t mind working on your own with a minimal set schedule then distance learning is for you. Shown above, Student and Faculty Services staff: Maleah Lundeen, student services coordinator; Jason Maseberg-Tomlinson, director; Lydell Cox, administrative specialist; Laura Widenor, faculty and alumni services coordinator

The degree programs are well worth the time to explore and are very real even with distance learning. Some people think distance learning is easy, but it’s not. A student has the same rights and responsibilities as an oncampus student. The classes are just as challenging as they would be on campus.” —Dietetics bachelor’s student

24

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION


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g and penin to. n o o i an long for irat te m nsp n. It’s to be there i a f t o atio d -S on c rou l be sK eac n edu am p te. I’l e b o I ta a ” e ing at d ce. om e than izationfor K-S har n c l S a Wh t e r gan ng dis nt • i a w mo !” me en uch an or ars br ma e o UD m r b f m o O d e s C s n y R m P ay e. It’ gs a 150 rea e• alw ATE yd Lik T rad as t for m er thin next m S h g t G ks K n n reat t the te s i . e a v o i t n m S el tio y P han ite “K- ighten d to g e wha tiva to b d m Ed! T re qu o n e l e e i t l s n m a t le e he m t to ab i mp d Con (there and o am e c I of t ’t wa em!” c ve t an nts ran ans Can t of th r ha Adul stude me eve e s v e r r n in i e pa nlin , pe do egree ld n ster ’s nadian e O u c o t o e t d e llen Iw K -S ta te Ma Ca Sta D is ta n d m aster ’s xce ce, n to a your e “Ke ce n w 2013 a s t i o m l o m l s i e o y a t d r D f a e s m t e u y a g t S g y n a h m yin nti “K Sta e) thd rnin sta nning Whnad t K- nd co py Bir ” anc – ea t e u l i s i o a a h l e e e t does K-State p )! th te D a whil ol w t be p t at th the mean to “Wi t in AA nd Ha know a o t h S you? - uite sc ld no ligh ldreLnik K Cer tate a s you o y t l q e i e • Co k ou e th y ch ial f for mmen c c w a t e I K-S w of u • S h a re m se o b ity t of “K-State esp a fe to g ortun ! I can show ahansdalways b nd ve pu .” enlighte a e n ( ! p d ee a nm m op s ha ering te oh an fm the m t ent for me. It n a welcomin ed ear s gI Sta e g reater ’s much more g beacon of in fresCaanl’tmwoasinit dtoto e llow out thi t 10 y dream l “K- ethin engin th a y b sp tha in d m andpart oof btheema!”see what the gnsexatnd an organnizaanti educationir.aIttio’sn and has With almos fill my n somtware e u 1 o an t c 5 . d nI s 0 years r ro s n n ul bring fo am proud to opening sof aOnnklin tate d a usba lesse“Kd-ST ista kiddo n afte d to f b r K-Sta h e D y e te. I’ll b elong to. h means o e a e there I am ab an-S.tate tate ith my duati excit g up!!” I pl ith a so b etiti“K for le to be . S E is m a w i excelle living m a “K e w r gr m so ivin C D w I nyce, pe y dream N o , d t g A i ’ e m y from a “Witho s ifrseeve ho emb nel! I ever u distanc e. N an tere CH ivtaeter Driskta+n l ion rance and motivatio Cert in t Kn-S e.” ND colleg Germ Regis Au A and c o n c . t e Dec he tun e in n K , O -S I e K w a w TATE P -Stahte o o n u n t C ld c i ti a n n s c u s e a ed on to T t u ROUD E ver hav n r d g e n g . H f d fi l S a a v n !” a p n pyeB e co o ort e aM y ce few o e a mi livi ien ll achfi ustayonuckenowu)!irt”thI dfaey from yoausrteCr’s in Adultmanpdleted my Post G n ans rs at mr and f beco imp e e i -S is ra anadia C t“K v m a sb n stude ont Ed! Tha d o te (andpeu nk nts (the con that ssffomfoetarthted specia tate ore ye augh l goal + m re are s in ll l y S g a K I s -S h a a q a c uite l tate Da ve p n m st softw “K hom old d ona rea fessio pport -Stataere engineerinugt.”off for ’qsuitgeoaiswtahnce) has allow s p r r d o e a f e ile ed s -ye K “K ” o u ro yp y lif cided a – earning my mmaesteto do ent ing p nate s m the phpoom-Sretat.wte Distanceeham two ulfill m m e r’s deg l s l k it a d h ll v r o u m o o m fi ree in w l s De o fr si hyidekuiddleosg. eWitIhoueldtd mI eato gno!b!!ac to f tate!” is fu e a w y pas ically their of thceemtuobear cgra k o th l a o to ” ti is e o S ! s s n o o c h ars b ver hys eed er almo y pportulfn!it! y Kimpitoy t nnel!gI’c m so aft mst 10yyseears I wouldoonl owhile staying or m to h fu tun trteanndceinin n4ev0erygeeivxcinitweditto t be pla !! I can te f ed me ave a way p you n r m lfi ll a o m nnin t s y ee t T dream a h S pp n“K-S attate mwe a ence g upC!!A ” and sh the light at th g my o “K- allow They miles when o D ans rai S e e o a w my c sophoN L h g I t e hildren end e soo. more xyepars ECWOND CH the has ance. I am there me son b atw l -yeater-oeld d eaat my firs ANCE. I p n s . l t e la b e to a c yed aro a ollege. ughter fu y v t g lfi i ll o ba dents lway m t e g m oll -State nydpersonal g and living in Now with a h und my fresh K-S K a as c en G u oal of b m stu y are ecomin ermany, I am sband and alm an and e h . Wh nish ng my AT a!” c so bles g a Re n ost fi C e i a “K r g s e t is e s D o ta the d te r t to red Die is deg ha WIL allow te for me is fu e D s titian. T be able m e e d lfi d hanks ll t an of a balanc me to be a w ment of drea my for Sta e m o studen . They have a rking profess s + convenie “K- etting s time again other ts io n v c . n ery pas e they are I am miles sionate al that still ac . The univers of g t it wa tudent the m awa always h it there w y physically support staff ieves work + y has fr fo life h o e r distan tha ege s to be m n you n “K-State the K S c e ee eded th ta of gettin Distance ha eir sup te campus b ducation coll proud s port.” ut I fee that it w g my degree. given me the l When as tim opport So

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25


REACHING THE MASSES

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION SERVICES

DCE Marketing and Communication Services

MCS by the numbers in FY13: •

Completed 789 projects

• Received 13 out of 35 awards submitted for the division, for a 37 percent success rate • Coordinated 170 education fair events • Tracked more than 338,257 visits on the division website, receiving 1,129 program inquiries • Published 30 news items • Developed 50 conference brochures, emails, postcards and programs

The goal of the Division of Continuing Education’s Marketing and Communication Services (MCS) office is to strategically promote all division programs, including distance education, conferences, noncredit programs and professional development, Evening College, Intersession and more. Marketing efforts include maintaining the division’s websites, placement of print and electronic advertising, radio and TV advertising, direct mail and email marketing, and education fair events. Evaluation is conducted to determine effectiveness of marketing efforts.

MCS also provides public relation services for the division by preparing • Mailed 210,341 direct mail pieces news releases and published • Deployed 59 email articles about students, events and marketing campaigns accomplishments, nominating programs to 229,246 contacts and individuals for awards, developing special projects such as the virtual open house and distance education giveaway website, and preparing communications for distance students, alumni and conference sponsors.

26

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

Above: A student employee seals envelopes for a direct mailing. Opposite left: Mary Hager (standing), graphic designer, provides assistance to a student designer. Opposite right: Matt Blomberg, communications coordinator, sets up equipment in the video studio.


MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION SERVICES

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION Capturing Compelling Student Stories With Marketing and Communication Services’ new in-house video studio, Matt Blomberg, communications coordinator, is able to create short videos for the division’s YouTube channel featuring current distance students, commercials and various special events. Implemented in fall 2013, the studio has already been used to produce nearly a dozen student feature videos, according to Blomberg. “In the past we’ve only written student feature stories, but having this new technology presents the opportunity to communicate with our students in a different way,” Blomberg said. The MCS team hopes to incorporate more videos into their communication efforts. Student testimonial videos help tell the story of how distance education has played a role in assisting students as they study through K-State. “I’m looking forward to doing projects that are a little longer in length,” Blomberg said. “We have some projects coming up that will hopefully turn into a documentary format, which is exciting.” Blomberg says having the video studio gives DCE more communication flexibility and ensures that the voice of the distance student is heard. “It’s a unique opportunity, and I’m extremely excited that we’ve made the decision to go down this road,” Blomberg said.

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27


MAKING AN INTERNATIONAL IMPACT India Engineering Summer Institute

Sue Maes, dean of continuing education, delivers remarks at an opening ceremony for Engineering Summer Institute students from India.

28

Kansas State University has provided a new pathway for academic and cultural exchange through the Engineering Summer Institute, developed as part of an intensive academic collaboration between K-State and Gujarat Technological University (GTU) in India. K-State is the first institution to host a collaboration between GTU and a Big 12 institution to offer the Engineering Summer Institute. In 2013, the second cycle of the program, course work expanded to include both electrical and mechanical engineering areas of study. Technical field trip activities—two for electrical engineering and two for mechanical engineering— allowed students to go beyond the engineering classroom

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

experience and expand their cultural knowledge during their time in the U.S. and the Midwest. “This partnership is particularly significant because India is a rapidly emerging global economic and demographic power, while the U.S.—a global leader in science and technology—attracts millions of students worldwide seeking higher education,” said Sanjoy Das, associate professor in electrical and computer engineering at K-State. “At K-State, Indian students benefit from faculty expertise in engineering research and education. Our project-oriented courses provide invaluable hands-on experience to Indian engineers and connect us with Indian students who are projected to make up a quarter of the global workforce by 2025.”

CONFERENCES AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS


CONFERENCES AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS

South Korea Korean Summer Institute Building on the success of the first cycle of the Engineering Summer Institute, K-State launched a similar noncredit engineering opportunity—the Korean Summer Institute. This program, sponsored in part by the South Korean government, brought computer science students from South Korea’s Hanyang University to the K-State campus to refine computer programming techniques and practice English grammar and technical writing skills. “I think this is very beneficial for both our departments,” said Kyung-Goo Doh, a K-State computing and information sciences doctoral graduate who teaches at Hanyang University. “South Korea is a really small country, so the only way we can survive is to work hard. For the future, the government has tried to push students to excel and has put an emphasis on computer science.” The institute is part of a larger program called SMaSH, or the Software Maven School at Hanyang University, which aims to send 30 students to Kansas State University for the next four summers to continue the cultural exchange and educational opportunity. “Interaction with a Korean university and the possibility of sending our students to them in the future is really nice,” said Masaaki Mizuno,

professor of computing and information sciences at K-State. “Plus, this is a wonderful way to recruit future graduate students.”

Ecuador Go Teacher The objective of the Go Teacher program, now in its fifth cohort group, is to improve English language proficiency among Ecuadorian teachers, prepare them to teach English in their own country and help provide them with certification to teach English as a second language. Go Teacher has allowed K-State to develop strong relationships with Ecuador, serving students who now comprise one of the largest international student populations on the K-State campus. The program is possible through a partnership between Kansas State University, Ecuador’s Ministry of Education and SENESCYT, Ecuador’s governing body of higher education. Campus partners include the Center for Intercultural and Multilingual Advocacy and the Office of International Programs. Over the past few cycles, the program has expanded to the University of Kentucky, New Mexico State University and Valparaiso University, though K-State oversees the program at these institutions. A Go Teacher master’s degree has also launched due to the success of the initial program cycles, bringing more than 40 teachers from Ecuador to campus for graduate work in collaboration with the College of Education. Left: Students pose for an official group photo of the 2013 Korean Summer Institute. Right: Socorro Herrera, professor of education, facilitates a Go Teacher activity with a cohort of students.

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29


CONFERENCES AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS

New Director of Conferences and Noncredit Programs With more than 30 years of experience in the corporate market, Jeff Wolfe joined the division as director of conferences and noncredit programs.

Conference Services provides: • Site selection and contract

negotiation

• Speaker arrangements • Financial management • Registration • On-site facilitation • Marketing and

communications

• Continuing education credits • Evaluation

“The most interesting and exciting part for me has been becoming part of a university,” Wolfe said. “I’ve really learned a whole new aspect of conferences. In the past, I’ve planned conferences within the for-profit sector for insurance companies, telecommunications firms, corporations, the pharmaceutical industry— and that’s all very different than what we do here within the nonprofit sector. I’m learning how to best utilize my background and my experience to help shape our team into further growth.”

The division’s conferences and noncredit programs office provides conference and event planning for the university as well as outside companies and corporations around the nation. Each year it coordinates more than 120 programs

30

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

spanning local, regional, national and international audiences. “Jeff brings a wealth of experience from the conferencing and event management industry,” said Sue Maes, dean of continuing education at K-State. “His years of leadership in client development and retention, sales and marketing, finance and contract negotiation for national and regional corporations adds to the depth of skills found among the conference and event planning staff at K-State.” Wolfe’s main vision for conference services is to continue building the university’s brand while increasing awareness about the services his team can provide to the campus. Professional conferences and noncredit program staff can assist K-State faculty throughout all aspects of their event—from conceptualization through evaluation. “We have a great opportunity to use our knowledge and experience in event planning and coordination to serve the K-State community,” Wolfe said. “It’s exciting to be part of the university and play a role in helping provide educational and professional experiences to those in Kansas and beyond.”

We have a great opportunity to use our knowledge and experience in event planning and coordination to serve the K-State community.” Jeff Wolfe, director


CONFERENCES AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS

New Conferences and Noncredit Programs in FY13 Face-to-Face 2012 Core Outcomes Project Academic Leadership Alliance Animal Health Corridor Seminars Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium Camp KLAY (Kansas Leadership Academy for Youth) Dialogue, Deliberation and Public Engagement (DDPE) Collaborative Certificate Program Early Childhood Symposium Earth Day Celebration

Responding to a Changing Climate on the Central Great Plains Rotary Peace Forum South Korean Summer Institute Statewide Wind Energy Forum Sustaining Kansas Universities Fighting World Hunger Global Summit University Professional and Continuing Education Association Central Region Conference

Focus on Food Safety Training Series

Wichita Air Emissions Reduction Opportunity (AERO) Seminars

Forum for Excellence

Women Managing the Farm Conference

Noncredit Program Delivery Face-to-Face Programs

143

Mediated Programs*

393

Totals

536

*Mediated programs refer to those programs containing components delivered through communication technologies such as video, Internet, live feed, etc. These programs extend K-State’s reach and offer greater opportunities to those who are location-bound.

Audiences State

57

Regional

48

Local

11

National

115

International

305

Totals

536

Noncredit Programs

Great Plains Sorghum Conference

Face-to- Mediated Total Face Programs

Istanbul Summer School Program

New Online Noncredit Trainings

Journalism Education Association Advisers Institute

Chemistry for Secondary Teachers

Ag and Extension

17

47

64

National Urban Extension Conference

Essential Understandings of Complex Math Topics

Architecture

4

0

4

New (Department) Chair Alliance

Middle School Mathematics for Teachers

Arts and Sciences

10

0

10

North Central American Phytopathological Society Annual Meeting

Middle School Science for Teachers

Education

11

34

45

North Central Region 4-H Volunteer Forum

One Health CE Modules – Human Health Providers and Animal Health Providers

Engineering

49

77

126

Professional Education Training Series

Physics for Science Teachers

External and Youth

20

12

32

Higher Education

23

1

24

Human Ecology

2

0

2

Veterinary Medicine

7

222

229

Redesigning Competitiveness Conference in the Animal Health Industry

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31


DEAN PROFILE

A DEAN’S PERSPECTIVE OF DCE Carol Shanklin, K-State Graduate School

Furthering the Mission The Division of Continuing Education has contributed significantly to coordinating online graduate degrees and certificate programs that provide opportunities for individuals to advance in their careers without leaving their employment or family to come to campus, thus expanding educational opportunities for the citizens of Kansas and beyond. Approximately 30 percent of K-State’s degree-seeking students are enrolled in courses through DCE. Since more than 50 percent of nondegree-seeking students are enrolled in DCE courses, it is imperative that we work together to identify how to encourage nondegree students to complete K-State graduate programs.

Meeting Needs through Collaboration The Graduate School works collaboratively with DCE to identify and meet the unique needs of graduate students enrolled in distance programs. For example, DCE coordinators identified a need for a special orientation session for graduate students. I worked with the Division of Communications and Marketing to create a virtual orientation for graduate students, available on the DCE website and Graduate School website.

32

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

When concerns are identified regarding specific programs, Graduate School administrators work with department heads and graduate program directors to identify strategies that will facilitate student success. The Graduate School also has a representative on the DCE Advisory Council to maintain open communication among DCE staff and college representatives. DCE is instrumental in marketing graduate educational opportunities, which is important in communicating to target audiences. This year the Graduate School administrative team worked closely with DCE to plan the transition to a new online application system, CollegeNet.

providing insight into the needs of graduate students, programs and faculty engaged in teaching and advising through DCE.

Enhancing the Graduate Student Experience

Going Forward

The Graduate School posts professional development workshops that are accessible online for graduate students enrolled through DCE. These opportunities are co-sponsored by the Graduate Student Council and the Graduate School.

The Graduate School will continue to explore the potential for international partnerships for collaborative programs, identify strategies to enhance the quality of distance courses and work together to increase graduate program completion through DCE.

The addition of an ex-officio, non-voting representative from DCE to serve on the Graduate Council beginning in fall 2013 ensures open communication between our units. Ellen Stauffer, DCE’s ex-officio representative, has been effective in

We will also continue facilitating the development of new graduate degree and certificate programs for online delivery, helping to increase opportunities for individuals pursuing graduate degrees or knowledge and skills to advance in their careers.


INSTRUCTOR SPOTLIGHT

FACULTY/INSTRUCTOR PROFILE

Linda Yarrow Honored for Achievements in Blended Learning

In recognition of her accomplishments and dedication to the blended learning teaching style, Linda Yarrow received the 2013 Shirley Davis Award for Excellence in Blended Learning from the National University Technology Network (NUTN). A blended learning teaching environment allows students to interact and engage with teachers in the face-to-face classroom while also staying actively engaged with online content designed to enhance their learning experience. “Distance students can often feel removed from actual classroom instruction,” Yarrow said. “Blended learning activities encourage distance students to actively engage with their instructor and their peers and help them connect to the campus instruction.” Yarrow completed bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs from Kansas State University. She began her professional career with K-State as an instructor in 2003 and in 2006 became an assistant professor of human nutrition. Yarrow teaches distance courses in Life Span Nutrition, Clinical Nutrition and Nutritional Assessment. “In advanced nutrition, it is important for students to recognize there is not always one ‘specific way’ to achieve positive outcomes with their patients,” Yarrow said. “I have developed activities through blended learning that allow them to discuss multiple methods and to consider viewpoints different from their own that could affect patient outcomes.”

Yarrow uses several unique methods to shape her distance classes into the blended learning format. Message boards allow students to be moderators of class discussions and debates to promote weekly interaction. Students also have the opportunity to create wikis, online information portals to credible resources that other professionals and consumers use. This activity helps students explore topics in greater detail while allowing them to be creative and have fun presenting information to their peers. “Blended learning is so important because distance students want to feel connected to the course, the instructor and other students,” Yarrow said. “These activities developed specifically for blended learning courses work very well for the students and provide them with the opportunities they need to make connections and relate to others in the class.” Being nominated and chosen for the NUTN award was truly an honor, Yarrow said. “Educators want to feel like they make a difference, and recognition by K-State and NUTN was my validation that what I am doing is important and has a positive impact on my students,” Yarrow said.

Linda Yarrow (left), assistant professor of human nutrition, accepts her award at the NUTN conference.

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33


ALUMNI

ALUMNI PROFILE

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2013 DCE Alumni Fellow Believes Education is More Than a Degree

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DiAvefew share rsityrsh roug Distanc holarshucation th ola Scips Above: All e Educ schat ip for . an Below Rig ion their ed Helping n, Mont ht: Schola Sicat ’03, Alumn • Kristina funds onStudents y, ten i Fel Those W ($Hamilto me hope rship rec Cale e are of ipients rec low and, th O’Lear 1,0s00 ) en scher n giv • ola ho lee Re ey ha rsh th gram og becca So Ka oned at Serve ip dono When Al olarship mplete the pro , r. ere’s mniz division m sch th ba ur lan re tch co rec he “Yo Sic areunable to W eption. nt Divis impact ely aware ion of Co he’d mak at ‘03, former U.S ments. t I will be you are most lik d the ., a stude l ntinu thaing e on his . disagree ip for Di As h an ina, Minn e personash lly. Ed alma m Army officer, Ed hig uc cia To trans o, ry sta ati an ve on is ho finuc e ea ater a de h Asebed iversity’s onlin wanted($900 unde nce Ed tuitionSc lar- few. Th to atiate cade lat rned his deSa comple ition from milit on Stu grra rgraduagradu ee onlin m, e Un ded grants are ted er. ar lping te; $1 t as Stat e, he haPh.D. progra rsh0ipgran nts olarship is he accompli an online mas y to civilian life gram tha in Kans schola,20 adschte) resolution• Ashle ning d no ide ter sh for a pro a ict nfl what g field.Ke y MacKinnon[Allan D. Sicat] uamp selected ments and dis ’s degree in and prepare for financial plan , Daina e my co letion derserved adult rri Lang enginee role of co as the Di tin Bit do un nte ine the financial plannin ring man the coex rpam t ter n, vision of guished caree or ara sis s, Pa ate as Ra gu h quality wo agemto r service Continu rld th, eAllan The hono leKame to ted ney, Kyra Thor trickllGe in in a hig re, en di s ab nts t. en ue cre Be ing in de ryn r of serv wig, th Krist nbur Educati oina Cale universi nal stu techniqcause of his anner with Ac Tiffanitio ing in th on’s first e years fol ty, lowing nner.” y Weigh , Asebed l plprofession non-trad is new ro l ma Alumni had neve gave Allan a t, adcia a dealcade fessiona eir uation, arly a fingran le for FelloAs str r , Penn. w in and pro Allan waaspects of th 20 c. for ne involved been done be ong desire to giv the division, co llersville t I accept estors,11In. fore— ugh all s changes and ady, Se in the m tha he starte e back to K-Sta upled wiInv er th hises ilitary. ents thro Justin Gr great humility ucation re cli ns ca affi d itio te. th vis ing a Ed ns nity, for He cont scholar So ad lud “It is wi incth ntinuing dents. Over the r life tra ship fund he did e life Co so l ajo of M m cia . to a degr acted the divisi et ion ns d specificfinan hing els e Stu use the Divis ee-seek on and Distanc rienced extende ally ement transeitio ats typically ca scholar es rface ship for distancecisth retirfor ve expe d temporary ship wi ing active-duty tablished th Scholar de stuionnt n couples to su ess. e ll be off years, I ha t an the oc d money ts bede ered for or veteran stu Allan D. Sicat twees past few unemploymen “This is ning pr aware of Scholar an de the next of w more greemen e financial plan n utilize conflict shdiip, five years nt. Through his sapr n ever periods experie an excellent ex I am no tha ov ty t— th ca idi en uri co e , nces, de ut beginnin ample of m ho ng $1,500d that sh help employm e of financial sec a long way in roug velop a on cam g with th mitm then how dis un party to t, an an es s fo nc str pu tance ed e fall 20 ebed o hanu as well as as a third forward. al rship go importa student s,” said David Steong allegiance ucation As13 term. tech niques is schola l security, s will be to move before. Th ain this financia s with it.” nts, t helped wart, associate the university studestu solution eye to eye and ts of att me as they ev toral denthrougreh their dean of e Allan’s ph seod helping of mind that co elemen n., a docen though pursue les , on go co Min s ce up nt ila na, an e co aw inu th nthropy theirbed dr fin ey qualify ing educ edo, Ediating the peac th, Ore. r is pr anning for therapy, iplines ation. “A have nenc Sarah Ase al uc Philoma u for the hono planni onal go r beplen Above: ication, more stu traditional un oviding s a res sc ina veial als.” oppo financi “Fult yo y Blair, alrtu n ive dents joi , ot ionr , commun “The various di person Brantle sincerely thank ne Alliso n the ran rsity scinholarsh nities for distan soluthe id.How the Mauri for distanc ment to “I most ips ce stude as conflict re ks of dis lopu ebedo sa ry deveYo ip ipient of C.”an Hel nts who tinguish due to required ills ling,” As holarsh such eo rsh ing a rec se Sc th l be ola ing un d p ed K-Sta of ria sk of ak sch co an cre d ten m dit hoy and doreno Finion for this tees an setarch on Memo d ou decis e, O’Bann chose to apply disciplin alumni. sociolog urs opepr r ac returning ore primarily tertic m—he d consumer or cont t m .I various y, economics, int Veteran re riboffered aboul t develop students egrated tions anlping log a disabled academic ca ing to scnhotolarbe uting ctoara distan psycho natio mmenda e fully int ari in my cause I am ceiptofudo d in the dTra be mor planning reco ansh nd by co ce education be ge after a break benefits are ne gucyidRo l of its kin need to on an lle nt st t cia bin ati co ac fir or an uc so e tin pp will help fin n at 785-5 s ed g tracyr@ ram is th e ongoing su Veteran this scholarship s. s optimize og fou 32 es My les pr e.” -75 l oc nd id ra pr .ks seam continu isu.e d and du. rsity,” 68 or o’s docto ate faculty prov d publication their en education can iversity Asebed K-St State Un ugh the unive arch an ensure my Kansas She says ro eir rese

Divis K-State

Alum

For the 2013 Division of Continuing Education Alumni Fellow, Brigadier General Mark R. Stammer, the education he received from Kansas State University was all about real-life application. “The selection of a particular program has to be based on what you want to get from it,” Stammer said. “What are you going to take away from it—not necessarily what it is going to do for you on some piece of paper.” Stammer is currently the acting senior commander of the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Ky. He completed his Master of Science in Foundations and Adult Education through the K-State Division of Continuing Education in 1999, a member of the first graduating cohort of the program based at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. He credits Cheryl Polson, director of K-State at Fort Leavenworth and associate dean of the Graduate School, for his desire to attend K-State.

Brigadier General Mark R. Stammer receives his award at an Alumni Fellow reception on campus.

34

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

“Her passion is really for people and it’s realized in adult education,” Stammer said. “We all picked up on that and her enthusiasm for this program. [It has] been of great benefit to me and in my career.” Stammer was selected as the division’s Alumni Fellow, a university program that honors a distinguished alumnus from each college or major unit and brings them to K-State to visit the campus. During the visit, Alumni Fellows meet with faculty and students to share their knowledge in both an informal and classroom environment.

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DCE Launches Alumni E-newsletter Summer 2013 marked the inaugural issue of the Division of Continuing Education E-newsletter, distributed to alumni of K-State distance education programs as well as donors to division funds. The publication will be distributed twice per year, featuring distance education alumni, program highlights, division announcements and more. View e-newsletter issues at enewsletters.k-state.edu/dce.


K-STATE SESQUICENTENNIAL

CELEBRATING THROUGH SERVICE Making a Difference in Honor of the K-State Sesquicentennial

As part of K-State’s sesquicentennial celebration spanning the last year, the Division of Continuing Education organized activities for its distance education students and employees with one common goal in mind: to make an impact by incorporating acts of service into every celebration activity. Lynda Spire, assistant dean, and Harry Williamson, director of administration and finance, served as the division’s representatives for the sesquicentennial. They wanted DCE to be as involved as possible in university celebrations while finding unique ways to honor the 150th. “It’s the chance of a lifetime to be part of something so significant for the university,” Spire said. “We wanted to give our staff opportunities to be involved in the celebration.”

Impacting Our Community The division held a canned food drive with a goal of contributing 150 nonperishable food items for donation to the Flint Hills Breadbasket community food network in Manhattan. At the completion of the food drive, DCE staff far exceeded the goal with more than 600 items for donation.

Impacting Our Colleagues Throughout the year, DCE focused on serving each other through everyday acts of kindness. Staff filled out cards denoting acts they had either completed or received, aspiring to reach 150 acts of kindness together. Staff completed more than 200 cards, with the first 150 placed in the K-State Sesquicentennial time capsule.

Impacting Our Campus A final event took place on World Kindness Day, Nov. 13, when the division hosted a celebration focused on the 150th to raise scholarship funds. Through a dessert silent auction, division staff and campus guests raised $500 for distance education student scholarships. “I’m so proud that we have been able to incorporate a service theme throughout our entire celebration,” Spire said. “I think it says a lot about the people who work here—that they are willing to contribute whenever they can.”

Keep the Giving Going Find out more about contributing to a distance education scholarship fund by contacting Tracy Robinson at 785-532-7568 or tracyr@found.ksu.edu.

dce.k-state.edu

35


CENTERING ON COMMUNITY

UFM FEATURE

Highlights from UFM Community Learning Center

The philosophy of UFM Community Learning Center is simple: everyone can teach and everyone can learn. UFM is based in Manhattan and serves people of all ages with varied backgrounds and interests. Its instructors have ranged in age from 6 to 98, providing opportunities for all community members to share their ideas and skills with others.

dance and fitness credit classes. UFM partners with four departments and three colleges at Kansas State University to offer these credit classes. UFM also participated in K-State’s 150th anniversary celebration, featuring the K-State Sesquicentennial on the cover of the spring 2013 course catalog. The UFM education program offered two classes in honor of K-State’s 150th, including the history of food at K-State and a trolley tour of the homes of famous K-State people and historic places in Manhattan. Due to the popularity of the trolley tour class, tours were also offered in the summer and fall semesters.

Programs offered through UFM include the Education Program of credit and noncredit classes, Community Outreach Program, Lou Douglas Lecture Series, Manhattan Community Garden, Teen Mentoring Program and more. Special activities that UFM coordinates include regional swim meets, K-State Ahearn Complex activities and program collaboration with other agencies, • More than 17,000 participants in UFM activities such as Project EXCELL.

UFM Statistics for FY13

One of UFM’s roles in the Division of Continuing Education is to coordinate recreation,

• Offered 768 noncredit classes taught by 193 instructors • Served 4,331 students locally

• Total of 2,273 students received credit for 191 K-State credit classes

36

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

Left: UFM launched trolley tour classes in the Manhattan area. Above: Participants take a class about the design, construction and use of wood fired masonry ovens.


MOVING FORWARD Military Student Feature

MILITARY STUDENT FEATURE Craig’s Golden Ruhl For Craig Ruhl, Kansas National Guard soldier and Kansas State University student, success means that juggling is an everyday occurrence. Since 2006, he has taken classes both on campus and online to keep moving forward in his degree. “When I am at my National Guard drills, I work on school work during my lunch or break, and then when I get out in the evening I normally go back to the barracks and start studying and doing whatever I need to get done for my classes,” Ruhl said. It’s that type of commitment and strong work ethic that has propelled Ruhl forward in his academics and will see him cross the stage in May 2014. As a Pinnacle Honor Society student and double major in general business and human resources, Ruhl knows it will be worth the long hours and sleepless nights. “Instead of going out, I would be in my container living unit (CLU) studying and watching the lectures online,” Ruhl said. “If you really want something, you’ll do whatever it takes. You might be tired, but you will make the time to study.” Along the way, Ruhl has seen his share of difficulties, having been deployed three times to Egypt, Iraq and areas in Africa. During his last deployment, he was able to take several online courses through K-State that helped keep him on track. “I really rely on online classes, especially Intersession classes,” he said. “They have helped me get to where I am about to be.” After graduation, Ruhl wants to pursue employment as a human resources officer in the National Guard and eventually in the private sector as a human resource manager. A master’s degree is also on his mind, but for now he is focused on graduating and on the three small words of advice he offers to other military students like him: “Never stop trying.”

Top right: Craig Ruhl balances his participation on the Fort Riley rugby team with his schooling and service. Center: A military student at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kan. dce.k-state.edu

37


SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED IN FY13

MEETING FINANCIAL NEEDS DCE Scholarship Recipients

In FY 2013, DCE awarded

$21,000 in scholarships to students in distance programs

38

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

Spring 2013 marked the first offering of the Division of Continuing Education Scholarship for Distance Education Students, helping the division achieve its goal of increased scholarship funding. The new scholarship provides $900 to undergraduate students and $1,200 to graduate students. Recipients must be enrolled in a Kansas State University distance education degree program. The division also awarded Maurine Allison O’Bannon Memorial Scholarships for fall and spring terms, as well as a scholarship through the K-State Office of Diversity. “Awarding these scholarships helps make higher education more attainable for adult students as they balance their education with other financial commitments,” said Sue C. Maes, dean of continuing education at K-State. “The division continually works with campus entities and university alumni to bring scholarship opportunities for distance education students.”

Fall 2012 Maurine Allison O’Bannon Memorial Scholarship

Division of Continuing Education Scholarship for Distance Education Students

Amy Buscher, Topeka, Kan.

Daina Bitters, Lawrence, Kan.

Shay Dodson, Manhattan, Kan.

Kristina Cale, Seattle, Wash.

Cynthia Naylor, Herington, Kan.

Patrick Gere, South Portland, Maine

Karyn Raney, Schenectady, N.Y.

Kerri Langdon, Wonder Lake, Ill.

Dawn Van Horn, Junction City, Kan.

Ashley MacKinnon, Fort Riley, Kan. Karyn Raney, Schenectady, N.Y.

Spring 2013 Maurine Allison O’Bannon Memorial Scholarship Angela Giancaterino, Los Angeles, Calif. Claudia Montoya Nunez, Bayonne, N.J. Melissa Routt, St. Charles, Mo.

Office of Diversity Scholarship for Distance Students Rebecca Sombatchareun, Pleasanton, Kan.

Kyra Thornburg, Allentown, Pa. Tiffany Weight, Logan, Utah


FY13 GRANT FUNDING

FIVE YEARS OF FUNDING

In five grant funding cycles, DCE has invested approximately

FY13 Grant Funding Report

$2 million FY13 marked the fifth year for the Division of Continuing Education’s annual grant funding program, investing $349,667 in 35 program development grants. For FY13, those grants, in full or in part, supported the development of 51 courses, five new programs, one new degree and three new professional development projects. Revenue returned to the university in this grant cycle will at least match the pattern of the past, generating more than $3 in net revenue for every dollar invested in program development. Dave Stewart, associate dean of continuing education, coordinates the division’s grant program and says that in addition to the financial success, the program has been highly successful in building partnerships with the K-State colleges. “We have been able to work together to accomplish far more than we could have separately,” Stewart said. “In many cases this program has provided the support for faculty members to try new approaches to teaching their subject matter, which they report has been energizing and fulfilling.”

The importance of the grant funding program and the development of online educational resources are recognized as a way that Kansas State University can serve the ten percent of its students who study exclusively at a distance. “These students cannot come to campus to access the education they need due to geographical location or other commitments,” Stewart said. “For other students, life happens and they need to leave the campus. When they do, distance education enables them to take K-State with them to complete their educational goals.” In addition to distance students, online courses are used by another 13 percent of the student body to meet their educational goals. K-State distance education now serves 23 percent of the university’s students.

in 168 projects

that developed

247 courses, 14 new degrees,

21 certificates and professional development programs

and 5 new conferences generating approximately

$8 million

in net revenue for the university

dce.k-state.edu

39


FY13 GRANT FUNDING Faculty Feedback College “Each of the three instructors have learned a great deal regarding online course development. This will definitely impact our future development of year two courses and how we interact with students.”

“I learned a great deal about online learning and developing online courses. Although the course got high ratings, there are several things I will change, based on my experience and on feedback from the students.”

“I have learned how to take most of what I do for classroom teaching and translate it to the online medium. I have learned what students can and cannot do, and what they expect in an online course. I have learned how to create online exams and quizzes and how to effectively use videotaped lectures.”

40

Proposal Name

PI Name(s)

AG

GENAG 712: Occupational and Agricultural Injury Prevention

Mitch Ricketts

AG

AGECON 120: Principles of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness

Andrew Barkley

AG

AGCOM 400: Business Communication in Agriculture

Lauri Baker

PLAN 655: Land Development Planning

Gary Stith

A&S

POLSC 607: Administrative Law POLSC 700: Research Methods in Political Science POLSC 708: Public Personnel Administration POLSC 735: Public Organization Theory POLSC 737: Public Budgeting

James Franke

A&S

SOCIO 500: Sexuality and Society

Nadia Shapkina

A&S

PSYCH 590: Cross-cultural Psychology

Satoris Culbertson

A&S

DANCE 205: Dance as an Art Form

Neill Dunn

A&S

HIST 101: Western Civilization I

Marsha Frey

A&S

PSYCH 110: General Psychology

Tammy Sonnentag

A&S

ECON 110: Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 120: Principles of Microeconomics

Amanda Freeman Bill Blankenau

A&S

STAT 350: Business and Economic Statistics I

Abigail Jager

A&S

STAT 720: Design of Experiments

Leigh Murray

A&S

STAT 722: Experimental Designs for Product Development and Process Improvement

Dallas Johnson

A&S

ENGL 200: Expository Writing II

Phillip Marzluf

A&S

COMM 450: Conflict and Communication

Sarah Riforgiate

A&S

MUS 249: Music Appreciation: Music of the World

Elizabeth Robinson

BUS

MANGT 420: Management Concepts

Sabine Turnley

BUS

MANGT 595: Business Strategy

Pamela Barnes

EDUC

EDCEP 886: Fundamentals of Program Evaluation

Linda Thurston

EDUC

EDSP 841: Interventions-Functional EDSP 885: Practicum-Functional EDSP 849: Interventions-Autism Spectrum Disorders

Warren White Marilyn Kaff

EDUC

EDCI 786 EDCI 786: History of Mathematics Education EDCI 821: Advanced Methods in Teaching K-12 Mathematics EDCI 786: Research in Mathematics Learning and Teaching Assessment in Mathematics Teaching and Learning Strategies for Inquiry in Mathematics Differentiating Instruction in Mathematics

David S. Allen Sherri Martinie

ARCH

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION


FY13 GRANT FUNDING

College

Proposal Name

PI Name(s)

EDUC

Professional Development Services

Mary Devin David C. Thompson Debbie Mercer

EDUC

EDCI 786 and EDCI 502 Meeting the Needs of All Students Reading/Writing Skill Development and Application Effective Teaching Methods Mathematics Skill Development and Application

Lotta Larson

EDUC

Common Core Math Topics - Noncredit Courses Developing Essential Understanding for Numbers and Numeracy Rational Numbers Ratios and Proportional Reasoning Functions

Melisa Hancock

EDUC

Integrating Universial Design for Learning into Online Learning Assessment Research

Haijun Kang Tim Frey

ENG

ARE 729: Seismic Design for Buildings

Kimberly Kramer

HUM EC

FSHS 300: Becoming an Effective Parent

Mary DeLuccie Aaron Norton

HUM EC

FSHS 708: Topics: Ethical Reasoning in the Emergence of Caring and Integrity

Charles A. Smith

HUM EC

FSHS 700: Early Childhood Education: International Perspectives

Bronwyn Fees

HUM EC

B.S. in Public Health Nutrition

Mark Haub Sara Rosenkranz

HUM EC

HN 844: Nutritional Epidemiology

Ric Rosenkranz

HUM EC

FSHS 767: Behavioral Finance FSHS 768: Research and Theory in Financial Therapy

Brad Klontz Sonya Britt Kristy Archuleta

HUM EC

Assessment Tool and Process for Evaluating Distance Courses

Mark Haub Linda Yarrow

HUM EC

FSHS 322: Transition to Parenthood

Roudi Nazarinia-Roy

VET MED

AP 890: Research Ethics (Michael Kenney) DMP 850: Domestic Animal Immunology (Melinda Wilkerson) DMP 815: Multidisciplinary Thought and Presentation (Justin Kastner and Abbey Nutsch) DMP 880: Scholarship in a Busy Age (Justin Kastner) CS 874: Clinical Pharmacokinetics (Ronette Gehring) Animal Health Seminar (Bob Larson) Regulatory Issues (Mike Apley)

Michael Kenney

dce.k-state.edu

41


AWARDS AND PRESENTATIONS

RECOGNIZING THE BEST

REGIONAL ACHE Noncredit Program Award: Go Teacher Program Colleague to Colleague Jonathan Bacon Outstanding Leadership Award: Sue Maes, Dean of Continuing Education UPCEA Professional Continuing Educator Award: Rosemary Boggs, Program Coordinator UPCEA Mature Noncredit Program Award: Academic Chairpersons Conference UPCEA John L. Christopher Outstanding Leadership Award: Bettie Minshall, Program Coordinator

AWARDS WON IN FY13

UPCEA Innovative Noncredit Program Award: Go Teacher Program UPCEA Innovative Credit Program Award: Reading Specialist Endorsement Program

NATIONAL ACHE Special Recognition Award: Virginia Moxley, Dean of Human Ecology ACHE Distinguished Non-Credit Program: GEAPS Program UPCEA International Leadership Award: Sue Maes, Dean of Continuing Education Kansas City Meeting Planners Rising Star: Renee Hultgren, Event Manager, K-State Olathe Award Organization Key: ACHE—Association for Continuing Higher Education NUTN—National University Technology Network UPCEA—University Professional and Continuing Education Association

NUTN Shirley Davis Award for Excellence in Synchronous Distance Learning: AGEC 710 Comparative Food and Agriculture Systems

MILITARY 2013 Military Friendly School, G.I. Jobs Magazine 2013 Top Military Friendly Colleges and Universities, Military Advanced Education

UNIVERSITY RECOGNITIONS 2013 President’s Award of Excellence for Unclassified Professionals: Bettie Minshall, Program Coordinator DCE Classified Employee of the Year: Nichole Stoddard, Senior Administrative Specialist

DCE HONORS AND AWARDS Outstanding Advising Award: Jennifer Pfortmiller, Affiliate Site Manager Extraordinary Student Award: Michael Feingold, Food Science ’13

42

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION


AWARDS AND PRESENTATIONS

PINNACLE HONOR SOCIETY A total of 77 students were inducted into K-State’s chapter of the Pinnacle Honor Society in 2013. This non-traditional student society accepts students with a record of academic achievement, leadership and service. New members were inducted at the Division of Continuing Education’s Honors and Awards Reception on May 1.

DCE STAFF PRESENTATIONS David Stewart, Associate Dean of Continuing Education; Lynda Spire, Assistant Dean of Continuing Education; Ellen Stauffer, Program Coordinator; Janice Nikkel, Program Coordinator; Linda Morse, Continuing Education Liaison, Registrar’s Office (Retired); Melinda Sinn, Director of Marketing and Communication Services

Sue Maes, Dean of Continuing Education • UPCEA National Conference “Go Teacher Model, Structure, Objectives, Successes and Challenges as They Relate to the University” Jennifer Pfortmiller, Affiliate Site Manager • Kansas Work Force Summit “Degree Completion as an Economic Development Strategy” Chuck Thorpe, Instructor, SVS High School Spanish • Kansas World Language Association 2012 Conference “Internet Safety for Teenagers: Authentic Video ‘Texts’ from Argentina and Spain”

• K-State 150th Celebration Brown Bag Luncheon “Historical Presentation on the Development and Growth of Distance Education at K-State”

Linda Teener, Director of UFM Community Learning Center

Sharon Brookshire, Director of Conferences and Noncredit Programs; Lynda Spire, Assistant Dean of Continuing Education

ACHE Regional Conference

• Conferencing Class “DCE and Conferencing”

• 2012 Built Environment and the Outdoors “How to Create a Community Garden”

UPCEA Regional Conference Lynda Spire, Assistant Dean of Continuing Education; Rosemary Boggs, Program Coordinator • “E-Learning Faculty Modules: Building Excellence through Collaboration” Sue Maes, Dean of Continuing Education • “Dean’s Panel: What’s Coming and How Are We Going to Successfully Navigate It?” Renee Hultgren, Event Manager, K-State Olathe; Tony Ballard, Conference and Noncredit Program Coordinator • “Start-Up Challenges: Opening and Operating a New Conferencing Facility” Tanya Beninga, Conference and Noncredit Program Coordinator • “Reaching More Audiences without Reinventing the Wheel: Repurposing Educational Content”

Jason Maseberg-Tomlinson, Director of Student and Faculty Services; Rosanna Vail, Communications Coordinator

Lynda Spire, Assistant Dean of Continuing Education

• “Student Communication and Marketing Strategies for Distance-Accessible Events”

• Innovations in Teaching and Learning Conference “Take 5: Teaching Technologies that Work”

Jennifer Pfortmiller, Affiliate Site Manager

Sue Maes, Dean of Continuing Education

• “The Kansas 2+2 Community College/University Partnership Model”

• Kansas House of Representatives Vision 2020 Committee “Presentation on the Future of Higher Education: Bricks and Mortar or Virtual Campuses” dce.k-state.edu

43


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7139

Annual Report 2013  

FY13 Annual Report for the Kansas State University Division of Continuing Education

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