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THE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

Issue 194

I

novembeR 2020

MAGAZINE

BAGS OF STYLE

High-end handbag maker seeks Bristol ambassador

WINTER CHEERS

Lush local spirits and seasonal cocktail inspo

THE SCIENCE OF HAPPINESS Axx

Brxx Professor Bruce Hood’s life hacks

WE SHALL REMEMBER THEM

The stories and sacrifices of Sikh soldiers in WWI

Keeping

the faith PALOMA ON MUSICAL MISTAKES & MAKING IT TO MOTHERHOOD; BRISTOL’S FILMIC RECORD LABEL ON HOLLYWOOD SUCCESS; AND THE LOCAL RELEASES WE’RE LISTENING TO

AND SO MUCH MORE IN THE CITY’S BIGGEST GUIDE TO LIVING IN BRISTOL


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A beautiful Woodhouse & Law interior on Cumberland Road

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38 66 Contents November 2020 Check out Bristol duo Tiny Dyno this month

REGULARS ZEITGEIST

REMEMBRANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 The often overlooked First World War stories of Sikh soldiers

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Top activities for the month to come

CITYIST

Sikh soliders on the march in 1914

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ARTS

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Catch up on local news and meet Professor Madhu Krishnan

BOOKS

BARTLEBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 ...On Covid limbo and the inestimable value of the arts

Staycations are the new vacations, so new guidebook 111 Places In Bristol That You Shouldn’t Miss is perfectly timed

SHOP LOCAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

RETAIL

A trio of creative indie retailers to try for Christmas gifts

John Lewis & Partners on working hard to stay relevant on the high street and navigating the pandemic

HEALTHCARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

40

Local exhibitions, and North Bristol Arts Trail which has introduced a virtual strand this year .............................................................................

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52

Bedminster Pharmacy’s Ade Williams on Self Care Week

MEET THE LOCALS

BRISTOL UPDATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Millie Bruce-Watt talks to Westbury-on-Trym’s 007 superfan

Business and community news

PSYCHOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

HEALTH & FITNESS NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

Professor Bruce Hood has launched a podcast based on his University of Bristol course on the science of happiness

Updates from the sector

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MUSIC SPECIAL

FOOD & DRINK

INTERVIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Paloma Faith on an ambitious new album and valuable musical mistakes

Local news from chefs, restaurants and producers

FOLK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

FESTIVE TREATS

Elske Waite on how this ever-relevant genre will survive Covid-19

NEW RELEASES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Just a few of the Bristol musicians we’re listening to this month

MUSIC & CINEMA

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34

Independent film music label Wave Theory Records on cinematic success

BRISTOL CHOIRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Divided but undimmed, local ensembles aren’t resting on their laurels

THE CULTURE FASHION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 All about Amschela; just awarded British Fashion Council membership

007 STYLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 No Time To Die has been pushed back again but, you know, you can always be your own Bond

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50

While this Christmas may be more social bubbles than champagne bubbles, we’ve put a bit aside to spend on special holiday treats

HABITAT INTERIORS

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This month we’ve been taking our interiors inspiration from a gorgeous Grade-II gaff on Cumberland Road

GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Cacti, succulents and air plants are enjoying a massive revival says Elly West, as we spend more time at home than ever before

ON THE COVER Paloma Faith, who talks on p26 about her ambitious fifth album, making it to motherhood, and the value of musical mistakes she allowed herself to make during lockdown.

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THIS MONTH WE’LL BE...

Many music venues remain closed but that doesn’t mean brilliant Bristol music has to go undiscovered

Le Cake Walk: Rob This England by Heather Agyepong from Wish You Were Here

from the

Viewing...

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ormally, by November, we’re spending a lot more of our time staying warm, dry and entertained inside the city’s music venues – The Louisiana and The Lanes, Thekla and the Thunderbolt, Canteen and Crofters Rights, Rough Trade and Trinity, and everywhere in between. Needless to say there’s not been nearly so much of that this autumn – although we were pleased to see new venue Strange Brew still able to launch on Fairfax Street and Trinity Presents’ new garden gig series start up. It doesn’t mean brilliant Bristol music has gone undiscovered, especially with lockdown projects such as Thekla’s podcast Isolation Discs and Shambala’s digital channel AiDU TV giving artists an online platform. Turn to p30 for a rundown of the releases we’re listening to this month; the very tip of the iceberg in terms of local talent. Many musicians embraced the spirit of lockdown limitation and DIY creativity, using the extra time to squirrel themselves away and look for latent gold; as did cover star Paloma Faith who says self-producing her latest recordings in her basement gave her the chance to push herself much more, artistically. On p26 she talks about the value of musical mistakes, making it to motherhood and the shady side of the biz. This issue has a musical bent because, despite the sector facing the challenges it does, it’s continuing to do great things, and in times of tumult it’s music that many turn to. The power of the arts can’t be underestimated so we must support creatives where we can. On p28 Elske Waite weighs in with why folk is relevant now more than ever, on p34 we chat cinematic success with film music label Wave Theory Records, and on p36 there are heartening words from our choral ensembles. Elsewhere, while the release of No Time To Die has been pushed back again – must be an especially arduous mission this time – we’ve put together some be-your-ownBond/Nomi style notes (p24) and Millie Bruce-Watt has been chatting with Bristol’s 007 superfan (p60). Professor Bruce Hood, teacher of the science of happiness course at University of Bristol, talks life hacks on p62; while we leaf through a lovely new Bristol guidebook (p44) and, as Remembrance Sunday approaches, look back at the stories and sacrifices of Sikh soldiers in the First World War (p38). And here’s an opportunity: handbag maker Keri Andriana, just granted British Fashion Council designer membership, is on the hunt this November for a Bristol ambassador to celebrate the roots of her Vogue-recommended brand Amschela. Reckon you could be a good fit? Flick to page 16 to find out. That’s probably enough direction. Will leave you in peace to forage the following pages for winter cocktail ideas, indie retail inspo, dreamy interiors and more...

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR

@thebristolmag

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@thebristolmag

Cracking out...

...The Christmas spirits. One of the most exciting to seek out on the high street is Marks & Spencer’s limited edition clementine light-up snow globe gin liqueur with 23-carat gold flakes; £18 for 70cl. Sip with a side of The Crown season four, arriving on Netflix on 15 November.

Browsing... ...Beautiful pieces by Bristol handbag maker Amschela. Turn to p16 for more

Image by Egle Vasi

EDITOR

...The work of Heather Agyepong as part of Arnolfini’s ‘A Picture Of Health’ (from 14 November) – a group exhibition of contemporary women photographers from The Hyman Collection, who have responded to subjects of health and wellbeing. Heather’s work focuses on African American vaudeville performer, ‘Queen of the Cake Walk’ Aida Overton Walker who challenged the rigid, problematic narratives of Black performers.


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ZEITGEIST

© Hannah Vijayan

top things to do in November

Lt Col Clarke is set to speak on 7 November

Listen

A retired Bristol-born army officer who toured the Western Front to locate the First World War graves of almost 40 former pupils of his old school – St John’s Church of England Primary in Worrall Road, Clifton – is set to speak about his research at All Saints Church on Remembrance Eve, 7 November. Lt Col Steen Clarke’s talk will be illustrated with photographs taken during his tour of war graves in Belgium, the Somme area and Northern France. The names of many of those whose graves he located are listed on the war memorial on the junction of Whiteladies Road and Apsley Road in Clifton. Tickets cost £5, which includes a free copy of Lt Col Clarke’s book, Our Heroes, which tells the story of the Great War through the experiences of 37 former pupils of St John’s School.

Admire Wildlife Photographer of the Year is back with a brand new set of stunning images. Throughout November, visitors will be able to immerse themselves in this year’s breathtaking nature photography and photojournalism at M Shed. Now in its 56th year, Wildlife Photographer of the Year uses photography’s unique power to tell stories and spark conversation, while inspiring curiosity in the natural world. Each image has been selected by a panel of international experts, with the winning images having been chosen for their creativity, originality and technical excellence.

• allsaintsclifton.org

Join

Award-winning poet, writer and thinker Claudia Rankine

Running from 18 – 21 November, Festival of Ideas will be hosting an array of online events with writers, poets and thinkers, many of which will focus on trying to find solutions to some of our society’s greatest questions and challenges. With topics including the future of law and democracy, the impact of Covid-19 on women, how work will change, whether the arts can survive the pandemic, and the future of freedom expression, listeners can enjoy over 50 events. This autumn, the likes of Helen Lewis, Mervyn King, Lionel Barber, Claudia Rankine, Gina Miller and Booker Prize nominees Diane Cook and Tsitsi Dangarembga will be speaking at the festival.

• bristolmuseums.org.uk

Starting on 2 November

• ideasfestival.co.uk

Watch Running from 27 November

Enjoy

Revitalising disused office buildings across the country and rebooting work morale for staff still at home, the District Theatre group have created some digital hilarity for the new normal. Performed and streamed live from your company’s abandoned workspace, Murder on the 28th Floor is the fast-paced and hilarious reunion for teams stuck working from home. Running from 2 November, this interactive whodunnit is a chance to digitally vacate the home office and revisit the old for a one-of-a-kind theatrical experience.

Stourhead’s hugely popular Christmas trail returns from 27 November for its second year with a host of new installations. Visitors are invited to enter a world of seasonal cheer, complete with glittering trees, giant baubles and snowflakes. Stourhead’s magical, after-dark, illuminated tunnel of light is set to be better than the last, offering a moment of quiet reflection at the fire garden, aglow with hundreds of flickering flames. Set in the world-famous landscape garden, this is not one to miss this festive season.

• districttheatre.co.uk

• nationaltrust.org.uk/stourhead

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THE CITY St George’s is among those to have received emergency funding

My

BRISTOL Meet the University of Bristol’s Centre for Black Humanities director and academic Professor Madhu Krishnan Born and raised just south of Boston, I moved to California for university, spent six years in France, the Czech Republic, India and China and moved to the UK for my PhD studies. I came to Bristol for my first permanent academic position in 2013. It was one of those crisp, blue spring days, and I walked around the Harbourside marvelling at how happy everyone looked.

Local arts lifeline There were sighs of relief in the city recently as the government announced a £1.57 billion rescue package to help see the live events industry through the effects of Covid-19, which has seen many theatres, galleries and music venues closed since March. In Bristol, we heard that 29 of our much-loved arts organisations would receive a lifeline from the government, helping ensure their future in our communities. The offer went some way towards reassuring employees, employers and audience members that the pandemic would not result in the permanent death of a sector that brought £32.3 billion into the UK economy just two years ago. After months of intense lobbying on the part of cultural leaders, the fund has provided necessary support to 1,385 venues and organisations across the UK. The fate of the arts has never looked so grim, with little or no audiences, shuttered venues, and no end in sight to lockdown restrictions. In August, venues showed their solidarity by lighting up red, symbolising the sector going in to ‘red alert’ amid the pandemic and calling for urgent government support. The lobbying simply highlighted how heavily reliant the industry is on an ecosystem of thousands of freelancers, designers, technicians and performers, many of whom have been left without any form of income. Bristol’s recipients applied for grants of under £1 million in the second round of the Culture Recovery Fund. St George’s Bristol, Bristol Old Vic, SS Great Britain Trust, Watershed Arts Trust were among those able to secure a place on the list. Although the fund has come too late for some organisations and there are still no clear guidelines outlining the industry’s safe reopening, we celebrate the development for these community cornerstones that provide joy and escape for both performers and audiences alike.

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The Centre for Black Humanities was established three years ago. The Faculty of Arts has expanded significantly with huge growth in staff numbers working on topics relating to African and African diaspora cultures, including Black British literature, African American writing, Black arts, hip hop, philosophy, race and social justice, Black history. A big part of why we felt this was so important had to do with being in Bristol; an important site in terms of its role in the transatlantic slave trade, but also as a crucible for Black artistic and cultural production. Despite being a vibrant, diverse city, Bristol remains incredibly unequal. It has been eyeopening to see the stark differences between where I work, and where I live in East Bristol. At the same time, there’s an entire cultural and intellectual life that feels so separate from the university; it was crucial our work engage with this. We share knowledge with different organisations and it’s been beneficial for the way we think about research. We work with partners across Europe, North America and Latin America; literary collectives in Cameroon, Uganda, Kenya, Nigeria, Somaliland. I hope we keep growing in strength and profile, as a civic, not just academic, institution. The MA in Black humanities is exciting. At the time it was developed, there were no courses of this kind in the UK, focusing on interdisciplinary approaches to explore the intellectual and cultural production of communities of African descent. The MA involves work with local activists, arts and community groups, drawing on cutting-edge research to engage with debates concerning racialised identities, representation and ethics. I’m also excited about a large-scale citizen science programme that would explore new methodologies for understanding city history, legacies and questions of reparative justice. We also recently received funding for a two-year project on Black humanities and health, which is really significant. I love Bristol-Bath Railway path for runs, Frome Valley walkway, Stoke Park Estate, Purdown and

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Twitter: @ProfMadhuK

Greenbank Cemetery for walks. I live close to Sweet Mart, basically the best grocery store in Bristol. Jeevan’s has the best samosas in town and I can’t say no to the vegan cinnamon swirls at the Bristol Loaf. Real Habesha Ethiopian restaurant is my favourite in Bristol. I love poking around all the little shops on Stapleton Road. You can truly get anything here, and the shopkeepers are always up for a chat about how the area’s changed over time. I am at the beginning of a five-year project on literary activism in Nigeria, Kenya, Cameroon, Uganda and Côte d’Ivoire, funded by the European Research Council. Not being able to travel to work with people has been hard but I aim to think about new approaches and keep up with friendships from afar. I’m glad the University is taking work to redress the curriculum seriously. Bottom-up and grassroots work is incredibly important but at a certain stage you need institutional backing to make large-scale change. I’m proud to see how emphatically the University is starting to step up, thinking about its own history and what reparative justice might look like. Dr MarieAnnick Gournet has done incredible work on decolonising the curriculum. I am a trained musician in European and South Indian classical traditions and mostly I listen to classical music (currently Rubinstein playing Chopin) when I work. Other artists on heavy rotation lately include Papa Wemba, Nina Simone, the Vaselines and Tegan and Sara! If I was mayor, I’d deliver better bus links. Outside of the centre it can be really hard to get around if you aren’t able to walk or cycle. n


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THE CITY

WINTER CHEER

Models wanted! Film fans in Bristol are being offered the rare opportunity to take home a part of the city’s history in celebration of the silver anniversary of Wallace & Gromit: A Close Shave. To mark this moment in the region’s heritage, the creators at The Vine Lab have partnered with Aardman to design an exclusive collectors’ model of one of the most memorable scenes from the short film. The detailed silver effect model will depict the moment that Gromit flies into the air in his sidecar plane at the end of the sequence that ultimately leads to the demise of the film’s villain, Preston. In a nod to the film’s original release date, there will be just 1,995 models available as part of the special edition release. However, in order to make the concept a reality, The Vine Lab is asking Early artist's impression of the local fans to pledge their interest in anniversary Gromit model securing this unique piece of Bristol’s history via Kickstarter, the crowd-funding platform that supports creative projects to come to life. The site is live until 26 November, or until all the models have been claimed. • kickstarter.com/projects/thevinelab/ wallace-and-gromit-a-close-shavecollectors-model

A city of givers Bristolians have donated more than £30,000 to support homeless people through the city’s TAP for Bristol contactless donation scheme since it launched just over a year ago. To mark World Homeless Day on 10 October a new TAP point was installed at Bristol Temple Meads station, Royal Fort Gardenssupported by Network Rail. The City Centre BID has also made its second (image: Barbara Evripidou) £10,000 donation to help homeless people move into new, permanent homes and to support and prevent people at risk from losing their home. A portion of the donation is going to homelessness charity St Mungo’s, facilitating personal budgets of up to £500 for up to 10 people to buy items for their new homes, helping them move away from the streets for good. Caring in Bristol has warned that even more people are facing home insecurity and that there will be a sharp increase in evictions as a result of the pandemic. The charity is using its portion of the funding to continue its homelessness prevention and early intervention support, training volunteers and funding a money advisor and a housing advisor. The additional investment has helped fund intensive advice case work, via Bristol Housing Advice Service, for people at risk of homelessness. Together these charities have also produced a bespoke ‘housing support handbook’ containing vital information on people’s rights and sources of advice for tenants and homeowners. “It says so much about our great city and the spirit of Bristol that even through the toughest of years people have donated an incredible £30,000 to help homeless people and those at risk of homelessness,” says Vicky Lee, project lead for TAP for Bristol at Bristol City Centre BID. “Bristol’s TAP points offer a fast, easy and safe way to donate money in a way that delivers real impact.” Steven Dodds, partnerships and grants manager at Caring in Bristol, added: “Demand for good-quality housing advice from people worried about losing their home has rocketed and the TAP partnership is working hard to ensure they find it. Seeking housing advice early really works to prevent homelessness; over the next 12 months we will be working to ensure Bristol communities have somewhere to turn.”

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Irish Espresso Martini The team’s winter take on an espresso martini. We’ve spiced it up by using Don Papa rum, which is, hands down, one of our favourite spirits on the bar. It’s got an amazing honey and vanilla flavour, which works so well with a creamy liqueur like Baileys. Paired with our medium-roast illy coffee, it’s definitely more indulgent than your standard espresso martini. 40ml Don Papa rum 20ml Baileys 10ml vanilla syrup Double espresso Shake with cubed ice, then fine strain into a martini glass. Winter Portuguese Spritz Harvey Nichols’ late bottled vintage port makes for a great Christmas treat on its own or in a cocktail. White port spritzes were a summer favourite for the HN team, so we wanted to make a version that works in the colder months. The LBV port is jammy, chocolatey and a touch spicy, so works really well in this. 35ml Harvey Nichols LBV port 20ml bramble gin liqueur 30ml coke 1 dash chocolate bitters Top with soda Build in a wine glass with cubed ice, and then stir to serve. ■

• justgiving.com/campaign/tapforbristol

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Five -minute refreshment This year, as we’ve not been out on the town quite as much, we’ve found ourselves getting more creative with the cocktails in the kitchen. With winter on its way, we asked Harvey Nichols Bristol’s cocktail experts Adam Polec and Karol Hladki to put their heads together (only figuratively, mind) for new-season inspiration.

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Covid Limbo

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he other day I did something for the first time in more than six months. Come to think of it, there are quite a number of things I haven’t done much lately. I haven’t been on a train. I haven’t set foot inside my local library (which is still closed, though I’m not sure why). I haven’t seen any number of people I normally encounter during the festival of local events that constitutes autumn in our part of town. And until the other day I hadn’t been to an art exhibition. You no doubt have your own list of things you miss: football matches or trips to the theatre, or singing in a choir or dancing at a nightclub (it’s been a lot more than six months since I did that, which is probably a good thing). Things are much worse for the people who would usually be providing us with the entertainments we enjoy. They’re out of a job, after all. Yet I don’t think we should underestimate the effect Covid Limbo is having on all of us, because how we cope with this condition may determine how quickly they can get back to work. Recently I was chatting with an older neighbour who has always been a great self-educator. She loves going to lectures, especially about art, and used to give me tips on which improving events I should attend. When lockdown was imposed her lectures were all cancelled and she was inconsolable. Why did I miss that lecture on the PreRaphaelites? She lamented. Now I may never get another chance! I didn’t see her for a while and when I did she was much more cheerful, having discovered the online webinar platform that sounds like a ’70s ice lolly (you know the one). “It’s not like the real thing,” she said. “But it will have to do for now.” That was in May. More recently I asked her again how she was coping without the cut and the thrust of the lecture hall, and this time she answered with a big smile. She much preferred online lectures, she said – no more wind and rain! But what about her friends? Coffee? Chats? Oh, I do miss all that, she said, faltering slightly, but you know… I did know, because I’ve been feeling the same way. Before lockdown I was a GWR frequent flyer (or equivalent thereof), and when in London I’d be in and out of the Tate and the National Gallery. In fact, wherever I went I’d check out the local art gallery or museum, and back home I rarely missed a show at the RWA or Arnolfini. Looking at art (old, new, weird, boring – I’m not fussy) had been a sort of colourful strand running through the weave of daily life. For years. For ever. Then came lockdown and that strand snapped. The great hiatus was followed by a tentative reopening. Art galleries and museums in Bristol and Bath invested time, money and goodwill to ensure they were safe for visitors. Exhibitions started up again. Yet through the summer and into the autumn I found myself trapped in Covid Limbo. It wasn’t that I was scared of the virus, because I’m pretty fatalistic. Nor was it a case of making a deliberate choice not to go to this thing or that. It was more that something had been extinguished. I’d got used to a smaller life that revolved around dog walks and Scrabble. An art exhibition? You mean, out there?! It was of course Ms B who dragged me – not kicking and screaming but limp, like someone rescued from a cult – to Arnolfini, where a new exhibition had just opened. I walked in and for the first time in months stood in front of a painting – not a picture of a painting but an actual canvas covered in richly coloured paint. Somewhere inside me, a light blinked on. ■

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FASHION

Image by Egle Vasi

We are utterly obsessed with this look and can’t wait to see what the Amschela gang come out with next

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FASHION

Bags of style Born in 2017 and quickly spotted by Vogue, Tatler, Vanity Fair and London Fashion Week, Amschela is the beautiful Bristol handbag maker with beautiful ethics to match. Excitingly, this month it’s looking for a local brand ambassador...

C

onfidence, resilience and transparency are the cornerstones of CEO Keri Andriana’s Bristol-rooted brand, and the qualities they hope to inspire in the Amschela wearer. With luxury and ethics on equal footing at the centre of the ethos, this year the brand has made the pledge to transition into becoming fully vegan, and two of its bestselling handbags – the Thais croc mini and the Rene Brunel – already hold PETA-approved vegan status. Proud to be a part of our creative, culturally diverse city and keen to celebrate its home and reflect the city in its content, the company has made its next challenge to find a Bristol ‘face of Amschela’. We’ll let Keri tell you all about her journey and values – maybe you’d make a great fit.

hardship and challenges – being a business owner doesn’t take that away. It’s important that we are able to relate to what the real world is feeling – people are losing their jobs and their homes during this pandemic, both of which are things I have experienced. I hope my story inspires someone in either situation to hang on in there and know things will and can get better.

My grandmother was a seamstress and as a child I would spend weekends with her. I became fascinated by watching her sew. She used to make clothing and it amazed me. She was a great lover of handbags and as I grew up she would give me her old bags and I would revamp them to make them current.

I love Fendi because they stepped out of the normality of what a handbag should look like. I think it’s definitely where I get my love of embellishments from. They set the trend to be daring and bold and this resonates with the current Amschela woman.

I was made redundant while working in the legal profession in 2016 and decided to take six months off to source my next role. I began to spend more time on that old hobby of mine: making bags. My children suggested I do it full time and that’s really how it happened. I wanted to go to handbag design school and learn the trade formally, but I could not afford it, so I turned to free courses and YouTube tutorials for a year and taught myself how to make more functional bags for the consumer. It became my full-time job. I was scared but I already had the basic skill and I knew if I just applied myself correctly I could do it. Appearing in British Vogue was our breakthrough moment and it took my breath away. We have now featured twice – June and September 2018. The feedback was amazing and led to us appearing on BBC Points West. Amazing opportunities started to come our way.

CEO Keri Andriana

It’s important to be honest and real as a business owner, especially in these tough times. As a brand we like to show our human side and relate our handbags to real-life women who have worked hard to be successful in their own right. Our bags serve to enhance character and individuality as opposed to overpowering it. I think the consumer has had enough of the ‘gloss and glamourisation’ of life – they want to see real people who they can identify with. They want to see something of their life in yours. We are all human and no-one is exempt from

I really like abstract art – I like to look at things with no concept and then create a concept of what I think it is. My designs are also quite open-flowing, so I never have an idea of a particular bag but once I start designing, the layers usually just form. I also get inspiration from ancient architecture and recently I have been looking at flooring.

I had wanted to take the brand in a vegan direction for some time so we designed ‘Thais’, a vegan croc mini bag made of 100% polyurethane and tencel cotton. It was a great day when we learned that it had acquired PETA approval; she is now one of two vegan products that we hold. We are one year into a three-year pledge

Could you be Bristol’s Face of Amschela? Throughout November, Amschela will be looking for a local brand ambassador to help create eye-catching fashion-focused and Bristolcentred ‘out-and- about’ content including Instagram reels, outfit-of-the-day images and videos showcasing the handbags, and editorial shots with an in-house photographer. You must be 18 years old or older, living in Bristol, confident in front of a camera and able to style interesting looks. You should have an engaged social media following, be experienced in taking high-quality photographs (iPhone quality is fine – they’re looking for correct angles, lighting and positioning rather than a fully kitted-out runway photographer), alignment with Amschela brand values of respect and inclusion, understanding of the vegan and ecoconscious values, and a willingness to have fun with the role and produce innovative content. Benefits include a range of luxury Amschela handbags, experience working with an emerging fashion brand, a chance to build your personal portfolio, content you can use on your social media pages, contacts in the fashion and influencer industry, chances to attend industry events and being a part of the fun-loving Amschela family. Send up to 10 full-length OOTD-style photographs of yourself modelling a handbag you love, ideally in a Bristol location; create a 15-second video suitable for Instagram reels; perhaps a flat-lay of building an outfit around your handbag, an OOTD showcase or you and your handbag out and about in Bristol; and tell the team what drew you to Amschela as a brand, what you would like to gain from the ambassador scheme and what Bristol content you would create. Send all of this with your full name and Instagram handle to laura@amschela.co.uk by 30 November to be in with a chance of becoming the Bristol ambassador.

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FASHION

with PETA however I hope to have made the full transition by spring 2021. I no longer wish to contribute to anything that is damaging our earth or supports cruelty to animals. There are so many eco-friendly and sustainable materials that can be used for fashion production. We owe it to future generations to make the planet as safe as can be. The business is in a transition phase that will encompass going fully vegan and, with the introduction of our own unique print, define who we really are. As a small brand we can make some distinct changes without losing the essence of the brand, and as we grow, we learn, we make mistakes, but these things allow us to retain our humanity within the business and shape who we are and what we stand for. Celebrity fans include soul singer Beverley Knight, TV presenters Naomi Isted and Sarah Mulindwa, actress Emily Milburn, Strictly’s Shirley Ballas and TV personality Imogen Thomas. I am so honoured each time one of our bags is worn, and seeing them in the press or on the red carpet always feels surreal as we are such a young brand.

The Rene Brunel – pictured aboard the SS Great Britain

My advice to other small business owners is to keep going until the brakes literally fall off – you have come too far to give up. Pace yourself, operate at your own speed and stay true to your vision. The universe will do the rest if you just have faith in yourself and your capabilities. Never be afraid to also ask for advice and, where you can, look back and help others. I adore my former university UWE. They taught me so many transferable skills in my law degree which I now use daily; great research skills, how to work logically and methodically and be organised. I am a student mentor and have recently taken on two summer interns in our social media department. I was able to offer part-time positions within the business after their internships ended. I hope to always be in a position to help students wishing to go into fashion to get work experience, and for those wishing to go into law, practical advice. Giving back is very important to me. The current climate has been very difficult, even for e-commerce businesses. No-one could have predicted Covid-19 and the destruction that was to follow. The obvious negative was that sales just stopped overnight for all businesses – we are slowly trying to rebuild. The positive is that we have engaged so much more with our loyal consumer base and created a really good digital footprint in the last few months which we think will help us to rebalance. The thing is that you cannot cry over spilt milk, so we are just cleaning up and getting on with it, learning to pivot in the process. Moving into TV and film is exciting – our first film placement is in On The Other Foot by director Fredi Nwaka. Cast members include Tim Faraday and Quinton Aaron and our bags will be worn by the female leads. We have just finished designing our brand print and hardware for our signature line as we seek to enter the high-end market more permanently. From the brand’s creation, I have wanted it to have its own bespoke print and I felt that now, having watched our consumer base take shape, it was time to do that. I worked with an amazing textile and graphic designer from Philadephia who took my vision to a new level. We will always do an affordable luxury range as that is at the core of who we are but we want to be diverse in what we offer. There are some special things coming within the next 12 months. ■ • amschela.co.uk 18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Deb Falke sporting the Thais vegan croc in emerald iris, approved by PETA

Image by Alex Mac

Amschela aims to be fully vegan by spring 2021

Image by Aliyah Rahal

Our biggest challenge has been funding. I started the brand from home, in my kitchen. I shouldn’t say this but at the beginning I really had no idea about how much it would all cost, I just liked to make bags and dived head on in. I had no idea that it would be spotted by British Vogue – when that happened it became really challenging to transition from it being almost a hobby to a fully fledged business on a non existent budget. At the time I was doing everything by hand and running all parts of the business myself and it was definitely very challenging and still is. I hope to crowdfund next year or at least look into equity investment to help us scale up effectively.


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SHOPPING

Top indie trio

This year it’s more important than ever to support our local, independent creatives and retailers – and these three make for a great starting point Clifton Ceramics & Fine Jewellers

Katie Johnston’s sgraffito enamel and silver hoop earrings, £28

These guys have been in Clifton Village for over 15 years, offering handmade, unique, very collectable art pottery from the iconic Moorcroft pottery in Stoke. Over 300 pieces in stock include limited edition vases, pictures and lamps, sought-after by local collectors – often a particular piece catches the attention of a passer-by and they become addicted – although Clifton Ceramics sends worldwide. They’re currently offering a complimentary silk shade with all Moorcroft lamps, and have some pieces from Dennis Chinaworks in Ilminster. The other half of the shop is devoted to fine jewellery at fair prices – new and vintage rings, pendants and brooches. The team looks after couples in search of their first engagement diamond, and others wanting a unique precious stone or dress ring. The shop at 58 The Mall is a treasure trove and open to customers Moorcroft plaques looking for unique from £90 and lamps Christmas gifts but, from £350 due to current restrictions, offering a private appointment service arranged in advance.

Room 212 At this ‘fiercely independent’, multifaceted shop, gallery and community hub on vibrant Gloucester Road – owned by mixed media artist Sarah Thorp – find a beautiful array of jewellery, artwork, soaps and books by local artists and makers. Room 212’s strength is in the incredible variety and high standard of work on offer. Regular customers know there will always be something new, unique and beautifully made every time they visit, and artists are inspired by the original creative work of others. There is generally a theme to the exhibitions and window displays which encourages artists to regularly update and create new work. The aim is to bring affordable art to customers while helping artists make a reasonable living. Check out the quirky Christmas cards and Katie Johnston’s jewellery – this year the shop will be Katie’s venue during the North Bristol Art Trail. She’s Room 212’s most popular jewellery designer and we can see why – we’re adding her enamel earrings to our Christmas list right away. • room212.co.uk Room 212 brings affordable art to customers while helping artists to make a reasonable living from their work. This is Jenny Urquhart’s Autumn in Leigh Woods

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• cliftonceramics.co.uk

Priormade In 2011 Beck Prior – a design and fabrication artist who creates innovative works for theatre, film, public spaces and events – began making jewellery with surplus materials from projects. By 2019 she had opened Prior Shop, showcasing designers who make sustainably crafted homewares and artworks. In the past, sustainably made products had looked recycled and had an overly ‘green’ aesthetic about them. Recycled creations were seen as ‘craft’ and not welcome in the world of high-profile design. Priormade – often commissioned to create largescale interactive games, props, puppets and site-specific art pieces – was established to create contemporary homewares, lighting and accessories, using sustainable, low impact and recycled materials, that would sit comfortably on the shelves of any luxury department store. Attention to detail and craftsmanship is at the forefront of each design, individually handmade in the Bristol workshop, and all offcuts are used to create key rings, magnets and jewellery, or donated to a ‘reusable waste’ charity. “We want to change common opinion,” says Beck, “and highlight that responsibly designed products can be more valuable, well-made and striking than those made irresponsibly.” Sustainably made salt and pepper vessels, £25 • priormade.store


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The NATIONAL ASSOCIATION of JEWELLERS

CLARITY VALUATIONS

Professional Design Consultant

Tel 0117 962 1111

www.julieannepalmer.com

129 Stoke Lane, Westbury on Trym Bristol BS9 3RW

Online shop www.uniquejewellerydesigns.co.uk

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Jewellery After 23 years it’s the end of an Era! Beginning with a gentle wind down in November

Discounts of up to 50% off

October opening hours: Wednesdays, Fridays & Saturdays 11am - 4pm Monday, Tuesdays & Thursdays by appointment only To book a “Jewellery Lock-in” appointment with Alexandra please call 07500 868 535

23 BROCK STREET BATH BA1 2LW • WWW.ALEXANDRAMAY.COM • 01225 465 094

Visit our new-look website

Stay well informed. Stay well entertained. Stay well read...thebristolmag.co.uk

Our What’s On calendar is a great place find things to do And if you have an event to promote - why not take a ‘tile’ and listing - From £35 (ex VAT) Discover thebristolmag.co.uk It’s packed with extra content, fascinating features, lifestyle news, digital editions of The Bristol Magazine (past and present) as well as regularly updated with things to do and enjoy. Follow us on social @thebristolmag or get in touch at info@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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www.priorshop.uk

| 58 West Street, Old Market, Bristol BS2 0BL

HISTORY,TRADITION & QUALITY

Kemps is a fourth generation family jeweller offering a beautiful selection of both new and pre-loved pieces

since 1881

We have re-opened and have taken all necessary steps to ensure our customers and staff are as safe as possible

KEMPS J EWELLERS

1881

9 Calton Court, Westbury on Trym, Bristol, BS9 3DF www.kempsjewellers.com • 0117 950 5090

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No time like the present... While we’ve been waiting for 007, Moneypenny and co to return from furlough, we’ve been putting together a wishlist of inspired gift ideas, and guess what?

...We’ve been inspecting them, Mr Bond. LEATHER SAY LEATHER AGAIN In a collaboration between Michael Kors and the Bond franchise, the character Moneypenny (Naomie Harris) will carry the MKC x 007 Bond Bancroft satchel in No Time To Die. It’s mini style with maximum impact, crafted in luxe calf leather with a roomy interior and it exudes an elegant casual daytime look. £720; harveynichols.com

...When it crumbles... Okay, not the original lyrics as sung by Adele but we had to weave it in somewhere. Posh chocolatiers Charbonnel et Walker have created a delicious drum of James Bond truffles – inspired by 007’s cocktail of choice and elegantly boxed in their iconic signature hat-box style drum. The dark chocolate martini truffles are filled with a luxurious infusion of vodka, gin and rich chocolate, with a twist of lemon. Nice. A treat for 007 enthusiasts. £15, available to order from 007store.com

And stick an olive in it. In No Time To Die, in a bar where James Bond (Daniel Craig) and Paloma (Ana de Armas) enjoy a drink, we can spot a pair of vintage martini glasses. We think these are possibly Paşabahçe Utopia which can be sourced on amazon.co.uk. However these LSA International bar glasses are a a little more classic, hold 180ml, and a box of four are £40; harveynichols.com

DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux) wears David Deyong DiamonDust sterling silver drop earrings in movie Spectre. The earrings are worn in the Morocco scenes; first when Swann and Bond have dinner together in the dining car of the train, then later on in with Franz Oberhauser (Christoph Waltz) at his secret desert villain facility. You can get the look at daviddeyong.co.uk for £199. However if you’re in the market for some real ice, then we spotted these belters... 18ct white gold threeclaw set of round brilliant cut diamond drop earrings from Mallory. Total diamond weight 1.6ct, £5,360; mallory-jewellers.com

ONE BOTTLE IS NOT ENOUGH... Dom Pérignon Champagne has appeared in many James Bond movies and is mentioned in Ian Fleming novel Moonraker when it’s recommended by the sommelier at Blades club in Mayfair while 007 is dining with M. They get through two bottles of the ‘46 vintage. Occasionally, though, a drop may be spilled; as in The Spy Who Loved Me, where Bond (Roger Moore) has a bottle of Dom Pérignon chilling in his train cabin but ends up smashing it on Jaws' (Curd Jürgens) head. The scene is reworked by Daniel Craig as 007 and henchman Mr Hinx (Dave Bautista) in Spectre. We think it’s best not to waste any and enjoy a celebration of only good times. Pick up a good 2008 vintage at Harvey Nichols, £175, 12% ABV, 75cl; harveynichols.com or DBM Wines have an excellent 2009, £129.50; dbmwines.co.uk

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Breaking tradition, and strongly tipped to be the next 007, Nomi (Lashana Lynch) wears an Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra in No Time To Die. The exact watch is a Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150M Co-Axial Master Chronometer with black dial and 38mm case. The case is stainless steel, with a wave-edged design featured on the back. The black dial has a horizontal ‘teak’ pattern which is inspired by the wooden decks of luxury sailboats. The dial shows a date window at six o'clock and rhodium-plated hands and indexes filled with white Super-LumiNova. The watch is powered by the OmegaMaster Chronometer calibre 8800 automatic movement. In the film, Nomi has replaced the standard steel bracelet in preference for the Omega black nylon Nato strap. Cool. For details on the model and similar versions visit mallory-jewellers.com

MOUTHFUL

SHAKEN NOT STIRRED

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TICK-TOCK, MR BOND

A VIEW TO A THRILL Italian actress and fashion model Monica Bellucci is considered one of the most beautiful women in the world. She’d just turned 50 when playing Bond girl Lucia Sciarra in Spectre, commanding the eye and looking ab-fab in Dior and Louboutins. However when asked about landing the role, she said she thought she was replacing Judi Dench as M rather than starring as the oldest of 007’s love interests. Christian Louboutin, So Kate heels, £525; harveynichols.com

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WE HAVE ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD

THE LIVING NIGHTLIGHTS

Since GoldenEye in 1995, the Omega Seamaster has been James Bond's watch of choice. Omega first introduced the Seamaster 300 in 1957 – it was a watch designed especially for underwater divers. More than half a century later, the timepiece makes a welcome return, upgraded and ready for a new generation of adventurers. This Seamaster 300 has a sand-blasted black dial with rhodium-plated hands coated with ‘vintage’ Super-LumiNova. The 41mm brushed and polished stainless steel case is presented on a matching bracelet. A transparent caseback makes it possible to see the anti-magnetic movement. For further details on this model and the Omega range, visit Mallory; mallory-jewellers.com

The first Anglepoise was invented by George Carwardine at his home in Macaulay Buildings in Bath in the 1930s. With the help of steel spring-makers Herbert Terry & Sons of Redditch, the Anglepoise became a household must-have. The original 1208 and the smaller 1227 are highly coveted design icons. Bond’s home furnishing is... let’s say minimal, but as seen in Skyfall, he does have a 1227 on the floor of his apartment and Q has the much later ‘model 75’ on his desk in No Time To Die. Available from Fiat Lux; fiatlux.co.uk

A SCENT FOR A GENT Floris No.89 fragrance was a personal favourite of Ian Fleming and featured in many of the early Bond movies. No.89 takes its name from the number of the Floris shop on Jermyn Street. With orange and bergamot blended with lavender and neroli and undertones of vetiver this is the quintessential English gentleman's fragrance. Comes in two sizes, 100ml (£80) and 50ml (£60) – if you are a secret agent, then a handy travel size is perfect for those missions abroad. Available online at florislondon.com or at John Lewis.

PAY ATTENTION 007 Quartermaster Q has another mug! We’ll never know what happened to Q’s famous Scrabble mug (probably a deleted blooper) but in No Time To Die you’ll spot a McLaggan Smith educational periodic table mug on his desk. Although, interestingly Q (like J) does not appear as an element in the table but is reserved for a future discovery. Pick one up at John Lewis.

THE SPY WHO GLOVED ME Made by Dents in England: a pair of Fleming unlined hairsheep leather driving gloves as worn by Daniel Craig in Spectre. They make the perfect winter accessory... No more coldfingers... (apologies). Available from dents.co.uk or find them at House of Fraser.

FOR YOUR EYES ONLY If you are planning on enjoying a white Christmas – perhaps taking to the mountains for a snow break will be a possibility – then these Tom Ford Eric Wayfarer-style sunglasses are as cool on the powder as they are hot in the sun. A true classic and Daniel Craig wears Tom Ford in Spectre. £266, available from Harvey Nichols. ON HER MAJESTY’S SECRET SANTA LIST

HE’S ONLY LIVED THRICE After surviving a traumatic explosion in his cameo role in Skyfall, he’s patched up and bequeathed to 007 by ‘M’, in Spectre. Royal Doulton’s Jack the Bulldog is still up to the job. He makes a welcome third return in No Time to Die, where he is enjoying his retirement on Bond’s coffee table. Good to see you back, Jack. Available from royaldoulton.co.uk or from House of Fraser.

Prestige luggage brand Globe-Trotter has launched a No Time To Die vulcanised fibreboard luggage collection. The new trolley cases are gorgeous and this fully branded luggage tag, £110, goes very nicely with them; globe-trotter.com

LICENCE TO CHILL

LIVE AND LET TIE

Macallan was one of the first of Scotland’s distilleries to be issued a legal licence. Connoisseurs believe it to produce one of the best single malts too. In Skyfall, the villain Silva (Javier Bardem) claims to know Bond’s favourite whisky, and the Macallan1962 was served regularly... Sadly Sévérine (Bérénice Marlohe) spilled her glass. Chill out like 007, and enjoy a Christmas tipple. Macallan single malt whisky, available at Harvey Nichols; also find out more at themacallan.com

To celebrate Bond 25, Crockett & Jones have released the 007 limited edition ‘James’ shoe. James follows in the footsteps of Crockett & Jones’s world-renowned wholecut Oxford (the Alex model which featured in both Skyfall and Spectre), but with James, Crockett & Jones has embellished the styling and applied its highest grade of shoemaking. Crocket and Jones, £850; crockettandjones.com

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MUSIC

Keeping the faith

From number-one album success through to battling her way to becoming a mother, Paloma Faith’s remarkable trajectory continues as she sets her sights on a chart return with her ambitious new album, reports Neill Barston

Only Love Can Hurt Like This featured a video with an interracial love scene. When US executives asked her to re-shoot it on grounds it ‘wouldn’t sell’, Paloma never spoke to them again

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MUSIC

A

mid a global pandemic, this year has been one to forget for many, but as Paloma Faith reveals, she feels notably blessed by news of her second child’s imminent arrival. After a hugely testing trial of repeated rounds of IVF treatment, the Brit Award-winning singer announced that the latest addition to her family happily coincides with her latest musical baby in the form of her fifth studio album. Since her last release, The Architect, achieved coveted number-one status, Paloma has featured as a coach on ITV’s The Voice Kids, seen herself nominated for a clutch of industry accolades, as well as exploring new territory as an actor in the Batman prequel spin-off, Pennyworth. So, as the coronavirus crisis grimly took hold around the world, the enforced downtime offered her a rare chance to take stock after an intense period of work. As she admits, inhabiting her line of work can often make you ‘whimsical in going with the flow,’ yet she reveals that having a toddler to take care of has, by necessity, required greater time management. “It’s made me go for the jugular more,” she notes, on having to be far more focused. Consequently, being creatively restless, material soon flowed while she was at home completing her latest album, led by its lyrically powerful lead single, Better Than This – a reflection on the fractured state of the world and hopes for the next generation. It stands proudly paving the way for what is a bold, uncompromising record brimming full of confidence and self-assurance, taking on everything from her trademark soulful pop, through to sweeping orchestral ballads that stem from an artist who is at the top of her creative game. “We live in a very volatile world; it now seems as if we only get one chance, so I have been lucky that I’ve been able to put releases out there and put myself on the map,” she says of her latest recording. However, it’s been a far from straightforward journey for the halfSpanish, East London-born singer, who holds a degree in contemporary dance and an MA in theatre directing, which saw her initially consider other artistic directions. But after early stints in cabaret, bar tending and modelling, she gravitated to singing, and has been doing things her own way ever since. There have been pressures along the route, some involving assuming a ‘showbiz age’ several years younger than her actual years for fear of not being given a recording contract, yet she remains very much true to herself. Despite such moments, her debut album provided plenty of vindication in reaching the top 10 in 2009, setting the tone for a career to date packed with notable milestones. There have been plenty of highlights beyond the icing on the cake of multi-platinum sales, including her friendship with the late Amy Winehouse, who she penned a tribute to on her last album. To her credit, she has stood firm on other key issues, notably on one of her biggest hits, Only Love Can Hurt Like This, which featured a video with an interracial love scene. When US executives asked her to re-shoot it on grounds it ‘wouldn’t sell’, she refused, and never spoke to them again, even if it might cost her a stateside breakthrough. She says she’d rather have success very much on her own terms. Her latest recordings, which were self-produced in her basement, allowed her the chance to push herself artistically more than ever before. “I think being at home meant I was completely uninhibited with wild abandon, in a way that I am not when sound engineers are looking at me. Also, I wasn’t afraid to make mistakes, and sometimes those mistakes land in places that are wonderful, and I wouldn’t make them if someone else was there. So, I feel like there’s more intimacy in this record, and that there’s more truth in the way that I am singing,” she explains thoughtfully, noting that the album is very much focused on motherhood and the pressures, hopes and expectations that it brings. While the 39-year-old singer has been frank about the challenges she endured to bring her daughter into the world, a clearly understandable desire to shield her child from media intrusion has been misinterpreted in some quarters as being a conscious decision to raise her as ‘gender neutral’. While it’s led to an, at times, uncomfortable relationship with the media, her engaging and refreshingly honest manner remains greatly endearing to her fans. “It is so great being a mum and I feel very lucky, as the lockdown meant that we’ve spent a lot of time together as a family, which has been a positive. Usually, it had just been

one or the other of us looking after our daughter, who has now started really learning about family,” says Paloma of her now three year old. As she adds, the record’s title track, Infinite Things, is about her youngster, and was inspired by previously reading Argentine writer and poet Jorge Luis Borge’s short story, The Aleph, in which its central character experiences the full spectrum of human emotion, from pain to joy, within a single moment. “With the title track, it’s about seeing things through my daughter’s eyes and is about becoming a parent, and how that is all about continuing humanity. You experience the worst heartache with it. The album is a commentary on society as well, in the respect of issues raised by living in the pandemic, and also knowing people who have lost loved ones. “It’s also about enduring love, as we’re most used to hearing about the initial parts of a relationship on that first spark, so it’s an area that’s under-represented. I think there’s a big cultural hole there that I’m aiming to address,” notes Paloma, who isn’t afraid to tackle some difficult subject areas that many would shun. This is most notable on one of the early tracks on the album, Monster, which is a reflection on the darker side of the music business. There’s certainly a bittersweet edge to one of the album’s standout tracks, the spine-tingling ballad If Loving You Were Easy, which would not seem out of place on a James Bond soundtrack – “I was born to do Bond,” she asserts, yet is also acutely aware that the more she mentions it, the less likely it will happen.

[The album] is about enduring love... an area that’s under-represented. I think there’s a big cultural hole there that I’m aiming to address

Whatever occurs, it seems there’s a strong level of support out there for her. She and her other half Leyman Lahcine, a French artist, have endured a lot in recent years, including handling a total of six rounds of fertility treatment. While they may have challenges ahead, including Paloma revealing she’s prone to postnatal depression, they’ve demonstrated a strong degree of resilience. “I’d pretty much resigned myself to giving up with this latest treatment, and I thought that this just wasn’t going to happen. It felt like it was the last chance saloon and I was thinking to myself, where am I am going with this? “With IVF, I think it’s sad that men don’t really talk about it in public, and it’s one of those things where society always assumes that it is a female issue. It’s something that can be hard on relationships,” she admits, keen to put across the fact that they’ve split their childcare as evenly as possible. As if she didn’t have enough to contend with, she’s greatly enjoyed the opportunity to explore acting roles – she describes Pennyworth as an ‘amazing experience’ that she would love the chance to repeat. Clearly, planning for the future is a little hard with a pandemic, but – with performing remaining her grand passion, especially with the added bonus of designing her own sets – the much-travelled singer is anticipating heading out on the road again for a UK tour next autumn. Somehow, beyond being a recording artist, mum and actress, she’s still found time to devote to other personal interests, including being an ambassador for Oxfam and Greenpeace. “When you’re in my industry, it’s easy to lose sight of the reality about the world. The truth is, there are a lot more pressing things going on out there than singing a pop song, so if I can use my platform for the greater good then I absolutely should and intend to,” she remarks, looking forward, in an uncertain world, with a true sense of optimism. ■ • Paloma Faith’s fifth studio album Infinite Things is out 13 November; chuffmedia.com/artists/paloma-faith

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MUSIC

But seriously, folk

Elske Waite on why this musical genre is particularly relevant now, and how it will survive the Covid crisis

I

• Watch The Folk Effect for free, 7pm nightly, 2 – 7 November; @ondervindenuk; ondervinden.com 28 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Image by Jannica Honey

Twelfth Day’s new song for The Folk Effect is released 7pm, 4 November

Image by Neil Thomas Douglas

Rambootan are another of the bands taking on the challenge, releasing new songs on 2 and 7 November

Ways to support your favourite musicians • Spotify's COVID-19 Music Relief project • Help Musicians UK • MusiCares • PRS Foundation • Unison Benevolent Fund • PLUS1’s collective Covid-19 fund • Jazz Foundation's Covid-19 Musicians’ Emergency Fund • New Music USA’s Solidarity Fund • Artist Relief Tree’s fundraising campaign Hazel Askew’s new song is released 7pm, 6 November

Image by Elly Lucas

n 2019 my production company Ondervinden toured a piece of theatre to rural pubs and village halls of the South West. It was a story native to this corner of England – an adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s tragic Tess of the d’Urbervilles – and we were determined to shift the focus away from its downright depressing reputation, and onto the overriding power of community and love. In order to do this, we decided we wanted to take the story of Tess back to a Victorian folk setting, and so we promptly enlisted the collaboration of a small folk band. This was without doubt the decision that made the show. Previously we had enjoyed folk music, we had participated in folk music, but after touring our Tess we saw the true effect of folk music. The community it sparked between the performers and audience, who were strangers to each other until minutes before the first notes of the show were played, and who by the end of the evening were laughing and sharing jokes and stories and pints together; this was something we had never anticipated. I have treasured clips saved of audience members throwing themselves gleefully into wild, lawless country dances while the band blasted through their tunes, and I will never forget the tears shed during the most moving scenes, which we told not with words, but with a guitar. In our touring we saw our music unite – in joy and sadness – people of all ages, backgrounds, tastes and opinions, and the experience has left me in no doubt of this: that the effect of folk music is uniquely powerful, and it is best when it is shared. When that becomes impossible to do in person, in the physical present, new ways must, and are, being found. One of these ways, which my company has initiated, is our week-long online folk music event: The Folk Effect, which we are trialling as a new evolution of musical collaboration. Thanks to support from Arts Council England the project has been fully funded, and will be available to watch for free on any screen or device of your choice from the 2 – 7 November. Its goal: to get people enjoying and engaging in the spirit of live, spontaneous music again. The Folk Effect is inspired by the spirit of sharing that we feel that folk music celebrates. Traditionally a folk song or tune has no ‘original author’; instead that importance is placed upon the chain created by the teaching and sharing of tunes musician to musician, each learning, adapting, and creating their own interpretation, then passing it on to the next musician. The music belongs to no one. You engage with it, you enjoy it, and then you pass it on. This is precisely what our new event has determined to do. We have programmed five folk artists and bands – based all across the UK – and through the course of one week we are giving them 24 hours, in turn, to write an entirely new folk song, each one directly inspired by the song of the day before, and directly inspiring the song of the next day. Our bands include both established and emerging folk musicians, in a way that leans on folk’s generational handing down of tunes, and we want the public to engage too. The challenge of ‘create and share’ is open to anyone who feels inspired. Engage, enjoy, and share: this is the premise of the whole week. It is the premise of folk music, and we believe it is an antidote to a year that has been, like Tess had been, downright depressing. We feel lucky to have felt first-hand the effect of folk music on a community, and to know its ability to leap the impossible gap between disconnected individuals, bridging and building across that sense of isolation – and we are all isolated now. When facing a crisis that shatters the internal as deeply as the international, we must look to the things that have bound and unified in spite of loss, or change, in spite of time. My company chooses to look to music; engage, enjoy and share in a folk tradition that has worked its effect for countless years, and we hope you will too. ■


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MUSIC

Isoldé translates ancient expression into contemporary art-pop aesthetic

On song

Despite the challenges currently facing the city’s incredible creatives, the calibre of Bristol’s musical output is stellar

Yola – Hold On

One of the West Country’s most successful musical exports of the moment, Yola is due not only to open for Chris Stapleton at Madison Square Garden in New York next year, but to make her headline debut at The Ryman Auditorium. She’s just released empowering self-penned song Hold On, raising money for the MusicCares and National Bailout Collective and featuring members of The Highwomen including Brandi Carlile and Natalie Hemby on backing vocals. Hold On is inspired by conversations Yola had with her mother while she was growing up, explicitly warning her of the systemic racism, colourism and unconscious bias she would experience in life as a Black woman. Lyrics include the lines: Mama said to me stay bold / No matter what they tell you girl, stay bold / Everyone that seems alright / Has a soul that’s hurting, deep inside. “Hold On is a conversation between me and the next generation of young Black girls,” says Yola. “My mother’s advice would always stress caution, that all that glitters isn’t gold, and that my Black female role models on TV are probably having a hard time. She warned me that I should rethink my calling to be a writer and a singer but, to me, 30 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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that was all the more reason I should take up this space. Hold On is asking the next gen to be visible and to show what it looks like to be young, gifted and Black.” Give this uplifting tune a listen for the layers of evocative harmonies, beautiful lead vocal – oh, and Sheryl Crow, no less, on the old Joanna. • iamyola.com

Emily Breeze – Confessions Of An Ageing Party Girl

On all digital platforms via Sugar Shack Records, the second single from Bristol chanteuse Emily Breeze’s forthcoming album retains her beautifully crafted pop noir trademarks. A glitter-drenched gothic disco anthem as slinky as a Blondie classic, its tough, world-weary melancholy recalls cult weepy bangers like Amanda Lear’s Follow Me or Agnetha Fältskog’s Wrap Your Arms Around Me. Breeze’s 2019 album Rituals saw comparisons to “a 21st-century Patti Smith” (Tom Robinson), “Nancy Sinatra on ketamine” (Louder Than War) and “the seedy kitchen sink romance of Pulp, the glamorous artful tragedy of Nick Cave” (God is in the TV). Now, swimming in luxuriant synths and whipped along by a minimalist beat, Breeze sashays through the dancefloor casualties to deliver a vocal of beguiling depth on joyously sad cut Confessions Of An Ageing Party Girl. Billed as a

Image by Jesse Wild

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olitical messages, freedom and empowerment, escapism, fantasy and images of better times; these have dominated the music of some of the most turbulent periods throughout history and helped people to get through them. The value of that, and the impact of the creative arts more widely, cannot be underestimated. The music being created during tumultuous 2020 – the corona canon, perhaps – is no different. Despite the challenges facing their sector, Bristol musicians have squirrelled themselves away, continued to do what they do best, and panned for gold. Lockdown also spawned new collaborations and projects that finally got the time to breathe and develop. Our current listening recommendations, from established homegrown acts to the up and coming, are as follows...


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MUSIC sing-a-long torch song for those who should have left the party three hours, five drinks, or possibly 10 years ago, it goes out especially to those who could never resist the yearning to stay out late and fall in love under an out-of-focus glitterball. • Instagram: @emilybreeze66

A wheezing Trump on the White House balcony; a tech giant insisting that theirs is a utopian workplace; armed right-wing militia protesting lockdown; a chief medic silently aghast at the suggestion of injecting disinfectant. These are the images that inspired Wïlderman’s debut offering as the series of unfortunate events that has been bookended by the beyond-bizarre 45th US presidency that has unfolded across the pond. Wïlderman is the alias of Bobby Anderson – son of singer and composer Carleen Anderson and grandson of James Brown’s right-hand man, Famous Flames founder Bobby Byrd. An intrinsic part of the fabric of Bristol’s live music scene for 15 years, Wïlderman is known for a seemingly effortless command of distinctively raw, soulful vocals.

Image by Tom Ham

Wïlderman – Who Wants To Be An American?

Idles just scored their first UK number-one album living through fuelled the songwriting, and lockdown gave it the time, space and imaginative oxygen to breathe,” Wïlderman explains. “People are sick of having beliefs shouted at them and told their opinion doesn’t count. I hope this track can open some conversations.” Encouraged to embark on a solo project by a long-time collaborator, Massive Attack’s Stew Jackson, Wïlderman cleared out his spare room to create a studio and departed from the safety of band parameters to find his own sound. With influences that include Bob Dylan, The Strokes, Credence Clearwater Revival, and a hint of Cyndi Lauper, what he found was pretty multifaceted. The diverse sounds on the forthcoming album include krautrock, haunting uke riffs, soft, dreamy sonics and soaring choral harmonies, with themes spanning politics, heartbreak and obsession.

We’ve always held the US up as the pinnacle of Western society, but they’re just making it up as they go along

Born in Los Angeles, California, but moving to the UK aged nine, Wïlderman counts himself a Brit but has always felt keenly his US heritage. It was this feeling of duality – akin, he says, to watching a load of toxic drama transpire among a group of friends he no longer drinks with – that led to the penning of the track. “We’ve always held the US up as the pinnacle of Western society, but they’re just making it up as they go along. This is a different way of viewing a subject we’ve been batting around for so long; of distilling and articulating all the ideas floating around between us to try and make sense of things.” Tinged with Americana, its lifeblood a powerful vox that doesn’t fail to deliver a shiver, the folk-flavoured Who Wants To Be An American can be seen as a peaceable protest yarn. A philosophical commentary set to archive footage of everything from the civil rights movement to the BLM protests of today, it illustrates Wïlderman’s knack for lyrics that communicate what everyone’s thinking but hasn’t quite worked out how to say yet. “The frustration and uncertainty of the times we’ve been

• Instagram: @wilderm_a_n

IDLES – Ultra Mono

The hugely successful Bristol act have just scored their first UK numberone album with Ultra Mono – recorded in Paris, produced by Nick Launay (Nick Cave, Yeah Yeah Yeahs) and Adam ‘Atom’ Greenspan (Anna Calvi, Cut Copy) and sonically constructed to capture the feeling of a hip-hop record. Across 12 tracks, the band double down on the vitriolic sneer and blunt social commentary of past work, with themes of active presence, inclusivity, class, gender inequality, nationalism, community and toxic masculinity remaining ever-present. Listen out for vocals from Savages’ Jehnny Beth and contributions from Jamie Cullum. “We wanted to write a song that embodied self-belief, and gave us self-belief – a counter-punch to all the doubt we build up from all the noise we so easily let in,” said frontman Joe Talbot of single Grounds. Model Village, meanwhile, decries often dangerous small-town mentality. “I hated growing up in a city that was really a town that was really a fishbowl,” Joe elaborates. “I left as soon as I could, only to realise the fishbowl didn’t exist... just the fish, and they’re everywhere.”

Wïlderman’s US heritage and feeling of duality inspired Who Wants To Be An American?

• idlesband.com

Katy J Pearson – Return

Image by Seren Carys

Image by John Morgan

‘West Country girl in a West Country world’, Katy releases her debut album on 13 November via Heavenly Recordings – a re-entry into

The songs on Katy’s debut album evolved in the live setting, while supporting Cass McCombs on tour

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MUSIC

Yola’s gorgeous new tune is raising money for MusicCares and National Bailout Collective

music-making after a previous collaborative project with her brother fell foul of the pressures of a major label record deal. “I didn’t write for about seven months,” she reflects. “I was just like: nope, I’m gonna become a gardener, this isn’t happening. Return is about the whole experience of beginning to enjoy writing again.” Between her Bristol bedroom and community arts space The Island, Katy honed her solo craft, learning to rely on her creative instincts, and bringing forth an album just as shaped by the South West as the rich musical history of America’s southern states. “These are the most Suchy, who cites influences ranging from D’Angelo to David Bowie, releases Miss Brown on 2 November

honest and proper songs I’ve written; from my own being, rather than a room with a guy prodding me to tell a traumatic story of my life.” The songs evolved in a live setting – including in support of Cass McCombs on tour – before being taken to the studio of PJ Harvey producer Ali Chant. The result is 10 tracks sliding between lovelorn country, lo-fi folk and glistening pop. Wheedling strings and warm brass herald opener Tonight; sleek, country-inflected ballads bleed into sparse acoustic heart-renders; mechanical drum beats and synths are counterbalanced with baroque incidentals and pastoral imagery – think Stevie Nicks taking a dip in a West Country river. • Instagram: @katyjpearsonband

Suchy Sha – Miss Brown

Born and raised in Bristol, vivacious singer Suchy cites influences ranging right from D’Angelo to David Bowie, Tupac to Timbaland. With a performance style that’s fiery and audacious, engaging and entertaining, and a compact alternative R&B/soul sound with catchy melodies and a Latino twist, Suchy has performed at the world-famous Webster Hall and cut her teeth on the UK festival circuit, including Glastonbury and, even closer to home, St Pauls Carnival. Her latest release Laylow, with its Latino-leaning guitar line, sea of South American strings, ska horns and energised drum and bass moments – perfect, in the words of Ujima Radio, for a pre-curfew-sixperson-rave – recently topped the Amazing Radio and Ujima South West charts. If you see a Laylow poster around Bristol, you can tag Suchy (@suchysha) in a photo of it for a free download of the track. The next single, complete with punchy horn section and cutting lyrical rawness, reflects on real-life experiences of the highs and lows of addiction; a dream-like, melodic chorus designed to reflect the sense of comfort craved. This local soul singer forges a powerful noise that is all her own but meant for everyone. • suchysha.com


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MUSIC

Isoldé – Next Time

Tiny Dyno – Fiction

Apparently Stephen Fry’s mum thinks Bristol experimental pop artist Isoldé is ‘out of this world’ – and that’s good enough for us. We’ve never met her but we’re guessing that she’s a sensible, intelligent sort. Isoldé fuses soul and electronica and incorporates in her selfproduced EP field recordings collected while travelling in India and Nepal. The first track, Elements, available to stream from 1 November, is mixed and mastered by Aneek Thapar (Ninja Tunes), accompanied by a video made during lockdown with local artist/filmmaker Simon Abel (Cabel). It was decided that the track would be released on the first day of the seasonal year – between Halloween and Day of the Dead – to signify a new life cycle. The story of Next Time starts in India, with a dying stranger on the streets of Kolkata. Too late to help, an outsider grapples with how to honour the life of one who is seemingly nameless, alone and otherwise forgotten. Gathering crackles from the crematorial fires, and words

Tiny Dyno are a two-piece pop band from Bristol. Having selfmedicated on a diet of Nirvana, Sylvan Esso and The Strokes during the 2020 lockdown, Emily Gardiner and Tom Kuras eagerly set about writing the songs they never heard on the radio. Without the old distractions of past life, Kuras began writing, maintaining “it was always on my to-do list, but I guess I always found a way of talking myself out of it.” Gardiner and Kuras came together through the Bristol music scene, finding common ground in their love of the infectious tones of indie pop. Music has always been at the centre of their friendship and when the duo put their heads together to make original music they discovered a unique sound, combining their indie influences with an underlying sense of anxiety. “Since the very start, a great song, and anxiety, have always been a huge part of our connection. Tiny Dyno marries the two in some sort of cleansing ritual,” says Emily. Debut single Fiction beautifully demonstrates this, combining Kuras’ ear for lo-fi synth pop with a strong and haunting lead vocal from Gardiner. Produced by Kuras, mixed and mastered by Bristol’s Robot Club and Sonic Mastering respectively, Fiction is woven to express a feeling of cathartic release on the everyday suffering of social angst.

In the spirit of lockdown limitation, the video embraces DIY creativity... even if it means cold water swimming at 6am in a second-hand bridesmaid dress

• Instagram: @tiny_dyno

Tungz – Why Do Anything?

from silent conversation with his spirit as it leaves this world, she brings together small offerings into a process of reconciliation. Back in the UK, Isoldé found herself between seasons, key moments in history, a way of living that we have known and one that is drastically uncertain. After a delay due to Covid-19, the making of the video became a wider response drawing parallels between the time we are in and the travel experience the video was initially about. Incorporating a practice of writing and burning grievances which hold us back, and sending new prayers out on their smoke, it’s a cathartic audio-visual space to reflect on all that has been brought to the surface during this time. In the spirit of lockdown limitation, the video embraces the experimental nature of DIY creativity: working with what you’ve got, even if it means cold water swimming at 6am in a second-hand bridesmaid dress. Challenge can be overcome, personal power can be reclaimed, loss can become gain, and beauty can still be found, even in mud voguing. Born into a family of visual artists, classically trained but exposed to electro thanks to her DJ dad, Isoldé’s experience of sound has always been colourful and textured, drawing upon nature, travel and an early initiation into choral music. With a ‘Björk-like’ desire to facilitate union between the organic and man-made, she explores art as ritual and ritual as art, and the anatomy of sound with inquisitive music production underpinned by the beats and bass of an urban upbringing.

With influences ranging from Herbie Hancock to Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker, Tungz are making a name for themselves as a vibrant emerging act. The Bristol outfit will look to cement the positive ascent with new EP Why Do Anything? – previewed by the bright, bedroom-pop tinged Somebody To Get Shy With – released 30 October with independent label Heist or Hit. The latter, which has a breezy sunkissed-psych aesthetic, sees the group team up with fellow West Country act Bad Sounds – tipped by the Guardian, MTV and Wonderland. “We’ve been fans of Bad Sounds for so long and always felt a spiritual connection to their vibe,” say Tungz. “We got to know them through the Bristol scene, going to each other’s shows and hanging out afterwards. So when the Tungzphone rang and the gang wanted to do a song with us we were buzzed as fuzz. “We’ve only ever produced music at home so it was crazy to see the Bad Sounds mothership and sit side by side, exploring new musical worlds. It was so cool to get to know the guys better, and bring into real life the connection we’d felt to them both as fans and Bristol music people. “The song is about changing relationships: falling for a friend and not knowing how to deal with your new feelings.” The two bands found common ground in taste and DIY mentality, say Bad Sounds. “But the things we’ve each naturally discovered on our own that work for us are really different so we were attacking the same problems but from different angles, with different techniques.”

• isoldemusic.co.uk

• tungz.co.uk; realbadsounds.com Funk-pop’s Tungz

Image by Cameron Nicoll

Image by Kirsten Williams

Emily Gardiner and Tom Kuras are Tiny Dyno – a duo formed during lockdown

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Recording Four Women at Real World

Lady Macbeth’s original motion picture soundtrack is by Dan Jones with Simon Birch on cello

Samantha Ege made a central part of a PhD thesis the resurrection of African American composers written out of history

For composers, by composers Bristol independent film music label Wave Theory Records on adding to Hollywood’s musical folklore

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et up by BAFTA and three-time Ivor Novello-winning composer Dan Jones four years ago, on the back of a long list of film, television and arts projects, Wave Theory was graced shortly after by fellow composer Simon Birch. The duo are now expanding the label into other composers’ work.

TBM: What have been the most exciting projects so far?

DJ: Four Women is up there – a compilation of music by neglected female composers. I’d heard Simon playing some beautiful piano music on his phone and it sounded familiar but I knew I’d never actually heard it. When he explained that it was by African American Florence Price, a composer almost written out of history, it seemed clear that this was an album waiting to happen. His fellow graduate Samantha Ege had made the resurrection of this music a central part of a PhD thesis, and the fact that she had mastered it as a performer, too, sealed the deal. A year later we were at Real World Studios enjoying the culmination of her labours. In a way we were helping her blaze a trail that the BBC has now taken up with its recent series on Black composers – recognising a trait of historical bias that needs redress. SB: Dan’s scores for The Miniaturist and SS-GB, which I had the pleasure of working on as music editor, received two of the three Ivor Novello 2018 nominations for Best Television Soundtrack, with The Miniaturist scooping the prize, so that was a great moment for us. What about in 2020, this most unusual of years? SB: Having started out releasing Dan’s music, what’s been really gratifying is to have two of legendary director Robert Altman’s key collaborators approach us. Allan Nicholls was Altman’s assistant 34 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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director on the iconic films Short Cuts and The Player, and Mike Kaplan is a producer who worked with Altman and was also a close associate of Stanley Kubrick and Paul Thomas Anderson. DJ: Altman asked Nicholls to write the songs for his remarkable film 3 Women and we’ll release that plus another two of his films a little later. SB: We’re releasing a single written by Kaplan to accompany the release of 2001: A Space Odyssey at Stanley Kubrick’s request. It feels amazing to be adding to Hollywood’s musical folklore in this way. DJ: Altman and Kubrick are obviously legends of cinema – they were my directing heroes – so it’s a huge honour to be working with their coterie. And hopefully a sign that we’re doing something right. Why Bristol? DJ: I love Bristol. It’s been my home since I was 11. Sky Orchestra this year [an audio-visual artwork delivering music to Bristol from the sky via hot air balloons] was something of a love letter to the city. But there are frustrating things. Bristol is very self reliant so it often turns its back on some amazing international culture in a way that cities like Birmingham, Manchester, Newcastle or Edinburgh embrace more readily. But I love the fact people are so down to earth about making music here. There is extraordinary talent in the city, and clearly a relentless search for new ideas and ways of working. SB: We’ve also done a lot of recordings in Cardiff with the National Orchestra of Wales who are great and have a fantastic recording hall that rivals Abbey Road. But it makes us wish Bristol had a professional symphony orchestra. I hope in future that we might have the infrastructure to rival those larger cities, because we’ve certainly got the creative talent.


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MUSIC

How did Sky Orchestra come about? DJ: Luke Jerram and I came up with Sky Orchestra in 2003 on the back of a conversation about giant surround-sound pieces across cities. Meeting with pilot Peter Dalby, we made it happen – no funding, and amazing support from Bristol’s ballooning community. I produced the soundtrack in my studio, trying to guess how 14 channels of music would sound, echoing from balloon to balloon – bouncing across huge distances. We got amazing news coverage and received commissions from the Royal Shakespeare Company, The Stratford Festival in Canada; we even opened the Sydney Festival. This year it was Bristol Old Vic that commissioned us. Artistic director Tom Morris rightly suggested that we should reflect Bristol’s diverse talent – an inspired idea, not least given what Bristol has gone through in the last year. We got to collaborate with Vanessa Kisuule, Liz Purnell, Stew Jackson, Grant Marshall and Adrian Utley which made it a dream project. SB: And Wave Theory has managed to put that online to raise money for musicians in Bristol, which right now feels like an urgent call, given how much damage Covid has done.

Dan Jones and Simon Birch

Which brilliant individuals deserve a shout out? SB: Liz Purnell, a brilliant orchestrator and conductor whose contribution to scores such as SS-GB and The Hollow Crown has been invaluable – as well as her work on the Attenborough films. DJ: She’s also a brilliant composer in her own right, which is why we asked her to create a piece for Sky Orchestra. Stew Jackson too. He cowrote some tracks for Louis Theroux’s My Scientology Movie. But I think that besides his work for Massive Attack he’s emerged as one of the country’s leading producers. He has an amazing ear. SB: David Attenborough – he included one of Dan’s On Chesil Beach tracks as the only piece of film music in his classical Mindful Music playlist for the BBC during the lockdown. DJ: I’m pretty thrilled when my mum likes stuff I’ve done, but approval from David Attenborough is humbling. I bumped into him on Cotham Hill once and he very gently said – knowing I’d just scored one of his documentaries – “Music really is the food of love!” I was walking on air for a week.

The duo kept busy during lockdown

What do you think of the Bristol Beacon’s identity shift? DJ: It’s great, and long overdue, that the Colston moniker has gone. It had cast a shadow over the Black community’s sense of ownership and participation in Bristol’s cultural life, and in other ways which are hard to measure. It’s hard to explain to a young child that the future is theirs if a brutally abusive past is enshrined in such a way. It’s another important step in ensuring that Bristol thrives in its diversity. What are your aims for 2021? DJ: We’ve just set up a writing room in Pembrokeshire but as we move forwards the plan is to keep expanding the scope of Wave Theory. SB: It’s been nice to get Dan’s music online but we’re looking to release other artists whose work deserves better recognition. It’s surprising how much music should be available that isn’t. We’re also transferring our catalogue to physical formats – CD and so on. I think people still like to own something they can hold in their hands.

Did you spot the Sky Orchestra this summer? Image by Jon Craig

Tell us something that might surprise us DJ: John Malkovich and Javier Bardem sang Happy Birthday to me in Madrid. It was the opening night of Being John Malkovich but rather than going to the screening, John, who I’d just worked with on Shadow of the Vampire, wanted to take us all out for dinner. To add to the surreal nature of the evening, as a publicity stunt the promoters had handed out John Malkovich face masks which people all over the place were wearing – including Javier. I remember thinking after dinner that I must have jumped through the looking glass. It was an amazing and slightly bizarre birthday. Something I won’t forget. SB: Aptly enough, we’re re-releasing the Shadow of the Vampire soundtrack this year! ■ At the Bristol studio • wavetheoryrecords.com THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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Divided but undimmed

The city’s choral ensembles and orchestras have been restricted but hardly resting on their laurels – we caught up with a few of the most popular local groups to see what they’ve been up to

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andemic or no pandemic, you can’t stop song for long. This is not Bomont, Oklahoma, for one thing, and our musically minded have found ways to work within their restrictions, even if it does mostly involve Zoom. We’ve loved seeing how creative people have got – The SelfIsolation Choir (theselfisolationchoir.com), founded by choral singers to comfort choral singers feeling disconnected, bringing them together to sing glorious works, now has over 11,458 subscriptions from all over the world. Singers learn the pieces online and record voice parts from home before these are combined in the studio. Sunday 1 November, 7.30pm, sees the release of Choirshow 2, a live broadcast of virtual choir videos recorded by 14 different choirs – children’s, community, show and chamber – from across the UK, and edited together in support of Keynsham charity The Music Man Project. On the night, there will be a special live ‘green room’ of the choir directors, a live interval performance and the audience will be able to share comments and celebrate using the YouTube chat function and even join in with some community singing. “Most of my choirs have been rehearsing on Zoom since lockdown began, but with no real purpose or performance to work toward,” says organiser Matt Finch, musical director for Bath Light Operatic Group. “Some began to spontaneously make virtual videos and we started sharing them on Facebook. The feedback was brilliant, but I soon realised there was just not enough people seeing them. I wanted a way of celebrating the choirs’ achievements and an online concert, in collaboration with other UK choirs, seemed the perfect vehicle and the best way forward.” A code for each choir involved has been set up to give audience members £1 off their ticket. They can then donate 25% of the rest of their ticket price to the choir of their choice. At the end of the show

Bristol Concert Orchestra conducted by Stefan Hofkes

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there will also be a big virtual bucket shake in aid of The Music Man Project – a club where adults with learning disabilities make music with friends and learn about performance, improvisation, and composition. Through the coronavirus crisis, the charity has seen a significant drop in income and has set up an appeal page on Just Giving (justgiving.com/fundraising/choirshow2). “This is a chance for us to make a real difference to many local musicians,” says Matt. Bristol’s ensembles have been rather busy too...

Bristol Ensemble

On 25 March, just two days after the start of lockdown, Bristol’s professional orchestra livestreamed the first of what would become a series of over 40 online recitals. Bristol Ensemble’s At Home series included solo performances and duets by a dazzling array of their musicians, from violinists, pianists and flautists, to recitals by a bandoneonist, percussionists and a harpist. The ensemble has also given outdoor concerts, and created video performances which have reached a worldwide audience, including a special Covid edition of I Will Survive which can be found on their YouTube channel. Many of the ensemble’s musicians turned to music by Johann Sebastian Bach for their lockdown recital programmes. For many, his timeless compositions are a source of solace, consolation and hope. It was with Bach’s famous Brandenburg Concertos that the Bristol Ensemble returned to indoor performances, with two one-hour concerts in October at St George’s Bristol. They are back in the hall on 15 November with a more contemporary programme of hypnotic and meditative music, as they perform a concert of the music of the Estonian composer Arvo Pärt – tickets are available now from St George’s box office. • bristolensemble.com


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MUSIC

Bristol Ensemble are due to perform again on 8 November

Image by Evan Dawson.

The bond remains the same: Exultate gathered on St George’s lawn – distanced but singing as though they’d never been apart

Exultate Singers

Thwaite on piano and keyboard. Listen out for Hannah Lawrance’s clarinet opening too – this is more than simply a choral experience – and check out the podcast on the Choral Society website, featuring musicologist Katy Hamilton in conversation with Hilary Campbell and with each of the composers.

In the early autumn sunshine, Exultate Singers gathered in concert dress for the first time since 8 February. With clothes pegs on their black folders to guard against the wind whipping away copies of music, singers positioned themselves around the lawn of St George’s Bristol, finding themselves a spot the regulation distance away from their colleagues, scattered in proud isolation among the shrubs. Feet crunched on twigs and fallen leaves; stationed on the vertiginous steps leading up to the majestic building’s pillared gallery; they basked in brightness on the patio outside the glinting glass doors of the new extension. Distanced from each other, but singing as though they’d never been apart, the choir’s first post-lockdown concert to a live audience on 20 September was an emotional and joyous occasion for singers and audience alike. The choir returns to St George’s on 8 November to give two concerts inside. Safeguards against virus transmission include the choir being reduced in numbers to around 20 singers for each of two performances – divided, but, like a candle flame, undimmed. Singers and audience members will wear face coverings. A silver lining will be the extra resonance of the already famously warm acoustic that arises from having fewer human beings in the building. As the choir lends its voices to the programme, entitled Songs of Hope, the music will uplift spirits with messages of light and love.

Fortunate to be able to perform their 14 March concert at St George’s Bristol just before the lockdown restrictions came into force, Bristol Concert Orchestra’s rehearsal room fell sadly silent afterwards. Recent times, however, have seen a socially distanced return, and the orchestra is hoping to be able to stage some kind of performance soon with a mixture of small live audience and online viewing. In addition to the three main season concerts annually, every October the orchestra stages a free concert of music for children – typically shortened versions of classics such as Swan Lake. These are incredibly popular – reaching family audiences of over 6,000 in total since inception – so it was a shame this October was without this annual dose of musical inspiration for the next generation. However, it is likely that the upcoming performance will be of the family-friendly variety, so do check the website for news.

• exultatesingers.org

• bristolconcertorchestra.org.uk

Bristol Choral Society has sung its way through more than a century. Founded in 1889, it has held concerts every season since, featuring both classical repertoire and contemporary music as it emerged – Elgar, Tippett, Vaughan-Williams and much more. This year has seen a new venture: conductor Hilary Campbell has inspired the choir to produce its first ever recorded CD on the Delphian label, featuring music by Cecilia McDowall, Bob Chilcott and Judith Weir and recorded at St George’s Bristol. All three are living composers and the CD presents a premiere recording of McDowall’s A Time for All Seasons – an evocative reflection on time and ageing, appropriate perhaps for such a momentous year as 2020 – and Weir’s The Big Picture, the title of her masterpiece of musical colours created for Aberdeen Art Gallery in 2019. Making the CD was a challenge but now it is an object of pride and joy, an achievement for the ensemble and a marker for posterity. In Chilcott’s Songs and Cries of London Town, the brilliant young singers in the Bristol Youth Choir play a prominent interweaving role with the older Londoners in the choir. Together, these pieces are essential listening as an escape from the current crises, into a world of creativity, and the experience of putting together the CD has been something the singers say they will never forget. They found producing it was nothing like performing a concert, with every detail, every consonant having to be exact, the balance of voices having to be perfected, and nothing left to chance. They had brilliant soloists in soprano Nina Bennet and Ian Tindale and Annabel

“This might be the last cultural event for a while,” conductor David Ogden told the audience just before City of Bristol Choir’s poignant performance of Duruflé’s Requiem on 14 March in All Saints’ Church, Clifton. Little did he know how true and understated these words would be, but, after almost exactly six months’ silence, thanks to thorough planning and the writing of copious risk assessments and emails, the choir started rehearsing regularly again at St Matthew’s Church. What piece to start with? It could only be a setting of Siegfried Sassoon’s poem Everyone Sang: Everyone suddenly burst out singing / And I was filled with such delight / As prisoned birds must find in freedom… “We had been caged birds, released to find what we had been missing for so long,” says David, “experiencing not only the sound of our voices but a renewal of the camaraderie and friendly atmosphere of rehearsals. Of course, things were not as they were before – we were socially distanced with masks, but isn’t it amazing how expressive one’s eyebrows can be? We send recordings of the rehearsals to those who are unable to attend. We all listened to them, amazed, despite the restrictions, at the quality of sound, the energy and emotion that we managed to pour into the music.” O, but everyone was a bird / And the song was wordless / The singing will never be done.

Bristol Choral Society

• bristolchoral.co.uk

Bristol Concert Orchestra

City of Bristol Choir

• cityofbristolchoir.org.uk THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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REMEMBRANCE

After arrival at Marseilles with a French interpreter

Castle Park’s Sikh war memorial depicts the Khanda

At New Milton Station

On the march in 1914 Lost gardens of Bishop’s Knoll 38 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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We shall remember them

One in six men who fought for Britain in the First World War came from the Indian subcontinent. If their sacrifices have been long overlooked, many in Bristol are determined they should not be forgotten, says Andrew Swift

B

ack in January, the actor Laurence Fox stirred up a storm of protest by accusing Sir Sam Mendes of being ‘institutionally racist’ for having the temerity to cast a Sikh soldier in his film 1917. Fox later apologised, admitting that he wasn’t aware that Indian soldiers had fought alongside British troops in the First World War. Fox probably wasn’t alone in being surprised at seeing a Sikh in a film set in the British trenches. When we remember, as we have done for over a century, at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month, those who gave their lives for their country, the images likely to come to mind will be those of Flanders Fields, of British troops hunkered down in dugouts awaiting the order to scramble out and advance through a hail of machine-gun fire towards the German lines. Beyond that, we may think of Gallipoli, where soldiers from Australia and New Zealand fought alongside British troops, US soldiers flooding over in ever-increasing numbers in the latter stages of the war, or even Mesopotamia, Palestine and Lawrence of Arabia. What we’re unlikely to remember is that one in six of the men who fought for Britain in that war came from the Indian subcontinent, or that the British Indian Army was larger than the expeditionary forces of Australia, Canada and New Zealand combined. Although the war was sparked by a dispute between European nations, this was the age of empire, so those nations dragged their colonies into the war as well. The greatest imperial power was Britain, on whose empire the sun never set, and the jewel in its crown was India. To quell internal discord and protect the north western frontier, there was a huge standing army. Led by British officers, recruits were drawn overwhelmingly from what the British termed the ‘martial races’ – not just because they were good at fighting but also because they had proved their loyalty to the Crown. Sikhs, who had stood by the British during the Indian Mutiny, represented about 20% of the army, despite making up less than 2% of the population. When war was declared on 4 August 1914, Britain, which had not introduced conscription, could mobilise less than 750,000 men. Germany, by contrast, mobilised over four million, as did France. Although a massive recruitment campaign was launched, the new recruits would take months to train. Meanwhile, the German army was marching westward. If they could not be stopped – and stopped quickly – they would emerge victorious. So Britain turned to India, and, on 30 September, 22 ships carrying the first contingent of what one newspaper called ‘unique stalwarts from the east’ arrived at Marseilles. Just over a month later, they headed north by train and marched to the front, where the Guardian described their arrival on 12 November: “It was a curious sight to all of us, French or English, the day when the Indians arrived in a dreary little town of northern France ... Suddenly the Indian Lancers appeared, and the pavement on both sides of the street was filled by a crowd of soldiers and civilians watching the procession ... Those Indians looked all like kings. The Lancers sat proudly in their saddles, with their heads upright under the oriental crowns; then came a regiment of Sikhs, walking at a brisk pace, all big and strong men, with curled beards and the wide ‘pagri’ round the ears ... The day after, we heard that during the night one of the Sikh regiments had had to recapture the trench, which the Germans had taken by surprise, and that their bayonet charge was so tremendous that the enemy did not dare counterattack.” According to one historian ‘the Indian contingent arrived during the First Battle of Ypres, just in time and in just enough numbers to block the gaps. They certainly saved the British from what might have been an embarrassing retreat to the Channel Ports’. Their largest action on the Western Front came four months later at

Neuve Chapelle, where around 24,000 Indian soldiers formed half the attacking force. During the three-day battle, casualties numbered 133 British officers, 60 Indian officers, 1,912 British soldiers and 2,128 Indian soldiers. German casualties were significantly higher, and many Indian soldiers and officers were awarded medals for bravery. Those wounded in action were treated in war hospitals at Brighton and in the New Forest. One wrote home on 31 March 1915: “The Sikhs did not turn even their noses. They were keen for the fight and where one man fell, another from behind stood in his place. And we took pleasure in the battle... Until now God has preserved us, but there is no hope of any of us returning to India. This is no war, but the destruction of the world.” Although Indian troops continued to serve on the Western Front, the loss of so many officers at Neuve Chapelle proved a severe handicap, as those who replaced them could not speak to the men under their command in their own language and were unfamiliar with the traditions of the Indian Army. Although the Indian cavalry divisions would remain on the Western Front till 1917, in October 1915 it was decided to transfer the infantry divisions to Mesopotamia. By the end of the war, Indian soldiers also fought in Persia, Egypt, Palestine and East Africa. In all, over a million Indian soldiers served abroad, of whom 74,187 died. The two battles on the Western Front where they played a decisive role were crucial in holding the British line at critical points in the campaign.

Around 10,000 Sikhs live in Bristol. Many are the descendants of those who fought for Britain in two world wars In the Second World War, Indian soldiers once again fought for the empire. Around 2.5 million served, of whom 87,000 were killed and 67,000 were made prisoners of war. Two years later, India and Pakistan achieved independence from Britain. Today, although the carnage and horror of the First World War seem to belong to a different world, perhaps even stranger is the knowledge that Britain once kept the peoples of the vast Indian subcontinent in thrall. But so it was, and in two world wars soldiers from India fought – and died – alongside those from Britain. But, if these sacrifices have been long overlooked, many are determined they should not be forgotten. Around 10,000 Sikhs live in Bristol. Many are the descendants of those who fought for Britain in two world wars, and in 2015 members of the city’s Sikh community formed the idea of creating a memorial garden in Castle Park, with a Sikh war memorial as its centrepiece. Four years later, on 2 April 2019, the dream was realised when the Duke of Kent unveiled the memorial in the presence of Lord Mayor Cleo Lake, Lord Lieutenant Peaches Golding and members of the local community. The memorial depicts the Khanda, symbol of the Sikh faith, made up of a double-edged sword and a circular throwing weapon called a chakkar, flanked by two single-edged swords. The garden that surrounds it is a place to reflect and remember those soldiers of the Indian army – Sikhs, Hindus and Muslims – who gave their lives in two world wars. It also forms a salutary reminder of a shared history that has been unaccountably and unjustly forgotten, so that this November, as we remember the British soldiers who fought and died, we can also honour the memory of those who fought and died alongside them. ■ THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Closer to Home: a new collection by Elaine Jones, Clifton Contemporary Art, 5 – 21 November

In 2020 Elaine Jones has drawn from the living and elemental forces that surround her Bristol base and beyond

Like the cycle of nature itself, the paintings of Elaine Jones grow layer by layer, texture on texture. They shift and develop and are reduced to be rebuilt again. Embracing natural forms, they are ethereal, restless and lucid. Her sources of inspiration can be found across the world, from the Arctic Circle to Central America, but this year, in unprecedented times, she has drawn from the living and elemental forces that surround her Bristol base and beyond into the South West peninsula. Elaine’s latest paintings conjure the colour, space and feel of places that are closer to home, yet still speak of boundless depth and far distance. • cliftoncontemporaryart.co.uk Pat has created a unique range of titanium dragonfly earrings especially for Rainmaker

Pat Pruitt jewellery collection, Rainmaker Gallery, ongoing

Image by Alice Hendy

In addition to original art, Rainmaker Gallery sources an exclusive range of expertly hand-crafted Native American jewellery, Zuni fetish carvings and magnificent Pendleton blankets. Celebrated artist and metalsmith Pat Pruitt (Laguna Pueblo and Chiricahua Apache), whose work is also displayed at the British Museum, has created a unique range of titanium dragonfly earrings especially for Rainmaker Gallery. The titanium is super lightweight, and each pair is signed by Pat, individually laser anodised to achieve a unique colour combination. • rainmaker.co.uk

Making Useful Simple; Geoffrey Whiting, 1919-1988, 10 October – 14 December, The Stradling Gallery The Stradling Gallery at 48 Park Row has hit upon an inventive way of bringing to a wide audience its latest exhibition – celebrating the work of Geoffrey Whiting and his skill in bringing out the beauty of the materials while making simple, useful objects. The exhibition, created with the help of Geoffrey’s son David, an art critic and writer on studio ceramics, is being displayed in the front windows of the gallery and is designed to be viewed entirely from the street outside. This simple but effective approach enables the public to continue to enjoy exhibitions at the Stradling despite Covid-19 restrictions. Whiting (1919-1988) is one of the most successful British studio potters of the 20th century, whose understated pottery continues to inspire. He set up his own potteries, and exhibited widely. His attitude to his craft was direct and uncluttered. He has been described as a ‘potter’s potter’ with his teapots renowned for their elegant and balanced forms. Whiting is recognised for his deep engagement in the design and making of every aspect of the object, from raw materials and equipment to glazes and pouring tea. • stradlingcollection.wordpress.com

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Whiting’s understated pottery continues to inspire


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Emily Dennys Ceramics

Open studio

07 November 10am-6pm 08 November 10.30-4pm

Elm Cottage, St Annes Terrace

BS4 4DY

To the rear of elm cottage, by entrance to Nightingale Valley

Limited parking. Please walk down St Annes Terrace

www.emilydennysceramics.com instagram.com/emilydennysceramics

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ART

Northern Bristol soul The NBA Virtual Trail begins this month, taking the trail beyond the physical confines of North Bristol for the public to interact with the sculptors, painters, jewellers and printmakers

Lady Raven by Toni Burrows

I

t’s important to plan Christmas early, this strange and difficult year, to avoid queues, ensure we shop and spend locally and support our artists and makers. Determined, like West Bristol Arts Trail before them, to go ahead with their popular art trail during the last weekend of November, artists in the North Bristol area are, for the first time, opening it up virtually via a public Facebook group – NBA Art Trail 2020 – to showcase potential gifts. Those in search of local work can join the group any time through November to see previews of artists’ work. The virtual trail itself will launch on Friday 27 November, and carry on throughout the weekend, during which time you can interact with the artists, learn about their making techniques, and buy their artwork direct. Many artists are still hoping to open their homes and studios to the public over the weekend, adhering to government guidelines on Covid19 safety. Others will show their work on the walls of public spaces such as cafes and bars along Gloucester Road, while others will create displays in their windows. This means that local art aficionados will be able to safely follow a walking trail, enjoying displays and chatting to artists, or see artwork on screen and interact with artists from the comfort of their homes. North Bristol Artists are adapting their approach for this special trail – for instance, Toni Burrows has created wonderful mosaics to use as images for her new book The Mermaid and the Tower, and while she won’t be able to open every floor of her incredibly mosaiced home, you’ll still be able to see the original mosaics used for the illustrations. Prolific artist, Laura Robertson, meanwhile – who produces quirky images in every medium, from oils to lino prints – will display her work at Cafe Jackaloupe on Gloucester Road and hopes to be there in person to chat about the work. Jenny Urquhart will appearing when she shows her popular paintings of Bristol and Leigh Woods in the New Gallery at the back of Room 212, while jewellery maker Katie Johnston will be offering her gorgeous enamel jewellery outside Marialina’s next door. Batik artist Jo Whiteland will be setting up a gazebo outside her house with her father, ceramicist John Pope, and will also have her lampshades in the windows of Craftworks and Room 212. The North Bristol Art Trail website will give up-to-date information about which artists will be showing their work on the walking trails, so you can plan your route, and check whether an appointment time is required. Elephant Estate Agents have also provided big signposts for all the artists taking part in the walking trail so be sure to look out for the blue elephants to signal where you can go. Glass artist Ilsa Fatt is guiding her fellow artists on how to present their work on the trail Facebook page. She’ll have photos of her glass pendants and jewellery creations, as well as videos of the making process with a livestream that will show her at work during the days of the event. The North Bristol Art Trail provides a perfect way to find unique, beautiful gifts and lovely cards for friends and family. It’s also a chance to brighten up the home with some brand new, locally and lovingly produced art. While nothing beats wandering round the North Bristol Art Trail on a crisp November day, the extra strand to the event this year, with the virtual trail, is that you can still indulge the senses even if it’s lashing with rain! ■ • northbristolartists.org.uk 42 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Sloth on the Bridge by Laura Robertson

Jo Whiteland (image by Paul Bullivant)


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DON’T MISS. ENDS 3 JANUARY 2021

View from home, Bid from home, Stay at home

Silver Salver 99oz

Solitaire Diamond ring

L S Lowry, signed print ‘The Family’

Omega Seamaster

£1,200 - £1,800

£7,000 - £10,000

£1,500 - £2,000

£1,200 - £1,800

Clevedon Salerooms have been busy running a full calendar of sales in accordance with government restrictions since the first lockdown was lifted. By creating a secure environment with valuation days often taking place outside (just like the antiques roadshow, but without the long queues) the Salerooms have adapted to new ways of working around new problems A fine selection of works of art, jewellery, furniture, silver and collectors items have been consigned for the 3rd December Quarterly Specialist Sale. The auction sales are now all held online, behind closed doors, although you may still view by appointment. The response to live online only sales has been remarkable and the numbers of registered bidders has risen dramatically in recent months. If you are a collector, or are just on the lookout for something more unusual by way of a Christmas gift, take a look at the on-line catalogue when it goes live on the 21st November. Sign up for our email auction alert and you will never miss being alerted to a forthcoming sale. For more information visit www.clevedon-salerooms.com

Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers

Quarterly Specialist Sale

The Auction Centre Kenn Road, Kenn Clevedon, BS21 6TT

Thursday 3rd December at 10.30am

Tel: 01934 830111

Live online-only auction behind closed doors Viewing in person by prior appointment (Catalogue goes live Saturday 21st November)

www.clevedon-salerooms.com

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All photography by Barbara Evripidou

EXPLORING THE CITY

Glitch in Old Market

There are feline friends to be found at The Bag of Nails

One of the UK’s smallest museums in Sea Mills

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EXPLORING THE CITY

Hidden in plain sight To borrow terms from the Americans, staycations are the new vacations, and so Martin Booth’s new guidebook on Bristol’s best and most unusual spots is perfectly timed

F

ull of little-known places and with lots of lovely photographs by Barbara Evripidou to illustrate them, 111 Places in Bristol That You Shouldn’t Miss is an enlightening read and a great guide to take out with you – as much for locals who reckon they know the place inside out as the visitor making a beeline for or just passing through this superlative city, revealing its unusual spots and fascinating idiosyncratic stories. Here’s your starter for 10...

The Bag of Nails

Go for its constantly changing selection of beers, vinyl records, Lego nights, the musings of landlord Luke Daniels – winner of the Beard Liberation Society’s beard of the year 2015. Don’t go to this small pub if you don’t like cats, because it’s big on them. If you do like cats, though, and you correctly time your visit, you will be in for a treat, with at least one family of furry felines often to be found either taking a nap on the bar among the hand pulls or wandering around among the legs of the customers – who have still popped in one at a time for takeaway beer during the coronavirus pandemic. One might even be found relaxing on a cat-sized chaise longue as a vinyl record spins on a player in one corner.

Barton Hill Settlement

The charitable beginnings of Barton Hill Settlement could soon be coming full circle. Founded by the University of Bristol in 1911 so that university staff and students could live there and spread enlightenment, it has been described as ‘a radically liberal community’, with much of its early activities focusing on reducing the area’s high infant mortality rate. During the First World War it provided an important source of support for women whose men were away fighting or who had become widowed, later supporting campaigns such as votes for women and helping to feed the families of local workers when they went on strike. Now a vital resource for local residents and visitors alike, offering everything from support for the over-50s to summer picnics, around 50 community groups meet there. It is also home to the likes of Bristol’s Somali Resource Centre and Travelling Light Theatre Company. A visit can not take place without popping into the cafe, where a slice of cake costs just 20p and owner Maggie seems to know all of her customers by name.

Anne’s and Broomhill. In 2020, a seal even swam this far up the river from the Bristol Channel.

Cheers Drive

In 2020 a new road was given the name of Cheers Drive following a poll of local residents: the city’s very own Boaty McBoatface. Cheers Drive is part of the new Whitewood Park development of homes off Brook Road in Speedwell. The other new roads in the development, on land that previously contained warehouses, are Ron Stone Road, named after a former councillor; Dening Gardens, named after Charles Dening, the architect of Speedwell Pool; and Kenney Lane, named after Annie Kenney, a militant suffragette.

The Cube

The history of the building which is home to the Cube Microplex is almost as eclectic as what happens now within its four walls. It has previously been a glass recycling depot, an amateur dramatics theatre, a gay avant-garde art centre, an extension of the Chinese Overseas Association, a girls’ school, a secret gig venue, and an illegal gambling den. Today, the Cube is run by a dedicated group of volunteers as a not-for-profit workers’ cooperative, screening films, putting on live music, making their own-recipe cola and much more. Anybody can attend as long as they are a member – which costs just £1 for life.

Glitch

Why just cut people’s hair when you can also sell house plants? And why just cut people’s hair and sell house plants when you can also serve coffee, host live music and sell records? Glitch, the dream of owner Stephan Vi, who based the concept on a creative hub that he had set up in his native Florence, is one of those undefinable businesses in Bristol doing a variety of different but complementary things under the same roof, and it is always evolving. There was

Beese’s

Nestled beside a picturesque, wooded stretch of the River Avon, Beese’s was founded in 1846 by Anne Beese to provide refreshments to travellers and workers using or crossing the river. This area was once home to a dozen small quarries, with coal and Pennant sandstone transported by horse-drawn barges to Bristol and Bath. The ferry connecting Beese’s to the Hanham side of the Avon is the oldest continuously operating service across the river. The best way to arrive at this tea rooms and bar is undoubtedly by boat, either by hailing the ferry from the opposite footpath or making the longer journey from Bristol city centre via Bristol Ferry Boats, Bristol Packet or Number Seven Boat Trips services. Until recently, cream teas were the order of the day here. These continue to be popular but there is now an expanded food menu that also includes salads and a Sunday roast. Despite being less than three miles from Temple Meads, this area really does feel like the middle of the countryside. City life winks at you when, from the garden and decked area, you can sometimes hear and spot a train as it makes a brief appearance between the tunnels of St

Anybody can attend The Cube as long as they are a member – but it only costs a quid

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EXPLORING THE CITY

(Incidentally, Brass Eye creator Chris Morris worked as a journalist at BBC Radio Bristol before he was fired for talking over the news bulletins and making silly noises, according to his former colleague and now Radio Bristol lunchtime show presenter, Steve Yabsley.) The Palestine Museum & Cultural Centre aims to educate, inform and communicate the story of Palestine and its people; gives a voice to the Palestinian cause; hosts events including talks, exhibitions and seminars; supports and promotes the culture and heritage of Palestine; and engages with individuals, groups and organisations in support of Palestine. Recent events have included a gig by Bethlehem-based musician Ziad Hilal, film screenings and embroidery workshops. A variety of traditional food and drink is available in Resbite Cafe on the ground floor. Try their signature oven-baked falafel.

Sea Mills Museum

A seal was spotted swimming up as far as Beese’s this year previously a nail bar here, Gossip, which has now moved a few hundred yards up the road; former kitchen residents Grano are now based in To The Moon, again nearby, where they serve delicious traditional Italian food. The Old Market community continues to grow and develop, and former tenants here often don’t want to move too far from their loyal customers. Current kitchen residents Coffee & Vinyl moved into their half of the building at the beginning of 2020 after opening their first cafe in Torquay on the Devon coast.

Nicholas Cage Pub Sign

For many years, a cardboard cut-out of Nicholas Cage looked down on passers-by from a first-floor window of the Three Tuns pub. In 2018, then-landlady Jenna Graves went one step further and gave the actor a sign outside all to himself. It portrays the Oscar-winning star as a Napoleonic-era general staring moodily into the middle distance towards Brandon Hill. The pub’s newest addition came about following a need to repaint the outside of the building – one of the oldest in this corner of Bristol – now in a vibrant shade of burnished orange. In addition to the fresh lick of paint, Jenna decided to put the fella from Face/Off on the sign, partly funded by customers buying a special pint of beer. The new sign was the crowning glory of the pub’s love of the California-born actor which began with former landlord Simon Calcraft’s regular Sunday hangover cure of a takeaway and watching a couple of Cage films. Look closely around the Three Tuns, both inside and in the beer garden, and you might find a few more homages to Cage, who used to own a home on The Circus in Bath.

Palestine Museum

Exploring Palestinian culture, heritage and political life, the Palestine Museum & Cultural Centre was originally opened in 2013 as a ‘Palestinian Embassy’. Then-lord mayor of Bristol, Faruk Choudhury, joined Manuel Hassassian, former Palestinian envoy to the UK, in conducting the opening ceremony by cutting a ceremonial green ribbon together. The museum was founded after Palestinians won ‘upgraded status’ at the United Nations. In the words of the museum’s founders, the aim was ‘to educate the ordinary people about the truth and the facts, past and present, of the Palestinian people’. Today, the organisation is run entirely by volunteers who proudly state that they are without political affiliations and come from different backgrounds, ‘of all faiths and none’. It is located within the former Arc bar and nightclub, which the Best of Bristol website remembers as ‘massively grimy’ and where ‘you’d be offered so many drugs in there that it was like that sketch in Brass Eye with the made up drug names’. 46 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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As part of a heritage project celebrating 100 years of the Sea Mills estate, a disused red telephone box was transformed into one of the UK’s smallest museums. One of its first displays marked Remembrance Sunday, including the story of an 18-year-old, among the first people to be born in Sea Mills, who died on a convoy ship during the Second World War. Also remembered are an American soldier billeted here, and a Jewish family who escaped the Nazis and found safety in nearby Sylvan Way. A decorated Christmas tree inside the telephone box was an early indication that something unusual was afoot. Work started to restore it in February 2019, with a lamp and lampshade installed as part of Window Wanderland, an art project which usually sees front windows rather than telephone boxes brightly decorated. With a lick of paint, new signage and a floor made from old coins, the first display included oral history recordings and a related heritage trail across Sea Mills which saw homeowners researching former residents of their house. Overlooking the telephone box is Addison’s Oak, which in 2019 was shortlisted in the Woodland Trust’s Tree of the Year competition. Described as ‘one of Bristol’s most important monuments’, it was planted in 1919 to mark the start of the building of a citywide public housing scheme that was to provide ‘homes fit for heroes’ returning from World War I. The mini museum is located within what is officially a K6 kiosk, designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott to commemorate the silver jubilee of King George V in 1935. Scott was also an architect, who in Bristol designed Electricity House, now luxury flats in the city centre, and 37-39 Corn Street, originally a bank and now student accommodation. There were some 60,000 examples of the K6 installed across the British Isles, but only this one in Sea Mills is believed to be used in such a way.

Sweetmart

Kassam Ismail Majothi fled to England from Uganda in 1972 with his wife and their six children. They ended up in a refugee camp in Somerset with nothing, having left their possessions and money behind in the rush to leave their home country. Fast-forward four decades and Kassam’s sons are now in charge of this thriving family business Kassam built up from scratch. Sweetmart has several locations along St Mark’s Road in Easton: their main shop with 9,000 products including an unrivalled selection of fresh food (check out the stories under the photos on the walls telling its proud history); a deli cooking authentic Indian food on the premises using recipes passed down through the generations – try the fiery parsnips and samosa chaat; and a wholesale business that counts most of Bristol’s Indian restaurants as its customers, and in the 2020 coronavirus pandemic has provided food to restaurants such as Chai Shai in Hotwells, which was closed to the public but still cooking meals for NHS staff. Inside the shop, around half of the products on the packed shelves cannot be found in any supermarket, so both professionals and home cooks rely on them. The family offers several dozen coconut products alone, and more than 100 different chilli sauces. And if you’re interested in more cultural flavour, every year the team helps to organise a Grand Iftar on the road outside their shop, with thousands of people eating together and learning more about Ramadan and the Muslim faith. ■ • To read the full, unedited extracts, and more besides, pick up a copy of the book from local stockists including Bristol Museums, Stanfords and Storysmith as well as Amazon; 111places.com


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PROMOTED CONTENT

Klosterhaus, Cabot Circus The much anticipated flagship restaurant Klosterhaus opened its doors on 3rd October. This spectacular Grand Café from D&D London restaurants, one of the UK’s most successful restaurant groups is their first opening in the west country and promises a feast for the senses for Bristol diners

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Brunch and Beats in the Haus

resenting a modern take on the European Grand Café, Klosterhaus promises to bring a brand new dining experience – featuring mittelEuropean cuisine – to Bristol’s 18th Century Friary Building, located at Cabot Circus, the city’s premier shopping destination. It is also the first D&D London restaurant to launch in the South West. Set in the historical Quaker’s Meeting House built in 1747, Klosterhaus will serve its mittelEuropean menu all day – from morning coffees, leisurely lunches, casual dinners, brunch on weekends, to all out celebratory dinners, in a luxurious interior designed by the award winning DesignLSM. Working with local suppliers such as Cornish Gouda Company and Wing of St Mawes, Klosterhaus’ menu encompasses everything from well-loved schnitzel and comforting strudel dishes, to lesser-known culinary delights. An abundance of vegetarian and vegan options will also take centre stage. The bar is available for casual dining at lunch, with light bites and cocktails in the evenings. Set as the centre piece of the restaurant’s ground floor, the bar offers a carefully curated selection of German beer from legendary brewer Rothaus and the Klosterhaus sommelier’s wine list promises an interesting and varied selection to accompany the dishes on the menu.

Bristol’s already bustling food scene now boasts the Klosterhaus brunch, which will be available every Saturday and Sunday. Mixing classic brunch dishes with tunes from Klosterhaus’ resident DJ and live saxophonist from 11am until 5pm, promises to be a lively and popular dining option. Choose from a carefully curated menu of breakfast classics with unexpected mittelEuropean twists, such as Eggs Benedict with soft poached egg, black forest ham, potato Rösti and hollandaise sauce, or The Klosterhaus Breakfast, which includes a choice of eggs, grilled Nürnberger sausages, dry cured crispy bacon, tomato and potato Rösti.

The restaurant’s outside terrace will evoke the feel of the modern continental café and groups wanting to celebrate special events will find a number of beautiful historic rooms to suit most occasions. Des Gunewardena, Chairman and CEO of D&D London, commented: “The opening of Klosterhaus in Bristol is our first venture in the South West and we hope we can add something special to Bristol’s vibrancy and great food scene. We hope we deliver not only a beautiful restaurant but one where everybody feels welcome a meeting place for good food, wine, beers and great atmosphere”. Klosterhaus The Friary Building, Quakers Friars Cabot Circus, Bristol BS1 3DF Tel: 0117 452 3111 Web: klostershaus.co.uk

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FOOD & DRINK TASTY TIDBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

LOVING THE VINA LOCA

Oli has worked in wine for years and has now started his own business

A new wine company has launched in Bristol, positioning itself as a strong supporter of modern, inventive, bold wines and building up from foundations of independence, freedom and nurture. Over 85% of the Vina Loca range is either vegan, organic or boutique, although founder Oli Di Meo and team stock the classics too. They also provide mystery boxes, virtual tastings and free delivery with no minimum order. Born and raised in Bristol, Oli went to Wellsway School in Keynsham and after a stint travelling post-university, worked for Majestic Wine and E&J Gallo, with another stint as Michelin-level head sommelier, and then a few years working in the Middle East managing a large portfolio of five-star hotel clients while consulting on and importing fine wines. His original plan to open a bar was quashed by coronavirus, but moving the concept online has proven to be a great success – and we’re very glad to hear it! • vinaloca.co.uk; @vina.loca (Instagram)

READ ALL ABOUT IT

PUT ‘THEM APPLES’ TO GOOD USE

A new Bristol start-up is enabling local home cooks, producing “real food, made in kitchens not factories” to sell their dishes to the people of Bristol. All About The Cooks, founded by Bristol Food Connections chair Claire Ladkin, aims to provide home-cooked food for celebrations, family mealtimes, dinner parties or those keen to try freshly cooked dishes without the hassle of sourcing ingredients and cooking themselves. “Discovering that someone only a few minutes from your home is cooking delicious Mauritian-inspired dishes, seriously tasty chicken wings or baklava is the joy of this concept,” says Claire. “Uncovering the cooks and their stories has been a total privilege and I cannot wait for the people of Bristol to do the same. All About The Cooks has the ability to create greater connection within communities and I think there’s a real appetite for that.”

Bristol residents with surplus apples in their garden are being urged to take them to Riverside Garden Centre in Southville so The Cotswold Fruit Company can turn them into 100% natural pressed apple juice or, if enough fruit is donated, a Bristol blend of cider. In return, donators will get a choice of free apple juice or cider, and the satisfaction of knowing their spare fruit has been put to use. “Bristol is a city that understands cider so using surplus local apples to make Bristolian cider seems right,” says director David Lindgren. “This year’s crop appears be a good one, so there may be people wondering what to do with their spare apples. The batches of Bristol juice and cider we made last year were much appreciated; we hope to go further this year.” Collect sacks from Riverside; pick apples when they are ripe (pips black or dark brown); leave filled sacks at Riverside on Fridays, Saturdays or Sundays up until late November and your juice will be left at Riverside once the apples have been milled and pressed. The Bristol cider blend will be ready next spring (after the first cuckoo has been heard in Gloucestershire, we’re told). Good quality fruit only please; the odd bruise or scab is fine but it’s a no to rotten or partly rotten fruit! Minimum donation 8kgs.

• allaboutthecooks.co.uk

MORE BANG FOR YOUR BEAN Local cook Ximena Saez

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• For more, email david@cotswoldfruit.co.uk

New research shows that buying a coffee from a community business or socially minded café keeps more money in the local area and costs less. Power to Change, a charitable trust supporting community businesses, has launched the Cappuccino Index to help coffee lovers get more bang for their bean, after commissioning an audit of cafés and finding that while a chain like Starbucks charges an average £2.70 for a cappuccino, Bristol community businesses charge an average of £2.10. “For aficionados, lower prices may raise alarm bells,”

they said. “But many cafés emphasised not just the quality of their coffee, but the social equity of their supply chain.” For every £1 spent with a large business, 40p stays in the area, while with a small business, you can expect 63p to stay in the local economy (source: Federation of Small Businesses). With the latter likely to buy locally and be part of local supply chains, helping ‘build back better’ can start as simply as where we buy our coffee. • powertochange.org.uk


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Order real food made by local people www.allaboutthecooks.co.uk @allaboutthecooks

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FOOD & DRINK

Finding the Bristol merry While this Christmas may be more social bubbles than champagne bubbles, we’ve been putting a little aside to spend on treats from local suppliers to make the holiday special. Here’s some of what we’ve got our eye on...

IT’S SIX O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE ...Always. Romy’s Edition is a deliciously moreish limited edition gin packed with flavour. The lovely distillers at 6 O’Clock worked closely with celebrated chef Romy Gill MBE to craft a gin that portrays the unique flavours of India, using herbs and spices commonly found in Indian cooking, and infuses juice from the native mango. The recipe is inspired by the Romy’s memoirs and strikes the perfect balance between rich, fruity sweetness and reserved spice. Enjoy in a G&T over plenty of ice and garnished with a slice of fresh mango. Romy’s Edition – Mango, Ginger & Lime, 40% ABV, 70cl, £38. Widely available at stockists across Bristol or order online at 6oclockgin.com

0% FREE SPIRIT Mockingbird Spirit is a brand new alcohol-free, tequila-inspired, agave-based spirit. This unique addition to the mocktail scene makes a great gift and is from a Bristol company setting out to bring inclusivity to anyone who’s off the booze. Made using functional, versatile, authentic, vegan and gluten-free ingredients, the vibe is evocative and moreish earthy blue Weber agave, sweet vanilla and cinnamon with a healthy hint of habanero. It’s passionately produced with the adaptogen ashwagandha to support health and happiness. The perfect pour: in a margarita – naturally! Available in 50cl (£22.99) & 5cl (£3.99) bottles, order online at mockingbirdspirit.com

HERO OF THE HAMPERS Go boxlocal.co.uk for a Bristol-inspired hamper or gift box experience. Off the shelf or made to measure, Box Local can supply treat-filled gift boxes for Bristol customers (business and personal) who love to celebrate the locally sourced or for individuals looking for the perfect goodie gift. Here’s the Christmas box 24, which includes a Zara’s Chocolates Christmas lolly, Step and Stone lavosh flatbreads, Aldwick Estate Vineyard Jubilate Seyval Salute 2017, Nania’s Vineyard rose spritzer, Go Wild Preserves raspberry and port jam, and so much more. £160. Order online at boxlocal.co.uk

EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCE Circumstance Distillery has released its first organic product – Circumstantial organic vodka. Made from organic British wheat, it has a bright nose, with residual grain sweetness on the palate and a light buttermilk finish. Founded in Bristol by Liam Hirt and Danny Walker in 2018, the distillery is dedicated to ‘New World’ distillation and uses a wide variety of ingredients, bringing its own ideas and techniques to the distilling process. “Everything we make is an expression of the raw material we are working with,” says Mark Scott, head distiller at Circumstance. “We look to develop and capture complexity at every stage. Our new-make spirit production employs long open fermentation and flavoursome beer yeasts. Our organic wheat vodka is true to these values, making it quite a special and unique English vodka.” £30, 40% ABV, 70cl. Order online from microdistillery.co.uk

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FOOD & DRINK

APPLE CIDER CELEBRATION Looking for something new and refreshing this Christmas? Try the latest limited edition cider from the Thatchers Cider Barn range – Grenadier. Harvested in September, the freshly pressed juice of the Grenadier apple is beautifully blended to create an elegant and light 7.4% ABV, wine-like sparkling cider. RRP £2.10 for 500ml. For more than 100 years the Thatcher family has been quietly perfecting the magic that turns apples into cider, and a visit to the Thatchers Cider Shop at Myrtle Farm is a special West Country treat at any time of the year; thatcherscider.co.uk

TIME FLIES WHEN YOU’RE HAVING RUM Hailing from the Bristol and Bath Rum Distillery on Park Street, renegade spiced rum brand Dead Man’s Fingers has 10 flavours on offer, including spiced, coconut, hazelnut, raspberry and passionfruit – it’s the perfect gift for those looking for a taste to challenge to the conventional Christmas tipples. The raspberry rum, shown here, comprises original Dead Man’s Fingers spiced rum with added notes of sweet, ripe raspberries balanced with a hint of citrus. Try serving over ice with lemonade and a wedge of lime or make yourself an awesome raspberry daiquiri. Delicious and different. Dead Man’s Fingers flavoured spiced rum, 37.5% ABV, 70cl, RRP £22. Available to buy from the Bristol and Bath Rum Distillery, most major supermarkets or order online at thedropstore.com

A FESTIVE CRACKER FROM BRISTOL Based in Bristol, The Handmade Cracker Company makes traditional crackers with a contemporary twist – beautiful items that are unique in every detail. Every cracker is illustrated or designed to be something special for everyone; from the kids to the adults with an inner child, and the more refined customer. All crackers use premium quality paper from UK suppliers. The gifts are meant to bring fun, and possibly a little competition, to the table while we’re pulling the crackers with friends and family. To see the full range visit thehandmadecrackercompany.co.uk

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RETAIL

Setting great store

From working hard to stay relevant on the high street, to navigating the pandemic, the John Lewis & Partners Cribbs Causeway team are taking on new challenges and reacting to changing consumer demand. Words by Libby Dallin

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t was in Broadmead in 1950 that John Lewis & Partners Cribbs Causeway started life, when the world and the customers it served were very different. Despite tough circumstances and changing times, the retail giant still stands today, at The Mall at Cribbs Causeway. A team of over 600 Partners work across four floors, selling everything from toys to televisions, and providing home design, fashion and nursery services to help us through life’s biggest moments. The store is home to experts in all areas, and displays regarded as some of the most beautiful and inspirational in the region. At the helm is branch manager Chris Hooper and, with the support of Partners, the store is on-hand this Christmas to help us create new memories and treasure those we love. Like the rest of us, the store has had an unusual year. From working hard to stay relevant on the high street, to navigating the pandemic, the team have had to take on new challenges and react to changing consumer demand. For the first time in his career, Chris had to face closing a store, not knowing when Partners could safely return. Weathering the storm was only possible with a strong community committed to the future. Now, having been open again since June, John Lewis & Partners Cribbs Causeway is gearing up for what could be its most important Christmas yet. We sat down with Chris to find out how they are supporting us in celebrating this season. LD: I’m sure, like me, you’re thinking about how we can make Christmas special despite things being a little strange. Do you foresee your own Christmas being different this year? 52 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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CH: Christmas will be different, but we’ll adapt and try and make sure it’s a great experience with family members. Having a daughter who is working frontline NHS will, no doubt, make it unique and maybe a little fragmented, but we’re prepared for something a little more unusual. This Christmas, more than ever, will be about connecting with the ones we love. It might be easy to think that it will be less magical this year, and may pass us by to some extent. My team and I are determined not to let that happen. We intend to make this Christmas in John Lewis & Partners even more magical than before, despite the limitations, so come in and be inspired. We’ll do everything to make you feel safe and to make the experience an enjoyable one. Even though we are heavily impacted by the current crisis, we hope we might be able to offer some sort of respite from it as well. Which area of the store is your favourite this time of year, and why? It’s got to be the gifting assortments and the food and drink. It’s great to have an excuse to buy family and friends fabulous gifts, beautifully packaged. A lot of it isn’t something you’d buy for yourself, but to surprise someone else, that’s a great opportunity. It doesn’t look like we’ll be attending any parties or significant social gatherings this year, so we’ve got even more time to focus on giving our loved ones unique and inspiring gifts, and maybe ones that really reflect their personality. Many people really deserve something special this year, and we’ve got some creative options. We’re particularly pleased to be setting up a hamper station which will help us create beautifully curated gifts.


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RETAIL

What Christmas activity can we expect from the store this year? We love the Christmas period as much as our customers do, so we’ll be stretching every possible idea and opportunity to make those few weeks feel special. We’ve already experienced this with the opening of our Christmas Shop, and the positive reaction as customers are delighted to see something uplifting and magical. The themes this year are inspirational, from pop art to Renaissance and post-impressionism. We’re also proud to host RIVA Gifts this year on the ground floor. A fantastic small business, RIVA Gifts is offering beautifully personalised products from coasters to cushions and everything in between. You can even have your favourite bottle of our gin personalised. What will shopping in-store be like? Safety is paramount. Customers will notice the huge effort we have put into safety and a comfortable shopping environment. From hosts on doors and in key parts of our shop, to distancing reminders and sanitisation stations, we think we’ll be well prepared for the demand that naturally comes as Christmas draws closer. We’re even re-laying large parts of our seasonal assortments to allow customers to move more freely and comfortably around them. Our Christmas Shop is the biggest it has ever been. Any options for those who don’t want to walk around the store? This year we’ve got more reasons than ever to come in and shop with us but, of course, we understand if you do not wish to visit. As usual, our click-and-collect service is a great option; simply place your order online and come and pick it up, as soon as the next day, from our friendly customer collection team. We’re also offering our new Want It Now* service, which offers the opportunity to call and pay for your chosen product which we will get ready for you to pick up the very same day. This service is great for those forgotten gifts, and for those that want to make Christmas shopping easier. Your wish is our command, and our team of shoppers will scour the shop for your chosen product or perfect gift so you don’t have to, making your shopping as easy as possible. *Terms and conditions apply Aside from working every Christmas Eve, what’s your favourite Christmas tradition?

It might be easy to think that Christmas will be less magical this year, and may pass us by to some extent, but Chris is determined not to let that happen, despite the limitations

At work it’s the traditional Christmas lunch for our hardworking Partners, and the improvised entertainment. Like everything else this needs a rethink this year as we take social distancing behind the scenes as seriously as on the shop floor. At home, even though my daughters are grown up, it’s still the Christmas stockings full of gifts. The tradition remains even if the contents have changed over the years. This year has been all about saying thank you to those who have helped us in this difficult time. Who’s your hero, and why? My eldest daughter. She works as deputy ward manager in Lambeth Hospital and, once again, her ward is preparing to support mental health patients who also have a Covid-19 diagnosis. It’s unlikely we’ll see her for quite a while, and will occasionally snatch a brief conversation with her. Having a more detailed understanding of the extraordinary work of frontline nurses in the NHS during the pandemic has only deepened my appreciation. Many of us have seen close at hand, and through personal experience, the inspirational efforts of other care workers who have looked after many of the most vulnerable in society. My own Partners have been outstanding – be it helping in their communities, coming together to produce scrubs for the NHS, or being prepared to move from John Lewis & Partners to work for our sister brand Waitrose & Partners at the height of the pandemic. At one point more than 120 were working across a dozen Waitrose & Partners shops to support the effort to ‘feed the nation’. ■ • For more on what the store has to offer, email the experience desk at experiencedesk.cribbs@johnlewis.co.uk or call 0117 958 1847 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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HEALTH & WELLBEING

Self-care for life With not only Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month in November but also Ask Your Pharmacist Week (2 – 9 November) and Self-Care Week (16 – 22 November), it’s time to place community pharmacy and its accessible healthcare professionals at the heart of self-care to encompass all three events, says Bedminster Pharmacy’s Ade Williams

B

efore appearing as part of the Rankin series of NHS portraits recognising the role of health workers in the coronavirus pandemic response, any internet image search result for me would regularly bring up a less conventional picture – the purple wig was always a conversation point. I will leave you to draw your own conclusions on taste, but I can assure you that the message it seeks to convey carries increased urgency and importance as Covid-19 continues. This year has morphed from the usual montage of memories to static slides with images and events etched into our minds and hearts – many of them most unwelcome and very distressing. Face masks, PPE, toilet roll towers! There are also less visible images that continue to cause great concern for many healthcare professionals. It is a sobering fact that as a result of Covid-19, fewer people have been referred for cancer investigations, and survival is likely to have been badly impacted. This is a major tragedy. In the last few years, so much effort has gone into increasing screening uptake for bowel, breast and cervical cancer alongside improving all cancer diagnosis and treatment. Historically the UK’s cancer survival rate has lagged behind the best-performing countries in Europe and in response to this, the 2019 NHS long-term plan laid out ambitious aims for three quarters of all cancers to be detected at an early stage and 55,000 more people surviving cancer for five years, each year, by 2028. The NHS prioritised the recovery of cancer services as all services resumed during the pandemic yet there remains a worrying drop in referrals for investigations. As an NHS clinician working across primary care settings: GP surgery and community pharmacy, I sadly have a unique insight. The scale of psychological trauma from Covid19 pandemic and illness is slowly emerging, with a large number of people affected. We know that many people are reluctant to visit any healthcare premises, including GP surgeries, pharmacies and hospitals. At Bedminster Pharmacy, we sometimes see the anxiety boiling over into irrational behaviour and even panic attacks. Bearing in mind the many ways our lives have been disrupted while we still face continuing uncertainty about our future, experiencing a profound sense of anxiety and a feeling of being continually in danger (hypervigilance) may settle in unnoticed. But crucial to cancer survival is early diagnosis. Put simply; nothing increases your chances of beating cancer more than getting it diagnosed early, so that any appropriate treatment can start. People delaying seeking advice is worrying. The type of symptoms we are talking about include: unexplained bleeding (rectal, vaginal, bruising); an unusual lump or swelling anywhere on the body; unexplained weight loss; very heavy night sweats; unexplained body pain or ache; unusual breast changes such as any change in the size, shape or feel of a breast, including any nipple or skin changes; coughing up blood; blood in urine or stool; mouth or tongue ulcer that lasts longer than three weeks; a change in bowel habits, such as constipation or looser

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Ade and team go purple for Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month or more frequent stools. If you have any of these, kindly speak with your doctor or pharmacist right away. It may not be anything but for peace of mind, just speak with us. Remember it is never a bother and no query is too small. Sadly during Covid-19, pancreatic cancer, like other cancers, has not stood still – decimating lives and preying more on those socio-economically and institutionally disadvantaged. The key message I will share alongside Dr Ellie Freeman and Dr Hilary Jones – both, like myself, clinical ambassadors of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Charity – is around spotting early signs. It has some non-specific symptoms such as pain in the back or stomach area, which may come and go at first and is often worse when lying down or after eating. Even in our new socially distanced world, we must continue to be life-savers, encouraging anyone we are concerned about to speak with NHS professionals. Now is the time to place community pharmacy and its NHS healthcare professionals – the most accessible in the UK – at the heart of self-care, a belief cemented by the profession’s frontline response to the coronavirus pandemic and continuing reassuring support to patients. We will be joining other healthcare professionals and NHS organisations across the country, coming together to embed support and empower people to care for their physical and mental health during the Self-Care Week, taking place 16 – 22 November under the banner ‘Live Self-Care For Life’. The emphasis is on supporting and encouraging people to protect themselves and others. Expect to see online events, Twitter chats and posters with key messages. Throughout the outbreak, pharmacies have been at the forefront of providing medicines and self-care advice in our communities – something which has helped re-shape public attitudes to the valuable role they play while emphasising the importance of preserving the NHS. This year’s Ask Your Pharmacist Week campaign, 2 – 9 November, will be themed ‘Your Local Pharmacy in the NHS Family’. The collective trauma ripping through our country must not stop us preserving life and dignity. Our NHS is very important but always remember that enhancing health and wellbeing is a partnership effort involving all of us working as a community. ■ • Follow Ade on Twitter: @adewilliamsnhs or @bedminsterpharm


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BRISTOL UPDATES NEWS FROM LOCAL BUSINESSES AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS Apartments are accessible via contactless check-in using digital room keys

BE THEIR GUEST

UPGRADERS UPGRADE South West Upholstery has revamped its Southville shop. The £65,000 project has increased the showroom size by removing loadbearing internal walls and opening up the space to showcase more company services. Specialising in bringing domestic and commercial furniture and soft furnishings back to life, and creating bespoke pieces to order, South West Upholstery can now display a wider variety of fabrics, sample projects and handcrafted Nkuku homewares. “We took advantage of the enforced time out this year to forge ahead with this refurbishment,” says MD Ryan Ball, whose grandad John started the business in his garden shed in Bishopsworth, repairing bus and coach seats. “Customers are so much more in tune with interiors trends now. There’s a huge appetite for reupholstering vintage or favourite pieces to bring them up to date alongside a trend for one-off bespoke pieces of furniture.”

Independent Bristol-based serviced apartment provider Your Apartment is launching a new tech-driven aparthotel concept at Merchants House in Clifton Village in December. Bristol-born brothers and co-founders Charlie and Toby Guest have acquired the lease of the former student accommodation, currently undergoing a £1.6 million redevelopment which will be comprise of 34 home-fromhome studio apartments and a fresh and vibrant new co-working space. “Merchants House is in an incredible location situated in the heart of Bristol’s’ most iconic neighbourhood,” said Charlie Guest. “This will be our biggest project to date and we are really excited to be launching it in our hometown of Bristol.” The new aparthotel will boast timeless and eclectic style curated by up-and-coming British designers. Each apartment will be accessible via contactless check-in using the latest smartphone-based digital room keys, and have its own kitchenette, relaxation area, king-bed and bathroom with a wet-room shower. Other on-site amenities include a 24/7 co-working space for residents with complimentary coffee and tea, free highspeed wi-fi and a secure bike store as well as ample parking spaces. “Since we launched Your Apartment in April 2017, our customers have demanded vibrant, comfortable and efficient living spaces in central locations in the city,” Toby Guest commented. “Our smaller aparthotels, Frederick Place and Rowan Tree, have been a huge success and Merchants House is a great opportunity for us to further deliver this to our guests.” It’s imagined that the 20-30 sq ft studio apartments will be predominantly used by professionals working away Monday to Friday on business assignments. On the weekends, the apartments will provide an affordable yet stylish place for leisure guests to rest up in between exploring the ever-evolving city. For more information or to follow updates on the project, visit the blog on the Your Apartment website. • yourapartment.com

The North Street shop

• swupholstery.co.uk

YUUP, COUNT US IN! Creating ceramics in Southville, learning to cook Thai food in Totterdown: it’s all easily possible thanks to a new online marketplace where you can book and gift local, original, inspiring, rewarding activities and experiences adhering to government Covid measures and ranging from £5 to £250. Limited ‘special edition’ experiences include a vegan baking class with Bristol Bake Off star Briony May Williams, a modelling workshop with Aardman’s senior animator Jim Parkyn, an exploration of the city’s most colourful spots while perfecting the art of smartphone photography with Jess Siggers

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(@PorthJess), and an exclusive tour of Bristol’s world-famous street art with UpFest founder Stephen Hayles. “There’s always so much going on in Bristol but before Yuup you couldn’t find it all in one place,” says Bristol resident, serial entrepreneur and Yuup founder Dominic Mills. “We launch with over 75 experiences but our aim is to have 500 live in the next 12 months and have an experience within a 10-minute walk of every address in the city. We’re passionate about supporting the Bristol circular economy.” • yuup.co

Perfect the art of smartphone photography with Jess Siggers


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BRISTOL UPDATES NEWS FROM LOCAL BUSINESSES AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS The enormity of the impact that Covid-19 has had on St Peter’s Hospice is devastating says Stephen

WHEN IT MATTERS MOST

SHE’S HYDRO-ELECTRIC Bristol Energy Cooperative has launched a £2 million share-offer to help create Bristol’s first community owned hydro-electric generator, near Bristol Temple Meads station at Netham Weir. This micro-hydro power station will use the natural force of the water falling across the weir to spin twin turbines, to produce energy to power 250 typical homes. The scheme will cost around £2.4 million and run night and day throughout the year, with peak output in winter; a time electricity demand is at its highest. The community share offer which will fund this project will help create the UK’s first net-zero domestic housing microgrid. Microgrids combine energy efficiency with shared on-site renewables, heat pumps for heating and hot water, and battery storage. No gas boilers are required. The microgrid will be installed at the Water Lilies housing development in Lawrence Weston. “We’re inviting Bristol to invest in BEC with as little as £100, so we can all help drive a green recovery for the region,” says Will Houghton, BEC project developer. “Through buying shares in BEC, Bristol can participate in the ownership of local renewable energy, support local communities, help tackle climate change and earn a projected 3.5% return on investment.” The clean energy produced is sold to the National Grid with the income used to develop renewable sites across Bristol. The not-forprofit organisation will add these schemes to its existing 16 community-owned renewable projects installed in the South West. • bristolenergy.coop; ethex.org.uk/BEC2020

Netham Weir

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St Peter’s Hospice has launched a fundraising campaign to protect the services it offers patients with life-limiting illnesses. The hospice has been hit drastically by the pandemic and, despite the public’s ongoing support, has a gap of over £2million in funding this year. They welcomed actor and comedian Stephen Merchant to their inpatient unit to announce their When It Matters Most campaign. “I can’t imagine Bristol without St Peter’s. The difference they have made to my family and the families of tens of thousands of others is immense,” he said. “It is devastating to realise the enormity of the impact that Covid-19 has had, and that critical end-of-life care is threatened and might not be available in the future.” Services are provided free of charge, supporting 3,000 patients every year. However, despite being a frontline service, only 20% of their funding comes from the NHS, with much of it coming from the charity’s shops and events. “The Hospice exists because of the generosity of our supporters and we have never needed you more,” said CEO Frank Noble. “Our ability to help those at home, those in need of specialist care and those who need support through bereavement during these extraordinarily difficult times is diminishing as every week goes by. We are now at the point of reviewing staffing across the Hospice – something we have never had to do before. After everything we have been through, it really is heart-breaking.” The next 12 months are critical. If you can help now, it will make a huge difference. If you are on social media, you can share the Hospice’s fundraising activities, or give one a go yourself. Ride, walk, bake, run, donate, dance – whatever it takes to raise awareness of the Hospice when it matters most. • To donate visit stpetershospice.org/make-a-donation; for a fundraising guide email community@stpetershospice.org

CALLING ALL BUILDERS! Creating an energy-efficient home is now a priority for homeowners, and installers and trades are being urged to adapt and shape their service offering to meet this evergrowing demand. With initiatives such as the Green Homes Grants scheme, homeowners are looking for builders who can carry out high-quality home improvements and energysaving retrofit work. Futureproof, by Bristol-based charity Centre for Sustainable Energy is helping local builders respond to this demand for sustainable construction. Training and skills development opportunities are available, offering certification in sustainable building practices. Futureproof helps builders access schemes like Green Homes and connects them with customers who want this work done. • To register interest visit futureproof.uk.net or email charlotte@greenregister.org.uk


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MEET GARDENING THE LOCALS

David Antonio Smith in his Bond-inspired barber shop, Barber-on-Trym

Live and let buy

We were poised and ready for No Time To Die to hit the big screens this month, but following the announcement it would be postponed to April 2021, Millie Bruce-Watt caught up with Bristol’s biggest James Bond fan, David Antonio Smith, to calm our restless minds

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here’s been a lot of anticipation surrounding the latest James Bond film and fans have been champing at the bit to see Daniel Craig play his final stint as 007 since the title was first announced in August 2019. No Time To Die was one of the first major films to postpone its release from 3 April to 12 November before the global health crisis caused by the coronavirus was even called a pandemic. In a statement released by the filmmakers last month, the film has been pushed back again to 2 April 2021 “in order to be seen by a worldwide theatrical audience.” Bond 25 has been shrouded in secrecy from the outset and, with new additions to the cast and writing team, all eyes have been drawn to the high-octane series. This time around, Cary Joji Fukunaga is directing, with Rami Malek, Léa Seydoux, Lashana Lynch and Ana De Armas appearing as new faces. Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s writing prowess will undoubtedly add a twist to the script and Billie Eilish’s vocals have already seen the biggest opening week of all time for a Bond theme song. No Time To Die is set to be a showstopper, and in an attempt to calm our restless minds, we caught up with James Bond superfan, David Antonio Smith, who has been collecting the franchise’s memorabilia for 35 years. A fountain of knowledge on the subject, David let us delve into his impressive life-long collection and ask our burning questions. 60 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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The fascination with the spy franchise began when David was seven. “My older brother took me to the cinema and, in those days, there were double bills so it was Dr. No and From Russia With Love – the two Sean Connery movies – and I always remember the spider crawling up his arm. From then, I had my first Aston Martin for Christmas, the one with the ejector seats, and it slowly built up from there.” As well as toy cars, David has since accumulated a varied assortment of collectables, from coins and stamps to a replica of the gun used by Christopher Lee in The Man With The Golden Gun. “When I got my first job and I got my car, we went to the toy fairs in Shepton Mallet, Taunton, Exeter, Birmingham and London. I decided to start up a collection and one model lead to another and it went on and on. Before I knew it, my bedroom and my mum’s loft were full of it and then I got married and now our loft is full of it.” A barber based in Westbury-on-Trym, David’s shop has been attracting customers from Bristol and beyond with his Bond-style interiors and outstanding Bond knowledge. Entering his shop and heading into M’s office – the waiting area – you are then guided through to the cutting chair and an area in the style of Q’s workspace. “When we came to open Barber-on-Trym, we wanted to create a theme and we decided to make a James Bond-themed barber shop because I was so in


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MEET THE LOCALS

David has been collecting Bond memorabilia for 35 years

A signed photograph from actress Caroline Munro

to it. It’s actually helped because I get to enjoy my collection and share it with my customers. The young boys just getting into Bond especially love it – they love having their pictures taken along the backdrop of my collection.” David has spent many hours researching, locating and buying the items he wanted over the years. “It’s been an interesting journey from 1972, from watching my first ever Bond movie to collecting. We didn’t have eBay or Amazon or SatNav so you would buy a monthly magazine, find something you wanted, ring the number and they’d give you an address. You get your road map out, you go to the middle of nowhere and someone has an old Aston Martin you want and you do the deal there and then. Those days were fun.” The collection consists of posters, models, film memorabilia, videos and books but, for David, it has always been about more than the actual items. “Each piece now has become a treasured piece for me. When I look at a car, a gun or a book, my thoughts go back to the person who I purchased from; that’s why it means so much to me. The value isn’t the value of the item, the value is the people I’ve met.” There are, however, some items in David’s collection that are more precious than others. “My most prized possession is the golden gun. It’s a cigarette case, a lighter, a pen and a cufflink together and I got it over 20 years ago. It was held for six months at East Midlands Airport because it came over from America as a weapon. It’s 24-carat gold plated. The airport security wanted to check it couldn’t be made in to a gun, which, of course, it can’t because it’s solid gold.” A huge part of David’s fascination with the spy franchise is the man behind it all. Ian Fleming’s illustrious career as an author and journalist saw him write 11 Bond novels, two collections of short stories and the children’s classic Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang. In 1952, Fleming wrote Casino Royale, his first novel of the series which became the first film in which Daniel Craig played the secret agent in 2006. “Fleming wrote so many brilliant stories. It took nearly 60 years to make that film because of who owned the rights and who could produce what. There’s a long history with the Bond films and it’s fascinating. It’s not just about going into the cinema and watching a film, it’s so much more than that.” With No Time to Die set to be the 25th film in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions since 1962, excitement and expectation was high for the anniversary release, which will also be the final outing for its leading man. After five films that have raked in over £1 billion worldwide, Daniel Craig, the sixth actor to portray Bond, is passing on the baton. There’s been years of speculation as to who will be next to utter the character’s famous lines, with Tom Hardy, Idris Elba and Richard Madden among those rumoured to be taking Craig’s place. According to David, however, it could have started out very differently. “In 1962, when they were casting for Dr. No, they wanted our very own Cary Grant. He said he would only do the one film and they knew they wanted to do a whole series so they didn’t cast him. It could’ve been a Bristolian to be the very first James Bond!” Whatever happens next, David is sure the franchise has many more storylines to explore. “We don’t know what the ending of No Time To Die is. Does he continue from there? Are they going to remake some of the old ones? There’s so much in the pipeline. One thing for sure is he will be British.”

Although audiences have to wait even longer to see the film in a cinema, David believes it will be worth the wait. “The world premiere has to be done properly,” he says. “They want to make sure the actors, the producers and the investors are all there. Without the fans outside as well, it won’t be the same.” In the meantime, fans of the franchise can comfort themselves with the back catalogue, even though as a fan since the age of seven, David finds it difficult to pinpoint which film is his standalone favourite. “As a fan you like the whole genre of Bond. If I had to choose, my favourite movie would be From Russia With Love, 1963. My favourite Bond would be Sean Connery but I think Daniel Craig has done a fantastic job. He’s brought it right back to life and given it the origins.”

In 1962, when they were casting for Dr. No, they wanted our very own Cary Grant... It could’ve been a Bristolian to be the very first James Bond!

David’s vast collection and Bond-inspired barber shop has attracted Bond fans for decades. In more recent years, Barber-on-Trym has been cutting the hair of the official Daniel Craig lookalike. “When he comes here for his haircut, people have to do a double take because they think it’s Daniel Craig. It’s brilliant!” A collection of this size and popularity can also sadly attract the wrong kind of attention. “About a year ago I was robbed. I was going to my auntie’s funeral and I left the shutters up and a note on the window to let people know that I would be back in the afternoon. By the time I came back, someone had broken in and they’d stolen some of my items. I didn’t let it get to me – otherwise it eats you up inside. What’s been great is that customers have offered their own Bond collectables. People have been wonderful.” It’s not just the customers who heard about the break-in and wanted to help. “I got something from Caroline Munro – she played Naomi in The Spy Who Loved Me,” David remembers. “She sent me a photograph. It says ‘Just for you, David. Best wishes, Carly Munro as Naomi, 007’. The actress, now in her 70s, heard about it and she sent me an 8x10 photograph, which I’ve got in my shop now – it’s heart touching. It relieves the pain of being broken into.” Barber-on-Trym has been open for five years in Carlton Court and David shows no signs of slowing down, with his collection or his devotion to Bond. His most recent purchase is a Blackwell Fine Jamaican Rum, a 007 limited edition bottle created by Chris Blackwell – the record producer and current owner of Ian Fleming’s former residence, GoldenEye. “I thought I had to have that,” says David. “It’s been a wonderful 35-year journey for me, understanding James Bond and being part of his life. James Bond captured my heart and I just love it.” ■ • barberontrym007.co.uk THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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PSYCHOLOGY

The science of happiness

Set aside 30 minutes to listen to BBC Radio Bristol and Professor Bruce Hood and focus on fulfilment this month

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he Happiness Half Hour is a new podcast from BBC Radio Bristol and Professor Hood, whose ‘science of happiness’ course at the University of Bristol has been re-packaged into 10 episodes revealing simple strategies scientifically proven to improve wellbeing.

Tune in for Prof Hood’s happiness hacks

TBM: How and why did you get into the business of happiness? Professor Hood: One of my first scientific papers was on student homesickness – published over 30 years ago! I then specialised in cognitive development in children and focused on that. In 2018, I heard of a course at Yale taught by a former student of mine, Laurie Santos, that was based on the science of happiness and I decided it was a course we could do with at Bristol. Laurie works on the same sorts of research questions I am interested in but does her research with animals. So she is a comparative psychologist but as head of Silliman College – one of Yale’s residential colleges – she spent much of her time dealing with mental health issues so she decided to put together a course to help. Does Bristol seem a happy city to you, on the whole? I would say so but then I spent most of my adult years in Cambridge, UK, and Cambridge, US, which are not exactly the best comparisons as they are very academic environments and not cities. Your podcast is well-timed. How are your students finding this term? They seem to be coping well given the circumstances. I feel for them, especially the first years – missing out on the excitement of being totally independent for the first time. But it is what it is and they are resilient. Has there been any telling feedback since the course was launched? I still get emails from students who took the course back in 2018, thanking me. I find this feedback most gratifying – especially from the international students for whom talking about mental issues is taboo. There is a degree of cynicism in relation to higher education and students, especially because of the high fees. It is true that some students (and parents) see university simply as a means to an end and focus on value for money, but others on the course have shown a genuine passion to learn which is what gets me out of bed in the morning. What do you think of the shift to working from home? It works for me, and reduces the environmental impact of so many practices: commuting, travelling, conferencing. Once we get through the crisis, we should rethink the value of time spent with loved ones.

Share one happiness hack discerned from your research Psychological distancing: a way to process negative events by taking a different perspective. Identify a problem that is worrying you and say to yourself, ‘I am worried about [whatever the problem is] because of [whatever the consequences may be].’ For example, ‘I am worried about losing my job because I will have no income.’ That will feel pretty bad. But if you repeat the statement using your name: “Bruce is worried about losing his job because he will have no income,” the emotional impact is less because you have psychologically distanced yourself. This can help you be more objective and positive about the situation and enable you to start seeking other ways of coping in the same way that a friend will help to support you through a crisis. It doesn’t remove the problem but does lessen the negative emotional impact, which as the stoic Greek philosopher Epictetus points out, ‘It’s not what happens to you, but how you respond that matters.” Bad things happen to all of us 62 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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but we can change the way they impact on us. What would you say to sceptics of mindfulness? Scepticism can be healthy when used to challenge unsupported claims. The problem with some mindfulness work is it has been used to create businesses that make unwarranted claims. However, there is interesting research on mindfulness as a technique to deactivate the default mode network of the brain which becomes overly reactive when we are ruminating. So it’s okay to be sceptical because science is all about evidence but that also means that we must not be cynical when the data tell us that effects are real. There are many examples of common sense and folk wisdoms that have bearing on happiness. That doesn’t mean that they are wrong or unscientific – we simply need to adopt a critical perspective which is one of the main things we teach on the course. We can’t always be happy. Why do we have a hard time accepting this? That is a bigger question than it seems. I’d just say that there is a whole industry built around expectations and promises that make people feel inadequate. In the West, there is a cultural emphasis on hedonism which can’t sustain mental wellbeing so, inevitably, people will be disappointed. Finally, social media makes everyone feel inadequate. What can be done about social media and its role in our unhappiness? The first thing to establish is how much impact it does have on your life. Track your usage in terms of the hours that you spend on it. Take note of your mood swings before and after. Note how it affects not just you but those around you. Unlike other addictions, social media platforms have been designed to capture as much of your attention as possible. They actively go out to take it from you and you shouldn’t let them steal the most precious resource any of us has: time. Why do people in less developed countries often seem happier? The data does not actually support that assumption. Developing countries are generally lower on world rankings but there are some interesting paradoxes. The happiest countries tend to be those in the Nordic regions but they also have the highest suicide rates. What are your plans for this winter? To refine my lectures and evaluate the effectiveness of online delivery. I am already delivering a version of the course for the University of Bern in Switzerland as a favour for a former student. The new tech will open up so many possibilities to reach new audiences. ■

• Twitter: @profbrucehood


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Welcome to the world baby Isabella In the August edition of The Bristol Magazine, we told the story of Karen Marks from Taunton and her joy at expecting a longed-for second baby after undergoing IVF at the Bristol Centre for Reproductive Medicine. The wait is now over with the birth of her beautiful daughter Isabella Grace

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he may have felt a long time coming, but baby Isabella Grace has most certainly arrived. The 7lb 4.5oz cutie was born on September 15 to proud parents Karen and James Marks, and sister to a ‘smitten’ two-year-old brother Cameron. Karen, who was diagnosed with fertility issues in 2015, was given funding for one round of IVF on the NHS in September 2017. During minimally invasive egg retrieval procedure surgeons collected 15 of her eggs which were fertilised with James’s sperm in BCRM’s labs in September 2017. The process created five viable embryos and their son Cameron was born the following year. “We are delighted to have a boy and a girl,” said Karen, who was under the care of BCRM’s Dr Alex Price. “It means the world to us. “Some days I think after all the years of trying that I must be dreaming – this can’t be my reality – that not only do I have one beautiful baby, but two! “We have our wonderful son but I’ve never wanted him to be an only child. “There is a bond between siblings you can’t always find with anyone else, you can talk about literally anything and everything and have your entire lives full of memories together. “Cameron absolutely adores her. He’s a super proud big brother and is always asking for cuddles.” Karen says she never hesitates to tell people that her children are IVF babies and says she never forgets how lucky they are to have them. “Infertility never leaves you. Pregnancy announcements can still be painful, especially when someone has seemingly conceived easily. “It’s a battle and a journey, and while part of me believes there’s a reason we had to go through it, we’ve met so many wonderful people along the way.” Karen urges couples who may be struggling with fertility issues to think about IVF. “If you’ve exhausted all other options, then crack on and go for it,” she added. “IVF is fine. Don’t put it off or avoid it. It’s the most likely fertility treatment to work, and it did for us. “I can’t speak for every clinic, but at BCRM I always felt the nurses and doctors REALLY care about you. They want what you want and they go through that journey and the ups and downs with you.

“They support you, give you advice, a caring and listening ear, a hug whenever you need. It’s like being part of an extended family.” And Karen and James’ journey may not end with baby Isabella as they have two remaining frozen embryos at BCRM. “Hopefully we will have more children,” said Karen. “I’ve always wanted four!” The Bristol Centre for Reproductive Medicine has world class facilities and technology that treats both private and NHS patients. BCRM is involved in innovative research and have one of the best success rates with IVF and other fertility treatments in the UK. Anyone wishing to register for a Virtual Open Evening webinar or book an initial consultation appointment can email BCRM at info@BCRM.org.uk or call 0117 3018605 or visit: https://www.fertilitybristol.com/.

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HEALTH & FITNESS UPDATES AND NEW PRODUCTS FROM THE SECTOR

NURTURING EXPERTISE

Paul (centre) with HSST students Jen (left) and Bonnie

FEEL FIT (AND PLANET-FRIENDLY) A new eco-friendly fitness brand has launched in Bristol with a range of sustainable gym and leisure wear including leggings, tops, and accessories. Feel Fit founder Ellie Crawley is a strength and nutrition coach keen to develop her profile as one of Bristol’s leading health and fitness experts. Wishing to make a difference to people’s health, and the planet’s, too, Ellie Crawley teaches and promotes long-lasting change in terms of health, fitness and nutrition and hopes to extend her ethos and effect similar change to Bristol’s fitness wardrobes. Created with sustainability in mind, Feel Fit items are produced with ECONYL® regenerated nylon fibre made of pre and post-consumer waste. The new signature range features classic pieces designed to make wearers feel good about themselves and their workout, as well as helping to preserve the planet. “We all find fitness at different times in our lives and for different reasons but we believe when you are physically strong it will carry over into every aspect of your life,” says Ellie. “By putting sustainability into every aspect of our lives, every choice, we will get the right results.” • myfeelfit.com Signature bralette, £35; leggings, £65

Invigorate high-waisted cropped running leggings, £55

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The fertility clinic in the South West of England with the highest rate of success for IVF is consolidating its position as a regional centre of excellence by investing in the development of the next generation of fertility experts. Five practitioners at the Bristol Centre for Reproductive Medicine (BCRM) are being supported to pursue two different higher qualifications, with two embarking on the Higher Scientific Training Programme (HSST) – which will eventually qualify them for consultant level/leadership roles – and three are participating in the Scientific Training Programme (STP), the qualifying programme for careers as clinical embryologists. “Our entire reason for existence is to help women with fertility issues achieve their dream of having a baby,” said Paul Wilson, BCRM’s scientific director. “We’ve already been instrumental in thousands of births and we aim to help with many more, which means continuing investment in our staff’s expertise is essential.” The clinic is staffed by world-recognised experts in fertility, many of whom are involved in innovative research, including Jen Nisbett, one of the candidates who has just started on the HSST programme. Jen won a top prize at Fertility 2020 – the sector’s annual national conference – with her research into how implanting frozen embryos in patients is more likely to result in a viable pregnancy in certain circumstances than using fresh embryos. Jen and colleague Bonnie Dickinson have both committed to a demanding five-year workplace-based programme that will equip them to become consultants. The programme includes a healthcare leadership and management postgraduate diploma from the University of Manchester, professional exams at the Royal College of Pathologists and large research projects for a Doctorate in Clinical Science. “Nationwide only around 60 scientists have enrolled on the HSST this year, of whom we believe just three are doing the reproductive science programme – and two of them are us,” said Jen. “Both the HSST and the STP represent a huge amount of work for the trainees and for the department, but the clinic has world-class facilities, technology and expertise so it’s the best place to train.” Jen and Bonnie are the first two candidates from BCRM to enrol on the HSST programme, but the clinic has trained a large number of STPs since the programme launch in 2009. Competition for entry to both programmes is fierce, with the most recently published statistics by the National School of Healthcare Science quoting 20 applications for every STP post, and HSST candidates facing the dual challenge of securing funding and undergoing a vigorous recruitment process for a relatively small number of highly coveted places. “These programmes demand real commitment – both on the part of the trainees and those of us who are involved in delivering their training,” Paul concluded. “But these dedicated students help perpetuate BCRM’s position as a centre of excellence, all playing their part in ensuring we continue to deliver the very best fertility treatment for NHS and private patients equally. So everybody benefits: trainees, the clinic, and patients alike.” • fertilitybristol.com

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

CNM has completely changed my life The lecturers were extremely knowledgeable in all aspects of nutrition and wellbeing. Emma Gould, CNM Naturopathic Nutrition Graduate

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hat attracted me to CNM was its flexibility around lectures, its proximity to where I live and the fact that my uncle used to be a lecturer. I especially loved the people I met at CNM. I made so many great, similar-minded friends and the lecturers were extremely knowledgeable about all aspects of nutrition and wellbeing. If I had to use three words to describe CNM they would be educational, flexible and fun. CNM has completely changed my life; I feel like I’m now fulfilling my purpose in life. I was medically diagnosed with psoriasis after the birth of my first child in 2011. At first, the recommended steroid creams seemed to work but soon my skin got used

to these and I needed more to get any relief. Eventually their effect stopped working altogether and I was just getting worse and worse. I was variously recommended light therapy, oat baths and other mainstream creams but nothing about nutrition. Seeing no improvement and increasingly disheartened, I decided to change my diet and lifestyle, to see if these changes helped. I had always been brought up to look at the body holistically as my grandmother was a homeopath, so it made sense to try a whole lifestyle approach. In 2015 I discovered a book called “Healing Psoriasis” by Dr Pagano. In it he explains his techniques in using diet and lifestyle interventions to heal psoriasis. I strictly followed his protocol from June to October 2015. My skin completely cleared after four months! Prior to this I was around 50% covered. I still get some spots if I’ve not been taking care of myself, but as soon as I implement nutrition and lifestyle measures, it’s fairly instant, I clear up again. Now I support my psoriasis using only natural therapies.

I have a degree in Human Biology and Psychology and an inquisitive nature so I wanted to learn why my body had responded like this, which is why I studied Nutrition at CNM. Now I have qualified, I hope to be able to help others in similar situations. I am still working as a secretary part-time whilst I am building up my own business, Nutrition by Emma, specialising in helping people with psoriasis and skin conditions. I love sharing the knowledge of everything I have learnt with others and, even better, watching them improve with my help. To anyone who is thinking of studying at CNM, relish every minute of the studying, I miss it now it’s gone.

CNM Online Open Events Discover how natural therapies promote true health and vitality. Our events are packed with inspiring tips on how to nurture yourself in natural, sustainable ways. And if you are thinking of turning your passion into a career, an Online Open Event will also Geoff Don cover what you need to know about studying at CNM.

Visit cnmcourses.com

or call 01342

777 747 to find out more

CNM has an exceptional 22-year track record training successful natural health practitioners online and in class. Over 80% of graduates are practising.

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INTERIORS

Jazzy Georgian gem

This month we’ve been taking our interiors inspiration from a gorgeous Grade-II gaff on Cumberland Road

Ground floor, dining room

Photography by Emma Lewis (emmalewis.xyz)

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his colourful, contemporary, stylish bachelor pad in a Georgian townhouse in the centre of Bristol really caught our eye and inspired us this month. Working closely with their client’s own contractors to create this beautiful interior, West Country design duo Woodhouse & Law produced everything from spatial plans and lighting designs, colour schemes and soft furnishings, right through to designing and installing the cabinetry – including a completely bespoke kitchen with enviable views out over the harbourside. “Each room has a distinctive look and feel, while a sense of cohesion is retained throughout with complementary colours, styles and features,” say designers Nick and John. “Bold, fresh colours are also key throughout, from the rich plum hue in the study to the decadent deep-blue of the drawing room and the light and fresh kitchen space, accented with teal as well as plenty of natural woods and blush pinks. “The house feels effortlessly stylish, and has a sense of fun and the unexpected with plenty of playful, surprising and artistic touches, avoiding the usual stereotype of bachelor living.” ■

Styling by Caroline Davis (carolinedavis-stylist.com)

• woodhouseandlaw.co.uk

First floor, living room

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Ground floor, kitchen

Second floor, master bedroom

Ground floor, dining room

Half landing

PROPERTY PROFILE Site: Grade-II listed building on Spike Island. Part of a terrace of three houses, built around 1840 in the late Georgian style. Over three storeys plus basement. Client: Director of a Bristol-based construction company. Items of note: (Ground floor) Pink dining chairs by Gubi, dining room blind fabric from Romo, dining room pendant light by Heathfield, Chaunceys Timber Flooring (of Bristol). (First floor) Art: Cyanotope palm by Jo de Pear; giclee, silkscreen and glazes by Bonnie and Clyde. (Half landing, between first and second floor) Art: Jane Emberson. All art available through Bath-based ModernArtBuyer. .

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Elly’s Wellies

Garden Designs

Pet P traits Beautiful bespoke hand-drawn portraits of your much-loved pets in pastel. Prices range from £80-250.

Turning your ideas into beautiful spaces Elly’s Wellies Garden Designs will help you maximise the potential of your outdoor space and tailor it to your individual needs. Whether you are looking for a complete garden redesign, or just need advice on what to plant in a border, Elly’s Wellies will be happy to help.

For a free initial consultation, contact Elly West

www.ellyswellies.co.uk ellyswellies@gmail.com 07788 640934 68 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Telephone 01275 853258 Email info@thepetportraits.com

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THE

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THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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NOVEMBER 2020

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 69


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GARDENING

Mixed echeverias

Looking sharp

Cacti, succulents and air plants are enjoying a massive revival says Elly West, as we spend more time at home than ever before and see the health and wellbeing benefits of greening up our indoor space

S

o, I may not have the official statistics to hand to back this up, but I reckon just about everybody has owned a cactus at some point in their lives. And again, I’m not sure of the actual, exact percentage, but a large number of these so-called indestructible plants have probably turned out to be destructible. The less green-fingered among us joke about not even being able to keep a cactus alive and it’s true they are tough, easy-care plants that thrive on neglect, but give them the wrong conditions and just like any living thing, they won’t survive. Cacti, succulents and air plants are enjoying a massive revival right now, along with other houseplants. We’re spending more time at home than ever before and many of us are seeing the health and wellbeing benefits of greening up our indoor space. Plants make us feel connected to nature and are an instant way to add mood-boosting impact to our homes, especially when arranged in groups. There’s something strangely addictive about cacti. Maybe it’s because they are so easy to personify – they somehow have character, with their unusual body-like shapes. This unique group of plants contains a huge number and variety of forms and colours, and it’s easy to see how collectors become hooked. There’s always something new to discover. A cactus is officially defined as a succulent plant, typically with spines, and fleshy leaves designed to store water. The family has nearly two thousand known species within it, without even starting to count all the many cultivated varieties created by enthusiasts through cross-breeding. Let it not be said they are dusty and boring! I chatted to Chris Rixton – of Coastal Succulents, Cacti and Alpines, based in Uphill near Weston-Super-Mare – who is a self-confessed nerd when it comes to his passion for these fascinating plants. What started as 70 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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a hobby around six years ago quickly grew into a business, and he now sells at pop-up markets and shops around the Bristol and North Somerset area. He also has an at-home nursery, open by appointment, for those who want to find out more or buy from his vast collection.

It’s true they are tough, easy-care plants that thrive on neglect, but give them the wrong conditions and just like any living thing, they won’t survive “Around 35 per cent of our stock are homegrown from seed or propagated from cuttings,” he says. “We’re aiming to offer a broader range of more specialist products that you can't get elsewhere.” Chris sources plants and seeds from all over the world to add to his collection, which includes the rare and elegant ghost euphorbia – a variegated form of Euphorbia ingens – plus the enticingly named mermaid’s tail, string of turtles, and bear’s paw, alongside just about any other kind of cacti, air plant or succulent you can imagine. “They appealed at first because they’re so low-maintenance,” he laughs. ‘But I like to research and understand everything about a subject, and there’s always more to know. A collection can never be complete – there are literally thousands of plants with so many unique things about them. I love their architectural forms.”


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GARDENING

Chris has noticed their increase in popularity over recent years, particularly among younger people. “Many of my customers are in their teens and early 20s,” he comments. “Anything that gets young people engaged with growing plants is a good thing.” When it comes to keeping these tough little specimens alive, Chris says a little common sense is needed, with thought to their native arid environment. Although they do need moisture, overwatering is by far the biggest killer. Cacti hate soggy roots, so free-draining soil is essential. He creates his own special growing medium – a mixture of multi-purpose peat-free compost, horticultural grit, perlite and sharp sand – and recommends watering every seven to 10 days from March to October, then leaving them alone over winter, their natural dormant season. If in doubt, err on the side of caution as it’s very hard to under-water a cactus. Evolution has given them the ability to survive weeks, if not months, of drought, by storing moisture in their leaves, but look out for signs of stress; the leaves will start to wrinkle if they are drying out.

There’s something strangely addictive about cacti. Maybe it’s because they are so easy to personify – they somehow have character, with their unusual body-like shapes

They also need lots of light, so a sunny windowsill or conservatory is ideal. During their winter rest they like to be kept slightly cooler, so avoid placing them above a radiator. Cacti make great houseplants for beginners, and may well reward you with summer flowers in vibrant colours. They can also be stood outside during the summer, with some of the plants Chris grows being hardy enough to stay outside all year

round. The front of his house has a newly planted eight-metre ‘living wall’ that passers-by can admire, created during lockdown from sandbags planted with a mixture of aeoniums, echeveria and other succulent plants. • Coastal Succulents, Cacti and Alpines has a stand in the Weston Collective, Sovereign Shopping Centre (Weston-Super-Mare). Email coastalsucculentsandcacti@gmail.com to visit the Uphill nursery or find out more. Visit ellyswellies.co.uk or @ellyswellies1 on Instagram for Elly West’s own work.

Plant of the month: Echeverias Echeverias are among my favourite succulent plants as they can be grown indoors or outside in a sunny and sheltered spot, where a happy plant will throw out beautiful summer flowers on long stems – somehow particularly rewarding given their exotic nature. In true succulent form, they form spiralling rosettes of fleshy leaves typically in beautiful soft shades of grey-green, but there are also dark burgundy and almost black forms, plus oranges, pinks, greys and those with multi-coloured leaves. As with all succulents, avoid overwatering. Let the soil dry out completely before watering again, and don’t leave indoor plants sitting in a wet saucer. Outdoor plants will need protection from freezing temperatures with a covering of fleece, or move them to a warmer spot such as an unheated greenhouse or cool windowsill during cold snaps. Echeveria are also extremely easy to propagate. New baby plants will be produced, nestled in against the main plant, so just pull one away and pot it up separately. Or simply break off a leaf and lie it flat on top of some compost mix in a sunny spot, and it will root and produce a whole new plant from the leaf base. Magic!

Create space with a garden room GARDEN OFFICES • LOG CABINS • STUDIOS • SUMMERHOUSES POSH SHEDS • TIMBER GARAGES • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES

01225 774566 • www.gardenaffairs.co.uk Visit our Display Centre at Trowbridge Garden Centre 288 Frome Road, BA14 0DT THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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NOVEMBER 2020

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 71


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Boutique office suites available for small to medium sized businesses Under new ownership, the office accommodation at Number 48 Corn Street has been completely transformed to provide open plan and stylish office suites with contemporary finishes.

Located at the heart of Bristol’s historic trading quarter, 48 Corn Street has been the subject of a high quality refurbishment to provide modern, open place office, behind an attractive period façade. The property is situated on Corn Street at the heart of Bristol city centre within easy walking distance of the prime shopping areas of Broadmead, Cabot Circus, Colston Avenue (convenient for public transport), The Waterfront and the Law Courts. For todays office occupier, 48 Corn Street offers the best of both worlds – a period and characterful building, with all the comforts of a modern office to include passenger lift, shower facilities and bike storage. The offices have been refurbished to provide solid wood flooring, exposed ceilings with suspended LED lighting and there are currently two suites available of 476 sq ft and 632 sq ft. Finola Ingham, Director of Burston Cook comments “the rent we are quoting is competitive and for occupiers seeking a statement office with all the modern amenities, we would encourage you to view the suites we currently have available.”

For further details please contact Finola Ingham MRICS at Burston Cook on 0117 934 9977

(0117) 934 9977 www.burstoncook.co.uk


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

44 PEMBROKE ROAD FOR SALE

FOR SALE (OR TO LET) BRISTOL CITY CENTRE

• Stunning period property • 16 rooms + garaging • Attractive garden • Suit day nursery & other commercial / residential uses • £1,795,000 ONO

• Stunning period offices • 3,000 sq ft net

MERCHANTS HOUSE, WAPPING WHARF, BS1

4 QUEEN SQUARE, BS1

• Self contained building over 4 floors • Rare freehold opportunity

• 1,805 sq ft + 1 car

• 8,150 sq ft – 6 cars

• Self contained building

• Fitted open plan office suite

• Under refurbishment

• Lease & rent o/a

• Lease & rent o/a

ST AUGUSTINES PARADE, BS1

TO LET (MAY SELL), EDEN OFFICE PARK

• Studio office suite

• Short drive from BS8

• C 815 sq ft

• 3,985 sq ft – 21 cars

• Light & airy space

• High Quality space

• Only £11,820 pax

• Terms o / a

TO LET (MAY SELL) ST THOMAS COURT, BS1

TO LET (MAY SELL) 15 COLSTON ST, BS1

• 2,775 sq ft – 1 car space

• Penthouse offices

• Contemporary suite

• Bright contemporary space – studio style

• High Specification

• 3,762 sq ft + 2 cars

• Terms o / a

• Terms o / a

CITY CENTRE OFFICES

SHOPS * BARS * CAFES

• New contemporary refurbishment of a fine office HQ

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

We are marketing a wide selection

• 4,200 sq ft – 8 car spaces

throughout BS1, BS6, BS7, BS8 & BS9

• New lease – rent o/a

PLEASE CALL HOLLY BOULTON

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• • • • •

Sales / Lettings Acquisitions Valuations Landlord & tenant Auction Sales

• • • • •

Rent reviews Property Management Investment Sales / Purchase Development & Planning Dilapidations Advice


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news, deals, testimonials and market comment at our website: www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977 FOR SALE HENLEAZE RD BS9

CHANDOS ROAD, CAFÉ • Established and busy

• Rare opportunity to purchase your own unit

• Fully fitted to walk in and trade • 766 sq ft

• Lockup shop / office

• New lease

• £125,000

• No premium 49 HENLEAZE ROAD

HAMPTON LANE GARAGE

• Shop to let • Busy retail pitch

• Garage / car repair workshop

• 926 sq ft (large unit)

• Suit other industrial & commercial use

• Suit shop & other uses

• 2,956 sq ft

SUITE 401, QC30 QUEEN CHARLOTTE STREET

YEO BANK BUSINESS PARK, CLEVEDON

• To let – flexible terms

• To rent (might sell)

• Open plan office unit • 1,005 sq ft

• 1,128 sq ft offices 4 cars

• Good modern space

• New flexible lease

• To let – economical rent

• Low occupational costs

CHANDOS RD REDLAND

MEWS OFFICES WESTBURY ON TRYM

• Prominent corner shop

• For sale • Your own Mews office building to purchase

• Established retail area

• 1,241 sq ft

• New lease

• Freehold price o / a

• Only £11,750 pax WHITELADIES RD – OFFICES

4 WHITELADIES RD • 2 floors of bright period offices fully refurbished

• 1st floor suite of offices • 1,000 sq ft + 2 car spaces

• C 1,570 sq ft

• Contemporary refurb New lease – rent on application

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte MRICS

Holly Boulton BSc(Hons)

• 2 Car spaces • New lease

• • • • •

Sales / Lettings Acquisitions Valuations Landlord & tenant Auction Sales

• • • • •

Rent reviews Property Management Investment Sales / Purchase Development & Planning Dilapidations Advice


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Rupert Oliver FP November.qxp_Layout 1 22/10/2020 12:18 Page 1

Sneyd Park, Bristol | Guide Price ÂŁ1,850,000 A stylish and beautifully presented modern home of exquisite proportions; with an integrated garage, off-street parking and sunny fully enclosed private garden. Stylish detached family house | Circa 4500 sq. ft of internal accommodation | Stunning double height drawing room | Open plan kitchen and dining room | Two further reception rooms | Boot room and separate coat-room | Utility room | Six double bedrooms and five bath / shower rooms (3 en-suite) | Integrated speaker system | Superb private gardens and integrated double garage | Underfloor heating throughout

Internal area 4558 sq. ft (424 sq. m)


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Clifton, Bristol | Guide Price ÂŁPOA An exquisite Grade II* Listed house providing superb accommodation and recreation space; with gated off-street parking, large garden and a beautifully converted coach house. Stunning Grade II* Listed family home | Circa 8800 sq. ft of internal accommodation | Beautiful family accommodation arranged over four floors | Potential for 7 bedrooms with 4 bathrooms | Cinema room, gym, games room and wine cellar | Stunning recently converted coach house to provide recreation and entertaining space | Self-contained one bedroom annexe | Fully enclosed generous gardens and grounds | Gated off-street parking for numerous vehicles | Internal coach house flag-stone courtyard

Internal area 8833 sq. ft (820 sq. ft)


Sales, Letting & Management

CLIFTON BS8

GUIDE PRICE

£1,500,000

An individually designed FIVE bedroom stone built detached house, with additional THREE bedroom annex, a secluded location tucked away at the end of a private CLIFTON mews, double GARAGE, PARKING, courtyard and mature gardens, superb Clifton location.

STOKE BISHOP BS9 GUIDE PRICE £775,000

I have used Howard Estate Agents on a number of occasions and what stands out is a unique, friendly and bespoke service. Added value: extra care, dedication, consideration, and high standards. I would highly recommend the Howard team. A streamlined service in Sales, Letting and Property Management. Exemplary knowledge of the local Bristol market. Down to earth staff, proactive and go the extra mile to make certain all process is in place and in order.

I’d have no hesitation in recommending Howard Estate Agent. The Sales Team provided exemplary service from start to finish. They were pro-active, communicative, helpful and friendly and were instrumental in securing our sale. Really glad to have used Howard Estate Agents these guys are helping to give estate agents a good name, well done.

My dealings with Howard and his team has been nothing but positive. They rented my flat with ease and made sure everything ran smoothly. The Lettings Team were just excellent. They are professional, friendly, great at their jobs, genuinely helpful and easy to deal with. I wouldn’t use anyone else.

- Bex

HHHHH Howard’s Estate Agents are by far the best agency I’ve ever worked with. They have fully managed my rental property for 3 years and I’ve never had any time without a tenant. They have always listened to me and been responsive to anything that has been needed. Absolutely the best agency for landlords.

- Miss NC

HHHHH

HHHHH Really good and personal approach to all aspects of the property market. Recently sold my flat, that they had previously rented for me. The teams’ approach takes the stress out of the whole process. Genuinely care about what they do. I’d highly recommend them in their new endeavour. - John

0117 923 8238

- Miss D

HHHHH

- Miss H

Fantastic, knowledgeable team and outstanding service! Would 100% recommend! After marketing the property for a very short time with Howard Homes we secured a sale. The process was extremely quick and efficient and the communication throughout the sale with the Sales Team was outstanding - the best we have received from an estate agent team (and we have dealt with a lot). We only wish that we had used Howard Homes from the go instead of wasting 6 months with another agent!

- Miss J

HHHHH

HHHHH

A beautifully presented FOUR BEDROOM gable fronted FAMILY home. Extended to offer a well presented, spacious interior. DRIVEWAY, lawned GARDEN and sun TERRACE. Excellent location and an open outlook. Viewing is highly recommended.

www.howard-homes.co.uk

REDLAND BS6

OIEO

£950,000

An elegant Victorian gable fronted FAMILY home. Boasting a great deal of ORIGINAL FEATURES throughout. Versatile and well-presented interior set over FOUR floors. OFFERED WITH NO ONWARD CHAIN. Viewing is highly recommended.

hello@howard-homes.co.uk


SNEYD PARK BS9

LET

£2,750.00 PCM

FIVE bedrooms, PRIVATE driveway, private TERRACE and GARDEN, unfurnished. Now LET, similar properties required.

HENLEAZE BS9

SSTC

SSTC

LET

GUIDE PRICE

FOR SALE

CLIFTON BS8

£1,200.00 PCM

UNDER OFFER

£985,000

An impressive FAMILY HOME offers a versatile and generous interior. Boasting a great deal of ORIGINAL character throughout. WELL-PRESENTED interior arranged over FOUR floors. DRIVEWAY, PARKING and beautiful enclosed GARDEN.

£850,000 REDLAND BS6

An exceptional FAMILY HOME offering panoramic views over the city, SOUTH FACING walled garden Extensive ROOF TERRACE, ALLOCATED PARKING. NO ONWARD CHAIN.

LET

TWO DOUBLE bedrooms PRIVATE PARKING, Communal GARDENS, unfurnished. Now LET, similar properties required.

£400,000 REDLAND BS6

An impressive TWO BEDROOM, split-level apartment with many ORIGINAL FEATURES, sought after location. Allocated PARKING space in PRIVATE OFF-STREET CAR PARK, communal GARDENS.

£550,000 KINGSDOWN BS2

A grand hall floor level GARDEN (front and back) flat offers GARAGE, gardens, CELLAR rooms and a spacious interior complete with many ORIGINAL features. NO ONWARD CHAIN.

£1,200.00 PCM

One double bedroom, walking distance to Clifton Down shopping centre, unfurnished. Now LET, similar properties required.

£790,000 COTHAM BS6

A substantial 1930’s four bedroom family house set over three floors. Beautiful rear garden and sun terrace. Commanding views of the surrounding area. Drive and garage. Similar properties required.

CLIFTON BS8

CLIFTON BS8

FOR SALE

£390,000

A most attractive and well-presented TWO BEDROOMED apartment. PRIVATE SUN TERRACE with spectacular views over the city, SECURE UNDERGROUND PARKING SPACE. NO ONWARD CHAIN. Square meterage for floorplan 66 sq mtrs

203 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2XT


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The Bristol Magazine November 2020